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Sample records for metal-related parenchymal disorders

  1. Brain parenchymal damage in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder - A multimodal MRI study

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    Pache, F.; Paul, F. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Zimmermann, H.; Lacheta, A.; Papazoglou, S.; Kuchling, J.; Wuerfel, J.; Brandt, A.U. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Finke, C. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ruprecht, K. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Scheel, M. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To investigate different brain regions for grey (GM) and white matter (WM) damage in a well-defined cohort of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) patients and compare advanced MRI techniques (VBM, Subcortical and cortical analyses (Freesurfer), and DTI) for their ability to detect damage in NMOSD. We analyzed 21 NMOSD patients and 21 age and gender matched control subjects. VBM (GW/WM) and DTI whole brain (TBSS) analyses were performed at different statistical thresholds to reflect different statistical approaches in previous studies. In an automated atlas-based approach, Freesurfer and DTI results were compared between NMOSD and controls. DTI TBSS and DTI atlas based analysis demonstrated microstructural impairment only within the optic radiation or in regions associated with the optic radiation (posterior thalamic radiation p < 0.001, 6.9 % reduction of fractional anisotropy). VBM demonstrated widespread brain GM and WM reduction, but only at exploratory statistical thresholds, with no differences remaining after correction for multiple comparisons. Freesurfer analysis demonstrated no group differences. NMOSD specific parenchymal brain damage is predominantly located in the optic radiation, likely due to a secondary degeneration caused by ON. In comparison, DTI appears to be the most reliable and sensitive technique for brain damage detection in NMOSD. (orig.)

  2. Diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Tomassetti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Between September 2015 and August 2016 there were >1500 publications in the field of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs. For the Clinical Year in Review session at the European Respiratory Society Congress that was held in London, UK, in September 2016, we selected only five articles. This selection, made from the enormous number of published papers, does not include all the relevant studies that will significantly impact our knowledge in the field of DPLDs in the near future. This review article provides our personal view on the following topics: early diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, current knowledge on the multidisciplinary team diagnosis of DPLDs and the diagnostic role of transbronchial cryobiopsy in this diagnostic setting, insights on the new entity of interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features, and new therapeutic approaches for scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease.

  3. S100 beta in heavy metal-related child attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in an informal e-waste recycling area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Wei; Huo, Xia; Liu, Daichun; Zeng, Xiang; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Xijin

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to lead even at low levels correlates with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, lead-contaminated environments are often contaminated with other heavy metals that could exacerbate lead-induced ADHD. We conducted this study to evaluate the relationship between multiple

  4. Abdominal polytrauma and parenchymal organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestan, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    The acute radiological diagnostics of polytrauma patients has become an essential part of the interdisciplinary treatment in the emergency room. The incidence of polytrauma patients with an injury severity score (ISS) > 16 is approximately 450 cases/million inhabitants/year in Europe. Injuries of the parenchymal organs are of utmost importance for the prognosis and treatment of these patients. The injury patterns are complex and a great deal of experience is necessary to be able to obtain the correct diagnosis within minutes. This review article deals with the radiological diagnostics and grading of the severity of injuries to the spleen, liver, pancreas and kidneys. The use of ultrasound for the evaluation of polytraumatized patients will be discussed. The most important trauma-associated findings for the above mentioned organs using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) will be described and illustrated by dedicated case findings. Ultrasound contrast agents can supply valuable, additional diagnostic information in the evaluation of polytraumatized patients. Computed tomography has become established as the most relevant imaging modality in severe trauma. Innovative organ-adapted and contrast application protocols improve the diagnostic performance of MDCT. The use of focused assessment sonography for trauma (FAST) scanning as a screening tool is in agreement with the other clinical disciplines of the trauma team. The use of MDCT is trauma-dependent and the classification of the severity of the different parenchymal organ injuries is ultimately decisive for further treatment and prognosis of trauma victims. (orig.) [de

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension in Parenchymal Lung Disease

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    Tsangaris, Iraklis; Tsaknis, Georgios; Anthi, Anastasia; Orfanos, Stylianos E.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) has been extensively investigated, although it represents a less common form of the pulmonary hypertension (PH) family, as shown by international registries. Interestingly, in types of PH that are encountered in parenchymal lung diseases such as interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and many other diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, some of which are very common, the available data is limited. In this paper, we try to browse in the latest available data regarding the occurrence, pathogenesis, and treatment of PH in chronic parenchymal lung diseases. PMID:23094153

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in parenchymal neurocysticercosis

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    Just, M.; Higer, H.P.; Pfannenstiel, P.; Mergner, T.; Henne, W.

    1987-03-01

    MRI-findings in a case of parenchymal neurocysticercosis are presented. The changes of the lesions as a response to chemotherapy were monitored by MRI and CT. Problems of sensitivity (MRI vs. CT) and MRI differential diagnoses are discussed.

  7. Pulmonary parenchymal changes in the pediatric patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, G.O. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of the pediatric chest radiograph for parenchymal pathology is similar to that of the adult. This chapter focuses primarily on the radiographic changes of certain entities presenting to the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU), including airway diseases, pneumonia, pulmonary hemorrhage, and lung trauma, as well as problems related to general anesthesia and surgery

  8. Acute pulmonary parenchymal densities in the adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.H.; Murphy, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    The thrust of the radiographic interpretation is to correlate the often non-specific appearance of any parenchymal density with its time-table of development, rate of change, distribution, and the patient's clinical status. Although this chapter contains separate sections on each major cause of acute pulmonary opacification, the intent of the chapter overall is their differential diagnosis. Before beginning to deal with acute pulmonary densities, it is stressed that acute densities can only be differentiated from chronic ones by reviewing preoperative or pre-existing studies. Without the baseline comparison film or reliable presumption of prior normalcy, the acuteness of a parenchymal density may not be apparent until later examinations reveal change or resolution. Also, as discussed is baseline pathology that is altered by the portable technique can be terribly confusing when attempting to evaluate a single isolated film in an acute clinical situation

  9. Parenchymal abnormalities associated with developmental venous anomalies

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    San Millan Ruiz, Diego; Gailloud, Philippe [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Geneva University Hospital, Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Geneva (Switzerland); Yilmaz, Hasan; Ruefenacht, Daniel A. [Geneva University Hospital, Section of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva (Switzerland); Piovan, Enrico; Bertramello, Alberto; Pizzini, Francesca [Verona City Hospital, Service of Neuroradiology, Verona (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    To report a retrospective series of 84 cerebral developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), focusing on associated parenchymal abnormalities within the drainage territory of the DVA. DVAs were identified during routine diagnostic radiological work-up based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (60 cases), computed tomography (CT) (62 cases) or both (36 cases). Regional parenchymal modifications within the drainage territory of the DVA, such as cortical or subcortical atrophy, white matter density or signal alterations, dystrophic calcifications, presence of haemorrhage or a cavernous-like vascular malformation (CVM), were noted. A stenosis of the collecting vein of the DVA was also sought for. Brain abnormalities within the drainage territory of a DVA were encountered in 65.4% of the cases. Locoregional brain atrophy occurred in 29.7% of the cases, followed by white matter lesions in 28.3% of MRI investigations and 19.3% of CT investigations, CVMs in 13.3% of MRI investigations and dystrophic calcification in 9.6% of CT investigations. An intracranial haemorrhage possibly related to a DVA occurred in 2.4% cases, and a stenosis on the collecting vein was documented in 13.1% of cases. Parenchymal abnormalities were identified for all DVA sizes. Brain parenchymal abnormalities were associated with DVAs in close to two thirds of the cases evaluated. These abnormalities are thought to occur secondarily, likely during post-natal life, as a result of chronic venous hypertension. Outflow obstruction, progressive thickening of the walls of the DVA and their morphological organization into a venous convergence zone are thought to contribute to the development of venous hypertension in DVA. (orig.)

  10. an intriguing diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... HOT TUB LUNG: AN INTRIGUING DIFFUSE PARENCHYMAL LUNG DISEASE. Mohan Rudrappa1,2 and Laxmi Kokatnur2. Ghana Med J 2017; 51(3): 143-147 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/gmj.v51i3.8. 1Overton Brooks VA Medical Center, Shreveport. LA, USA, 2Lousiana State University Health Science ...

  11. MR findings of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis

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    Lee, Yul; Chung, Eun A; Yang, Ik; Park, Hae Jung; Chung, Soo Young [Hallym Univ. Kangnam Sungshim Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    To evaluate MR imaging findings of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis and to determine the characteristics which distinguish it from other brain diseases. MR imagings of 19 patients (56 lesions) of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis were retrospectively evaluated, focusing on the size and location of lesions signal intensity patterns of cyst fluid and wall, the extent of the surrounding edema and features of contrast enhancement. Degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis was located in gray or subcortical while matter in 89.3% of 56 lesions (50/56) ; most of these (98.2%) were smaller than 2 cm in diameter. Cyst fluid signal was hyperintense relative to CSF on T1 and proton density weighted images (92.9%). A hypointense signal rim of the cyst wall was noted in the lesions on proton density (92.9%) and T2 weighted (98.2%) images, Surrounding edema was mostly mild. Peripheral rim enhancement was noted in all lesions, and this was frequently irregular and lobulated (67.9%) with a focal defect in the enhancing rim(41.1%). Findings which could be helpful in distinguishing degenerating parencymal neurocysticercosis from other brain diseases are as follows : small, superficial lesions ; hyperintense signal of the cyst fluid on T1 and proton density weighted images ; hypointense signal of the cyst wall on proton density and T2 weighted images ; relatively mild extent of surrounding edema, and peripheral rim enhancement which is frequently irregular and lobulated with a focal defect in the enhancing rim.

  12. MR findings of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yul; Chung, Eun A; Yang, Ik; Park, Hae Jung; Chung, Soo Young

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate MR imaging findings of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis and to determine the characteristics which distinguish it from other brain diseases. MR imagings of 19 patients (56 lesions) of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis were retrospectively evaluated, focusing on the size and location of lesions signal intensity patterns of cyst fluid and wall, the extent of the surrounding edema and features of contrast enhancement. Degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis was located in gray or subcortical while matter in 89.3% of 56 lesions (50/56) ; most of these (98.2%) were smaller than 2 cm in diameter. Cyst fluid signal was hyperintense relative to CSF on T1 and proton density weighted images (92.9%). A hypointense signal rim of the cyst wall was noted in the lesions on proton density (92.9%) and T2 weighted (98.2%) images, Surrounding edema was mostly mild. Peripheral rim enhancement was noted in all lesions, and this was frequently irregular and lobulated (67.9%) with a focal defect in the enhancing rim(41.1%). Findings which could be helpful in distinguishing degenerating parencymal neurocysticercosis from other brain diseases are as follows : small, superficial lesions ; hyperintense signal of the cyst fluid on T1 and proton density weighted images ; hypointense signal of the cyst wall on proton density and T2 weighted images ; relatively mild extent of surrounding edema, and peripheral rim enhancement which is frequently irregular and lobulated with a focal defect in the enhancing rim

  13. Imaging Characteristics of Venous Parenchymal Abnormalities.

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    Arnoux, Audrey; Triquenot-Bagan, Aude; Andriuta, Daniela; Wallon, David; Guegan-Massardier, Evelyne; Leclercq, Claire; Martinaud, Olivier; Castier-Amouyel, Mélody; Godefroy, Olivier; Bugnicourt, Jean-Marc

    2017-12-01

    There are few published data on the patterns of parenchymal imaging abnormalities in a context of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). The objectives of the present study were to describe the patterns of parenchymal lesions associated with CVT and to determine the lesion sites. We included 44 consecutively hospitalized patients with CVT and parenchymal lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnosis of CVT had been confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance venography. Magnetic resonance imaging patterns for CVT were retrospectively analyzed with regard to the lesion's type, shape, and site. The most frequent stroke subtype was hemorrhagic ischemia (in 56.8% of cases), followed by intracerebral hematoma (in 22.72% of cases) and nonhemorrhagic ischemia (in 20.45% of cases). Although there were no significant differences between these 3 groups with regard to the clinical and radiological characteristics, we observed a nonsignificant trend ( P =0.08) toward a shorter time interval between hospital admission and magnetic resonance imaging for nonhemorrhagic stroke. The CVT parenchymal abnormalities were centered on 6 main foci and were related to the site of venous occlusion: (1) the inferior parietal lobule (n=20; 44.5%), associated mainly with occlusion of the transverse sinus (n=10) or pure cortical veins (n=10); (2) the inferior and posterior temporal regions (n=10; 22.75%), associated mainly with occlusion of the transverse sinus (n=9); (3) the parasagittal frontal region (n=6; 13.6%), associated mainly with occlusion of the superior sagittal sinus (n=4) or the transverse sinus (n=4); (4) the thalamus (n=5; 11.3%) associated with occlusion of the straight sinus (n=5); (5) the cerebellar hemisphere (n=2; 4.5%), associated in both cases with occlusion of the transverse sinus; and (6) the deep hemispheric regions (n=3; 6.8%), associated with occlusion of the superior sagittal sinus in all cases. Parenchymal lesions caused by CVT display specific

  14. Transbronchial cryobiopsy in diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonpun Ussavarungsi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of patients with diffuse parenchymal lung disease is best achieved by a multidisciplinary team approach combining clinical, radiological, and pathological information. Although a lung biopsy may be necessary to firmly establish a diagnosis, safely obtaining adequate tissue specimens in such patients remains challenging. Traditional bronchoscopic forceps biopsies are not recommended for most idiopathic interstitial pneumonias due to their low diagnostic yields, whereas a surgical lung biopsy increases the risk for serious complications, including a small but real risk of an exacerbation of the underlying interstitial lung disease and death. Bronchoscopic cryosurgical techniques (i.e., cryobiopsy is being increasingly used as an attractive compromise between the two, due to its ability to be performed under conscious sedation and its ability to obtain larger tissue fragments without crush artifacts. Although promising and increasingly employed at some academic centers, it remains untested in rigorous systematic studies. This article will review the existing literature on the diagnostic role and safety of transbronchial cryobiopsy in patients with diffuse parenchymal lung diseases.

  15. Quantitative stratification of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases.

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    Sushravya Raghunath

    Full Text Available Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs are characterized by widespread pathological changes within the pulmonary tissue that impair the elasticity and gas exchange properties of the lungs. Clinical-radiological diagnosis of these diseases remains challenging and their clinical course is characterized by variable disease progression. These challenges have hindered the introduction of robust objective biomarkers for patient-specific prediction based on specific phenotypes in clinical practice for patients with DPLD. Therefore, strategies facilitating individualized clinical management, staging and identification of specific phenotypes linked to clinical disease outcomes or therapeutic responses are urgently needed. A classification schema consistently reflecting the radiological, clinical (lung function and clinical outcomes and pathological features of a disease represents a critical need in modern pulmonary medicine. Herein, we report a quantitative stratification paradigm to identify subsets of DPLD patients with characteristic radiologic patterns in an unsupervised manner and demonstrate significant correlation of these self-organized disease groups with clinically accepted surrogate endpoints. The proposed consistent and reproducible technique could potentially transform diagnostic staging, clinical management and prognostication of DPLD patients as well as facilitate patient selection for clinical trials beyond the ability of current radiological tools. In addition, the sequential quantitative stratification of the type and extent of parenchymal process may allow standardized and objective monitoring of disease, early assessment of treatment response and mortality prediction for DPLD patients.

  16. All-In-One: Advanced preparation of Human Parenchymal and Non-Parenchymal Liver Cells.

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    Melanie Werner

    Full Text Available Liver cells are key players in innate immunity. Thus, studying primary isolated liver cells is necessary for determining their role in liver physiology and pathophysiology. In particular, the quantity and quality of isolated cells are crucial to their function. Our aim was to isolate a large quantity of high-quality human parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells from a single liver specimen.Hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and stellate cells were isolated from liver tissues by collagenase perfusion in combination with low-speed centrifugation, density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic-activated cell sorting. The purity and functionality of cultured cell populations were controlled by determining their morphology, discriminative cell marker expression, and functional activity.Cell preparation yielded the following cell counts per gram of liver tissue: 2.0 ± 0.4 × 10(7 hepatocytes, 1.8 ± 0.5 × 10(6 Kupffer cells, 4.3 ± 1.9 × 10(5 liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and 3.2 ± 0.5 × 10(5 stellate cells. Hepatocytes were identified by albumin (95.5 ± 1.7% and exhibited time-dependent activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Kupffer cells expressed CD68 (94.5 ± 1.2% and exhibited phagocytic activity, as determined with 1 μm latex beads. Endothelial cells were CD146(+ (97.8 ± 1.1% and exhibited efficient uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Hepatic stellate cells were identified by the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (97.1 ± 1.5%. These cells further exhibited retinol (vitamin A-mediated autofluorescence.Our isolation procedure for primary parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells resulted in cell populations of high purity and quality, with retained physiological functionality in vitro. Thus, this system may provide a valuable tool for determining liver function and disease.

  17. Computerized breast parenchymal analysis on DCE-MRI

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    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Yuan, Yading; Jansen, Sanaz A.; Lan, Li; Bhooshan, Neha; Newstead, Gillian M.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been shown to be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer, and MRI has been recommended for high-risk women screening, however, it is still unknown how the breast parenchymal enhancement on DCE-MRI is associated with breast density and breast cancer risk. Ninety-two DCE-MRI exams of asymptomatic women with normal MR findings were included in this study. The 3D breast volume was automatically segmented using a volume-growing based algorithm. The extracted breast volume was classified into fibroglandular and fatty regions based on the discriminant analysis method. The parenchymal kinetic curves within the breast fibroglandular region were extracted and categorized by use of fuzzy c-means clustering, and various parenchymal kinetic characteristics were extracted from the most enhancing voxels. Correlation analysis between the computer-extracted percent dense measures and radiologist-noted BIRADS density ratings yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.76 (pBIRADS 3 and 4) were found to have more parenchymal enhancement at their peak time point (Ep) with an average Ep of 116.5% while those women with fatty breasts (BIRADS 1 and 2) demonstrated an average Ep of 62.0%. In conclusion, breast parenchymal enhancement may be associated with breast density and may be potential useful as an additional characteristic for assessing breast cancer risk.

  18. Relation between breast parenchymal pattern and breast cancer

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    Kim, Kyeung Hee; Lee, Sung Yong; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    Although the usefulness of mammography as a screening test for breast cancer is still in dispute, its use to patients over 50 years of age is valid. Since Wolfe first classified the breast parenchymal patterns of mammography into 4 patterns, many authors have adopted the criteria in studying the changes of the parenchymal patterns for certain ages and the risks for breast cancer of certain parenchymal patterns. Authors reviewed 49 cases of breast masses which diagnosed by mammography and by operation during the period from January 1978 to July 1983 at St. Mary Hospital, Catholic Medical College. The parenchymal tissue patterns were classified according to Wolfe into N1, P1, P2 and DY, Risk groups were classified into low risk group (N1, P1) and high group (P2, DY). On the basis of these criteria, benign and malignant disease were analyzed against the breast parenchymal patterns. The results and conclusions were as follows: 1. Age ranged from 16 years to 67 years with the most prevalent age being 4th and 5th decades. 2. Diagnoses were: fibroadenoma 17 cases, fibrous dysplasia 16 cases, ductal papilloma 3 cases, and cancer 13 cases. 3. Categorization of those 26 benign disease according to the Wolfe's criteria was: N1 6 cases, P1 10 cases, P2 9 cases and DY 11 cases. On the other hand, categorization of 13 cases of cancer was: N1 5 caes, P1 3 cases, P2 3 cases, and DY 2 cases. 4. Of 13 cases of cancer, 8 fell in the low risk group and remainder in the high risk group. There were no significant correlation between the parenchymal patterns and the incidence of breast cancer.

  19. Relation between breast parenchymal pattern and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyeung Hee; Lee, Sung Yong; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1985-01-01

    Although the usefulness of mammography as a screening test for breast cancer is still in dispute, its use to patients over 50 years of age is valid. Since Wolfe first classified the breast parenchymal patterns of mammography into 4 patterns, many authors have adopted the criteria in studying the changes of the parenchymal patterns for certain ages and the risks for breast cancer of certain parenchymal patterns. Authors reviewed 49 cases of breast masses which diagnosed by mammography and by operation during the period from January 1978 to July 1983 at St. Mary Hospital, Catholic Medical College. The parenchymal tissue patterns were classified according to Wolfe into N1, P1, P2 and DY, Risk groups were classified into low risk group (N1, P1) and high group (P2, DY). On the basis of these criteria, benign and malignant disease were analyzed against the breast parenchymal patterns. The results and conclusions were as follows: 1. Age ranged from 16 years to 67 years with the most prevalent age being 4th and 5th decades. 2. Diagnoses were: fibroadenoma 17 cases, fibrous dysplasia 16 cases, ductal papilloma 3 cases, and cancer 13 cases. 3. Categorization of those 26 benign disease according to the Wolfe's criteria was: N1 6 cases, P1 10 cases, P2 9 cases and DY 11 cases. On the other hand, categorization of 13 cases of cancer was: N1 5 caes, P1 3 cases, P2 3 cases, and DY 2 cases. 4. Of 13 cases of cancer, 8 fell in the low risk group and remainder in the high risk group. There were no significant correlation between the parenchymal patterns and the incidence of breast cancer

  20. Normative ultrasound values of renal parenchymal thickness among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the ultrasound normative values of renal parenchymal thickness (RPT) among adults and correlate them with age ... Methods: This was a prospective clinic based study involving 310 normal adults (135 males and 175 females) scanned at ... kidneys and subjects in which three RPT measurements.

  1. Computerized tomography of renal parenchymal disturbance following nephrolithotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Eiichi; Fukushima, Shuji.

    1983-01-01

    Staghorn calculi were removed by nephrolithotomy with the one-layer interrupted parenchymal suture method designed by Taguchi and renal parenchymal disturbance following the operation were evaluated by computerized tomography. Twenty kidneys in 17 cases were examined pre and postoperatively for changes in the incised and sutured part of the renal parenchyma. The postoperative CT scanning demonstrated the low density areas following enhancement and depression of the parenchyma. These changes were classified into the following 3 patterns: Type I-no changes were observed in the parenchyma, or a linear low density area was found (5 kidneys, 25.0%); type II-a long, narrow strip of low density area was found in accord with the excised and sutured part (5 kidneys, 25.0%); and type III-a wedge-shaped low density area or depression of the parenchyma was found (10 kidneys, 50.0%). The length of the parenchymal incision was analysed with reference to these patterns. The length of type I was significantly shorter than that of type II or III (p<0.05). Th e clamping time of the renal pedicle in type I was also shorter than that in type II and III, but the differences did not reach a statistically significant level. Type II pattern frequently was found shortly after the operation. It is, however, undeniable that type II may tramsform to type III. (J.P.N.)

  2. Diagnostic workup for diffuse parenchymal lung disease: schematic flowchart, literature review, and pitfalls.

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    Deconinck, Barbara; Verschakelen, Johny; Coolen, Johan; Verbeken, Eric; Verleden, Geert; Wuyts, Wim

    2013-02-01

    The term diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD) refers to a group of disorders affecting the lung parenchyma that can be categorized into those of known and those of unknown etiology. Early diagnosis is important since some forms of DPLD are characterized by a rapid progression to respiratory failure. Notwithstanding the fact that recently guidelines have been published, some issues concerning the practical evaluation of a patient with suspected DPLD remain unclear. In this article we propose a practical approach to the diagnosis and differentiation of DPLD. Moreover, a critical appraisal is provided based on the current literature and frequent pitfalls are highlighted. we propose a practical workup, but in spite of increasing evidence concerning the diagnosis of DPLD, further studies will be needed to clarify several issues for efficient investigation of newly diagnosed patients with DPLD.

  3. Evaluation of parenchymal thyroid diseases with multiparametric ultrasonography

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    Duzgun Yildirim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Differential diagnosis of parenchymal thyroid diseases by gray-scale ultrasound is quite difficult for a radiologist as the findings are very similar to each other. In this study we aimed to assess some quantitative spectral Doppler parameters, resistivity index (RI, acceleration time (AT, and quantitative elastography [shear wave velocity (SWV] together to show their reliability for differential diagnosis of parenchymal thyroid diseases. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed findings of 227 patients (179 females, 48 males that underwent spectral Doppler ultrasound and acoustic radiation force impulse between October 2013 and March 2016. Ages of the patients were between 18 and 74 years (39.52 ± 12.67. Based on clinical and laboratory findings, patients were divided into five groups (N: Normal, EH: Early Hashimoto, H: Late Hashimoto, M: Nodular Thyroid Disease, HM: Hashimoto + Nodular Thyroid Disease. Detailed statistical analyses were done on parameters such as age, gender, volume information, and RI, AT (ms, SWV (m/s. Results: No significant effect of gender or volume on the differentiation of disease pattern (Chi-square test: P= 0.306, Kruskal-Wallis test: P= 0.290 was found in this study. RI (0.41 ± 0.06 and SWV values (1.19 ± 0.18 m/s were the lowest. AT values (>55 ms were the highest in EH group (area under the curve: 0.913. Existence of H decreased RI and SWV values, while it extended AT in a different thyroid disease. Conclusion: Thyroid parenchymal diseases could be classified and differentiated from each other by measuring RI, AT, and SWV values quantitatively. So, in suspicious cases, these parameters could be a reliable asset for differential diagnosis.

  4. Pathophysiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Parenchymal Lung Disease.

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    Singh, Inderjit; Ma, Kevin Cong; Berlin, David Adam

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension commonly complicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The association of chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension portends a worse prognosis. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension differs in the presence or absence of lung disease. We describe the physiological determinants of the normal pulmonary circulation to better understand the pathophysiological factors implicated in chronic parenchymal lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of 3 forms of chronic lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bronchoscopic cryobiopsy for the diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease.

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    Jonathan A Kropski

    Full Text Available Although in some cases clinical and radiographic features may be sufficient to establish a diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD, surgical lung biopsy is frequently required. Recently a new technique for bronchoscopic lung biopsy has been developed using flexible cryo-probes. In this study we describe our clinical experience using bronchoscopic cryobiopsy for diagnosis of diffuse lung disease.A retrospective study of subjects who had undergone bronchoscopic cryobiopsy for evaluation of DPLD at an academic tertiary care center from January 1, 2012 through January 15, 2013 was performed. The procedure was performed using a flexible bronchoscope to acquire biopsies of lung parenchyma. H&E stained biopsies were reviewed by an expert lung pathologist.Twenty-five eligible subjects were identified. With a mean area of 64.2 mm(2, cryobiopsies were larger than that typically encountered with traditional transbronchial forceps biopsy. In 19 of the 25 subjects, a specific diagnosis was obtained. In one additional subject, biopsies demonstrating normal parenchyma were felt sufficient to exclude diffuse lung disease as a cause of dyspnea. The overall diagnostic yield of bronchoscopic cryobiopsy was 80% (20/25. The most frequent diagnosis was usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP (n = 7. Three of the 25 subjects ultimately required surgical lung biopsy. There were no significant complications.In patients with suspected diffuse parenchymal lung disease, bronchoscopic cryobiopsy is a promising and minimally invasive approach to obtain lung tissue with high diagnostic yield.

  6. Primary Angiitis of the Central Nervous System: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Spectrum of Parenchymal, Meningeal, and Vascular Lesions at Baseline.

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    Boulouis, Grégoire; de Boysson, Hubert; Zuber, Mathieu; Guillevin, Loïc; Meary, Eric; Costalat, Vincent; Pagnoux, Christian; Naggara, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system remains challenging. To report an overview and pictorial review of brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in adult primary angiitis of the central nervous system and to determine the distribution of parenchymal, meningeal, and vascular lesions in a large multicentric cohort. Adult patients from the French COVAC cohort (Cohort of Patients With Primary Vasculitis of the Central Nervous System), with biopsy or angiographically proven primary angiitis of the central nervous system and brain magnetic resonance imaging available at the time of diagnosis were included. A systematic imaging review was performed blinded to clinical data. Sixty patients met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 45 years (±12.9). Patients initially presented focal deficit(s) (83%), headaches (53%), cognitive disorder (40%), and seizures (38.3%). The most common magnetic resonance imaging finding observed in 42% of patients was multiterritorial, bilateral, distal acute stroke lesions after small to medium artery distribution, with a predominant carotid circulation distribution. Hemorrhagic infarctions and parenchymal hemorrhages were also frequently found in the cohort (55%). Acute convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage was found in 26% of patients and 42% demonstrated pre-eminent leptomeningeal enhancement, which is found to be significantly more prevalent in biopsy-proven patients (60% versus 28%; P =0.04). Seven patients had tumor-like presentations. Seventy-seven percent of magnetic resonance angiographic studies were abnormal, revealing proximal/distal stenoses in 57% and 61% of patients, respectively. Adult primary angiitis of the central nervous system is a heterogenous disease, with multiterritorial, distal, and bilateral acute stroke being the most common pattern of parenchymal lesions found on magnetic resonance imaging. Our findings suggest a higher than previously thought prevalence of hemorrhagic transformation and other hemorrhagic

  7. Abdominal polytrauma and parenchymal organs; Abdominelles Polytrauma und Parenchymorgane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestan, C.R. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien AKH, Abteilung fuer Allgemeine Radiologie und Kinderradiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    The acute radiological diagnostics of polytrauma patients has become an essential part of the interdisciplinary treatment in the emergency room. The incidence of polytrauma patients with an injury severity score (ISS) > 16 is approximately 450 cases/million inhabitants/year in Europe. Injuries of the parenchymal organs are of utmost importance for the prognosis and treatment of these patients. The injury patterns are complex and a great deal of experience is necessary to be able to obtain the correct diagnosis within minutes. This review article deals with the radiological diagnostics and grading of the severity of injuries to the spleen, liver, pancreas and kidneys. The use of ultrasound for the evaluation of polytraumatized patients will be discussed. The most important trauma-associated findings for the above mentioned organs using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) will be described and illustrated by dedicated case findings. Ultrasound contrast agents can supply valuable, additional diagnostic information in the evaluation of polytraumatized patients. Computed tomography has become established as the most relevant imaging modality in severe trauma. Innovative organ-adapted and contrast application protocols improve the diagnostic performance of MDCT. The use of focused assessment sonography for trauma (FAST) scanning as a screening tool is in agreement with the other clinical disciplines of the trauma team. The use of MDCT is trauma-dependent and the classification of the severity of the different parenchymal organ injuries is ultimately decisive for further treatment and prognosis of trauma victims. (orig.) [German] Die akute radiologische Diagnostik bei Polytraumapatienten ist in den letzten Jahren unerlaesslicher Bestandteil der interdisziplinaeren Versorgung im Schockraum geworden. Die Inzidenz von Polytraumata mit einem Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 16 betraegt in Europa ca. 450/Mio. Einwohner/Jahr. Verletzungen abdomineller Parenchymorgane sind von

  8. A Review on Automatic Mammographic Density and Parenchymal Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenda; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erika R. E.; Oliver, Arnau

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. However, the exact cause(s) of breast cancer still remains unknown. Early detection, precise identification of women at risk, and application of appropriate disease prevention measures are by far the most effective way to tackle breast cancer. There are more than 70 common genetic susceptibility factors included in the current non-image-based risk prediction models (e.g., the Gail and the Tyrer-Cuzick models). Image-based risk factors, such as mammographic densities and parenchymal patterns, have been established as biomarkers but have not been fully incorporated in the risk prediction models used for risk stratification in screening and/or measuring responsiveness to preventive approaches. Within computer aided mammography, automatic mammographic tissue segmentation methods have been developed for estimation of breast tissue composition to facilitate mammographic risk assessment. This paper presents a comprehensive review of automatic mammographic tissue segmentation methodologies developed over the past two decades and the evidence for risk assessment/density classification using segmentation. The aim of this review is to analyse how engineering advances have progressed and the impact automatic mammographic tissue segmentation has in a clinical environment, as well as to understand the current research gaps with respect to the incorporation of image-based risk factors in non-image-based risk prediction models. PMID:26171249

  9. Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis: Interactions between Liver Parenchymal and Nonparenchymal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Magee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common type of chronic liver disease in the Western countries, affecting up to 25% of the general population and becoming a major health concern in both adults and children. NAFLD encompasses the entire spectrum of fatty liver disease in individuals without significant alcohol consumption, ranging from nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and cirrhosis. NASH is a manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and hepatic disorders with the presence of steatosis, hepatocyte injury (ballooning, inflammation, and, in some patients, progressive fibrosis leading to cirrhosis. The pathogenesis of NASH is a complex process and implicates cell interactions between liver parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells as well as crosstalk between various immune cell populations in liver. Lipotoxicity appears to be the central driver of hepatic cellular injury via oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. This review focuses on the contributions of hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells to NASH, assessing their potential applications to the development of novel therapeutic agents. Currently, there are limited pharmacological treatments for NASH; therefore, an increased understanding of NASH pathogenesis is pertinent to improve disease interventions in the future.

  10. Effect of the menstrual cycle on background parenchymal enhancement observed on breast MRIs in Korean women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Vivan Young Jean; KIm, Eun Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the menstrual cycle on background parenchymal enhancement observed on breast MRIs in Korean women, and to suggest an optimal period for scheduling breast MRIs. Between March and December 2012, 214 premenopausal breast cancer patients who underwent breast MRIs for preoperative evaluation were included. Levels of background parenchymal enhancement were retrospectively compared according to the menstrual cycle. There was no significant difference between levels of background parenchymal enhancement (minimal, mild, moderate, and marked) according to the weeks of the menstrual cycle. However, the 1st and 2nd week of the menstrual cycle showed a significantly higher proportion of patients with minimal background parenchymal enhancement than the 3rd and 4th week of the menstrual cycle (47.0% vs. 32.0%; p = 0.025). For screening purposes and for the follow-up of Korean breast cancer patients, breast MRIs should be performed during the 1st or 2nd week of the menstrual cycle

  11. Effect of the menstrual cycle on background parenchymal enhancement observed on breast MRIs in Korean women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Vivan Young Jean; KIm, Eun Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate the effect of the menstrual cycle on background parenchymal enhancement observed on breast MRIs in Korean women, and to suggest an optimal period for scheduling breast MRIs. Between March and December 2012, 214 premenopausal breast cancer patients who underwent breast MRIs for preoperative evaluation were included. Levels of background parenchymal enhancement were retrospectively compared according to the menstrual cycle. There was no significant difference between levels of background parenchymal enhancement (minimal, mild, moderate, and marked) according to the weeks of the menstrual cycle. However, the 1st and 2nd week of the menstrual cycle showed a significantly higher proportion of patients with minimal background parenchymal enhancement than the 3rd and 4th week of the menstrual cycle (47.0% vs. 32.0%; p = 0.025). For screening purposes and for the follow-up of Korean breast cancer patients, breast MRIs should be performed during the 1st or 2nd week of the menstrual cycle.

  12. Bronchial Artery Embolization in the Management of Pulmonary Parenchymal Endometriosis with Hemoptysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kervancioglu, Selim; Andic, Cagatay; Bayram, Nazan; Telli, Cumali; Sarica, Akif; Sirikci, Akif

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary parenchymal endometriosis is extremely rare and usually manifests itself with a recurrent hemoptysis associated with the menstrual cycle. The therapies proposed for women with endometriosis consist of medical treatments and surgery. Bronchial artery embolization has become a well-established and minimally invasive treatment modality for hemoptysis, and to the best of our knowledge, it has not been reported in pulmonary endometriosis. We report a case of pulmonary parenchymal endometriosis treated with embolotheraphy for hemoptysis.

  13. Bone marrow-derived versus parenchymal sources of inducible nitric oxide synthase in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zehntner, Simone P; Bourbonniere, Lyne; Hassan-Zahraee, Mina

    2004-01-01

    . These discrepancies may reflect balance between immunoregulatory and neurocytopathologic roles for NO. We investigated selective effects of bone marrow-derived versus CNS parenchymal sources of iNOS in EAE in chimeric mice. Chimeras that selectively expressed or ablated iNOS in leukocytes both showed significant...... delay in disease onset, with no difference in disease severity. We conclude that bone marrow-derived and CNS parenchymal sources of iNOS-derived NO both play a regulatory role in EAE....

  14. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France)]|[Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France); Visy, J.M. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Belin, C. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Gaston, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Goldlust, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Dumas, M. [Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France)

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. MRI Background Parenchymal Enhancement Is Not Associated with Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bennani-Baiti

    Full Text Available Previously, a strong positive association between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and breast cancer was reported in high-risk populations. We sought to determine, whether this was also true for non-high-risk patients.540 consecutive patients underwent breast MRI for assessment of breast findings (BI-RADS 0-5, non-high-risk screening (no familial history of breast cancer, no known genetic mutation, no prior chest irradiation, or previous breast cancer diagnosis and subsequent histological work-up. For this IRB-approved study, BPE and fibroglandular tissue FGT were retrospectively assessed by two experienced radiologists according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to explore associations between BPE, FGT, age and final diagnosis of breast cancer. Subsequently, multivariate logistic regression analysis, considering covariate colinearities, was performed, using final diagnosis as the target variable and BPE, FGT and age as covariates.Age showed a moderate negative correlation with FGT (r = -0.43, p<0.001 and a weak negative correlation with BPE (r = -0.28, p<0.001. FGT and BPE correlated moderately (r = 0.35, p<0.001. Final diagnosis of breast cancer displayed very weak negative correlations with FGT (r = -0.09, p = 0.046 and BPE (r = -0.156, p<0.001 and weak positive correlation with age (r = 0.353, p<0.001. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, the only independent covariate for prediction of breast cancer was age (OR 1.032, p<0.001.Based on our data, neither BPE nor FGT independently correlate with breast cancer risk in non-high-risk patients at MRI. Our model retained only age as an independent risk factor for breast cancer in this setting.

  16. Relevance analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Rendong; Lv Xiangyang; Li Shaolin; Gao Ming; Miao Liqiong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Discussing the relativity of Mammographic parenchymal patterns and breast cancer, implementing the intervention treatment and regularly traces to the breast high dangerous crowd, in order to reduce the occurrence rate of beast cancer and the mortality rate. Methods: Mammary gland type was marked according to X ray on 500 breast cancer subjects and 1000 control subjects. Peri-cancer histological sections of the subtypes of the breast cancer group and histological section of the subtypes of the control group were studied contrastively to analyze the breast cancer risk index in every subtype and the occurrence rate in every age group. The types and the occurrence rates were counted. Results: (1)The lowest risk group: the subtypes with OR 0.3 and the cancer incidence rate ranging from 5% to 10% were IV b, II b, III b. (4)High-risk group: the subtypes with OR> 1 and the cancer incidence rate above 10% were III c, IV c. High dangerous age sections of breast cancer: 35 to 55 years old in IVc and IIIc (the age section of IIIc may lengthen to 60 years old), 31 to 50 years old in IVb, 50 to 60 years old in IIIb and IIb. Conclusion: IIIc and IVc belong to the high dangerous subtypes. People of these subtypes reach 67.4% of all breast cancer examples, so these people are the main subjects of the mammary gland general survey and tracing. Patient aged from 35 to 55 should be reexamined once a year. When necessary, the intervention treatment may be carried out to prevent breast cancer and to reduce the occurrence rate of beast cancer. Discovery and treatment in early phase can improve the breast cancer's survival quality, and reduce the mortality rate. (authors)

  17. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, J.L.; Visy, J.M.; Belin, C.; Gaston, A.; Goldlust, D.; Dumas, M.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. The Mass-Luminosity-Metallicity Relation for M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Andrew; Dupuy, Trent; Rizzuto, Aaron; Kraus, Adam; Gaidos, Eric; Ansdell, Megan

    2018-01-01

    One of the most powerful tools for stellar characterization is the mass-luminosity relation (MLR). In addition to its use for characterizing exoplanet hosts, the MLR for late-type stars is critical to measuring the stellar IMF, testing isochrones, and studies of Galactic archeology. However, existing MLRs do not fully account for metallicity effects, do not extend down to the substellar boundary, and are not precise enough to take full advantage of the impending arrival of Gaia parallaxes for millions of late-type stars. For two years we monitored 72 nearby M-dwarf astrometric binaries using adaptive optics and non-redundant aperture masking, with the goal of better constraining the MLR. We combined our astrometry with measurements from the literature and Keck archive to measure orbits, masses, and flux ratios of all binaries in JHK bands. In parallel, we obtained moderate-resolution NIR spectra of all binaries, from which we determine empirical metallicities for each system. We derived an updated MLR-metallicity relation that spans most of the M dwarf sequence (K5 to M7) and the metallicity range expected in the solar neighborhood (-0.5 revised relation and Gaia-precision parallaxes, it will soon be possible to calculate empirical masses of nearby M dwarfs to better than 2%, and future studies will enable us to extend our relation to more metal-poor stars and explore the role of youth and evolution of the MLR for M dwarfs.

  19. Understanding the Lung Abscess Microbiome: Outcomes of Percutaneous Lung Parenchymal Abscess Drainage with Microbiologic Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Christopher; Nadolski, Gregory J; Gade, Terence; Hunt, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    Lung parenchymal abscesses represent an uncommon pathology with high mortality if untreated. Although most respond well to antibiotics, the optimal therapy for persistent abscesses is unknown. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of percutaneous lung parenchymal abscess catheter drainage after broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy failure and correlate with patient microbiologic samples. Retrospective review of patients who underwent percutaneous lung abscess drainage at a tertiary hospital system from 2005 to 2015 was performed. In total, 19 procedures were identified on 16 different patients; six females and ten males. Mean patient age was 55 years (range 22-81). Median follow-up time was 7 months (range drainage is highly sensitive for microbiologic sampling compared to sputum/bronchoscopic or blood cultures. Additionally, percutaneous drainage of lung parenchymal abscess cavities may promote resolution of the abscess with high rates of therapeutic success and low complications.

  20. Background parenchymal enhancement on baseline screening breast MRI: impact on biopsy rate and short-interval follow-up.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hambly, Niamh M

    2011-01-01

    Background parenchymal enhancement on breast MRI refers to normal enhancement of the patient\\'s fibroglandular tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of background parenchymal enhancement on short-interval follow-up, biopsy, and cancer detection rate on baseline screening MRI in a high-risk group.

  1. Multicentre evaluation of multidisciplinary team meeting agreement on diagnosis in diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a case-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Simon L F; Wells, Athol U; Desai, Sujal R; Poletti, Venerino; Piciucchi, Sara; Dubini, Alessandra; Nunes, Hilario; Valeyre, Dominique; Brillet, Pierre Y; Kambouchner, Marianne; Morais, António; Pereira, José M; Moura, Conceição Souto; Grutters, Jan C; van den Heuvel, Daniel A; van Es, Hendrik W; van Oosterhout, Matthijs F; Seldenrijk, Cornelis A; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Rasmussen, Finn; Madsen, Line B; Gooptu, Bibek; Pomplun, Sabine; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuoka, Junya; Johkoh, Takeshi; Nicholson, Andrew G; Sayer, Charlie; Edmunds, Lilian; Jacob, Joseph; Kokosi, Maria A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Flaherty, Kevin R; Hansell, David M

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease represents a diverse and challenging group of pulmonary disorders. A consistent diagnostic approach to diffuse parenchymal lung disease is crucial if clinical trial data are to be applied to individual patients. We aimed to evaluate inter-multidisciplinary team agreement for the diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease. We did a multicentre evaluation of clinical data of patients who presented to the interstitial lung disease unit of the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust (London, UK; host institution) and required multidisciplinary team meeting (MDTM) characterisation between March 1, 2010, and Aug 31, 2010. Only patients whose baseline clinical, radiological, and, if biopsy was taken, pathological data were undertaken at the host institution were included. Seven MDTMs, consisting of at least one clinician, radiologist, and pathologist, from seven countries (Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Portugal, and the UK) evaluated cases of diffuse parenchymal lung disease in a two-stage process between Jan 1, and Oct 15, 2015. First, the clinician, radiologist, and pathologist (if lung biopsy was completed) independently evaluated each case, selected up to five differential diagnoses from a choice of diffuse lung diseases, and chose likelihoods (censored at 5% and summing to 100% in each case) for each of their differential diagnoses, without inter-disciplinary consultation. Second, these specialists convened at an MDTM and reviewed all data, selected up to five differential diagnoses, and chose diagnosis likelihoods. We compared inter-observer and inter-MDTM agreements on patient first-choice diagnoses using Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ). We then estimated inter-observer and inter-MDTM agreement on the probability of diagnosis using weighted kappa coefficient (κw). We compared inter-observer and inter-MDTM confidence of patient first-choice diagnosis. Finally, we evaluated the prognostic significance of a

  2. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, G.J. van den; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendruiks, H.F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (< 1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver,

  3. Extrapancreatic necrosis without pancreatic parenchymal necrosis: a separate entity in necrotising pancreatitis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Olaf J.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar; Besselink, Marc G. H.; Boermeester, Marja A.; van Eijck, Casper; Dejong, Kees; van Goor, Harry; Hofker, Sijbrand; Ahmed Ali, Usama; Gooszen, Hein G.; Bollen, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    In the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis, the term necrotising pancreatitis also refers to patients with only extrapancreatic fat necrosis without pancreatic parenchymal necrosis (EXPN), as determined on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT). Patients with EXPN are thought to have a better

  4. Renal Parenchymal Area Growth Curves for Children 0 to 10 Months Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Katherine; Li, Chunming; Wang, Huixuan; Song, Yihua; Furth, Susan; Tasian, Gregory E

    2016-04-01

    Low renal parenchymal area, which is the gross area of the kidney in maximal longitudinal length minus the area of the collecting system, has been associated with increased risk of end stage renal disease during childhood in boys with posterior urethral valves. To our knowledge normal values do not exist. We aimed to increase the clinical usefulness of this measure by defining normal renal parenchymal area during infancy. In a cross-sectional study of children with prenatally detected mild unilateral hydronephrosis who were evaluated between 2000 and 2012 we measured the renal parenchymal area of normal kidney(s) opposite the kidney with mild hydronephrosis. Measurement was done with ultrasound from birth to post-gestational age 10 months. We used the LMS method to construct unilateral, bilateral, side and gender stratified normalized centile curves. We determined the z-score and the centile of a total renal parenchymal area of 12.4 cm(2) at post-gestational age 1 to 2 weeks, which has been associated with an increased risk of kidney failure before age 18 years in boys with posterior urethral valves. A total of 975 normal kidneys of children 0 to 10 months old were used to create renal parenchymal area centile curves. At the 97th centile for unilateral and single stratified curves the estimated margin of error was 4.4% to 8.8%. For bilateral and double stratified curves the estimated margin of error at the 97th centile was 6.6% to 13.2%. Total renal parenchymal area less than 12.4 cm(2) at post-gestational age 1 to 2 weeks had a z-score of -1.96 and fell at the 3rd percentile. These normal renal parenchymal area curves may be used to track kidney growth in infants and identify those at risk for chronic kidney disease progression. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of extent of UTI related renal parenchymal damage in pediatric patient population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.R.; Charan, S.; Silva, I.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is important cause of morbidity in childhood. UTI may lead to involvement of renal parenchyma ranging from recoverable acute inflammation, renal scarring of Reflux nephropathy, hypertension and ultimately end stage renal disease. Hence, extent of renal parenchymal involvement bears prognostic significance in pediatric population. Laboratory and clinical parameters have inherent limitations in detecting and localizing renal parenchymal involvement in the settings of UTI. Objectives: The present study has been designed with the aim to determine the frequency and degree of renal parenchymal involvement in pediatric patients having urinary tract infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From May to December 2003, 33 consecutive children (65 Kidneys, 32-paired, I-solitary) aged one month to 12 years (mean age 3 years, 20M, 13F) with positive past history and culture documented urinary tract infection were enrolled in the study. They were subjected to Renal cortical scan using Tc-99m DMSA (20-100 MBq) on Dual detectors gamma camera (e.cam) fitted with LEHR collimator in anterior, posterior and posterior oblique projections. DMSA renal scans were interpreted as per Clarke's interpretation criteria. Renal ultrasound (RUS) and cystourethrogram (MCUG) were available in all the cases. Results: As per Clarke's classification, there were 19 children with no evidence of renal cortical involvement (Type-1). Renal parenchymal involvement found to be unilateral (Type-4 to Type-6) and bilateral (Type-7 and 8) in 8 and 6 children respectively. DMSA scan was abnormal in 20 of 65 kidneys (31%). MCUG was positive for presence of VUR in 34 kidneys (Group A) and negative for VUR in remaining 31 units (Group B). In Gp A, 18 of 34 kidneys (53%) showed renal parenchymal involvement on DMSA Scan. In Gp A, presence or absence of renal parenchymal damage on DMSA scan did not show any statistically significant difference in age, sex and grade of VUR. Whereas

  6. Ancillary lung parenchymal findings at spiral CT scanning in pulmonary embolism. Relationship to chest sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reissig, Angelika; Heyne, Jens-Peter; Kroegel, Claus

    2004-01-01

    Introduction/objective: The aim of the study was to compare findings of transthoracic sonography (TS) and of spiral computed tomography (sCT) in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods and patients: Peripheral parenchymal and pleural findings of TS and sCT were compared in 62 patients (25 females, 37 males; mean age 62.2 years) with suspected PE. Results: In 39 patients PE was established, of whose pleura-based lesions could be detected by TS in 30 patients and by sCT in 31 patients. Whilst in three of the patients parenchymal lesions were exclusively detected by sonography, no peripheral abnormalities could be discovered with either technique in five patients. Among the nine patients lacking peripheral abnormalities on sonography, four revealed peripheral lesions in sCT. In 23 patients without PE, peripheral consolidations at CT were detected in six patients whereas two showed lesions on TS. With respect to the appearance, pleura-based wedge-shaped consolidations were the main parenchymal alterations (82.4% at TS, 66.1% at sCT) as compared with non-wedge-shaped consolidations (17.6% at TS, 33.9% at sCT). Peripheral lesions were located preferentially within the lower lobes. In addition, both localised and basal pleural effusion associated with PE could be demonstrated in 58.9% at TS and in 23.1% by sCT. Discussions and conclusion: The study shows that in PE parenchymal and pleural changes are detectable by TS and sCT. If parenchymal findings are present at sCT, peripheral PE should be considered, even in the absence of directly visible emboli

  7. Breast Cancer Risk Estimation Using Parenchymal Texture Analysis in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kontos, Despina; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture has been shown to correlate with genetic markers of developing breast cancer. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel x-ray imaging technique in which tomographic images of the breast are reconstructed from multiple source projections acquired at different angles of the x-ray tube. Compared to digital mammography (DM), DBT eliminates breast tissue overlap, offering superior parenchymal tissue visualization. We hypothesize that texture analysis in DBT could potentially provide a better assessment of parenchymal texture and ultimately result in more accurate assessment of breast cancer risk. As a first step towards validating this hypothesis, we investigated the association between DBT parenchymal texture and breast percent density (PD), a known breast cancer risk factor, and compared it to DM. Bilateral DBT and DM images from 71 women participating in a breast cancer screening trial were analyzed. Filtered-backprojection was used to reconstruct DBT tomographic planes in 1 mm increments with 0.22 mm in-plane resolution. Corresponding DM images were acquired at 0.1 mm pixel resolution. Retroareolar regions of interest (ROIs) equivalent to 2.5 cm 3 were segmented from the DBT images and corresponding 2.5 cm 2 ROIs were segmented from the DM images. Breast PD was mammographically estimated using the Cumulus scale. Overall, DBT texture features demonstrated a stronger correlation than DM to PD. The Pearson correlation coefficients for DBT were r = 0.40 (p 2 = 0.39) compared to DM (R 2 = 0.33). We attribute these observations to the superior parenchymal tissue visualization in DBT. Our study is the first to perform DBT texture analysis in a screening population of women, showing that DBT could potentially provide better breast cancer risk assessment in the future.

  8. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: Impact on tumor size estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Ji Eun; Kim, Sung Hun; Lee, Ah Won

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Methods: Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. Results: The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p = 0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; p < 0.001). The tumor of women negative for HER2 was more accurately estimated than those of women positive for HER2 (72.2% vs. 51.6%; p = 0.047). Conclusion: Moderate and marked background parenchymal enhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size

  9. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: Impact on tumor size estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun, E-mail: rad-ksh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ah Won [Department of Hospital Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Objective: To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Methods: Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. Results: The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p = 0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; p < 0.001). The tumor of women negative for HER2 was more accurately estimated than those of women positive for HER2 (72.2% vs. 51.6%; p = 0.047). Conclusion: Moderate and marked background parenchymal enhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size.

  10. The universal relation of galactic chemical evolution: the origin of the mass-metallicity relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahid, H. Jabran; Dima, Gabriel I.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Kewley, Lisa J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Silverman, John D.; Kashino, Daichi

    2014-01-01

    We examine the mass-metallicity relation for z ≲ 1.6. The mass-metallicity relation follows a steep slope with a turnover, or 'knee', at stellar masses around 10 10 M ☉ . At stellar masses higher than the characteristic turnover mass, the mass-metallicity relation flattens as metallicities begin to saturate. We show that the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity relation depends only on the evolution of the characteristic turnover mass. The relationship between metallicity and the stellar mass normalized to the characteristic turnover mass is independent of redshift. We find that the redshift-independent slope of the mass-metallicity relation is set by the slope of the relationship between gas mass and stellar mass. The turnover in the mass-metallicity relation occurs when the gas-phase oxygen abundance is high enough that the amount of oxygen locked up in low-mass stars is an appreciable fraction of the amount of oxygen produced by massive stars. The characteristic turnover mass is the stellar mass, where the stellar-to-gas mass ratio is unity. Numerical modeling suggests that the relationship between metallicity and the stellar-to-gas mass ratio is a redshift-independent, universal relationship followed by all galaxies as they evolve. The mass-metallicity relation originates from this more fundamental universal relationship between metallicity and the stellar-to-gas mass ratio. We test the validity of this universal metallicity relation in local galaxies where stellar mass, metallicity, and gas mass measurements are available. The data are consistent with a universal metallicity relation. We derive an equation for estimating the hydrogen gas mass from measurements of stellar mass and metallicity valid for z ≲ 1.6 and predict the cosmological evolution of galactic gas masses.

  11. The Age-Metallicity Relation for the Field Disk Stars in the Solar Neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, See-Woo; Ann, Hong Bae; Sung, Hwankyung

    1989-06-01

    The ages of field stars given in the catalogue of Cayrel de Strobel et al.(1985) are derived by the five different methods with combination of theoretical isochrones. By using these ages and metal abundances homogenized by Lee and Choe(1988), the age-metallicity relations are obtained. For disk stars of [Fe/H] > -0.9, the present age-metallicity relations are nearly consistent with those given by Twarog(1980) and Carlberg et al.(1985).

  12. Isolated unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia with accompanying pulmonary parenchymal findings on CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Surin; Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Jeung Sook; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Jeong, Yun Jeong [Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia or agenesis without congenital cardiovascular anomalies is rare in adults. We report a case of a 36-year-old man with isolated left unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia with recurrent hemoptysis. On computed tomography (CT), the left pulmonary artery showed hypoplasia with multiple collateral vessels seen in the mediastinum and the left hemithorax. Also, parenchymal bands and peripheral linear opacities were seen in the affected lung, which were probably due to chronic infarction induced by unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia. There are only a few reports focusing on the radiologic findings in the pulmonary parenchyma induced by unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia, such as parenchymal bands and peripheral linear opacities. Therefore we report this case, which focused on the CT findings in the pulmonary parenchyma due to isolated unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia.

  13. Segmentation of brain parenchymal regions into gray matter and white matter with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Chiaki; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yamashita, Yasuo; Magome, Taiki; Honda, Hiroshi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Toyofuku, Fukai; Ohki, Masafumi

    2010-01-01

    It is very difficult and time consuming for neuroradiologists to estimate the degree of cerebral atrophy based on the volume of cortical regions etc. Our purpose of this study was to develop an automated segmentation of the brain parenchyma into gray and white matter regions with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted MR images. Our proposed method consisted of extraction of a brain parenchymal region based on a brain model matching and segmentation of the brain parenchyma into gray and white matter regions based on a fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm. We applied our proposed method to MR images of the whole brains obtained from 9 cases, including 4 clinically AD cases and 5 control cases. The mean volume percentage of a cortical region (41.7%) to a brain parenchymal region in AD patients was smaller than that (45.2%) in the control subjects (p=0.000462). (author)

  14. MR angiographic and parenchymal evaluation of cerebral infaraction in sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaryk, T.J.; Masaryk, A.M.; Ross, J.S.; Modic, M.T.; Wiznitzer, M.; Berman, B.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral infarction is an important complication of sickle cell anemia, believed to be related to large-vessel stenoses/occlusion and/or capillary/venous sickling resulting in thrombosis. Identification of these complications (especially large-vessel arterial disease) is important in selecting patients for transfusion therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine the suitability of combined three-dimensional Fourier transform time-of-flight MR angiographic and parenchymal T2-weighted spin-echo examinations for evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) complications of sickle cell anemia. Seven patients (age range, 5-14 years) were evaluated. Five had documented strokes while two had symptoms resembling those of transient ischemic attack. The preliminary data indicate that combined MR angiographic and parenchymal studies are capable of identifying those patients with sickle cell anemia complicated by large-vessel CNS occlusive disease and cerebral infarction and can be used as a noninvasive guide to therapy

  15. Correlation between computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of parenchymal lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rafful, Patricia Piazza [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rodrigues, Rosana Souza [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); D’Or Institute for Research and Education, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zanetti, Gláucia [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Complexo Hospitalar Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Souza, Arthur Soares [Department of Radiology, Medical School of Rio Preto (FAMERP) and Ultra X, São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Guimarães, Marcos Duarte [Department of Imaging, Hospital AC Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be the gold standard method for the assessment of morphological changes in the pulmonary parenchyma. Although its spatial resolution is lower than that of CT, MRI offers the advantage of characterizing different aspects of tissue based on the degree of contrast on T1-weighted image (WI) and T2-WI. In this article, we describe and correlate the MRI and CT features of several common patterns of parenchymal lung disease (air trapping, atelectasis, bronchiectasis, cavitation, consolidation, emphysema, ground-glass opacities, halo sign, interlobular septal thickening, masses, mycetoma, nodules, progressive massive fibrosis, reverse halo sign and tree-in-bud pattern). MRI may be an alternative modality for the collection of morphological and functional information useful for the management of parenchymal lung disease, which would help reduce the number of chest CT scans and radiation exposure required in patients with a variety of conditions.

  16. Medical imaging for congenital anomalies of the lung. Focused on tracheobronchial and parenchymal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohda, Ehiichi; Shiraga, Nobuyuki; Higuchi, Mutsumi; Ishibashi, Ryouchi [Tachikawa Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    This is a review of medical imaging studies for congenital anomalies of the lung focused on tracheobronchial and parenchymal anomalies. It is important to know the findings of these developmental anomalies, because they are frequently manifested as infectious diseases or mass. Documented details are pulmonary agenesis, aplasia, pulmonary hypoplasia, tracheal agenesis, bridging bronchus, tracheal bronchus, congenital tracheal stenosis, bronchial atresia, bronchobiliary fistula, bronchogenic cyst, bronchopulmonary sequestration, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, and pulmonary lymphangiectasia. (author)

  17. Size, node status and grade of breast tumours: association with mammographic parenchymal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sala, E.; Solomon, L.; McCann, J.; Warren, R.; Duffy, S.; Luben, R.; Day, N.

    2000-01-01

    A case-control study was designed to assess the association of mammographic parenchymal patterns with the risk of in-situ and invasive breast cancer. In addition, the relationship between tumour characteristics and mammographic patterns were also investigated. A total of 875 patients with breast cancer were selected and matched with 2601 controls. Mammographic parenchymal patterns of breast tissue were assessed according to Wolfe's classification, and statistical analysis was by conditional logistic regression. Relative to the N1 pattern, the odds ratios of having an invasive breast cancer associated with the P2 and DY patterns were 1.8 and 1.4, respectively. In addition, the odd ratios of having an invasive grade 3 breast cancer associated with the P2 and DY patterns were 2.8 and 3.9, respectively. Relative to the combined N1/P1 pattern, the odd ratios of having a breast cancer smaller than 14 mm, 15-29 mm, or larger than 30 mm associated with the combined high-risk P2/DY pattern (P2 + DY) were 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0, respectively. Finally, women with the P2/DY pattern were twice as likely to have a breast cancer which had already spread to the axillary nodes, compared to women with women with the N1/P1 pattern (odds ratios of 2.1 and 1.4, respectively). Our results confirm previous findings suggesting that mammographic parenchymal patterns may serve as indicators of risk for breast cancer. Our results also suggest that mammographic parenchymal patterns are associated with the stage at which breast cancer is detected. (orig.)

  18. High risk mammographic parenchymal patterns and diet: a case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, E; Warren, R; Duffy, S; Welch, A; Luben, R; Day, N

    2000-01-01

    Mammographic parenchymal patterns are related to breast cancer risk and are also thought to be affected by diet. We designed a case–control study comprising 200 cases with high-risk (P2 and DY) mammographic parenchymal pattern and 200 controls with low-risk (N1 and P1) patterns in order to investigate the effect of food and nutrient intake on mammographic patterns. Mammograms were evaluated according to the Wolfe classification system. Dietary data were obtained from 7-day food diaries. Mean daily intake of nutrients was computed from standard UK food tables. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of having a high-risk pattern in women in the highest tertile of total protein and carbohydrate intake was twice that of women in the lowest tertile (OR = 2.00; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06–3.77;P = 0.04 and OR = 1.93; 95% CI 1.03–3.59;P = 0.04 respectively). There was no excess risk for fat intake. In addition, there was no association between intake of vitamins and mammographic parenchymal patterns. Total meat intake was strongly and positively associated with high-risk patterns among post-menopausal women (OR = 2.50, 95% CI 1.09–5.69, P = 0.03). Our study suggests that certain macronutrients and foods such as protein, carbohydrate and meat intake influence the risk of breast cancer through their effects on breast tissue morphology, whereas fat and vitamins do not affect mammographic density. It seems that parenchymal pattern acts as an informative biomarker of the effect of some macronutrient and foodstuffs intake on breast cancer risk. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883679

  19. Caliceal clubbing and adjacent parenchymal scarring (always reflux nephropathy) as a cause of end-stage renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, H.S.; Dorph, S.; Copenhagen Univ., Herlev

    1986-01-01

    Various clinical and laboratory aspects in 15 kidney transplanted patients with urographic evidence of caliceal clubbing and adjacent parenchymal scarring in their native kidneys are reported. These lesions were found in 16 per cent of our series of kidney transplantations; below 35 years of age it was the second most frequent disease. In 9 of these patients severe vesicoureteral reflux had been demonstrated. In the remaining 6 patients reflux nephropathy was only a tentative diagnosis based on a striking similarity in the radiographs and in several clinical findings. Nine patients had symptoms (mainly related to urinary tract infection) from 1 to 17 years before diagnosis/urography, in 5 as early as the first year of life. Recurrent urinary tract infection and renal impairment were the most frequent disorders leading to the diagnosis. Replacement therapy was initiated at an average age of 32.7 years. Following renal transplantation urinary tract infection was documented in 37 per cent of patients whether the patient had been bilaterally nephrectomized or not. (orig)

  20. Focal parenchymal lesions in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a clinico-radiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katchanov, Juri [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Charite, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Siebert, Eberhard; Klingebiel, Randolf [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany); Endres, Matthias [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Here, we analyzed the frequency, morphological pattern, and imaging characteristics of focal lesions as a consequence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted imaging combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, serial scanning, and multimodal vascular studies would provide further insight into the pathological basis of such parenchymal lesions in bacterial meningitis. We reviewed clinical and imaging data (i.e., magnetic resonance tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography) of 68 adult patients admitted to our neurological intensive care unit between March 1998 and February 2009 with the diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We identified seven patients with parenchymal lesions. These lesions could be attributed to four morphological patterns: (1) territorial cerebral ischemia, (2) perforating vessels ischemia, (3) ischemia of presumed cardiac origin, and (4) isolated cortical lesions. Whereas the patterns (1) and (2) were associated with vasculopathy of large- and medium-sized vessels (as shown by cerebral vascular imaging), vessel imaging in (3) and (4) did not show abnormal findings. Our study implies that parenchymal lesions in acute bacterial meningitis are mainly ischemic and due to involvement of large-, medium-, and small-sized arteries of the brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging combined with conventional, CT-, or MR-based cerebral angiography revealed the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the majority of patients. Furthermore, we detected two patients with isolated bilateral cortical involvement and normal vessel imaging. These lesions might represent ischemia due to the involvement of small pial and intracortical arteries. (orig.)

  1. Fibrocystic change of breast : relation with parenchymal pattern on mammogram and fibroadenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Yeol; Cha, In Ho; Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Jung Hyuk

    1996-01-01

    To determine the relationship between fibrocystic change and parenchymal pattern and fibroadenoma on mammogram. Mammograms of 135 patients with histologically- diagnosed fibrocystic disease after excisional biopsy were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with pathologic specimens. Classification of the parenchymal pattern was based on Wolfe's method. On mammogram, we observed abnormality in 88 out of the 135 cases;these latter consisted of 70 cases of DY, 30 of P2, 20 of P1, and 15 of Nl, following Wolfe's parenchymal patterns. Among the 88 abnormal cases we obseved 37 cases of mass with clear boundaries, five cases of mass with unclear boundaries, 22 with clustered microcalcifications, six with macrocalcifications and 18 with asymmetric dense breast. Histologic examination revealed a varying composition of stromal fibrosis, epithelial hyperplasia,cyst formation, apocrine metaplasia, etc. Histologically fibroadenomatoid change in 18 cases was appeared as a radiopaque mass on mammogram, especially in those cases where the change was well-defined, which were all except three. Fibrocystic disease was prevalent in Wolfe's P2 and DY patterns(about 80%). About 40% of fibrocystic change appearing as a well defined mass on mammogram showed fibroadenomatoid chage histologically and was difficult to differentiate from fibroadenoma. Fibrocystic disease should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis of a mass which on mammogram is well-defined

  2. Fibrocystic change of breast : relation with parenchymal pattern on mammogram and fibroadenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Yeol; Cha, In Ho; Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Jung Hyuk [Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To determine the relationship between fibrocystic change and parenchymal pattern and fibroadenoma on mammogram. Mammograms of 135 patients with histologically- diagnosed fibrocystic disease after excisional biopsy were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with pathologic specimens. Classification of the parenchymal pattern was based on Wolfe's method. On mammogram, we observed abnormality in 88 out of the 135 cases;these latter consisted of 70 cases of DY, 30 of P2, 20 of P1, and 15 of Nl, following Wolfe's parenchymal patterns. Among the 88 abnormal cases we obseved 37 cases of mass with clear boundaries, five cases of mass with unclear boundaries, 22 with clustered microcalcifications, six with macrocalcifications and 18 with asymmetric dense breast. Histologic examination revealed a varying composition of stromal fibrosis, epithelial hyperplasia,cyst formation, apocrine metaplasia, etc. Histologically fibroadenomatoid change in 18 cases was appeared as a radiopaque mass on mammogram, especially in those cases where the change was well-defined, which were all except three. Fibrocystic disease was prevalent in Wolfe's P2 and DY patterns(about 80%). About 40% of fibrocystic change appearing as a well defined mass on mammogram showed fibroadenomatoid chage histologically and was difficult to differentiate from fibroadenoma. Fibrocystic disease should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis of a mass which on mammogram is well-defined.

  3. Integrated Genomic Characterization of a Pineal Parenchymal Tumor of Intermediate Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun Jee; Bi, Wenya Linda; Dubuc, Adrian M; Martineau, Louine; Ligon, Azra H; Berkowitz, Aaron L; Aizer, Ayal A; Lee, Eudocia Q; Ligon, Keith L; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Dunn, Ian F

    2016-01-01

    Pineal parenchymal tumors of intermediate differentiation (PPTIDs) are rare lesions. The differential diagnosis and management strategy for PPTIDs can be challenging because of the variable prognostic and pathologic characteristics of these tumors. A 24-year-old man presented with progressive headaches, gait abnormalities, and abulia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large T1-hypointense, T2-isointense, contrast-enhancing, partially cystic mass of the pineal and tectal region. Near-total resection was achieved in a 2-stage operation followed by focal and craniospinal irradiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. Immunohistochemical analysis including use of pineal lineage marker confirmed a diagnosis of PPTID. Targeted exome sequencing showed mutations in TSC1(L388P) and IKZF3(F206C), whereas high-resolution array cytogenetics revealed losses in chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 11, 17, and 20, leading to single-copy loss of PTEN and TP53. Pineal parenchymal tumors reflect a broad spectrum of malignancy potential and prognoses, which mandate better understanding of the disease mechanism for rational therapeutic strategies. We present a case of PPTID and report several mutations and chromosomal abnormalities previously unrecognized in this tumor subtype. Review of the literature highlights a need for surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation. Further investigation of these novel variants may improve understanding of the pathogenesis underlying pineal parenchymal tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Normal parenchymal enhancement patterns in women undergoing MR screening of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Sanaz A.; Lin, Vicky C.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Newstead, Gillian M.

    2011-01-01

    To characterize the kinetic and morphological presentation of normal breast tissue on DCE-MRI in a large cohort of asymptomatic women, and to relate these characteristics to breast tissue density. 335 consecutive breast MR examinations in 229 asymptomatic women undergoing high-risk screening evaluations based on recommendations from the American Cancer Society including strong family history and genetic predisposition were selected for IRB-approved review (average age 49.2 ± 10.5 years). Breast tissue density was assessed on precontrast T 2 -weighted images. Parenchymal enhancement pattern (PEP) was qualitatively classified as minimal, homogeneous, heterogeneous or nodular. Quantitative analysis of parenchymal enhancement kinetics (PEK) was performed, including calculation of initial and peak enhancement percentages (E 1 , E peak ), the time to peak enhancement (T peak ) and the signal enhancement ratio (SER). 41.8% of examinations were classified as minimal, 13.7% homogeneous, 23.9% heterogeneous and 21.2% nodular PEP. Women with heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts exhibited a higher proportion of nodular PEP (44.2% (27/61)) and significantly higher E 1 , and E peak (p < 0.003) compared with those with less dense breasts. Qualitative and quantitative parenchymal enhancement characteristics vary by breast tissue density. In future work, the association between image-derived MR features of the normal breast and breast cancer risk should be explored. (orig.)

  5. Normal parenchymal enhancement patterns in women undergoing MR screening of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Sanaz A.; Lin, Vicky C.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Newstead, Gillian M. [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-07-15

    To characterize the kinetic and morphological presentation of normal breast tissue on DCE-MRI in a large cohort of asymptomatic women, and to relate these characteristics to breast tissue density. 335 consecutive breast MR examinations in 229 asymptomatic women undergoing high-risk screening evaluations based on recommendations from the American Cancer Society including strong family history and genetic predisposition were selected for IRB-approved review (average age 49.2 {+-} 10.5 years). Breast tissue density was assessed on precontrast T{sub 2}-weighted images. Parenchymal enhancement pattern (PEP) was qualitatively classified as minimal, homogeneous, heterogeneous or nodular. Quantitative analysis of parenchymal enhancement kinetics (PEK) was performed, including calculation of initial and peak enhancement percentages (E{sub 1}, E{sub peak}), the time to peak enhancement (T{sub peak}) and the signal enhancement ratio (SER). 41.8% of examinations were classified as minimal, 13.7% homogeneous, 23.9% heterogeneous and 21.2% nodular PEP. Women with heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts exhibited a higher proportion of nodular PEP (44.2% (27/61)) and significantly higher E{sub 1}, and E{sub peak} (p < 0.003) compared with those with less dense breasts. Qualitative and quantitative parenchymal enhancement characteristics vary by breast tissue density. In future work, the association between image-derived MR features of the normal breast and breast cancer risk should be explored. (orig.)

  6. Impact of leukoaraiosis on parenchymal hemorrhage in elderly patients treated with thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nighoghossian, Norbert; Cho, Tae-Hee; Cottaz, Vincent; Mechtouff, Laura; Derex, Laurent [Universite Lyon 1, Department of Stroke, Neurological Hospital, Lyon (France); Abbas, Fatima; Schott, Anne Marie [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pole Information Medicale Evaluation Recherche, Lyon (France); Geraldo, Ana Filipa; Janecek, Elie; Hermier, Marc; Tisserand, Louis Guy; Amelie, Roxana; Chamard, Leila; Berthezene, Yves [Universite Lyon 1, Department of Neuroradiology, Neurological Hospital, Bron, Lyon (France); Bischoff, Magali; El Khoury, Carlos [RESUVAL Stroke Network, Lyon (France)

    2016-10-15

    Severity of vascular damage of white matter may predict hemorrhagic transformation (HT). We assess the relationship between leukoaraiosis (LA) severity and the type of hemorrhagic transformation in elderly patients treated with thrombolysis. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data and pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 180 consecutive ischemic stroke patients aged over 75 years. LA severity was graded according to the Fazekas scale, and acute diffusion-weighted-imaging (DWI) lesion volumes were semi-automatically outlined. Predictors of hemorrhagic infarction (HI) and parenchymal hemorrhage (PH) were identified using logistic regression analysis and exact multinomial logistic analysis. HT occurred in 31 patients (17 %). Baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS; p = 0.008), severe LA (p = 0.02), and diffusion lesion volume (p = 0.02) were predictors of HT in univariable logistic regression. Adjusted to lesion volume and baseline NIHSS score, exact multinomial logistic analysis showed that severe LA was the only independent predictor of parenchymal hemorrhage (p = 0.03). In elderly patients, LA severity better predicts parenchymal hemorrhage than infarct size. (orig.)

  7. [SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF INTRAVENTRICULAR AND PARENCHYMAL INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE IN PATIENTS WITH SEVERE TRAUMA BRAIN INJURY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshorov, A V; Popugaev, K A; Savin, I A; Potapov, A A

    2016-01-01

    "Standard" assessment of ICP by measuring liquor ventricular pressure recently questioned. THE OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: Compare the values of ventricular and parenchymal ICP against the closure of open liquor drainage and during active CSF drainage. Examined 7 patients with TBI and intracranial hypertension syndrome, GCS 5.6 ± 1.2 points, 4.2 ± age 33 years. Compared parenchymal and ventricular ICP in three time periods: 1--during closure of ventricular drainage, 2--during of the open drains and drainage at the level of 14-15 mmHg, 3--during the period of active drainage. When comparing two methods of measurement used Bland-Altman method. 1. During time period of the closed drainage correlation coefficient was r = 0.83, p intracranial pressure is reduced. 3. During the active CSF drainage correlation between the two methods of measuring intracranial pressure can be completely lost. Under these conditions, CSF pressure is not correctly reflect the ICP 4. For an accurate and continuous measurement of intracranial pressure on the background of the active CSF drainage should be carried out simultaneous parenchymal ICP measurement.

  8. Focal parenchymal lesions in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a clinico-radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katchanov, Juri; Siebert, Eberhard; Klingebiel, Randolf; Endres, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Here, we analyzed the frequency, morphological pattern, and imaging characteristics of focal lesions as a consequence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted imaging combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, serial scanning, and multimodal vascular studies would provide further insight into the pathological basis of such parenchymal lesions in bacterial meningitis. We reviewed clinical and imaging data (i.e., magnetic resonance tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography) of 68 adult patients admitted to our neurological intensive care unit between March 1998 and February 2009 with the diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We identified seven patients with parenchymal lesions. These lesions could be attributed to four morphological patterns: (1) territorial cerebral ischemia, (2) perforating vessels ischemia, (3) ischemia of presumed cardiac origin, and (4) isolated cortical lesions. Whereas the patterns (1) and (2) were associated with vasculopathy of large- and medium-sized vessels (as shown by cerebral vascular imaging), vessel imaging in (3) and (4) did not show abnormal findings. Our study implies that parenchymal lesions in acute bacterial meningitis are mainly ischemic and due to involvement of large-, medium-, and small-sized arteries of the brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging combined with conventional, CT-, or MR-based cerebral angiography revealed the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the majority of patients. Furthermore, we detected two patients with isolated bilateral cortical involvement and normal vessel imaging. These lesions might represent ischemia due to the involvement of small pial and intracortical arteries. (orig.)

  9. Use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kremer (Stephane); F. Renard (Felix); S. Achard (Sophie); M.A. Lana-Peixoto (Marco A.); J. Palace (Jacqueline); N. Asgari (Nasrin); E.C. Klawiter (Eric C.); S. Tenembaum (Silvia); B. Banwell (Brenda); B.M. Greenberg (Benjamin M.); J.L. Bennett (Jeffrey); M. Levy (Michael); P. Villoslada (Pablo); A. Saiz (Albert Abe); K. Fujihara (Kazuo); K.H. Chan (Koon Ho); S. Schippling (Sven); F. Paul (Friedemann); H.J. Kim (Ho Jin); J. De Seze (Jerome); J.T. Wuerfel (Jens T.); P. Cabre (Philippe); R. Marignier (Romain); T. Tedder (Thomas); E.D. van Pelt - Gravesteijn (Daniëlle); S. Broadley (Simon); T. Chitnis (Tanuja); D. Wingerchuk (Dean); L. Pandit (Lekha); M.I. Leite (M. Isabel); M. Apiwattanakul (Metha); I. Kleiter (Ingo); N. Prayoonwiwat (Naraporn); M. Han (May); K. Hellwig (Kerstin); K. Van Herle (Katja); G. John (Gareth); D.C. Hooper (D. Craig); I. Nakashima (Ichiro); D. Sato (Douglas); M.R. Yeaman (Michael R.); E. Waubant (Emmanuelle); S. Zamvil (Scott); O. Stüve (Olaf); O. Aktas (Orhan); T.J. Smith (Terry J.); A. Jacob (Anu); K. O'Connor (Kevin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBrain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other

  10. Action of DTPA on hepatic plutonium. II. DTPA-induced removal of monomeric plutonium from mouse liver parenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Peterson, D.P.; Lindenbaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Liver parenchymal cells were isolated 6 and 24 hr following the administration of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA, 0.25 mmole/kg) to mice previously injected with 239 Pu-citrate (4.4 μCi/kg). Isolated parenchymal cells contained 440 dpm Pu/10 6 cells at 24 hr after Pu injection, just prior to DTPA administration. The PU content decreased to 330 dpm/10 6 cells at 6 hr and 140 dpm/10 6 cells at 24 hr after DTPA administration. Thus DTPA induced a striking decrease in the Pu content of isolated liver parenchymal cells. Parenchymal cells isolated from control mice not treated with DTPA changed little in Pu content from 24 to 48 hr after Pu injection. By 24 hr after DTPA treatment, the decrease in the Pu content of isolated liver parenchymal cells could account for the DTPA-induced release of Pu from the intact liver. Thus in the liver DTPA appears to act preferentially on the Pu associated with parenchymal cells. Liver parenchymal cells isolated 6 hr after DTPA administration and containing 330 dpm Pu/10 6 cells were incubated in vitro in the absence of added DTPA. After 18 hr of incubation the cells contained 130 dpm Pu/10 6 cells. This level corresponds to the level observed in cells isolated 24 hr after DTPA administration. Cells isolated from untreated mice lost only 15% of their Pu content during a similar in vitro incubation. Thus, by 6 hr after DTPA administration to the mouse, isolated liver parenchymal cells appeared to retain their ability to release Pu in vitro with no need for additional exposure to DTPA. The physiological significance of this finding is discussed

  11. Smoking and high-risk mammographic parenchymal patterns: a case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sala, Evis; Warren, Ruth; McCann, Jenny; Duffy, Stephen; Luben, Robert; Day, Nicholas

    2000-01-01

    Current smoking was strongly and inversely associated with high-risk patterns, after adjustment for concomitant risk factors. Relative to never smokers, current smokers were significantly less likely to have a high-risk pattern. Similar results were obtained when the analysis was confined to postmenopausal women. Past smoking was not related to the mammographic parenchymal patterns. The overall effect in postmenopausal women lost its significance when adjusted for other risk factors for P2/DY patterns that were found to be significant in the present study, although the results are still strongly suggestive. The present data indicate that adjustment for current smoking status is important when evaluating the relationship between mammographic parenchymal pattern and breast cancer risk. They also indicate that smoking is a prominent potential confounder when analyzing effects of other risk factors such as obesity-related variables. It appears that parenchymal patterns may act as an informative biomarker of the effect of cigarette smoking on breast cancer risk. Overall, epidemiological studies [1,2,3,4] have reported no substantial association between cigarette smoking and the risk of breast cancer. Some studies [5,6,7] reported a significant increase of breast cancer risk among smokers. In recent studies that addressed the association between breast cancer and cigarette smoking, however, there was some suggestion of a decreased risk [8,9,10], especially among current smokers, ranging from approximately 10 to 30% [9,10]. Brunet et al [11] reported that smoking might reduce the risk of breast cancer by 44% in carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. Wolfe [12] described four different mammographic patterns created by variations in the relative amounts of fat, epithelial and connective tissue in the breast, designated N1, P1, P2 and DY. Women with either P2 or DY pattern are considered at greater risk for breast cancer than those with N1 or P1 pattern [12

  12. Predicting local recurrence following breast-conserving treatment: parenchymal signal enhancement ratio (SER) around the tumor on preoperative MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Nariya; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Yun, Bo La; Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: river7774@gmail.com; Chie, Eui Kyu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Background: The level of background parenchymal enhancement around tumor is known to be associated with breast cancer risk. However, there is no study investigating predictive power of parenchymal signal enhancement ratio (SER) around tumor for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Purpose: To investigate whether the breast parenchymal SER around the tumor on preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is associated with subsequent IBTR in breast cancer patients who had undergone breast-conserving treatment. Material and Methods: Nineteen consecutive women (mean age, 44 years; range, 34-63 years) with breast cancer who developed IBTR following breast-conserving treatment and 114 control women matched for age, as well as T and N stages were included. We compared the clinicopathologic features of the two groups including nuclear grade, histologic grade, hormonal receptor status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) status, lymphovascular invasion, negative margin width, use of adjuvant therapy, and parenchymal SER around the tumor on preoperative DCE-MRI. The SER was measured on a slice showing the largest dimension of the tumor. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent factors associated with IBTR. Results: In univariate analysis, ER negativity (odds ratio [OR] = 4.7; P = 0.040), PR negativity (OR = 4.0; P = 0.013), HER-2 positivity (OR = 3.6; P = 0.026), and a parenchymal SER greater than 0.53 (OR = 23.3; P = 0.011) were associated with IBTR. In multivariate analysis, ER negativity (OR = 3.8; P = 0.015) and a parenchymal SER greater than 0.53 (OR = 13.2; P = 0.040) on preoperative MRI were independent factors associated with IBTR. Conclusion: In addition to ER negativity, a higher parenchymal SER on preoperative MRI was an independent factor associated with subsequent IBTR in patients with breast cancer who had undergone breast-conserving treatment.

  13. Parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis: findings of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Clecia Santos; Pellini, Marcos; Boasquevisque, Edson; Souza, Luis Alberto M. de

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to determine the frequency and localization of parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography as well as their correlation with the territory and affected venous drainage. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis (1996 to 2004) of 21 patients (3 male and 18 female) age range between 3 and 82 years (mean 40 years, median 36 years) with clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography in 2D PC, 3D PC and contrast-enhanced 3D TOF sequences. The statistical analysis was performed with the qui-square test. Four patients had follow-up exams and three patients underwent digital subtraction angiography. Results: main predisposing factors were: infection, use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and collagenosis. Predominant symptoms included: focal deficit, headache, alteration of consciousness level and seizures. Most frequent parenchymal manifestations were: cortical/subcortical edema or infarct, venous congestion and collateral circulation, meningeal enhancement and thalamic and basal ganglia edema or infarct. Occlusion occurred mainly in superior sagittal, left transverse, left sigmoid and straight sinuses. Cavernous sinus and cortical veins thrombosis are uncommon events. Conclusion: cerebral venous thrombosis is an uncommon cause of stroke, with favorable prognosis because of its reversibility. Diagnosis is highly dependent on the radiologist capacity to recognize the presentations of this disease, principally in cases where the diagnosis is suggested by parenchymal abnormalities rather than necessarily by visualization of the thrombus itself. An accurate and rapid diagnosis allows an immediate treatment, reducing the morbidity and mortality rates. (author)

  14. Understanding the Lung Abscess Microbiome: Outcomes of Percutaneous Lung Parenchymal Abscess Drainage with Microbiologic Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Christopher; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Gade, Terence; Hunt, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.hunt@uphs.upenn.edu [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-06-15

    IntroductionLung parenchymal abscesses represent an uncommon pathology with high mortality if untreated. Although most respond well to antibiotics, the optimal therapy for persistent abscesses is unknown. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of percutaneous lung parenchymal abscess catheter drainage after broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy failure and correlate with patient microbiologic samples.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of patients who underwent percutaneous lung abscess drainage at a tertiary hospital system from 2005 to 2015 was performed. In total, 19 procedures were identified on 16 different patients; six females and ten males. Mean patient age was 55 years (range 22–81). Median follow-up time was 7 months (range <1–78).ResultsTechnical success was 100%. There was one major complication, a pneumothorax. Follow-up was until tube removal or death in 100% of patients. Catheters were removed with resolution of the abscess cavity in 58% (11/19) or with non-draining abscess cavities in 21% (4/19) for a clinical success rate of 79%. Blood cultures demonstrated no growth in all cases, while 21% (4/19) of sputum or bronchoscopic cultures demonstrated growth. In comparison, the specimens from initial catheter placement isolated a causative organism in 95% (18/19) of case (p < 0.0001).ConclusionIn cases of persistent lung abscess after broad-spectrum antibiotics, percutaneous abscess drainage is highly sensitive for microbiologic sampling compared to sputum/bronchoscopic or blood cultures. Additionally, percutaneous drainage of lung parenchymal abscess cavities may promote resolution of the abscess with high rates of therapeutic success and low complications.

  15. Vitamin A deficiency alters the pulmonary parenchymal elastic modulus and elastic fiber concentration in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes Amey J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchial hyperreactivity is influenced by properties of the conducting airways and the surrounding pulmonary parenchyma, which is tethered to the conducting airways. Vitamin A deficiency (VAD is associated with an increase in airway hyperreactivity in rats and a decrease in the volume density of alveoli and alveolar ducts. To better define the effects of VAD on the mechanical properties of the pulmonary parenchyma, we have studied the elastic modulus, elastic fibers and elastin gene-expression in rats with VAD, which were supplemented with retinoic acid (RA or remained unsupplemented. Methods Parenchymal mechanics were assessed before and after the administration of carbamylcholine (CCh by determining the bulk and shear moduli of lungs that that had been removed from rats which were vitamin A deficient or received a control diet. Elastin mRNA and insoluble elastin were quantified and elastic fibers were enumerated using morphometric methods. Additional morphometric studies were performed to assess airway contraction and alveolar distortion. Results VAD produced an approximately 2-fold augmentation in the CCh-mediated increase of the bulk modulus and a significant dampening of the increase in shear modulus after CCh, compared to vitamin A sufficient (VAS rats. RA-supplementation for up to 21 days did not reverse the effects of VAD on the elastic modulus. VAD was also associated with a decrease in the concentration of parenchymal elastic fibers, which was restored and was accompanied by an increase in tropoelastin mRNA after 12 days of RA-treatment. Lung elastin, which was resistant to 0.1 N NaOH at 98°, decreased in VAD and was not restored after 21 days of RA-treatment. Conclusion Alterations in parenchymal mechanics and structure contribute to bronchial hyperreactivity in VAD but they are not reversed by RA-treatment, in contrast to the VAD-related alterations in the airways.

  16. Understanding the Lung Abscess Microbiome: Outcomes of Percutaneous Lung Parenchymal Abscess Drainage with Microbiologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, Christopher; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Gade, Terence; Hunt, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionLung parenchymal abscesses represent an uncommon pathology with high mortality if untreated. Although most respond well to antibiotics, the optimal therapy for persistent abscesses is unknown. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of percutaneous lung parenchymal abscess catheter drainage after broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy failure and correlate with patient microbiologic samples.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of patients who underwent percutaneous lung abscess drainage at a tertiary hospital system from 2005 to 2015 was performed. In total, 19 procedures were identified on 16 different patients; six females and ten males. Mean patient age was 55 years (range 22–81). Median follow-up time was 7 months (range <1–78).ResultsTechnical success was 100%. There was one major complication, a pneumothorax. Follow-up was until tube removal or death in 100% of patients. Catheters were removed with resolution of the abscess cavity in 58% (11/19) or with non-draining abscess cavities in 21% (4/19) for a clinical success rate of 79%. Blood cultures demonstrated no growth in all cases, while 21% (4/19) of sputum or bronchoscopic cultures demonstrated growth. In comparison, the specimens from initial catheter placement isolated a causative organism in 95% (18/19) of case (p < 0.0001).ConclusionIn cases of persistent lung abscess after broad-spectrum antibiotics, percutaneous abscess drainage is highly sensitive for microbiologic sampling compared to sputum/bronchoscopic or blood cultures. Additionally, percutaneous drainage of lung parenchymal abscess cavities may promote resolution of the abscess with high rates of therapeutic success and low complications.

  17. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis with pulmonary parenchymal spread - report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto de; Campos, Rubia Mara Correia; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes Santos

    2002-01-01

    The authors report the cases of two adolescent patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis with pulmonary parenchymal spread. Both patients presented very similar initial symptoms and clinical evolution. The patients developed larynx papillomas in childhood causing obstruction to airflow and required permanent tracheostomy after several resection and recurrence episodes. Long time after they developed recurrent pulmonary infections. In both cases the disease was diagnosed through clinical history and high resolution computed tomography that revealed papillomas in the trachea and solid or cavitary nodules in the lungs. (author)

  18. Carcinoma of the so-called empty breast and its relation to the Wolfe's parenchymal classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.; Eiter, H.; Taxer, F.

    1983-01-01

    Carcinoma in the ''empty breast'' in our experience is so common that we doubt Wolfe's conclusions in his classification of parenchymal patterns. Amongst patients over 60 years, almost 70% of carcinomas were situated in an ''empty'' parenchyma and they did not develop in a parechymal group above P1. Mammographically, the ''empty breast'' is the structureless fatty breast of older women after the menopause. Some authors believe that there is a lower incidence of carcinomas in this type of breast than in other types of parenchyma, such as those showing mastopathies. Our experience concerning carcinomas in involuted breasts is described. (orig.) [de

  19. Proton MR spectroscopic features according to change of hepatic parenchymal iron content after SPIO injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Chang Hae; Cho, Soon Gu; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Hyung Jin

    2001-01-01

    To determine the effect of iron on proton MR spectra ( 1 H-MRS) by evaluating changes in 1 H-MRS of the liver according to changes in hepatic parenchymal iron content. We evaluated serial changes in 1 H-MRS of the liver after intravenous infusion of SPIO in 40 rabbits. These were divided into eight groups of five, and in each group, respectively, 1 H-MRS and T2WI MR images were acquired prior to SPIO infusion, just after infusion, and at 15 minutes and 1, 2, 4, 24 and 96 hours after infusion. MR spectra were evaluated with particular attention ot the curve pattern observed at specific times after the infusion of SPIO, and the results were correlated with the signal intensity observed on T2WI images and the histologic giade of iron content of samples of resected liver parenchyma. As observed on T2WI, the mean signal intensity of rabbit liver in tis pre-SPIO infusion state, just after infusion, at 15 minutes, and at 1, 2, 4 and 96 hours after SPIO infusion was 121.3±15.5, 41.5±12.7, 30.3±7.9, 31.3±3.5, 33.6±9.4, 45.5±10.9, 80.3±15.7 and 110.4±22.9, respectively (p<0.05). Mean standard deviation of the ratio of the area of the peak (3.9-4.1 ppm)/lipid peak (1.3 ppm) peak at each of the above times except for the pre-infusion state was 1.10±0.13, 1.86±0.21, 1.80±0.30, 1.76±0.27, 1.74±0.20, 0.07±0.02 and 0.03±0.01, respectively (p<0.05). The hepatic parenchymal iron content increased rapidly from just after SPIO infusion, reaching its maximal level (as revealed by histologic specimens) at 15 minutes, sustaining this for up to 4 hours, and then decreasing gradually over periods of 24 and 96 hours. These results show that serial changes in patterns of MR spectra and the signal intensity seen on T2WI images correlate closely with changes in hepatic parenchymal iron content. Elevated hepatic parenchymal iron content leads to increases in the relative intensity of unknown peaks at around 4.0 ppm and decreases in the relative intensity of lipid peaks

  20. Cigarette Smoking Is Associated with Subclinical Parenchymal Lung Disease:The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)–Lung Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lederer, David J; Enright, Paul L; Kawut, Steven M; Hoffman, Eric A; Hunninghake, Gary; van Beek, Edwin J R; Austin, John H M; Jiang, Rui; Lovasi, Gina S; Barr, R Graham

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for diffuse parenchymal lung disease. Risk factors for subclinical parenchymal lung disease have not been described.Objectives: To determine if cigarette smoking is associated with subclinical parenchymal lung disease, as measured by spirometric restriction and regions of high attenuation on computed tomography (CT) imaging.Methods: We examined 2,563 adults without airflow obstruction or clinical cardiovascular disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of...

  1. Detection of parenchymal abnormalities in experimentally induced acute pyelonephritis in rabbits using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, CT, and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah; Kim, Bo Hyun; Kim, Seung Kwon; Seo, Jin Won [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Sung [Laboratory Animal Research Center, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We evaluated the efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in detecting acute pyelonephritis (APN) using the rabbit kidney model and compared it with CT and MRI. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. In a total of 20 New Zealand White rabbits, APN was induced experimentally. CEUS, CT, and MRI were performed on the first, third, and seventh postoperative days. After imaging studies, the subjects were sacrificed and the pathological diagnosis of APN was confirmed in each animal by a pathologist. Imaging studies were obtained in eight animals, including eight CEUS, four computed tomography (CT), and four magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images. CEUS depicted diffuse renal enlargement (7), diffuse heterogeneous parenchymal enhancement (6), and focal areas of decreased parenchymal enhancement (6). These findings were well correlated with the CT and MRI findings in five cases in which these studies were available. CT and MRI showed diffuse renal enlargement, diffuse heterogeneous parenchymal enhancement, focal areas of decreased parenchymal enhancement, focal contour bulging, and the finding of perinephric spread of infection. In a rabbit model, CEUS could depict the parenchymal lesions of APN similar to CT or MRI; however, it was limited in depicting the perinephric extension of inflammation.

  2. Contralateral kidney volume change as a consequence of ipsilateral parenchymal atrophy promotes overall renal function recovery after partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung Hwa; Yoon, Young Eun; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Han, Woong Kyu

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether ischemic time is related to ipsilateral parenchymal atrophy (IPA) and contralateral compensational hypertrophy (CCH) and how CCH affects late functional outcome after partial nephrectomy. Parenchymal kidney volumes and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were determined preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively in 79 patients. Kidney volume was measured by Voxel Plus® 2.5 with a tissue segmentation tool. Correlation analysis and univariate and multivariate regression models were used to evaluate the recovery of IPA, CCH, and GFR. The mean preserved ipsilateral kidney volume was 86.7%. At 12 months, mean IPA and CCH were 3.0 and 4.8%, respectively, and the mean GFR decrease was 8.0%. Ipsilateral volume decrease and contralateral volume increase were significant until 6 months postoperatively (p35 min; p=0.029 and 0.003, respectively), and CCH correlated positively with IPA (r2=0.052, p=0.045). On multivariate analysis, IPA correlated with a longer ischemic time and percent of preserved normal parenchymal volume (PPV), and CCH correlated with a longer ischemic time, IPA, PPV, and total parenchymal volume increase. At 12 months postoperatively, CCH correlated with GFR recovery (r2=0.072, p=0.026), and significant predictors of GFR recovery were age, sex, PPV, and CCH. We present the meaningful possibility that longer ischemic time and less preservation of normal parenchyma cause greater parenchymal atrophy, thereby promoting CCH, which contributes to renal function recovery after partial nephrectomy.

  3. Enriched Endogenous Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Mice Ameliorate Parenchymal Cell Death After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huixia; Yang, Zhen; Luo, Chuanming; Zeng, Haitao; Li, Peng; Kang, Jing X; Wan, Jian-Bo; He, Chengwei; Su, Huanxing

    2017-07-01

    Currently no effective therapies are available for the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Early intervention that specifically provides neuroprotection is of most importance which profoundly influences the outcome of TBI. In the present study, we adopted a closed-skull mild TBI model to investigate potential roles of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) in protecting against TBI. Using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM), parenchymal cell death and reactive oxidative species (ROS) expression were directly observed and recorded after TBI through a thinned skull bone window. Fat-1 mice with high endogenous ω-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited ROS expression and attenuated parenchymal cell death after compression injury during the early injury phase. Elevated generation of glutathione (GSH) and neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) in the parenchyma of fat-1 mice could be the contributor to the beneficial role of ω-3 PUFAs in TBI. The results of the study suggest that ω-3 PUFAs is an effective neuroprotectant as an early pharmacological intervention for TBI and the information derived from this study may help guide dietary advice for those who are susceptible to repetitive mild TBI.

  4. Impact of parenchymal tuberculosis sequelae on mediastinal lymph node staging in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Min, Joo-Won; Lee, Chang Hoon; Park, Chang Min; Goo, Jin Mo; Chung, Doo Hyun; Kang, Chang Hyun; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young-Soo; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2011-01-01

    Because tuberculous (TB) involvement of mediastinal lymph nodes (LN) could cause false positive results in nodal staging of lung cancer, we examined the accuracy of nodal staging in lung cancer patients with radiographic sequelae of healed TB. A total of 54 lung cancer patients with radiographic TB sequelae in the lung parenchyma ipsilateral to the resected lung, who had undergone at least ipsilateral 4- and 7-lymph node dissection after both chest computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT were included for the analysis. The median age of 54 subjects was 66 yr and 48 were males. Calcified nodules and fibrotic changes were the most common forms of healed parenchymal pulmonary TB. Enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes (short diameter > 1 cm) were identified in 21 patients and positive mediastinal lymph nodes were identified using FDG-PET/CT in 19 patients. The overall sensitivity and specificity for mediastinal node metastasis were 60.0% and 69.2% with CT and 46.7% and 69.2% with FDG-PET/CT, respectively. In conclusion, the accuracy of nodal staging using CT or FDG-PET/CT might be low in lung cancer patients with parenchymal TB sequelae, because of inactive TB lymph nodes without viable TB bacilli.

  5. The lung parenchymal strip as a model of peripheral airway responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, C L; Black, J L; Berend, N

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four patients scheduled for surgery for carcinoma of the lung were challenged with inhaled methacholine. A greater than 20% fall in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was recorded in nine of these patients. The PD20 (dose of methacholine producing a 20% fall in FEV1) values ranged from 0.6 to 5.6 mumol methacholine. Following surgery, lung tissue was prepared as lung parenchymal strips for in vitro studies. There was no correlation between in vivo airway responsiveness to methacholine (PD20) and in vitro sensitivity as measured by the EC50 (the concentration of agonist producing half the maximal tension [Tmax]) for carbachol (r = -0.17; n = 16) or histamine (r = 0.23; n = 24). The variation in in vivo and in vitro responsiveness was not due to the presence of inflammatory cells in the peripheral lung tissue. Of the 38 lung parenchymal strips studied with histamine, 17 demonstrated a variable relaxation response at low concentrations followed by contraction at higher concentrations. The presence or absence of this relaxation response could not be explained in terms of variable proportions of airway or vascular smooth muscle.

  6. New technique in hepatic parenchymal transection for living related liver donor and liver neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Doria, Cataldo; Vitale, Claudio H; Mandala', Lucio; Magnone, Mario; Fung, John J; Marino, Ignazio R

    2004-01-01

    Many different surgical techniques have been described for hepatic parenchymal transection. A retrospective analysis of perioperative mortality, length of hospitalization and blood transfused during operation in two patient groups undergoing liver resection was carried out. In group A, we developed a new technique to resect hepatic parenchyma, using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator with monopolar floating ball cautery, while in group B the crushing clamp technique was used. In all, 42 patients with liver resection were enrolled in group A and 107 resections in group B. All patients had hepatic neoplasms except for seven living transplant donors. In group A 43% of resections involved >or=3 segments and 57% involved or=3 segments and 63.6% consisted of parenchymal transection seems to reduce the LOS, length of procedure and need for intraoperative blood transfusion.

  7. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Miyanohara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal. Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem; and (iv the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients.

  8. Ultrasonographic evaluation of renal parenchymal diseases in dogs: 32 cases (1981-1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, P.A.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; O'Leary, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    The medical records of 32 dogs with microscopically proven renal parenchymal disease were evaluated to characterize the associated ultrasonographic patterns and to assess the contribution of ultrasonography to the diagnosis and management in each case. Ultrasonography provided additional information on internal renal architecture in 18 dogs with radiographic evidence of structural abnormality. Ultrasonography determined the renal origin of 2 abdominal masses, defined the extent and distribution of neoplastic disease in 6 dogs, and identified kidneys not seen on survey radiographs or excretory urograms in 5 dogs because of decreased abdominal contrast or poor function. The ultrasonographic patterns were most specific for focal and multifocal or diffuse neoplasia. Ultrasonographic findings were least specific for diffuse parenchymal disease without architectural disruption such as glomerulo/interstitial nephritis, renal tubular necrosis, and nephrocalcinosis. In these cases, biopsy was recommended. Six interpretive errors were made. Four of these errors were related to the overestimation of renal pelvic and diverticular size because of confusion with medullary papilla. Two errors occurred in the diagnosis of renal lymphosarcoma, one of which was interpreted to be pyelonephritis. The other was an interpretive dilemma because of absence of hypoechoic multifocal nodules. Renal tubular necrosis was confirmed in this case

  9. Mammographic parenchymal patterns: value as a predictor of hormone dependency and survival in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, C.P.; Roebuck, E.J.; Williams, M.R.; Blamey, R.W.; Glaves, J.; Nicholson, R.I.; Griffiths, K.

    1985-01-01

    The relation between the parenchymal pattern of the breasts as demonstrated on a mammogram and the estrogen-receptor status of the primary tumor in 337 patients with operable invasive breast cancer has been studied. These factors have also been correlated with the response to endocrine therapy in 92 patients who subsequently developed secondary disease. It has been shown that patients with a DY pattern are more likely to develop tumors that are estrogen-receptor (ER) positive. Patients with secondary disease who have a DY pattern are more likely to respond to endocrine therapy. The DY pattern has been shown to be at least as good an indicator of the probability of response to endocrine therapy as the estrogen-receptor status, and a combination of the two factors better than either taken singly. In a series of 141 postmenopausal women, the DY pattern, as determined at the time of mastectomy, was associated with significantly improved survival. Mammographic parenchymal pattern could form the basis for selecting patients for endocrine therapy where no estrogen-receptor assay is available

  10. DMPD: Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions onnonparenchymal and parenchymal cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nnonparenchymal and parenchymal cells. Schieferdecker HL, Schlaf G, Jungermann K, Gotze O. Int Immunopharmac...31 Title Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions onnonparenchymal and paren...chymal cells. Authors Schieferdecker HL, Schlaf G, Jungermann K, Gotze O. Publication Int Immunopharmacol. 2

  11. Very low cerebral blood volume predicts parenchymal hematoma in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermitte, Laure; Cho, Tae-Hee; Ozenne, Brice

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative Acute Stroke Study II criteria. Recanalization and reperfusion were assessed on 3-hour follow-up MRI. RESULTS: Of the 110 patients, hemorrhagic transformation occurred in 59 patients, including 7 PH. In univariate analysis, the acute National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (P=0...... hemorrhagic transformation or PH. CONCLUSION: Very low CBV was the only independent predictor of PH in patients with acute stroke.......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Parenchymal hematoma (PH) may worsen the outcome of patients with stroke. The aim of our study was to confirm the relationship between the volume of very low cerebral blood volume (CBV) and PH using a European multicenter database (I-KNOW). A secondary objective...

  12. Late lung parenchymal changes on HRCT in children with mycoplasma pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyeon; Kim, Joung Sook; Yoon, Jung Hee; Hur, Gham; Kim, Chang Gun

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate late lung parenchymal change, as seen on high-resolution CT(HRCT) in children with mycoplasma pneumonia. Twenty-three patients [15 boys and 8 girls aged two to 13 (mean, 6) years] with mycoplasma pneumonia underwent HRCT four to 39 (mean, 10) months after initial infection. Using increased mycoplasma antibody titer( > 1;640) mycoplasma pneumonia was diagnosed, and patients were divided into two groups : high titer group (antibody titer > 1:5120), and lower titer group ( < 1:5120). CT scans were performed using 2mm collimation and 5-10mm interval from apex to diaphragm. In seven patients who were cooperative, both inspiratory scans were obtained at a window width of 1600 HU and level of 700. HRCT findings of mosaic low attenuations and changes in bronchioles and bronchial walls were assessed by three radiologists and correlated with initial chest radiographic findings. On HRCT, 17 of 23 patients (74%) demonstrated abnormal findings. These included mosaic attenuation of lung density alone in 11 of 17 patients (65%), mosaic attenuation associated with bronchiectasis in five(29%), and bronchiectasis only in one(6%). Mosaic attenuation was more accentuated on expiratory scans than on inspiratory. These findings were obtained in 10 of 12 high titer group and in 7 of 11 in the lower titer group. In 15 of 23 patients(65%), involved areas seen on HRCT exactly corresponded with initially involved areas seen on chest radiographs (CXR). Two patients in whom findings on initial CXR were normal showed mosaic attenuation on HRCT. Six patients in whom such findings were abnormal showed normal findings on HRCT, a fact which reflected their complete recovery. The most common late parenchymal change in mycoplasma pneumonia, as seen on HRCT, was mosaic attenuation of lung density followed by bronchiectasis. The latter is presumably due to bronchiolitis obliterans, a well-known complication. We believe that HRCT is very useful for the evaluation of long-term sequelae of

  13. A syndrome of severe idiopathic pulmonary parenchymal disease with pulmonary hypertension in Pekingese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köster LS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Liza S Köster,1 Robert M Kirberger2 1Section of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Integrative Mammalian Research (IMR Center, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM, Basseterre, St Kitts, West Indies; 2Diagnostic Imaging Section, Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, South Africa Abstract: This paper describes 35 Pekingese dogs with a syndrome characterized by dyspnea, cyanosis, episodic syncope, soft pulmonary “Velcro” crackles, pulmonary hypertension (PH, and computed tomography and radiographic changes consistent with pulmonary parenchymal disease. The medical data base was searched with the criteria “Pekingese” and “syncope” or “dyspnea” or “tachypnea” or “pulmonary hypertension”, over a 36-month period. Inclusion criteria were echocardiographic changes consistent with noninvasive diagnosis of PH, either subjectively by B-mode or objectively by Doppler. Dogs were excluded (n=106 if there were insufficient or poor-quality radiographic or echocardiographic records or if diseases other than chronic pulmonary disease were found to be the etiology. The records of 35 dogs met these criteria and presented with a respiratory crises preceded by a history of chronic exercise intolerance and episodic syncope. The average age was 14.5 years (range: 7–19 years, with 21 males and 14 females. Most of the dogs had an interstitial lung pattern with radiographic evidence of right heart enlargement. There was a 77% (n=27 mortality and a median survival of 60 days (interquartile range: 9–210 days. This study highlights a cor pulmonale syndrome from PH due to chronic pulmonary parenchymal disease, with a grave prognosis, in middle-aged to geriatric population of Hong Kong Pekingese. Keywords: computed tomography, interstitial lung disease, dog, syncope

  14. Mammographic parenchymal texture as an imaging marker of hormonal activity: a comparative study between pre- and post-menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daye, Dania; Bobo, Ezra; Baumann, Bethany; Ioannou, Antonios; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture patterns have been shown to be related to breast cancer risk. Yet, little is known about the biological basis underlying this association. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture patterns as an inherent phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure of the breast tissue. Digital mammographic (DM) images in the cranio-caudal (CC) view of the unaffected breast from 138 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate marker of endogenous hormonal activity. Retroareolar 2.5cm2 ROIs were segmented from the post-processed DM images using an automated algorithm. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, grey-level spatial correlation, and fractal dimension were computed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate feature classification performance in distinguishing between 72 pre- and 66 post-menopausal women. Logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of each texture feature in predicting menopause status. ROC analysis showed that texture features have inherent capacity to distinguish between pre- and post-menopausal statuses (AUC>0.5, pcontraception use and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) use lead to a modest model improvement (AUC=0.78) while texture features maintained significant contribution (p<0.05). The observed differences in parenchymal texture features between pre- and post- menopausal women suggest that mammographic texture can potentially serve as a surrogate imaging marker of endogenous hormonal activity.

  15. A Comparative Study of Peripheral Immune Responses to Taenia solium in Individuals with Parenchymal and Subarachnoid Neurocysticercosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskra Tuero

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Taenia solium to modulate the immune system likely contributes to their longevity in the human host. We tested the hypothesis that the nature of the immune response is related to the location of parasite and clinical manifestations of infection.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were obtained from untreated patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC, categorized as having parenchymal or subarachnoid infection by the presence of cysts exclusively within the parenchyma or in subarachnoid spaces of the brain, and from uninfected (control individuals matched by age and gender to each patient. Using multiplex detection technology, sera from NCC patients and controls and cytokine production by PBMC after T. solium antigen (TsAg stimulation were assayed for levels of inflammatory and regulatory cytokines. PBMC were phenotyped by flow cytometry ex vivo and following in vitro stimulation with TsAg.Sera from patients with parenchymal NCC demonstrated significantly higher Th1 (IFN-γ/IL-12 and Th2 (IL-4/IL-13 cytokine responses and trends towards higher levels of IL-1β/IL-8/IL-5 than those obtained from patients with subarachnoid NCC. Also higher in vitro antigen-driven TNF-β secretion was detected in PBMC supernatants from parenchymal than in subarachnoid NCC. In contrast, there was a significantly higher IL-10 response to TsAg stimulation in patients with subarachnoid NCC compared to parenchymal NCC. Although no differences in regulatory T cells (Tregs frequencies were found ex vivo, there was a trend towards greater expansion of Tregs upon TsAg stimulation in subarachnoid than in parenchymal NCC when data were normalized for the corresponding controls.T. solium infection of the subarachnoid space is associated with an enhanced regulatory immune response compared to infection in the parenchyma. The resulting anti-inflammatory milieu may represent a parasite strategy to maintain a permissive environment in the host or diminish

  16. The Metallicity Spread and the Age-Metallicity Relation of ω Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanova, S.; Geisler, D.; Gratton, R. G.; Cassisi, S.

    2014-08-01

    ω Centauri is a peculiar globular cluster formed by a complex stellar population. To investigate it, we studied 172 stars belonging to the five SGBs that we can identify in our photometry, in order to measure their [Fe/H] content as well as estimate their age dispersion and the age-metallicity relation. The first important result is that all of these SGBs have a distribution in metallicity with a spread that exceeds the observational errors and typically displays several peaks that indicate the presence of several subpopulations. We were able to identify at least six of them based on their mean [Fe/H] content. These metallicity-based subpopulations are seen to varying extents in each of the five SGBs. Taking advantage of the age sensitivity of the SGB, we showed that, first of all, at least half of the subpopulations have an age spread of at least 2 Gyr. Then, we obtained an age-metallicity relation that is the most complete to date for this cluster. Interpretation of the age-metallicity relation is not straightforward, but it is possible that the cluster (or what we can call its progenitor) was initially composed of two populations with different metallicities. Because of their age, it is very unlikely that the most metal-rich derives from the most metal-poor by some kind of chemical evolution process, so they can be assumed to be two independent primordial objects, or perhaps two separate parts of a single larger object, that merged in the past to form the present-day cluster. Based on FLAMES+GIRAFFE@VLT observations under the program 082.D-0424(A).

  17. The Universal Stellar Mass-Stellar Metallicity Relation for Dwarf Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Cheng, Lucy; Bullock, James S.; Gallazzi, Anna

    2013-01-01

    We present spectroscopic metallicities of individual stars in seven gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs), and we show that dIrrs obey the same massmetallicity relation as the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of both the Milky Way and M31: Z * σ M * 0.30±0. 02 . The uniformity of the relation is in contradiction to previous estimates of metallicity based on photometry. This relationship is roughly continuous with the stellar massstellar metallicity relation for galaxies as massive asM*...

  18. Improved parenchymal liver enhancement with extended delay on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI in patients with parenchymal liver disease: associated clinical and imaging factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esterson, Y.B.; Flusberg, M.; Oh, S.; Mazzariol, F.; Rozenblit, A.M.; Chernyak, V.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To establish the effect of prolonged hepatobiliary phase (HBP) delay time on hepatic enhancement in patients with parenchymal liver disease (PLD). Materials and methods: Gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations with HBP were obtained after 20- (HBP-20) and 30-minute (HBP-30) delays in patients with PLD. For each patient, the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, total and direct bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), prothrombin time (PT), and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) were recorded. Signal intensities of the liver, main portal vein, and spleen on pre-contrast, HBP-20, and HBP-30 were documented. Signal intensities were used to calculate liver relative enhancement (LRE), liver–spleen index (LSI), and liver–portal vein index (LPI) for HBP-20 and HBP-30. Improved hepatic enhancement was considered if two or more indices were higher on HBP-30 than HBP-20. A logistic regression model was constructed with improved hepatic enhancement as the outcome. Results: One hundred and twenty-nine patients underwent 142 MRIs. Mean LRE, LSI, and LPI each increased from HBP-20 to HBP-30 (p = 0.004, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). Seventy-two point five percent of cases demonstrated improved hepatic enhancement. The odds ratios for improved hepatic enhancement were 0.85 for MELD score (p = 0.02) and 3.2 for the 3 T scanner (p = 0.02), adjusted for age and sex. Conclusion: Increasing HBP delay to 30 minutes improves hepatic enhancement in patients with PLD, particularly if using a 3 T scanner. This effect is attenuated with higher MELD scores. -- Highlights: •Increasing hepatobiliary phase delay improves hepatic enhancement in liver disease. •This effect is enhanced if using a 3T scanner. •This effect is attenuated with higher MELD scores

  19. The role of atomic hydrogen in regulating the scatter of the mass-metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Toby; Cortese, Luca; Catinella, Barbara; Kilborn, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we stack neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) spectra for 9720 star-forming galaxies along the mass-metallicity relation. The sample is selected according to stellar mass (109 ≤ M⋆/M⊙ ≤ 1011) and redshift (0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.05) from the overlap of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. We confirm and quantify the strong anticorrelation between H I mass and gas-phase metallicity at fixed stellar mass. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the relationship between gas content and metallicity is consistent between different metallicity estimators, contrary to the weaker trends found with star formation which are known to depend on the observational techniques used to derive oxygen abundances and star formation rates. When interpreted in the context of theoretical work, this result supports a scenario where galaxies exist in an evolving equilibrium between gas, metallicity and star formation. The fact that deviations from this equilibrium are most strongly correlated with gas mass suggests that the scatter in the mass-metallicity relation is primarily driven by fluctuations in gas accretion.

  20. Similar star formation rate and metallicity variability timescales drive the fundamental metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars; McKinnon, Ryan; Marinacci, Federico; Simcoe, Robert A.; Springel, Volker; Pillepich, Annalisa; Naiman, Jill; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Weinberger, Rainer; Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy

    2018-03-01

    The fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) is a postulated correlation between galaxy stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and gas-phase metallicity. At its core, this relation posits that offsets from the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) at a fixed stellar mass are correlated with galactic SFR. In this Letter, we use hydrodynamical simulations to quantify the timescales over which populations of galaxies oscillate about the average SFR and metallicity values at fixed stellar mass. We find that Illustris and IllustrisTNG predict that galaxy offsets from the star formation main sequence and MZR oscillate over similar timescales, are often anti-correlated in their evolution, evolve with the halo dynamical time, and produce a pronounced FMR. Our models indicate that galaxies oscillate about equilibrium SFR and metallicity values - set by the galaxy's stellar mass - and that SFR and metallicity offsets evolve in an anti-correlated fashion. This anti-correlated variability of the metallicity and SFR offsets drives the existence of the FMR in our models. In contrast to Illustris and IllustrisTNG, we speculate that the SFR and metallicity evolution tracks may become decoupled in galaxy formation models dominated by feedback-driven globally-bursty SFR histories, which could weaken the FMR residual correlation strength. This opens the possibility of discriminating between bursty and non-bursty feedback models based on the strength and persistence of the FMR - especially at high redshift.

  1. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRI before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: correlation with tumour response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preibsch, H.; Wanner, L.; Bahrs, S.D.; Wietek, B.M.; Nikolaou, K.; Wiesinger, B. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Siegmann-Luz, K.C. [Diagnostic Center for Breast Cancer and Screening Mammography Brandenburg Ost, Koenigs Wusterhausen (Germany); Oberlecher, E.; Hahn, M. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tuebingen (Germany); Staebler, A. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    To correlate the decrease in background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and tumour response measured with MRI in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). One hundred and forty-six MRI examinations of 73 patients with 80 biopsy-proven breast cancers who underwent breast MRI before and after NAC were retrospectively analysed. All images were reviewed by two blinded readers, who classified BPE into categories (BEC; 1 = minimal, 2 = mild, 3 = moderate, 4 = marked) before and after NAC. Histopathological and morphological tumour responses were analysed and compared. The distribution of BEC 1/2/3/4 was 25/46/18/11 % before and 78/20/2/0 % after NAC. On average, BPE decreased by 0.87 BEC. Cohen's kappa showed substantial agreement (k = 0.73-0.77) before and moderate agreement (k = 0.43-0.60) after NAC and moderate agreement (k = 0.62-0.60) concerning the change in BEC. Correlating the change in BPE with tumour response, the average decrease in BEC was 1.3 in cases of complete remission, 0.83 in cases with partial response, 0.85 in cases with stable disease and 0.40 in cases with progressive disease. Correlation analysis showed a significant correlation between the decrease in BEC and tumour response (r = -0.24, p = 0.03). BPE decreased by, on average, 0.87 BEC following NAC for breast cancer. The degree of BPE reduction seemed to correlate with tumour response. (orig.)

  2. Renal artery and parenchymal changes after renal denervation: assessment by magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Margreet F.; Vink, Eva E.; Blankestijn, Peter J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Doormaal, Pieter Jan van; Habets, Jesse; Vonken, Evert-Jan; Leiner, Tim [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Beeftink, Martine M.A.; Verloop, Willemien L.; Voskuil, Michiel [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bots, Michiel L. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Fadl Elmula, Fadl Elmula M. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Cardiology, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway); Hammer, Frank [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Hoffmann, Pavel [Oslo University Hospital, Section for Interventional Cardiology, Department of Cardiology, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway); Jacobs, Lotte; Staessen, Jan A. [University of Leuven, Studies Coordinating Centre, Research Unit Hypertension and Cardiovascular Epidemiology, KU Leuven Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leuven (Belgium); Mark, Patrick B.; Taylor, Alison H. [University of Glasgow, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Pole of Cardiovascular Research, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique, Brussels (Belgium); Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cardiology Department, Brussels (Belgium); Roditi, Giles [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Spiering, Wilko [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Vascular Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the European Network COordinating research on Renal Denervation (ENCOReD) Consortium

    2017-09-15

    Relatively little is known about the incidence of long-term renal damage after renal denervation (RDN), a potential new treatment for hypertension. In this study the incidence of renal artery and parenchymal changes, assessed with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) after RDN, is investigated. This study is an initiative of ENCOReD, a collaboration of hypertension expert centres. Patients in whom an MRA was performed before and after RDN were included. Scans were evaluated by two independent, blinded radiologists. Primary outcome was the change in renal artery morphology and parenchyma. MRAs from 96 patients were analysed. Before RDN, 41 renal anomalies were observed, of which 29 mostly mild renal artery stenoses. After a median time of 366 days post RDN, MRA showed a new stenosis (25-49% lumen reduction) in two patients and progression of pre-existing lumen reduction in a single patient. No other renal changes were observed and renal function remained stable. We observed new or progressed renal artery stenosis in three out of 96 patients, after a median time of 12 months post RDN (3.1%). Procedural angiographies showed that ablations were applied near the observed stenosis in only one of the three patients. (orig.)

  3. Parotid sialosis: morphometrical analysis of the glandular parenchyme and stroma among diabetic and alcoholic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Carolina; Bohl, Luciana; Carda, Carmen; Gómez de Ferraris, María Elsa; Carranza, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    Among the agents that cause parotid sialosis, diabetes mellitus type 2 and chronic alcoholism are included. In this study, the morphometrical modifications in the diabetic parotid sialosis were determined to compare them with the histopathological characteristics of alcoholic parotid sialosis. Five parotid biopsy samples obtained from patients with diabetic sialosis, 12 samples from patients with alcoholic sialosis and seven from individuals without these pathologies (control group) were analyzed. A morphometrical study of parotid parenchyme and stroma, using a digital image analyzer attached to an optical microscope, was carried out. Dimensions of serous acini and striated ducts, the area occupied by the fatty tissue, and the number of ducts were recorded. Mean values were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test (P

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Parenchymal Brain Development and Growth in the Healthy Fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andescavage, Nickie N; DuPlessis, Adre; McCarter, Robert; Vezina, Gilbert; Robertson, Richard; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to characterize absolute cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) development, as well as its relative development to fetal brain parenchyma in the healthy human fetus. We created three-dimensional high-resolution reconstructions of the developing brain for healthy fetuses between 18 and 40 weeks' gestation, segmented the parenchymal and CSF spaces, and calculated the volumes for the lateral, third, and fourth ventricles; extra-axial CSF space; and the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem. From these data, we constructed normograms of the resulting volumes according to gestational age and described the relative development of CSF to fetal brain parenchyma. Each CSF space demonstrated major increases in volumetric growth during the second half of gestation: third ventricle (23-fold), extra-axial CSF (11-fold), fourth ventricle (8-fold), and lateral ventricle (2-fold). Total CSF volume was related to total brain volume (p development detected on fetal screening using neurosonography. Normative values of absolute CSF volume, as well as relative growth in comparison to intracranial parenchyma, provide valuable insight into normal fetal neurodevelopment. These data may provide important biomarkers of early deviations from normal growth, better distinguish between benign variants and early disease, and serve as reference standards for postnatal growth and development in the premature infant. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Role of Transbronchial Lung Cryobiopsies in Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases: Interest of a Sequential Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Bondue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transbronchial lung cryobiopsies (TBLCs are a promising diagnostic tool in the setting of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs. However, no comparison with surgical lung biopsy (SLB in the same patient is available. Methods. The diagnostic yield and safety data of TBLCs, as well as the result of SLB performed after TBLCs, were analysed in a multicentric Belgian study. A SLB was performed after TBLCs in absence of a definite pathological diagnosis or if a NSIP pattern was observed without related condition identified following multidisciplinary discussion. Results. Between April 2015 and November 2016, 30 patients were included. Frequent complications included pneumothorax (20% and bleeding (severe 7%, moderate 33%, and mild 53%. There was no mortality. The overall diagnostic yield was 80%. A SLB was performed in six patients (three without definite histological pattern and three with an NSIP. The surgical biopsy changed the pathological diagnosis into a UIP pattern in five patients and confirmed a NSIP pattern in one patient. Conclusion. TBLCs are useful in the diagnostic work-up of DPLDs avoiding a SLB in 80% of the patients. However, surgical biopsies, performed as a second step after TBLCs because of an indefinite diagnosis or a NSIP pattern, provide additional information supporting the interest of a sequential approach in these patients.

  6. The impact of bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy on breast MRI background parenchymal enhancement and fibroglandular tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, E.R. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Division of Women' s Imaging, San Francisco, California (United States); Brooks, J.D. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Watson, E.J.; Brennan, S.B.; Morris, E.A. [Department of Radiology, Breast Imaging Section, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Comen, E.A. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-01-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) on background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) seen on breast MRI. Retrospective review identified 21 BRCA mutation carriers who underwent breast MRI before and after elective BSO. After exclusion of patients placed on postoperative hormone replacement therapy, there were 18 eligible patients. Blinded to surgical status, three independent readers used categorical scales to rate BPE (minimal, mild, moderate, marked) and the amount of FGT (fatty, scattered, heterogeneously dense, dense) on pre- and post-BSO MRI examinations. The sign test was used to assess for changes in the categorical ratings of BPE and FGT. Significant proportions of women demonstrated decreases in BPE and in the amount of FGT following oophorectomy (P = 0.004 and 0.02, respectively.) BPE decreases were larger and seen earlier than FGT changes. There was no significant relationship between age/body mass index and changes in BPE and FGT. BPE and the amount of FGT seen on breast MRI are significantly decreased by oophorectomy; BPE decreases to a greater extent and earlier than FGT. (orig.)

  7. Impact of menopausal status on background parenchymal enhancement and fibroglandular tissue on breast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Valencia; Gu, Yajia; Kaplan, Jennifer B.; Morris, Elizabeth A.; Brooks, Jennifer D.; Pike, Malcolm C.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of menopausal status on the background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) on breast MRI. Retrospective review identified 1,130 women who underwent screening breast MRI between July and November 2010. In 28 of these women, breast MRI was performed both at one time point while pre- and one time point while post-menopausal (median interval 49 months). Two independent readers blinded to menopausal status used categorical scales to rate BPE (minimal/mild/moderate/marked) and FGT (fatty/scattered/heterogeneously dense/dense). Consensus was reached when there was disagreement. The sign test was used to assess changes in rating categories, and the Spearman rank and Fisher's exact tests were used to measure correlations and associations between variables. Significant proportions of women demonstrated decreases in BPE and FGT on post-menopausal breast MRI (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0009). BPE category was unchanged in 39 % (11/28) and decreased in 61 % (17/28) of women. FGT category was unchanged in 61 % (17/28) and decreased in 39 % (11/28) of women. Age, reason for menopause, or interval between MRIs had no significant impact on changes in BPE and FGT. On MRI, BPE, and FGT decrease after menopause in significant proportions of women; BPE decreases more than FGT. (orig.)

  8. Change of Renal Parenchymal Width in Patients with Unilateral Ureteral Stent: A Bicenter Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Youn Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether kidney sizes were changed after ureteral stents were instilled, and if so, what parameters were significant. Methods. Parenchymal width (PW of 98 patients with unilateral ureteral stents was measured from the coronal view of CT scans for both stented and unstented contralateral kidney. The mean PW and % change of mean PW were calculated before stenting and at the time of last stent change. Estimated glomerular filtrate rate (eGFR was recorded as well. Results. The mean duration of ureteral stent indwelled was 15.6±10.2 (mean ± SD months. The change of mean PW of stented kidneys and unstented contralateral kidneys was −16.9±16.4 (mean ± SD% and 3.6±10.7%, respectively. eGFR before and at the time of the last stent change did not show significant difference (p=0.294. Duration of ureteral stent indwelled was found to be inversely related to the % change of mean PW (Spearman’s correlation coefficient = −0.291, p<0.001. Conclusions. For unilateral ureteral obstruction, kidney size was decreased over time in spite of indwelling ureteral stent. This finding can be overlooked by clinicians due to compensatory growth of contralateral kidney and resultant normal eGFR.

  9. Impact of menopausal status on background parenchymal enhancement and fibroglandular tissue on breast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Valencia [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Breast Imaging Section, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Gu, Yajia [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Fudan University, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai (China); Kaplan, Jennifer B.; Morris, Elizabeth A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Breast Imaging Section, New York, NY (United States); Brooks, Jennifer D.; Pike, Malcolm C. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the effect of menopausal status on the background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) on breast MRI. Retrospective review identified 1,130 women who underwent screening breast MRI between July and November 2010. In 28 of these women, breast MRI was performed both at one time point while pre- and one time point while post-menopausal (median interval 49 months). Two independent readers blinded to menopausal status used categorical scales to rate BPE (minimal/mild/moderate/marked) and FGT (fatty/scattered/heterogeneously dense/dense). Consensus was reached when there was disagreement. The sign test was used to assess changes in rating categories, and the Spearman rank and Fisher's exact tests were used to measure correlations and associations between variables. Significant proportions of women demonstrated decreases in BPE and FGT on post-menopausal breast MRI (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0009). BPE category was unchanged in 39 % (11/28) and decreased in 61 % (17/28) of women. FGT category was unchanged in 61 % (17/28) and decreased in 39 % (11/28) of women. Age, reason for menopause, or interval between MRIs had no significant impact on changes in BPE and FGT. On MRI, BPE, and FGT decrease after menopause in significant proportions of women; BPE decreases more than FGT. (orig.)

  10. The Assessment of Background Parenchymal Enhancement (BPE in a High-Risk Population: What Causes BPE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao You

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate promoting factors for background parenchymal enhancement (BPE in MR mammography (MRM. METHODS: 146 patients were retrospectively evaluated, including 91 high-risk patients (50 BRCA patients, 41 patients with elevated lifetime risk. 56 screening patients were matched to the high-risk cases on the basis of age. The correlation of BPE with factors such as fibroglandular tissue (FGT, age, menopausal status, breast cancer, high-risk precondition as well as motion were investigated using linear regression. RESULTS: BPE positively correlated with FGT (P  .05. A high-risk precondition showed a significant impact on the formation of BPE (P < .05. However, when corrected for motion, the correlation between BPE and a high-risk precondition became weak and insignificant, and a highly significant association between BPE and motion was revealed (P < .01. CONCLUSION: BPE positively correlated with FGT and negatively correlated with age. Cancer did not have an effect on BPE. A high-risk precondition appears to have a negative effect on BPE. However, when corrected for motion, high-risk preconditions became insignificant. Technical as well as physiological influences seem to play an important role in the formation of BPE.

  11. Inter-observer agreement according to three methods of evaluating mammographic density and parenchymal pattern in a case control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Rikke Rass; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina; Nielsen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    , Tabár's PIV and PV and the upper two quartiles (within density range) of PMD. The relative risk of breast cancer was estimated using logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for age, which were compared between the two readers. RESULTS: Substantial inter-observer agreement was seen......, respectively. Inter-reader variability showed different impact on the relative risk of breast cancer estimated by the two readers on a multiple-category scale, however, not on a high/low-risk scale. Tabár's pattern IV demonstrated the highest ORs of all density patterns investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Our study......BACKGROUND: Mammographic breast density and parenchymal patterns are well-established risk factors for breast cancer. We aimed to report inter-observer agreement on three different subjective ways of assessing mammographic density and parenchymal pattern, and secondarily to examine what potential...

  12. Cerebral Parenchymal Photopenia on FDG-PET/CT Reflecting Vasogenic Edema Due to Leptomeningeal Metastasis in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Mitsutomi; Matesan, Manuela Christina

    2017-04-01

    A 61-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer presented with migrainelike episodes over the past 10 months. FDG-PET/CT(PET/CT) showed relatively symmetric areas of photopenia predominantly in the bilateral superior parietal lobules. Subsequent contrast-enhanced MRI revealed leptomeningeal metastasis in the bilateral posterior parietal regions with associated vasogenic edema in the adjacent brain parenchyma. There was no clear evidence of parenchymal metastasis on MRI. After chemotherapy, the areas of abnormality resolved on PET/CT 8 months later, and the patient showed interval symptomatic improvement. The present case demonstrates brain parenchymal photopenia on PET/CT as an indirect sign of leptomeningeal metastasis reflecting regional vasogenic edema.

  13. Use of a polytetrafluoroethylene (GORE-TEX) bolster to close the renal parenchymal defect during open partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redshaw, Jeffrey D; West, Jeremy M; Stephenson, Robert A; Lowrance, William T; Hamilton, Blake D; Southwick, Andrew W; Dechet, Christopher B

    2014-09-01

    Numerous surgical techniques have been described to facilitate closure of the renal parenchymal defect. We sought to describe the operative technique and define the safety and efficacy of using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (GORE-TEX; WL Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) bolster to aid in closure of the renal parenchymal defect at the time of open partial nephrectomy (OPN). A retrospective review of 175 patients who underwent an OPN using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) bolster at the Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah and Salt Lake City Veterans Affairs Medical Center from March 2005 to February 2013 was conducted. Postoperative complications occurring within 90 days were graded using the Clavien grading system. Overall, 57 patients (32.6%) experienced a postoperative complication. Fifteen patients (8.5%) had a Clavien ≥ grade-III complication. Ten patients (5.7%) received blood transfusions. Urine leak requiring intervention occurred in 2 patients (1.1%). Delayed hemorrhage requiring nephrectomy and pseudoaneurysm formation were rare, occurring in 1 patient each (0.6%). Infection of the ePTFE material occurred in 2 patients (1.1%). In both cases, it was explanted without requiring nephrectomy. The use of an ePTFE bolster is an effective and safe method of closing the renal parenchymal defect after OPN with an acceptable 90-day postoperative complication rate and a low risk of infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of the relationship between lung parenchymal destruction and impaired pulmonary perfusion on a lobar level in patients with emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Eberhardt, Ralf; Weinheimer, Oliver; Fink, Christian; Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika; Herth, Felix; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between lung parenchymal destruction and impaired pulmonary perfusion on a lobar level using CT and MRI in patients with emphysema. Material and methods: Forty-five patients with severe emphysema (GOLD III and IV) underwent inspiratory 3D-HRCT and contrast-enhanced MR-perfusion (1.5T; 3.5 mm x 1.9 mm x 4 mm). 3D-HRCT data was analyzed using a software for detection and visualization of emphysema. Emphysema was categorized in four clusters with different volumes and presented as overlay on the CT. CT and lung perfusion were visually analyzed for three lobes on each side using a four-point-score to grade the abnormalities on CT (1: predominantly small emphysema-clusters to 4: >75% large emphysema-clusters) and MRI (1: normal perfusion to 4: no perfusion). Results: A total of 270 lobes were evaluated. At CT, the score was 1 for 9 lobes, 2 for 43, 3 for 77, and 4 for 141 lobes. At MRI, the score was 1 for 13 lobes, 2 for 45, 3 for 92, and 4 for 120 lobes. Matching of lung parenchymal destruction and reduced perfusion was found in 213 lobes (weighted kappa = 0.8). The score was higher on CT in 44, and higher on MRI in 13 lobes. Conclusion: 3D-HRCT and 3D MR-perfusion show a high lobar agreement between parenchymal destruction and reduction of perfusion in patients with severe emphysema

  15. Changes of renal sinus fat and renal parenchymal fat during an 18-month randomized weight loss trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelicha, Hila; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Shelef, Ilan; Gepner, Yftach; Tsaban, Gal; Tene, Lilac; Yaskolka Meir, Anat; Bilitzky, Avital; Komy, Oded; Cohen, Noa; Bril, Nitzan; Rein, Michal; Serfaty, Dana; Kenigsbuch, Shira; Chassidim, Yoash; Sarusi, Benjamin; Thiery, Joachim; Ceglarek, Uta; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Haviv, Yosef S; Stampfer, Meir J; Rudich, Assaf; Shai, Iris

    2017-05-02

    Data regarding the role of kidney adiposity, its clinical implications, and its dynamics during weight-loss are sparse. We investigated the effect of long-term weight-loss induced intervention diets on dynamics of renal-sinus-fat, an ectopic fat depot, and %renal-parenchymal-fat, lipid accumulation within the renal parenchyma. We randomized 278 participants with abdominal obesity/dyslipidemia to low-fat or Mediterranean/low-carbohydrate diets, with or without exercise. We quantified renal-sinus-fat and %renal-parenchymal-fat by whole body magnetic-resonance-imaging. Participants (age = 48 years; 89% men; body-mass-index = 31 kg/m 2 ) had 86% retention to the trial after 18 months. Both increased renal-sinus-fat and %renal-parenchymal-fat were directly associated with hypertension, and with higher abdominal deep-subcutaneous-adipose-tissue and visceral-adipose-tissue (p of trend weight. Higher renal-sinus-fat was associated with lower estimated-glomerular-filtration-rate and with higher microalbuminuria and %HbA1C beyond body weight. After 18 months of intervention, overall renal-sinus-fat (-9%; p fat (-1.7%; p = 0.13 vs. baseline) significantly decreased, and similarly across the intervention groups. Renal-sinus-fat and %renal-parenchymal-fat changes were correlated with weight-loss per-se (p fat associated with decreased pancreatic, hepatic and cardiac fats (p fat, after adjustment for 18 months weight-loss (β = 0.15; p = 0.026) and hypertension (β = 0.14; p = 0.04). Renal-sinus-fat and renal-parenchymal-fat are fairly related to weight-loss. Decreased renal-sinus-fat is associated with improved hepatic parameters, independent of changes in weight or hepatic fat, rather than with improved renal function or blood pressure parameters. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT01530724. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  16. Lack of association between parenchymal neurocysticercosis and HLA Class I and Class II antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Picchioni Bompeixe

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis, caused by encysted larvae of the tapeworm Taenia solium, is the most common infection of the central nervous system and a major public health problem in many countries. Prevalence in the region of Curitiba, located in the southern Brazilian State of Paraná, is one of the highest in the world. The genetics of host susceptibility to neurocysticercosis (NCC is still obscure. To investigate if major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes influence individual susceptibility to NCC, we performed a case-control association analysis. Fifty-two Caucasoid patients and 149 matched controls were typed for antigens of the HLA-A, B, C, DR and DQ loci. All patients had computerized tomography and clinical features compatible with parenchymal NCC. Indirect immunofluorescence of cerebrospinal fluid showed that 19 (37% of the patients presented anti-cysticercus antibodies at titers ³ 1:10. Frequencies of HLA specificities in the whole group of patients and in the subgroup with antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid were compared to those of the control group. No significant difference was found. These results do not support the hypothesis of HLA gene participation in susceptibility to parenchymal neurocysticercosis.A neurocisticercose, causada pelo cisticerco, a larva do cestóide Taenia solium, é a infecção mais comum do sistema nervoso central e constitui importante problema de saúde pública em muitos países. A sua prevalência na região de Curitiba, localizada no Estado do Paraná, foi estimada em 9%, situando-se entre as mais elevadas do mundo. Os aspectos genéticos de suscetibilidade à neurocisticercose (NCC ainda são pouco conhecidos. Com o objetivo de investigar se genes do MHC influenciam a suscetibilidade individual à NCC, realizamos uma análise de associação caso-controle. Cinqüenta e dois pacientes caucasóides e 149 indivíduos-controle pareados foram tipados para antígenos dos locos HLA-A, B, C, DR e DQ. Todos os

  17. Impact of fibroglandular tissue and background parenchymal enhancement on diffusion weighted imaging of breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacconi, Chiara; Thakur, Sunitha B.; Dershaw, David D.; Brooks, Jennifer; Fry, Charles W.; Morris, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Aim of the paper is to evaluate if the amount of fibroglandular breast tissue (FGT) and the background enhancement(BPE) influence the detection of lesions and their quantitative analysis in diffusion weighted imaging(DWI) • The structure of the breast, including both FGT and BPE, as well as the menopausal status of the patient are not a relevant factor for lesion identification in DWI. • Quantitative analysis of normal breast is not uniform and is influenced by the amount of fibroglandular tissue,while there is no influence of background parenchymal enhancement. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the influence of the amount of fibroglandular breast tissue (FGT) and background-parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on lesion detection, quantitative analysis of normal breast tissue and of breast lesions on DWI. Materials and methods: IRB approved this retrospective study on focal findings at contrast-enhanced (CE) breast MR and DWI performed during July–December 2011. Patients with cysts, previous irradiation, silicone implants and current chemotherapy were excluded. DWI with fat suppression was acquired before dynamic acquisition (b factors: 0.1000 s/mm 2 ) using 1.5 and 3 T scanners. Using correlation with dynamic and T2 images, ROIs were drawn free-hand within the borders of any visible lesion and in contralateral normal breast. Fisher's exact test to evaluate visibility and Wilcoxon-rank-sum test for comparison of ADC values were used. The amount of FGT and BPE was visually assessed by concurrent MRI. Analysis was stratified by menopausal status. Results: 25/127 (20%) lesions were excluded for technical reasons. 65/102 (64%) lesions were visible on DWI (median diameter: 1.85 cm). Mass lesions (M) were more visible (43/60 = 72%) than non-mass enhancement (NME) (22/42 = 52%) and malignant lesions were more visible (55/72 = 76%) than benign (10/30 = 33%). BPE and FGT did not influence visibility of M (p = 0.35 and p = 0.57 respectively) as well as of

  18. Predicting fibrosis worsening in obese patients with NASH through parenchymal fibronectin, HOMA-IR, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Paolo; Terracciano, Luigi; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Ferbo, Umberto; Bracigliano, Alessandra; Vecchione, Raffaela

    2010-02-01

    Few published studies have examined the results obtained from repeat liver biopsies in obese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The progressive form of this disease may be largely limited to a subgroup of NAFLD patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The presence of intralobular fibronectin (Fn) and other variables was investigated in relation to subsequent fibrosis progression. In this prospective study, 271 obese patients admitted to the hospital with NAFLD and abnormal liver enzymes were scheduled to undergo a repeat liver biopsy at least 5 years after the initial biopsy. After excluding cirrhotic patients, basal biopsy specimens obtained from patients who underwent a second liver biopsy were stained with antibodies against Fn. The progression of fibrosis in the follow-up sample was correlated with the amount of Fn and other clinicopathological variables. We obtained a second liver biopsy from 149 patients after a median time of 6.4 years. Of these, 132 showed suitable Fn staining for semi-quantitative assessments. In all, 44 out of 83 patients (53%) with basal NASH showed fibrosis progression by at least one stage in the second liver biopsy. The amount of Fn (odds ratio=14.1; PHOMA-IR) scores (>8, odds ratio=1.9; P=0.004) were independent predictive factors of worsening fibrosis. A semi-quantitative assessment of the amount of parenchymal Fn present at an early stage in obese patients with NASH is valuable for predicting the progression of fibrosis. Similarly, lobular Fn deposition may be a sensitive and early indicator of active fibrogenetic processes in the liver. Hypertension and higher HOMA-IR scores are other clinical independent risk factors that predict the progression of fibrosis.

  19. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 106 KC, 2.7 × 105 LEC and 4.7 × 105 HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4–5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  20. Effect of needle gauge and lobe laterality on parenchymal liver biopsy outcome: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Gopal R; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Rangan, Vikram; Karam, Adib; Zheng, Larry; Roychowdhury, Abhijit; Hussain, Sarwat

    2015-06-01

    To analyze the effect of lobe selection, needle gauge, and number of passes on procedure outcomes in terms of specimen length and post-procedure complications. In this HIPAA-compliant, IRB-approved retrospective study, the data from 771 ultrasound-guided adult parenchymal liver biopsies were analyzed. Post-procedure complications were assigned a 3-point rating scale. Associations between specimen length and post-procedure complications with lobe laterality, needle gauge, and number of passes were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the likelihood for achieving a specimen length of at least 2 cm. Post-procedure complications were not associated with lobe laterality, needle gauge, and number of passes (p > 0.3). Specimen length was associated with the number of passes dichotomized at the study mean (p = 0.007), but not with lobe laterality or needle gauge (p > 0.2). After adjusting for lobe laterality and needle gauge, procedures with 1 or 2 passes were associated with a higher likelihood of obtaining a 2 cm or longer specimen (OR 2.469; CI 1.08-5.63, p = 0.0315) than procedures with 3 or more passes, possibly due to poorer sample quality. After adjusting for lobe laterality, an 18-gauge needle was associated with higher odds of a biopsy procedure with 1 or 2 passes (OR 3.665; CI 1.93-6.95, p gauge needle. Lobe laterality was not associated with specimen length or post-procedure complications. An 18-gauge needle compared to a 20-gauge needle could reduce the need for a procedure with more than 2 passes. There was no difference in post-procedure complications between the two needle sizes.

  1. The relationships between clinical variables and renal parenchymal disease in pediatric clinically suspected urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Lim Byun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the significance of clinical signs and laboratory findings as predictors of renal parenchymal lesions and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in childhood urinary tract infection (UTI. Methods : From July 2005 to July 2008, 180 patients admitted with a first febrile UTI at the Pediatric Department of Konkuk University Hospital were included in this study. The following were the clinical variables: leukocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP, positive urine nitrite, positive urine culture, and fever duration both before and after treatment. We evaluated the relationships between clinical variables and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA scan and voiding cystourethrography (VCUG results. Results : VCUG was performed in 148 patients; of them, 37 (25.0% had VUR: 18 (12.2% had low-grade (I-II VUR, and 19 (10.5% had high-grade (III-V VUR. Of the 95 patients who underwent DMSA scanning, 29 (30.5% had cortical defects, of which 21 (63.6% had VUR: 10 (30.3%, low-grade (I-II VUR; and 11 (33.3%, high-grade VUR. Of the 57 patients who were normal on DMSA scan, 8 (14.0% had low-grade VUR and 6 (10.5% had high-grade VUR. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the DMSA scan in predicting high-grade VUR were 64.7%, 69.9%, 33.3%, and 89.5%, respectively. Leukocytosis, elevated CRP, and prolonged fever (?#243;6 hours after treatment were significantly correlated with the cortical defects on DMSA scans and high-grade VUR. Conclusion : Clinical signs, including prolonged fever after treatment, elevated CRP, and leukocytosis, are positive predictors of acute pyelonephritis and high-grade VUR.

  2. Surface density: a new parameter in the fundamental metallicity relation of star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Goto, Tomotsugu; Momose, Rieko

    2018-04-01

    Star-forming galaxies display a close relation among stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rate (or molecular-gas mass). This is known as the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) (or molecular-gas FMR), and it has a profound implication on models of galaxy evolution. However, there still remains a significant residual scatter around the FMR. We show here that a fourth parameter, the surface density of stellar mass, reduces the dispersion around the molecular-gas FMR. In a principal component analysis of 29 physical parameters of 41 338 star-forming galaxies, the surface density of stellar mass is found to be the fourth most important parameter. The new 4D fundamental relation forms a tighter hypersurface that reduces the metallicity dispersion to 50 per cent of that of the molecular-gas FMR. We suggest that future analyses and models of galaxy evolution should consider the FMR in a 4D space that includes surface density. The dilution time-scale of gas inflow and the star-formation efficiency could explain the observational dependence on surface density of stellar mass.

  3. The Evolution of the Mass-Metallicity Relation at 0.20 < z < 0.35

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwon Chung

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a spectroscopic study of 343 blue compact galaxies (BCGs at 0.20 < z < 0.35 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR7 data. We derive gas phase oxygen abundance using the empirical and direct method. Stellar masses of galaxies are derived from the STARLIGHT code. We also derive star formation rates of galaxies based on Hα emission line from the SDSS as well as far-ultraviolet (FUV flux from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer GR6 data. Evolution of the luminosity-metallicity and mass-metallicity (M-Z relations with redshift is observed. At a given luminosity and mass, galaxies at higher redshifts appear to be biased to low metallicities relative to the lower redshift counterparts. Furthermore, low mass galaxies show higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs than more massive ones and galaxies at higher redshifts are biased to higher SSFRs compared to the lower redshift sample. By visual inspection of the SDSS images, we classify galaxy morphology into disturbed or undisturbed. In the M-Z relation, we find a hint that morphologically disturbed BCGs appear to exhibit low metallicities and high SSFRs compared to undisturbed counterparts. We suggest that our results support downsizing galaxy formation scenario and star formation histories of BCGs are closely related with their morphologies.

  4. Drosophila melanogaster Models of Metal-Related Human Diseases and Metal Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calap-Quintana, Pablo; González-Fernández, Javier; Sebastiá-Ortega, Noelia; Llorens, José Vicente; Moltó, María Dolores

    2017-07-06

    Iron, copper and zinc are transition metals essential for life because they are required in a multitude of biological processes. Organisms have evolved to acquire metals from nutrition and to maintain adequate levels of each metal to avoid damaging effects associated with its deficiency, excess or misplacement. Interestingly, the main components of metal homeostatic pathways are conserved, with many orthologues of the human metal-related genes having been identified and characterized in Drosophila melanogaster . Drosophila has gained appreciation as a useful model for studying human diseases, including those caused by mutations in pathways controlling cellular metal homeostasis. Flies have many advantages in the laboratory, such as a short life cycle, easy handling and inexpensive maintenance. Furthermore, they can be raised in a large number. In addition, flies are greatly appreciated because they offer a considerable number of genetic tools to address some of the unresolved questions concerning disease pathology, which in turn could contribute to our understanding of the metal metabolism and homeostasis. This review recapitulates the metabolism of the principal transition metals, namely iron, zinc and copper, in Drosophila and the utility of this organism as an experimental model to explore the role of metal dyshomeostasis in different human diseases. Finally, a summary of the contribution of Drosophila as a model for testing metal toxicity is provided.

  5. Background parenchymal enhancement on breast MRI and mammographic breast density: correlation with tumour characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.Y.; Choi, N.; Yang, J.-H.; Yoo, Y.B.; Park, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the relationship between mammographic breast density (MGD) and background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) at breast MRI and histopathological features of invasive breast cancers. Materials and methods: A total of 178 women with unilateral invasive breast cancer who preoperatively underwent mammography and breast MRI were included in the study. Two radiologists rated MGD and BPE according to BI-RADS criteria in consensus. The relationship between MGD and BPE was investigated, and compared with histopathological features of invasive breast cancers according to the level of MGD and BPE. Results: At MRI, there is no significant difference in the distribution of MGD and BPE of the contralateral breast in women with invasive breast cancer according to menopausal status (p=0.226, 0.384). Women with high MGD (>50% glandular) were more likely to have oestrogen-receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer (p=0.045) and progesterone receptor (PR)-positive breast cancer (p=0.020). With regard to BPE, PR positivity correlated with moderate or marked BPE with borderline significance (p=0.054). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that women with high MGD were less likely to have triple-negative (i.e., a cancer that is ER negative, PR negative, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 [HER2] negative) breast cancer compared with ER (+)/HER2 (−) cancer (OR=0.231, 95% CI: 0.070, 0.760; p=0.016). No association between the histological tumour characteristics and BPE was observed. Conclusion: In women with invasive breast cancer, high MGD is associated with ER positivity of the invasive breast cancer. However, at MRI, BPE of the contralateral breast seems to be independent of tumour characteristics. -- Highlights: •There is no difference in distribution of MGD and BPE of contralateral breast on MRI. •High MGD is associated with ER positivity of the invasive breast cancer. •BPE of the contralateral breast on MRI is independent of tumor

  6. Sonographic assessment of normal renal parenchymal and medullary pyramid thicknesses among children in Enugu, Southeast, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eze, C.U.; Akpan, V.P.; Nwadike, I.U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal parenchymal thickness (RPT) and renal medullary pyramid thickness (MPT) are important renal size parameters. This study was aimed at establishing normograms for RPT and MPT with respect to age and somatometric parameters among children. Methods: This was a cross sectional study done in Enugu, Nigeria between May 2013 and April 2014. The subjects were 512 children aged 1–17 years scanned with ultrasound equipment with 3.5 MHz and 5 MHz curvilinear transducers. The RPT was measured perpendicularly to the long axis of the kidney from the medullary papilla to the renal capsule and MPT was measured from the apex to the base of the medullary pyramid on the same plane. The age and somatometric parameters of the subjects were recorded. Results: The mean ± SD of RPT and MPT for the right kidney were 12.62 ± 1.67 mm and 7.10 ± 0.92 mm and the left kidney were 12.81 ± 1.7 and 7.23 ± 0.94 mm respectively. There was a significant difference between the right and left RPT and MPT (p < 0.05). The right and left RPT correlated strongly with age, body surface area (BSA), height, and weight but moderately with body mass index (BMI). A moderate positive correlation was observed between MPT and age, BSA, height, and weight. However, a weak correlation was observed between MPT and BMI. Conclusion: Normograms of RPT and MPT in relation to age could be useful for grading hydronephrosis in children. - Highlights: • Sonography of RPT and MPT at the anterior longitudinal axis of the kidney is simple. • RPT and MPT Measurements are reliable within and between experienced sonographers. • No significant gender differences in RPT and MPT values exist in this study. • Significant differences exist between the right and left RPT and MPT measurements. • Normative values of RPT and MPT in relation to age in children are useful.

  7. Whole brain C-arm computed tomography parenchymal blood volume measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Byrne, James V

    2016-04-01

    C-arm flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) parenchymal blood volume (PBV) imaging in the neuro-interventional suite is a new technique for which detailed whole brain measurements have not been previously reported. This study aims to create a catalogue of PBV measurements for various anatomical regions encompassing the whole brain, using a three-dimensional volume-of-interest (3D-VOI) analysis. We acquired and analysed 30 C-arm FDCT datasets from 26 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), as part of a prospective study comparing C-arm computed tomography (CT) PBV with magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging (MR-PWI). We calculated the PBV values for various brain regions with an automated analysis, using 58 pre-defined atlas-based 3D-VOIs encompassing the whole brain. VOIs partially or completely overlapping regions of magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging (MR-DWI) abnormality or magnetic resonance cerebral blood flow (MR-CBF) asymmetry were excluded from the analysis. Of the 30 C-arm CT PBV datasets, 14 (54%; 12 patients) had areas of restricted diffusion, the majority of which were focal. The PBV values for the cerebral cortex and cerebral white matter were 4.01 ± 0.47 (mean ± SD) and 3.01 ± 0.39 ml per 100 ml. Lobar PBV values were: frontal lobe 4.2 ± 0.8, temporal lobe 4.2 ± 0.9, parietal lobe 3.9 ± 0.7 and occipital lobe 4.3 ± 0.8 ml/100 ml. The basal ganglia and brainstem PBV values were 3.4 ± 0.7 and 4.6 ± 0.6 ml/100 ml, respectively. Compared with the typical reference cerebral blood volume (CBV) values reported in the literature for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), the PBV values were relatively high for the white matter and relatively low for the cortical grey matter. The reported catalogue of PBV values for various brain regions would be useful to inform future studies and could be used in clinical practice, when interpreting PBV maps. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Mammographic parenchymal patterns as an imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure: a preliminary study in a high-risk population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daye, Dania; Keller, Brad; Conant, Emily F; Chen, Jinbo; Schnall, Mitchell D; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kontos, Despina

    2013-05-01

    Parenchymal texture patterns have been previously associated with breast cancer risk, yet their underlying biological determinants remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture as a phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure. A retrospective cohort study was performed. Digital mammography (DM) images in the craniocaudal (CC) view from 297 women, 154 without breast cancer and 143 with unilateral breast cancer, were analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate of cumulative endogenous hormonal exposure. Parenchymal texture features were extracted and mammographic percent density (MD%) was computed using validated computerized methods. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association between texture features and menopause status, after adjusting for MD% and hormonally related confounders. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) of each model was estimated to evaluate the degree of association between the extracted mammographic features and menopause status. Coarseness, gray-level correlation, and fractal dimension texture features have a significant independent association with menopause status in the cancer-affected population; skewness and fractal dimension exhibit a similar association in the cancer-free population (P menopause status (P hormone replacement therapy, parity, and age at first birth. Mammographic texture patterns may reflect the effect of endogenous hormonal exposure on the breast tissue and may capture such effects beyond mammographic density. Differences in texture features between pre- and postmenopausal women are more pronounced in the cancer-affected population, which may be attributed to an increased association to breast cancer risk. Texture features could ultimately be incorporated in breast cancer risk assessment models as markers of hormonal exposure. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by

  9. Pallial oviduct of Pomacea canaliculata (Gastropoda): ultrastructural studies of the parenchymal cellular types involved in the metabolism of perivitellins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, M; Dreon, M S; Heras, H; Pollero, R J; Fernández, S N; Winik, B

    2006-06-01

    Seasonal variations in the morphology of the parenchymal mass and function of the albumen gland/capsule gland complex have been studied in Pomacea canaliculata, together with the cellular types involved in the synthesis and secretion of perivitellin fluid components. The two major parenchymal cell types, albumen secretory cells (AS) and labyrinthic cells (LC), undergo seasonal variations throughout the annual reproductive cycle, which is divided into three periods. Both cellular types show maximal development and structural complexity during the reproductive period (spring and summer). AS cells have a well-developed Golgi complex and rough endoplasmic reticulum and their secretory granules show electron-dense particles of about 20 nm (probably galactogen). These cells are uniquely involved in ovorubin and PV2 perivitellin synthesis and their secretory granules are the single storage site for these two major perivitellins, as revealed by immunoelectron microscopy. AS also possess calcium deposits that infiltrate the cytoplasmic matrix. The luminal surfaces of LC exhibit long cilia intermingled with sparce short microvilli. Basally, the plasma membrane shows deep irregular folds that extend through the cytoplasm up to the subapical region. Calcium deposits infiltrate the cytoplasm and accumulate in the extracellular space of the basal labyrinth. Nerve terminals seem to be involved in the regulation of parenchymal cell secretion. At the post-reproductive period, AS markedly change their aspect following the release of most of the secretory granules into the acinar lumen. LC decrease in volume, the number of their cilia decreases, their cytoplasmic folds are much thinner and their extracellular spaces lack calcium particles. At the pre-reproductive period (winter), AS and LC recover and prepare for the subsequent period.

  10. FURTHER DEFINITION OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS AROUND BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockcroft, Robert; Harris, William E.; Wehner, Elizabeth M. H.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Rothberg, Barry

    2009-01-01

    We combine the globular cluster (GC) data for 15 brightest cluster galaxies and use this material to trace the mass-metallicity relations (MMRs) in their globular cluster systems (GCSs). This work extends previous studies which correlate the properties of the MMR with those of the host galaxy. Our combined data sets show a mean trend for the metal-poor subpopulation that corresponds to a scaling of heavy-element abundance with cluster mass Z ∼ M 0.30±0.05 . No trend is seen for the metal-rich subpopulation which has a scaling relation that is consistent with zero. We also find that the scaling exponent is independent of the GCS specific frequency and host galaxy luminosity, except perhaps for dwarf galaxies. We present new photometry in (g',i') obtained with Gemini/GMOS for the GC populations around the southern giant ellipticals NGC 5193 and IC 4329. Both galaxies have rich cluster populations which show up as normal, bimodal sequences in the color-magnitude diagram. We test the observed MMRs and argue that they are statistically real, and not an artifact caused by the method we used. We also argue against asymmetric contamination causing the observed MMR as our mean results are no different from other contamination-free studies. Finally, we compare our method to the standard bimodal fitting method (KMM or RMIX) and find our results are consistent. Interpretation of these results is consistent with recent models for GC formation in which the MMR is determined by GC self-enrichment during their brief formation period.

  11. Enhanced iron removal from liver parenchymal cells in experimental iron overload: liposome encapsulation of HBED and phenobarbital administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Y.E.; Cerny, E.A.; Lau, E.H.; Carnes, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of N,N'-bis[2-hydroxybenzyl]-ethylene-diamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED) in removing radioiron introduced into the parenchymal cells of mouse liver as 59 Fe-ferritin has been investigated. The effectiveness of HBED, an iron chelator of low water solubility, has also been compared with that of desferrioxamine (DF), an iron chelator of high water solubility and currently in clinical use for treatment of transfusional iron overload. Using the 59 Fe excretion as the measure of effectiveness of chelation therapy and a standardized single chelator dose of 25 mg/kg, they have found that: (1) a saline suspension of HBED, prepared by sonication and given intraperitoneally to mice, promotes a small but significant increase in excretion of radioiron compared to the untreated controls, whereas DF, in its free form, is ineffective; (2) HBED encapsulated in lipid bilayers of liposomes and given intravenously is superior to nonencapsulated HBED; (3) DF encapsulated in small unilamellar liposomes is ineffective in removing iron given in the form of ferritin; (4) administration of phenobarbital in drinking water, at a concentration of 1 g/liter, induces a 30%-55% increase of iron excretion from untreated control mice and also from mice given HBED either in liposome-encapsulated or nonencapsulated form. HBED is superior to DF for removal of storage iron from liver parenchymal cells and liposomes are useful carriers for iron chelators of low water solubility

  12. Parenchymal lymphoma of the brain on initial MR imaging: A comparative study between primary and secondary brain lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senocak, Efsun, E-mail: eurger@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Sihhiye-Ankara (Turkey); Oguz, Kader Karli; Ozgen, Burce [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Sihhiye-Ankara (Turkey); Mut, Melike; Ayhan, Selim; Berker, Mustafa [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery (Turkey); Ozdemir, Pinar [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics (Turkey); Cila, Aysenur [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Sihhiye-Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-08-15

    Background and purpose: Parenchymal lymphomatous brain masses have not been investigated considering if they are primary or as a part of systemic lymphoma (secondary) on imaging studies previously. We aimed to determine characteristics of the secondary parenchymal lymphomatous involvement of the brain and to find if there is any radiologic feature to help discrimination of untreated primary and secondary central nervous system lymphoma on patients' initial magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: We evaluated MR images of 18 patients with the diagnosis of primary (n = 12) and secondary central nervous system lymphoma (n = 6). We considered the number, localization, enhancement pattern, signal characteristics, diffusion properties, presence of hemorrhage and presence of butterfly pattern on MR imaging at initial presentation. Results: Secondary central nervous system lymphomas predominantly presented as multiple (n = 4, 66.7%) lesions. Homogenous nodular enhancement and supratentorial white matter involvement were present in all patients with butterfly pattern and infiltrative/perivenular enhancement in half (n = 3) of the patients. Deep gray matter (n = 1, 16.7%) and infratentorial involvement (n = 1, 16.7%) were scarce and no ring enhancement was observed. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the investigated MR features between the two groups. Conclusion: Statistical analyses revealed no significant distinctive radiologic characteristics between primary and secondary lymphoma of the brain parenchyma.

  13. Can MRI replace DMSA in the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children with urinary tract infections?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, Eoin C.; Ryan, Stephanie; McCourbrey, Siobhan; O'Connor, Rachel; Donoghue, Veronica; Awan, Atif

    2005-01-01

    Renal parenchymal defects may be a consequence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in childhood. MRI is a non-radiation imaging modality compared with DMSA scanning. To compare DMSA with MRI for the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children presenting for radiological investigation after a first UTI. Both DMSA and MRI were performed at the same appointment in 37 children (aged 4 months-13 years; mean 4.5 years) with a history of UTI. Both planar and SPECT DMSA were performed. MRI of the kidneys employed axial and coronal T1-, T2- and fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences. Some children had imaging after IV contrast medium. The coronal fat-saturated T1-W sequence was the best sequence and it detected all the findings on MRI. MRI had a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 87% for the detection of a scarred kidney using DMSA as the gold standard. MRI diagnosed pyelonephritis in two children that had been interpreted as scarring on DMSA. Renal MRI using a single, coronal, fat-saturated T1-W sequence is a rapid, accurate and minimally invasive technique for the detection of renal scarring that does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  14. Mechanical Recanalization following i.v. Thrombolysis: A Retrospective Analysis regarding Secondary Hemorrhagic Infarctions and Parenchymal Hematomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Höltje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In acute stroke by occlusion of the proximal medial cerebral artery (MCA or the distal internal carotid artery, intravenous thrombolysis is an established treatment. Another option is mechanical recanalization. It remains unclear if the combination of both methods poses an additional bleeding risk. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to determine the proportion of hemorrhagic infarctions and parenchymal hematomas. Methods. Inclusion criteria were an occlusion of the carotid T or proximal MCA treated with full dose thrombolysis and mechanical recanalization. 31 patients were selected. Devices used were Trevo, Penumbra Aspiration system, Penumbra 3D Retriever, and Revive. The initial control by computed tomography was carried out with a mean delay to intervention of 10.9 hours (SD: 8.5 hours. Results. A slight hemorrhagic infarction (HI1 was observed in 2/31 patients, and a more severe HI2 occurred in two cases. A smaller parenchymal hematoma (PH1 was not seen and a space-occupying PH2 was seen in 2/31 cases. There was no significant difference in the probability of intracranial bleeding after successful (thrombolysis in cerebral infarctions 2b and 3 or unsuccessful recanalization. Conclusion. The proportion of intracranial bleeding using mechanical recanalization following intravenous thrombolysis appears comparable with reports using thrombolysis alone.

  15. The Relationship Between Intestinal Iron Absorption and Hepatic Parenchymal Cell Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mok Hyun; Hahn, Shin Suck

    1971-01-01

    more, or the liver was irradiated with a single dose of 12,000 rads or more. The results of liver function tests which done simultaneously remained within normal limit except SGOT and SGPR which were somewhat increased. 3. In each case, there has been good correlation between the extent of liver cell damage and degree of increased iron absorption rate or serum iron level. 4. The method of liver damage appeared to make no obvious difference in the pattern of iron deposit in liver. This may be partly due to the fact that tissue specimens were obtained too late, for by this time the elevated serum iron level had returned within normal range and the pathological changes were almost healed. 5. The possible factors and relationship between intestinal iron absorption and hepatic parenchymal cell damage has been discussed.

  16. Applications of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of parenchymal kidney disease in cats: 24 cases (1981-1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, P.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Feeney, D.A.; O'Brien, T.D.

    1988-01-01

    Renal sonograms from 24 cats with confirmed parenchymal kidney disease and from 1 cat with radiographic and palpable evidence of renal enlargement (but without identifiable histologic abnormalities) were evaluated to describe the ultrasonographic appearance of feline renal diseases and to determine the role of ultrasonographic examination in the clinical evaluation of these cases. In all cats with radiographic evidence of abnormal renal size or contour and when poor intraabdominal radiographic contrast precluded visualization of the kidneys, ultrasonography provided complementary information pertaining to location (cortical/medullary), extent, and distribution (focal/multifocal/diffuse) of disease. Ultrasonography also characterized these lesions as cystic (cavitating) or solid. The echo patterns were most specific for renal cysts. Infiltrative diseases did not have consistent patterns. Multifocal hypoechoic nodules, diffuse cortical hyper-echogenicity, and normal-appearing parenchyma were identified. In these instances, however, ultrasonography did define the extent of disease and narrowed the spectrum of differential considerations

  17. A review of scientific topics and literature in abdominal radiology in Germany. Pt. 2. Abdominal parenchymal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenacher, L. [Diagnostik Muenchen-Diagnostic Imaging Centre (Germany); Juchems, M.S. [Konstanz Hospital (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Holzapfel, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kinner, S.; Lauenstein, T.C. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Wessling, J. [Clemens Hospital Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schreyer, A.G. [University Hospital Regenburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2016-03-15

    The working group for abdominal and gastrointestinal diagnosis is a group of the German Radiological Society (DRG) focusing clinically and scientifically on the diagnosis and treatment of the gastrointestinal tract as well as the parenchymal abdominal organs. In this article we give an up-to-date literature review of scientific radiological topics especially covered by German radiologists. The working group experts cover the most recent relevant studies concerning liver-specific contrast media with an emphasis on a new classification system for liver adenomas. Additionally studies regarding selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) are reviewed. For the pancreas the most important tumors are described followed by an introduction to the most recently introduced functional imaging techniques. The manuscript concludes with some remarks on recent studies and concerning chronic pancreatitis as well as autoimmune pancreatitis.

  18. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptor Mediates Parenchymal Arteriole and Posterior Cerebral Artery Remodeling During Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Otero, Janice M; Fisher, Courtney; Downs, Kelsey; Moss, M Elizabeth; Jaffe, Iris Z; Jackson, William F; Dorrance, Anne M

    2017-12-01

    The brain is highly susceptible to injury caused by hypertension because the increased blood pressure causes artery remodeling that can limit cerebral perfusion. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism prevents hypertensive cerebral artery remodeling, but the vascular cell types involved have not been defined. In the periphery, the endothelial MR mediates hypertension-induced vascular injury, but cerebral and peripheral arteries are anatomically distinct; thus, these findings cannot be extrapolated to the brain. The parenchymal arterioles determine cerebrovascular resistance. Determining the effects of hypertension and MR signaling on these arterioles could lead to a better understanding of cerebral small vessel disease. We hypothesized that endothelial MR signaling mediates inward cerebral artery remodeling and reduced cerebral perfusion during angiotensin II (AngII) hypertension. The biomechanics of the parenchymal arterioles and posterior cerebral arteries were studied in male C57Bl/6 and endothelial cell-specific MR knockout mice and their appropriate controls using pressure myography. AngII increased plasma aldosterone and decreased cerebral perfusion in C57Bl/6 and MR-intact littermates. Endothelial cell MR deletion improved cerebral perfusion in AngII-treated mice. AngII hypertension resulted in inward hypotrophic remodeling; this was prevented by MR antagonism and endothelial MR deletion. Our studies suggest that endothelial cell MR mediates hypertensive remodeling in the cerebral microcirculation and large pial arteries. AngII-induced inward remodeling of cerebral arteries and arterioles was associated with a reduction in cerebral perfusion that could worsen the outcome of stroke or contribute to vascular dementia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Non-neoplastic parenchymal changes in kidney cancer and post-partial nephrectomy recovery of renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Wassim M; Chen, Ling Y; Cordon, Billy H; Mashni, Joseph; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Bernstein, Melanie; Russo, Paul

    2015-09-01

    To explore the association of non-neoplastic parenchymal changes (nNPC) with patients' health and renal function recovery after partial nephrectomy (PN). This retrospective review identified 800 pT1a patients who underwent PN at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2007 to 2012. Pathology reports were reviewed for nNPC graded as mild or severe: vascular sclerosis (VS), glomerulosclerosis (GS), and fibrosis/scarring. Correlations between nNPC and known preoperative predictors of renal function [age, sex, African-American race, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, body mass index, coronary artery disease, and hypertension (HTN)] were assessed using Spearman's rank correlation (ρ). Multivariable linear regression, adjusted for the described known preoperative risk predictors, was performed to evaluate whether the parenchymal features were able to predict 6-month postoperative eGFR. In this study, 46 % of tumors had benign surrounding parenchyma. We noted statistically significant yet weak associations of VS with age (ρ = 0.19; p < 0.001), ASA (ρ = 0.09; p < 0.001), preoperative eGFR (ρ = -0.14; p < 0.001), and HTN (ρ = 0.14; p < 0.001). GS also significantly correlated with HTN, but the correlation was again small (ρ = 0.12; p < 0.001). After adjusting for known risk predictors, only GS was a significant predictor of 6-month postoperative eGFR. When compared with no GS, mild and severe GS were negatively associated with a decrease of 4.9 and 10.8 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in 6-month postoperative eGFR, respectively. Presence of VS and GS correlated with patients' baseline health, and presence of GS predicted postoperative renal function recovery.

  20. Micropatterned co-culture of hepatocyte spheroids layered on non-parenchymal cells to understand heterotypic cellular interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Otsuka, Kohei Sasaki, Saya Okimura, Masako Nagamura and Yuichi Nakasone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfabrication and micropatterning techniques in tissue engineering offer great potential for creating and controlling cellular microenvironments including cell–matrix interactions, soluble stimuli and cell–cell interactions. Here, we present a novel approach to generate layered patterning of hepatocyte spheroids on micropatterned non-parenchymal feeder cells using microfabricated poly(ethylene glycol (PEG hydrogels. Micropatterned PEG-hydrogel-treated substrates with two-dimensional arrays of gelatin circular domains (phgr = 100 μm were prepared by photolithographic method. Only on the critical structure of PEG hydrogel with perfect protein rejection, hepatocytes were co-cultured with non-parenchymal cells to be led to enhanced hepatocyte functions. Then, we investigated the mechanism of the functional enhancement in co-culture with respect to the contributions of soluble factors and direct cell–cell interactions. In particular, to elucidate the influence of soluble factors on hepatocyte function, hepatocyte spheroids underlaid with fibroblasts (NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts or endothelial cells (BAECs: bovine aortic endothelial cells were compared with physically separated co-culture of hepatocyte monospheroids with NIH3T3 or BAEC using trans-well culture systems. Our results suggested that direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors, both of these between hepatocytes and fibroblasts, significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions. In contrast, direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact between hepatocytes and endothelial cells only contributed to enhance hepatocyte functions. This patterning technique can be a useful experimental tool for applications in basic science, drug screening and tissue engineering, as well as in the design of artificial liver devices.

  1. Predominant location of pulmonary parenchymal lesions of tuberculosis primary complex in infants aged less than one year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Shinya; Ito, Masaki; Uchimura, Kazuhiro

    2003-01-01

    It is useful to know the distribution of pulmonary lesions in the diagnosis of tuberculosis on radiological examination. The aim of this study was to investigate if there is predominant lung segment or lobe for tuberculous lesions in infants aged less than one year using contrast enhanced CT. We studied 57 infants (40 boys, 17 girls) who were diagnosed as tuberculosis by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or combination of family contact, radiographic findings suggesting tuberculosis, and positive reaction of 5 mm or more induration to purified protein derivative (PPD) tuberculin. All the infants had lesions in mediastinal and/or hilar lymphonodes, and 54 out of 57 infants had parenchymal lesions as well. In the study of the segmental predominance of tuberculous lesions, each infant had a share of 100 points. If an infant had a single focus, all the points were distributed to the corresponding segment. If he or she had multiple foci, the 100 points were equally divided into affected lung segments. There was no significant difference between right (3385 points/10 segments) and left (2005 points/8 segments) lungs. The points in upper lobes (2224 points/5 segments) were significantly higher than the combined points of middle and lingual (896 points/4 segments) and lower (2270 points/9 segments) lobes (p<0.05). The points in posterior lung segments (2839 points/7 segments) were significantly higher than the combined points of middle (436 points/3 segments) and anterior (2115 points/8 segments) lung segments (p<0.05). These results suggest that upper lobes and posterior segments are predominant parenchymal regions of tuberculosis among infants less than one year, although tuberculous lesions may locate in any lung segment. (author)

  2. Accuracy of a Cone-Beam CT Virtual Parenchymal Perfusion Algorithm for Liver Cancer Targeting during Intra-arterial Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbel, Haytham; Kobeiter, Hicham; Pizaine, Guillaume; Ridouani, Fourat; Luciani, Alain; Radaelli, Alessandro; Van der Sterren, William; Chiaradia, Mélanie; Tacher, Vania

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate accuracy of virtual parenchymal perfusion (VPP) algorithm developed for targeting liver cancer during intra-arterial therapy (IAT) using cone-beam CT guidance. VPP was retrospectively applied to 15 patients who underwent IAT for liver cancer. Virtual territory (VT) was estimated after positioning a virtual injection point on nonselective dual-phase (DP) cone-beam CT images acquired during hepatic arteriography at the same position chosen for selective treatment. Targeted territory (TT) was used as the gold standard and was defined by parenchymal phase enhancement of selective DP cone-beam CT performed before treatment start. Qualitative evaluation of anatomic conformity between VT and TT was performed using a 3-rank scale (poor, acceptable, excellent) by 3 double-blinded readers. VT and TT were also quantitatively compared using spatial overlap-based (Dice similarity coefficient [DSC], sensitivity, and positive predictive value), distance-based (mean surface distance [MSD]), and volume-based (absolute volume error and correlation between pairwise volumes) metrics. Interreader agreement was evaluated for the 2 evaluation methods. Eighteen DP cone-beam CT scans were performed. Qualitative evaluation showed excellent overlap between VT and TT in 88.9%-94.4%, depending on the readers. DSC was 0.78 ± 0.1, sensitivity was 80%, positive predictive value was 83%, and MSD was 5.1 mm ± 2.4. Absolute volume error was 15%, and R 2 Pearson correlation factor was 0.99. Interreader agreement was good for both qualitative and quantitative evaluations. VPP algorithm is accurate and reliable in identification of liver arterial territories during IAT using cone-beam CT guidance. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. In vivo regulation of scavenger receptor BI and the selective uptake of high density lipoprotein cholesteryl esters in rat liver parenchymal and Kupffer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluiter, K.; van der Westhuijzen, D. R.; van Berkel, T. J.

    1998-01-01

    High density lipoprotein cholesteryl esters (HDL-CE) are selectively taken up by liver parenchymal cells without parallel apolipoprotein uptake. This selective uptake route forms an important step in the so-called reverse cholesterol transport. Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the only known HDL

  4. Background ¹⁸F-FDG uptake in positron emission mammography (PEM): correlation with mammographic density and background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hye Ryoung; Moon, Woo Kyung; Chun, In Kook; Eo, Jae Seon; Jeyanth, Joseph Xavier; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya; Kang, Keon Wook

    2013-10-01

    We aimed to determine whether background (18)F-FDG uptake in positron emission mammography (PEM) was related to mammographic density or background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRI. We studied a total of 52 patients (mean age, 50.9 years, 26 premenopausal, 26 postmenopausal) with newly diagnosed breast cancer who underwent (18)F-FDG PEM (positron emission mammography), conventional mammography and breast MRI. The background mean (18)F-FDG uptake value on PEM was obtained by drawing a user-defined region of interest (ROI) in a normal area of the contralateral breast. We reviewed the mammography retrospectively for overall breast density of contralateral breast according to the four-point scale (grade 1-4) of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification. The background parenchymal enhancement of breast MRI was classified as minimal, mild, moderate, or marked. All imaging findings were interpreted by two readers in consensus without knowledge of image findings of other modalities. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between background (18)F-FDG uptake on PEM and mammographic density after adjustment for age and menopausal status (PPEM and background parenchymal enhancement on MRI. Background (18)F-FDG uptake on PEM significantly increases as mammographic density increases. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRI was not an independent predictor of the background (18)F-FDG uptake on PEM unlike mammographic density. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-detector CT urography: effect of oral hydration and contrast medium volume on renal parenchymal enhancement and urinary tract opacification - a quantitative and qualitative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szolar, Dieter H.; Tillich, Manfred; Preidler, Klaus W. [Diagnostikum Graz-Suedwest, Graz (Austria)

    2010-09-15

    To assess the effect of oral hydration and contrast-medium volume on renal enhancement and urinary tract opacification in multi-detector CT urography. A total of 192 patients were assigned to different protocols with varying doses of contrast agent with and without oral hydration. The attenuation was measured in the renal parenchyma in the unenhanced, nephrographic and excretory phase, and in the urinary tract in excretory phase imaging, respectively. Opacification of the urinary tract was graded on volume rendered images. Oral hydration did not significantly alter renal parenchymal enhancement in both the nephrographic and the excretory phase (p > 0.001), but significantly decreased mean attenuation of the urinary tract in the excretory phase (p {<=} 0.001), and improved continuous opacification of all ureter segments (p < 0.01). Higher volumes of contrast medium improved renal parenchymal enhancement (p {<=} 0.001) and continuous opacification of the urinary tract (p {<=} 0.01). Oral hydration leads to lower attenuation values in the urinary tract but improves the continuous opacification of the tract. Increase in contrast medium volume leads to higher renal parenchymal enhancement as well as to an increased continuous opacification of the urinary tract. Decrease in contrast medium volume cannot be compensated for by oral hydration in terms of parenchymal enhancement. (orig.)

  6. The mass-metallicity relations for gas and stars in star-forming galaxies: strong outflow versus variable IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jianhui; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Goddard, Daniel; Comparat, Johan; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Ventura, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the mass-metallicity relations for the gaseous (MZRgas) and stellar components (MZRstar) of local star-forming galaxies based on a representative sample from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. The mass-weighted average stellar metallicities are systematically lower than the gas metallicities. This difference in metallicity increases towards galaxies with lower masses and reaches 0.4-0.8 dex at 109 M⊙ (depending on the gas metallicity calibration). As a result, the MZRstar is much steeper than the MZRgas. The much lower metallicities in stars compared to the gas in low-mass galaxies imply dramatic metallicity evolution with suppressed metal enrichment at early times. The aim of this paper is to explain the observed large difference in gas and stellar metallicity and to infer the origin of the mass-metallicity relations. To this end we develop a galactic chemical evolution model accounting for star formation, gas inflow and outflow. By combining the observed mass-metallicity relation for both gas and stellar components to constrain the models, we find that only two scenarios are able to reproduce the observations. Either strong metal outflow or a steep initial mass function (IMF) slope at early epochs of galaxy evolution is needed. Based on these two scenarios, for the first time we successfully reproduce the observed MZRgas and MZRstar simultaneously, together with other independent observational constraints in the local Universe. Our model also naturally reproduces the flattening of the MZRgas at the high-mass end leaving the MZRstar intact, as seen in observational data.

  7. THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN THE CONTEXT OF NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICTY RELATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakeslee, John P.; Cantiello, Michele; Peng, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    Two recent empirical developments in the study of extragalactic globular cluster (GC) populations are the color-magnitude relation of the blue GCs (the 'blue tilt') and the nonlinearity of the dependence of optical GC colors on metallicity. The color-magnitude relation, interpreted as a mass-metallicity relation, is thought to be a consequence of self-enrichment. Nonlinear color-metallicity relations have been shown to produce bimodal color distributions from unimodal metallicity distributions. We simulate GC populations including both a mass-metallicity scaling relation and nonlinear color-metallicity relations motivated by theory and observations. Depending on the assumed range of metallicities and the width of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we find that the simulated populations can have bimodal color distributions with a 'blue tilt' similar to observations, even though the metallicity distribution appears unimodal. The models that produce these features have the relatively high mean GC metallicities and nearly equal blue and red peaks characteristic of giant elliptical galaxies. The blue tilt is less apparent in the models with metallicities typical of dwarf ellipticals; the narrower GCLF in these galaxies has an even bigger effect in reducing the significance of their color-magnitude slopes. We critically examine the evidence for nonlinearity versus bimodal metallicities as explanations for the characteristic double-peaked color histograms of giant ellipticals and conclude that the question remains open. We discuss the prospects for further theoretical and observational progress in constraining the models presented here and for uncovering the true metallicity distributions of extragalactic GC systems.

  8. Metal Abundances of KISS Galaxies. VI. New Metallicity Relations for the KISS Sample of Star-forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschauer, Alec S.; Salzer, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven; Wegner, Gary A.

    2018-02-01

    We present updated metallicity relations for the spectral database of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) found in the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS). New spectral observations of emission-line galaxies obtained from a variety of telescope facilities provide oxygen abundance information. A nearly fourfold increase in the number of KISS objects with robust metallicities relative to our previous analysis provides for an empirical abundance calibration to compute self-consistent metallicity estimates for all SFGs in the sample with adequate spectral data. In addition, a sophisticated spectral energy distribution fitting routine has provided robust calculations of stellar mass. With these new and/or improved galaxy characteristics, we have developed luminosity–metallicity (L–Z) relations, mass–metallicity (M *–Z) relations, and the so-called fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) for over 1450 galaxies from the KISS sample. This KISS M *–Z relation is presented for the first time and demonstrates markedly lower scatter than the KISS L–Z relation. We find that our relations agree reasonably well with previous publications, modulo modest offsets due to differences in the strong emission line metallicity calibrations used. We illustrate an important bias present in previous L–Z and M *–Z studies involving direct-method (T e ) abundances that may result in systematically lower slopes in these relations. Our KISS FMR shows consistency with those found in the literature, albeit with a larger scatter. This is likely a consequence of the KISS sample being biased toward galaxies with high levels of activity.

  9. Volume-controlled histographic analysis of pulmonary parenchyma in normal and diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyo Yong; Lee, Jongmin; Kim, Jong Seob; Won, Chyl Ho; Kang, Duk Sik; Kim, Myoung Nam

    2000-01-01

    located in an area of higher density. Using a home-made histographic analysis system which included a lung volume controller, patients with diffuse parenchymal lung disease could be distinguished from normal contros. The method may be useful for the diagnosis and follow up of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. (author)

  10. Role of digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Madhurima; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Gorsi, Ujjwal; Gupta, Dheeraj; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography are modifications of digital radiography. • These modalities perform better than digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis. • Digital tomosynthesis has a sensitivity of 100% in detection of cavities. • Centrilobular nodules seen on CT in active pulmonary tuberculosis, were also demonstrated on digital tomosynthesis in our study. • Digital tomosynthesis can be used for diagnosis and follow up of patients in pulmonary tuberculosis, thereby reducing the number of CT examinations. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the role of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and dual energy subtraction digital radiography (DES-DR) in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and to compare them with digital radiography (DR). Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institutional review committee. DTS and DES-DR were performed in 62 patients with active pulmonary TB within one week of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) study. Findings of active pulmonary TB, that is consolidation, cavitation and nodules were noted on digital radiography (DR), DTS and DES-DR in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of all 3 modalities was calculated with MDCT as reference standard. In addition presence of centrilobular nodules was also noted on DTS. Results: Our study comprised of 62 patients (33 males, 29 females with age range 18–82 years). Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of nodules and cavitation was better than DR and DES-DR. Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of consolidation was comparable to DR and DES-DR. DES-DR performed better than DR in detection of nodules and cavitation. DTS was also able to detect centrilobular nodules with sensitivity and specificity of 57.4% and 86.5% respectively. Conclusion: DTS and DES-DR perform better

  11. Role of digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Madhurima, E-mail: madhurimashrm88@gmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Sandhu, Manavjit Singh, E-mail: manavjitsandhu@yahoo.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Gorsi, Ujjwal, E-mail: ujjwalgorsi@gmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Gupta, Dheeraj, E-mail: dheeraj1910@gmail.com [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Khandelwal, Niranjan, E-mail: khandelwaln@hotmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography are modifications of digital radiography. • These modalities perform better than digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis. • Digital tomosynthesis has a sensitivity of 100% in detection of cavities. • Centrilobular nodules seen on CT in active pulmonary tuberculosis, were also demonstrated on digital tomosynthesis in our study. • Digital tomosynthesis can be used for diagnosis and follow up of patients in pulmonary tuberculosis, thereby reducing the number of CT examinations. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the role of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and dual energy subtraction digital radiography (DES-DR) in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and to compare them with digital radiography (DR). Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institutional review committee. DTS and DES-DR were performed in 62 patients with active pulmonary TB within one week of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) study. Findings of active pulmonary TB, that is consolidation, cavitation and nodules were noted on digital radiography (DR), DTS and DES-DR in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of all 3 modalities was calculated with MDCT as reference standard. In addition presence of centrilobular nodules was also noted on DTS. Results: Our study comprised of 62 patients (33 males, 29 females with age range 18–82 years). Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of nodules and cavitation was better than DR and DES-DR. Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of consolidation was comparable to DR and DES-DR. DES-DR performed better than DR in detection of nodules and cavitation. DTS was also able to detect centrilobular nodules with sensitivity and specificity of 57.4% and 86.5% respectively. Conclusion: DTS and DES-DR perform better

  12. Novel algorithm to identify and differentiate specific digital signature of breath sound in patients with diffuse parenchymal lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Parthasarathi; Mondal, Ashok; Dey, Rana; Saha, Dipanjan; Saha, Goutam

    2015-05-01

    Auscultation is an important part of the clinical examination of different lung diseases. Objective analysis of lung sounds based on underlying characteristics and its subsequent automatic interpretations may help a clinical practice. We collected the breath sounds from 8 normal subjects and 20 diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD) patients using a newly developed instrument and then filtered off the heart sounds using a novel technology. The collected sounds were thereafter analysed digitally on several characteristics as dynamical complexity, texture information and regularity index to find and define their unique digital signatures for differentiating normality and abnormality. For convenience of testing, these characteristic signatures of normal and DPLD lung sounds were transformed into coloured visual representations. The predictive power of these images has been validated by six independent observers that include three physicians. The proposed method gives a classification accuracy of 100% for composite features for both the normal as well as lung sound signals from DPLD patients. When tested by independent observers on the visually transformed images, the positive predictive value to diagnose the normality and DPLD remained 100%. The lung sounds from the normal and DPLD subjects could be differentiated and expressed according to their digital signatures. On visual transformation to coloured images, they retain 100% predictive power. This technique may assist physicians to diagnose DPLD from visual images bearing the digital signature of the condition. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  13. Repeated surgeries in invasive lobular breast cancer with preoperative MRI: Role of additional carcinoma in situ and background parenchymal enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preibsch, H; Richter, V; Bahrs, S D; Hattermann, V; Wietek, B M; Bier, G; Kloth, C; Blumenstock, G; Hahn, M; Staebler, A; Nikolaou, K; Wiesinger, B

    2017-05-01

    Analysing the influence of additional carcinoma in situ (CIS) and background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) in preoperative MRI on repeated surgeries in patients with invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) of the breast. Retrospective analysis of 106 patients (mean age 58.6±9.9years) with 108 ILC. Preoperative tumour size as assessed by MRI, mammography and sonography was recorded and compared to histopathology. In contrast-enhanced MRI, the degree of BPE was categorised by two readers. The influence of additionally detected CIS and BPE on the rate of repeated surgeries was analysed. Additional CIS was present in 45.4% of the cases (49/108). The degree of BPE was minimal or mild in 80% of the cases and moderate or marked in 20% of the cases. In 17 cases (15.7%) at least one repeated surgery was performed. In n=15 of these cases, repeated surgery was performed after BCT (n=9 re-excisions, n=6 conversions to mastectomy), in n=2 cases after initial mastectomy. The initial surgical procedure (p=0.008) and additional CIS (p=0.046) significantly influenced the rate of repeated surgeries, while tumour size, patient age and BPE did not (p=ns). Additional CIS was associated with a higher rate of repeated surgeries, whereas BPE had no influence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pancreatic parenchymal injection of ethanol and octreotide to induce focal pancreatic fibrosis in rats: Strategies to eliminate postoperative pancreatic fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Ho; Hong, Tae Ho

    2018-02-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) is more likely to occur in a soft pancreas compared to a hard pancreas in which fibrosis has progressed. There is almost no leakage at the anastomosis site or cut surface of a hard pancreas. The aim of this study was to induce localized fibrosis at the cut surface of the pancreas in a rat model. Thirty-six rats were divided into three groups (group S: normal saline group; group E: ethanol group; and group O: octreotide group). Each rat was directly injected with a particular compound at the duodenal lobe of the pancreatic parenchyma. Each group was divided into three subgroups according to the time of post-injection sacrifice (1, 2, or 4 weeks). The hardness, suture holding capacity (SHC), and histological fibrosis grade of each pancreas were measured. The hardness, SHC, and fibrosis grade of groups E and O were increased at week 1, with greater increases in group E (all P injected site (duodenal lobe) and non-injected site (splenic lobe) of the pancreas revealed increases in the three parameters of group E only in the duodenal lobe, with increases in group O at both the duodenal and splenic lobes. Parenchymal injection of ethanol and octreotide increased pancreatic fibrosis. Unlike octreotide, ethanol provoked localized fibrosis that was maintained over time. It is expected that ethanol injection could eliminate POPF during pancreatic surgery. Copyright © 2018 First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine in China. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thy-1 (CD90)-Positive Hepatic Progenitor Cells, Hepatoctyes, and Non-parenchymal Liver Cells Isolated from Human Livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Thomas S; Dayoub, Rania

    2017-01-01

    In response to liver injury, hepatic cells, especially hepatocytes, can rapidly proliferate to repair liver damage. Additionally, it was shown that under certain circumstances liver resident cells with progenitor capabilities are involved in liver cell proliferation and differentiation. These hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), known as oval cells in rodents, are derived from the canals of Hering, which are located in the periportal region of the liver. Regarding to different cell niches, which were defined for human HPCs, several markers have been used to identify these cells such as CD34, c-kit, OV-6, and Thy-1 (CD90). The latter was shown to be expressed on HPCs in human liver tissue with histological signs of regeneration. In this chapter we describe a detailed method for the isolation of Thy-1 positive cells from human resected liver tissue. Based on a procedure for isolating primary human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) we expanded this protocol to additional enzymatic dissociation, filtration, and centrifugation steps. This results in a bile duct cell enriched fraction of NPCs from which Thy-1 (CD90) positive cells were purified by Thy-1 positivity selection using MACS technique. Bipotential progenitor cells from human liver resections can be isolated using Thy-1 and was shown to be a suitable tool for the enrichment of liver resident progenitor cells for xenotransplantation.

  16. Severe cerebral hypovolemia on perfusion CT and lower body weight are associated with parenchymal haemorrhage after thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsetsou, S.; Eskandari, A.; Michel, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne CHUV, Department of Neurology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Amiguet, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, R.; Maeder, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Jiang, B.; Wintermark, M. [Stanford University and Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Division, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Haemorrhagic transformation of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and particularly parenchymal haemorrhage (PH) remains a feared complication of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). We aimed to identify clinical and perfusion CT (PCT) variables which are independently associated with PHs. In this observational cohort study, based on the Acute Stroke Registry Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL) from 2003 to December 2013, we selected patients with AIS involving the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory who were thrombolysed within 4.5 h of symptoms' onset and who had a good quality baseline PCT at the beginning of IVT. In addition to demographic, clinical, laboratory and non-contrast CT data, volumes of salvageable tissue and ischemic core on PCT, as well as absolute CBF and CBV values within the ischemic regions were compared in patients with and without PH in multivariate analysis. Of the 190 included patients, 24 (12.6%) presented a PH (11 had PH1 and 13 had PH2). In multivariate analysis of the clinical and radiological variables, the lowest CBV in the core and lower body weight was both significantly associated with PH (p = 0.009 and p = 0.024, respectively). In thrombolysed MCA strokes, maximal hypoperfusion severity depicted by lowest CBV values in the core region and lower body weight are independently correlated with PH. This information, if confirmed in other case series, may add to the stratification of revascularisation decisions in patients with a perceived high PH risk. (orig.)

  17. The effects of hemorrhagic parenchymal infarction on the establishment of sensori-motor structural and functional connectivity in early infancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arichi, T.; Edwards, A.D. [Kings College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Perinatal Imaging and Health, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Counsell, S.J.; Mondi, V.; Tusor, N.; Merchant, N. [Kings College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Perinatal Imaging and Health, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Allievi, A.G.; Burdet, E. [Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Chew, A.T. [Kings College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Perinatal Imaging and Health, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom); Martinez-Biarge, M.; Cowan, F.M. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    The objective of the study was to characterize alterations of structural and functional connectivity within the developing sensori-motor system in infants with focal perinatal brain injury and at high risk of cerebral palsy. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were used to study the developing functional and structural connectivity framework in six infants born prematurely at term equivalent age. This was first characterised in three infants without focal pathology, which was then compared to that derived from three infants with unilateral haemorrhagic parenchymal infarction and a subsequent focal periventricular white matter lesion who developed later haemiparesis. Functional responses to passive hand movement were in the contralateral perirolandic cortex, regardless of focal pathology. In infants with unilateral periventricular injury, afferent thalamo-cortical tracts appeared to have developed compensatory trajectories which circumvented areas of damage. In contrast, efferent corticospinal tracts showed marked asymmetry at term equivalent age following focal brain injury. Sensori-motor network analysis suggested that inter-hemispheric functional connectivity is largely preserved despite pathology and that impairment may be associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. Following focal perinatal brain injury, altered structural and functional connectivity is already present and can be characterized with MRI at term equivalent age. The results of this small case series suggest that these techniques may provide valuable new information about prognosis and the pathophysiology underlying cerebral palsy. (orig.)

  18. Impaired virus control and severe CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunopathology in chimeric mice deficient in gamma interferon receptor expression on both parenchymal and hematopoietic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Pernille; Bartholdy, Christina; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2005-01-01

    virus completely lack the ability to control the infection and develop severe wasting disease. Further, the study shows that IFN-gamma receptor expression on parenchymal cells in the viscera is more important for virus control than IFN-gamma receptor expression on bone marrow-derived cells.......Bone marrow chimeras were used to determine the cellular target(s) for the antiviral activity of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). By transfusing such mice with high numbers of naive virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, a system was created in which the majority of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells would...... be capable of responding to IFN-gamma, but expression of the relevant receptor on non-T cells could be experimentally controlled. Only when the IFN-gamma receptor is absent on both radioresistant parenchymal and bone marrow-derived cells will chimeric mice challenged with a highly invasive, noncytolytic...

  19. A Study of Clinical Presentation and Correlative Histopathological Patterns in Renal Parenchymal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K; Nair, R R; Seethalekshmy, N V; Kurian, G; Mathew, A; Sreedharan, S; Paul, Z

    2018-01-01

    Suspicion and subsequent detection of renal disease is by an assessment of the urinalysis and renal function in the clinical context. Our attempt in this study is to correlate initial presenting features of urinalysis and renal function to the final histopathological diagnosis. A retrospective analysis of 1059 native kidney biopsies performed from January 2002 to June 2015 at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences was conducted. Correlative patterns between urinalysis, renal function, and final histopathological diagnosis were studied. Five hundred and eleven (48%) patients had nephrotic syndrome. Out of these, 193 (38%) had pure: nephrotic syndrome, 181 (35.8%) had associated microhematuria, 110 (21.7%) had microhematuria and renal failure, and 27 (5.3%) had only associated renal failure. Minimal change disease (MCD) (30%), membranous nephropathy (30%), and IgA nephropathy (29%) were the major diseases in the respective groups. Five hundred and five (47.6%) patients had subnephrotic proteinuria. Out of these, 29 (5.6%) had only subnephrotic proteinuria, 134 (27%) had additional microhematuria, 300 (59%) had subnephrotic proteinuria, microhematuria, and renal failure, and 42 (8%) had subnephrotic proteinuria with renal failure. Lupus Nephritis (45% and 40%) and IgA Nephropathy (32% and 21%) were the major disorders in the subgroups respectively. Forty-two patients (3.7%) were biopsied for isolated renal failure with bland urinary sediment. Cast nephropathy and acute interstitial nephritis were the major diseases. Out of 89 patients with diabetes who were biopsied, 15 (16.8%) had diabetic nephropathy, 45 (50.5%) had no diabetic nephropathy, and 29 (32.5%) had diabetic nephropathy along with a non-diabetic renal disease. Postinfectious glomerulonephritis was the major glomerular disease. IgA nephropathy (22.2%) and membranous nephropathy (15.5%) were the major diseases in patients with diabetes with no diabetic nephropathy. In our population, MCD and membranous

  20. Robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy versus laparoscopic partial nephrectomy: A propensity score-matched comparative analysis of surgical outcomes and preserved renal parenchymal volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Hidekazu; Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2018-02-04

    To compare surgical outcomes, including renal function and the preserved renal parenchymal volume, between robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy using propensity score-matched analyses. In total, 253 patients, with a normal contralateral kidney, who underwent laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (n = 131) or robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (n = 122) with renal arterial clamping between 2010 and 2015, were included. Patients' background and tumor factors were adjusted by propensity score matching. Surgical outcomes, including postoperative renal function, complications, warm ischemia time and preserved renal parenchymal volume, evaluated by volumetric analysis, were compared between the surgical procedures. After matching, 64 patients were assigned to each group. The mean age was 56-57 years, and the mean tumor size was 22 mm. Approximately 50% of patients had low complexity tumors (RENAL nephrometry score 4-7). The incidence rate of acute kidney failure was significantly lower in the robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (11%) than laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (23%) group (P = 0.049), and warm ischemia time shorter in the robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (17 min) than laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (25 min) group (P < 0.0001). The preservation rate of renal function, measured by the estimated glomerular filtration rate, at 6 months post-surgery was 96% for robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and 90% for laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (P < 0.0001). The preserved renal parenchymal volume was higher for robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (89%) than laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (77%; P < 0.0001). The rate of perioperative complications, surgical margin status and length of hospital stay were equivalent for both techniques. Robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy allows to achieve better preservation of renal function and parenchymal volume

  1. Background {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in positron emission mammography (PEM): Correlation with mammographic density and background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Hye Ryoung, E-mail: huilings@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung, E-mail: moonwk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, In Kook, E-mail: inkook.chun@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Jae Seon, E-mail: jaeseon76@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, 148 Gurodongro, Guro-gu, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Jeyanth, Joseph Xavier, E-mail: jeyanth7@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jung Min, E-mail: imchangjm@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya, E-mail: river7774@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook, E-mail: kangkw@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    We aimed to determine whether background {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in positron emission mammography (PEM) was related to mammographic density or background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRI. Methods: We studied a total of 52 patients (mean age, 50.9 years, 26 premenopausal, 26 postmenopausal) with newly diagnosed breast cancer who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PEM (positron emission mammography), conventional mammography and breast MRI. The background mean {sup 18}F-FDG uptake value on PEM was obtained by drawing a user-defined region of interest (ROI) in a normal area of the contralateral breast. We reviewed the mammography retrospectively for overall breast density of contralateral breast according to the four-point scale (grade 1–4) of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification. The background parenchymal enhancement of breast MRI was classified as minimal, mild, moderate, or marked. All imaging findings were interpreted by two readers in consensus without knowledge of image findings of other modalities. Results: Multiple linear regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between background {sup 18}F-FDG uptake on PEM and mammographic density after adjustment for age and menopausal status (P < 0.01), but not between background {sup 18}F-FDG uptake on PEM and background parenchymal enhancement on MRI. Conclusion: Background {sup 18}F-FDG uptake on PEM significantly increases as mammographic density increases. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRI was not an independent predictor of the background {sup 18}F-FDG uptake on PEM unlike mammographic density.

  2. Personality disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... personality disorder Borderline personality disorder Dependent personality disorder Histrionic personality disorder Narcissistic personality disorder Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder Paranoid ...

  3. Initial results of selective renal parenchymal clamping with an adjustable kidney clamp in nephron-sparing surgery: an easy way to minimise renal ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K C; Yiu, M K; Ho, S H; Ng, T L; Tsu, H L; Ma, W K

    2016-12-01

    A renal parenchymal clamp has been used at our centre since March 2012. It is used in position over the kidney to achieve optimal vascular control of a tumour while minimising parenchymal ischaemia. This study aimed to report the feasibility, surgical outcome, and oncological control of a kidney clamp in partial nephrectomy. This study was conducted at a teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Partial nephrectomies performed from January 2009 to March 2015 were reviewed. The tumour characteristics and surgical outcomes of kidney clamp were studied and compared with traditional hilar clamping. A total of 92 patients were identified during the study period. Kidney clamps were used in 20 patients and hilar clamping in 72, with a mean follow-up of 27 and 37 months, respectively. For patients in whom a kidney clamp was applied, all tumours were exophytic to a different extent and the majority (90%) were located at the polar region. The PADUA (preoperative aspects and dimensions used for an anatomical) classification nephrometry score was also lower than those in whom hilar clamping was used (7.07 vs 8.34; P=0.002). The clamp was used in open, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted surgery. Operating time was shorter (207 ± 72 mins vs 306 ± 80 mins; Pkidney clamp. No acute kidney injury occurred. Postoperative renal function was comparable between the two groups. Partial nephrectomy using parenchymal clamping is safe and feasible in selected cases. The postoperative renal function and oncological control were satisfactory.

  4. Does breast MRI background parenchymal enhancement indicate metabolic activity? Qualitative and 3D quantitative computer imaging analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mema, Eralda; Mango, Victoria L; Guo, Xiaotao; Karcich, Jenika; Yeh, Randy; Wynn, Ralph T; Zhao, Binsheng; Ha, Richard S

    2018-03-01

    To investigate whether the degree of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) is associated with the amount of breast metabolic activity measured by breast parenchymal uptake (BPU) of 18F-FDG on positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT). An Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved retrospective study was performed. Of 327 patients who underwent preoperative breast MRI from 1/1/12 to 12/31/15, 73 patients had 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation performed within 1 week of breast MRI and no suspicious findings in the contralateral breast. MRI was performed on a 1.5T or 3.0T system. The imaging sequence included a triplane localizing sequence followed by sagittal fat-suppressed T 2 -weighted sequence, and a bilateral sagittal T 1 -weighted fat-suppressed fast spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which was performed before and three times after a rapid bolus injection (gadobenate dimeglumine, Multihance; Bracco Imaging; 0.1 mmol/kg) delivered through an IV catheter. The unaffected contralateral breast in these 73 patients underwent BPE and BPU assessments. For PET/CT BPU calculation, a 3D region of interest (ROI) was drawn around the glandular breast tissue and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) was determined. Qualitative MRI BPE assessments were performed on a 4-point scale, in accordance with BI-RADS categories. Additional 3D quantitative MRI BPE analysis was performed using a previously published in-house technique. Spearman's correlation test and linear regression analysis was performed (SPSS, v. 24). The median time interval between breast MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation was 3 days (range, 0-6 days). BPU SUV max mean value was 1.6 (SD, 0.53). Minimum and maximum BPU SUV max values were 0.71 and 4.0. The BPU SUV max values significantly correlated with both the qualitative and quantitative measurements of BPE, respectively (r(71) = 0.59, P Qualitatively assessed high BPE group (BI-RADS 3/4) had

  5. Sporadic meningioangiomatosis-associated atypical meningioma mimicking parenchymal invasion of brain: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Bo-ning

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Meningioangiomatosis is a rare hamartomatous lesion or meningiovascular malformation in brain. In extremely rare condition, meningioma may occur together with meningioangiomatosis, and only 19 cases have been described in English literature until now. We now report a case of meningioangiomatosis-associated meningioma with atypical and clear cell variant. A 34-year-old man presented a 3-month history of progressive numbness and weakness of his left lower extremity. He had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis type 2. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed multifocal lesions in the right frontoparietal lobe. The lesions were totally removed. Microscopically, parts of lesions were atypical and clear cell meningioma corresponding to WHO grade II. The adjacent brain parenchyma showed the histological features of meningioangiomatosis. Neoplastic cells in atypical meningioma area were immunoreactive to epithelial membrane antigen (EMA with high MIB-1 index of up to 20%. However, the spindle cells in meningioangiomatosis area were negative for EMA with low MIB-1 index of up to 1%. The diagnosis of atypical meningioma associated with sporadic meningioangiomatosis was made. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a meningioangiomatosis-associated meningioma with atypical and clear cell variant component to be described. The patient had been followed-up for 11 months without adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy. No tumor recurrence was found during this period. Meningioangiomatosis-associated meningioma is more likely to occur in younger patients and histologically to mimic parenchymal invasion of brain. We suggest that postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy should be given careful consideration to avoid over-treatment due to erroneously interpret as malignant meningioma.

  6. Intra-Parenchymal Renal Resistive Index Variation (IRRIV) Describes Renal Functional Reserve (RFR): Pilot Study in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoni, Sara; Nalesso, Federico; Meola, Mario; Villa, Gianluca; De Cal, Massimo; De Rosa, Silvia; Petrucci, Ilaria; Brendolan, Alessandra; Rosner, Mitchell H; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    An increase of glomerular filtration rate after protein load represents renal functional reserve (RFR) and is due to afferent arteriolar vasodilation. Lack of RFR may be a risk factor for acute kidney injury (AKI), but is cumbersome to measure. We sought to develop a non-invasive, bedside method that would indirectly measure RFR. Mechanical abdominal pressure, through compression of renal vessels, decreases blood flow and activates the auto-regulatory mechanism which can be measured by a fall in renal resistive index (RRI). The study aims at elucidating the relationship between intra-parenchymal renal resistive index variation (IRRIV) during abdominal pressure and RFR. In healthy volunteers, pressure was applied by a weight on the abdomen (fluid-bag 10% of subject's body weight) while RFR was measured through a protein loading test. We recorded RRI in an interlobular artery after application of pressure using ultrasound. The maximum percentage reduction of RRI from baseline was compared in the same subject to RFR. We enrolled 14 male and 16 female subjects (mean age 38 ± 14 years). Mean creatinine clearance was 106.2 ± 16.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2). RFR ranged between -1.9 and 59.7 with a mean value of 28.9 ± 13.1 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Mean baseline RRI was 0.61 ± 0.05, compared to 0.49 ± 0.06 during abdominal pressure; IRRIV was 19.6 ± 6.7%, ranging between 3.1% and 29.2%. Pearson's coefficient between RFR and IRRIV was 74.16% (p RFR. Our results can lead to the development of a "stress test" for a rapid screen of RFR to establish renal susceptibility to different exposures and the consequent risk for AKI.

  7. Oxidative modification of albumin in the parenchymal lung tissue of current smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Wan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is accumulating evidence that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. One current hypothesis is that the increased oxidant burden in these patients is not adequately counterbalanced by the lung antioxidant systems. Objective To determine the levels of oxidised human serum albumin (HSA in COPD lung explants and the effect of oxidation on HSA degradation using an ex vivo lung explant model. Methods Parenchymal lung tissue was obtained from 38 patients (15F/23M undergoing lung resection and stratified by smoking history and disease using the GOLD guidelines and the lower limit of normal for FEV1/FVC ratio. Lung tissue was homogenised and analysed by ELISA for total levels of HSA and carbonylated HSA. To determine oxidised HSA degradation lung tissue explants were incubated with either 200 μg/ml HSA or oxidised HSA and supernatants collected at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 24 h and analysed for HSA using ELISA and immunoblot. Results When stratified by disease, lung tissue from GOLD II (median = 38.2 μg/ml and GOLD I (median = 48.4 μg/ml patients had lower levels of HSA compared to patients with normal lung function (median = 71.9 μg/ml, P Conclusion We report on a reliable methodology for measuring levels of oxidised HSA in human lung tissue and cell culture supernatant. We propose that differences in the levels of oxidised HSA within lung tissue from COPD patients and current smokers provides further evidence for an oxidant/antioxidant imbalance and has important biological implications for the disease.

  8. Using Convolutional Neural Networks for Enhanced Capture of Breast Parenchymal Complexity Patterns Associated with Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastounioti, Aimilia; Oustimov, Andrew; Hsieh, Meng-Kang; Pantalone, Lauren; Conant, Emily F; Kontos, Despina

    2018-01-30

    We evaluate utilizing convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to optimally fuse parenchymal complexity measurements generated by texture analysis into discriminative meta-features relevant for breast cancer risk prediction. With Institutional Review Board approval and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliance, we retrospectively analyzed "For Processing" contralateral digital mammograms (GE Healthcare 2000D/DS) from 106 women with unilateral invasive breast cancer and 318 age-matched controls. We coupled established texture features (histogram, co-occurrence, run-length, structural), extracted using a previously validated lattice-based strategy, with a multichannel CNN into a hybrid framework in which a multitude of texture feature maps are reduced to meta-features predicting the case or control status. We evaluated the framework in a randomized split-sample setting, using the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) to assess case-control discriminatory capacity. We also compared the framework to CNNs directly fed with mammographic images, as well as to conventional texture analysis, where texture feature maps are summarized via simple statistical measures that are then used as inputs to a logistic regression model. Strong case-control discriminatory capacity was demonstrated on the basis of the meta-features generated by the hybrid framework (AUC = 0.90), outperforming both CNNs applied directly to raw image data (AUC = 0.63, P images, which can be extracted and summarized via a multichannel CNN architecture toward leveraging the associations of textural measurements to breast cancer risk. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotter, R.; Riccabona, M.

    2005-01-01

    Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract as well as vesicoureteral reflux involved in the disease complex of urinary tract infection/permanent renal parenchymal damage can be considered predisposing or risk factors. Two main forms can be distinguished, i.e., unstable bladder and dysfunctional voiding, while transitional forms between the two exist. Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract obstruct spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux. They are found in about 50% of cases in all children with urinary tract infection and are associated with an increased risk of developing renal parenchymal scars. They are observed during the newborn period up to school age. In the first few months of life, particularly boys with bilateral high-grade reflux and congenital renal parenchymal damage are affected. At later ages girls are also affected, but in this age group bladder instability predominates. Incontinence as the leading clinical symptom appears in approximately 70% of all cases and is closely correlated with chronic constipation. Imaging procedures in addition to urodynamic methods are of decisive importance for diagnosis and treatment, but noninvasive approaches such as sonography should be given preference. (orig.) [de

  10. THE GAS PHASE MASS METALLICITY RELATION FOR DWARF GALAXIES: DEPENDENCE ON STAR FORMATION RATE AND HI GAS MASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2015-10-20

    Using a sample of dwarf galaxies observed using the VIMOS IFU on the Very Large Telescope, we investigate the mass–metallicity relation (MZR) as a function of star formation rate (FMR{sub SFR}) as well as HI-gas mass (FMR{sub HI}). We combine our IFU data with a subsample of galaxies from the ALFALFA HI survey crossmatched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the FMR{sub SFR} and FMR{sub HI} across the stellar mass range 10{sup 6.6}–10{sup 8.8} M{sub ⊙}, with metallicities as low as 12 + log(O/H) = 7.67. We find the 1σ mean scatter in the MZR to be 0.05 dex. The 1σ mean scatter in the FMR{sub SFR} (0.02 dex) is significantly lower than that of the MZR. The FMR{sub SFR} is not consistent between the IFU observed galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS galaxies for SFRs lower than 10{sup −2.4} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, however, this could be the result of limitations of our measurements in that regime. The lowest mean scatter (0.01 dex) is found in the FMR{sub HI}. We also find that the FMR{sub HI} is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS crossmatched sample. We introduce the fundamental metallicity luminosity counterpart to the FMR, again characterized in terms of SFR (FML{sub SFR}) and HI-gas mass (FML{sub HI}). We find that the FML{sub HI} relation is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxy sample and the larger ALFALFA/SDSS sample. However, the 1σ scatter for the FML{sub HI} relation is not improved over the FMR{sub HI} scenario. This leads us to conclude that the FMR{sub HI} is the best candidate for a physically motivated fundamental metallicity relation.

  11. Aging is associated with changes to the biomechanical properties of the posterior cerebral artery and parenchymal arterioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Otero, Janice M; Garver, Hannah; Fink, Gregory D; Jackson, William F; Dorrance, Anne M

    2016-02-01

    Artery remodeling, described as a change in artery structure, may be responsible for the increased risk of cardiovascular disease with aging. Although the risk for stroke is known to increase with age, relatively young animals have been used in most stroke studies. Therefore, more information is needed on how aging alters the biomechanical properties of cerebral arteries. Posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) and parenchymal arterioles (PAs) are important in controlling brain perfusion. We hypothesized that aged (22-24 mo old) C57bl/6 mice would have stiffer PCAs and PAs than young (3-5 mo old) mice. The biomechanical properties of the PCAs and PAs were assessed by pressure myography. Data are presented as means ± SE of young vs. old. In the PCA, older mice had increased outer (155.6 ± 3.2 vs. 169.9 ± 3.2 μm) and lumen (116.4 ± 3.6 vs. 137.1 ± 4.7 μm) diameters. Wall stress (375.6 ± 35.4 vs. 504.7 ± 60.0 dyn/cm(2)) and artery stiffness (β-coefficient: 5.2 ± 0.3 vs. 7.6 ± 0.9) were also increased. However, wall strain (0.8 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1) was reduced with age. In the PAs from old mice, wall thickness (3.9 ± 0.3 vs. 5.1 ± 0.2 μm) and area (591.1 ± 95.4 vs. 852.8 ± 100 μm(2)) were increased while stress (758.1 ± 100.0 vs. 587.2 ± 35.1 dyn/cm(2)) was reduced. Aging also increased mean arterial and pulse pressures. We conclude that age-associated remodeling occurs in large cerebral arteries and arterioles and may increase the risk of cerebrovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis: findings of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography; Alteracoes parenquimatosas na trombose venosa cerebral: aspectos da ressonancia magnetica e da angiorressonancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Clecia Santos; Pellini, Marcos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: csferreira@superig.com.br; Boasquevisque, Edson [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Patologia; Souza, Luis Alberto M. de [Hospital da Beneficencia Portuguesa do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Imagem. Setor de Ressonancia Magnetica

    2006-09-15

    Objective: to determine the frequency and localization of parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography as well as their correlation with the territory and affected venous drainage. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis (1996 to 2004) of 21 patients (3 male and 18 female) age range between 3 and 82 years (mean 40 years, median 36 years) with clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography in 2D PC, 3D PC and contrast-enhanced 3D TOF sequences. The statistical analysis was performed with the qui-square test. Four patients had follow-up exams and three patients underwent digital subtraction angiography. Results: main predisposing factors were: infection, use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and collagenosis. Predominant symptoms included: focal deficit, headache, alteration of consciousness level and seizures. Most frequent parenchymal manifestations were: cortical/subcortical edema or infarct, venous congestion and collateral circulation, meningeal enhancement and thalamic and basal ganglia edema or infarct. Occlusion occurred mainly in superior sagittal, left transverse, left sigmoid and straight sinuses. Cavernous sinus and cortical veins thrombosis are uncommon events. Conclusion: cerebral venous thrombosis is an uncommon cause of stroke, with favorable prognosis because of its reversibility. Diagnosis is highly dependent on the radiologist capacity to recognize the presentations of this disease, principally in cases where the diagnosis is suggested by parenchymal abnormalities rather than necessarily by visualization of the thrombus itself. An accurate and rapid diagnosis allows an immediate treatment, reducing the morbidity and mortality rates. (author)

  13. Parenchymal and Functional Lung Changes after Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer—Experiences from a Single Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Hörner-Rieber

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThis study aimed to evaluate parenchymal and functional lung changes following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and to correlate radiological and functional findings with patient and treatment characteristics as well as survival.Materials and methodsSeventy patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT from 2004 to 2015 with more than 1 year of CT follow-up scans were analyzed. Incidence, morphology, severity of acute and late lung abnormalities as well as pulmonary function changes were evaluated and correlated with outcome.ResultsMedian follow-up time was 32.2 months with 2-year overall survival (OS of 83% and local progression-free survival of 88%, respectively. Regarding parenchymal changes, most patients only developed mild to moderate CT abnormalities. Mean ipsilateral lung dose (MLD in biological effective dose and planning target volume size were significantly associated with maximum severity score of parenchymal changes (p = 0.014, p < 0.001. Furthermore, both maximum severity score and MLD were significantly connected with OS in univariate analysis (p = 0.043, p = 0.025. For functional lung changes, we detected significantly reduced total lung capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and forced vital capacity (FVC parameters after SBRT (p ≤ 0.001. Multivariate analyses revealed SBRT with an MLD ≥ 9.72 Gy and FVC reduction ≥0.54 L as independent prognostic factors for inferior OS (p = 0.029, p = 0.004.ConclusionSBRT was generally tolerated well with only mild toxicity. For evaluating the possible prognostic impact of MLD and FVC reduction on survival detected in this analysis, larger prospective studies are truly needed.

  14. Novel Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography of Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Disease Combining a Labeled Somatostatin Receptor Analogue and 2-Deoxy-2 [18F] Fluoro-D-Glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thida Win

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We prospectively investigated the potential of positron emission tomography (PET using the somatostatin receptor (SSTR analogue 68Ga-DOTATATE and 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG in diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD. Twenty-six patients (mean age 68.9 ± 11.0 years with DPLD were recruited for 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG combined PET/high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT studies. Ten patients had idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, 12 patients had nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, and 4 patients had other forms of DPLD. Using PET, the pulmonary tracer uptake (maximum standardized uptake value [SUVmax] was calculated. The distribution of PET tracer was compared to the distribution of lung parenchymal changes on HRCT. All patients demonstrated increased pulmonary PET signal with 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG. The distribution of parenchymal uptake was similar, with both tracers corresponding to the distribution of HRCT changes. The mean SUVmax was 2.2 ± 0.7 for 68Ga-DOTATATE and 2.8 ± 1.0 (t-test, p = .018 for 18F-FDG. The mean 68Ga-DOTATATE SUVmax in IPF patients was 2.5 ± 0.9, whereas it was 2.0 ± 0.7 (p = .235 in NSIP patients. The correlation between 68Ga-DOTATATE SUVmax and gas transfer (transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide [TLCO] was r = .34 (p = .127 and r = .49 (p = .028 between 18F-FDG SUVmax and TLCO. We provide noninvasive in vivo evidence in humans showing that SSTRs may be detected in the lungs of patients with DPLD in a similar distribution to sites of increased uptake of 18F-FDG on PET.

  15. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis with pulmonary parenchymal spread - report of two cases; Papilomatose respiratoria recorrente com disseminacao pulmonar - relato de dois casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto de; Campos, Rubia Mara Correia [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: rubiacampos@ig.com.br; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes Santos [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Pneumologia

    2002-04-01

    The authors report the cases of two adolescent patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis with pulmonary parenchymal spread. Both patients presented very similar initial symptoms and clinical evolution. The patients developed larynx papillomas in childhood causing obstruction to airflow and required permanent tracheostomy after several resection and recurrence episodes. Long time after they developed recurrent pulmonary infections. In both cases the disease was diagnosed through clinical history and high resolution computed tomography that revealed papillomas in the trachea and solid or cavitary nodules in the lungs. (author)

  16. Effect of insulin on albumin production and incorporation of 14C-leucine into proteins in isolated parenchymal liver cells from normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, J; Gluud, C N

    1975-01-01

    Parenchymal rat liver cells were isolated by a modification of the collagenase method of Quistorff, Bondesen and Grunnet. The cells secreted albumin into the medium and incorporated 14C-leucine both into cell proteins and proteins secreted into the medium. Albumin production measured from...... the immunologically determined increment in the incubation medium was 1.7 +/- 0.2 mug albumin/min per g liver wet wt. This is about 30% of the rate of production in the perfused liver. Addition of insulin (10(-6)-10(-10) M) enhanced albumin production (50-17%), and incorporation of 14C-leucine both into albumin (50...

  17. Relationships (II) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with ventilatory functions indices for parenchymal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Taro; Suganuma, Narufumi; Hering, Kurt G; Vehmas, Tapio; Itoh, Harumi; Akira, Masanori; Takashima, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Harukazu; Kusaka, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) is used to screen and diagnose respiratory illnesses. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the relationship between subject characteristics and parenchymal abnormalities according to ICOERD, and the results of ventilatory function tests (VFT). Thirty-five patients with and 27 controls without mineral-dust exposure underwent VFT and HRCT. We recorded all subjects' occupational history for mineral dust exposure and smoking history. Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities (Items) grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). High-resolution computed tomography showed that 11 patients had RO; 15 patients, IR; and 19 patients, EM. According to the multiple regression model, age and height had significant associations with many indices ventilatory functions such as vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The EM summed grades on the upper, middle, and lower zones of the right and left lungs also had significant associations with FEV1 and the maximum mid-expiratory flow rate. The results suggest the ICOERD notation is adequate based on the good and significant multiple regression modeling of ventilatory function with the EM summed grades.

  18. Intrapancreatic Parenchymal Injection of Cells as a Useful Tool for Allowing a Small Number of Proliferative Cells to Grow In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Sato

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In vivo inoculation of cells such as tumor cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS/embryonic stem (ES cells into immunocompromised mice has been considered as a powerful technique to evaluate their potential to proliferate or differentiate into various cell types originating from three germ cell layers. Subcutaneous grafting and grafting under the kidney capsule have been widely used for this purpose, but there are some demerits such as the requirement of a large number of tumor cells for inoculation and frequent failure of tumorigenesis. Therefore, grafting into other sites has been explored, including intratesticular or intramuscular grafting as well as grafting into the cochleae, liver, or salivary glands. In this study, we found that intrapancreatic parenchymal injection of cells is useful for allowing a small number of cells (~15 × 103 cells or ~30 cell clumps μL−1·site−1 to proliferate and sometimes differentiate into various types of cells. It requires only surgical exposure of the pancreas over the dorsal skin and subsequent injection of cells towards the pancreatic parenchyma under dissecting microscope-based observation using a mouthpiece-controlled glass micropipette. We now name this technology “intrapancreatic parenchymal cell transplantation (IPPCT”, which will be useful, especially when only a small number of cells or colonies are available.

  19. Relation between Mammographic Parenchymal Patterns and Breast Cancer Risk: Considering BMI, Compressed Breast Thickness and Age of Women in Tabriz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnati, Parinaz; Alizadeh, Hamed; Hoda, Haleh

    2016-01-01

    Mammographic density determined according paranchymal patterns is a risk factor for breast cancer and its relationships with body and other breast characteristics of women is important. The purpose of the present study was to correlate breast parenchymal patterns and mammography abnormality findings with women's BMI, compressed breast thickness (CBT) and age in Tabriz city, Iran. From 1,100 mammograms interpreted by radiologists, breast parenchymal was classified into four categories from Types 1 (mostly fatty) through 4 (mostly fibroglandular tissue). Age, BMI, and CBT were recorded and their relation with risk for the development of breast abnormalities in mammograms was analyzed. In women with a mean age of 45.8±8.63 years 17.7% were in the high density group (Type 3 and 4). A comparison of four types of breast paranchymal with BMI, CBT and age showed inverse relations to breast density. Abnormal mammographic findings were 25.8% of all reported mammograms with a circular mass (12.7%) as the most common abnormality. About 21% abnormal cases were in less than 40 years. Increasing of BMI had significant relation with breast abnormality but in CBT was not observed. Measurement of women's body characteristics is useful for assistance in mammography diagnosis as well as selection of imaging instrument by high sensitivity for following patient in future. The effects of age, CBT and BMI groups on the breast paranchymal were significant.

  20. Design-based stereological analysis of the lung parenchymal architecture and alveolar type II cells in surfactant protein A and D double deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, A; Allen, L; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2005-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II cells synthesize and secrete surfactant. The surfactant-associated proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D), members of the collectin protein family, participate in pulmonary immune defense, modulation of inflammation, and surfactant metabolism. Both proteins are known to have...... overlapping as well as distinct functions. The present study provides a design-based stereological analysis of adult mice deficient in both SP-A and SP-D (A(-)D(-)) with special emphasis on parameters characterizing alveolar architecture and surfactant-producing type II cells. Compared to wild-type, A......, but the mean volume of a single lamellar body remains constant. These results demonstrate that chronic deficiency of SP-A and SP-D in mice leads to parenchymal remodeling, type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and disturbed intracellular surfactant metabolism. The design-based stereological approach...

  1. MR-imaging of the breast at 0.5 Tesla: menstrual-cycle dependency of parenchymal contrast enhancement in healthy volunteers with oral contraceptive use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, J.; Welger, J.; Krupski, G.; Adam, G.; Lisboa, B.W.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate changes of contrast medium enhancement of the breast parenchyma due to menstrual cycle in healthy volunteers with oral contraceptive use in MR-imaging of the breast. Material and Methods: 15 healthy volunteers (age: 22 - 36, mean 28,2) without breast disease were examined two times during one menstrual cycle (days 7 - 14 and days 21 - 2). Two volunteers were examined only in the second part of the cycle (days 21 - 2). All volunteers used oral contraceptives for more than 6 month continuously. Examinations were performed with a 0,5 T magnet (dynamic 3D-gradient echo protocol with subtraction postprocessing). We evaluated the number of enhancing foci and the parenchymal contrast medium enhancement during the different phases of the cycle by region of interest. Results: Only a total of two enhancing foci were found in 2 of 17 volunteers. Time/signal intensity diagrams in these both cases were not suspicious ( [de

  2. Un caso de infeccion humana por cisticerco racemoso cerebral de localizacion parenquimatosa en Valdivia, Chile A case of human cerebral infection by parenchymal racemose cysticercus in Valdivia, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ortega

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso clínico de infección por cisticerco racemoso cerebral de localización parenquimatosa en un paciente de la ciudad de Valdivia (Chile cuyo diagnóstico definitivo se efectuó a través del estudio morfológico del parásito. Se discute brevemente la escasa frecuencia de la localización parenquimatosa del cisticerco racemoso, así como su diagnóstico diferencial con otros estados larvarios de cestodos que desarrollan en el sistema nervioso.A clinical case of cerebral infection by parenchymal racemose cysticercus, diagnosed by means of morphological characteristics in a patient of Valdivia city is described. The rare frequency of parenquimal location of racemose cysticercus as well as its differential diagnosis with other larval stages of cestodes that develop in the brain and its treatment are discussed.

  3. Usefulness of SPECT/CT in parathyroid lesion detection in patients with thyroid parenchymal {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sang Hyun; Rhee, Yumie; Yun, Mi Jin; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Cho, Arthur [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Won [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, International St. Mary' s Hospital,Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Parathyroid adenoma detection with dual-phase 99mTc-sestamibi (MIBI) scintigraphy depends on differential MIBI washout from thyroid. However, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) may cause MIBI to be retained in the thyroid gland and reduce parathyroid detection. We evaluated the impact of AITD on MIBI thyroid retention and additional benefit of SPECT/CT in these patients. Dual phase planar MIBI and SPECT/CT was performed on 82 patients. SPECT/CT was performed immediately after delayed planar scan. Thyroid density (Hounsfield unit, CT-HU) and size were measured on CT component of SPECT/CT. MIBI uptake in early scans and retention in delayed scans were visually graded and correlated with clinical factors and CT findings. Finally, planar and SPECT/CT findings were compared for parathyroid lesion visualization according to thyroid MIBI retention. In early scan, multivariate analysis showed only thyroid size predicted early uptake. In delayed scan, multivariate analysis showed higher visual grade in early scan, lower CT-HU or AITD were significant predictors for delayed thyroid parenchymal retention. Overall, ten more parathyroid lesions were visualized on SPECT/CT compared to planar scans (57 vs. 47, p = 0.002). SPECT/CT was especially more useful in patients with thyroidal MIBI retention, as eight out of the ten additional lesions detected were found in patients with thyroid MIBI retention. AITD is an important factor for MIBI thyroid parenchymal retention on delayed scans, and may impede parathyroid lesion detection. Patients with MIBI retention in the thyroid parenchyma on delayed scans are likely to benefit from an additional SPECT/CT.

  4. Recent advances in 2D and 3D in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes, alternative hepatocyte sources and non-parenchymal liver cells and their use in investigating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity, cell signaling and ADME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godoy, Patricio; Hewitt, Nicola J.; Albrecht, Ute; Andersen, Melvin E.; Ansari, Nariman; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Bode, Johannes Georg; Bolleyn, Jennifer; Borner, Christoph; Boettger, Jan; Braeuning, Albert; Budinsky, Robert A.; Burkhardt, Britta; Cameron, Neil R.; Camussi, Giovanni; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Rowlands, J. Craig; Dahmen, Uta; Damm, Georg; Dirsch, Olaf; Teresa Donato, Maria; Dong, Jian; Dooley, Steven; Drasdo, Dirk; Eakins, Rowena; Ferreira, Karine Sa; Fonsato, Valentina; Fraczek, Joanna; Gebhardt, Rolf; Gibson, Andrew; Glanemann, Matthias; Goldring, Chris E. P.; Jose Gomez-Lechon, Maria; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Gustavsson, Lena; Guyot, Christelle; Hallifax, David; Hammad, Seddik; Hayward, Adam; Haeussinger, Dieter; Hellerbrand, Claus; Hewitt, Philip; Hoehme, Stefan; Holzhuetter, Hermann-Georg; Houston, J. Brian; Hrach, Jens; Ito, Kiyomi; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Keitel, Verena; Kelm, Jens M.; Park, B. Kevin; Kordes, Claus; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A.; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Lu, Peng; Luebke-Wheeler, Jennifer; Lutz, Anna; Maltman, Daniel J.; Matz-Soja, Madlen; McMullen, Patrick; Merfort, Irmgard; Messner, Simon; Meyer, Christoph; Mwinyi, Jessica; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Nussler, Andreas K.; Olinga, Peter; Pampaloni, Francesco; Pi, Jingbo; Pluta, Linda; Przyborski, Stefan A.; Ramachandran, Anup; Rogiers, Vera; Rowe, Cliff; Schelcher, Celine; Schmich, Kathrin; Schwarz, Michael; Singh, Bijay; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Stieger, Bruno; Stoeber, Regina; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Tetta, Ciro; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu; Weiss, Thomas S.; Widera, Agata; Woods, Courtney G.; Xu, Jinghai James; Yarborough, Kathy M.; Hengstler, Jan G.

    This review encompasses the most important advances in liver functions and hepatotoxicity and analyzes which mechanisms can be studied in vitro. In a complex architecture of nested, zonated lobules, the liver consists of approximately 80 % hepatocytes and 20 % non-parenchymal cells, the latter being

  5. Post-tuberculosis pulmonary function and noninfectious pulmonary disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irfan

    2016-01-01

    A variety of noninfectious pulmonary disorders are also common in post-TB patients. (1 Parenchymal disorders that include thin-walled cavities (open negative syndrome, and lung fibrosis with structural destruction and scar carcinoma. (2 Airway disorders that include subglottic stenosis, chronic obstructive air flow obstruction, bronchiectasis, tracheobronchial stenosis, anthracofibrosis, and broncholithiasis. (3 Vascular lesions such as Rasmussen aneurysm. (4 Pleural lesions that range from pleural thickening to severe fibrothorax. (5 General complications that include cor pulmonale, secondary amyloidosis, and chronic respiratory failure. The prevalence of these abnormalities among patients completing anti-TB treatment is alarmingly high. In fact, some studies have suggested greater morbidity from the sequelae rather than from the disease itself. It is important to be aware of the full spectrum of these disorders to facilitate early diagnosis and management.

  6. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Bulimia What Causes Eating Disorders? Sports and Eating Disorders Effects of Eating Disorders Treatment for Eating Disorders Print ... when they are biologically destined to gain it. Effects of Eating Disorders Eating disorders are serious medical illnesses. They often ...

  7. Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play ...

  8. Doença parenquimatosa renal: correlação histológico-sonográfica Renal parenchymal disease: histopathologic-sonographic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordeval Cavalcante Araújo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo foi planejado para avaliar a correlação da ecografia do rim com as lesões histológicas e com os achados clínico-laboratoriais na doença parenquimatosa renal, por análise de regressão logística multivariada. MÉTODOS: Os dados clínicos, laboratoriais, ecográficos e as biópsias foram avaliados em 154 pacientes. A ecogenicidade cortical foi graduada como menor que grau zero, igual a grau um ou maior que grau dois a do parênquima hepático ou esplênico. As lesões histológicas - proliferação mesangial (PM, permeação leucocitária (PL, crescente e necrose fibrinóide (CNF, infiltrado inflamatório intersticial (II, esclerose glomerular segmentar (ES, obsolescência glomerular (OG, atrofia tubular (AT, fibrose intersticial (FI e edema intersticial (EI - foram graduadas de acordo com a extensão, em normal (0%, leve (25% 50%. RESULTADOS: a II, FI, ES, EI e creatinina elevada ocorreram menos no grau 0 de ecogenicidade cortical; b PM, hipertensão arterial e espessura normal do parênquima foram preditores do grau 1 de ecogenicidade cortical; c FI, EI, creatinina elevada e parênquima fino foram preditores do grau 2 de ecogenicidade cortical; d Excluindos os obesos, em jovens com hematócrito baixo, a pirâmide proeminente foi mais comum; e Creatinina elevada e OG foram preditores de rins pequenos. CONCLUSÃO: A ecogenicidade cortical foi um sensível marcador de doença parenquimatosa renal. Lesões distintas mais do que o grau de severidade da lesão contribuiram para o aumento da ecogenicidade cortical. O EI aumenta exponencialmente o efeito da FI na ecogenicidade cortical.PURPOSE: This study was designed to address the correlation between sonography of a kidney with histological lesions and clinical findings in patients with renal parenchymal disease based on a multivariate logistic regression analysis. METHODS: Clinical and laboratory data, sonograms and renal biopsies were evaluated in 154 patients. Cortical

  9. Background {sup 99m}Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile uptake of breast-specific gamma imaging in relation to background parenchymal enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Kim, Bom Sahn [Ewha Womans University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Yangchun-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yemi [Ewha Womans University, Clinical Research Institute and Department of Conservative Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jee Eun [Ewha Womans University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    This study investigated factors that could affect background uptake of {sup 99m}Tc- methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) on normal breast by breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI). In addition, the impact of background {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI uptake on the diagnostic performance of BSGI was further investigated. One hundred forty-five women with unilateral breast cancer who underwent BSGI, MRI, and mammography were retrospectively enrolled. Background uptake on BSGI was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. Patients were classified into non-dense and dense breast groups according to mammographic breast density. Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) was rated according to BI-RADS classification. The relationship of age, menopausal status, mammographic breast density, and BPE with background {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI uptake was analyzed. Heterogeneous texture and high background uptake ratio on BSGI were significantly correlated with younger age (p < 0.001, respectively), premenopausal status (p < 0.001 and p = 0.003), dense breast (p < 0.001, respectively), and marked BPE (p < 0.001, respectively). On multivariate analysis, only BPE remained a significant factor for background MIBI uptake (p < 0.001).There was a significant reduction in positive predictive value (p = 0.024 and p = 0.002) as background MIBI uptake and BPE grade increased. BPE on MRI was the most important factor for background MIBI uptake on BSGI. High background MIBI uptake or marked BPE can diminish the diagnostic performance of BSGI. (orig.)

  10. Laparoscopic parenchymal preserving liver resections for colorectal liver metastases in the era of highly effective systemic therapy and selective internal radiation therapy can often prevent a hemihepatectomy. (With video).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hondt, Mathieu; Ververken, Frédéric; Nuytens, Frederiek

    2017-12-01

    Preservation of hepatic parenchyma is important in liver surgery to prevent postoperative liver failure and according to some reports it could offer a prolonged survival and lower recurrence rates compared to major hepatectomies in patients with colorectal liver metastases. However, laparoscopic parenchyma-preserving liver resections can be technically challenging. The aim of this video is to illustrate the concept of laparoscopic parenchymal-preserving liver resections after conversion chemotherapy with targeted therapy. In this video we present three cases in which a laparoscopic parenchymal-preserving liver resection was performed after neo-adjuvant therapy: the first patient had a giant solitary colorectal metastasis in segment V and VIII. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was given, resulting in a 30% volume reduction of the lesion after which a laparoscopic anterior sectionectomy was successfully performed. The second patient had five colorectal liver metastases. After conversion chemotherapy, four remaining metastases were resected by laparoscopic surgery. The last patient had 7 colorectal liver metastases. After 18 cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and a good response to selective internal radiation therapy, a laparoscopic liver resection of six metastases and radiofrequency ablation of 1 central lesion were performed. The video of these three cases shows that laparoscopic parenchymal-preserving liver surgery is feasible after neo-adjuvant systemic therapy and selective internal radiation therapy. The emergence of more effective systemic chemotherapies with biologicals and SIRT for the treatment of colorectal liver metastases often creates a possibility for parenchymal-preserving liver resections to achieve an R0 resection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Steady-state captopril renography: continuous monitoring of the captopril-induced increase in {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3} mean parenchymal transit time in renovascular hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Esper, I. [Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Amiens (France); Chajari, M`H. [Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Amiens (France); Fonroget, J. [Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Amiens (France); Neveu, J.P. [Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Amiens (France); Makdassi, R. [Department of Nephrology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Amiens (France); Bailly, P. [Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Amiens (France); Fournier, A. [Department of Nephrology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Amiens (France)

    1997-07-01

    Steady-state captopril renography (SSCR) is an original technique for assessing the captopril-induced increase in technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ({sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}) mean parenchymal transit time (MPTT) in kidneys affected with functional renal artery stenosis (RAS). The steady-state parenchymal activity achieved by constant infusion of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}is directly linked to the MPTT of the radiopharmaceutical. This steady-state parenchymal activity was continuously monitored from 15 min before to 60 min after a single dose of captopril in order to detect possible disruption of the steady state. SSCR was performed in 11 hypertensive patients with unilateral RAS and in two with RAS of a solitary kidney before renal revascularization (RR). In four of these patients, an additional SSCR was performed after RR. Of the ten patients whose hypertension was cured or improved by RR, one presented an uninterpretable SSCR and six presented a positive SSCR on the affected side. Control SSCR performed in four of these six patients was bilaterally negative. SSCR was also bilaterally negative in the three patients who showed no blood pressure response to RR. These preliminary results tend to indicate that, in spite of the stability of pre- and post-captopril hydration and data acquisition conditions allowed by this steady-state technique, the sensitivity is lower than expected. However, the reason for the false-negative results does not seem to be inherent to SSCR. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A NEW SCALING RELATION FOR H II REGIONS IN SPIRAL GALAXIES: UNVEILING THE TRUE NATURE OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Díaz, A. I.; Sánchez, S. F.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Mast, D.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Husemann, B.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of a local mass, metallicity, star formation relation using spatially resolved optical spectroscopy of H II regions in the local universe. One of the projections of this distribution—the local mass-metallicity relation—extends over a wide range in this parameter space: three orders of magnitude in mass and a factor of eight in metallicity. We explain the new relation as the combined effect of the differential distributions of mass and metallicity in the disks of galaxies, and a selective star formation efficiency. We use this local relation to reproduce—with a noticeable agreement—the mass-metallicity relation seen in galaxies, and conclude that the latter is a scale-up integrated effect of a local relation, supporting the inside-out growth and downsizing scenarios of galaxy evolution.

  13. Levels and Age Dependency of Neurofilament Light and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in Healthy Individuals and Their Relation to the Brain Parenchymal Fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Vågberg

    Full Text Available Neurofilament light (NFL and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP are integral parts of the axonal and astrocytal cytoskeletons respectively and are released into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in cases of cellular damage. In order to interpret the levels of these biomarkers in disease states, knowledge on normal levels in the healthy is required. Another biomarker for neurodegeneration is brain atrophy, commonly measured as brain parenchymal fraction (BPF using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Potential correlations between levels of NFL, GFAP and BPF in healthy individuals have not been investigated.To present levels of NFL and GFAP in healthy individuals stratified for age, and investigate the correlation between them as well as their correlation with BPF.The CSF was analysed in 53 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 70 (1 sample missing for GFAP analysis and 48 of the volunteers underwent determination of BPF using MRI.Mean (±SD NFL was 355 ng/L (±214, mean GFAP was 421 ng/L (±129 and mean BPF was 0.867 (±0.035. All three biomarkers correlated with age. NFL also correlated with both GFAP and BPF. When controlled for age, only the correlation between NFL and GFAP retained statistical significance.This study presents data on age-stratified levels of NFL and GFAP in the CSF of healthy individuals. There is a correlation between levels of NFL and GFAP and both increase with age. A correlation between NFL and BPF was also found, but did not retain statistical significance if controlled for age.

  14. Dynamic analysis of amyloid β-protein in behaving mice reveals opposing changes in ISF versus parenchymal Aβ during age-related plaque formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soyon; Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Ostaszewski, Beth L; Podlisny, Daniel R; Cavanaugh, William T; Yang, Ting; Holtzman, David M; Cirrito, John R; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2011-11-02

    Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that soluble, diffusible forms of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) are pathogenically important in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and thus have both diagnostic and therapeutic salience. To learn more about the dynamics of soluble Aβ economy in vivo, we used microdialysis to sample the brain interstitial fluid (ISF), which contains the most soluble Aβ species in brain at steady state, in >40 wake, behaving APP transgenic mice before and during the process of Aβ plaque formation (age 3-28 months). Diffusible forms of Aβ, especially Aβ(42), declined significantly in ISF as mice underwent progressive parenchymal deposition of Aβ. Moreover, radiolabeled Aβ administered at physiological concentrations into ISF revealed a striking difference in the fate of soluble Aβ in plaque-rich (vs plaque-free) mice: it clears more rapidly from the ISF and becomes more associated with the TBS-extractable pool, suggesting that cerebral amyloid deposits can rapidly sequester soluble Aβ from the ISF. Likewise, acute γ-secretase inhibition in plaque-free mice showed a marked decline of Aβ(38), Aβ(40), and Aβ(42), whereas in plaque-rich mice, Aβ(42) declined significantly less. These results suggest that most of the Aβ(42) that populates the ISF in plaque-rich mice is derived not from new Aβ biosynthesis but rather from the large reservoir of less soluble Aβ(42) in brain parenchyma. Together, these and other findings herein illuminate the in vivo dynamics of soluble Aβ during the development of AD-type neuropathology and after γ-secretase inhibition and help explain the apparent paradox that CSF Aβ(42) levels fall as humans develop AD.

  15. Non-invasive assessment of vasospasm following aneurysmal SAH using C-arm FDCT parenchymal blood volume measurement in the neuro-interventional suite: Technical feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Jonathan; Corkill, Rufus; Byrne, James V

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasospasm is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) surviving the initial ictus. Commonly used techniques for vasospasm assessment are digital subtraction angiography and transcranial Doppler sonography. These techniques can reliably identify only the major vessel spasm and fail to estimate its haemodynamic significance. To overcome these issues and to enable comprehensive non-invasive assessment of vasospasm inside the interventional suite, a novel protocol involving measurement of parenchymal blood volume (PBV) using C-arm flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) was implemented. Materials and methods Patients from the neuro-intensive treatment unit (ITU) with suspected vasospasm following aneurysmal SAH were scanned with a biplane C-arm angiography system using an intravenous contrast injection protocol. The PBV maps were generated using prototype software. Contemporaneous clinically indicated MR scan including the diffusion- and perfusion-weighted sequences was performed. C-arm PBV maps were compared against the MR perfusion maps. Results Distribution of haemodynamic impairment on C-arm PBV maps closely matched the pattern of abnormality on MR perfusion maps. On visual comparison between the two techniques, the extent of abnormality indicated PBV to be both cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume weighted. Conclusion C-arm FDCT PBV measurements allow an objective assessment of the severity and localisation of cerebral hypoperfusion resulting from vasospasm. The technique has proved feasible and useful in very sick patients after aneurysmal SAH. The promise shown in this early study indicates that it deserves further evaluation both for post-SAH vasospasm and in other relevant clinical settings. PMID:26017197

  16. Castleman disease-associated diffuse parenchymal lung disease: A STROBE-compliant retrospective observational analysis of 22 cases in a tertiary Chinese hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Feng, Ruie; Li, Jian; Song, Xinyu; Li, Shan; Xu, Kai; Cao, Jian; Zhang, Lu; Bi, Yalan; Xu, Zuojun

    2017-09-01

    Intrathoracic involvement is common in Castleman disease (CD), but CD-associated diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD) is rare and not well-reported.We conducted a retrospective analysis of 262 CD patients with a definite pathological diagnosis who were hospitalized between 1999 and 2015.Twenty-two CD patients had DPLD based on chest computed tomography (CT) scans. Among them, 9 were male and 13 were female, with a mean age of 45.3 years. Coughing (72.7%), fever (68.2%), and dyspnea (59.1%) were the common clinical manifestations. In high-resolution CT, obvious lymphadenopathy (81.8%) was the most frequent, followed by multiple nodules of different sizes (72.7%), cysts (59.1%), and patches of ground-glass opacity (54.5%). Six patients had lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP)-like CT images. Superficial lymph node biopsies (63.6%), video-assisted thoracic surgery lung biopsies (27.3%), CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies (9.1%), and endoscopic lymph node biopsies (9.1%) were performed to make final diagnoses. The hyaline vascular variant (27.3%), the plasma cell variant (63.6%), and the mixed variant (9.1%) were the pathological subtypes. All but 2 were prescribed chemotherapy, and none was administered anti-interleukin-6 therapy. Among them, 14 patients improved, 3 died, 2 were stable, 2 were refractory, and 1 was lost to follow-up.Chinese CD-associated DPLD might be more prevalent in middle-aged female patients, with most cases being the plasma cell variant. Although a LIP-like pattern was reported, only one-quarter of the patients showed LIP-like CT images. Multiple nodules (especially solid nodules), cysts, and patchy areas were the common pulmonary radiological findings. More than half of the patients improved after chemotherapy. A well-designed prospective study should be performed to confirm these results.

  17. Diagnostic value of the delayed phase image for iso-attenuating pancreatic carcinomas in the pancreatic parenchymal phase on multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, Kousei; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Irie, Hiroyuki; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Asayama, Yoshiki; Nishie, Akihiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Daisuke; Nagata, Shigenori; Nishihara, Yunosuke; Yamaguchi, Koji; Taketomi, Akinobu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of the delayed phase (DP) in pancreatic carcinomas which appear iso-attenuating in the pancreatic parenchymal phase (PPP). Materials and methods: Fifty-seven preoperative MDCT studies of pancreatic carcinomas were retrospectively reviewed. The size of the tumors, and the Hounsfield unit (HU) of the tumors and pancreatic parenchyma were measured. The tumor-to-pancreas contrast (TPC: |HU [tumor] - HU [normal pancreas]|) was calculated. Results: Eight cases (14.0%) showed iso-attenuation and 49 showed hypo-attenuation in the PPP. The DP images revealed seven of eight (87.5%) iso-attenuating tumors to be hyper-attenuating. The size of iso-attenuating tumors was smaller than that of hypo-attenuating tumors (mean ± S.D.: 12.4 ± 4.8 mm vs. 30.3 ± 9.0 mm, p < 0.0001). In hypo-attenuating tumors, TPC in the PPP (60.2 ± 24.6 HU) was higher than those in the portal venous phase (PVP, 40.5 ± 23.0 HU, p < 0.0001) and DP (18.3 ± 11.8 HU, p < 0.0001). In contrast, in iso-attenuating tumors, TPC in the DP (26.0 ± 4.9 HU) was higher than those in the PPP (9.2 ± 3.7 HU, p = 0.0003) and PVP (7.1 ± 4.7 HU, p = 0.001) phases. Conclusion: The DP image is helpful in depicting small iso-attenuating pancreatic carcinomas as slightly hyper-attenuating tumors

  18. Delayed parenchymal transit during Tc-99m MAG3 renography is a valuable sign in diagnosing urinary obstruction in patients with early hydronephrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Woo; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Kim, Jae Seung; Ryu, Jin Sook; Lee, Hee Kyung [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    Diuretic renography (DR) can be false negative with upper urinary tract obstruction due to low compliance of the renal pelvis. Delayed parenchymal transit (DPT) may be a valuable sign in case of false negative DR. We compared the diagnostic values of DR and DPT during Tc-99m MAG3 diuretic scan in adults with suspected unilateral obstructive uropathy. Fifty-four patients (male:female=30:24, age: 40.7{+-}15.5 yrs) who underwent Tc-99m MAG3 diuretic scan due to suspicious unilateral obstructive uropathy were analyzed. DR with a T{sub 1/2} of > 15 min was considered as positive for obstruction. DPT was considered to be present when there was delayed appearance of radioactivity in the renal pelvis and prolonged retention of radioactivity in the renal pelvis and prolonged retention of radioactivity in the renal parenchyma. The renal area ratio was defined as the ratio of pixel number of hydronephrotic after intervention, or aggravated hydronephrosis without intervention. Non-obstruction was defined as unchanged hydronephrosis over 6 months. Twenty-six renal units had obstruction and 28 no obstruction. The sensitivities of DR and DPT were 69% (18/26) and 50% (13/26) respectively. Two renal units with DPT but negative DR showed DPT had lower renal area ratio than 7 renal units without DPT (0.97{+-}0.20 vs 1.30{+-}0.41, p<0.05). Differential renal function was not significantly different between these groups. DPT correctly diagnosed all renal units with non-obstruction (specificity 100%), while the specificity of DR was 89% (25/28). DPT during Tc-99m MAG3 diuretic scan may be a valuable sign in diagnosing urinary obstruction especially in patients with false negative DR and early HN.

  19. Mammographic parenchymal pattern and breast cancer risk profile of Papua New Guinean women - A baseline study of the screening population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, R; Spuur, K; Umo, P

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this research is to evidence for the first time the breast density of Papua New Guinean (PNG) women as described by mammographic parenchymal patterns (MPPs) and profile breast cancer risk; to examine the relationship of age and MPPs. A retrospective analysis of 1161 screening mammograms of women who had undergone imaging at the Pacific International Hospital (PIH) was undertaken. Mammograms were classified into one of five Tabár MPPs; age was recorded in years. Descriptive analysis of the data for pattern distribution and a chi-square test, to test for relationships between age and pattern type were undertaken. The majority (51.42%) of women had Pattern I breasts; Pattern II (30.58%), Pattern III (4.31%), Pattern IV (7.24%), and Pattern V (6.46%). The mean age was 38.8 with a range of 30-80 years; there were no obvious differences in mean age across the categories of patterns. A chi-square test reported no evidence of a relationship between age and pattern type (p-value = 0.504). Pattern V differed from other patterns, with proportionally more women aged over 50 and less aged in their 40s. This study sets a baseline for future studies of the MPPs of PNG women, and demonstrated that in this snapshot of PNG women, there is no unique distribution of MPPs and no increased risk of breast cancer based on breast density profile. This result does not help to explain the high incidence of breast cancer in PNG. A more comprehensive study of the PNG screening population is required to validate this study. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Contrast-enhanced MRI after neoadjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer: lesion-to-background parenchymal signal enhancement ratio for discriminating pathological complete response from minimal residual tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Cho, Nariya; Shin, Sung Ui; Lee, Han-Byoel; Han, Wonshik; Park, In Ae; Kwon, Bo Ra; Kim, Soo Yeon; Lee, Su Hyun; Chang, Jung Min; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2018-01-29

    To retrospectively investigate whether the lesion-to-background parenchymal signal enhancement ratio (SER) on breast MRI can distinguish pathological complete response (pCR) from minimal residual cancer following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAT), and compare its performance with the conventional criterion. 216 breast cancer patients who had undergone NAT and MRI and achieved pCR or minimal residual cancer on surgical histopathology were included. Clinical-pathological features, SER and lesion size on MR images were analysed. Multivariate logistic regression, ROC curve and McNemar's test were performed. SER on early-phase MR images was independently associated with pCR (odds ratio [OR], 0.286 [95% CI: 0.113-0.725], p = .008 for Reader 1; OR, 0.306 [95% CI: 0.111-0.841], p = .022 for Reader 2). Compared with the conventional criterion, SER ≤1.6 increased AUC (0.585-0.599 vs. 0.709-0.771, p=.001-.033) and specificity (21.9-27.4% vs. 80.8-86.3%, p highest specificity of 90.4%. SER on early-phase MR images was independently associated with pCR, and showed improved AUC and specificity compared to the conventional criterion. The combined criterion of SER and size could be used to select candidates to avoid surgery in a future study. • Compared with conventional criterion, SER ≤ 1.6 criterion increased AUC and specificity. • Simple measurement of signal intensity could differentiate pCR from minimal residual cancer. • SER ≤1.6 and/or size≤0.2cm criterion showed the highest specificity of 90.4 %. • The combined criterion could be used for a study to avoid surgery.

  1. Cytotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloid in human hepatic parenchymal and sinusoidal endothelial cells: Firm evidence for the reactive metabolites mediated pyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengbi; Ruan, Jianqing; Fu, Peter P; Lin, Ge

    2016-01-05

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) widely distribute in plants and can cause hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS), which typically presents as a primary sinusoidal endothelial cell damage. It is well-recognized that after ingestion, PAs undergo hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYPs)-mediated metabolic activation to generate dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids (DHPAs), which are hydrolyzed to dehydroretronecine (DHR). DHPAs and DHR are reactive metabolites having same core pyrrole moiety, and can bind proteins to form pyrrole-protein adducts, which are believed as the primary cause for PA-induced HSOS. However, to date, the direct evidences supporting the toxicity of DHPAs and DHR in the liver, in particular in the sinusoidal endothelial cells, are lacking. Using human hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSEC) and HepG2 (representing hepatic parenchymal cells), cells that lack CYPs activity, this study determined the direct cytotoxicity of dehydromonocrotaline, a representative DHPA, and DHR, but no cytotoxicity of the intact PA (monocrotaline) in both cell lines, confirming that reactive metabolites mediate PA intoxication. Comparing with HepG2, HSEC had significantly lower basal glutathione (GSH) level, and was significantly more susceptible to the reactive metabolites with severer GSH depletion and pyrrole-protein adducts formation. The toxic potency of two reactive metabolites was also compared. DHPA was more reactive than DHR, leading to severer toxicity. In conclusion, our results unambiguously provided the first direct evidence for the critical role of DHPA and DHR in the reactive metabolites-mediated PA-induced hepatotoxicity, which occurs predominantly in HSEC due to severe GSH depletion and the significant formation of pyrrole-protein adducts in HSEC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make treatment less successful. Examples include: Anxiety disorders Eating disorders Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Alcohol or drug problems Physical health problems, such as heart disease, thyroid ...

  3. Schizoaffective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder Images Schizoaffective disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  4. Cyclothymic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Cyclothymic disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, 2013:139-141. Fava M, Ostergaard SD, Cassano P. Mood disorders: depressive disorders (major ...

  5. Parenchymal reflux in renal dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinckney, L.E.; Currarino, G.; Weinberg, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Primitive ducts, tubules, and cysts often communicate with the pelvocalyceal systems of dysplastic kidneys, and may sometimes be filled in retrograde fashion with radiographic contrast material. Their size, shape, and distribution provide a variable radiographic appearance that must be distinguished from other causes of intrarenal reflux. When reflux filling of dysplastic structures is incomplete, the radiographic findings do not fully represent the severity of anatomic abnormality

  6. Separate Ways: The Mass–Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Heckman, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sánchez, S. F. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-264, 04510 México, D.F., México (Mexico); Blanc, G. A., E-mail: jbarrer3@jhu.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Collaboration: MaNGA Team

    2017-07-20

    We present the integrated stellar mass–metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R {sub eff}) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  7. Separate Ways: The Mass–Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Heckman, T.; Sánchez, S. F.; Blanc, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the integrated stellar mass–metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R eff ) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  8. A local leaky-box model for the local stellar surface density-gas surface density-gas phase metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Yan, Renbin; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the relation between the stellar surface density, the gas surface density and the gas-phase metallicity of typical disc galaxies in the local Universe with the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, using the star formation rate surface density as an indicator for the gas surface density. We show that these three local parameters form a tight relationship, confirming previous works (e.g. by the PINGS and CALIFA surveys), but with a larger sample. We present a new local leaky-box model, assuming star-formation history and chemical evolution is localized except for outflowing materials. We derive closed-form solutions for the evolution of stellar surface density, gas surface density and gas-phase metallicity, and show that these parameters form a tight relation independent of initial gas density and time. We show that, with canonical values of model parameters, this predicted relation match the observed one well. In addition, we briefly describe a pathway to improving the current semi-analytic models of galaxy formation by incorporating the local leaky-box model in the cosmological context, which can potentially explain simultaneously multiple properties of Milky Way-type disc galaxies, such as the size growth and the global stellar mass-gas metallicity relation.

  9. Separate Ways: The Mass-Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Heckman, T.; Blanc, G. A.; The MaNGA Team

    2017-07-01

    We present the integrated stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R eff) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  10. Are Qualitative Assessments of Background Parenchymal Enhancement, Amount of Fibroglandular Tissue on MR Images, and Mammographic Density Associated with Breast Cancer Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontchos, Brian N.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Korde, Larissa A.; Lam, Diana L.; Scheel, John R.; Peacock, Sue; Lehman, Constance D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether qualitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging assessments of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT), and mammographic density are associated with risk of developing breast cancer in women who are at high risk. Materials and Methods In this institutional review board–approved HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, all screening breast MR images obtained from January 2006 to December 2011 in women aged 18 years or older and at high risk for but without a history of breast cancer were identified. Women in whom breast cancer was diagnosed after index MR imaging comprised the cancer cohort, and one-to-one matching (age and BRCA status) of each woman with breast cancer to a control subject was performed by using MR images obtained in women who did not develop breast cancer with follow-up time maximized. Amount of BPE, BPE pattern (peripheral vs central), amount of FGT at MR imaging, and mammographic density were assessed on index images. Imaging features were compared between cancer and control cohorts by using conditional logistic regression. Results Twenty-three women at high risk (mean age, 47 years ± 10 [standard deviation]; six women had BRCA mutations) with no history of breast cancer underwent screening breast MR imaging; in these women, a diagnosis of breast cancer (invasive, n = 12; in situ, n = 11) was made during the follow-up interval. Women with mild, moderate, or marked BPE were nine times more likely to receive a diagnosis of breast cancer during the follow-up interval than were those with minimal BPE (P = .007; odds ratio = 9.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 71.0). BPE pattern, MR imaging amount of FGT, and mammographic density were not significantly different between the cohorts (P = .5, P = .5, and P = .4, respectively). Conclusion Greater BPE was associated with a higher probability of developing breast cancer in women at high risk for cancer and warrants further study. © RSNA

  11. Preliminary assessment of interand intraobserver reproducibility, and normative values of renal mean transit time (MTT) and parenchymal transit time (PTT) for 99mTc-etylenodicysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Paweł; Surma, Marian; Woźnicki, Wojciech; Bieńkiewicz, Małgorzata; Płachcińska, Anna; Kuśmierek, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    renal scintigraphy used in this study is reproducible. Normative values of MTT and PTT for 99mTc-EC were established as 200 s and 170 s, respectively. An attempt to optimize and standardize the technique of determining parenchymal ROI in a matrix deconvolution method, followed by an evaluation of clinical usefulness of these parameters in the diagnosis of chosen renal function impairments would be a logical continuation of this initial research.

  12. Is there a uniform approach to the management of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD in the UK? A national benchmarking exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partridge Martyn R

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benchmarking is the comparison of a process to the work or results of others. We conducted a national benchmarking exercise to determine how UK pulmonologists manage common clinical scenarios in diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD, and to determine current use and availability of investigative resources. We compared management decisions to existing international guidelines. Methods Consultant members of the British Thoracic Society were mailed a questionnaire seeking their views on the management of three common scenarios in DPLD. They were asked to choose from various management options for each case. Information was also obtained from the respondents on time served as a consultant, type of institution in which they worked and the availability of a local radiologist and histopathologist with an interest/expertise in thoracic medicine. Results 370 out of 689 consultants replied (54% response rate. There were many differences in the approach to the management of all three cases. Given a scenario of relapsing pulmonary sarcoidosis in a lady with multiple co-morbidities, half of respondents would institute treatment with a variety of immunosuppressants while a half would simply observe. 42% would refer a 57-year old lady with new onset DPLD for a surgical lung biopsy, while a similar number would not. 80% would have referred her for transplantation, but a fifth would not. 50% of consultants from district general hospitals would have opted for a surgical biopsy compared to 24% from cardiothoracic centres: this may reflect greater availability of a radiologist with special interest in thoracic imaging in cardiothoracic centres, obviating the need for tissue diagnosis. Faced with an elderly male with high resolution CT thorax (HRCT evidence of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, three quarters would observe, while a quarter would start immunosuppressants. 11% would refer for a surgical biopsy. 14% of UK pulmonologists responding

  13. Relationships (I) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with the ILO International Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses for parenchymal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Taro; Suganuma, Narufumi; Hering, Kurt G; Vehmas, Tapio; Itoh, Harumi; Akira, Masanori; Takashima, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Harukazu; Kusaka, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) has been developed for the screening, diagnosis, and epidemiological reporting of respiratory diseases caused by occupational hazards. This study aimed to establish a correlation between readings of HRCT (according to the ICOERD) and those of chest radiography (CXR) pneumoconiotic parenchymal opacities (according to the International Labor Organization Classification/International Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses [ILO/ICRP]). Forty-six patients with and 28 controls without mineral dust exposure underwent posterior-anterior CXR and HRCT. We recorded all subjects' exposure and smoking history. Experts independently read CXRs (using ILO/ICRP). Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). The correlation between the ICOERD summed grades and ILO/ICRP profusions was evaluated using Spearman's rank-order correlation. Twenty-three patients had small opacities on CXR. HRCT showed that 21 patients had RO; 20 patients, IR opacities; and 23 patients, EM. The correlation between ILO/ICRP profusions and the ICOERD grades was 0.844 for rounded opacities (p<0.01). ICOERD readings from HRCT scans correlated well with previously validated ILO/ICRP criteria. The ICOERD adequately detects pneumoconiotic micronodules and can be used for the interpretation of pneumoconiosis.

  14. What is the best technique in parenchymal transection in laparoscopic liver resection? Comprehensive review for the clinical question on the 2nd International Consensus Conference on Laparoscopic Liver Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Hironori; Cleary, Sean P; Buell, Joseph F; Cai, Xiujun; Wakabayashi, Go

    2015-05-01

    The continuing evolution of technique and devices used in laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has allowed successful application of this minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of liver disease. However, the type of instruments by energy sources and technique used vary among each institution. We reviewed the literature to seek the best technique for parenchymal transection, which was proposed as one of the important clinical question in the 2nd International Consensus Conference on LLR held on October 2014. While publications have described transection techniques used in LLR from 1991 to June 2014, it is difficult to specify the best technique and device for laparoscopic hepatic parenchymal transection, owing to a lack of randomized trials with only a small number of comparative studies. However, it is clear that instruments should be used in combination with others based on their functions and the depth of liver resection. Most authors have reported using staplers to secure and divide major vessels. Preparation for prevention of unexpected hemorrhaging particularly in liver cirrhosis, the Pringle's maneuver and prompt technique for hemostasis should be performed. We conclude that hepatobiliary surgeons should select techniques based on their familiarity with a concrete understanding of instruments and individualize to the procedure of LLR. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  15. Dissociative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... actions and identity. People with dissociative disorders escape reality in ways that are involuntary and unhealthy and ... conditions. Complications People with dissociative disorders are at increased risk of complications and associated disorders, such as: ...

  16. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  17. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Therapist Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Helping Kids Cope With Stress Helping Kids Handle Worry Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Childhood Stress Anxiety Disorders Special Needs Factsheet Social Phobia Special Needs Factsheet Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) ...

  18. Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder. It causes panic attacks, which are sudden feelings of terror ... their lives and they cannot leave their homes. Panic disorder is more common in women than men. It ...

  19. The vitamin D, ionised calcium and parathyroid hormone axis of cerebral capillary function: therapeutic considerations for vascular-based neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Virginie; Takechi, Ryusuke; Pallabage-Gamarallage, Menuka; Giles, Corey; Mamo, John C L

    2015-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterised by brain parenchymal extravasation of plasma proteins may contribute to risk of neurodegenerative disorders, however the mechanisms for increased capillary permeability are not understood. Increasing evidence suggests vitamin D confers central nervous system benefits and there is increasing demand for vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D may influence the CNS via modulation of capillary function, however such effects may be indirect as it has a central role in maintaining calcium homeostasis, in concert with calcium regulatory hormones. This study utilised an integrated approach and investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation, parathyroid tissue ablation (PTX), or exogenous infusion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cerebral capillary integrity. Parenchymal extravasation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) was used as a marker of cerebral capillary permeability. In C57BL/6J mice and Sprague Dawley rats, dietary vitamin D was associated with exaggerated abundance of IgG within cerebral cortex (CTX) and hippocampal formation (HPF). Vitamin D was also associated with increased plasma ionised calcium (iCa) and decreased PTH. A response to dose was suggested and parenchymal effects persisted for up to 24 weeks. Ablation of parathyroid glands increased CTX- and HPF-IgG abundance concomitant with a reduction in plasma iCa. With the provision of PTH, iCa levels increased, however the PTH treated animals did not show increased cerebral permeability. Vitamin D supplemented groups and rats with PTH-tissue ablation showed modestly increased parenchymal abundance of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of astroglial activation. PTH infusion attenuated GFAP abundance. The findings suggest that vitamin D can compromise capillary integrity via a mechanism that is independent of calcium homeostasis. The effects of exogenous vitamin D supplementation on capillary function and in the context of prevention of vascular

  20. The vitamin D, ionised calcium and parathyroid hormone axis of cerebral capillary function: therapeutic considerations for vascular-based neurodegenerative disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Lam

    Full Text Available Blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterised by brain parenchymal extravasation of plasma proteins may contribute to risk of neurodegenerative disorders, however the mechanisms for increased capillary permeability are not understood. Increasing evidence suggests vitamin D confers central nervous system benefits and there is increasing demand for vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D may influence the CNS via modulation of capillary function, however such effects may be indirect as it has a central role in maintaining calcium homeostasis, in concert with calcium regulatory hormones. This study utilised an integrated approach and investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation, parathyroid tissue ablation (PTX, or exogenous infusion of parathyroid hormone (PTH on cerebral capillary integrity. Parenchymal extravasation of immunoglobulin G (IgG was used as a marker of cerebral capillary permeability. In C57BL/6J mice and Sprague Dawley rats, dietary vitamin D was associated with exaggerated abundance of IgG within cerebral cortex (CTX and hippocampal formation (HPF. Vitamin D was also associated with increased plasma ionised calcium (iCa and decreased PTH. A response to dose was suggested and parenchymal effects persisted for up to 24 weeks. Ablation of parathyroid glands increased CTX- and HPF-IgG abundance concomitant with a reduction in plasma iCa. With the provision of PTH, iCa levels increased, however the PTH treated animals did not show increased cerebral permeability. Vitamin D supplemented groups and rats with PTH-tissue ablation showed modestly increased parenchymal abundance of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker of astroglial activation. PTH infusion attenuated GFAP abundance. The findings suggest that vitamin D can compromise capillary integrity via a mechanism that is independent of calcium homeostasis. The effects of exogenous vitamin D supplementation on capillary function and in the context of prevention of

  1. A fully-automated software pipeline for integrating breast density and parenchymal texture analysis for digital mammograms: parameter optimization in a case-control breast cancer risk assessment study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Wang, Yan; Keller, Brad M.; Conant, Emily; Gee, James C.; Kontos, Despina

    2013-02-01

    Estimating a woman's risk of breast cancer is becoming increasingly important in clinical practice. Mammographic density, estimated as the percent of dense (PD) tissue area within the breast, has been shown to be a strong risk factor. Studies also support a relationship between mammographic texture and breast cancer risk. We have developed a fullyautomated software pipeline for computerized analysis of digital mammography parenchymal patterns by quantitatively measuring both breast density and texture properties. Our pipeline combines advanced computer algorithms of pattern recognition, computer vision, and machine learning and offers a standardized tool for breast cancer risk assessment studies. Different from many existing methods performing parenchymal texture analysis within specific breast subregions, our pipeline extracts texture descriptors for points on a spatial regular lattice and from a surrounding window of each lattice point, to characterize the local mammographic appearance throughout the whole breast. To demonstrate the utility of our pipeline, and optimize its parameters, we perform a case-control study by retrospectively analyzing a total of 472 digital mammography studies. Specifically, we investigate the window size, which is a lattice related parameter, and compare the performance of texture features to that of breast PD in classifying case-control status. Our results suggest that different window sizes may be optimal for raw (12.7mm2) versus vendor post-processed images (6.3mm2). We also show that the combination of PD and texture features outperforms PD alone. The improvement is significant (p=0.03) when raw images and window size of 12.7mm2 are used, having an ROC AUC of 0.66. The combination of PD and our texture features computed from post-processed images with a window size of 6.3 mm2 achieves an ROC AUC of 0.75.

  2. Predicting Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease in Infants and Young Children at Diagnosis of Posterior Urethral Valves: Initial Ultrasound Kidney Characteristics and Validation of Parenchymal Area as Forecasters of Renal Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeh, Rakan; Noone, Damien; Bowlin, Paul R; Braga, Luis H P; Lorenzo, Armando J

    2016-09-01

    There is paucity of validated objective early imaging markers to help predict future renal deterioration in infants with posterior urethral valves. We evaluated the prognostic value of total renal parenchymal area, renal echogenicity and corticomedullary differentiation regarding future development of chronic kidney disease. We analyzed initial postnatal ultrasonographic images from serial posterior urethral valve cases seen at a single tertiary referral center using National Institutes of Health sponsored image processing software. Echogenicity and corticomedullary differentiation were objectively measured as ratios relative to the adjacent liver or spleen and between cortex and medulla. The primary study outcome, renal function at last followup, was dichotomized based on glomerular filtration rate and/or need for renal replacement therapy (dialysis or renal transplantation, stage 5 chronic kidney disease). A total of 75 patients were evaluated, of whom 16 had progression to stage 5 chronic kidney disease after a mean ± SD followup of 64.2 ± 38.9 months. Mean renal parenchymal area was 21.41 cm(2) in patients without and 16 cm(2) in patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease (p kidneys were significantly associated with development of stage 5 chronic kidney disease (p = 0.004). The performance of corticomedullary differentiation in predicting stage 5 chronic kidney disease was statistically significant (AUROC 0.881, 95% CI 0.776-0.987, p chronic kidney disease in patients with posterior urethral valves. These data are promising for developing tools to risk stratify patients, counsel parents and customize monitoring protocols. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Colin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD presents in different phases over time and is oftencomplicated by comorbid conditions such as substance-use disordersand anxiety disorders. Treatment usually involves pharmacotherapywith combinations of different classes of medications and frequentmedication revisions.

  4. Conduct disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000919.htm Conduct disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Conduct disorder is a set of ongoing emotional and behavioral ...

  5. Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personality disorders are a group of mental illnesses. They involve long-term patterns of thoughts and behaviors that ... serious problems with relationships and work. People with personality disorders have trouble dealing with everyday stresses and problems. ...

  6. Menstrual Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Menstrual Disorders in Teens Page Content Article Body Within ... test Measurement of gonadotropins, prolactin and androgens How Menstrual Disorders are treated with Drug Therapy: After exclusion ...

  7. Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mental disorder(s) (84.5%). 1 Table 1 Download PNG image Download PDF file Past Year Co-morbidity ... in the past 12 months. Table 2 Download PNG image Download PDF file Past Year Treatment of ...

  8. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000816.htm Autoimmune disorders To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An autoimmune disorder occurs when the body's immune system attacks and ...

  9. TMJ disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and dislocations. Alternative Names TMD; Temporomandibular joint disorders; Temporomandibular muscle disorders References Garza I, Schwedt TJ, Robertson CE, Smith JH. Headache and other craniofacial pain. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  10. Conversion disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000954.htm Conversion disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Conversion disorder is a mental condition in which a person ...

  11. Neuromuscular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can ... function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Multiple sclerosis Myasthenia ...

  12. Mathematics disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001534.htm Mathematics disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mathematics disorder is a condition in which a child's ...

  13. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eating disorders are serious behavior problems. They can include severe overeating or not consuming enough food to stay ... concern about your shape or weight. Types of eating disorders include Anorexia nervosa, in which you become too ...

  14. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go ... The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. ...

  15. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Publications About Eating Disorders Research Results PubMed: Journal Articles about Eating Disorders Contact Us The National Institute of Mental Health Information Resource Center Hours: 8:30 a.m. ...

  16. Panic Disorder and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health illnesses Alcoholism, substance abuse, and addictive behavior Anxiety disorders Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Bipolar disorder (manic depressive illness) Borderline personality disorder Depression Eating disorders Post-traumatic ...

  17. Secondary Eating Disorder: A Reality? Case Report of Post Brain Injury Sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Aparna; Elwadhi, Deeksha; Gupta, Manushree

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to changes in eating behavior patterns. This report describes the case of a patient with alcohol dependence presenting with behavioral changes and eating disorder following frontal lobe trauma. A 42-year-old male, premorbidly well-adjusted presented with alcohol use in dependent pattern for years. He sustained a subdural hematoma in the frontal lobe following a road traffic accident 10 years back. Post-TBI, the patient, started having low frustration tolerance, aggressive outbursts, disinhibition, difficulty in persisting with tasks, apathy, amotivation, and craving for food with inability to control intake on the sight of food. On testing, a deficit in frontal lobe functions was seen. Magnetic resonance imaging scan showed large areas of gliosis and encephalomalacia involving both frontal lobes with parenchymal loss. Eating disorders have been reported after TBI. This case report underscores a major role of frontal-subcortical circuits in regulation of eating habits.

  18. Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gucciardi, Enza; Celasun, Nalan; Ahmad, Farah; Stewart, Donna E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Health Issue Eating disorders are an increasing public health problem among young women. Anorexia and bulimia may give rise to serious physical conditions such as hypothermia, hypotension, electrolyte imbalance, endocrine disorders, and kidney failure. Key Issues Eating disorders are primarily a problem among women. In Ontario in 1995, over 90% of reported hospitalized cases of anorexia and bulimia were women. In addition to eating disorders, preoccupation with weight, body image and...

  19. Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... They may say they're in a bad mood. A mood disorder is different. It affects a person's everyday emotional state. Nearly one in ten people aged 18 and older have mood disorders. These include depression and bipolar disorder (also ...

  20. Anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women of other races and ethnicities. 7 What causes anxiety disorders? Researchers think anxiety disorders are caused by a ... Asnaani, A… .Hofmann, S.G. (2011). Gender Differences in Anxiety Disorders: Prevalence, Course of Illness, Comorbidity and Burden of Illness . Journal of Psychiatric ...

  1. Panic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Samarasinghe, D S

    1983-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a prevalent anxiety disorder with lifetimeprevalence rates ranging from 1.1% to 3.7% in the general populationand 3.0% to 8.3% in clinic settings.[1]The presence of agoraphobia inpatients with PD is associated with substantial severity, comorbidity(e.g. major depression, other anxiety disorders, alcohol abuse) andfunctional impairment.[1

  2. Mental disorders, brain disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Amongst DSM's most vocal 'insider' critics has been Thomas Insel, Director of the US National Institute of Mental Health. Insel has publicly criticised DSM's adherence to a symptom-based classification of mental disorder, and used the weight ...

  3. Compulsive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, John M; Black, Donald W

    2004-02-01

    Compulsive disorders include a diverse group of conditions characterized by excessive thoughts or preoccupations combined with poorly controlled behaviors. They include trichotillomania, kleptomania, pathologic gambling, compulsive buying disorder, compulsive sexual behavior, and compulsive computer use. Some investigators have suggested that these conditions constitute a spectrum of disorders linked to obsessive-compulsive disorder. Others have questioned the validity of this conceptualization, and have debated the relationship between these disorders. Nevertheless, much has been learned about compulsive disorders, and there have been some successes with psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatments. Recent therapy-based interventions have moved from psychodynamic treatments toward cognitive-behavioral modalities. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors remain the best-studied pharmacologic treatment, but researchers have also explored other antidepressants, opioid agonists, mood stabilizers, and atypical antipsychotics.

  4. [Eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshie; Okamoto, Yuri; Jinnin, Ran; Shishida, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Yasumasa

    2015-02-01

    Eating disorders are characterized by aberrant patterns of eating behavior, including such symptoms as extreme restriction of food intake or binge eating, and severe disturbances in the perception of body shape and weight, as well as a drive for thinness and obsessive fears of becoming fat. Eating disorder is an important cause for physical and psychosocial morbidity in young women. Patients with eating disorders have a deficit in the cognitive process and functional abnormalities in the brain system. Recently, brain-imaging techniques have been used to identify specific brain areas that function abnormally in patients with eating disorders. We have discussed the clinical and cognitive aspects of eating disorders and summarized neuroimaging studies of eating disorders.

  5. Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    TUČKOVÁ, Jana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to create an eating disorder prevention program. The thesis particularly focuses on the eating disorder problems during adolescence and early adulthood along with the explanation and specification of basic terms, history and cause of the disorder. A strong emphasis is placed on the possibilities of the prevention. A qualitative research was carried out within the scope of this thesis and it brought useful data about the students and their knowledge of the ea...

  6. Digested disorder

    OpenAIRE

    DeForte, Shelly; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins is overwhelming. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a ?Digested Disorder? project and represent a series of reader?s digest type articles objectively representing the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be ded...

  7. Digested disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Krishna D; DeForte, Shelly; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins grows fast. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a ?Digested Disorder? project and represent a new issue of reader?s digest of the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrin...

  8. Personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, L.M.C.; Verheul, R.; Verster, J.C.; Brady, K.; Galanter, M.; Conrod, P.

    2012-01-01

    Subject of this chapter is the often found combination of personality disorders and ­substance abuse disorders. The serious nature of this comorbidity is shown through the discussion of prevalence and epidemiological data. Literature shows that the comorbidity, hampering the diagnostic process, is

  9. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rachel G.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence and their negative long-term consequences, child anxiety disorders have become an important focus of interest. Whether pathological anxiety and normal fear are similar processes continues to be controversial. Comparative studies of child anxiety disorders are scarce, but there is some support for the current…

  10. Dysthymic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health: Keeping Your Emotional HealthManaging Daily StressDepressionGrieving: Facing Illness, Death, and Other LossesTherapy and CounselingUnderstanding Your Teen’s Emotional HealthGeneralized Anxiety Disorder Home Diseases and Conditions Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD) ...

  11. Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not receive early and comprehensive treatment . Without treatment, many youngsters with conduct disorder are unable to adapt to the demands of ... break laws or behave in an antisocial manner. Treatment of children with conduct disorder can be complex and challenging. Treatment can be ...

  12. Conduct disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitelaar, J.K.; Smeets, K.C.; Herpers, P.; Scheepers, F.; Glennon, J.; Rommelse, N.N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic

  13. Gambling disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, David C; Stea, Jonathan N; Grant, Jon E

    2011-11-26

    Gambling disorders, including pathological gambling and problem gambling, have received increased attention from clinicians and researchers over the past three decades since gambling opportunities have expanded around the world. This Seminar reviews prevalence, causes and associated features, screening and diagnosis, and treatment approaches. Gambling disorders affect 0·2-5·3% of adults worldwide, although measurement and prevalence varies according to the screening instruments and methods used, and availability and accessibility of gambling opportunities. Several distinct treatment approaches have been favourably evaluated, such as cognitive behavioural and brief treatment models and pharmacological interventions. Although promising, family therapy and support from Gamblers Anonymous are less well empirically supported. Gambling disorders are highly comorbid with other mental health and substance use disorders, and a further understanding is needed of both the causes and treatment implications of this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrer, Peter; Mulder, Roger; Crawford, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Personality disorder is now being accepted as an important condition in mainstream psychiatry across the world. Although it often remains unrecognized in ordinary practice, research studies have shown it is common, creates considerable morbidity, is associated with high costs to services...... and to society, and interferes, usually negatively, with progress in the treatment of other mental disorders. We now have evidence that personality disorder, as currently classified, affects around 6% of the world population, and the differences between countries show no consistent variation. We are also getting...... increasing evidence that some treatments, mainly psychological, are of value in this group of disorders. What is now needed is a new classification that is of greater value to clinicians, and the WPA Section on Personality Disorders is currently undertaking this task....

  15. Autism spectrum disorder - childhood disintegrative disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of the larger developmental disorder category of autism spectrum disorder . ... American Psychiatric Association. Autism spectrum disorder. ... VA: American Psychiatric Publishing: 2013;50-59. Raviola GJ, ...

  16. Utilizing flat-panel detector parenchymal blood volume imaging (FD-PBV) for quantitative kidney perfusion analysis during the process of percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA): A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chenyang; Shao, Jiang; Liu, Xiu; Liu, Bao

    2017-11-01

    Traditional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) provides lumen morphology of renal artery as indicators for vascular patency in patients with renal artery stenosis (RAS). It, however, lacks hemodynamic information toward target kidney. To solve this shortcoming, a novel technique, flat-panel detector parenchymal blood volume imaging (FD-PBV), is introduced, which is able to evaluate hemodynamic changes of target kidney intraoperatively. A 77-year-old female presented with hypertension, intermittent dizziness, nausea, and fatigue. Ninety-nine percent stenosis of left RAS was found. Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty was performed, along with FD-PBV acquisition protocol. Her symptoms relieved gradually after procedure. Intuitive FD-PBV maps showed her renal perfusion improved remarkably. Quantitative analysis of FD-PBV showed her kidney volume was 47.02 and 75.61 cm with average density of contrast medium (CM) 58.1 HU and 311.5 HU before and after stenting. Follow-up at 6 months showed patency of the stent and stable kidney blood perfusion. FD-PBV technique possesses a remarkable value in quantitatively assessing the changes of kidney blood perfusion and can be a useful auxiliary technique for DSA. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Dissociative disorders and affective disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montant, J; Adida, M; Belzeaux, R; Cermolacce, M; Pringuey, D; Da Fonseca, D; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenology of dissociative disorders may be complex and sometimes confusing. We describe here two cases who were initially misdiagnosed. The first case concerned a 61 year-old woman, who was initially diagnosed as an isolated dissociative fugue and was actually suffering from severe major depressive episode. The second case concerned a 55 year-old man, who was suffering from type I bipolar disorder and polyvascular disease, and was initially diagnosed as dissociative fugue in a mooddestabilization context, while it was finally a stroke. Yet dissociative disorders as affective disorder comorbidity are relatively unknown. We made a review on this topic. Dissociative disorders are often studied through psycho-trauma issues. Litterature is rare on affective illness comorbid with dissociative disorders, but highlight the link between bipolar and dissociative disorders. The later comorbidity often refers to an early onset subtype with also comorbid panic and depersonalization-derealization disorder. Besides, unipolar patients suffering from dissociative symptoms have more often cyclothymic affective temperament. Despite the limits of such studies dissociative symptoms-BD association seems to correspond to a clinical reality and further works on this topic may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  18. [Affective disorders and eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakra, Eric; Belzeaux, R; Azorin, J M; Adida, M

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies show a frequent co-occurence of affective and eating disorders. The incidence of one disorder in patients suffering from the other disorder is well over the incidence in the general population. Several causes could explain this increased comorbidity. First, the iatrogenic origin is detailed. Indeed, psychotropic drugs, and particularly mood stabilizers, often lead to modification in eating behaviors, generally inducing weight gain. These drugs can increase desire for food, reduce baseline metabolism or decrease motor activity. Also, affective and eating disorders share several characteristics in semiology. These similarities can not only obscure the differential diagnosis but may also attest of conjoint pathophysiological bases in the two conditions. However, genetic and biological findings so far are too sparse to corroborate this last hypothesis. Nonetheless, it is noteworthy that comorbidity of affective and eating disorders worsens patients'prognosis and is associated with more severe forms of affective disorders characterized by an earlier age of onset in the disease, higher number of mood episodes and a higher suicidality. Lastly, psychotropic drugs used in affective disorders (lithium, antiepileptic mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, antidepressants) are reviewed in order to weigh their efficacy in eating disorders. This could help establish the best therapeutic option when confronted to comorbidity. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  19. Balance Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder can profoundly affect daily activities and cause psychological and emotional hardship. What are the symptoms of ... that help with balance but are destroyed by aging, medications, infections, or trauma can someday be regrown ...

  20. Bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of pleasure in activities once enjoyed Loss of self-esteem Thoughts of death or suicide Trouble getting to ... other. This is called rapid cycling. Exams and Tests To diagnose bipolar disorder, the provider may do ...

  1. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  2. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight loss. With anorexia, a person will deny hunger and refuse to eat, practice binge eating and ... to better insure healthy eating patterns, and increases awareness and support. Related Conditions People with eating disorders ...

  3. Amnestic Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Savage, G.; Cautin, R.L.; Lilienfeld, S.O.

    2015-01-01

    Amnestic disorders may involve deficits in the encoding or storage of information in memory, or in retrieval of information from memory. Etiologies vary and include traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative disease, and psychiatric illness. Different forms of amnesia can be distinguished:

  4. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21 (Down syndrome) . Other trisomies include trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) . Monosomy is another ... which there is an extra chromosome. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome): A chromosomal disorder that causes serious problems with ...

  5. Eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kontić Olga; Vasiljević Nadja; Trišović Marija; Jorga Jagoda; Lakić Aneta; Jašović-Gašić Miroslava

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis...

  6. Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract in children; Funktionelle Stoerungen des unteren Harntrakts im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotter, R.; Riccabona, M. [Radiologische Univ.-Klinik Graz (Austria). Klinische Abteilung fuer Kinderradiologie

    2005-12-01

    Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract as well as vesicoureteral reflux involved in the disease complex of urinary tract infection/permanent renal parenchymal damage can be considered predisposing or risk factors. Two main forms can be distinguished, i.e., unstable bladder and dysfunctional voiding, while transitional forms between the two exist. Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract obstruct spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux. They are found in about 50% of cases in all children with urinary tract infection and are associated with an increased risk of developing renal parenchymal scars. They are observed during the newborn period up to school age. In the first few months of life, particularly boys with bilateral high-grade reflux and congenital renal parenchymal damage are affected. At later ages girls are also affected, but in this age group bladder instability predominates. Incontinence as the leading clinical symptom appears in approximately 70% of all cases and is closely correlated with chronic constipation. Imaging procedures in addition to urodynamic methods are of decisive importance for diagnosis and treatment, but noninvasive approaches such as sonography should be given preference. (orig.) [German] Funktionelle Stoerungen des unteren Harntrakts koennen ebenso wie der vesikoureterale Reflux im Krankheitskomplex Harnweginfekt/permanente Nierenparenchymschaedigung als praedisponierende bzw. als Risikofaktoren angesehen werden. Zwei Hauptformen koennen unterschieden werden, die instabile Harnblase und die Sphinkter-Detrusor-Dyskoordination, wobei zwischen diesen beiden Typen Uebergaenge bestehen. Funktionelle Stoerungen des unteren Harntrakts behindern die spontane Rueckbildung des vesikoureteralen Refluxes, sie finden sich in etwa 50% der Faelle bei allen Kindern mit Harnweginfekten und sind mit einem erhoehten Risiko fuer die Entstehung von Nierenparenchymnarben vergesellschaftet. Sie werden von der Neugeborenenperiode bis

  7. Personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrer, Peter; Mulder, Roger; Crawford, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Personality disorder is now being accepted as an important condition in mainstream psychiatry across the world. Although it often remains unrecognized in ordinary practice, research studies have shown it is common, creates considerable morbidity, is associated with high costs to services and to s...... increasing evidence that some treatments, mainly psychological, are of value in this group of disorders. What is now needed is a new classification that is of greater value to clinicians, and the WPA Section on Personality Disorders is currently undertaking this task.......Personality disorder is now being accepted as an important condition in mainstream psychiatry across the world. Although it often remains unrecognized in ordinary practice, research studies have shown it is common, creates considerable morbidity, is associated with high costs to services...... and to society, and interferes, usually negatively, with progress in the treatment of other mental disorders. We now have evidence that personality disorder, as currently classified, affects around 6% of the world population, and the differences between countries show no consistent variation. We are also getting...

  8. Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Impulse control problems Substance use disorder Suicide Many children and teens with ODD also have other mental health disorders, such as: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Conduct disorder Depression Anxiety Learning and communication disorders Treating ...

  9. MR-imaging of the breast at 0.5 Tesla: menstrual-cycle dependency of parenchymal contrast enhancement in healthy volunteers with oral contraceptive use?; MR-Mammographie bei 0,5 Tesla: Menstruationszyklusabhaengigkeit der Kontrastmittelanreicherung unter hormoneller Kontrazeption?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzen, J.; Welger, J.; Krupski, G.; Adam, G. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Lisboa, B.W. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Introduction: To evaluate changes of contrast medium enhancement of the breast parenchyma due to menstrual cycle in healthy volunteers with oral contraceptive use in MR-imaging of the breast. Material and Methods: 15 healthy volunteers (age: 22 - 36, mean 28,2) without breast disease were examined two times during one menstrual cycle (days 7 - 14 and days 21 - 2). Two volunteers were examined only in the second part of the cycle (days 21 - 2). All volunteers used oral contraceptives for more than 6 month continuously. Examinations were performed with a 0,5 T magnet (dynamic 3D-gradient echo protocol with subtraction postprocessing). We evaluated the number of enhancing foci and the parenchymal contrast medium enhancement during the different phases of the cycle by region of interest. Results: Only a total of two enhancing foci were found in 2 of 17 volunteers. Time/signal intensity diagrams in these both cases were not suspicious (< 80% initial signal increase after of contrast medium injection, no wash-out phenomenon) and sonography of the breast in these two cases was inconspicuous. Contrast medium enhancement of breast parenchyma in cycle days 7 - 14 (mean enhancement: 0.12 - 0.26, minutes 1 - 9 p.i.) was not significantly different (p = 0.2209; Wilcoxon signed rank test) from cycle days 21 - 2 (mean: 0.13 - 0.32). Conclusion: Menstrual cycle dependency of parenchymal contrast medium enhancement seems to be of minor relevance for premenopausal women with use of oral contraceptives. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung: Untersuchung der Kontrastmittelaufnahme des Brustparenchyms in Abhaengigkeit vom Menstruationszyklus bei gesunden Probandinnen unter oraler Kontrazeption. Material und Methode: Bei 15 gesunden Probandinnen ohne Brusterkrankung in der Anamnese wurde eine MR-Mammographie zweimal waehrend eines Menstruationszyklus durchgefuehrt (Zyklustag: 7 - 14 und 21 - 2). Bei zwei weiteren Probandinnen erfolgte die MR-Mammographie nur in der zweiten Zyklushaelfte

  10. Generation of Hepatocyte-like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cells By Co-culturing Embryoid Body Cells with Liver Non-parenchymal Cell Line TWNT-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, M. S.; Yaqoob, N.; Iwamuro, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Fujiwara, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To generate a homogeneous population of patient-specific hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) from human iPS cells those show the morphologic and phenotypic properties of primary human hepatocytes. Study Design: An experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery, Okayama University, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan, from April to December 2011. Methodology: Human iPS cells were generated and maintained on ES qualified matrigel coated plates supplemented with mTeSR medium or alternatively on mitotically inactivated MEF feeder layer in DMEM/F12 medium containing 20% KOSR, 4ng/ml bFGF-2, 1 x 10-4 M 2-mercaptoethanol, 1 mmol/L NEAA, 2mM L-glutamine and 1% penicillin-streptomycin. iPS cells were differentiated to HLCs by sequential culture using a four step differentiation protocol: (I) Generation of embryoid bodies (EBs) in suspension culture; (II) Induction of definitive endoderm (DE) from 2 days old EBs by growth in human activin-A (100 ng/ml) and basic fibroblasts growth factor (bFGF2) (100 ng/ml) on matrigel coated plates; (III) Induction of hepatic progenitors by co-culture with non-parenchymal human hepatic stellate cell line (TWNT-1); and (IV) Maturation by culture in dexamethasone. Characterization was performed by RT-PCR and functional assays. Results: The generated HLCs showed microscopically morphological phenotype of human hepatocytes, expressed liver specific genes (ASGPR, Albumin, AFP, Sox17, Fox A2), secreted human liver-specific proteins such as albumin, synthesized urea and metabolized ammonia. Conclusion: Functional HLCs were generated from human iPS cells, which could be used for autologus hepatocyte transplantation for liver failure and as in vitro model for determining the metabolic and toxicological properties of drug compounds. (author)

  11. Comparison of two fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences to standard t2-weighted images for brain parenchymal contrast and lesion detection in dogs with inflammatory intracranial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Benjamin D; Mankin, Joseph M; Griffin, John F; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fowler, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    T2-weighted (T2w) sequences are commonly relied upon in magnetic resonance imaging protocols for the detection of brain lesions in dogs. Previously, the effect of fluid suppression via fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) has been compared to T2-weighting with mixed results. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) has been reported to increase the detection of some CNS lesions in people. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of fat suppression on brain parenchymal contrast resolution and lesion detection in dogs. We compared three sequences: T2w images, STIR, and T2w FLAIR with chemical fat suppression (T2-FLAIR-FS) in dogs with meningoencephalitis. Dogs with meningoencephalitis and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy were retrospectively identified and anonymized. Evaluators recorded the presence or absence of lesions within 12 predetermined brain regions on randomized sequences, viewing and scoring each sequence individually. Additionally, signal-to-noise ratios, contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative contrast (RC) were measured in a reference population. Short tau inversion recovery sequences had the highest RC between gray and white matter. While descriptively more lesions were identified by evaluators on T2-FLAIR-FS images, there was no statistical difference in the relative sensitivity of lesion detection between the sequences. Nor was there a statistical difference in false lesion detection within our reference population. Short tau inversion recovery may be favored for enhanced anatomic contrast depiction in brain imaging. No benefit of the inclusion of a fat-suppressed T2-FLAIR sequence was found. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  12. Paraneoplastic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes target specific areas of the nervous system with pathogenic autoantibodies or T-cell responses. Each syndrome conveys a risk of particular tumors. Expanded paraneoplastic antibody testing has led to improved diagnosis but created challenges involving appropriate interpretation of test results. Peripheral nervous system paraneoplastic disorders such as myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome involve pathogenic autoantibodies. Recently, the pathogenic mechanisms and antigens of these disorders have been further elucidated. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with onconeuronal antibodies, such as anti-Hu, have strong cancer associations and limited response to treatment. Autoimmunity to central nervous system membrane proteins, such as the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor or leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1), defines an expanding group of disorders with better prognosis and more variable cancer associations. In these diseases, the autoantibodies are either proven to be or are potentially pathogenic. An animal model of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis will allow novel treatments to be developed. Autoantibodies to intracellular synaptic antigens, such as glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), are associated with diverse disorders such as stiff person syndrome, and the pathophysiology of these diseases is unclear. Paraneoplastic disorders have diverse clinical manifestations, including weakness, sensory neuronopathy, encephalitis, epilepsy, and psychosis. Proper use of antibody testing may assist with diagnosis. Treatment may require immunotherapy and tumor treatment.

  13. Tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Davide; Mink, Jonathan W

    2013-10-01

    Primary tic disorders are complex, multifactorial disorders in which tics are accompanied by other sensory features and an array of comorbid behavioral disorders. Secondary tics are proportionally much less frequent, but their etiology is diverse. This review aims to guide clinicians in the recognition of the phenomenology, pathophysiology, and treatment of these disorders. Advances include greater phenomenologic insights, particularly of nonmotor (sensory) features; increased knowledge of disease mechanisms, particularly coming from neuropsychological, functional imaging, pathologic, and animal model studies; growing evidence on the efficacy of alpha-2 agonists and the newer generation of dopamine-modulating agents; and recent strides in the evaluation of cognitive-behavioral therapy and deep brain stimulation surgery. The correct diagnostic approach to tic disorders requires accurate historical gathering, a thorough neurologic examination, and detailed definition of the patient's psychopathologic profile. Treatment should always begin with individualized psychoeducational strategies. Although pharmacologic treatments remain beneficial for most patients, cognitive-behavioral treatments have thus far shown promising efficacy. Deep brain stimulation surgery should still be limited to adult patients refractory to pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

  14. Myoclonic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Eberhardt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Few movement disorders seem to make a straightforward approach to diagnosis and treatment more difficult and frustrating than myoclonus, due to its plethora of causes and its variable classifications. Nevertheless, in recent years, exciting advances have been made in the elucidation of the pathophysiology and genetic basis of many disorders presenting with myoclonus. Here, we provide a review of all of the important types of myoclonus encountered in pediatric and adult neurology, with an emphasis on the recent developments that have led to a deeper understanding of this intriguing phenomenon. An up-to-date list of the genetic basis of all major myoclonic disorders is presented. Randomized studies are scarce in myoclonus therapy, but helpful pragmatic approaches at diagnosis as well as treatment have been recently suggested.

  15. Personality disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sebastian; Heinskou, Torben; Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this naturalistic study, patients with personality disorders (N = 388) treated at Stolpegaard Psychotherapy Center, Mental Health Services, Capital Region of Denmark were allocated to two different kinds of treatment: a standardized treatment package with a preset number of treatment...... characteristics associated with clinicians' allocation of patients to the two different personality disorder services. METHODS: Patient characteristics across eight domains were collected in order to study whether there were systematic differences between patients allocated to the two different treatments...... that younger age was the most significant predictor of longer treatment replicates an earlier finding of allocation to treatment for personality disorder. Overall, this study therefore lends further support to the importance of demographic and social contextual factors in clinicians' allocation of patients...

  16. Sleep Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian sleep has evolved under the influence of the day-night cycle and in response to reproductive needs, food seeking, and predator avoidance, resulting in circadian (predictive) and homeostatic (reactive) regulation. A molecular clock characterized by transcription/translation feedback loops...... mediates circadian regulation of sleep. Misalignment with the rhythm of the sun results in circadian disorders and jet lag. The molecular basis of homeostatic sleep regulation is mostly unknown. A network of mutually inhibitory brain nuclei regulates sleep states and sleep-wake transitions. Abnormalities...... in these networks create sleep disorders, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep walking, and narcolepsy. Physiological changes associated with sleep can be imbalanced, resulting in excess movements such as periodic leg movements during sleep or abnormal breathing in obstructive sleep apneas...

  17. Digested disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForte, Shelly; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins is overwhelming. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a “Digested Disorder” project and represent a series of reader’s digest type articles objectively representing the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrinsic disorder). The current digest issue covers papers published during the period of April, May, and June of 2013. The papers are grouped hierarchically by topics they cover, and for each of the included paper a short description is given on its major findings. PMID:28516028

  18. Temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Thomas; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2017-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is an umbrella term for pain and dysfunction involving the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMD is the most common orofacial pain condition. Its prominent features include regional pain in the face and preauricular area......, and may affect the quality of life of the patient. Assessment Evaluations indicate that the recently published Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) are reliable and valid. These criteria cover the most common types of TMD, which include pain-related disorders (e.g., myalgia, headache attributable to TMD......, and arthralgia) as well as disorders associated with the TMJ (primarily disc displacements and degenerative disease). As peripheral mechanisms most likely play a role in the onset of TMD, a detailed muscle examination is recommended. The persistence of pain involves more central factors, such as sensitization...

  19. Digested disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna D; DeForte, Shelly; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins grows fast. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a “Digested Disorder” project and represent a new issue of reader’s digest of the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrinsic disorder). The current digest issue covers papers published during the third quarter of 2013; i.e., during the period of June, July, and September of 2013. Similar to previous issues, the papers are grouped hierarchically by topics they cover, and for each of the included paper a short description is given on its major findings. PMID:28232877

  20. Conversion Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacov Rofé

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder remains a mystery that has only become more complicated with the decline of the scientific status of psychoanalysis (e.g., Piper, Lillevik, & Kritzer, 2008; Rofé, 2008 and recent neurological findings suggest that this behavior is controlled by biological mechanisms (van Beilen, Vogt, & Leenders, 2010. Moreover, existing theories have difficulty explaining the efficacy of various interventions, such as psychoanalysis, behavior therapy, drug therapy and religious therapy. This article reviews research and clinical evidence pertaining to both the development and treatment of conversion disorder and shows that this seemingly incompatible evidence can be integrated within a new theory, the Rational-Choice Theory of Neurosis (RCTN; Rofé, 2010. Despite the striking differences, RCTN continues Freud's framework of thinking as it employs a new concept of repression and replaces the unconscious with self-deception. Moreover, it incorporates Freud's idea, implicitly expressed in his theory, that neurotic disorders are, in fact, rational behaviors.

  1. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Stephane; Renard, Felix; Achard, Sophie; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A.; Palace, Jacqueline; Asgari, Nasrin; Klawiter, Eric C.; Tenembaum, Silvia N.; Banwell, Brenda; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Levy, Michael; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Chan, Koon Ho; Schippling, Sven; Paul, Friedemann; Kim, Ho Jin; de Seze, Jerome; Wuerfel, Jens T.

    2016-01-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease. PMID:26010909

  2. Somatic symptom disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Somatic symptom disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing; 2013: ...

  3. Orgasmic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turns touching each other in pleasurable ways (see Sexual Arousal Disorders : Treatment ). Couples may try using more or different stimuli, such as a vibrator, fantasy, or erotic videos. A vibrator may be especially useful when ... about sexual function may help. For some women, incorporating stimulation ...

  4. 4. Disorder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dyskinesia, movement disorders in sleep stiff-man syndrome. Ballism means 'to throw'. Ballism consists of throwing or flinging movements of the limbs that are usually high in amplitude and velocity and involve proximal more than distal muscles. Ballistic movements are large proximal rotatory throwing or kicking movements.

  5. Hoarding disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impairments that are part of hoarding disorder. Hoarding animals People who hoard animals may collect dozens or even hundreds of pets. ... for properly. The health and safety of the person and the animals are at risk because of unsanitary conditions. When ...

  6. Depressive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Russell, Samantha; Rasor, Kaitlin

    2017-01-01

    Depression is among the most common mental disorders in the United States. Its diagnosis is often related to impairment of functioning across several domains, including how an individual thinks, feels, and participates in daily activities. Although depression has a relatively high prevalence among adults, the rate is alarmingly higher among…

  7. Penis Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Problems with the penis can cause pain and affect a man's sexual function and fertility. Penis disorders include Erectile dysfunction - inability to get or ... not go away Peyronie's disease - bending of the penis during an erection due to a hard lump ...

  8. Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emotional Well-Being, Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Mental Health, Prevention and Wellness, Seniors, WomenTags: Anxiety, anxiety disorders, ... Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental ... Childbirth Women Men Seniors In The News Your Health Resources Healthcare ...

  9. Movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenders, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes the measurement of brain-tissue functions in patients with movement disorders using positron emission tomography (PET). This scanning technique is a method for direct in vivo quantitation of the regional tissue content of positron emitting radionuclides in brain (or other organs) in an essentially non-invasive way. Ch. 2 outlines some general features of PET and describes the scanner which has been used for the studies in this thesis. Also the tracer methodology, as applied to data investigations of movement disorders, are discussed. Ch. 3 contains the results of the PET investigations which were performed in the study of movement disorders. The results are presented in the form of 12 papers. The main goals of these studies were the understanding of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, Steele-Richardson-Olzewski syndrome and special case reports. Ch. 4 summarizes the results of these publications and Ch. 5 concludes the main part of this thesis with a general discussion of movement disorders in relation to PET investigations. 697 refs.; 60 figs.; 31 tabs

  10. Rumination disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Katzman DK, Kearney SA, Becker AE. Feeding and eating disorders. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 9. Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ...

  11. Eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontić Olga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis. The main characteristic of these diseases is changed behavior in the nutrition, either as an intentional restriction of food, i.e. extreme dieting, or overeating, i.e. binge eating. Extreme dieting, skipping meals, self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, and misuse of laxatives and diuretics for the purpose of maintaining or reducing body weight are characteristic forms of compensatory behavior of patients with eating disorder. The most appropriate course of treatment is determined by evaluating the patient’s health condition, associated with behavior and eating habits, the experience of one’s own body, character traits of personality, and consequently the development and functioning of the individual. The final treatment plan is individual. Eating disorders are a growing medical problem even in this part of the world. Prevention should be planned in cooperation with different sectors so as to stop the epidemic of these diseases.

  12. 4. Disorder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Human Genome Project data showed that humans are identical across 99.9% of their genome. There is considerable evidence that despite being genetically identical, race and ethnicity appears to be an important factor in the prevalence and clinical characteristics of many, if not most, disorders. Literature ...

  13. Traumatic parenchymal laceration in a horseshoe kidney.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stunell, H

    2011-03-01

    An 18-year-old man was transferred to the authors\\' institution after a motor vehicle collision in which he was a restrained front seat passenger. The referring hospital performed contrast-enhanced computed tomography which revealed a previously undiagnosed horseshoe kidney with a laceration of the right lower pole moiety. On transfer, he was pale and mildly tachycardic but normotensive.

  14. Bipolar Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The comorbidity of bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders is a well known concept. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is the most commonly seen comorbid anxiety disorder in bipolar patients. Some genetic variants, neurotransmitters especially serotonergic systems and second-messenger systems are thought to be responsible for its etiology. Bipolar disorder alters the clinical aspects of obsessive compulsive disorder and is associated with poorer outcome. The determination of comorbidity between bipolar disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder is quite important for appropriate clinical management and treatment. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 429-437

  15. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located Early Stage or Isolated Parenchymal Recurrences of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: How to Fly in a “No Fly Zone”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Qiao-Qiao; Xu, Qing-Yong; Allen, Pamela K.; Rebueno, Neal; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mehran, Reza; Swisher, Stephen G.; Roth, Jack A. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: We extended our previous experience with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR; 50 Gy in 4 fractions) for centrally located non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); explored the use of 70 Gy in 10 fractions for cases in which dose-volume constraints could not be met with the previous regimen; and suggested modified dose-volume constraints. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based volumetric image-guided SABR was used for 100 patients with biopsy-proven, central T1-T2N0M0 (n=81) or isolated parenchymal recurrence of NSCLC (n=19). All disease was staged with positron emission tomography/CT; all tumors were within 2 cm of the bronchial tree, trachea, major vessels, esophagus, heart, pericardium, brachial plexus, or vertebral body. Endpoints were toxicity, overall survival (OS), local and regional control, and distant metastasis. Results: At a median follow-up time of 30.6 months, median OS time was 55.6 months, and the 3-year OS rate was 70.5%. Three-year cumulative actuarial local, regional, and distant control rates were 96.5%, 87.9%, and 77.2%, respectively. The most common toxicities were chest-wall pain (18% grade 1, 13% grade 2) and radiation pneumonitis (11% grade 2 and 1% grade 3). No patient experienced grade 4 or 5 toxicity. Among the 82 patients receiving 50 Gy in 4 fractions, multivariate analyses showed mean total lung dose >6 Gy, V{sub 20} >12%, or ipsilateral lung V{sub 30} >15% to independently predict radiation pneumonitis; and 3 of 9 patients with brachial plexus D{sub max} >35 Gy experienced brachial neuropathy versus none of 73 patients with brachial D{sub max} <35 Gy (P=.001). Other toxicities were analyzed and new dose-volume constraints are proposed. Conclusions: SABR for centrally located lesions produces clinical outcomes similar to those for peripheral lesions when normal tissue constraints are respected.

  16. What Are Related Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Contact Us Donate Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ...

  17. Symptoms of Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In This Article Generic Name Select Brand Names aspirin No US brand name Symptoms and Diagnosis of Blood Disorders Overview of Blood Disorders Symptoms of Blood Disorders Medical History and Physical Examination for Blood Disorders Laboratory Tests ...

  18. Types of Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many people have bipolar disorder along with another illness such as anxiety disorder, substance abuse, or an eating disorder. People with ... are sometimes misdiagnosed with schizophrenia. Anxiety and ADHD: ... such as bipolar disorder. Risk Factors Scientists are ...

  19. Language disorder - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Preschool language disorders. www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/Preschool-Language-Disorders . Accessed July 8, 2016. Nass R, Trauner DA. Developmental language disorders. ...

  20. Reading Disorders:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaber, Emma

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between eating disorders and reading behaviors, arguing that there is a meaningful difference in a minority of readers' approach to and understanding of anorexia life-writing, and of literary texts more broadly. To illuminate this distinction, this article begins by considering the reported deleterious influence of Marya Hornbacher’s anorexia memoir, Wasted, elaborating the ways Hornbacher offers a positive presentation of anorexia nervosa that may, intentionally or not, induce certain readers to “try it” themselves. This is followed by an exploration of how Hornbacher’s own reading praxis is implicated in a discursive feedback loop around anorexia narratives. It concludes with a discussion of disordered reading attitudes in relation to the emergence of the “pro-anorexia” phenomenon. PMID:28569728

  1. [Deglutition disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, E K

    1998-08-01

    Dysphagia is related to the impairment of food passage from the mouth to the stomach. Globus pharyngis implies the frequent and often painful sensation of a lump in the throat that usually does not interfere with swallowing and may even be relieved by food intake. The diagnosis is based upon a careful history, clinical examination, endoscopy, dynamic imaging (videofluoroscopy, cinematography, videosonography) and electrophysiologic procedures (including pharyngoesophageal manometry, electromyography and pH determinations). Structural lesions of the cervical spine such as diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis are rare causes of dysphagia. Dysphagia following anterior cervical fusion as well as globus and dysphonia due to dysfunction of the vertebral joints are more likely. Symptoms with swallowing fluids indicate a neurogenic origin. Dyscoordinated swallowing, nasal reflux, dysphonia or general weakness may also occur. Chronic aspiration with respiratory compromize is the main consequence in a variety of neurological disorders as well as in cases of postsurgical dysphagia. Relaxation of the upper esophageal sphincter indicates coordinated muscle movement between the pharynx and esophagus. Dysfunction of the pharyngoesophageal segment may lead to cricopharyngeal achalasia. A dyskinetic sphincter commonly represents an extrapharyngeal cause: i.e., disease associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Disorders of the esophageal phase of deglutition can produce retrosternal pain, heartburn, regurgitation and vomiting, as well as laryngeal and respiratory signs. Esophageal motility disorders include lower achalasia, tumors, peptic strictures, inflammatory diseases, drug-induced ulcers, rings and webs. Motility disorders present with aperistaltic, spontaneous contractions, diffuse esophagospasm, or a hypermotile esophagus. Gastroesophageal reflux with esophagitis must always be excluded, especially in patients with a globus sensation. The multiple features of the

  2. [Are eating disorders addictions?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzl, Johann F; Biebl, Wilfried

    2010-01-01

    The various eating disorders, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder, are characterized by severe disturbances in eating behavior and are seen as typical "psychosomatic disorders". The subdivision of anorexia nervosa into two subtypes, namely "anorexia nervosa restricting type" and "anorexia nervosa bulimic type" has proved to be very good. It is to be assumed that eating disorders are not a homogeneous group, and that the various subtypes of eating disorders are also heterogeneous at several levels. Co-morbid psychiatric disorders, especially affective disorders, anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, and personality disorders, are often found in eating- disordered patients. Many anorectics of the restrictive type and orthorectics show co-morbid psychiatric disorders such as anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and avoidant or obsessive-compulsive personality disorders, while a co-morbidity of affective disorders, addiction, personality disorders, especially multi-impulsivity and borderline personality disorder, is frequently found in anorectics of bulimic type, bulimics, and binge eaters. Addictive behavior manifests itself in permanent preoccupation with food and eating, withdrawal symptoms, continuation of disturbed eating behavior in spite of negative consequences, loss of control, and frequent relapse. There are some indications that there is a basic psychological disturbance common to eating disorders, especially bulimia nervosa, and to substance-related disorders, namely a personality disorder with an emotional instability and multi-impulsivity. The possible associations between eating disorders and mental disorders, particularly addictions, will be discussed.

  3. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST). Common Ground: Toward a Standards-Based Training System for the U.S. Machine Tool and Metal Related Industries. Volume 1: Executive Summary, of a 15-Volume Set of Skills Standards and Curriculum Training Materials for the Precision Manufacturing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    The Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST) consortium was formed to address the shortage of skilled workers for the machine tools and metals-related industries. Featuring six of the nation's leading advanced technology centers, the MAST consortium developed, tested, and disseminated industry-specific skill standards and model curricula for…

  4. Disordered eating practices in gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satherley, R; Howard, R; Higgs, S

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review evidence concerning disordered eating practices in dietary-controlled gastrointestinal conditions. Three key questions were examined: a) are disordered eating practices a feature of GI disorders?; b) what abnormal eating practices are present in those with GI disorders?; and c) what factors are associated with the presence of disordered eating in those with GI disorders? By exploring these questions, we aim to develop a conceptual model of disordered eating development in GI disease. Five key databases, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings (1900-2014) and MEDLINE (1950-2014), PubMed, PsycINFO (1967-2014) and Google Scholar, were searched for papers relating to disordered eating practices in those with GI disorders. All papers were quality assessed before being included in the review. Nine papers were included in the review. The majority of papers reported that the prevalence of disordered eating behaviours is greater in populations with GI disorders than in populations of healthy controls. Disordered eating patterns in dietary-controlled GI disorders may be associated with both anxiety and GI symptoms. Evidence concerning the correlates of disordered eating was limited. The presence of disordered eating behaviours is greater in populations with GI disorders than in populations of healthy controls, but the direction of the relationship is not clear. Implications for further research are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A pilot study on predictors of brainstem raphe abnormality in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostić, Milutin; Munjiza, Ana; Pesic, Danilo; Peljto, Amir; Novakovic, Ivana; Dobricic, Valerija; Tosevski, Dusica Lecic; Mijajlovic, Milija

    2017-02-01

    Hypo/anechogenicity of the brainstem raphe (BR) structures has been suggested as a possible transcranial parenchymal sonography (TCS) marker associated with depression. The aim of this study was to analyze possible association of the abnormal BR echogenicity in patients with major depression when compared to healthy controls, and to evaluate its clinical and genetic correlates. TCS was performed in 53 patients diagnosed as major depressive disorder (MDD) without psychotic symptoms and in 54 healthy matched controls. The TCS detected BR abnormalities were significantly more frequent in MDD patients (35 out of 53; 66%) in comparison to matched controls (5 out of 56; 9%). The prevalence of short allele (s) homozygocity in the length polymorphism of the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) was significantly higher in MDD patients relative to those with normal BR echogenicity. A stepwise statistical discriminant analysis revealed statistically significant separation between MDD patients with and without BR abnormalities groups based on the four predictors combined: the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale item 5 ("difficulty in concentration, poor memory"), presence of social phobia, s allele homozygocity of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, and presence of generalized anxiety disorder. Cross-sectional design and heterogenous treatment of depressed patients. Reduced BR echogenicity in at least a subgroup of MDD patients may reflect a particular phenotype, characterized by more prevalent comorbid anxiety disorders, associated with particular genetic polymorphisms and neurotransmitter(s) deficits, most probably altered serotonergic mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Personality Disorder Cognitions in the Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel, C.; Waller, G.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with eating disorder have relatively high rates of comorbid personality disorder diagnoses, including both anxiety-based personality disorders (obsessive-compulsive and avoidant) and borderline personality disorder. However, there is preliminary evidence that the core cognitions underlying personality pathology in the eating disorders are those related specifically to anxiety. This article builds on that evidence, replicating and extending the findings with a large sample of patients...

  7. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. II. A TEST ON THE NONLINEARITY SCENARIO FOR COLOR BIMODALITY USING THE u-BAND COLORS: THE CASE OF M87 (NGC 4486)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Hak-Sub; Cho, Jaeil; Chung, Chul; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Blakeslee, John P.

    2011-01-01

    The optical color distributions of globular clusters (GCs) in most large elliptical galaxies are bimodal. Based on the assumed linear relationship between GC colors and their metallicities, the bimodality has been taken as evidence of two GC subsystems with different metallicities in each galaxy and has led to a number of theories in the context of galaxy formation. More recent observations and modeling of GCs, however, suggests that the color-metallicity relations (CMRs) are inflected, and thus colors likely trace metallicities in a nonlinear manner. The nonlinearity could produce bimodal color distributions from a broad underlying metallicity spread, even if it is unimodal. Despite the far-reaching implications, whether CMRs are nonlinear and whether the nonlinearity indeed causes the color bimodality are still open questions. Given that the spectroscopic refinement of CMRs is still very challenging, we here propose a new photometric technique to probe the possible nonlinear nature of CMRs. In essence, a color distribution of GCs is a 'projected' distribution of their metallicities. Since the form of CMRs hinges on which color is used, the shape of color distributions varies depending significantly on the colors. Among other optical colors, the u-band related colors (e.g., u – g and u – z) are theoretically predicted to exhibit significantly less inflected CMRs than other preferred CMRs (e.g., for g – z). As a case study, we performed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFPC2 archival u-band photometry for the M87 (NGC 4486) GC system with confirmed color bimodality. We show that the u-band color distributions are significantly different from that of g – z and consistent with our model predictions. With more u-band measurements, this method will support or rule out the nonlinear CMR scenario for the origin of GC color bimodality with high confidence. The HST/WFC3 observations in F336W for nearby large elliptical galaxies are highly anticipated in this regard.

  8. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Beena Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, ...

  9. Conduct disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitelaar, Jan K; Smeets, Kirsten C; Herpers, Pierre; Scheepers, Floor; Glennon, Jeffrey; Rommelse, Nanda N J

    2013-02-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to CD in the light of the forthcoming DSM-5 definition. The diagnostic criteria for CD will remain unchanged in DSM-5, but the introduction of a specifier of CD with a callous-unemotional (CU) presentation is new. Linked to this, we discuss the pros and cons of various other ways to subtype aggression/CD symptoms. Existing guidelines for CD are, with few exceptions, already of a relatively older date and emphasize that clinical assessment should be systematic and comprehensive and based on a multi-informant approach. Non-medical psychosocial interventions are recommended as the first option for the treatment of CD. There is a role for medication in the treatment of comorbid syndromes and/or in case of insufficient response to psychosocial interventions and severe and dangerous aggressive and violent behaviours.

  10. Oxytocin and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Nur Say

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that plays critical role in mother-infant bonding, pair bonding and prosocial behaviors. Several neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, alcohol/substance addiction, aggression, suicide, eating disorders and personality disorders show abnormalities of oxytocin system. These findings have given rise to the studies searching therapeutic use of oxytocin for psychi-atric disorders. The studies of oxytocin interventions in psychiatric disorders yielded potentially promising findings. This paper reviews the role of oxytocin in emotions, behavior and its effects in psychiatric disorders. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 102-113

  11. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Ambar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychogenic movement Disorders (PMD may result from somatoform disorders, factitious disorders, malingering, depression anxiety disorders and less frequently, histrionic personality disorders. First recognized by Henry Head in early twentieth century, PMD s commonly encountered and clues to their differentiation from organic disease. A generally accepted management protocol has been outlined.

  12. Bipolar Disorder (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Bipolar Disorder KidsHealth / For Teens / Bipolar Disorder What's in this ... Disorder Print en español Trastorno bipolar What Is Bipolar Disorder? Bipolar disorders are one of several medical conditions ...

  13. Sleep Disorders in Childhood Neurogenetic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Beth Mann Dosier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic advances in the past three decades have transformed our understanding and treatment of many human diseases including neurogenetic disorders. Most neurogenetic disorders can be classified as “rare disease,” but collectively neurogenetic disorders are not rare and are commonly encountered in general pediatric practice. The authors decided to select eight relatively well-known neurogenetic disorders including Down syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Prader–Willi syndrome, Smith–Magenis syndrome, congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, achondroplasia, mucopolysaccharidoses, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Each disorder is presented in the following format: overview, clinical characteristics, developmental aspects, associated sleep disorders, management and research/future directions.

  14. Imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Maher, Eamonn R

    2015-01-01

    sequence shown to disturb imprinted gene expression, and the correspondingly broad range of resultant clinical syndromes. At the same time, however, it has become clear that this diversity of IDs has common underlying principles, not only in shared molecular mechanisms, but also in interrelated clinical...... impacts upon growth, development and metabolism. Thus, detailed and systematic analysis of IDs can not only identify unifying principles of molecular epigenetics in health and disease, but also support personalisation of diagnosis and management for individual patients and families.......Congenital imprinting disorders (IDs) are characterised by molecular changes affecting imprinted chromosomal regions and genes, i.e. genes that are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Recent years have seen a great expansion in the range of alterations in regulation, dosage or DNA...

  15. Diagnosing Tic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit" /> Information For… Media Policy Makers Diagnosing Tic Disorders Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... or postviral encephalitis). Persistent (Chronic) Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder To be diagnosed with a persistent tic disorder, ...

  16. Chronic motor tic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start at ...

  17. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, low educational status, family history of anxiety disorder, financial stress in family and adverse childhood experiences are risk factors for the development of anxiety disorders. If not diagnosed and managed at the earliest, paediatric anxiety disorders can cause life threatening problems in the future. Hence early and scientific management of anxiety disorders is essential. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the effective evidence based treatment for paediatric anxiety disorders.

  18. Histrionic personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personality disorder - histrionic; Attention seeking - histrionic personality disorder ... Causes of histrionic personality disorder are unknown. Genes and early childhood events may be responsible. It is diagnosed more often in women than in ...

  19. Paranoid personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personality disorder - paranoid; PPD ... American Psychiatric Association. Paranoid personality disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of ental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013:649-652. Blais MA, Smallwood ...

  20. Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... compulsive disorder. Environment. Your environment, life experiences and culture may contribute to body dysmorphic disorder, especially if ... Having another psychiatric disorder, such as anxiety or depression Complications Complications that may be caused by or ...

  1. Schizoid Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with schizoid personality disorder: Are in touch with reality, so they're unlikely to experience paranoia or ... People with schizoid personality disorder are at an increased risk of: Developing schizotypal personality disorder, schizophrenia or ...

  2. What is Bipolar Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect friends and family? For More Information Share Bipolar Disorder Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... brochure will give you more information. What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder is a serious brain illness. It ...

  3. Oppositional defiant disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with oppositional defiant disorder grow up to have conduct disorder as teenagers or adults. In some cases, children ... Moseley LR, DeMaso DR. Disruptive, imulse-control, and conduct disorders. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, ...

  4. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. ...

  5. About Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... security updates for DBSAlliance.org. Read more... About Mood Disorders Marked by changes in mood, depression and ... screening for depression. Bipolar Disorder: More Than a Mood Swing Bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression) ...

  6. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) KidsHealth / For Parents / Posttraumatic Stress Disorder ( ... My Child? Looking Ahead Print What Is Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? Someone who is the victim of ( ...

  7. [Autism spectrum disorders and substance use disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sizoo, B.B.; Wijngaarden-Cremers, P.J.M. van; Gaag, R.J. van der

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: So far, little is known about the comorbidity of substance use disorders (sud) and autism spectrum disorders (asd). AIM: To increase our knowledge of sud in

  8. Eating disorder symptoms in affective disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, P N

    1991-01-01

    Patients with Major Affective Disorder (MAD), Secondary Depression, Panic Disorder, and bulimia with and without MAD, were given the Eating Disorder Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the General Behavior Inventory at presentation. It was found that patients with MAD have a triad of eating disorder symptoms: a disturbance in interoceptive awareness, the sense of ineffectiveness, and a tendency toward bulimia. The data supported the concept that the sense of ineffectiveness is secon...

  9. Schizotypal personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... schizotypal References American Psychiatric Association. Schizotypal personality disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013; ...

  10. Binge eating disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eating disorder - binge eating; Eating - binge; Overeating - compulsive; Compulsive overeating ... as having close relatives who also have an eating disorder Changes in brain chemicals Depression or other emotions, ...

  11. Brief psychotic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychosis - brief psychotic disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  12. Sleep Disorders (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Sleep Disorders (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Sleep Disorders Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Getting ...

  13. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy ...

  14. Comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Ruiz, Eva M; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders has not been studied in depth. In addition, clinical implications involved in the appearance of both disorders are very important. A systematic literature review of MEDLINE published up to September 2013 was performed, analyzing all the articles that studied the comorbidity of both conditions (bipolar disorder and eating disorders) and others research that studied the efficacy of pharmacological treatment and psychotherapy to improve these illnesses. In this review we found a high comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders, especially of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Studies show that lithium and topiramate are 2 of the more effective pharmacological agents in the treatment of both disorders. There are a lot of studies that show evidence of comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders. However, further research is needed on assessment and treatment when these conditions co-exist, as well as study into the biopsychological aspects to determine the comorbid aetiology. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Psychotic and Bipolar Disorders: Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Sarah D

    2017-04-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe chronic mental illness that affects a large number of individuals. This disorder is separated into two major types, bipolar I disorder, with mania and typically recurrent depression, and bipolar II disorder, with recurrent major depression and hypomania. Patients with bipolar disorder spend the majority of time experiencing depression, and this typically is the presenting symptom. Because outcomes are improved with earlier diagnosis and treatment, physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for bipolar disorder. The most effective long-term treatments are lithium and valproic acid, although other drugs also are used. In addition to referral to a mental health subspecialist for initiation and management of drug treatment, patients with bipolar disorder should be provided with resources for psychotherapy. Several comorbidities commonly associated with bipolar disorder include other mental disorders, substance use disorders, migraine headaches, chronic pain, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Family physicians who care for patients with bipolar disorder should focus their efforts on prevention and management of comorbidities. These patients should be assessed continually for risk of suicide because they are at high risk and their suicide attempts tend to be successful. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  16. Overview of Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver and Gallbladder Disorders Lung and Airway Disorders Men's Health Issues Mental Health Disorders Mouth and Dental Disorders Older People’s ... Liver and Gallbladder Disorders Lung and Airway Disorders Men's Health Issues Mental Health Disorders Mouth and Dental Disorders Older People’s ...

  17. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver and Gallbladder Disorders Lung and Airway Disorders Men's Health Issues Mental Health Disorders Mouth and Dental Disorders Older People’s ... Liver and Gallbladder Disorders Lung and Airway Disorders Men's Health Issues Mental Health Disorders Mouth and Dental Disorders Older People’s ...

  18. Densidade mamográfica em mulheres climatéricas em uso de terapia de reposição hormonal Mammographic parenchymal pattern in climacteric women receiving hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herberth Régis de Araújo

    2004-01-01

    ênica.PURPOSE: to measure changes and predictors of changes in mammographic density of climacteric women, before and one year after hormone replacement therapy. METHODS: seventy climacteric women of 45 years or more participated in the study. They were followed-up at a Climacteric Outpatient Service. All of them used regularly either estrogenic or estroprogestative HRT for one year. They were submitted to one basal mammography and another at the end of the first year. HRT schedules could be different from each other, although with the same bioequivalence. Mammographic density was evaluated blindly at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Age, ovarian function, time since menopause, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, age at menarche, age at first pregnancy, and smoking were evaluated as well. Mammographic density was classified according to the American College of Radiology BI-RADS system into one of the following four parenchymal patterns: A entirely liposubstituted breasts, B liposubstituted breasts with disperse glandular parenchyma, C heterogeneously dense breasts, and D extremely dense breasts. We proposed a subdivision of each category in to A e A1, B e B1, C and C1, D and D1 in order to identify smaller variations in mammographic density. Therefore, we attributed initial and final scores of 1-8 to each of the patients according to the mammographic density before and after HRT, corresponding to categories A to D1. The proportions of women that presented increase, decrease and no variation in mammographic density after 1 year of HRT were calculated. In addition, we estimated initial to final score variation using the paired t-test of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS. RESULTS: mammographic density increased in 22.9%, decreased in 7.1% and did not change in 70% of the studied cases. A significant difference was observed between the score means before (2.2±1.82 and after HRT (2.5±1.9 (p=0.019. The androgenic distribution of body fat was associated with a

  19. Bipolar disorder: an overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    which is the reason that up to 69% of patients with BD are misdiagnosed.1 Bipolar ... Cyclothymic disorder. • Substance/medication induced bipolar and related disorder. • Bipolar and related disorder due to another medical condition ... patients. Keywords: bipolar disorder, mania, depression, pharmacological management.

  20. SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Social phobia, also known as social anxiety disorder, is a highly prevalent disorder with significant morbidity. Patients with social phobia frequently develop co-morbid psychiatric disorders such as depression and substance abuse, and the disorder impacts significantly on social and occupational functioning.

  1. Panic Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... panic disorder, and 2.3% had severe impairment. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria were used to ... 2003 with a response rate of 70.9%. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) mental disorders were assessed ...

  2. Conduct Disorder and Comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Nicole D.; Clarizio, Harvey F.

    1999-01-01

    Provides critical examination of research published during past ten years addressing Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), and internalizing disorders. Concludes comorbidity varies with age, gender, informant, diagnostic criteria, and nature of the sample. Implications of comorbidity…

  3. Oral Manifestations of Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Neeta Misra; Anshul Mehra; Pradyuman Misra; Jaya Mehra

    2010-01-01

    Eating disorders are potentially life-threatening disorders. In this article, we discuss the oral manifestations of eating disorders so as to enable dental practitioners to recognize the effects of eating disorders and to manage the patients with eating disorders.

  4. Characterization of star-forming dwarf galaxies at 0.1 ≲z ≲ 0.9 in VUDS: probing the low-mass end of the mass-metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, A.; Amorín, R.; Fontana, A.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Lemaux, B. C.; Ribeiro, B.; Bardelli, S.; Castellano, M.; Contini, T.; De Barros, S.; Garilli, B.; Grazian, A.; Guaita, L.; Hathi, N. P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Schaerer, D.; Talia, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Zucca, E.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The study of statistically significant samples of star-forming dwarf galaxies (SFDGs) at different cosmic epochs is essential for the detailed understanding of galaxy assembly and chemical evolution. However, the main properties of this large population of galaxies at intermediate redshift are still poorly known. Aims: We present the discovery and spectrophotometric characterization of a large sample of 164 faint (IAB 23-25 mag) SFDGs at redshift 0.13 ≤ z ≤ 0.88 selected by the presence of bright optical emission lines in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS). We investigate their integrated physical properties and ionization conditions, which are used to discuss the low-mass end of the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) and other key scaling relations. Methods: We use optical VUDS spectra in the COSMOS, VVDS-02h, and ECDF-S fields, as well as deep multi-wavelength photometry that includes HST-ACS F814W imaging, to derive stellar masses, extinction-corrected star-formation rates (SFR), and gas-phase metallicities of SFDGs. For the latter, we use the direct method and a Te-consistent approach based on the comparison of a set of observed emission lines ratios with the predictions of detailed photoionization models. Results: The VUDS SFDGs are compact (median re 1.2 kpc), low-mass (M∗ 107-109M⊙) galaxies with a wide range of star-formation rates (SFR(Hα) 10-3-101M⊙/yr) and morphologies. Overall, they show a broad range of subsolar metallicities (12 +log (O/H) =7.26-8.7; 0.04 ≲Z/Z⊙≲ 1). Nearly half of the sample are extreme emission-line galaxies (EELGs) characterized by high equivalent widths and emission line ratios indicative of higher excitation and ionization conditions. The MZR of SFDGs shows a flatter slope compared to previous studies of galaxies in the same mass range and redshift. We find the scatter of the MZR is partly explained in the low mass range by varying specific SFRs and gas fractions amongst the galaxies in our sample. In

  5. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lut Tamam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etiological studies displayed the role of both psychosocial factors like childhood traumas and biological factors like dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems and genetics. In differential diagnosis of the disorder, disorders involving agression as a symptom such as alcohol and drug intoxication, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, personality changes due to general medical conditions and behavioral disorder should be considered. A combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches are suggested in the treatment of the disorder. This article briefly reviews the historical background, diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, etiology and treatment of intermittent explosive disorder.

  6. Adult onset tic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Chouinard, S.; Ford, B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tic disorders presenting during adulthood have infrequently been described in the medical literature. Most reports depict adult onset secondary tic disorders caused by trauma, encephalitis, and other acquired conditions. Only rare reports describe idiopathic adult onset tic disorders, and most of these cases represent recurrent childhood tic disorders.
OBJECTIVE—To describe a large series of patients with tic disorders presenting during adulthood, to compare cl...

  7. Panic disorder, phobias, and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Waters, Allison M

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of recent empirical developments, current controversies, and areas in need of further research in relation to factors that are common as well as specific to the etiology and maintenance of panic disorder, phobias, and generalized anxiety disorder. The relative contribution of broad risk factors to these disorders is discussed, including temperament, genetics, biological influences, cognition, and familial variables. In addition, the role that specific learning experiences play in relation to each disorder is reviewed. In an overarching hierarchical model, it is proposed that generalized anxiety disorder, and to some extent panic disorder, loads most heavily on broad underlying factors, whereas specific life history contributes most strongly to circumscribed phobias.

  8. Comorbidity bipolar disorder and personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latalova, Klara; Prasko, Jan; Kamaradova, Dana; Sedlackova, Jana; Ociskova, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Outcome in bipolar patients can be affected by comorbidity of other psychiatric disorders. Comorbid personality disorders are frequent and may complicate the course of bipolar illness. We have much information about treating patients with uncomplicated bipolar disorder (BD) but much less knowledge about possibilities for patients with the comorbidity of BD and personality disorder. We conducted a series of literature searches using, as key words or as items in indexed fields, bipolar disorder and personality disorder or personality traits. Articles were obtained by searching MEDLINE from 1970 to 2012. In addition, we used other papers cited in articles from these searches, or cited in articles used in our own work. Tests of personality traits indicated that euthymic bipolar patients have higher scores on harm avoidance, reward dependence, and novelty seeking than controls. Elevation of novelty seeking in bipolar patients is associated with substance abuse comorbidity. Comorbidity with personality disorders in BD patients is associated with a more difficult course of illness (such as longer episodes, shorter time euthymic, and earlier age at onset) and an increase in comorbid substance abuse, suicidality and aggression. These problems are particularly pronounced in comorbidity with borderline personality disorder. Comorbidity with antisocial personality disorder elicits a similar spectrum of difficulties; some of the antisocial behavior exhibited by patients with this comorbidity is mediated by increased impulsivity.

  9. Binge Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senol Turan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Binge Eating Disorder, characterized by frequent and persistent overeating episodes that are accompanied by feeling of loss of control over eating without regular compensatory behaviors and was identified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as a new eating disorder category. Binge Eating Disorder is the most common eating disorder among adults. Binge Eating Disorder is associated with significant morbidity, including medical complications related to obesity, eating disorder psychopathology, psychiatric comorbidity; reduced quality of life, and impaired social functioning. Current treatments of Binge Eating Disorder include pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy and bariatric surgery. In this review, the definition, epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, and also mainly treatment of Binge Eating Disorder are discussed.

  10. Asperger disorder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Manu; Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Sarkhel, Sujit; Sinha, Vinod Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Asperger disorder was first described in 1944 by the Austrian pediatrician, Hans Asperger. It was introduced as a separate diagnostic category from autistic disorder in DSM-IV and ICD-10. The pattern of comorbidity in Asperger disorder is different from autistic disorder, with a higher level of psychosis, violent behavior, anxiety, and mood disorders. We present three cases of Asperger disorder diagnosed for the first time in adulthood, with psychosis being the predominant reason for the referral. In each case, the psychosis improved with antipsychotic treatment, although core autistic symptoms remained the same.

  11. Sexual desire disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Keith A

    2008-06-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) and sexual aversion disorder (SAD) are an under-diagnosed group of disorders that affect men and women. Despite their prevalence, these two disorders are often not addressed by healthcare providers and patients due their private and awkward nature. As physicians, we need to move beyond our own unease in order to adequately address our patients' sexual problems and implement appropriate treatment. Using the Sexual Response Cycle as the model of the physiological changes of humans during sexual stimulation and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition this article will review the current literature on the desire disorders focusing on prevalence, etiology, and treatment.

  12. Autism spectrum disorder - Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of the larger developmental disorder category of autism spectrum disorder . ... American Psychiatric Association. Autism spectrum disorder. ... VA: American Psychiatric Publishing: 2013;50-59. Raviola GJ, ...

  13. Parental psychiatric disorders and autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokiranta, Elina; Brown, Alan S.; Heinimaa, Markus; Cheslack-Postava, Keely; Partanen, Auli; Sourander, Andre

    2013-01-01

    The present population-based, case-control study examines associations between specific parental psychiatric disorders and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) including childhood autism, Asperger’s syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder (PDD-NOS). The cohort includes 4713 children born between 1987 and 2005 with diagnoses of childhood autism, Asperger’s syndrome or PDD-NOS. Cases were ascertained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register, and each was matched to four controls by gender, date of birth, place of birth, and residence in Finland. Controls were selected from the Finnish Medical Birth Register. Parents were identified through the Finnish Medical Birth Register and Finnish Central Population Register. Parental psychiatric diagnoses from inpatient care were collected from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess whether parents’ psychiatric disorders predicted ASD after controlling for parents’ age, smoking during pregnancy and weight for gestational age. In summary, parental schizophrenia spectrum disorders and affective disorders were associated with the risk of ASD regardless of the subgroup. PDD-NOS was associated with all parental psychiatric disorders investigated. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings. These results may facilitate the investigation of shared genetic and familial factors between ASD and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:23391634

  14. Tic Disorder and ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2001-01-01

    The behavioral and neuropsychological characteristics of tic disorder, with or without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), were examined in 78 children followed at Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea.

  15. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Questions to ...

  16. Antisocial personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sociopathic personality; Sociopathy; Personality disorder - antisocial ... A person with antisocial personality disorder may: Be able to act witty and charming Be good at flattery and manipulating other people's emotions Break the law ...

  17. Neuroimaging of neurotic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Yoshiro; Yahata, Noriaki

    2006-01-01

    Neuroimaging has been involved in recent biological approaches with evidence for neurotic disorders in place of diagnostic criteria on Freud theory hitherto. This review describes the present states of brain imaging in those disorders. Emotion has such three bases for environmental stimuli as recognition/evaluation of causable factors, manifestation, and its control, each of which occurs in various different regions connected by neuro-net work in the brain. The disorders are regarded as abnormality of the circuit that can be imaged. Documented and discussed are the actual regions imaged by MRI and PET in panic disorder, social phobia, phobias to specified things, posttraumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The approach is thought important for elucidating not only the pathogenesis of the disorders but also the human emotional functions and mechanism of the mind, which may lead to a better treatment of the disorders in future. (T.I)

  18. Sleep and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C; Spaeth, Andrea; Hopkins, Christina M

    2016-10-01

    Insomnia is related to an increased risk of eating disorders, while eating disorders are related to more disrupted sleep. Insomnia is also linked to poorer treatment outcomes for eating disorders. However, over the last decade, studies examining sleep and eating disorders have relied on surveys, with no objective measures of sleep for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and only actigraphy data for binge eating disorder. Sleep disturbance is better defined for night eating syndrome, where sleep efficiency is reduced and melatonin release is delayed. Studies that include objectively measured sleep and metabolic parameters combined with psychiatric comorbidity data would help identify under what circumstances eating disorders and sleep disturbance produce an additive effect for symptom severity and for whom poor sleep would increase risk for an eating disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia may be a helpful addition to treatment of those with both eating disorder and insomnia.

  19. Functional Movement Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychogenic movement may develop as part of a conversion disorder (in which a psychological event causes physical symptoms ... distracted. Many individuals with psychogenic tremor have a conversion disorder. Psychogenic dystonia involves involuntary muscle contractions that cause ...

  20. Males and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Males and Eating Disorders Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo: PhotoDisc Eating disorders primarily affect girls and women, but boys and ...

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Diagnosis and ...

  2. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment ...

  3. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Questions to ...

  4. Dependent personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Dependent personality disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013;675-678. Blais MA, Smallwood P, Groves JE, Rivas-Vazquez RA, Hopwood ...

  5. Avoidant personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Avoidant personality disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013;672-675. Blais MA, Smallwood P, Groves JE, Rivas-Vazquez RA, Hopwood ...

  6. Speech and Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Speech problems like stuttering Developmental disabilities Learning disorders Autism spectrum disorder Brain injury Stroke Some speech and communication problems may be genetic. Often, no one knows the causes. By first grade, about 5 percent of children ...

  7. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy ...

  8. Lipid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Lipid metabolism disorders, such as Gaucher disease and Tay-Sachs disease, involve lipids. Lipids are fats or fat-like substances. They ...

  9. Illness anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001236.htm Illness anxiety disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) is a preoccupation that physical symptoms are ...

  10. What Are Reading Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and they are not a sign of lower intelligence or unwillingness to learn. People with reading disorders ... levels significantly lower than expected despite having normal intelligence. Although the disorder varies from person to person, ...

  11. Panic Disorder - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Panic Disorder URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Panic Disorder - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  12. Seasonal affective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Fava M, Ostergaard SD, Cassano P. Mood disorders. In: Stern TA, Fava M, Wilens TE, Rosenbaum JF, eds. ...

  13. Genetic Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  14. Disorder of written expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder Reading disorder ADHD Symptoms Symptoms may include: Errors in grammar and punctuation Poor handwriting Poor spelling Poorly organized writing Has to say words aloud when writing Exams and Tests Other causes of learning disabilities must be ruled out before ...

  15. Alcohol Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In this Section Genetics of Alcohol Use Disorder Alcohol Use Disorder Problem drinking that becomes severe is given the medical diagnosis of “alcohol use disorder” or AUD. AUD is a chronic relapsing brain ...

  16. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not enough ... born unable to make enough cortisol. Causes of adrenal gland disorders include Genetic mutations Tumors including pheochromocytomas Infections A ...

  17. Stereotypic movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001548.htm Stereotypic movement disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stereotypic movement disorder is a condition in which a person makes ...

  18. Sexual Desire Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) and sexual aversion disorder (SAD) are an under-diagnosed group of disorders that affect men and women. Despite their prevalence, these two disorders are often not addressed by healthcare providers and patients due their private and awkward nature. As physicians, we need to move beyond our own unease in order to adequately address our patients’ sexual problems and implement appropriate treatment. Using the Sexual Response Cycle as the model of the phys...

  19. Personality disorder diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    WIDIGER, THOMAS A

    2003-01-01

    Every person has a characteristic manner of thinking, feeling, and relating to others. Some of these personality traits can be so dysfunctional as to warrant a diagnosis of personality disorder. The World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD- 10) includes ten personality disorder diagnoses. Three issues of particular importance for the diagnosis of personality disorders are their differentiation from other mental disorders, from general persona...

  20. Cytokines in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj; Vedel Kessing, Lars

    2012-01-01

    to affective state. METHODS: We conducted a systemtic review of studies measuring endogenous cytokine concentrations in patients with bipolar disorder and a meta-analysis, reporting results according to the PRISMA statement. RESULTS: Thirteen studies were included, comprising 556 bipolar disorder patients......BACKGROUND: Current research and hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder suggests the involvement of immune system dysfunction that is possibly related to disease activity. Our objective was to systematically review evidence of cytokine alterations in bipolar disorder according...

  1. Reproductive Disorders in Snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Nicola; Selleri, Paolo

    2017-05-01

    Reproduction of snakes is one of the challenging aspects of herpetology medicine. Due to the complexity of reproduction, several disorders may present before, during, or after this process. This article describes the physical examination, and radiographic, ultrasonographic, and endoscopic findings associated with reproductive disorders in snakes. Surgical techniques used to resolve reproductive disorders in snakes are described. Finally, common reproductive disorders in snakes are individually discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Generalised anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Christopher K; Millichamp, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Generalised anxiety disorder is characterised by persistent, excessive and difficult-to-control worry, which may be accompanied by several psychic and somatic symptoms, including suicidality. Generalized anxiety disorder is the most common psychiatric disorder in the primary care, although it is often underrecognised and undertreated. Generalized anxiety disorder is typically a chronic condition with low short- and medium-term remission rates. Clinical presentations often include depression, ...

  3. Sleep and anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Staner, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Sleep disturbances-particularly insomnia - are highly prevalent in anxiety disorders and complaints such as insomnia or nightmares have even been incorporated in some anxiety disorder definitions, such as generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. In the first part of this review, the relationship between sleep and anxiety is discussed in terms of adaptive response to stress. Recent studies suggested that the corticotropin-releasing hormone system and the locus ceruleus-a...

  4. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Lut Tamam; Meliha Zengin Eroglu; Ozlem Paltaci

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etio...

  5. Separation anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, M.H.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Sturmey, P.; Hersen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is the only anxiety disorder that is specific to childhood; however, SAD has hardly ever been addressed as a separate disorder in clinical trials investigating treatment outcome. So far, only parent training has been developed specifically for SAD. This particular

  6. Dissociative Identity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Few psychological disorders in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual have generated as much controversy as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). For the past 35 years diagnoses of DID, previously referred to as Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), have increased exponentially, causing various psychological researchers and clinicians to question the…

  7. Problems Disorders Receipt Food

    OpenAIRE

    VALIŠOVÁ, Monika

    2009-01-01

    The work deals with eating disorders, the issue, describing the occurrence. It shows the difference between boys and girls. It introduces us to the history and seeks to show that eating disorders are not just a matter of last time. It also seeks to show the new (modern) forms of eating disorders and explain their specific features.

  8. Kids and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Kids and Eating Disorders KidsHealth / For Kids / Kids and Eating Disorders What's ... and pee) withdrawing from social activities What Causes Eating Disorders? There really is no single cause for an ...

  9. 10. Musculoskeletal Disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) have been defined as musculoskeletal injuries that result from a work-. 4 related event . These disorders are common causes. 5,6 of severe long-term pain and physical disability . There are a number of factors that can lead to one developing musculoskeletal disorders.

  10. Sleep and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staner, Luc

    2003-09-01

    Sleep disturbances-particularly insomnia - are highly prevalent in anxiety disorders and complaints such as insomnia or nightmares have even been incorporated in some anxiety disorder definitions, such as generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. In the first part of this review, the relationship between sleep and anxiety is discussed in terms of adaptive response to stress. Recent studies suggested that the corticotropin-releasing hormone system and the locus ceruleus-autonomic nervous system may play major roles in the arousal response to stress. It has been suggested that these systems may be particularly vulnerable to prolonged or repeated stress, further leading to a dysfunctional arousal state and pathological anxiety states, Polysomnographic studies documented limited alteration of sleep in anxiety disorders. There is some indication for alteration in sleep maintenance in generalized anxiety disorder and for both sleep initiation and maintenance in panic disorder; no clear picture emerges for obsessive-compulsive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder. Finally, an unequivocal sleep architecture profile that could specifically relate to a particular anxiety disorder could not be evidenced; in contrast, conflicting results are often found for the same disorder. Discrepancies between studies could have been related to illness severity, diagnostic comorbidity, and duration of illness. A brief treatment approach for each anxiety disorder is also suggested with a special focus on sleep.

  11. Genetics of complex disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kere, Juha

    2010-05-21

    The success stories of identifying genes in Mendelian disorders have stimulated research that aims at identifying the genetic determinants in complex disorders, in which both genetics, environment and chance affect the pathogenetic processes. This review summarizes the brief history and lessons learned from genetic analysis of complex disorders and outlines some landscapes ahead for medical research. 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Dual Disorders in Adolescent Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van West, D.; Vermeiren, R.R.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity in adolescents who abuse substances is the rule rather than the exception, and common comorbidities include depression, anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, conduct disorder, and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Among adolescents, the presence of both mental

  13. Pulmonary hypertensive vasculopathy in parenchymal lung diseases and/or hypoxia: Number 1 in the Series "Pathology for the clinician" Edited by Peter Dorfmüller and Alberto Cavazza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigna, Maria Rosa; Mooi, Wolter J; Grünberg, Katrien

    2017-06-30

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) with complicating chronic lung diseases and/or hypoxia falls into group 3 of the updated classification of PH. Patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), diffuse lung disease (such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)) and with sleep disordered breathing are particularly exposed to the risk of developing PH. Although PH in such a context is usually mild, a minority of patients exhibit severe haemodynamic impairment, defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) of ≥35 mmHg or mPAP values ranging between 25 mmHg and 35 mmHg with a low cardiac index (pulmonary circulation in chronic lung diseases, with an emphasis on COPD, IPF and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  14. Chronobiology and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Selvi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Living organizms show cyclic rhythmicity in a variety of physiological, hormonal, behavioral, and psychological processes. Sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, hormone levels, mood and cognition display a circadian rhythm in humans. Delays, advances or desynchronizations of circadian rhythm are known to be strongly associated with mental illness especially mood disorders such as bipolar disorder, major depression and seasonal affective disorder. Furthermore, some of the mood stabilizers, sleep deprivation and light treatment are employed to treat mood disorders by shifting circadian rhythm. This paper reviews the relationship between mood disorders and circadian rhythm, and describes treatment options by altering circadian rhythm.

  15. La Tourette's Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Fernando Oviedo Lugo

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Tourette Syndrome (TS is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder in which tic symptoms emerge prior to age of 18 and have, at least, a minimum duration of 12 months. This disorder produces distress and impairs normal functioning; it has a well-known chronic-waxing and waning course. TS has several comorbid conditions like obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, and learning disorders, among others. This article will review the epidemiologic, etiologic and phenomenological concepts of the disease and its therapeutic perspectives.

  16. Causes of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivy, Janet; Herman, C Peter

    2002-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa have emerged as the predominant eating disorders. We review the recent research evidence pertaining to the development of these disorders, including sociocultural factors (e.g., media and peer influences), family factors (e.g., enmeshment and criticism), negative affect, low self-esteem, and body dissatisfaction. Also reviewed are cognitive and biological aspects of eating disorders. Some contributory factors appear to be necessary for the appearance of eating disorders, but none is sufficient. Eating disorders may represent a way of coping with problems of identity and personal control.

  17. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, Francesca; Edwards, Mark J.; Espay, Alberto J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review describes the main clinical features of psychogenic (functional) movement disorders and reports recent advances in diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment. Recent Findings The terminology and definition of patients with psychogenic movement disorders remain subjects of controversy; the term “functional” has been used more frequently in the literature in recent years regarding the neurobiological substrate underpinning these disorders. Correct diagnosis of psychogenic movement disorders should rely not on the exclusion of organic disorders or the sole presence of psychological factors but on the observation or elicitation of clinical features related to the specific movement disorder (ie, a positive or inclusionary rather than exclusionary diagnosis). Sudden onset, spontaneous remissions, and variability over time or during clinical examination are useful “red flags” suggestive of a psychogenic movement disorder. Imaging studies have demonstrated impaired connectivity between limbic and motor areas involved in movement programming and hypoactivity of a brain region that compares expected data with actual sensory data occurring during voluntary movement. Treatment of psychogenic movement disorders begins with ensuring the patient’s acceptance of the diagnosis during the initial debriefing and includes nonpharmacologic (cognitive-behavioral therapy, physiotherapy) and pharmacologic options. Summary Psychogenic movement disorders represent a challenging disorder for neurologists to diagnose and treat. Recent advances have increased understanding of the neurobiological mechanism of psychogenic movement disorders. Treatment with cognitive strategies and physical rehabilitation can benefit some patients. As short duration of disease correlates with better prognosis, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment are critical. PMID:24092294

  18. Genetics of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerner B

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Berit Kerner Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Bipolar disorder is a common, complex genetic disorder, but the mode of transmission remains to be discovered. Many researchers assume that common genomic variants carry some risk for manifesting the disease. The research community has celebrated the first genome-wide significant associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and bipolar disorder. Currently, attempts are under way to translate these findings into clinical practice, genetic counseling, and predictive testing. However, some experts remain cautious. After all, common variants explain only a very small percentage of the genetic risk, and functional consequences of the discovered SNPs are inconclusive. Furthermore, the associated SNPs are not disease specific, and the majority of individuals with a “risk” allele are healthy. On the other hand, population-based genome-wide studies in psychiatric disorders have rediscovered rare structural variants and mutations in genes, which were previously known to cause genetic syndromes and monogenic Mendelian disorders. In many Mendelian syndromes, psychiatric symptoms are prevalent. Although these conditions do not fit the classic description of any specific psychiatric disorder, they often show nonspecific psychiatric symptoms that cross diagnostic boundaries, including intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit, impulse control deficit, and psychosis. Although testing for chromosomal disorders and monogenic Mendelian disorders is well established, testing for common variants is still controversial. The standard concept of genetic testing includes at least three broad criteria that need to be fulfilled before new genetic tests should be introduced: analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. These criteria are

  19. Comorbid personality disorders in subjects with panic disorder: which personality disorders increase clinical severity?

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Ozkan; Abdurrahman Altindag

    2003-01-01

    Personality disorders are common in subjects with panic disorder. Personality disorders have shown to affect the course of panic disorder. The purpose of this study was to examine which personality disorders effect clinical severity in subjects with panic disorder. This study included 122 adults (71 female, 41 male), who met DSM-IV criteria for panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia). Clinical assessment was conducted by using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders...

  20. [Gambling disorder in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    Gambling disorder is a psychiatric disorder characterized by persistent and recurrent problematic gambling behavior, associated with impaired functioning, reduced quality of life, and frequent divorce and bankruptcy. Gambling disorder is reclassified in the category Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders in the DSM-5 because its clinical features closely resemble those of substance use disorders, and gambling activates the reward system in brain in much the same way drugs do. Prevalence of gambling disorder in Japan is high rate because of slot machines and pachinko game are very popular in Japan. The author recommend group psychotherapy and self-help group (Gamblers Anonymous), because group dynamics make them accept their wrongdoings related to gambling and believe that they can enjoy their lives without gambling.

  1. Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E. Rosenberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a national online registry to examine variation in cumulative prevalence of community diagnosis of psychiatric comorbidity in 4343 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Adjusted multivariate logistic regression models compared influence of individual, family, and geographic factors on cumulative prevalence of parent-reported anxiety disorder, depression, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder or attention deficit disorder. Adjusted odds of community-assigned lifetime psychiatric comorbidity were significantly higher with each additional year of life, with increasing autism severity, and with Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder—not otherwise specified compared with autistic disorder. Overall, in this largest study of parent-reported community diagnoses of psychiatric comorbidity, gender, autistic regression, autism severity, and type of ASD all emerged as significant factors correlating with cumulative prevalence. These findings could suggest both underlying trends in actual comorbidity as well as variation in community interpretation and application of comorbid diagnoses in ASD.

  2. Psychiatric disorders and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "SH. Akhondzadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are common in women during their childbearing years. Special considerations are needed when psychotic disorders present during pregnancy. Early identification and treatment of psychiatric disorders in pregnancy can prevent morbidity in pregnancy and in postpartum with the concomitant risks to mother and baby. Nevertheless, diagnosis of psychiatric illnesses during pregnancy is made more difficult by the overlap between symptoms of the disorders and symptoms of pregnancy. In majority of cases both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy should be considered. However, psychiatric disorders in pregnancy are often under treated because of concerns about potential harmful effects of medication. This paper reviews findings about the presentation and course of major psychiatric disorders during pregnancy.

  3. Eating disorders in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    JÁGLOVÁ, Štěpánka

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor degree work deals with disorders food intake, in particular, mental anorexia and mental bulimia in maturing period. The theoretical part is aimed at maturing problems and food intake disorders generally. There is characteristics and division of maturing period into early and late adolescence including psychological and physical changes which are typical for this period. Then food intake disorders, their causes, effects and their possible treatment are specified. The aim of the pr...

  4. EATING DISORDERS IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, T.N.; Suresh, T.R.; Jayaram, Vasantha; Fernandez, M. Peter

    1995-01-01

    Data on the nature and extent of major eating disorders, anorexia nervosa and bulimia is lacking in non-white, native populations of the developing world, leaving a gap in understanding the determinants of these disorders. In a study on 210 medical students examined by a two-stage survey method, 31 subjects were found to have distress relating to their eating habits and body size not amounting to criterion-based diagnosis of eating disorders. The characteristics of this eating distress syndro...

  5. Pituitary Disorders and Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bolanowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various hormonal disorders can influence bone metabolism and cause secondary osteoporosis. The consequence of this is a significant increase of fracture risk. Among pituitary disorders such effects are observed in patients with Cushing’s disease, hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, and hypopituitarism. Severe osteoporosis is the result of the coexistence of some of these disorders and hypogonadism at the same time, which is quite often.

  6. Genetics of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common, complex genetic disorder, but the mode of transmission remains to be discovered. Many researchers assume that common genomic variants carry some risk for manifesting the disease. The research community has celebrated the first genome-wide significant associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and bipolar disorder. Currently, attempts are under way to translate these findings into clinical practice, genetic counseling, and predictive testing. However, some experts remain cautious. After all, common variants explain only a very small percentage of the genetic risk, and functional consequences of the discovered SNPs are inconclusive. Furthermore, the associated SNPs are not disease specific, and the majority of individuals with a "risk" allele are healthy. On the other hand, population-based genome-wide studies in psychiatric disorders have rediscovered rare structural variants and mutations in genes, which were previously known to cause genetic syndromes and monogenic Mendelian disorders. In many Mendelian syndromes, psychiatric symptoms are prevalent. Although these conditions do not fit the classic description of any specific psychiatric disorder, they often show nonspecific psychiatric symptoms that cross diagnostic boundaries, including intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit, impulse control deficit, and psychosis. Although testing for chromosomal disorders and monogenic Mendelian disorders is well established, testing for common variants is still controversial. The standard concept of genetic testing includes at least three broad criteria that need to be fulfilled before new genetic tests should be introduced: analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. These criteria are currently not fulfilled for common genomic variants in psychiatric disorders. Further work is clearly needed before genetic testing for common variants in

  7. Personality disorders as risk factors for eating disorders: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2010-04-01

    Personality disorders are oftentimes comorbid with eating disorders. According to a review of the literature, obsessive-compulsive personality disorder is the most common Axis II disorder in eating-disordered individuals with restrictive eating behavior, whereas borderline personality disorder is the most common Axis II disorder in those with impulsive eating pathology. Because personality disorders developmentally precede eating disorders and the characteristics of the personality disorder oftentimes mirror the style of eating pathology (eg, highly controlled personality styles and highly controlled eating patterns; impulsive personality styles and impulsive eating pathology), it is reasonable to assume that personality disorders influence subsequent eating pathology. Therefore, it is likely that personality disorders function, to some degree, as risk factors for the development of specific types of eating disorders. The authors discuss the clinical implications of these relationships.

  8. Schizotypal Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other personality disorders Problems with alcohol or drugs Suicide attempts Temporary psychotic episodes, usually in response to stress Schizophrenia By Mayo Clinic Staff . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal ...

  9. Body dysmorphic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Župan

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Body dysmorphic disorder is a common psychiatric disorder, which needs to be addressed by the medical profession and the general public. By searching Medline, we found 577 articles matching »body dysmorphic disorder .The disorder is well known by general public of Western countries, especially USA, but is less known in Slovenia. As patients often pursue cosmetic procedures and aesthetic surgery, it is important that medical staff, especially providers of cosmetic surgical and minimally invasive treatments, are able to identify them and refer them for appropriate mental health care.

  10. Speech disorder prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladis Fornaris-Méndez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Language therapy has trafficked from a medical focus until a preventive focus. However, difficulties are evidenced in the development of this last task, because he is devoted bigger space to the correction of the disorders of the language. Because the speech disorders is the dysfunction with more frequently appearance, acquires special importance the preventive work that is developed to avoid its appearance. Speech education since early age of the childhood makes work easier for prevent the appearance of speech disorders in the children. The present work has as objective to offer different activities for the prevention of the speech disorders.

  11. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Eating Disorders in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available According to International Classification of Diseases by World Health Organization, eating disorders are behavioural syndromes associated with physiological disturbances [1]. Eating disorders include anorexia nervosa, atypical anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, atypical bulimia nervosa, overeating associated with other psychological disturbances and vomiting associated with other psychological disturbances [1]. Maladaptive eating pattern and inadequate physical activity are seen in adolescents with eating disorders and obesity [2]. Those with comorbid eating disorder and obesity have a poorer prognosis and are at higher risk for future medical problems.

  14. Expressive language disorder - developmental

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal ability in vocabulary, saying complex sentences, and remembering words. However, a child with this disorder may ... past, present, future) Problems making complex sentences Problems remembering words

  15. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  16. International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reports Industry Council Contact Us IFFGD Twitter Facebook YouTube Search Search ... GI Disorders Functional GI Disorders Motility Disorders Upper GI Disorders Lower GI Disorders Other Disorders Kids & Teens Manage Your Health Finding a Doctor The ...

  17. Neonate brain disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xydis, V.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Hypoxic-Ischemic insults in the brain of neonates constitute major cause of morbidity and mortality. A wide range of motor, sensory, and cognitive disabilities are observed in this population spanning from slight motor deficits, school difficulties and behavioral problems up to cerebral palsy and mental retardation. Pathologically involved areas characterized by high metabolic demands and therefore with enhanced vulnerability to any reduction or cessation of energy and oxygen supply. Watershed areas of the brain (vascular end zones and vascular border zones) are predominately affected in any adverse event. Radiologic and pathologic appearance of these lesions depends both on the severity of the insult and the maturity of the brain. The dominant pathology observed in preterm neonates is white matter lesions. There are three basic patterns of brain destruction in this population. Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL focal fPVL, diffuse dPVL), germinal matrix haemorrhage (GMH) associated with intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), and parenchymal haemorrhage (PH). fPVL is characterized by focal necrosis of all cellular elements in the periventricular white matter, resulting in the formation of cysts, and dPVL is characterized by diffuse destruction of the premyelinating oligodendrocytes (pre-OLs) the precursors of mature oligodendroglia cells responsible for the formation of myelin in a later stage. GMH is located beneath germinal matrix layer surrounding the lateral ventricles and can extend into the ventricular system resulting thus to IVH. Finally, PH is located within the parenchyma adjacent to the ventricles and is believed to represent haemorrhagic infarcts following venous drainage compromise. In term or near-term neonates, the top-ographic pattern of injuries involves mainly gray matter structures. Most frequent predilection sites include the cerebral cortex (paracentral lobule, Rolandic area, visual cortex and hippocampus), basal ganglia, thalamus, and

  18. Bipolar Disorder - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MP3 Bipolar Disorder (An Introduction) - English MP4 Bipolar Disorder (An Introduction) - español (Spanish) MP4 Healthy Roads Media Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  19. Female sexual arousal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Rellini, Alessandra H.; Pfaus, James; Laan, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Definitions and terminology for female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD) are currently being debated. While some authors have suggested that FSAD is more a subjective response rather than a genital response, others have suggested that desire and arousal disorders should be combined in one entity.

  20. Eating Disordered Adolescent Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliot, Alexandra O.; Baker, Christina Wood

    2001-01-01

    Described a sample of eating disordered adolescent males who were seen for treatment at Boston Children's Hospital Outpatient Eating Disorders Clinic. Findings suggest the idea that clinicians, coaches, peers, and family should encourage young men to share concerns about body image and weight at an earlier, less severe juncture, with the assurance…

  1. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that can cause ... of CDC’s work. Autism: What's New Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder Data Community Report Press Release Learn the Signs. ...

  2. Generalized anxiety disorder - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAD - children; Anxiety disorder - children ... The cause of GAD is unknown. Genes may play a role. Children with family members who have an anxiety disorder also may be more likely to have one. Stress may be a factor in developing GAD. Things ...

  3. Gastritis and mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Renee D; Cowles, Robert A; Galea, Sandro; Jacobi, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Although previous studies have suggested an association between various gastrointestinal disorders and mood and anxiety disorders, no previous study has examined the relationship between a diagnosis of gastritis and mood and anxiety disorders in the community. This work aimed to investigate the association between physician-diagnosed gastritis and DSM-IV mood and anxiety disorders among adults in the general population, and to examine sex differences in these relationships. Data were drawn from a population-based, representative sample of 4181 adults aged 18-79 in the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey. Anxiety disorders (27.0% vs. 15.3%) and affective disorders (20.1% vs. 11.5%) were significantly more common among adults with compared to without a diagnosis of gastritis. Lifetime and current physician diagnosed gastritis were associated with an increased prevalence of panic attacks, social phobia, any mood disorder and major depression, compared to those without gastritis. There were no significant sex differences in these associations. A diagnosis of gastritis appears to be associated with significantly increased odds of mood and anxiety disorders among adults in the general population. Contrary to findings from animal studies, we found the relationship between gastritis and mood/anxiety consistent among both sexes. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Boys with Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatmaker, Grace

    2005-01-01

    Although commonly associated with girls and women, eating disorders do not discriminate. School nurses need to be aware that male students also can suffer from the serious health effects of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, anorexia athletica, and eating disorders not otherwise specified. Sports that focus on leanness and weight limits can add to a…

  5. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-17

    Immune Deficiency Disorders; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorders; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  6. Eating Disorders Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... us in our mission. F.E.A.S.T.'s Eating Disorders Glossary Welcome to our comprehensive quick-reference eating ... Conversion Weight Manipulation Weight restoration, weight restored Zinc Eating disorders biology & pharmacology Antidepressants BDNF - brain-derived neurotophic factor ...

  7. [DSM-5: neurodevelopmental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinkstok, J.; Buitelaar, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) was published in May, 2013. AIM: To review the changes in the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and ADHD in DSM-5, compared to DSM-IV. METHOD: The diagnostic criteria for ASD and ADHD

  8. Genetic disorders of collagen.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsipouras, P; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Marfan syndrome form a group of genetic disorders of connective tissue. These disorders exhibit remarkable clinical heterogeneity which reflects their underlying biochemical and molecular differences. Defects in collagen types I and III have been found in all three syndromes.

  9. Treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin; Michaelis, Sophie; Wedekind, Dirk

    2017-06-01

    Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder/agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, and others) are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders, and are associated with a high burden of illness. Anxiety disorders are often underrecognized and undertreated in primary care. Treatment is indicated when a patient shows marked distress or suffers from complications resulting from the disorder. The treatment recommendations given in this article are based on guidelines, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews of randomized controlled studies. Anxiety disorders should be treated with psychological therapy, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of both. Cognitive behavioral therapy can be regarded as the psychotherapy with the highest level of evidence. First-line drugs are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Benzodiazepines are not recommended for routine use. Other treatment options include pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, buspirone, moclobemide, and others. After remission, medications should be continued for 6 to 12 months. When developing a treatment plan, efficacy, adverse effects, interactions, costs, and the preference of the patient should be considered.

  10. Athletes with seizure disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Byron Don; Pleacher, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with seizure disorders have long been restricted from participation in certain sporting activities. Those with seizure disorders are more likely than their peers to have a sedentary lifestyle and to develop obesity. Regular participation in physical activity can improve both physical and psychosocial outcomes for persons with seizure disorders. Seizure activity often is reduced among those patients who regularly engage in aerobic activity. Recent literature indicates that the diagnosis of seizure disorders remains highly stigmatizing in the adolescent population. Persons with seizure disorders may be more accepted by peer groups if they are allowed to participate in sports and recreational activities. Persons with seizure disorders are encouraged to participate in regular aerobic activities. They may participate in team sports and contact or collision activities provided that they utilize appropriate protective equipment. There seems to be no increased risk of injury or increasing seizure activity as the result of such participation. Persons with seizure disorders still are discouraged from participating in scuba diving and skydiving. The benefits of participation in regular sporting activity far outweigh any risk to the athlete with a seizure disorder who chooses to participate in sports.

  11. Defining Oppositional Defiant Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Richard; Maughan, Barbara; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Background: ICD-10 and DSM-IV include similar criterial symptom lists for conduct disorder (CD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), but while DSM-IV treats each list separately, ICD-10 considers them jointly. One consequence is that ICD-10 identifies a group of children with ODD subtype who do not receive a diagnosis under DSM-IV. Methods: We…

  12. Related Addictive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Tina; Sales, Amos

    This paper provides an overview of addiction related to substance abuse. It provides basic information, prevalence, diagnostic criteria, assessment tools, and treatment issues for eating disorders, compulsive gambling, sex addictions, and work addictions. Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, especially affect adolescents.…

  13. Eating Disorders and Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Dick; Moriarty, Mary

    Since sports can sometimes lend themselves to eating disorders, coaches and sports administrators must get involved in the detection and treatment of this problem. While no reliable studies or statistics exist on the incidence of anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia among athletes, some research suggests that such disorders occur frequently among…

  14. Temperament and Attachment Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeanah, Charles H.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2004-01-01

    Reviewed in this article is research on children with reactive attachment disorder (RAD) who exhibit specific patterns of socially aberrant behavior resulting from being maltreated or having limited opportunities to form selective attachments. There are no data explaining why 2 different patterns of the disorder, an emotionally withdrawn-inhibited…

  15. Social Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Seedat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available According to epidemiological studies, rates of social anxiety disorder(SAD or social phobia range from 3% to 16% in the generalpopulation.[1,2]Social phobia and specific phobias have an earlier ageof onset than other anxiety disorders.

  16. Affective Disorders among Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjåstad, Hege Nordem; Gråwe, Rolf W.; Egeland, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Background The high co-occurrence between borderline personality disorder and affective disorders has led many to believe that borderline personality disorder should be considered as part of an affective spectrum. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the prevalence of affective disorders are higher for patients with borderline personality disorder than for patients with other personality disorders. Methods In a national cross-sectional study of patients receiving mental health treatment in Norway (N = 36 773), we determined whether psychiatric outpatients with borderline personality disorder (N = 1 043) had a higher prevalence of affective disorder in general, and whether they had an increased prevalence of depression, bipolar disorder or dysthymia specifically. They were compared to patients with paranoid, schizoid, dissocial, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, avoidant, dependent, or unspecified personality disorder, as well as an aggregated group of patients with personality disorders other than the borderline type (N = 2 636). Odds ratios were computed for the borderline personality disorder group comparing it to the mixed sample of other personality disorders. Diagnostic assessments were conducted in routine clinical practice. Results More subjects with borderline personality disorder suffered from unipolar than bipolar disorders. Nevertheless, borderline personality disorder had a lower rate of depression and dysthymia than several other personality disorder groups, whereas the rate of bipolar disorder tended to be higher. Odds ratios showed 34% lower risk for unipolar depression, 70% lower risk for dysthymia and 66% higher risk for bipolar disorder in patients with borderline personality disorder compared to the aggregated group of other personality disorders. Conclusions The results suggest that borderline personality disorder has a stronger association with affective disorders in the bipolar spectrum than disorders in the unipolar

  17. Affective disorders among patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjåstad, Hege Nordem; Gråwe, Rolf W; Egeland, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The high co-occurrence between borderline personality disorder and affective disorders has led many to believe that borderline personality disorder should be considered as part of an affective spectrum. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the prevalence of affective disorders are higher for patients with borderline personality disorder than for patients with other personality disorders. In a national cross-sectional study of patients receiving mental health treatment in Norway (N = 36 773), we determined whether psychiatric outpatients with borderline personality disorder (N = 1 043) had a higher prevalence of affective disorder in general, and whether they had an increased prevalence of depression, bipolar disorder or dysthymia specifically. They were compared to patients with paranoid, schizoid, dissocial, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, avoidant, dependent, or unspecified personality disorder, as well as an aggregated group of patients with personality disorders other than the borderline type (N = 2 636). Odds ratios were computed for the borderline personality disorder group comparing it to the mixed sample of other personality disorders. Diagnostic assessments were conducted in routine clinical practice. More subjects with borderline personality disorder suffered from unipolar than bipolar disorders. Nevertheless, borderline personality disorder had a lower rate of depression and dysthymia than several other personality disorder groups, whereas the rate of bipolar disorder tended to be higher. Odds ratios showed 34% lower risk for unipolar depression, 70% lower risk for dysthymia and 66% higher risk for bipolar disorder in patients with borderline personality disorder compared to the aggregated group of other personality disorders. The results suggest that borderline personality disorder has a stronger association with affective disorders in the bipolar spectrum than disorders in the unipolar spectrum. This association may reflect

  18. Affective disorders among patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege Nordem Sjåstad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high co-occurrence between borderline personality disorder and affective disorders has led many to believe that borderline personality disorder should be considered as part of an affective spectrum. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the prevalence of affective disorders are higher for patients with borderline personality disorder than for patients with other personality disorders. METHODS: In a national cross-sectional study of patients receiving mental health treatment in Norway (N = 36 773, we determined whether psychiatric outpatients with borderline personality disorder (N = 1 043 had a higher prevalence of affective disorder in general, and whether they had an increased prevalence of depression, bipolar disorder or dysthymia specifically. They were compared to patients with paranoid, schizoid, dissocial, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, avoidant, dependent, or unspecified personality disorder, as well as an aggregated group of patients with personality disorders other than the borderline type (N = 2 636. Odds ratios were computed for the borderline personality disorder group comparing it to the mixed sample of other personality disorders. Diagnostic assessments were conducted in routine clinical practice. RESULTS: More subjects with borderline personality disorder suffered from unipolar than bipolar disorders. Nevertheless, borderline personality disorder had a lower rate of depression and dysthymia than several other personality disorder groups, whereas the rate of bipolar disorder tended to be higher. Odds ratios showed 34% lower risk for unipolar depression, 70% lower risk for dysthymia and 66% higher risk for bipolar disorder in patients with borderline personality disorder compared to the aggregated group of other personality disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that borderline personality disorder has a stronger association with affective disorders in the bipolar spectrum than

  19. Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Related Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Heidi A.; Gair, Shannon L.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Grice, Dorothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Twin and family studies support a significant genetic contribution to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related disorders such as chronic tic disorders, trichotillomania, skin picking disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, and hoarding disorder. Recently, population-based studies and novel laboratory-based methods have confirmed substantial heritability in OCD. Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene association studies have provided information on specific gen...

  20. Conduct disorders as a result of specific learning disorders

    OpenAIRE

    VOKROJOVÁ, Nela

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on relationship between specific learning disorders and conduct disorders in puberty. The theoretical part explains the basic terms apearing in the thesis such as specific learning disorders, conduct disorders, puberty and prevention of conduct disorder formation. It presents Czech and foreign research which have already been done in this and related areas. The empirical part uses a quantitative method to measure anxiety and occurrence of conduct disorders in second grade ...

  1. Depressive and bipolar disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Demyttenaere, Koen

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that attitudes and beliefs are important in predicting adherence to treatment and medication in depressive and bipolar disorders. However, these attitudes have received little study in patients whose disorders were sufficiently severe to require...... hospitalization. METHOD: The Antidepressant Compliance Questionnaire (ADCQ) was mailed to a large population of patients with depressive or bipolar disorder, representative of patients treated in hospital settings in Denmark. RESULTS: Of the 1005 recipients, 49.9% responded to the letter. A large proportion....... Moreover, their partners agreed on these negative views. Women had a more negative view of the doctor-patient relationship than men, and patients with a depressive disorder had a more negative view of antidepressants than patients with bipolar disorder. The number of psychiatric hospitalizations...

  2. Tourette disorder and other tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Thomas V; State, Matthew W; Pittenger, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Tourette disorder is a developmental neuropsychiatric condition characterized by vocal and motor tics that can range in severity from mild to disabling. It represents one end of a spectrum of tic disorders and is estimated to affect 0.5-0.7% of the population. Accumulated evidence supports a substantial genetic contribution to disease risk, but the identification of genetic variants that confer risk has been challenging. Positive findings in candidate gene association studies have not replicated, and genomewide association studies have not generated signals of genomewide significance, in large part because of inadequate sample sizes. Rare mutations in several genes have been identified, but their causality is difficult to establish. As in other complex neuropsychiatric disorders, it is likely that Tourette disorder risk involves a combination of common, low-effect and rare, larger-effect variants in multiple genes acting together with environmental factors. With the ongoing collection of larger patient cohorts and the emergence of affordable high-throughput genomewide sequencing, progress is expected to accelerate in coming years. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Personal Relationships and Digestive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Verify password * Email * Verify email * Captcha * Register Sidebar × MOBILE MENU GI Disorders Functional GI Disorders Motility Disorders ... condition and improve how you feel: Try to locate areas of conflict in your personal relationships and ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often occurs with other mental health conditions, including anxiety disorders (such as panic attacks), behavioral disorders (such as ... disorder is a common form of mental illness. At some point during their lifetime, 2.4 ...

  5. Adrenal Gland Disorders: Condition Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print About Adrenal Gland Disorders The adrenal glands, located on the top of ... as estrogen and testosterone. What are adrenal gland disorders? Adrenal gland disorders occur when the adrenal glands do not ...

  6. Personality Disorders in patients with disorders in eating behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Carina Góngora

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The interest for the systematic study of personality disorder in patients with eating disorders starts in 1980 with the edition of the DSM III multiaxial classification system. Since then, several publications have been focused on the prevalence and the effect on treatment of personality disorders in bulimic and anorexic patients. These researches showed inconsistent results due to conceptual and methodological divergences. In this paper, the more relevant findings of these studies are presented and the possible sources of discrepancy are analyzed. In general, there is a moderate comorbidity between personality disorders and eating disorders. The most frequent disorders are borderline, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, dependent and avoidant personality disorders. Borderline and histrionic personality disorders are more frequently associated with bulimia, whereas avoidant and obsessive- compulsive personality disorders are more characteristic of anorexia nervosa. Nevertheless, the effect of the relationship between eating disorders and personality disorders in treatment remains uncertain, giving raise to several controversies and researches. 

  7. Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Families Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) No. 110; Updated May 2013 Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) is a relatively new diagnosis ...

  8. The cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph ePhillips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has been considered for a long time to play a role solely in motor coordination. However, studies over the past two decades have shown that the cerebellum also plays a key role in many motor, cognitive, and emotional processes. In addition, studies have also shown that the cerebellum is implicated in many psychiatric disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. In this review, we discuss existing studies reporting cerebellar dysfunction in various psychiatric disorders. We will also discuss future directions for studies linking the cerebellum to psychiatric disorders.

  9. Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... References American Psychiatric Association. Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013; ...

  10. Post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Post-traumatic stress disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  11. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Kinetics of tetrataenite disordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, E.; Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P.; Fillion, G.; Scorzelli, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrataenite is a chemically ordered L1 0 -type Fe 50 Ni 50 alloy detected for the first time in 1977 by 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy studies in iron meteorites. The thermal history of meteorites, in particular short thermal events like those associated to hypervelocity impacts, can be constrained by tracing the presence of tetrataenite or its disordering into taenite. The knowledge of the disordering kinetics of tetrataenite, that is associated with changes in its magnetic properties, is still very fragmentary so that the time–temperature history of these meteorites cannot be constrained in details. Furthermore, knowledge of disordering kinetics is important due to potential technological application of tetrataenite as a rare-earth free strong magnet. Thus, this work provides the first time–temperature data for disordering reaction of tetrataenite. We have shown that disordering is not an instantaneous process but is a kinetic limited reaction. It was shown that disordering may take place at any temperature above the order–disorder transition for L 10 superstructure phase (∼320 °C) when the appropriate time-scale is considered. This result means that the apparent Curie point for tetrataenite is not an absolute property in the sense that any estimate of this parameter should be referred to a given time-scale. - Highlights: • The first time–temperature data for tetrataenite disordering reaction is provided. • Previous works does not give a complete picture of tetrataenite disordering. • Apparent Curie temperature of tetrataenite should be referred to a time-scale. • Tetrataenite can be used as a probe to detect thermal/shock events recorded in meteorites

  13. Kinetics of tetrataenite disordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dos Santos, E., E-mail: edisanfi@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P. [Centre Européen de Recherche et d’Enseignement des Géosciences de l’Environnement, UM34, CNRS/Aix-Marseille University, Aix-en-Provence (France); Fillion, G. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses (LNCMI), CNRS, UJF, 38042 Grenoble (France); Scorzelli, R.B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-02-01

    Tetrataenite is a chemically ordered L1{sub 0}-type Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} alloy detected for the first time in 1977 by {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy studies in iron meteorites. The thermal history of meteorites, in particular short thermal events like those associated to hypervelocity impacts, can be constrained by tracing the presence of tetrataenite or its disordering into taenite. The knowledge of the disordering kinetics of tetrataenite, that is associated with changes in its magnetic properties, is still very fragmentary so that the time–temperature history of these meteorites cannot be constrained in details. Furthermore, knowledge of disordering kinetics is important due to potential technological application of tetrataenite as a rare-earth free strong magnet. Thus, this work provides the first time–temperature data for disordering reaction of tetrataenite. We have shown that disordering is not an instantaneous process but is a kinetic limited reaction. It was shown that disordering may take place at any temperature above the order–disorder transition for L{sub 10} superstructure phase (∼320 °C) when the appropriate time-scale is considered. This result means that the apparent Curie point for tetrataenite is not an absolute property in the sense that any estimate of this parameter should be referred to a given time-scale. - Highlights: • The first time–temperature data for tetrataenite disordering reaction is provided. • Previous works does not give a complete picture of tetrataenite disordering. • Apparent Curie temperature of tetrataenite should be referred to a time-scale. • Tetrataenite can be used as a probe to detect thermal/shock events recorded in meteorites.

  14. Surgical speech disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tianjie; Sie, Kathleen C Y

    2014-11-01

    Most speech disorders of childhood are treated with speech therapy. However, two conditions, ankyloglossia and velopharyngeal dysfunction, may be amenable to surgical intervention. It is important for surgeons to work with experienced speech language pathologists to diagnose the speech disorder. Children with articulation disorders related to ankyloglossia may benefit from frenuloplasty. Children with velopharyngeal dysfunction should have standardized clinical evaluation and instrumental asseessment of velopharyngeal function. Surgeons should develop a treatment protocol to optimize speech outcomes while minimizing morbidity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perihan Cam Ray

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Body dysmorphic disorder is a type of mental illness, wherein the affected person is concerned with body image, manifested as excessive concern about and preoccupation with a perceived defect of their physical features. Although it is a common disease and has been defined in the literature over a century, it is not a well known disease. Chronic, treatment resistant and sometimes delusional nature could result in severe functional impairment. The diagnosis and appropriate therapy of disorder are crucial because of increased suicidality and reduction in life quality. In this article the symptoms, etiology, clinical features and treatment of body dysmorphic disorder are briefly reviewed.

  16. [Clothing and heat disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satsumoto, Yayoi

    2012-06-01

    The influence of the clothing material properties(like water absorbency and rapid dryness, water vapor absorption, water vapor permeability and air permeability) and the design factor of the clothing(like opening condition and fitting of clothing), which contributed to prevent heat disorder, was outlined. WBGT(wet-bulb globe temperature) is used to show a guideline for environmental limitation of activities to prevent heat disorder. As the safety function is more important than thermal comfort for some sportswear and protective clothing with high cover area, clothing itself increases the risk of heat disorder. WBGT is corrected by CAF (clothing adjustment factor) in wearing such kind of protective clothing.

  17. [Antisocial personality disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Hallikainen, Tero

    2016-01-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASP), especially psychopathy as its extreme form, has provoked fear and excitement over thousands of years. Ruthless violence involved in the disorder has inspired scientists, too.The abundance of research results concerning epidemiology, physiology, neuroanatomy, heritability, and treatment interventions has made ASP one of the best documented disorders in psychiatry. Numerous interventions have been tested, but there is no current treatment algorithm. Biological and sociological parameters indicate the importance of early targeted interventions among the high risk children. Otherwise, as adults they cause the greatest harm. The use of medications or psychotherapy for adults needs careful consideration.

  18. Body dysmorphic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jawad, Mustafa Bashir M; Sjögren, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is defined by a preoccupation of one or more non-existent or slight defects or flaws in the physical appearance. The prevalence is 1.7-2.4% in the general population with a higher incidence rate in women. The rate of suicidal ideation is as high as 80%, and up to 25......% of the patients attempt to commit suicide. Comorbidities, such as obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and anxiety, are frequent. These patients may seek cosmetic or dermatologic rather than psychological treatment. In the view of the high prevalence and risk of suicide, recognizing this disorder...

  19. Ghrelin and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalayer, Deniz; Gibson, Charlisa; Konopacka, Alexandra; Geliebter, Allan

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence supporting a multifactorial etiology that includes genetic, neurochemical, and physiological components for eating disorders above and beyond the more conventional theories based on psychological and sociocultural factors. Ghrelin is one of the key gut signals associated with appetite, and the only known circulating hormone that triggers a positive energy balance by stimulating food intake. This review summarizes recent findings and several conflicting reports on ghrelin in eating disorders. Understanding these findings and inconsistencies may help in developing new methods to prevent and treat patients with these disorders. PMID:22960103

  20. Personality disorders and pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaddiparti, Krishna; Cottler, Linda B

    2017-01-01

    To explore recent developments in the field of personality disorders and their association with pathological gambling or gambling disorder. The review covers literature published from 2015 to present time (August 2016) to understand the prevalence rates of common personality disorders among pathological gamblers. Commonly seen personality disorders among pathological or problem gamblers represent Cluster B disorders. There are reports indicating prevalence of Clusters A and C personality disorders as well. The rates of personality disorders among pathological gamblers reported in these studies align with Hill's guidelines - Strength, Specificity, Temporality, Biological gradient, Plausibility and Replicability indicating a strong association between pathological gambling and personality disorders. Studies are predominantly cross-sectional and consistently show that the presence of a personality disorder is associated with gambling severity and early age of onset pathological gambling. Research on pathological gambling should advance beyond estimating rates of personality disorders and focus on longitudinal research to understand the pathways between personality disorders and onset and severity of pathological gambling.

  1. Can eating disorders cause functional gastrointestinal disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, P

    2010-12-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are very common (up to 98%) in patients with an eating disorder (ED). Boyd et al. discuss in this issue of Neurogastroenterology & Motility that FGIDs can persist independently on the outcome of the ED. Their findings leave room for speculation on the mechanisms underlying FGIDs in patients with an ED. FGIDs result from a complex interaction of biological, psychosocial and social factors. The altered eating behavior seen in EDs is strongly associated with disturbed gastrointestinal sensitivity and motor physiology. Moreover, psychiatric co-morbidities in ED patients are also frequently found in FGIDs. The motor and sensitivity disturbances together with psychiatric co-morbidities can lay the foundation of a FGID. Once established the psychological and physiological disturbances can perpetuate and strengthen each other resulting in a FGID that can persist independently of the ED that originally caused the motor and sensitivity disturbances.

  2. The relationship of body dysmorphic disorder and eating disorders to obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Kaye, Walter H

    2007-05-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and eating disorders are body image disorders that have long been hypothesized to be related to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Available data suggest that BDD and eating disorders are often comorbid with OCD. Data from a variety of domains suggest that both BDD and eating disorders have many similarities with OCD and seem related to OCD. However, these disorders also differ from OCD in some ways. Additional research is needed on the relationship of BDD and eating disorders to OCD, including studies that directly compare them to OCD in a variety of domains, including phenomenology, family history, neurobiology, and etiology.

  3. Delusional disorder-somatic type (or body dysmorphic disorder) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With regard to delusional disorder-somatic subtype there may be a relationship with body dysmorphic disorder. There are reports that some delusional disorders can evolve to become schizophrenia. Similarly, the treatment of such disorders with antipsychotics has been documented. This report describes a case of ...

  4. Sleep disorders in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina Permatawati

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion The proportion of sleep disorder in children with ADHD is relatively high, with the majority having a disorder of initiating and maintaining sleep. Children with combined type ADHD experience a higher amount of sleep disorder than those with either the inattention or hyperactive-impulsive types of ADHD. Children with poor sleep hygiene have significantly more severe sleep disorders.

  5. Neuromuscular Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Neuromuscular Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  6. Anal Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Anal Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  7. Esophagus Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Esophagus Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  8. Parathyroid Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Parathyroid Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  9. Muscle Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Muscle Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  10. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... explosive disorder have an increased risk of: Impaired interpersonal relationships. They're often perceived by others as ... of control: Stick with your treatment. Attend your therapy sessions, practice your coping skills, and if your ...

  11. Female Sexual Arousal Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Rellini, Alessandra H; Pfaus, James

    2012-01-01

    and psychological disorders, as well as to discuss different medical and psychological assessment and treatment modalities. Methods.  The experts of the International Society for Sexual Medicine's Standard Committee convened to provide a survey using relevant databases, journal articles, and own clinical experience....... Conclusion.  Recommendations are given for assessment and treatment of FSAD and PGAD. Giraldi A, Rellini AH, Pfaus J, and Laan E. Female sexual arousal disorders. J Sex Med **;**:**-**.......Introduction.  Definitions and terminology for female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD) are currently being debated. While some authors have suggested that FSAD is more a subjective response rather than a genital response, others have suggested that desire and arousal disorders should be combined...

  12. Developmental coordination disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental coordination disorder can lead to: Learning problems Low self-esteem resulting from poor ability at sports and teasing by other children Repeated injuries Weight gain as a result of not wanting to participate ...

  13. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Headache Intermittent explosive disorder Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  14. Psychoneuroimmunology of mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Virginia; Uribe, Javiera; Salvat-Pujol, Neus; Palao, Diego; Menchón, José Manuel; Labad, Javier

    2017-10-06

    The immune system is a key element in the organism's defence system and participates in the maintenance of homeostasis. There is growing interest in the aetiopathogenic and prognostic implications of the immune system in mental disorders, as previous studies suggest the existence of a dysregulation of the immune response and a pro-inflammatory state in patients with mental disorders, as well as an increased prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients suffering from autoimmune diseases or receiving immune treatments. This study aims to conduct a narrative review of the scientific literature on the role of Psychoneuroimmunology in mental disorders, with special focus on diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic issues. The development of this body of knowledge may bring in the future important advances in the vulnerability, aetiopathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis and treatment of some mental disorders. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Questions to Ask Your BPD Treatment Provider There are different types of therapy for borderline ...

  16. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Hardeveld, F.; de Graaf, R.; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  17. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.; Beekman, A.T.; Hardeveld, F.; Graaf, R. de; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  18. Disability in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, S.M.; Spijker, J.; Licht, C.M.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Hardeveld, F.; Graaf, R. de; Batelaan, N.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study compares disability levels between different anxiety disorders and healthy controls. We further investigate the role of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour in disability, and whether differences in these symptom patterns contribute to disability differences between anxiety

  19. Generalized anxiety disorder (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalized anxiety disorder is characterized by excessive worry about 2 or more life circumstances for a period of 6 months or longer. Biological and genetic factors may combine with stress to produce psychological symptoms.

  20. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it keeps the temperature just right. What Is Thyroid Disease? There are two main kinds of thyroid disorder ... into the kid's bloodstream. Why Do Kids Get Thyroid Disease? In most cases, doctors and scientists can't ...

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... borderline personality disorder (BPD). Therapy may be given one-on-one and through support groups, enabling people with BPD ... reassign extreme positive or negative images associated with one person to another person, such as the therapist. ...

  2. Talking about GI Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bellyaches in Children Childhood Defecation Disorders Diarrhea Hirschsprung's Disease Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction Irritable Bowel Syndrome General Treatments Lifestyle Changes Strategies for Improving Bowel Habits Improving Sleep Quality Kids & Dietary Fiber Fruit Juice Surgery Laxatives ...

  3. Schizophrenia: A Systemic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Brian; Miller, Brian; García-Rizo, Clemente; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The concept of schizophrenia that is most widely taught is that it is a disorder in which psychotic symptoms are the main problem, and a dysregulation of dopamine signaling is the main feature of pathophysiology. However, this concept limits clinical assessment, the treatments offered to patients, research, and the development of therapeutics. A more appropriate conceptual model is that: 1) schizophrenia is not a psychotic disorder, but a disorder of essentially every brain function in which psychosis is present; 2) it is not a brain disease, but a disorder with impairments throughout the body; 3) for many patients, neuropsychiatric problems other than psychosis contribute more to impairment in function and quality of life than does psychosis; and, 4) some conditions that are considered to be comorbid are integral parts of the illness. In conclusion, students, patients, and family members should be taught this model, along with its implications for assessment, research, and therapeutics. PMID:23518782

  4. Smell and Taste Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely to develop in people who have a histrionic personality (characterized by conspicuous seeking of attention with dramatic behavior). Some disorders can distort the sense of smell, making innocuous ...

  5. Overview of Tooth Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necessitated by crowns and bridges. Bonding involves the attachment of tooth-colored fillings to natural teeth with ... Drugs Mentioned In This Article Generic Name Select Brand Names tetracycline ACHROMYCIN V Tooth Disorders Overview of ...

  6. Disordered Materials An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ossi, Paolo M

    2006-01-01

    This self-contained text introduces the physics of structurally disordered condensed systems at the level of advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Among the topics are the geometry and symmetries of the structural units used as building blocks of extended structures, the various kinds of disorder, the phenomenology and the main theories of the glass transition, the structure of amorphous systems and the techniques to investigate it, the evolution of system's structure with its size (clusters) and the presence of orientational order in the absence of translational order (quasicrystals). In the second edition, the treatment of the mode coupling theory of the glass transition has been enlarged and connects now to a new section on collective excitations in disordered systems. Special attention has been devoted to nanometer-sized disordered systems, with emphasis on cluster-assembled materials. Questions of what governs the occurrence and stability of quasicrystals, the features of the amorphous to quasicr...

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders ( DSM-5 ) , a guide created by the American Psychiatric Association ... the current revised version of the DSM (the DSM-5 ), these separate conditions have been combined into one ...

  8. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the guidelines health care providers use to diagnose different mental health conditions, was released. The DSM-5 made significant changes to how autism is classified ...

  9. Child Behavior Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... misbehave some times. And some may have temporary behavior problems due to stress. For example, the birth ... family may cause a child to act out. Behavior disorders are more serious. They involve a pattern ...

  10. Hearing Disorders and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impossible, to hear. They can often be helped. Deafness can keep you from hearing sound at all. ... certain medicines, and surgery. NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  11. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids are "building blocks" that join together to form proteins. If you have one of these disorders, your body may have trouble breaking down certain amino acids. Or there may be a problem getting the ...

  12. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their menstrual cycle. PMDD may be associated with eating disorders and smoking. When to Contact a Medical Professional ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  13. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)? Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Learn what those dental words mean. Check out how your teeth and mouth ...

  14. Speech disorders - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after age 4 (I want...I want my doll. I...I see you.) Putting in (interjecting) extra ... may outgrow milder forms of speech disorders. Speech therapy may help with more severe symptoms or any ...

  15. Disordered adsorbate phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Franz S.

    1985-04-01

    The occurrence of disordered phases at low temperatures in adsorbed monolayers, as shown recently in a domain wall model, is discussed, the main results are summarized and some relevant experimental systems are mentionned.

  16. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can taking antiseizure medications during pregnancy harm my baby? • Should I stop taking my antiseizure medications during pregnancy? • What extra steps may my health care provider take when monitoring my pregnancy? • If I have a seizure disorder, ...

  17. Sleep in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, Anna J; Schwichtenberg, Amy J

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) experience sleep problems at higher rates than the general population. Although individuals with IDD are a heterogeneous group, several sleep problems cluster within genetic syndromes or disorders. This review summarizes the prevalence of sleep problems experienced by individuals with Angelman syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome, Cri du Chat syndrome, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Smith-Magenis syndrome, Williams syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, and idiopathic IDD. Factors associated with sleep problems and the evidence for sleep treatments are reviewed for each neurodevelopmental disorder. Sleep research advancements in neurodevelopmental disorders are reviewed, including the need for consistency in defining and measuring sleep problems, considerations for research design and reporting of results, and considerations when evaluating sleep treatments. PMID:28503406

  18. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Marguerite; Nigg, Joel T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, there have been numerous technical and methodological advances available to clinicians and researchers to better understand attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its etiology. Despite the growing body of literature investigating the disorder’s pathophysiology, ADHD remains a complex psychiatric disorder to characterize. This chapter will briefly review the literature on ADHD, with a focus on its history, the current genetic insights, neurophysiologic theories, and the use of neuroimaging to further understand the etiology. We address some of the major concerns that remain unclear about ADHD, including subtype instability, heterogeneity, and the underlying neural correlates that define the disorder. We highlight that the field of ADHD is rapidly evolving; the descriptions provided here will hopefully provide a sturdy foundation for which to build and improve our understanding of the disorder. PMID:24214656

  19. Dementia in affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L V; Olsen, E W; Mortensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate whether patients with affective disorder have increased risk of developing dementia compared to other groups of psychiatric patients and compared to the general population. METHOD: In the Danish psychiatric central register, 3363 patients...... with unipolar affective disorder, 518 patients with bipolar affective disorder, 1025 schizophrenic and 8946 neurotic patients were identified according to the diagnosis at the first ever discharge from psychiatric hospital during the period from 1970 to 1974. The rate of discharge diagnosis of dementia...... on readmission was estimated during 21 years of follow-up. In addition, the rates were compared with the rates for admission to psychiatric hospitals with a discharge diagnosis of dementia for the total Danish population. RESULTS: Patients with unipolar and with bipolar affective disorder had a greater risk...

  20. Mental Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Soomaali (Somali) MP3 EthnoMed Spanish (español) Expand Section Mental Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Enfermedades mentales: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National Library of Medicine ...