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Sample records for metal-metal wear mechanisms

  1. Evolution of metal-metal wear mechanisms in martensitic steel deposits for recharging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualco, Agustin; Svoboda, Hernan G; Surian, Estela S; De Vedia, Luis A

    2008-01-01

    This work studied metal recharged by welding with a martensitic steel (Cr, Mn, Mo, V and W alloy), deposited with a metal filled tubular wire on a low carbon steel, using semi-automatic welding with a contributing heat of 2 kJ/mm and under a gaseous protection of Ar-2%CO 2 . Transverse cuts were extracted from the welded sample for microstructural characterization, hardness measurement, determination of chemical composition and wear tests. The microstructural characterization was performed using light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The wear tests (metal-metal) were carried out on an Amsler machine in natural flow condition, with 500, 1250 and 2000 N of applied charge. The reference material was SAE 1020 steel. The weight loss curves were determined as a function of the distance run up to 5000 meters for all conditions. Then the test's wear surfaces and debris were analyzed. The microstructure consisted mostly of martensite and a fraction of retained austenite. A pattern of dendritic segregation was observed. The hardness on the wear surface averaged 670 HV 1 . The wear behavior showed a lineal variation between the loss of weight and the distance run, for the different loads applied. The rates of wear for each condition were obtained. The observed wear mechanisms were abrasion and adhesion, with plastic deformation. At low charges, the predominant mechanism was mild oxidative wear and at bigger loads heavy oxidative wear with the presence of zones with adhesion. The oxides formed on the surface of the eroded plate were identified

  2. Wear mechanisms of coated hardmetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, V.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper several aspects of the wear mechanisms of coated hardmetals, ceramics and super-hard materials (CBN) in machining cast iron are discussed, with particular attention being given to high-speed machining of different cast iron grades. The influence of machining parameters, microstructure, composition and mechanical and chemical properties of the cutting tool and the work-piece material on wear are considered. (author)

  3. Pure mechanical wear loss measurement in corrosive wear

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The method for the measurement of the pure mechanical wear loss for 321 stainless steel, 1045 steel and pure iron in the study of the synergy between corrosion and wear was studied. The methods studied included the measurement in distilled water, by cathodic protection and by adding inhibitor KI, and all were ...

  4. Effects of digestion protocols on the isolation and characterization of metal-metal wear particles. I. Analysis of particle size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelas, I; Bobyn, J D; Medley, J B; Krygier, J J; Zukor, D J; Petit, A; Huk, O L

    2001-06-05

    Isolation of metal wear particles from hip simulator lubricants or tissues surrounding implants is a challenging problem because of small particle size, their tendency to agglomerate, and their potential for chemical degradation by digestion reagents. To provide realistic measurements of size, shape, and composition of metal wear particles, it is important to optimize particle isolation and minimize particle changes due to the effects of the reagents. In this study (Part I of II), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine and compare the effects of different isolation protocols, using enzymes or alkaline solutions, on the size and shape of three different types of cobalt-based alloy particles produced from metal-metal bearings. The effect on particle composition was examined in a subsequent study (Part II). Large particles (particles (particle size and to a lesser extent particle shape. For both large particles and small particles generated in water, the changes in size were more extensive after alkaline than after enzymatic protocols and increased with alkaline concentration and time in solution, up to twofold at 2 h and threefold at 48 h. However, when isolating particles from 95% serum, an initial protective effect of serum proteins and/or lipids was observed. Because of this protective effect, there was no significant difference in particle size and shape for both oval and needle-shaped particles after 2 h in 2N KOH and after enzymatic treatments. However, round particles were significantly smaller after 2 h in 2N KOH than after enzymatic treatments. Particle composition may also have been affected by the 2N KOH treatment, as suggested by a difference in particle contrast under TEM, an issue examined in detail in Part II. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 55: 320-329, 2001

  5. Delamination wear mechanism in gray cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, M.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of the friction and sliding wear of gray cast iron against chromium plated cast irons was carried out on a newly constructed reciprocating friction and wear tester. The tests were the first to be done on the test rig under dry conditions and at the speed of 170 cm/min, and variable loads of 20-260 N for a duration of 15 min. to 3 hours. The gray cast iron surfaces worn by a process of plastic deformation at the subsurface, crack nucleation, and crack growth leading to formation of plate like debris and therefore the delamination theory applies. No evidence of adhesion was observed. This could be due to formation of oxides on the wear surface which prevent adhesion. channel type chromium plating ''picked'' up cast iron from the counter-body surfaces by mechanically trapping cast iron debris on and within the cracks. The removal of the plated chromium left a pitted surface on the cast iron

  6. Pure mechanical wear loss measurement in corrosive wear

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Jiang Xiaoxia 1992 Metall. Sinica 28 B57. Jiang Xiaoxia and Li Sizuo 1991 Chemical Machinery 18 150. (in Chinese). Madson B W 1988 Wear 123 127. Pitt C H 1986 Corrosion 42 312. Schumacher W 1985 Wear of Materials 558. Tomlison W J 1991 Tribo. Inter. 2 67. Yue Zhongying 1987 Solid Lubrication 7 65 (in Chinese).

  7. Adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms in ion implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1985-01-01

    The distinction between adhesive and abrasive wear processes was introduced originally by Burwell during the nineteen-fifties, though some authors prefer to classify wear according to whether it is mild or severe. It is argued here that, on the basis of the performance of a variety of ion implanted metal surfaces, exposed to different modes of wear, the Burwell distinction is a valid one which, moreover, enables us to predict under which circumstances a given treatment will perform well. It is shown that, because wear rates under abrasive conditions are very sensitive to the ratio of the hardness of the surface to that of the abrasive particles, large increases in working life are attainable as a result of ion implantation. Under adhesive wear conditions, the wear rate appears to fall inversely as the hardness increases, and it is advantageous to implant species which will create and retain a hard surface oxide or other continuous film in order to reduce metal-metal contact. By the appropriate combination of physico-chemical changes in an implanted layer it has been possible to reduce wear rates by up to three orders of magnitude. Such rates compensate for the shallow depths achievable by ion implantation. (orig.)

  8. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  9. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  10. Wear mechanisms in ceramic hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonaker, Matthew; Goswami, Tarun

    2004-01-01

    The wear in hip implants is one of the main causes for premature hip replacements. The wear affects the potential life of the prosthesis and subsequent removals of in vivo implants. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review various joints that show lower wear rates and consequently higher life. Ceramics are used in hip implants and have been found to produce lower wear rates. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of ceramics compared to other implant materials. Different types of ceramics that are being used are reviewed in terms of the wear characteristics, debris released, and their size together with other biological factors. In general, the wear rates in ceramics were lower than that of metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene combinations.

  11. An approach to understanding tribological behaviour of dental composites through volumetric wear loss and wear mechanism determination; beyond material ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaie, Asmaa; Bubb, Nigel L; Franklin, Paul; Dowling, Adam H; Fleming, Garry J P; Wood, David J

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the fundamental wear mechanisms of six resin-based composite (RBC) formulations during short-term in vitro wear testing. RBC materials were condensed into rectangular bar-shaped specimens and light irradiated using the ISO 4049 specimen manufacture and irradiation protocol. Wear testing (n=10 specimens for each RBC) was performed on a modified pin-on-plate wear test apparatus and wear facets were analysed for wear volume loss using a white light profilometer. The wear tested RBC specimens and their corresponding antagonists were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively to determine the wear mechanism. Data generated using the profilometer showed variations in the mean total wear volume (mm 3 ) between the RBCs tested (ptribology of the system rather than relying on a simple wear ranking for the RBC materials as is routinely the case in dental research studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multi technical analysis of wear mechanisms in axial piston pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhler, G.; Jourani, A.; Bouvier, S.; Perrochat, J.-M.

    2017-05-01

    Axial piston pumps convert a motor rotation motion into hydraulic or pneumatic power. Their compactness and efficiency of approximately 0.9 make them suitable for actuation applications especially in aeronautics. However, they suffer a limited life due to the wear of their components. In the literature, studies of axial piston pumps deal with contact between its different elements under lubrication conditions. Nevertheless, they are more focused on analytic or numerical approaches. This study consists in an experimental analysis of worn pump components to highlight and understand wear mechanisms. Piston shoes are central components in the axial piston pump since they are involved in three tribological contacts. These three contacts are thereby studied: piston shoes/swashplate, piston shoes/pistons and piston shoes/shoes hold down plate (SHDP). To perform this analysis, helicopter hydraulic pumps after different operating times have been studied. The wear damage mechanisms and wear debris are analysed using SEM observations. 3D surface roughness measurements are then used to characterize worn surfaces. The observations reveal that in the contact between shoes and swashplate, the main wear mechanism is three-body abrasive wear due to coarse carbides removal. Between shoes and pistons, wear occurs in a less severe way and is mainly due to the debris generated in the first contact and conveyed by the lubricating fluid. In the third contact, the debris are also the prime cause of the abrasive wear and the generation of deep craters in the piston shoes.

  13. The mechanics of wear in slurry dumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with the pumping of abrasive slurries which exposes machinery and parts to an exceedingly large number of modes of wear, probably representing all possible modes that can be conceived. The term ''slurry'' as defined implies that the abrasive solids are mixed with a liquid, usually water, which can combine with certain soluble elements from the solids or from the atmosphere to form an insidious combination of corrosion-abrasion. The various wear modes are described and exemplified with drawings and photographs. A discussion on wear reduction and operating practices is included. A brief description of the ASTM G75 Miller Number Test for slurry abrasivity and a proposed Slurry Abrasion Resistance Test for the effect of slurries on materials is included

  14. Tool Wear Mechanisms during Cutting of Soda Lime Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konneh, Mohamed; Nasima Bagum, Mst.; Yeakub Ali, Mohammad; Arif, Tasnim Firdaus Bt. Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Soda lime glass milling has high performance application. It is a challenging task to achieve fracture free surface on this material due to its brittle nature. High-speed end milling is capable to achieve ductile mode in an enhance flexibility. In this research, end milling of soda lime using uncoated carbide tool was performed where spindle speed varied from 20,000 to 40,000 rpm, cutting depth from 10 to 30 µm and feed rate from 5 to 20 mm/min in dry condition. The effects of cutting parameters (cutting speed, feed per tooth and depth of cut) on tool flank wear as well as wear mechanisms of tool flank investigated. Investigation showed that feed per edge has most influencing effect followed by cutting speed and depth of cut on flank wear and the main wear mechanism is abrasion wear. In some cases, oxidation, thermal diffusion and recast layer on tool flank also observed.

  15. Coupling behavior between adhesive and abrasive wear mechanism of aero-hydraulic spool valves

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Yunxia; Gong Wenjun; Kang Rui

    2016-01-01

    Leakage due to wear is one of the main failure modes of aero-hydraulic spool valves. This paper established a practical coupling wear model for aero-hydraulic spool valves based on dynamic system modelling theory. Firstly, the experiment for wear mechanism verification proved that adhesive wear and abrasive wear did coexist during the working process of spool valves. Secondly coupling behavior of each wear mechanism was characterized by analyzing actual time-variation of model parameters duri...

  16. Assessment of mechanical and three-body abrasive wear peculiarity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper is about the development of bi-directional E-glass fibre-based polyester composites filled with zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) fillers, respectively. The mechanical characterization of these composites is performed. The three-body abrasive wear characteristic of fabricated composites has been ...

  17. Abrasive wear mechanisms and surface layer structure of refractory materials after mechanical working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milman, Y.V.; Lotsko, D.V.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms of abrasive wear and surface layer structure formation after different kinds of mechanical working are considered in terms of fracture and plastic deformation mechanisms for various refractory materials. The principles for classification of abrasive wear mechanisms are proposed, the four types of wear mechanisms are distinguished for various combinations of fractures and plastic deformation types. The concept of characteristic deformation temperature t * (knee temperature) is used. Detailed examples are given of investigating the surface layer structures in grinded crystals of sapphire and molybdenum. The amorphisation tendency of the thinnest surface layer while mechanical polishing is discussed separately. 19 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  18. Mechanisms for fatigue and wear of polysilicon structural thinfilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsem, Daniel Henricus [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Fatigue and wear in micron-scale polysilicon structural films can severely impact the reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Despite studies on fatigue and wear behavior of these films, there is still an on-going debate regarding the precise physical mechanisms for these two important failure modes. Although macro-scale silicon does not fatigue, this phenomenon is observed in micron-scale silicon. It is shown that for polysilicon devices fabricated in the MUMPs foundry and SUMMiT process stress-lifetime data exhibits similar trends in ambient air, shorter lifetimes in higher relative humidity environments and no fatigue failure at all in high vacuum. Transmission electron microscopy of the surface oxides of the samples show an approximate four-fold thickening of the oxide at stress concentrations after fatigue failure, but no thickening after fracture in air or after fatigue cycling in vacuo. It is found that such oxide thickening and fatigue failure (in air) occurs in devices with initial oxide thicknesses of ~4-20 nm. Such results are interpreted and explained by a reaction layer fatigue mechanism; specifically, moisture-assisted subcritical cracking within a cyclic stress-assisted thickened oxide layer occurs until the crack reaches a critical size to cause catastrophic failure. Polysilicon specimens from the SUMMiT process are used to study wear mechanisms in micron-scale silicon in ambient air. Worn parts are examined by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while temperature changes are monitored using infrared microscopy. These results are compared with the development of values of static coefficients of friction (COF) with number of wear cycles. Observations show amorphous debris particles (~50-100 nm) created by fracture through the silicon grains (~500 nm), which subsequently oxidize, agglomerate into clusters and create plowing tracks. A nano-crystalline layer (~20-200 nm) forms at worn regions. No dislocations or

  19. Features wear nodes mechanization wing aircraft operating under dynamic loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.М. Хімко

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available  The conducted researches of titanic alloy ВТ-22 at dynamic loading with cycled sliding and dynamic loading in conditions of rolling with slipping. It is established that roller jamming in the carriage increases wear of rod of mechanization of a wing to twenty times. The optimum covering for strengthening wearied sites and restoration of working surfaces of wing’s mechanization rod is defined.

  20. Photoemission mechanism of water-soluble silver nanoclusters: ligand-to-metal-metal charge transfer vs strong coupling between surface plasmon and emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuting; Yang, Taiqun; Pan, Haifeng; Yuan, Yufeng; Chen, Li; Liu, Mengwei; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Sanjun; Wu, Peng; Xu, Jianhua

    2014-02-05

    Using carboxylate-protected silver nanoclusters (Ag-carboxylate NCs) as a model, we separately investigated the contribution of the ligand shell and the metal core to understand the nature of photoluminescence of Ag NCs. A new Ag(0)NCs@Ag(I)-carboxylate complex core-shell structural model has been proposed. The emission from the Ag-carboxylate NCs could be attributed to ligand-to-metal-metal charge transfer from Ag(I)-carboxylate complexes (the oxygen atom in the carboxylate ligands to the Ag(I) ions) to the Ag atoms and subsequent radiative relaxation. Additionally, we found that the emission wavelength of the Ag NCs depends on the excitation wavelength implying a strong coupling between surface plasmon and emitter in Ag NCs. The strong coupling between the surface plasmon and the emitter determines the quantum yield and lifetime. The emission mechanism of Ag NCs and its relation to the organic templates and metal cores were clearly clarified. The results should stimulate additional experimental and theoretical research on the molecular-level design of luminescent metal probes for optoelectronics and other applications.

  1. Wear mechanisms in powder metallurgy high speed steels matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordo, E.; Martinez, M. A.; Torralba, J. M.; Jimenez, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The development of metal matrix composites has a major interest for automotive and cutting tools industries since they possess better mechanical properties and wear resistance than corresponding base materials. One of the manufacturing methods for these materials includes processing by powder metallurgy techniques. in this case, blending of both, base material and reinforcement powders constitute the most important process in order to achieve a homogeneous distribution of second phase particles. in the present work, composite materials of M3/2 tool steel reinforced with 2.5,5 and 8 vol% of niobium carbide have been prepared. In order to ensure a homogeneous mix, powders of both materials were mixed by dry high-energy mechanical milling at 200 r.p.m. for 40 h. After a recovering annealing, two routes for consolidate were followed die pressing and vacuum sintering, and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Pin-on-disc tests were carried out to evaluate wear behaviour in all the materials. Results show that ceramic particles additions improve wear resistance of base material. (Author) 9 refs

  2. Correlation between the wear behaviour and the mechanical properties of several surface treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelait, L.; Lina, A.; Rezakhanlou, R.; Duysen, J.C. van; Stebut, J. von

    1993-01-01

    Surface mechanical strength of chromium base (electrolytic and plasma sprayed) coatings is studied for friction and wear applications in nuclear environment. Indentation, scratch, and wear testing results are compared. In particular intrinsic coating brittleness is investigated as a mechanism responsible for impact wear. Electrolytic, hard chromium plate has a wear resistance well below that of the spray coated specimens studied. Acoustic emission level and brittle damage features are shown to be correlated. (orig.)

  3. Wear mechanisms and friction parameters for sliding wear of micron-scale polysilicon sidewalls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsem, D. H.; van der Hulst, R.; Stach, E. A.; Dugger, M. T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Ritchie, R. O.

    As tribological properties are critical factors in the reliability of silicon-based microelectromechanical systems, it is important to understand what governs wear and friction. Average dynamic friction, wear volumes and morphology have been studied for polysilicon devices fabricated using the

  4. Investigation on the Tribological Behavior and Wear Mechanism of Five Different Veneering Porcelains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Min

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this research was to investigate the wear behavior and wear mechanism of five different veneering porcelains.Five kinds of veneering porcelains were selected in this research. The surface microhardness of all the samples was measured with a microhardness tester. Wear tests were performed on a ball-on-flat PLINT fretting wear machine, with lubrication of artificial saliva at 37°C. The friction coefficients were recorded by the testing system. The microstructure features, wear volume, and damage morphologies were recorded and analyzed with a confocal laser scanning microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The wear mechanism was then elucidated.The friction coefficients of the five veneering porcelains differ significantly. No significant correlation between hardness and wear volume was found for these veneering porcelains. Under lubrication of artificial saliva, the porcelain with higher leucite crystal content exhibited greater wear resistance. Additionally, leucite crystal size and distribution in glass matrix influenced wear behavior. The wear mechanisms for these porcelains were similar: abrasive wear dominates the early stage, whereas delamination was the main damage mode at the later stage. Furthermore, delamination was more prominent for porcelains with larger crystal sizes.Wear compatibility between porcelain and natural teeth is important for dental restorative materials. Investigation on crystal content, size, and distribution in glass matrix can provide insight for the selection of dental porcelains in clinical settings.

  5. Investigation on the Tribological Behavior and Wear Mechanism of Five Different Veneering Porcelains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Qiu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Minhao; Yu, Haiyang; Gao, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this research was to investigate the wear behavior and wear mechanism of five different veneering porcelains. Five kinds of veneering porcelains were selected in this research. The surface microhardness of all the samples was measured with a microhardness tester. Wear tests were performed on a ball-on-flat PLINT fretting wear machine, with lubrication of artificial saliva at 37°C. The friction coefficients were recorded by the testing system. The microstructure features, wear volume, and damage morphologies were recorded and analyzed with a confocal laser scanning microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The wear mechanism was then elucidated. The friction coefficients of the five veneering porcelains differ significantly. No significant correlation between hardness and wear volume was found for these veneering porcelains. Under lubrication of artificial saliva, the porcelain with higher leucite crystal content exhibited greater wear resistance. Additionally, leucite crystal size and distribution in glass matrix influenced wear behavior. The wear mechanisms for these porcelains were similar: abrasive wear dominates the early stage, whereas delamination was the main damage mode at the later stage. Furthermore, delamination was more prominent for porcelains with larger crystal sizes. Wear compatibility between porcelain and natural teeth is important for dental restorative materials. Investigation on crystal content, size, and distribution in glass matrix can provide insight for the selection of dental porcelains in clinical settings.

  6. Elucidation of mechanism wear carbon steel with structure of martensite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the paper is an estimation of degree of metal hardness change for the railway wheel with martensite structure during rolling. Methodology. As strength characteristic the Rockwell hardness is used. Wear tests were conducted in the conditions of normal loading with (10% and without sliding on the test equipment SMTs-2. Parameters of the fine crystalline structure (tetragonality degree of the crystalline grid, dislocation density, scale of coherent scattering regions, and disturbance value of the crystalline grid of second kind are determined by the methods of X-ray structural analysis. Findings. During operation of the railway wheels with different strength level, origin of defects on the wheel thread is caused by simultaneous action of both the friction forces and the cyclically changing loadings. Considering that formation of damage centers is largely determined by the state of metal volumes near the wheel thread, one should expect the differences in friction processes development at high contact stress for the wheels with different strength level and structural state. Originality. During the wear tests softening effect of carbon steel with martensite quenching structure is obtained. Softening effect equaled 3.5–7% from the level of quenched metal hardness. The softening effect is accompanied by the reduction of tetragonality degree of the crystalline structure of martensite, reduction of coherent scattering regions, dislocation density increase and crystalline grid disturbance of the second kind. Practical value. The results point out the necessity for further studies to clarify the resulted softening effect mechanism.

  7. Wear resistance and fracture mechanics of WC-Co composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaytbay, Saleh [Benha Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; El-Hadek, Medhat [Port-Said Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Production and Mechanical Design

    2014-06-15

    Manufacturing of WC-Co composites using the electroless precipitation method at different sintering temperatures of 1 100, 1 250, 1 350 and 1 500 C was successfully achieved. The chemical composition of the investigated materials was 90 wt.% WC with 10 wt.% Co, and 80 wt.% WC with 20 wt.% Co. The specific density, densification, and Vickers microhardness measurements were found to increase with increased sintering temperature for both the WC-Co compositions. The composites of tungsten carbide with 10 wt.% Co had a higher specific density and Vickers microhardness measurements than those for the composites of tungsten carbide with 20 wt.% Co. Composites with WC-10 wt.% Co had better wear resistance. The stress-strain and transverse rupture strength increased monotonically with the increase in sintering temperatures, agreeing with the material hardness and wear resistance behavior. Fractographical scanning electron microscopy analysis of the fracture surface demonstrated a rough characteristic conical shape failure in the direction of the maximum shear stress. A proposed mechanism for the formation of the conical fracture surface under compression testing is presented. (orig.)

  8. Characteristics of fracture during the approach process and wear mechanism of a silicon AFM tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Ha; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2005-01-01

    The wear of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is one of the crucial issues in AFM as well as in other probe-based applications. In this work, wear tests under extremely low normal load using an AFM were conducted. Also, in order to understand the nature of silicon tip wear, the wear characteristics of crystal silicon and amorphous silicon oxide layer were investigated by a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). It was found that fracture of the tip readily occurred due to impact during the approach process. Experimental results showed that the impact should be below 0.1 nN s to avoid significant fracture of the tip. Also, it was observed that wear of the amorphous layer, formed at the end of the tip, occurred at the initial stage of the silicon tip damage process. Based on Archard's wear law, the wear coefficient of the amorphous layer was in the range of 0.009-0.014. As for the wear characteristics of the silicon tip, it was shown that wear occurred gradually under light normal load and the wear rate decreased with increase in the sliding distance. As for the wear mechanism of the silicon tip, oxidation wear was identified to be the most significant. It was shown that the degree of oxidation was higher under high normal load and in a nitrogen environment, oxidation of the silicon tip was reduced

  9. Fracture mechanics approach to estimate rail wear limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes a systematic methodology to estimate allowable limits for rail head wear in terms of vertical head-height loss, gage-face side wear, and/or the combination of the two. This methodology is based on the principles of engineering fr...

  10. Bionic design perspectives based on the formation mechanism of dental anti-wear function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZR Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human teeth are the important masticatory organ and therefore are subjected to friction and wear everyday. Both the loading condition and the environment are relatively complex in the mouth, however, normally human teeth can serve in mouth all their time with excellent wear resistance in most people. Obviously, through the process of human evolution, human teeth have become a natural anti-wear system that far outclasses the best engineering anti-wear systems at present. To understand the excellent anti-wear properties of human teeth, we need to look into what act as the wear resisting elements of human teeth. In this paper, based on the results obtained by the authors and from literatures, the formation mechanism of dental anti-wear function was summarized. Particular attention was paid to the multi-scale anti-wear mechanism caused by the unique hierarchical structure of human teeth, the self-repair mechanism by tooth remineralization, and the cooperating lubrication mechanism of salivary pellicle upon tooth surface and the hydration proteins within the tooth. Based on the formation mechanism of dental anti-wear function, some bionic design perspectives were discussed and future research directions are recommended.

  11. Enamel erosion and mechanical tooth wear in medieval Icelanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Svend; Eliasson, Sigfus Thor

    2016-01-01

    The Icelandic Sagas are an important source of information on the way of life and diet habits in Iceland and possibly other Nordic countries 1000 years ago. Archaeological human skull material worldwide has revealed extensive tooth wear, with the main cause believed to be coarse diet. From a graveyard near volcano Hekla, 66 skeletons dated from before 1104 were excavated. The purpose of this study was to determine the main causes of tooth wear in Icelanders 1000 years ago. Forty-nine skulls were available for research. Two methods were used to evaluate tooth wear and seven for age estimation. An attempt was made to determine the main causes of tooth wear in the light of likely diet and beverage consumption according to a computer search on food and drink customs described in the Icelandic Sagas. Tooth wear was extensive in all groups, increasing with age. The highest score was on first molars, with no difference between sexes. It had all the similarities seen in wear from coarse diet. In some instances it had similar characteristics to those seen in erosion in modern Icelanders consuming excessive amounts of soft drinks. According to the Sagas, acidic whey was a daily drink and used for preservation of food in Iceland until recently. Since acidic whey has considerably high dental erosive potential, it is postulated that consumption of acidic drinks and food, in addition to a coarse and rough diet, played a significant role in the dental wear of ancient Icelanders.

  12. Assessment of mechanical and three-body abrasive wear peculiarity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    body abrasive wear characteristic of fabricated composites has been assessed under different operating conditions. For this, the three-body abrasion test is done on dry abrasion test rig (TR-50)and analysed using Taguchi's experimental design ...

  13. Wear mechanism of CBN cutting tool during high-speed machining of mold steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhat, Z.N.

    2003-01-01

    Wear behavior of cubic boron nitride (CBN) cutting tool when cutting P20 tool steel was investigated. Oblique cutting tests were performed on a CNC lathe using five speeds, namely, 240, 600 and 1000 m min -1 . The CBN cutting tools were found to be superior to tungsten carbide (WC) tools. Fourfold increase in productivity and significant reduction in chipping and cratering was achieved for CBN as compared to WC. Wear, as the width of the wear land (VB), was monitored at selected time intervals; furthermore, topography of worn surfaces was performed, using a profilometer. Wear characterization of the rake and the flank surfaces as well as of the collected chips was conducted using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), backscattered electron imaging and energy depressive X-ray (EDX). It was found that deformation in the chips occurs by localized shear deformation and the dominant wear mechanism at all speeds used was identified to be diffusive wear. At a 1000 m min -1 cutting speed, a secondary wear mechanism was identified, which is melt wear, i.e., formation of low melting point Cr and Mn compounds with the tool material and the subsequent ejection from the cutting zone

  14. Mechanism-Based FE Simulation of Tool Wear in Diamond Drilling of SiCp/Al Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Xiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyze the micro mechanisms underlying the wear of macroscale tools during diamond machining of SiCp/Al6063 composites and to develop the mechanism-based diamond wear model in relation to the dominant wear behaviors. During drilling, high volume fraction SiCp/Al6063 composites containing Cu, the dominant wear mechanisms of diamond tool involve thermodynamically activated physicochemical wear due to diamond-graphite transformation catalyzed by Cu in air atmosphere and mechanically driven abrasive wear due to high-frequency scrape of hard SiC reinforcement on tool surface. An analytical diamond wear model, coupling Usui abrasive wear model and Arrhenius extended graphitization wear model was proposed and implemented through a user-defined subroutine for tool wear estimates. Tool wear estimate in diamond drilling of SiCp/Al6063 composites was achieved by incorporating the combined abrasive-chemical tool wear subroutine into the coupled thermomechanical FE model of 3D drilling. The developed drilling FE model for reproducing diamond tool wear was validated for feasibility and reliability by comparing numerically simulated tool wear morphology and experimentally observed results after drilling a hole using brazed polycrystalline diamond (PCD and chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond coated tools. A fairly good agreement of experimental and simulated results in cutting forces, chip and tool wear morphologies demonstrates that the developed 3D drilling FE model, combined with a subroutine for diamond tool wear estimate can provide a more accurate analysis not only in cutting forces and chip shape but also in tool wear behavior during drilling SiCp/Al6063 composites. Once validated and calibrated, the developed diamond tool wear model in conjunction with other machining FE models can be easily extended to the investigation of tool wear evolution with various diamond tool geometries and other machining processes in cutting

  15. Mechanism-Based FE Simulation of Tool Wear in Diamond Drilling of SiCp/Al Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Junfeng; Pang, Siqin; Xie, Lijing; Gao, Feinong; Hu, Xin; Yi, Jie; Hu, Fang

    2018-02-07

    The aim of this work is to analyze the micro mechanisms underlying the wear of macroscale tools during diamond machining of SiC p /Al6063 composites and to develop the mechanism-based diamond wear model in relation to the dominant wear behaviors. During drilling, high volume fraction SiC p /Al6063 composites containing Cu, the dominant wear mechanisms of diamond tool involve thermodynamically activated physicochemical wear due to diamond-graphite transformation catalyzed by Cu in air atmosphere and mechanically driven abrasive wear due to high-frequency scrape of hard SiC reinforcement on tool surface. An analytical diamond wear model, coupling Usui abrasive wear model and Arrhenius extended graphitization wear model was proposed and implemented through a user-defined subroutine for tool wear estimates. Tool wear estimate in diamond drilling of SiC p /Al6063 composites was achieved by incorporating the combined abrasive-chemical tool wear subroutine into the coupled thermomechanical FE model of 3D drilling. The developed drilling FE model for reproducing diamond tool wear was validated for feasibility and reliability by comparing numerically simulated tool wear morphology and experimentally observed results after drilling a hole using brazed polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond coated tools. A fairly good agreement of experimental and simulated results in cutting forces, chip and tool wear morphologies demonstrates that the developed 3D drilling FE model, combined with a subroutine for diamond tool wear estimate can provide a more accurate analysis not only in cutting forces and chip shape but also in tool wear behavior during drilling SiC p /Al6063 composites. Once validated and calibrated, the developed diamond tool wear model in conjunction with other machining FE models can be easily extended to the investigation of tool wear evolution with various diamond tool geometries and other machining processes in cutting different

  16. Study of wear mechanism of chopped fiber reinforced epoxy composite filled with graphite and bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nitinchand; Prasad, Krishna

    2018-04-01

    The combined effect of graphite and sintered bronze with a short glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites was investigated in this work. A pin on disc wear test was carried out to study the wear behaviour and mechanism of the composites. The objective of this work is to develop an alternate friction resistance material for the application of sliding bearing. It was observed that the addition of sintered bronze improved mechanical and thermal stability of the composites as bronze has low contact resistance with graphite and has high thermal conductivity. It was observed from the test results that increased volume percentage of graphite and presence of bronze are play significant role in wear mechanism of the composites. It was observed from the scanning electronic microscopes (SEM) that the abrasive and adhesive wear mechanism was prominent in this study. It was also evident from the result that the frictional force remains stable irrespective of the applied normal load.

  17. Influence of carbon content on wear resistance and wear mechanism of Mn13Cr2 and Mn18Cr2 cast steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-shan Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By means of impact abrasion tests, micro-hardness tests, and worn surface morphology observation via SEM, a comparison research based upon different impact abrasive wear conditions was conducted in this research to study the influence of different carbon contents (1.25wt.%, 1.35wt.%, and 1.45 wt.% on the wear resistance and wear mechanism of water-quenched Mn13Cr2 and Mn18Cr2 cast steels. The research results show that the wear resistance of the Mn18Cr2 cast steel is superior to that of the Mn13Cr2 cast steel under the condition of the same carbon content and different impact abrasive wear conditions because the Mn18Cr2 cast steel possesses higher worn work hardening capacity as well as a more desirable combination of high hardness and impact toughness than that of the Mn13Cr2 cast steel. When a 4.5 J impact abrasive load is applied, the wear mechanism of both steels is that plastic deformation fatigue spalling and micro-cutting coexist, and the former dominates. When the carbon content is increased, the worn work hardening effect becomes increasingly dramatic, while the wear resistance of both steels decreases, which implies that an increase in impact toughness is beneficial to improving the wear resistance under severe impact abrasive wear conditions. Under the condition of a 1.0 J impact abrasive load, the wear mechanism of both steels is that plastic deformation fatigue spalling and micro-cutting coexist, and the latter plays a leading role. The worn work hardening effect and wear resistance intensify when the carbon content is increased, which implies that a higher hardness can be conducive to better wear resistance under low impact abrasive condition.

  18. Assessment of mechanical and three-body abrasive wear peculiarity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    8.5. Figure 1. Typical appearance of wear scars on specimens. composite from the mould after curing. The cast of each composite is cured under a load of about 50 kg for 24 h ...... In similar fashion, for ZnO- filled E-glass fibre-based polyester composite, the arbitrary set of factor combination is taken i.e., A1B2C1D1E1 but.

  19. A Comparative Study on the Formation Mechanism of Wear Scars during the Partial and Full Scale Fretting Wear Tests of Spacer Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Ho; Shin, Chang Hwan; Oh, Dong Seok; Kang, Heung Seok

    2012-01-01

    Fretting wear studies for evaluating the contact damages of nuclear fuel rods have been focused on the contact shape, rod motion, contact condition, environment, etc.. However, fretting wear mechanism was dramatically changed with slight variation of test variables such as test environments and contact shapes. For example, in an unlubricated condition, effects of wear debris and/or its layer on the fretting wear mechanism showed that the formation of a well-developed layer on the contact surfaces has a beneficial effect for decreasing a friction coefficient. Otherwise, a severe wear was happened due to a third body abrasion. In addition, in water lubrication condition, some of wear debris was remained on worn surface of fuel rod specimens at both sliding and impacting loading conditions. So, it is apparent that a wear rate of fuel rod specimen was easily accelerated by the third-body abrasion. This is because the restrained agglomeration behavior between generated wear particles results in rapid removal of wear debris and its layer. In case of contact shape effects, previous studies show that wear debris are easily trapped between contact surfaces and its debris layer was well developed in a localized area especially in a concave spring rather than a convex spring shape. Consequently, localized wear was happened at both ends of a concave spring and center region of a convex spring. So, it is useful for determining the fretting wear resistance of spacer gird spring and dimple by using part unit in the various lubricated conditions. It is well known that the fretting wear phenomenon of nuclear fuel rod is originated from a flow-induced vibration (FIV) due to the rapid primary coolant. This means that both rod vibration and debris removal behavior were affected by flow fields around the contact regions between fuel rod and spring/dimple. However, all most of the fretting tests were performed by simulating rod vibrating motions such as axial vibration, conservative rod

  20. Tribopolymerization as an anti-wear mechanism. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furey, M.J.

    1996-04-01

    The primary objective of this activity is to obtain the necessary data which would enhance, promote, and encourage the introduction of advanced lubrication technology into the marketplace. This includes (a) defining specific but different applications, (b) establishing the limits or ranges of applied loads, speeds, and temperatures over which the concept of tribopolymerization would work in reducing wear and/or friction, (c) continuing in efforts to understand the film-forming process (this rates to (b) above), using this knowledge to develop new and even more effective additives, and (d) exploring possible connections with private and investment companies for the licensing and marketing of products which will reduce friction and wear in a variety of applications. Progress was made in several different but connected areas. These included (a) establishing of load/velocity limits of selected monomers for ceramic lubrication, (b) the discovery of new and effective monomers designed for higher temperature anti-wear applications, (c) improvements and modifications of the high load/high speed pin-on-disk machine, (d) the initiation of related or spin-off projects designed to get their advanced technology into the marketplace, (e) the filing of three new patent applications, and (f) collaborative research with Dr. Kajdas--the co-inventor with Dr. Furey--on tribopolymerization as a novel and effective approach to the boundary lubrication of ceramics and steel. These and other elements of progress made during the first Quarter of 1996 are discussed briefly.

  1. Dry Sliding Wear and Mechanical Characterization of Mg Based Composites by Uniaxial Cold Press Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar P. Selva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry sliding wear tests are performed on magnesium composites produced by uniaxial cold press technique by using pin-on-disc. Co-efficient of friction and wear rate of magnesium composites are measured under a load of 5 N and sliding velocity of 0.2 ms-1. Porosity, Vickers’s micro hardness, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD results are presented to characterize the physical and mechanical properties of magnesium composites. Worn surfaces are inspected by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS. Three types of wear mechanisms namely abrasive, adhesive and oxidation were observed. The wear rate was found to be low for 2wt% of HAP (3.6×10-6cm3/m and co-efficient of friction was observed as 0.8.

  2. Characterization of Wear Mechanisms in Distorted Conical Picks After Coal Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    The interest in understanding the wear mechanisms of cemented carbide (CC) is not a new development. For a long time, there have been studies on different wear mechanisms under different coal/rock cutting conditions. These studies have helped improving the quality of CC, thereby preventing such wearing of tools. Due to highly unpredictable character of coal/rock, the wearing phenomena cannot be attributed to one single domain of conditions. However, one conclusion that can be drawn in this context is that, under similar working conditions, similar types of CC undergo similar nature of wearing process. An optimum combination of high wear resistance, strength and hardness has facilitated widespread application of CC in the field of mining engineering. The abrasive parts of the mining tools are made of CC materials. The current study is focussed on a detailed characterization of the wear mechanisms of conical picks, which are used for coal mining. Conical picks consist of a steel body with an inserted cone-shaped CC tip. After being used for a certain period of time, both, the CC tip and the steel body get distorted. In this study, selection of appropriate samples was followed by critical observation of them through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In the previous study, we explained the distortion process of both, the tip as well as the body, using the SEM images. For the present study, two samples were taken from our previous investigation for further analysis. Three other samples were also included in the present study. Seven different types of wear mechanisms, such as, cracking and crushing, cavity formation, coal intermixing, chemical degradation along with abrasion, long and deep cracks, heating effect and body deformation were observed in the five tool samples.

  3. Backside Wear Analysis of Retrieved Acetabular Liners with a Press-Fit Locking Mechanism in Comparison to Wear Simulation In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Puente Reyna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Backside wear due to micromotion and poor conformity between the liner and its titanium alloy shell may contribute to the high rates of retroacetabular osteolysis and consequent aseptic loosening. The purpose of our study was to understand the wear process on the backside of polyethylene liners from two acetabular cup systems, whose locking mechanism is based on a press-fit cone in combination with a rough titanium conical inner surface on the fixation area. A direct comparison between in vitro wear simulator tests (equivalent to 3 years of use and retrieved liners (average 13.1 months in situ was done in order to evaluate the backside wear characteristics and behavior of these systems. Similar wear scores between in vitro tested and retrieved liners were observed. The results showed that this locking mechanism did not significantly produce wear marks at the backside of the polyethylene liners due to micromotion. In all the analyzed liners, the most common wear modes observed were small scratches at the cranial fixation zone directly below the rough titanium inner surface of the shell. It was concluded that most of the wear marks were produced during the insertion and removal of the liner, rather than during its time in situ.

  4. Wear Processes in a Mechanical Friction Clutch: Theoretical, Numerical, and Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Grzelczyk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling, theoretical/numerical analysis, and experimental verification of wear processes occurring on the contact surface of friction linings of a mechanical friction clutch are studied. In contrast to many earlier papers we take into consideration wear properties and flexibility of friction materials being in friction contact. During mathematical modeling and numerical simulations we consider a general nonlinear differential model of wear (differential wear model and a model of wear in the integral form (integral wear model. Equations governing contact pressure and wear distributions of individual friction linings, decrease of distance between clutch shields, and friction torque transmitted by the clutch are derived and compared with experimental data. Both analytical and numerical analyses are carried out with the qualitative and quantitative theories of differential and integral equations, including the Laplace transform approach to ODEs. We show that theoretical results and numerical simulations agree with the experimental data. Finally, a numerical analysis of the proposed mathematical models was carried out in a wider range of parameters of the considered system.

  5. Using stamping punch force variation for the identification of changes in lubrication and wear mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, B. M.; Pereira, M. P.; Rolfe, B. F.; Doolan, M. C.

    2017-09-01

    The growth in use of Advanced High Strength Steels in the automotive industry for light-weighting and safety has increased the rates of tool wear in sheet metal stamping. This is an issue that adds significant costs to production in terms of manual inspection and part refinishing. To reduce these costs, a tool condition monitoring system is required and a firm understanding of process signal variation must form the foundation for any such monitoring system. Punch force is a stamping process signal that is widely collected by industrial presses and has been linked closely to part quality and tool condition, making it an ideal candidate as a tool condition monitoring signal. In this preliminary investigation, the variation of punch force due to different lubrication conditions and progressive wear are examined. Linking specific punch force signature changes to developing lubrication and wear events is valuable for die wear and stamping condition monitoring. A series of semi-industrial channel forming trials were conducted under different lubrication regimes and progressive die wear. Punch force signatures were captured for each part and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to determine the key Principal Components of the signature data sets. These Principal Components were linked to the evolution of friction conditions over the course of the stroke for the different lubrication regimes and mechanism of galling wear. As a result, variation in punch force signatures were correlated to the current mechanism of wear dominant on the formed part; either abrasion or adhesion, and to changes in lubrication mechanism. The outcomes of this study provide important insights into punch force signature variation, that will provide a foundation for future work into the development of die wear and lubrication monitoring systems for sheet metal stamping.

  6. Mechanical properties and three-body wear of dental restoratives and their comparative flowable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Sabine; Rosentritt, Martin; Behr, Michael; Handel, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    To compare wear performance and resistance to crack propagation (K1C) of commercial restorative materials and their flowable variations. A potential correlation between three-body wear and fracture toughness, modulus of elasticity, fracture work, Vickers hardness, and filler content was investigated. Seven restoratives (five composites, one ormocer, and one compomer) and their corresponding flowable materials were used to determine and compare the three-body wear with a bolus of millet-seed shells and rice food (Willytec). The wear characteristics were measured by profilometry after 50,000, 100,000, 150,000, and 200,000 loading cycles. The fracture toughness value, K1C (MPam1/2), for each single-edged notched specimen was measured in a three-point bending test (universal testing machine 1446, Zwick). Fracture work and modulus of elasticity were calculated from the load curves. Vickers hardness was measured (HV hardness tester, Zwick) according to DIN 50133. The veneering composite Sinfony (3M ESPE) was used as a reference material. Heavily filled composites experienced less wear than their flowable variations. The nanofiller composites revealed better wear results than hybrid composites, compomers, and ormocers. After 200,000 load cycles, the lowest wear rates were detected for Grandio (14 microm; Voco), and the highest mean values were found for Dyract AP (104 microm; Dentsply DeTrey). The values for fracture toughness (K1C) ranged from 0.82 to 3.64 MPam1/2. Highest K1C data was exhibited by the nanocomposite Nanopaq (Schutz Dental). All tested restorative materials exhibited higher fracture toughness than their low-viscosity variations. The wear resistance of the newer generation composites with incorporated nanofiller or microfiller particles increased to a high extent. Flowables show less resistance against wear and crack propagation because of their lower filler content. The reduced mechanical properties limit their use as a restorative to small noncontact

  7. Fixed bearing knee congruency -- influence on contact mechanics, abrasive wear and kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupp, Thomas M; Stulberg, Dave; Kaddick, Christian; Maas, Allan; Fritz, Bernhard; Schwiesau, Jens; Bloemer, Wilhlm

    2009-04-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the in vitro wear behavior of fixed bearing designs for total knee arthroplasty in relation to contact mechanics and resultant kinematics for different degrees of congruency. a finite element model was created for three knee articulations with increasing degrees of tibio-femoral congruency (flat, curved, and dished design). For the three different knee design configurations, in vitro wear simulation was performed according to iso 14243-1. Contact areas increased with increasing knee congruency, whereas the peak surface contact stresses decreased. The wear rates for the knee design configurations differed substantially between the three test groups (flat, curved, and dished). our observations demonstrate that increased congruency in conjunction with decreased surface contact stresses significantly contributes to reducing wear in fixed bearing knee articulations.

  8. Effect of mechanical vibrations on the wear behavior of AZ91 Mg alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, V.; Pandel, U.; Sharma, A.

    2018-02-01

    AZ91 Mg alloy is the most promising alloy used for structural applications. The vibration induced methods are effective and economic viable in term of mechanical properties. Sliding wear tests were performed on AZ91 Mg alloy using a pin-on- disc configuration. Wear rates were measured at 5 N and 10N at a sliding velocity of 1m/s for varied frequency within the range of 5- 25Hz and a constant amplitude of 2mm. Microstructures of worn surfaces and wear debris were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). It is observed that wear resistance of vibrated AZ91 alloy at 15Hz frequency ad 2mm amplitude was superior than cast AZ91 Mg alloy. Finer grain size and equiaxed grain shape both are important parameters for better wear resistance in vibrated AZ91 Mg alloys. FESEM analysis revealed that wear is considerably affected due to frictional heat generated by the relative motion between AZ91 Mg alloy and EN31 steel surface. No single mechanism was responsible for material loss.

  9. Friction and wear mechanisms in MoS2/Sb2O3/Au nanocomposite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharf, T.W.; Kotula, P.G.; Prasad, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental phenomena governing the tribological mechanisms in sputter deposited amorphous MoS 2 /Sb 2 O 3 /Au nanocomposite coatings are reported. In dry environments the nanocomposite has the same low friction coefficient as pure MoS 2 (∼0.007). However, unlike pure MoS 2 coatings, which wear through in air (50% relative humidity), the composite coatings showed minimal wear, with wear factors of ∼1.2-1.4 x 10 -7 mm 3 Nm -1 in both dry nitrogen and air. The coatings exhibited non-Amontonian friction behavior, with the friction coefficient decreasing with increasing Hertzian contact stress. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of wear surfaces revealed that frictional contact resulted in an amorphous to crystalline transformation in MoS 2 with 2H-basal (0 0 0 2) planes aligned parallel to the direction of sliding. In air the wear surface and subsurface regions exhibited islands of Au. The mating transfer films were also comprised of (0 0 0 2)-oriented basal planes of MoS 2 , resulting in predominantly self-mated 'basal on basal' interfacial sliding and, thus, low friction and wear.

  10. Effects of crystal refining on wear behaviors and mechanical properties of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Guo, Jiawen; Sun, Yali; Tian, Beimin; Zheng, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Ming; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to improve wear resistance and mechanical properties of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics by refining their crystal sizes. After lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LD) were melted to form precursory glass blocks, bar (N = 40, n = 10) and plate (N = 32, n = 8) specimens were prepared. According to the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of precursory glass, specimens G1-G4 were designed to form lithium disilicate glass-ceramics with different crystal sizes using a two-step thermal treatment. In the meantime, heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (GC-P) and original ingots (GC-O) were used as control groups. Glass-ceramics were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and were tested using flexural strength test, nanoindentation test and toughness measurements. The plate specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350 N up to 2.4 × 10 6 loading cycles. The wear analysis of glass-ceramics was performed using a 3D profilometer after every 300,000 wear cycles. Wear morphologies and microstructures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data. Multiple pairwise comparisons of means were performed by Tukey's post-hoc test. Materials with different crystal sizes (p properties. Specifically, G3 with medium-sized crystals presented the highest flexural strength, hardness, elastic modulus and fracture toughness. G1 and G2 with small-sized crystals showed lower flexural strength, whereas G4, GC-P, and GC-O with large-sized crystals exhibited lower hardness and elastic modulus. The wear behaviors of all six groups showed running-in wear stage and steady wear stage. G3 showed the best wear resistance while GC-P and GC-O exhibited the highest wear volume loss. After crystal refining, lithium disilicate glass-ceramic with medium-sized crystals showed the highest wear resistance and mechanical properties. Copyright © 2018

  11. On the processing, microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of cermet/stainless steel layer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Akhtar; Guo Shiju

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with layer composites of carbide reinforcements and stainless steel prepared successfully by powder technology. The layer material consisted of two layers. The top layer consisted of reinforcements (TiC and NbC) and 465 stainless steel as the binder material for the carbides. The bottom layer was entirely of binder material (465 stainless steel). The microstructure of the composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microstructural study revealed that the top layer (TiC-NbC/465 stainless steel) showed the typical core-rim microstructure of conventional steel bonded cermets and the bottom layer showed the structure of sintered steel. An intermediate layer was found with a gradient microstructure, having a higher carbide content towards the cermet layer and lower carbide content towards the stainless steel layer. The bending strength of the layered material measured in the direction perpendicular to the layer alignment was remarkably high. The variation of strength as a function of the thickness of the bottom layer revealed that the character of the material changed from the cermet, to a layer composite and then towards metallic materials. The wear resistance of the top layer was studied against high speed steel. The wear mechanisms were discussed by means of microscopical observations on the worn surfaces. The wear was severe at higher wear loads and lower TiC content. Microploughing of the stainless steel matrix was found to be the dominant wear mechanism. Heavy microploughing and rapid removal of material from the wear surface was observed at high wear load. The fracture morphologies of the top, bottom and intermediate layers are reported

  12. Mechanical and abrasive wear characterization of bidirectional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddhartha,; Gupta, Kuldeep

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bi-directional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated. ► Three body abrasive wear behavior of fabricated composites has been assessed. ► Results are validated against existing microscopic models of Lancaster and Wang. ► Tensile strength of bi-directional E-glass fiber reinforced composites increases. ► Chopped glass fiber composites are found better in abrasive wear situations. -- Abstract: Bi-directional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated in five different (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35) wt% in an epoxy resin matrix. The mechanical characterization of these composites is performed. The three body abrasive wear behavior of fabricated composites has been assessed under different operating conditions. Abrasive wear characteristics of these composites are successfully analysed using Taguchi’s experimental design scheme and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results obtained from these experiments are also validated against existing microscopic models of Ratner-Lancaster and Wang. It is observed that quite good linear relationships is held between specific wear rate and reciprocal of ultimate strength and strain at tensile fracture of these composites which is an indicative that the experimental results are in fair agreement with these existing models. Out of all composites fabricated it is found that tensile strength of bi-directional E-glass fiber reinforced composites increases because of interface strength enhancement. Chopped glass fiber reinforced composites are observed to perform better than bi-directional glass fiber reinforced composites under abrasive wear situations. The morphology of worn composite specimens has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand about dominant wear mechanisms.

  13. Wear mechanism and tribological characteristics of porous NiTi shape memory alloy for bone scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuilin; Liu, Xiangmei; Wu, Guosong; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Zheng, Dong; Chung, C Y; Xu, Z S; Chu, Paul K

    2013-09-01

    The abraded debris might cause osteocytic osteolysis on the interface between implants and bone tissues, thus inducing the subsequent mobilization of implants gradually and finally resulting in the failure of bone implants, which imposes restrictions on the applications of porous NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this work, the effects of the annealing temperature, applied load, and porosity on the tribological behavior and wear resistance of three-dimensional porous NiTi SMA are investigated systematically. The porous structure and phase transformation during the exothermic process affect the tribological properties and wear mechanism significantly. In general, a larger porosity leads to better tribological resistance but sometimes, SMAs with small porosity possess better wear resistance than ones with higher porosity during the initial sliding stage. It can be ascribed to the better superelasticity of the former at the test temperature. The porous NiTi phase during the exothermic reaction also plays an important role in the wear resistance. Generally, porous NiTi has smaller friction coefficients under high loads due to stress-induced superelasticity. The wear mechanism is discussed based on plastic deformation and microcrack propagation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Load application for the contact mechanics analysis and wear prediction of total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zhenxian; Wang, Ling; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2017-05-01

    Tibiofemoral contact forces in total knee replacement have been measured at the medial and lateral sites respectively using an instrumented prosthesis, and predicted from musculoskeletal multibody dynamics models with a reasonable accuracy. However, it is uncommon that the medial and lateral forces are applied separately to replace a total axial load according to the ISO standard in the majority of current finite element analyses. In this study, we quantified the different effects of applying the medial and lateral loads separately versus the traditional total axial load application on contact mechanics and wear prediction of a patient-specific knee prosthesis. The load application position played an important role under the medial-lateral load application. The loading set which produced the closest load distribution to the multibody dynamics model was used to predict the contact mechanics and wear for the prosthesis and compared with the total axial load application. The medial-lateral load distribution using the present method was found to be closer to the multibody dynamics prediction than the traditional total axial load application, and the maximum contact pressure and contact area were consistent with the corresponding load variation. The predicted total volumetric wear rate and area were similar between the two load applications. However, the split of the predicted wear volumes on the medial and the lateral sides was different. The lateral volumetric wear rate was 31.46% smaller than the medial from the traditional load application prediction, while from the medial-lateral load application, the lateral side was only 11.8% smaller than the medial. The medial-lateral load application could provide a new and more accurate method of load application for patient-specific preclinical contact mechanics and wear prediction of knee implants.

  15. Wear and Failure Mechanism of PTFE/SiO2/Epoxy Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, J.T.; Pei, Y.T.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the wear and failure mechanism of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)/SiO2/epoxy composites with a high concentration of SiO2 particles under dry sliding is examined. In the composite with 12.5 wt.% PTFE, a significant rise of the coefficient of friction (COF) appears after sliding over

  16. EFFECT OF AGING ON MECHANICAL AND WEAR PROPERTIES OF BERYL PARTICULATE REINFORCED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. N. REDDAPPA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the study of effect of aging on mechanical and wear properties of ‘hot rolled’ Al6061-10% wt. of beryl particulate reinforced composites produced by stir casting have been examined. The result shows that hardness and tensile strength of ‘90% hot rolled and aged’ composites were increased by 10.28% and 3.78% as compared to ‘hot rolled’ composites respectively. The ‘hot rolled and aged’ composite shows significant decrease in specific wear rate when compared to that of ‘hot rolled’ composites.

  17. Mechanical Properties and Sliding-impact Wear Resistance of Self-adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, T; Takamizawa, T; Tsujimoto, A; Miyazaki, M; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A

    2016-01-01

    The present study determined the mechanical properties and impact-sliding wear characteristics of self-adhesive resin cements. Five self-adhesive resin cements were used: G-CEM LinkAce, BeautiCem SA, Maxcem Elite, Clearfil SA Automix, and RelyX Unicem 2. Clearfil Esthetic Cement was employed as a control material. Six specimens for each resin cement were used to determine flexural strength, elastic modulus, and resilience according to ISO specification #4049. Ten specimens for each resin cement were used to determine the wear characteristics using an impact-sliding wear testing apparatus. Wear was generated using a stainless-steel ball bearing mounted inside a collet assembly. The maximum facet depth and volume loss were determined using a noncontact profilometer in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Data were evaluated using analysis of variance followed by the Tukey honestly significantly different test (α=0.05). The flexural strength of the resin cements ranged from 68.4 to 144.2 MPa; the elastic modulus ranged from 4.4 to 10.6 GPa; and the resilience ranged from 4.5 to 12.0 MJ/m(3). The results for the maximum facet depth ranged from 25.2 to 235.9 μm, and volume loss ranged from 0.0107 to 0.5258 mm(3). The flexural properties and wear resistance were found to vary depending upon the self-adhesive resin cement tested. The self-adhesive cements tended to have lower mechanical properties than the conventional resin cement. All self-adhesive resin cements, apart from G-CEM LinkAce, demonstrated significantly poorer wear resistance than did the conventional resin cement.

  18. Mechanical and wear behaviour of steel chips reinforced Zn27Al composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo ALANEME

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and wear behaviour of Zn27Al alloy reinforced with steel machining chips (an industrial waste was investigated. Two step stir casting process was used to produce the Zn27Al based composites consisting of 5, 7.5 and 10 wt.% of the steel machining chips while unreinforced Zn27Al alloy and a composition consisting of 5 wt.% alumina were also prepared as control samples. Microstrutural analysis; mechanical and wear behaviour were assessed for these composites. The results show that the hardness and wear resistance of the composites increased with increase in weight percent of the steel chips from 5 to 10 wt.%. The UTS, strain to fracture, and the fracture toughness were however highest for the 5 wt.% steel chips reinforced composite grade; and decreased with increase in the weight percent of the steel chips from 5 to 10 wt.%. Generally the Zn27Al alloy based composites reinforced with steel machining chips, exhibited superior mechanical and wear properties in comparison to the unreinforced Zn27Al alloy and the 5 wt.% alumina reinforced Zn27Al alloy composite.

  19. Characterization of wear mechanism by tribo-corrosion of nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Some components of nuclear power plants, as steam generator tubes are made from Ni base alloys. These components are exposed to severe environment of high temperature and high pressure and submitted to contact mechanical stresses. These Ni - based alloys properties are determined by their ability to form on their surface an inner protective barrier film mainly composed of Cr 2 O 3 . The steam generator tubes are among the most difficult components to maintain, on the hand, because of their safety importance and secondly, the exchange tubes are subject to various degradation mechanisms, because of the harsh conditions of work. Wear by tribo-corrosion is a physicochemical aging mechanism which occurs in the management of the nuclear power plants life time. Tribo-corrosion is an irreversible process which involves mechanical and chemical / electrochemical interactions between surfaces in relative motion, in the presence of a corrosive environment. The goal of this study was to quantify in terms of quantity and quality the wear generated by tribo-corrosion process on Ni - Cr model alloys. Two model alloys: Ni -15Cr and Ni -30Cr were used to highlight, evaluate and compare the influence of the chromium content on the formation of the protective oxide layer and the role played by the latter one on the kinetics and mechanisms of wear by tribo-corrosion. The tribo-corrosion experiments were performed by using a pin-on-disc tribometer under controlled electrochemical conditions in LiOH - H 3 BO 3 solution. The corrosion - wear degradation of the protective layer during continuous and intermittent unidirectional sliding tests was investigated by a three-stage tribo-corrosion protocol. In the first stage, electrochemical techniques (open circuit potential measurements and electrochemical impedance measurements) were used without applying unidirectional sliding to monitor and evaluate the characteristics of protective oxide layer formed on the surface of the two model alloys

  20. Effect of Boron Addition on the Mechanical Wear Resistance of Additively Manufactured Biomedical Titanium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantri, S. A.; Torgerson, T.; Ivanov, E.; Scharf, T. W.; Banerjee, R.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of the addition of boron to the biomedical alloy Ti-13Nb-13Zr (TNZ) has been studied. A noticeable change between TNZ and TNZ-0.5B has been observed both in terms of morphology, and size scale of the α precipitates along with the in situ formation of TiB precipitates during laser processing. These contrasting microstructures are responsible for differences in mechanical hardness and sliding wear properties and mechanisms.

  1. Understanding the Atomic Scale Mechanisms that Control the Attainment of Ultralow Friction and Wear in Carbon-Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-16

    2015. 15. Invited. New Insights into Friction and Wear through In-Situ Nanotribology. Joint Symposium of the Surface Science Society of Japan and...and Carpick, R.W. Influence of Surface Passivation on the Friction and Wear Behavior of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond and Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0053 Understanding the Atomic Scale Mechanism that controls the attainment of ultralow friction and wear in carbon based

  2. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis and Three-Body Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Thermoplastic Copolyester Elastomer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanth Rajashekaraiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various amounts of short fibers (glass and carbon and particulate fillers like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, silicon carbide (SiC, and alumina (Al2O3 were systematically introduced into the thermoplastic copolyester elastomer (TCE matrix for reinforcement purpose. The mechanical properties such as storage modulus, loss modulus, and Tan δ by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA and three-body abrasive wear performance on a dry sand rubber wheel abrasion tester have been investigated. For abrasive wear study, the experiments were planned according to L27 orthogonal array by considering three factors and three levels. The complex moduli for TCE hybrid composites were pushed to a higher level relative to the TCE filled PTFE composite. At lower temperatures (in the glassy region, the storage modulus increases with increase in wt.% of reinforcement (fiber + fillers and the value is maximum for the composite with 40 wt.% reinforcement. The loss modulus and damping peaks were also found to be higher by the incorporation of SiC and Al2O3 microfillers. The routine abrasive wear test results indicated that TCE filled PTFE composite exhibited better abrasion resistance. Improvements in the abrasion resistance, however, have not been achieved by short-fiber and particlaute filler reinforcements. From the Taguchi’s experimental findings, optimal combination of control factors were obtained for minimum wear volume and also predictive correlations were proposed. Further, the worn surface morphology of the samples was discussed.

  3. Adhesive wear mechanism under combined electric diamond grinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Vyacheslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a scientific substantiation of loading of metal-bond diamond grinding wheels and describes the mechanism of contact interaction (interlocking of wheels with tool steel as well as its general properties having an influence on combined electric diamond grinding efficiency. The study concluded that a loaded layer can be formed in a few stages different by nature. It is known, that one of the causes of grinding degradation is a continuous loading of active grits (abrasive grinding tool by workpiece chips. It all affects the diamond grinding wheels efficiency and grinding ability with a result in increase of tool pressure, contact temperature and wheels specific removal rate. Science has partially identified some various methods to minimize grinding wheel loading, however, as to loading of metal-bond diamond grinding wheels the search is still in progress. Therefore, research people have to state, that in spite of the fact that the wheels made of cubic boron nitride are of little use as applied to ceramic, ultrahard, hard-alloyed hard-to-machine and nano-materials of the time, but manufactures have to apply cubic boron nitride wheels wherein diamond ones preferable.

  4. Wear Resistance and Mechanical Behaviour of Epoxy/Mollusk Shell Biocomposites developed for Structural Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Oladele

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy resin is one of the strongest commercially exploitable thermosetting polymers in the polymer family; however its expensive nature in comparison with other thermosetting polymers such as vinylester and polyester limits its applications as a structural material. Inexpensive fillers on the other hand, especially those derived from agro-industrial wastes are very important in reducing the overall cost of polymer composites and furthermore influential in enhancing some of their engineering properties. In the present study, the wear resistance and mechanical behaviour of epoxy polymer matrix filled with <75 and 75 μm calcined particles of African land snail shells have been comparatively investigated. The wear resistance and the mechanical behaviour of the composites were studied via Taber Abraser and INSTRON universal testing machine. Also, the elemental constituents of the calcined snail shell and the epoxy biocomposites were characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy. From the experimental results, it was observed that, at the highest filler loading, smaller particle size presented a biocomposite with significant enhancement in wear and mechanical properties. However, it was also observed that increase in particle size showed no significant enhancement in the mechanical properties of the biocomposites.

  5. Mechanical and wear behaviour of Mg–SiC–Gr hybrid composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Soorya Prakash

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present research deals with development and characterisation of magnesium–SiC–Gr hybrid composites through powder metallurgy route. Morphology analysis of the magnesium and reinforcement powder particles has been carried out using particle size analyser (PSA and X-ray diffraction (XRD, and then the mixed powders were analysed through scanning electron microscope (SEM. The developed composite exhibit increased hardness when compared to base material, which could be attributed to the presence of hard SiC. Furthermore, a slight decrease in hardness is observed for the hybrid composite when compared to Mg–SiC composite due to the presence of soft Gr particles. The tribological properties of the developed composite materials were investigated using pin-on-disc wear test apparatus under dry sliding conditions. The wear resistance of the developed composites improved significantly than that of the magnesium matrix due to the upright effect offered by both of the reinforcements. The SEM analysis was carried out on the worn out surfaces for better understanding of wear mechanisms. 5% Gr reinforced Mg-10SiC composites confer better wear resistance among the developed composites.

  6. Wear Behavior of Mechanically Alloyed Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Containing Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sheng Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the preparation and wear behavior of mechanically alloyed Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites containing carbon nanotube (CNT particles. The differential scanning calorimeter results show that the thermal stability of the amorphous matrix is affected by the presence of CNT particles. Changes in glass transition temperature (Tg and crystallization temperature (Tx suggest that deviations in the chemical composition of the amorphous matrix occurred because of a partial dissolution of the CNT species into the amorphous phase. Although the hardness of CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composites is increased with the addition of CNT particles, the wear resistance of such composites is not directly proportional to their hardness, and does not follow the standard wear law. A worn surface under a high applied load shows that the 12 vol. % CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composite suffers severe wear compared with monolithic Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass.

  7. IMPROVEMENT OF WEAR-RESISTANCE AND SERVICE LIFE OF MULTI-DISK BRAKE MECHANISMS OF «BELARUS» TRACTOR BY LASER THERMAL HARDENING OF FAST WEARING PARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Kobjakov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems concerning wear resistance improvement of «Belarus» tractor brake mechanism parts are considered in the paper. Properties of ВЧ-50-pig iron are investigated as a result of laser thermal hardening by various technological methods.

  8. Mechanisms of lubrication and wear of a bonded solid lubricant film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of how bonded solid lubricant films lubricate and wear (in general), the tribological properties of polyimide-bonded graphite fluoride films were studied (in specific). A pin-on-disk type of testing apparatus was used; but in addition to sliding a hemispherically tipped rider, a rider with a 0.95 mm diameter flat area was slid against the film. This was done so that a lower, less variable contact stress could be achieved. Two stages of lubrication occurred. In the first, the film supported the load. The lubricating mechanism consisted of the shear of a thin surface layer (of the film) between the rider and the bulk of the film. The second occurred after the bonded film had worn to the substrate, and consisted of the shear of very thin lubricant films between the rider and flat plateaus generated on the metallic substrate asperities. The film wear mechanism was strongly dependent on contact stress.

  9. Raman analysis of DLC coated engine components with complex shape: Understanding wear mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaoul, C.; Jarry, O.; Tristant, P.; Merle-Mejean, T.; Colas, M.; Dublanche-Tixier, C.; Jacquet, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were deposited on flat samples and engine components using an industrial scale reactor. Characterization of the coating allowed validating its application on engine parts due to high hardness (32 GPa) and high level of adhesion achieved using sublayers. The original approach of this work concerned the use of Raman analysis not only on flat samples after tribometer tests but also directly on coated engine parts with complex shape (like cam/follower system), in order to understand wear mechanisms occurring in motorsport engines. As wear could lead to a coating thickness decrease, a particular attention was paid on the Raman signal of the sublayers. Among the different values extracted from Raman spectrum to characterize structural organization, the value of G peak intensity appeared as a criterion of validity of analyses because it is directly linked to the remaining thickness of the a-C:H layer. For flat samples tested on ball-on-disc tribometer, structure of a-C:H film observed by Raman spectroscopy in the wear track remained stable in depth. Then, a-C:H coated engine components were studied before and after working in real conditions. Two different wear mechanisms were identified. The first one did not show any structural modification of the bulk a-C:H layer. In the second one, the high initial roughness of samples (R t = 1.15 μm) lead to coating delaminations after sliding. Massive graphitization which decreases drastically mechanical properties of the coatings was observed by Raman analyses on the contact area. The increase of the temperature on rough edges of the scratches could explain this graphitization.

  10. Current Total Knee Designs: Does Baseplate Roughness or Locking Mechanism Design Affect Polyethylene Backside Wear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisko, Zachary W; Teeter, Matthew G; Lanting, Brent A; Howard, James L; McCalden, Richard W; Naudie, Douglas D; MacDonald, Steven J; Vasarhelyi, Edward M

    2017-12-01

    Tibial baseplate roughness and polyethylene-insert micromotion resulting from locking-mechanism loosening can lead to polyethylene backside wear in TKAs. However, many retrieval studies examining these variables have evaluated only older TKA implant designs. We used implant-retrieval analysis to examine if there were differences in: (1) backside damage scores, (2) backside damage modes, and (3) backside linear wear rates in five TKA implant designs owing to differing baseplate surface roughness and locking mechanisms. Additionally, we examined if (4) patient demographics influence backside damage and wear. Five TKA implant models (four modern and one historical design) were selected with different tibial baseplate and/or locking mechanism designs. Six tibial inserts retrieved at the time of revision from each TKA model were matched for time in vivo, age of the patient at TKA revision, BMI, sex, revision number, and revision reason. Each insert backside was analyzed for: (1) visual total damage score and (2) individual visual damage modes, both by two observers and with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.39-0.92), and (3) linear wear rate measured by micro-CT. Median primary outcomes were compared among the five designs. For our given sample size among five groups we could detect with 80% power a 10-point difference in damage score and an 0.11-mm per year difference in wear rate. The polished tibial design with a partial peripheral capture locking mechanism and anterior constraint showed a lower total damage score compared with the nonpolished tibial design with only a complete peripheral-rim locking mechanism (median, 12.5; range, 9.5-18.0; 95% CI, 9.58-16.42 versus median, 22.3; range, 15.5-27.0; 95% CI, 17.5-26.5; p = 0.019). The polished baseplate with a tongue-in-groove locking mechanism showed more abrasions than the nonpolished baseplate with a peripheral-rim capture and antirotational island (median, 7.25; range, 0.5-8.0; 95% CI, 2

  11. Two-body, dry abrasive wear of Fe/Cr/C experimental alloys - relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, C.K.S.

    1982-01-01

    A systematic study of abrasive wear resistance of Fe/Cr/Mn based alloys has been carried out using a two body pin-on-disc wear machine. Abrasives used were silicon carbide, alumina and quartz. The objective of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear resistance and to investigate the relationships between microstructure, mechanical properties, and abrasive wear resistance for these experimental alloys. Several commercial alloys were also tested to provide a basis for comparison. The goal of this study was to develop information so as to improve wear resistance of these experimental alloys by means of thermal treatments. Grain-refinement by double heat treatment was carried out in this research

  12. Study on Friction and Wear Characteristics of Aluminum Alloy Hydraulic Valve Body and Its Antiwear Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order for the working status of the aluminum alloyed hydraulic valve body to be controlled in actual conditions, a new friction and wear design device was designed for the cast iron and aluminum alloyed valve bodies comparison under the same conditions. The results displayed that: (1 The oil leakage of the aluminum alloyed hydraulic valve body was higher than the corresponding oil leakage of the iron body during the initial running stage. Besides during a later running stage, the oil leakage of the aluminum alloyed body was lower than corresponding oil leakage of the iron body; (2 The actual oil leakage of different materials consisted of two parts: the foundation leakage that was the leakage of the valve without wear and wear leakage that was caused by the worn valve body; (3 The aluminum alloyed valve could rely on the dust filling furrow and melting mechanism that led the body surface to retain dynamic balance, resulting in the valve leakage preservation at a low level. The aluminum alloy modified valve body can meet the requirements of hydraulic leakage under pressure, possibly constituting this alloy suitable for hydraulic valve body manufacturing.

  13. Wearing knee wraps affects mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jason P; Carden, Patrick J C; Shorter, Kath A

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of wearing knee wraps on mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise. Ten resistance trained men (back squat 1 repetition maximum [1RM]: 160.5 ± 18.4 kg) performed 6 single back squats with 80% 1RM, 3 wearing knee wraps, 3 without. Mechanical output was obtained from ground reaction force, performance characteristics from digitized motion footage obtained from a single high-speed digital camera. Wearing knee wraps led to a 39% reduction (0.09 compared with 0.11 m, p = 0.037) in horizontal barbell displacement that continued during the lifting phase. Lowering phase vertical impulse remained within 1% across conditions; however, the lowering phase was performed 45% faster (1.13 compared with 1.57 seconds). This demonstrated that vertical force applied to the center of mass during the lowering phase was considerably larger and was likely a consequence of the generation and storage of elastic energy within the knee wrap. Subsequent vertical impulse applied to the center of mass was 10% greater (192 compared with 169 N·s, p = 0.018). Mechanical work involved in vertically displacing the center of mass was performed 20% faster and was reflected by a 10% increase in peak power (2,121 compared with 1,841 W, p = 0.019). The elastic properties of knee wraps increased mechanical output but altered back squat technique in a way that is likely to alter the musculature targeted by the exercise and possibly compromise the integrity of the knee joint. Knee wraps should not be worn during the strength and condition process, and perceived weakness in the knee joint should be assessed and treated.

  14. The Effects of Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical and Wear Properties of AZ31 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyang Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT-reinforced AZ31 matrix nanocomposites were successfully fabricated using a powder metallurgy method followed by hot extrusion. The influence of CNTs on microstructures, mechanical properties, and wear properties were systematically investigated by optical microscope (OM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, hardness test, tensile test, and wear test. The results revealed that the nanocomposites showed a slightly smaller grain size compared with the matrix and uniform distribution that CNTs could achieve at proper content. As a result, the addition of CNTs could weaken basal plane texture. However, the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the composites were enhanced as the amount of CNTs increased up to 2.0 wt. %, reaching maximum values of 241 MPa (+28.2% and 297 MPa (+6.1%, respectively. The load transfer mechanism, Orowan mechanism, and thermal mismatch mechanism played important roles in the enhancement of the yield strength, and several classical models were employed to predict the theoretical values. The effect of CNT content on the friction coefficient and weight loss of the nanocomposites was also studied. The relationships between the amount of CNTs, the friction coefficient, and weight loss could be described by the exponential decay model and the Boltzmann model, respectively.

  15. From observation to understanding: Approach to analysis of wear mechanisms, Case of RCCAs and CRDM latch arms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, D.

    2004-01-01

    Component wear can affect the ability of a component to fulfill its required function. For a designer or user, it is reasonable to expect possible wear occurrence as soon as parts are in relative motion. It is less obvious to extend this possibility to motions with small or very small amplitudes and loads. However, it has to be admitted that such cases exist. It then becomes imperative to determine the wear mechanisms so that the lifetime of the components and the optimum date of their replacement can be predicted or the degradation can be remedied. For this purpose, standard and widely accepted practice is to carry out simulator tests. Through examples of wear from nuclear reactor components such as the RCCAs (Rod Cluster Control Assembly) and the CRDM (Control Rod Drive Mechanism) latch arms, an approach for understanding the wear mechanisms and controlling their effects can be undertaken. Cases of wear have been observed on real-life parts, but the first simulator tests have shown deviations from in-reactor behaviour. Comparative examination of the wear facies of actual parts which have operated in reactor or simulators, both control rods and CRDM latch arms, was the key starting point for a new analytical approach, incorporating the formulation of wear mechanism hypotheses which can account for the observed facies. Expert assessment thus highlighted the importance of the environment by revealing that the wear featured a large component linked to friction-assisted corrosion. By including this tribo-corrosion aspect, it became possible to reach understanding of the mechanisms and account for the wear observed in reactor and on simulators. Further well-controlled simulator tests then made it possible to verify the importance of the tribo-corrosion processes in a pressurized water medium. Analysis of the physical chemical behaviour of the original materials (austenitic stainless steel) also explains why these surface modifications limit or remedy wear

  16. Wear mechanisms of Al2O3/TiC/Mo/Ni ceramic wire-drawing dies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jianxin; Yang Xuefeng; Wang Jinghai

    2006-01-01

    Al 2 O 3 /TiC/Mo/Ni ceramic composites were produced by hot-pressing for the use of wire drawing dies. The fundamental properties of these ceramic die materials were examined. Wire drawing tests were carried out on the 65Mn steel wire with these ceramic dies. Finite element method (FEM) was used as a means of numerically evaluating stress and its distribution inside the ceramic drawing dies. Worn bore surfaces of the ceramic drawing dies were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The wear mechanisms of the ceramic drawing dies were investigated. Detailed observations and analyses of the die wear surface have revealed that the most common failure of the ceramic drawing die is the wear at its approach zone. FEM analysis showed that the compressive stresses on both sides of the corners at the approach zone are higher than those of other parts of the ceramic drawing die. Abrasive and adhesive wear were found to be the predominant wear mechanisms through the whole approach zone owing to the greater compressive stresses. Examination of the center bore surface at the die bearing zone of the ceramic drawing dies demonstrated that the wear occurred by light abrasive, no adhesion wear was observed

  17. Ultrananocrystalline diamond film as a wear resistant and protective coating for mechanical seal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumant, A.V.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Auciello, O.; Erdemir, A.; Williams, M.; Artiles, A.F.; Adams, W.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical shaft seals used in pumps are critically important to the safe operation of the paper, pulp, and chemical process industry, as well as petroleum and nuclear power plants. Specifically, these seals prevent the leakage of toxic gases and hazardous chemicals to the environment and final products from the rotating equipment used in manufacturing processes. Diamond coatings have the potential to provide negligible wear, ultralow friction, and high corrosion resistance for the sliding surfaces of mechanical seals, because diamond exhibits outstanding tribological, physical, and chemical properties. However, diamond coatings produced by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) exhibit high surface roughness (R a ≥ 1 μm), which results in high wear of the seal counterface, leading to premature seal failure. To avoid this problem, we have developed an ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film formed by a unique CH 4 /Ar microwave plasma CVD method. This method yields extremely smooth diamond coatings with surface roughness R a = 20-30 nm and an average grain size of 2-5 nm. We report the results of a systematic test program involving uncoated and UNCD-coated SiC shaft seals. Results confirmed that the UNCD-coated seals exhibited neither measurable wear nor any leakage during long-duration tests that took 21 days to complete. In addition, the UNCD coatings reduced the frictional torque for seal rotation by five to six times compared with the uncoated seals. This work promises to lead to rotating shaft seals with much improved service life, reduced maintenance cost, reduced leakage of environmentally hazardous materials, and increased energy savings. This technology may also have many other tribological applications involving rolling or sliding contacts.

  18. Experimental study and modelling of the effect of microstructure on friction and wear mechanisms of low alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisiol, C.; Jourani, A.; Bouvier, S.

    2017-12-01

    Few models are focused on the combined effects of microstructure and roughness on the tribological behavior of materials. Hardness is the material property mainly used in the tribological models which are usually at a macroscopic scale. For a dual-phase steel, experimental and predicted values of friction coefficients and specific wear resistances are compared. The investigated models are declined into two pressure distribution modes between the phases. Friction tests are performed between steel pins composed of a ferrite-martensite dual-phase microstructure against abrasive papers with various abrasive particle sizes ranging from 15 µm to 200 µm. By using heat treatments on a low alloy steel, dual-phase microstructures with various martensite volume fractions, ranging from 45% to 100%, are generated. As martensite volume fraction increases, the experimental and predicted results show that the specific wear resistance increases whereas the friction coefficient decreases. Furthermore, the latter evolutions depend on roughness. For a predominance of abrasive wear mechanisms generated by coarse abrasive particles (~200 µm), the experimental tribological parameters tend to follow the predicted ones associated to the mode characterized by equal pressures between the phases. Then, as the abrasive particle size decreases, abrasive wear mechanisms reduce whereas adhesive wear mechanisms increase and the experimental tribological parameters tend to follow the predicted ones associated to the mode characterized by equal wear rate between the phases.

  19. Mechanism of wear and tribofilm formation with ionic liquids and ashless antiwear additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vibhu

    Increasingly stringent government regulation on emissions (EPA Emissions Standard Reference Guide and latest CAFE standards requiring an average fuel economy of 54.5 mpg (combined cars and trucks) by 2025) impose significant challenges to the automotive and lubricant industries calling for the development and implementation of lower viscosity ILSAC GF-5&6 and API-CJ4&5 oils which further limit the amount of SAPS and deposits in engines. Development of additives that result in lower ash content, volatility and anti-wear property plays a crucial role in being able to reach these standards. The current industrial additive technology i.e. zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) forms harmful deposits on catalytic convertor due to the volatility of Zn, S and P which, impairs its functionality and consequently results in higher emission from vehicles. In this research work, ionic liquids (IL's) that are non-volatile have been studied as new generation environment friendly antiwear additives along with other ashless anti-wear additives including boron based additives to overcome the current challenges of improving the fuel efficiency and reducing the amount of hazardous emissions. The goal of this thesis work is to study the tribological performance of selected IL's and develop a comprehensive understating of IL's chemistry and its consequences to their friction and wear outcomes. As first approach, various P, S and F based ionic liquids are studied for their tribological properties by analyzing the friction and wear results generated using standard tribological experiments. Following this, advanced surface characterization techniques such as X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, SEM, Nano-indentation, SPM techniques are used to investigate the chemical-mechanical properties of the antiwear films. Results indicate that the tribological properties of ionic liquids depend on their solubility in base oil (BO) as well as their chemical interaction with the

  20. Bionic design perspectives based on the formation mechanism of dental anti-wear function

    OpenAIRE

    ZR Zhou; W. Gong; J. Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Human teeth are the important masticatory organ and therefore are subjected to friction and wear everyday. Both the loading condition and the environment are relatively complex in the mouth, however, normally human teeth can serve in mouth all their time with excellent wear resistance in most people. Obviously, through the process of human evolution, human teeth have become a natural anti-wear system that far outclasses the best engineering anti-wear systems at present. To understand the exce...

  1. Effect of vanadium of mechanical behavior, machinability and wear resistance of aluminium grain refined by Ti+B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.; Hamid, A.A.A.

    1999-01-01

    It is well established that aluminum and its alloys are industrially grain refined by adding either Ti or Ti-B to improve their mechanical behavior and surface finish. In a previous paper, it was found that the grain refining efficiency of aluminum master alloys containing Ti or Ti+B was enhanced by addition of small amounts of other elements including vanadium. V. Therefore, it is anticipated that such an element will improve mechanical behavior, machinability and wear resistance of aluminum and its alloys. In this paper, the effect of vanadium addition, up to 0.3% on mechanical behavior is investigated. Machinability was assessed under different cutting conditions: speed, feed and depth of cut and finally the wear resistance was determined at different loads and speeds. The results indicated that improvement in hardness and mechanical strength were achieved by the addition of V that addition of more than 0.2%V resulted in little or no improvement. Similarly, addition of V resulted in improvement of surface quality under the different cutting conditions of speed, feed and depth of cut, and resistance to wear. However addition of more than 0.2% V resulted in increase of wear rate and change of wear mechanisms. (author)

  2. Investigations on mechanical and two-body abrasive wear behaviour of glass/carbon fabric reinforced vinyl ester composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresha, B.; Kumar, Kunigal N. Shiva

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research article is to study the mechanical and two-body abrasive wear behaviour of glass/carbon fabric reinforced vinyl ester composites. The measured wear volume loss increases with increase in abrading distance/abrasive particle size. However, the specific wear rate decreases with increase in abrading distance and decrease in abrasive particle size. The results showed that the highest specific wear rate is for glass fabric reinforced vinyl ester composite with a value of 10.89 x 10 -11 m 3 /Nm and the lowest wear rate is for carbon fabric reinforced vinyl ester composite with a value of 4.02 x 10 -11 m 3 /Nm. Mechanical properties were evaluated and obtained values are compared with the wear behaviour. The worn surface features have been examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Photomicrographs of the worn surfaces revealed higher percentage of broken glass fiber as compared to carbon fiber. Also better interfacial adhesion between carbon and vinyl ester in carbon reinforced vinyl ester composite was observed.

  3. Mechanisms of lubrication and wear of a bonded solid-lubricant film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The tribological properties of polyimide-bonded graphite fluoride films were investigated. A pin-on-disk type of testing apparatus was used; in addition to sliding a hemispherically tipped rider, a rider with a 0.95-mm-diameter flat area was slid against the film so that a lower, less variable contact stress could be achieved. Two stages of lubrication occurred: in the first, the film supported the load and the lubricating mechanism consisted of the shear of a thin surface layer between the rider and the bulk of the film. The second occurred after the bonded film had worn to the substrate, and consisted of the shear of very thin lubricant films between the rider and flat plateaus generated on the metallic substrate asperities. The film wear mechanism was strongly dependent on contact stress.

  4. The Wear Mechanisms Description Of Multilayer Coatings, Performed By Transmission Electron Microscopy – An Overview Of The Own Research Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Ł.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the presented paper was to describe the wear mechanisms operating at the small length scale in multilayer coatings subjected to a mechanical testing. A hybrid PLD system (Pulsed Laser Deposition connected with magnetron sputtering was used for the multi-layer coating deposition. Coatings were subjected to indentation, ball-on disc wear and scratch adhesion tests. Microstructure of the as-deposited coating and after mechanical tests was studied using the Scanning (SEM and the Transmission (TEM Electron Microscopes. The research work revealed that application of innovative multilayer coatings may allow to predict their life time and to steer their properties.

  5. Physico-mechanical properties and abrasive wear resistance of refractory compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrushchov, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    The method has been proposed to estimate abrasive wear resistance of refractory compounds and interstitial phases used as wear resistant PVD and CVD coatings. It was based on Khruschov-Babichev empiric laws for abrasion and used correlations between atomic pproperties of solids and their wear resistance. Based on these formulae, a simple model has been used to describe wear processes in a tribological system consisting of a coating deposited on a substrate. The agreement has been demonstrated between theoretical predictions of this paper and experimental results on abrasive wear of a PVD TiN coating on a stainless steel (12Kh18N10T) substrate

  6. INTRODUCTION TO THE ANALYSIS OF THE MECHANICS OF THE DIAMOND GRINDING PROCESS WITH THE ACCOUNT OF WEAR OF WHEEL GRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feodor NOVIKOV

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the theoretical analysis of the mechanics of the diamond grinding process, taking into account the wear of the wheel grains for scientifically based choice of optimal processing conditions. A multiplicative probabilistic approach to the generalization of the cutting profile of a diamond grinding wheel in its consideration in a state of some steady wear during processing is considered. This is achieved by working the wheel in a mode of properly established self-sharpening or with the use of effective dressing methods. In this case, the linear wear of individual grains of diamond abrasive located on the working surface of the grinding wheel and opened to mechanical contact with the material being processed is assumed to proportionally to the depth of the introduction of grain into it. The analytical dependence of the maximum thickness of the cut is presented, and the relationship between the maximum grain wear and the accepted universal relative characteristic of the steady wear with the operational parameters of the tool and the grinding mode is shown. The obtained results can be used in the development of analytical models of processing productivity and microgeometric engineering of the treated surface, new approaches to increasing the efficiency of diamond grinding. The research is based on modern technical possibilities of controlling the state of the cutting relief of diamond-abrasive tools, especially in electro-physical-mechanical grinding technologies, for example, using the diamond-spark method developed at the Kharkov Polytechnic Institute.

  7. Wear Resistance of Steels with Surface Nanocrystalline Structure Generated by Mechanical-Pulse Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the surface mechanical-pulse treatment based on high-speed friction with a rapid cooling by the technological environment on the wear resistance of medium- and high-carbon steels was considered. The treatment due to a severe plastic deformation enabled obtaining the nanocrystalline structure with a grain size of 14-40 nm. A high positive effect of this treatment was obtained not only because of metal nanocrystallization but also thanks to other factors, namely, structural-phase transformations, carbon saturation of the surface due to decomposition of the coolant and the friction coefficient decrease. Higher carbon content leads to better strengthening of the surface, and its microhardness can reach 12 GPa.

  8. Investigation on Mechanical Properties and Wear Behavior of Al-Si-SiC-Graphite Composite using SEM and EDAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, A.; Nallusamy, S.

    2017-08-01

    In this research article mechanical properties and wear performance with regard to the tribological behavior of aluminum metal matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide particulates and added with graphite particulates as a second reinforcement has been analysed. The method of stir casting procedure was used for the preparation of composite samples for analysis and those samples were tested for the presence of reinforcement particles using scanning electron microscope and EDAX. Uniform distribution of reinforcements and their presence was well established using characterization. The different mechanical properties have been tested and found to be better than the base alloy. Wear tests were performed to study the influence of graphite particulates and SiC particles through pin on disc tester. The experimental results of wear test reveal that, the formation of lubricate film with 4 kg of load establish the influence of graphite in the composite materials.

  9. Ceramic wear maps: Zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Hsu, S.M.; Shen, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The wear characteristics of an yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) are represented by a set of three-dimensional wear maps under dry and lubricated conditions. Water, paraffin oil, and a formulated oil were used as lubricants. Different wear regions were identified as a function of load, speed, and lubrication environment. Sudden increases in wear, identified as ear transitions, were found at certain loads and speeds. The onset of wear transitions was moderated by the presence of a lubricant. Below the wear transitions, the wear was mild and the wear mechanism was predominantly plastic deformation and microfracture. Above the wear transitions, the wear was severe, dominated by brittle fracture and third-body abrasion. Different fluids had different effects on wear. Water had a deleterious effect on wear for this material. The presence of oil lubricants effectively reduced friction and moderated wear. Under high load and high speed, additional stress induced by a thermal gradient within a small area contributed significantly to wear. A critical velocity model was found to describe the locations of the wear transition zones successfully

  10. Effect of Copper Coated SiC Reinforcements on Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Wear of Aluminium Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kori, P. S.; Vanarotti, Mohan; Angadi, B. M.; Nagathan, V. V.; Auradi, V.; Sakri, M. I.

    2017-08-01

    Experimental investigations are carried out to study the influence of copper coated Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforcements in Aluminum (Al) based Al-SiC composites. Wear behavior and mechanical Properties like, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and hardness are studied in the present work. Experimental results clearly revealed that, an addition of SiC particles (5, 10 and 15 Wt %) has lead in the improvement of hardness and ultimate tensile strength. Al-SiC composites containing the Copper coated SiC reinforcements showed better improvement in mechanical properties compared to uncoated ones. Characterization of Al-SiC composites are carried out using optical photomicrography and SEM analysis. Wear tests are carried out to study the effects of composition and normal pressure using Pin-On Disc wear testing machine. Results suggested that, wear rate decreases with increasing SiC composition, further an improvement in wear resistance is observed with copper coated SiC reinforcements in the Al-SiC metal matrix composites (MMC’s).

  11. Effect of nano-additives on microstructure, mechanical properties and wear behaviour of Fe–Cr–B hardfacing alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou, Junfeng; Lu, Pengpeng; Wang, You; Liu, Saiyue; Zou, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Wear rate of the hardfacing layers with different nano-additives content and the counterpart GCr15 steel balls under conditions: normal load = 15 N, rotating speed = 400 rpm, total sliding time = 20 min. - Highlights: • Nano-additives remarkably improved the microstructure of hardfacing layers. • The hardness of hardfacing layers increased linearly with the increase of nano-additives. • The wear rate of the hardfacing layer with 0.65 wt.% nano-additives decreased about 88% than that of the hardfacing layer without nano-additives. • According to observation of wear tracks of hardfacing layers, the main wear mechanism was adhesion wear. - Abstract: Fe–Cr–B hardfacing alloys with different nano-additives content were investigated. The effects of nano-additives on the microstructures of hardfacing alloy were studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer. The hardness and the fracture toughness of hardfacing alloys were measured, respectively. The sliding wear tests were carried out using a ball-on-disc tribometer. The experimental results showed that primary carbide of hardfacing alloys was refined and its distribution became uniform with content of nano-additives increased. The hardfacing alloys are composed of Cr 7 C 3 , Fe 7 C 3 , α-Fe and Fe 2 B according to the results of X-ray diffraction. The hardness of hardfacing alloys increased linearly with the increase of nano-additives. The hardness of the hardfacing alloy with 1.5 wt.% nano-additives increased 54.8% than that of the hardfacing alloy without nano-additives and reached to 1011HV. The K IC of the hardfacing alloy with 0.65 wt.% nano-additives was 15.4 MPam 1/2 , which reached a maximum. The value increased 57.1% than that of the hardfacing alloy without nano-additives. The wear rates of the hardfacing layer with 0.65 wt.% and 1.0 wt.% nano-additives decreased about 88% than that of the hardfacing layer without nano-additives. The

  12. Comparative wear mapping techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, J.; Sørensen, Ole Toft; Jensen, S.

    1996-01-01

    Pin-on-disc tests of tungsten carbide pins against silicon carbide discs were performed and wear rate, mechanism and friction maps constructed. Correlations were observed between the wear mode and the friction of the pin-disc interface, and between the qualitative incidence of disruptive wear mec...

  13. Investigation of Mechanical and Wear Properties of LM24/Silicate/Fly Ash Hybrid Composite Using Vortex Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Senthil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work has investigated to find the influence of silicate on the wear behavior of LM 24/4 wt.% fly ash hybrid composite. The investigation reveals the effectiveness of incorporation of silicate in the composite for gaining wear reduction. Silicate particles with fly ash materials were incorporated into aluminum alloy matrix to accomplish reduction in wear resistance and improve the mechanical properties. The LM24/silicate/fly ash hybrid composite was prepared with 4 wt.% fly ash particles with 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 wt.% of silicate using vortex technique. Tribological properties were evaluated under different load (15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 N; sliding velocity (0.75, 1.5, 2.25, and 3 m/sec condition using pin on disc apparatus and mechanical properties like density, hardness, impact strength, and tensile strength of composites were investigated. In addition, the machining of the aluminum hybrid composite was studied using Taguchi L9 orthogonal array with analysis of variance. The properties of the hybrid composites containing 24 wt.% silicates exhibit the superior wear resistance and mechanical properties.

  14. Mechanical behavior and wear prediction of stir cast Al–TiB2 composites using response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, S.; Shenbaga Vinayaga Moorthi, N.; Vettivel, S.C.; Selvakumar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Various experiments were conducted on Al6061–TiB 2 composite. • XRD and EDS studies confirm the crystalline size and elements present. • SEM, EDS and OM observations were used to study the characteristics. • Curve fitting and RSM design methods are effectively used to develop the model. - Abstract: Al6061 was reinforced with various percentages of TiB 2 particles by using high energy stir casting method. The characterization was performed through X-ray Diffraction, Energy Dispersive Spectrum and Scanning Electron Microscope. The mechanical behaviors such as hardness, tensile strength and tribological behavior were investigated. Wear experiments were conducted by using a pin-on-disc wear tester at varying load. The curve fitting technique was used to develop the respective polynomial and power law equations. The wear mechanism of the specimen was studied through SEM. Response Surface Methodology was used to minimize the number of experimental conditions and develop the mathematical models between the key process parameters namely weight percentage of TiB 2 , load and sliding distance. Analysis of Variance technique was applied to check the validity of the developed model. The mathematical model developed for the specific wear rate was predicted at 99.5% confidence level and some useful conclusions were made

  15. Abrasive Wear Resistance, Mechanical Behaviour, Water Transport Phenomena and Biocorrosion of Epoxy/Femora Biocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Olajide

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Of late, some biological wastes have proven to be reliable candidates in promoting the economic viability of developing polymeric composites. However, the field-proven reliability prediction of such materials during service life requires extensive characterization. In this research, the influence of 75 µm bovine femur ash subjected to two-step calcination process on spectroscopic, wear, mechanical, water absorbent and biocorrosive properties of epoxy/femur waste biocomposites was investigated. The test materials were developed via open mould casting and subjected to preferred characterizations apropos of the abovementioned properties. Elemental constituents of the biocomposites and the ash were determined by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy with scanning electron microscopy and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. The investigated properties were studied dependent on predetermined volume fractions of the ash in epoxy matrix. Observations from the experimental results revealed that properties’ enhancement was not specific to either low or high volume fraction of the ash in epoxy. Different properties were enhanced at different volume fractions of the ash. Nonetheless, one biocomposite approaching intermediate volume faction of the ash used, exhibited optimum combination of the investigated properties. This is a clear indication that bovine femur waste can be successfully exploited for engineering applications, especially in the areas of materials development.

  16. MICROSTRUCTURE, THERMO-PHYSICAL, MECHANICAL AND WEAR PROPERTIES OF IN-SITU FORMED BORON CARBIDE - ZIRCONIUM DIBORIDE COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. R. Ch. Murthy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure, thermos-physical, mechanical and wear properties of in-situ formed B₄C- ZrB₂ composite were investigated. Coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and electrical resistivity of the composite were measured at different temperatures up to 1000 °C in inert atmosphere. Flexural strength was measured up to 900 °C in air. Friction and wear properties have been studied at different loads under reciprocative sliding, using a counter body (ball of cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co at ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction (XRD and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA confirmed the formation of ZrB₂ as the reaction product in the composite. Electrical resistivity was measured as 3.02 x 10-4Ω.m at 1000°C. Thermal conductivity measured at temperatures between 25°C and 1000 °C was in the range of 8 to 10 W/m-K. Flexural strength of the composite decreased with increase in temperature and reached a value of 92 MPa at 900°C. The average value of coefficient of friction (COF was measured as 0.15 at 20 N load and 10 Hz frequency. Increase of load from 5 N to 20 N resulted in decrease in COF from 0.24 to 0.15 at 10 Hz frequency. Specific wear rate data observed was of the order of 10-6 mm³/N-m. Both abrasive and tribo-chemical reaction wear mechanisms were observed on the worn surface of flat and counter body materials. At higher loads (≥10 N a tribo-chemical reaction wear mechanism was dominant.

  17. Wear and Mechanical Properties of Various Bone Cements – Influence of Saline Environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balko, J.; Fides, M.; Sedlák, R.; Hvizdoš, P.; Hloch, Sergej; Kloc, J.; Monka, P.

    -, č. 662 (2015), s. 147-150 ISSN 1662-9795 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : wear * saline * hardness * bone cement Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools http://www.scientific.net/KEM.662.147

  18. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajmi, Mahdi; Shalwan, Abdullah

    2015-07-08

    The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE), Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE), and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE). The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR) and coefficient of friction (COF) of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs), as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  19. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Alajmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE, Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE, and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE. The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR and coefficient of friction (COF of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs, as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  20. Wear pattern, dental function, and jaw mechanism in the Late Cretaceous ankylosaur Hungarosaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osi, Attila; Barrett, Paul M; Földes, Tamás; Tokai, Richárd

    2014-07-01

    Feeding in thyreophoran dinosaurs is poorly understood. Although the group existed for over 130 million years, only the Early Jurassic basal thyreophoran Scelidosaurus harrisonii and the Late Cretaceous ankylosaurid Euoplocephalus tutus have been studied from this perspective in detail. In contrast to the earlier, conservative hypothesis of a simple "orthal pulping" feeding mode with no or limited tooth-tooth contact, recent studies have demonstrated precise dental occlusion with differing jaw mechanisms in these two species. Here, we describe the first detailed study of feeding related characters in a nodosaurid ankylosaur, Hungarosaurus tormai, from the Late Cretaceous of Hungary. Dental wear patterns comprising small, apical, and low-angled facets on the maxillary and steep, extended, and bowl-like facets on the dentary teeth reveal sophisticated tooth-tooth contact in this basal nodosaurid. The presence of two different scratch generations (vertical and low-angled) on the dentary teeth unambiguously demonstrate a multiphasic powerstroke, which is further supported by the morphology of the quadrate-articular and mandibular symphyseal joints and by the architecture of the reconstructed jaw adductors. Chewing started with an initial slicing phase associated with orthal movement that was followed by a retractive powerstroke with significant occlusal contact. Because of the curved tooth rows, these movements were probably facilitated by some mediolateral translation and/or axial rotation of the mandibles to produce precise shearing along the whole tooth row. These results demonstrate that complex jaw mechanisms and dental occlusion were more widespread among thyreophorans than thought previously and that palinal movement was present in at least two ankylosaurian lineages. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Resistance to wear and microstructure of martensitic welds deposits for recharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualco, Agustin; Svoboda, Hernan G; Surian, Estela S; Vedia, Luis A

    2006-01-01

    This work studied the welding metal for a martensitic steel (alloyed to Cr, Mn, Mo, V and W), deposited with a tubular metal-cored wire with gaseous protection of 82%Ar-18%Co 2 on a low carbon steel using the semi-automatic welding process. Transverse pieces were cut from the welded coupon for microstructural characterization, measurement of hardness profiles, determination of the chemical composition and wear trials. The microstructural characterization was done using optic and scanning electronic microscopes, X-rays diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Vicker microhardness (1 kg.) was measured. The wear trials (metal-metal) were performed in an Amsler machine under pure flow conditions. Different loads were used and the reference material was a SAE 1020 steel. The temperatures for each case were measured and the weight loss curves were defined as a function of the distance run and of the load. After testing the wear surfaces and the debris were measured. The microstructure of the welded deposit mostly consists of martensite and some retained austenite, with a pattern of dendritic segregation, and a hardness on the surface of 612 HVI. A lineal variation between the weight loss and the load applied was obtained as a response to the wear. The following phenomena were observed: abrasion, plastic deformation, oxidation and adhesion to the wear surfaces, as well as a tempering effect in the condition of the biggest load. The wear mechanisms acting on both surfaces were identified (CW)

  2. Mechanical and wear behaviour of AZ91D magnesium matrix hybrid composite reinforced with boron carbide and graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Aatthisugan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this experimental study, magnesium (AZ91D based boron carbide (B4C and graphite (Gr particle reinforced hybrid composite materials were manufactured by stir casting. The tribological and mechanical properties of these composite materials were investigated. The results of the tests revealed that the graphite reinforced hybrid composites exhibited a lower wear loss compared to the unreinforced AZ91D alloy and AZ91D–B4C composites. It was found that with an increase in the B4C content, the wear resistance increased monotonically with hardness and ultimate tensile strength decreased. This study revealed that the addition of both a hard reinforcement (e.g., B4C and soft reinforcement (e.g., graphite significantly improves the wear resistance of magnesium composites. These entire results designate that the hybrid magnesium composites can be considered as an excellent material where high strength, ultimate tensile strength and wear-resistant components are of major importance, primarily in the aerospace and automotive engineering sectors.

  3. Role of Silicon Dioxide Filler on Mechanical and Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Glass-Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Anjum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and dry sliding wear behaviour of glass fabric reinforced epoxy (G-E composite with varying weight percentage of silicon dioxide (SiO2 filler have been studied in the present work. The influence of sliding distance, velocity, and applied normal load on dry sliding wear behaviour has been considered using Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array. Addition of SiO2 increased the density, hardness, flexural, and impact strengths of G-E composite. Results of dry sliding wear tests showed increasing wear volume with increase in sliding distance, load, and sliding velocity for G-E and SiO2 filled G-E composites. Taguchi's results indicate that the sliding distance played a significant role followed by applied load, sliding velocity, and SiO2 loading. Scanning electron micrographs of the worn surfaces of composite samples at different test parameters show smooth surface, microploughing, and fine grooves under low load and velocity. However, severe damage of matrix with debonding and fiber breakage was seen at high load and velocity especially in unfilled G-E composite.

  4. Mechanical property and wear performance dependence on processing condition for cold-sprayed WC-(nanoWC-Co)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guan-Jun; Gao, Pei-Hu; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2015-03-01

    WC-(nanoWC-Co) with micro-WC reinforcing particles in nanoWC-Co cermet matrix was cold-sprayed by using WC-Co with bimodal sized WC particles (with both micro-sized WC particles and nano-sized WC particles). The effect of spray powder property and post-spray treatment on the mechanical properties and wear performance of cold-sprayed WC-(nanoWC-Co) coating were examined in comparison to the conventional high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC-Co coating. Results showed that both hardness and toughness were influenced by the spray powder properties and the post-spray heat treatment. Compared to the HVOF-sprayed WC-Co coating with micro-sized WC particles, WC-(nanoWC-Co) exhibited much higher hardness and toughness and thereby much higher wear resistance. The further toughening of WC-(nanoWC-Co) by post-spray heat treatment significantly doubled the wear performance. The excellent wear resistance of WC-(nanoWC-Co) is attributed to the simultaneous strengthening and toughening effects resulting from the microstructure design of bimodal WC particle size distribution composed of both micro-sized and nano-sized WC particles.

  5. MECHANISMS OF CUTTING BLADE WEAR AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CUTTING ABILITY OF THE TOOL DURING MACHINING OF SPECIAL ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Zlámal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With increased requirements for quality and shelf life of machined parts there is also a higher share of the use of material with specific properties that are identified by the term “superalloys”. These materials differ from common steels by mechanical and physical properties that cause their worse machinability. During machining of “superalloys” worse machinability has negative influence primarily on the amount of cutting edge wear, which shortens durability of the cutting tool. The goal of experimental activity shown in this contribution is to determine individual mechanisms of the cutting edge wear and their effects on the cutting ability during high speed machining of nickel superalloy. A specific exchangeable cutting insert made from cubic boric nitride was used for machining of the 625 material according to ASM 5666F. The criteria to evaluate cutting ability and durability of the cutting tool became selected parameters of surface integrity and quality of the machined surface.

  6. Mechanical And Microstructural Evaluation Of A Wear Resistant Steel; Avaliacao mecanica e microestrutural de um aco resistente ao desgaste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, F.L.F. dos; Vieira, A.G.; Correa, E.C.S.; Pinheiro, I.P., E-mail: falletti@hotmail.co [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    In the present work, the analysis of the mechanical properties and the microstructural features of a high strength low alloy steel, containing chromium, molybdenum and boron, subjected to different heat treatments, was conducted. After austenitizing at 910 deg C for 10 minutes, three operations were carried out: oil quenching, oil quenching followed by tempering at 200 deg C for 120 minutes and austempering at 400 deg C for 5 minutes followed by water cooling. The analysis was performed through tensile and hardness tests, optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The bainitic structure led to high strength and toughness, both essential mechanical properties for wear resistant steels. The occurrence of allotriomorphic ferrite and retained austenite in the samples also increased the wear resistance. This phenomenon is related to the fact that both structures are able to be deformed and, in the case of the retained austenite, the transformation induced plasticity TRIP effect may take place as the material is used. (author)

  7. Formation of nano-laminated structures in a dry sliding wear-induced layer under different wear mechanisms of 20CrNi2Mo steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Cun-hong; Liang, Yi-long; Jiang, Yun; Yang, Ming; Long, Shao-lei

    2017-11-01

    The microstructures of 20CrNi2Mo steel underneath the contact surface were examined after dry sliding. Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and an ultra-micro-hardness tester were used to characterize the worn surface and dry sliding wear-induced layer. Martensite laths were ultra-refined due to cumulative strains and a large strain gradient that occurred during cyclic loading in wear near the surface. The microstructure evolution in dominant abrasive wear differs from that in adhesive wear. In dominant abrasive wear, only bent martensite laths with high-density deformation dislocations were observed. In contrast, in dominant adhesive wear, gradient structures were formed along the depth from the wear surface. Cross-sectional TEM foils were prepared in a focused ion beam (FIB) to observe the gradient structures in a dry sliding wear-induced layer at depths of approximately 1-5 μm and 5-20 μm. The gradient structures contained nano-laminated structures with an average thickness of 30-50 nm and bent martensite laths. We found that the original martensite laths coordinated with the strain energy and provided origin boundaries for the formation of gradient structures. Geometrically necessary boundaries (GNBs) and isolated dislocation boundaries (IDBs) play important roles in forming the nano-laminated structures.

  8. Experimental study on friction and wear behaviour of amorphous carbon coatings for mechanical seals in cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianlei; Jia, Qian; Yuan, Xiaoyang; Wang, Shaopeng

    2012-10-01

    The service life and the reliability of contact mechanical seal are directly affected by the wear of seal pairs (rotor vs. stator), especially under the cryogenic environment in liquid rocket engine turbopumps. Because of the lower friction and wear rate, amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings are the promising protective coatings of the seal pairs for contact mechanical seal. In this paper, a-C coatings were deposited on 9Cr18 by pulsed DC magnetron sputtering. The tribological performances of the specimen were tested under three sealed fluid conditions (air, water and liquid nitrogen). The results show that the coatings could endure the cryogenic temperature while the friction coefficients decrease with the increased contact load. Under the same contact condition, the friction coefficient of the a-C coatings in liquid nitrogen is higher than that in water and that they are in air. The friction coefficients of the a-C coatings in liquid nitrogen range from 0.10 to 0.15. In the cryogenic environment, the coatings remain their low specific wear rates (0.9 × 10-6 to 1.8 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1). The results provide an important reference for designing a water lubricated bearing or a contact mechanical seal under the cryogenic environment that is both reliable and has longevity.

  9. Development of a new inexpensive green thermoplastic composite and evaluation of its physico-mechanical and wear properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, Murtuza Ali; Syed, Akheel Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Turmeric spent (TS) incorporated polypropylene (PP) green composites were fabricated. ► Addition of TS into PP matrix improved tensile modulus and flexural properties of composites. ► The water absorption characteristics of composites were determined. ► Wear volume loss and specific wear rate as a function of abrading distance and load were determined. ► Surface morphology of composites was examined using scanning electron microscope. -- Abstract: In the present study an attempt has been made to use turmeric spent (TS) as reinforcing filler to fabricate polypropylene (PP) green composite for load bearing and tribological applications. PP/TS composites were fabricated using varying amounts of TS viz, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% (w/w) by twin screw extrusion method. The fabricated PP green composites were evaluated for physico-mechanical and tribological properties. Experimentally obtained tensile values were compared with theoretically predicted values using different theoretical models. Tensile modulus of composites increased from 1041 to 1771 MPa with the increase in filler addition from 0 to 40 wt.%. Flexural strength and flexural modulus of composites were improved after incorporation of TS into PP matrix. The water absorption characteristics of composites were determined. The effect of abrading distances viz., 150, 300, 450, and 600 m and different loads of 23.54 and 33.54 N at 200 rpm on the abrasive wear behaviour were studied using dry sand/rubber wheel abrasive test rig. The TS filler lowered the abrasion resistance of PP/TS composites. The wear volume loss and specific wear rate as a function of abrading distance and load were determined. The surface morphology of tensile fractured green composites and their worn surface features were examined under scanning electron microscope.

  10. Sliding wear of cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engqvist, H.; Ederyd, S.; Uhrenius, B.; Hogmark, S.

    2001-01-01

    Cemented carbides are known to be very hard and wear resistant and are therefor often used in applications involving surface damage and wear. The wear rate of cemented carbides is often measured in abrasion. In such tests it has been shown that the wear rate is inversely dependent on the material hardness. The sliding wear is even more of a surface phenomenon than a abrasion, making it difficult to predict friction and wear from bulk properties. This paper concentrates on the sliding wear of cemented carbides and elucidates some wear mechanisms. It is especially shown that a fragmenting wear mechanism of WC is very important for the description of wear of cemented carbides. (author)

  11. Atom Probe Tomography Unveils Formation Mechanisms of Wear-Protective Tribofilms by ZDDP, Ionic Liquid, and Their Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Zhou, Yan; Sang, Xiahan; Leonard, Donovan N; Qu, Jun; Poplawsky, Jonathan D

    2017-07-12

    The development of advanced lubricant additives has been a critical component in paving the way for increasing energy efficiency and durability for numerous industry applications. However, the formation mechanisms of additive-induced protective tribofilms are not yet fully understood because of the complex chemomechanical interactions at the contact interface and the limited spatial resolution of many characterizing techniques currently used. Here, the tribofilms on a gray cast iron surface formed by three antiwear additives are systematically studied; a phosphonium-phosphate ionic liquid (IL), a zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), and an IL+ZDDP combination. All three additives provide excellent wear protection, with the IL+ZDDP combination exhibiting a synergetic effect, resulting in further reduced friction and wear. Atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to interrogate the subnm chemistry and bonding states for each of the tribofilms of interest. The IL tribofilm appeared amorphous and was Fe, P, and O rich. Wear debris particles having an Fe-rich core and an oxide shell were present in this tribofilm and a transitional oxide (Fe 2 O 3 )-containing layer was identified at the interface between the tribofilm and the cast iron substrate. The ZDDP+IL tribofilm shared some of the characteristics found in the IL and ZDDP tribofilms. Tribofilm formation mechanisms are proposed on the basis of the observations made at the atomic level.

  12. Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene: Influence of the Chemical, Physical and Mechanical Properties on the Wear Behavior. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierangiola Bracco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE is the most common bearing material in total joint arthroplasty due to its unique combination of superior mechanical properties and wear resistance over other polymers. A great deal of research in recent decades has focused on further improving its performances, in order to provide durable implants in young and active patients. From “historical”, gamma-air sterilized polyethylenes, to the so-called first and second generation of highly crosslinked materials, a variety of different formulations have progressively appeared in the market. This paper reviews the structure–properties relationship of these materials, with a particular emphasis on the in vitro and in vivo wear performances, through an analysis of the existing literature.

  13. Forecast of reliability for mechanical components subjected to wearing; Pronostico de la fiabilidad de componentes mecanicos sometidos a desgaste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo-Zevallos, J.; Castellote-Varona, C.; Alanbari, M.

    2010-07-01

    Generally, improving quality and price of products, obtaining a complete customer satisfaction and achieving excellence in all the processes are some of the challenges currently set up by every company. To do this, knowing frequently the reliability of some component is necessary. To achieve this goal, a research, that contributes with clear ideas and offers a methodology for the assessment of the parameters involved in the reliability calculation, becomes necessary. A parameter closely related to this concept is the probability of product failure depending on the operating time. It is known that mechanical components fail by: creep, fatigue, wear, corrosion, etc. This article proposes a methodology for finding the reliability of a component subject to wear, such as brake pads, grinding wheels, brake linings of clutch discs, etc. (Author)

  14. Tooth wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tušek Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth wear is the loss of dental hard tissue that was not caused by decay and represents a common clinical problem of modern man. In the etiology of dental hard tissue lesions there are three dominant mechanisms that may act synergistically or separately:friction (friction, which is caused by abrasion of exogenous, or attrition of endogenous origin, chemical dissolution of dental hard tissues caused by erosion, occlusal stress created by compression and flexion and tension that leads to tooth abfraction and microfracture. Wear of tooth surfaces due to the presence of microscopic imperfections of tooth surfaces is clinically manifested as sanding veneers. Tribology, as an interdisciplinary study of the mechanisms of friction, wear and lubrication at the ultrastructural level, has defined a universal model according to which the etiopathogenesis of tooth wear is caused by the following factors: health and diseases of the digestive tract, oral hygiene, eating habits, poor oral habits, bruxism, temporomandibular disorders and iatrogenic factors. Attrition and dental erosion are much more common in children with special needs (Down syndrome. Erosion of teeth usually results from diseases of the digestive tract that lead to gastroesophageal reflux (GER of gastric juice (HCl. There are two basic approaches to the assessment of the degree of wear and dental erosion. Depending on the type of wear (erosion, attrition, abfraction, the amount of calcium that was realised during the erosive attack could be determined qualitatively and quantitatively, or changes in optical properties and hardness of enamel could be recorded, too. Abrasion of teeth (abrasio dentium is the loss of dental hard tissue caused by friction between the teeth and exogenous foreign substance. It is most commonly provoked by prosthetic dentures and bad habits, while its effect depends on the size of abrasive particles and their amount, abrasive particle hardness and hardness of tooth

  15. Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Tim W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-01-04

    A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

  16. Thermal conductivity of metal-metal microlaminate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, M. C.; Doerr, H. J.; Deshpandey, C. V.; Bunshah, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Microlaminate composites consisting of alternate layers of metal-metal, metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic exhibit anisotropy in thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity in the direction perpendicular to the laminate plane is significantly lower than in the plane of the laminate. Results of the study on thermal conductivity of Ni-NiCoCrAlY and Ti-CoCrAlY microlaminate composites are presented. A semi-quantitative model explaining the thermal conductivity variation in the above systems as a function of number of layers is discussed. An expression correlating the experimental data with the calculated data for the above system is presented.

  17. Comparison of Polyethylene Wear before and after Hip Revision with Liner Exchange Fixed with the Original Locking Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinfeng Gu

    Full Text Available To compare the wear of conventional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (CUHMWPE and highly cross-linked polyethylene (HCLPE in hip revision with liner exchange fixed with original locking mechanism using analysis of history medical data.From Jan. 1, 2000, to Dec. 31, 2007, 26 patients (with 29 involved hips underwent liner exchange revision fixed with the original locking mechanism due to wear of CUHMWPE and/or osteolysis. The mean age was 53 ± 9 years at the time of the primary total hip arthroplasty (THA and 64 ± 9 years at the revision. The exchanged liners (Marathon, Depuy were made of HCLPE. Annual X-rays were used to measure linear wear and osteolysis. The annual linear penetration was measured using PolyWare® software (Draftware Inc.. Annual Harris Hip Scores(HSS were recorded.The mean follow-up time between the primary and revision THAs was 11 ± 2 years and 8 ± 2 years after revision. The mean Harris Hip Score(HHS before primary THA, 1 year after primary THA, before revision and 1 year after revision was 43±5, 85±5, 71±6, 83±7 individually. The mean penetration of the CUHMWPE and HCLPE liners occurring in the first year were 0.44 ± 0.28 mm and 0.38 ± 0.14 mm, respectively (p = 0.211. The mean annual linear penetration of CUHMWPE and HCLPE from the second year onward were 0.29±0.09 mm and 0.08 ± 0.03 mm respectively (p <0.01. All THAs with CUHMWPE showed osteolysis on acetabular and/or femoral side before revision. No HCLPE liner showed osteolysis at the last follow-up. Conclusion: The CUHMWPE liner had a significantly higher wear rate than did the HCLPE liner. The HCLPE liner showed a satisfactory liner penetration rate after revision with isolated liner exchange fixed with the original locking mechanism.

  18. Investigations on Wear Mechanisms of PVD Coatings on Carbides and Sialons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staszuk M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results on the wear resistance of PVD coatings on cutting inserts made from sintered carbide and sialon ceramics. The exploitative properties of coatings in technological cutting trials were defined in the paper, which also examined the adhesion of coatings to the substrate, the thickness of the coating, and the microhardness. As a result, it was found that isomorphic coating with AlN-h phase of covalent interatomic bonds exhibits much better adhesion to the sialon substrate than isomorphic coating with titanium nitride TiN. These coatings assure the high wear resistance of the coated tools, and the high adhesion combined with the high microhardness and fine-grained structure assure an increase in the exploitative life of the coated tools. In the case of coatings on substrate made from sintered carbide, there was a significant influence on the properties of the tools coated with them as concerns the existence of the diffusion zone between the substrate and the coating.

  19. An Evaluation of High Velocity Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Stachowiak (Ed.), Wear: Materials, Mechanisms and Practice. Chichester, England: John Wiley and Sons. 10. Hooser, M. (2007). Rail dimensions...NV, 10-13 Jan 2000. , AIAA 2000-0155 13. Hutchings, I. M. (2005). The Challenge of Wear. In G. W. Stachowiak (Ed.), Wear: Materials, Mechanisms and...Kato, K. (2005). Classification of Wear Mechanisms/Models. In G. W. Stachowiak (Ed.), Wear: Materials, mechanisms and practice. Chichester, England

  20. Chemically Derived Dense Alumina-Zirconia Composites for Improved Mechanical and Wear Erosion Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    As a result of this funded project high purity Zirconia-Toughened Alumina (ZTA) ceramic powders with and without yttria were produced using metal alkoxide precursors. ZTA ceramic powders with varying volume percents of zirconia were prepared (7, 15, and 22%). Aluminum tri-sec butoxide, zirconium propoxide, and yttrium isopropoxide were the reagents used. Synthesis conditions were varied to control the hydrolysis and the aging conditions for the sol to gel transition. FTIR analysis and rheological characterization were used to follow the structural evolution during the sol to gel transition. The greater extent of hydrolysis and the build-up of structure measured from viscoelastic properties were consistent. Heat treatment was conducted to produce submicron grain fully crystalline ZTA ceramic powders. This improved materials should have enhanced properties such strength, toughness, and wear resistance for advanced structural applications, for example engine components in high technology aerospace applications.

  1. Laboratory mechanical parameters of composite resins and their relation to fractures and wear in clinical trials-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Siegward D; Ilie, Nicoleta; Hickel, Reinhard; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro; Rousson, Valentin

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate a range of mechanical parameters of composite resins and compare the data to the frequency of fractures and wear in clinical studies. Based on a search of PubMed and SCOPUS, clinical studies on posterior composite restorations were investigated with regard to bias by two independent reviewers using Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias in randomized trials. The target variables were chipping and/or fracture, loss of anatomical form (wear) and a combination of both (summary clinical index). These outcomes were modelled by time and material in a linear mixed effect model including random study and experiment effects. The laboratory data from one test institute were used: flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength, and fracture toughness (all after 24-h storage in distilled water). For some materials flexural strength data after aging in water/saliva/ethanol were available. Besides calculating correlations between clinical and laboratory outcomes, we explored whether a model including a laboratory predictor dichotomized at a cut-off value better predicted a clinical outcome than a linear model. A total of 74 clinical experiments from 45 studies were included involving 31 materials for which laboratory data were also available. A weak positive correlation between fracture toughness and clinical fractures was found (Spearman rho=0.34, p=0.11) in addition to a moderate and statistically significant correlation between flexural strength and clinical wear (Spearman rho=0.46, p=0.01). When excluding those studies with "high" risk of bias (n=18), the correlations were generally weaker with no statistically significant correlation. For aging in ethanol, a very strong correlation was found between flexural strength decrease and clinical index, but this finding was based on only 7 materials (Spearman rho=0.96, p=0.0001). Prediction was not consistently improved with cutoff values. Correlations between clinical and laboratory

  2. Effect of deep cryogenic treatment and tempering on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of a wear-resistant austempered alloyed bainitic ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liqing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of deep cryogenic treatment in combination with conven- tional heat treatment process was investigated on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of alloyed bainitic ductile iron. Three processing schedules were employed to treat this alloyed ductile iron including direct tempering treatment, tempering.+deep cryogenic treatment and deep cryogenic treatment.+tempering treatments. The microstructure and mechanical behavior, especially the wear resistance, have been evaluated after treated by these three schedules. The results show that martensite microstructure can be obviously refined and the precipitation of dispersed carbides is promoted by deep cryogenic treatment at .−196 ∘C for 3 h after tempered at 450 ∘C for 2 h. In this case, the alloyed bainitic ductile iron possesses rather high hardness and wear-resistance than those processed by other two schedules. The main wear mechanism of the austempered alloyed ductile iron with deep cryogenic treatment and tempering is micro-cutting wear in association with plastic deformation wear.

  3. Bipolarons in metal-metal halide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fois, E.S.; Selloni, A.; Parrinello, M.; Car, R.

    1988-06-02

    A novel molecular dynamics method is used to follow the adiabatic dynamics of two electrons solvated in molten KCl. The electrons are treated quantum mechanically within the local spin density approximation. A coupled set of Newtonian and time-dependent Schroedinger-like equations is used to describe the evolution of the ions and of the Kohn-Sham orbitals. The authors find that parallel spin electrons repel each other and form separate F-center-like states. Antiparallel spin electrons, instead, attract each other and coalesce into a single bipolaronic complex. The electrons sit mostly in an ionic cavity which is surrounded by cations. The diffusion of the bipolaron, while bound, occurs on an ionic time scale. However, dissociation processes occur during which the electrons can acquire a high mobility leading on average to a large electronic diffusion.

  4. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion-Abrasion Wear Behavior of Low-Alloy MnSiCrB Cast Steels Containing Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kaishuang; Bai, Bingzhe

    2011-01-01

    Two medium carbon low-alloy MnSiCrB cast steels containing different Cu contents (0.01 wt pct and 0.62 wt pct) were designed, and the effect of Cu on the mechanical properties and corrosion-abrasion wear behavior of the cast steels was studied. The results showed that the low-alloy MnSiCrB cast steels obtained excellent hardenability by a cheap alloying scheme. The microstructure of the MnSiCrB cast steels after water quenching from 1123 K (850 °C) consists of lath martensite and retained austenite. After tempering at 503 K (230 °C), carbides precipitated, and the hardness of the cast steels reached 51 to 52 HRC. The addition of Cu was detrimental to the ductility and impact toughness but was beneficial to the wear resistance in a corrosion-abrasion wear test. The MnSiCrB cast steel with Cu by the simple alloying scheme and heat treatment has the advantages of being high performance, low cost, and environmentally friendly. It is a potential, advanced wear-resistant cast steel for corrosion-abrasion wear conditions.

  5. Effects of the different frequencies and loads of ultrasonic surface rolling on surface mechanical properties and fretting wear resistance of HIP Ti–6Al–4V alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G., E-mail: ligang_scut@outlook.com; Qu, S.G., E-mail: qusg@scut.edu.cn; Pan, Y.X.; Li, X.Q.

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Effects of MUSR frequency and load on surface properties of HIP Ti-6Al-4V investigated. • The grains in surface-modified layer were refined and appeared twins and many dense dislocations. • The hardened layer depth and surface residual stress of MUSR- treated samples were significantly improved. • MUSR- treated samples showed the good fretting friction and wear resistance. • The best microstructure and properties of surface-modified layer obtained by sample treated by 30 kHz and 900 N. - Abstract: The main purpose of this paper was to investigate the effects of the different frequencies and loads of multi-pass ultrasonic surface rolling (MUSR) on surface layer mechanical properties, microstructure and fretting friction and wear characteristics of HIP (hot isostatic pressing) Ti–6Al–4 V alloy. Some microscopic analysis methods (SEM, TEM and EDS) were used to characterize the modified surface layer of material after MUSR treatment. The results indicated that the material in sample surface layer experienced a certain extent plastic deformation, and accompanied by some dense dislocations and twins generation. Moreover surface microhardness and residual stress of samples treated by MUSR were also greatly improved compared with the untreated. The fretting friction and wear properties of samples treated by MUSR in different conditions are tested at 10 and 15 N in dry friction conditions. It could be found that friction coefficient and wear volume loss were significantly declined in the optimal result. The main wear mechanism of MUSR-treated samples included abrasive wear, adhesion and spalling.

  6. "Wearing My Spiritual Jacket": The Role of Spirituality as a Coping Mechanism among African American Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, LeConté J.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing evidence in the theoretical literature regarding the importance of religion and religiosity in people's lives, particularly concerning their health and well-being. Spirituality, a related but different concept, has been less well studied, especially empirically, but shows promise as a mechanism for coping with deleterious social…

  7. Tribo-Mechanical Properties of HVOF Deposited Fe3Al Coatings Reinforced with TiB2 Particles for Wear-Resistant Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Amiriyan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reveals the effect of TiB2 particles on the mechanical and tribological properties of Fe3Al-TiB2 composite coatings against an alumina counterpart. The feedstock was produced by milling Fe3Al and TiB2 powders in a high energy ball mill. The high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF technique was used to deposit the feedstock powder on a steel substrate. The effect of TiB2 addition on mechanical properties and dry sliding wear rates of the coatings at sliding speeds ranging from 0.04 to 0.8 m·s−1 and loads of 3, 5 and 7 N was studied. Coatings made from unreinforced Fe3Al exhibited a relatively high wear rate. The Vickers hardness, elastic modulus and wear resistance of the coatings increased with increasing TiB2 content in the Fe3Al matrix. The wear mechanisms strongly depended on the sliding speed and the presence of TiB2 particles but were less dependent on the applied load.

  8. Critical component wear in heavy duty engines

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, P A

    2011-01-01

    The critical parts of a heavy duty engine are theoretically designed for infinite life without mechanical fatigue failure. Yet the life of an engine is in reality determined by wear of the critical parts. Even if an engine is designed and built to have normal wear life, abnormal wear takes place either due to special working conditions or increased loading.  Understanding abnormal and normal wear enables the engineer to control the external conditions leading to premature wear, or to design the critical parts that have longer wear life and hence lower costs. The literature on wear phenomenon r

  9. Eye Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  10. [Wear intensity and surface roughness of microhybrid composite and ceramic occlusal veneers on premolars after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Y; Jiang, T; Cheng, M X; Zhang, Y W

    2018-02-18

    To evaluate the wear intensity and surface roughness of occlusal veneers on premolars made of microhybrid composite resin or two kinds of ceramics in vitro after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests. In the study,24 fresh extracted human premolars without root canal treatment were prepared (cusps reduction of 1.5 mm in thickness to simulate middle to severe tooth wear, the inclinations of cusps were 20°). The prepared teeth were restored with occlusal veneers made of three different materials: microhybrid composite, heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) lithium disilicate ceramic in the thickness of 1.5 mm. The occlusal veneers were cemented with resin cement. The specimens were fatigued using the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests after being stored in water for 72 h. The wear of specimens was measured using gypsum replicas and 3D laser scanner before and after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests and the mean lost distance (mm) was used to indicate the level of wear. The surfaces of occlusal contact area were observed and the surface roughness was recorded using 3D laser scanning confocal microscope before and after the fatigue test. Differences between the groups were compared using ONE-way ANOVA(Pmechanical loading tests. The mean wear of microhybrid composite group, heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic group, and CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic group was (-0.13±0.03) mm, (-0.05±0.01) mm and (-0.05±0.01) mm, the wear of microhybrid composite was significantly higher than the two ceramic groups(PCAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic (P=0.010). From the view of wear speed, microhybrid composite was significantly higher than the two kinds of ceramics, but it was similar to enamel when the opposing tooth was natural. The surface roughness before the themocycling and cyclic mechanical loading test of microhybrid composite was significantly

  11. Expecting ankle tilts and wearing an ankle brace influence joint control in an imitated ankle sprain mechanism during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Dominic; Wissler, Sabrina; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the functional aspects of ankle joint control is essential to developing effective injury prevention. It is of special interest to understand how neuromuscular control mechanisms and mechanical constraints stabilize the ankle joint. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine how expecting ankle tilts and the application of an ankle brace influence ankle joint control when imitating the ankle sprain mechanism during walking. Ankle kinematics and muscle activity were assessed in 17 healthy men. During gait rapid perturbations were applied using a trapdoor (tilting with 24° inversion and 15° plantarflexion). The subjects either knew that a perturbation would definitely occur (expected tilts) or there was only the possibility that a perturbation would occur (potential tilts). Both conditions were conducted with and without a semi-rigid ankle brace. Expecting perturbations led to an increased ankle eversion at foot contact, which was mediated by an altered muscle preactivation pattern. Moreover, the maximal inversion angle (-7%) and velocity (-4%), as well as the reactive muscle response were significantly reduced when the perturbation was expected. While wearing an ankle brace did not influence muscle preactivation nor the ankle kinematics before ground contact, it significantly reduced the maximal ankle inversion angle (-14%) and velocity (-11%) as well as reactive neuromuscular responses. The present findings reveal that expecting ankle inversion modifies neuromuscular joint control prior to landing. Although such motor control strategies are weaker in their magnitude compared with braces, they seem to assist ankle joint stabilization in a close-to-injury situation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Relevance of Orbital Interactions and Pauli Repulsion in the Metal-Metal Bond of Coinage Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Maria B; Nitsch, Jörn; Guerra, Célia Fonseca

    2018-03-05

    The importance of relativity and dispersion in metallophilicity has been discussed in numerous studies. The existence of hybridization in the bonding between closed shell d 10 -d 10 metal atoms has also been speculated, but the presence of attractive MO interaction in the metal-metal bond is still a matter of an ongoing debate. In this comparative study, a quantitative molecular orbital analysis and energy decomposition is carried out on the metallophilic interaction in atomic dimers (M + ···M + ) and molecular perpendicular [H 3 P-M-X] 2 (where M = Cu, Ag, and Au; X = F, Cl, Br, and I). Our computational studies prove that besides the commonly accepted dispersive interactions, orbital interactions and Pauli repulsion also play a crucial role in the strength and length of the metal-metal bond. Although for M + ···M + the orbital interaction is larger than the Pauli repulsion, leading to a net attractive MO interaction, the bonding mechanism in perpendicular [H 3 P-M-X] dimers is different due to the larger separation between the donor and acceptor orbitals. Thus, Pauli repulsion is much larger, and two-orbital, four-electron repulsion is dominant.

  13. Wear Micro-Mechanisms of Composite WC-Co/Cr - NiCrFeBSiC Coatings. Part I: Dry Sliding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kekes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the cermet fraction in cermet/ metal composite coatings developed by High-Velocity Oxyfuel Flame (HVOF spraying on their tribological behaviour was studied. Five series of coatings, each one containing different proportion of cermet-metal components, prepared by premixing commercially available feedstocks of NiCrFeBSiC metallic and WC-Co/Cr cermet powders were deposited on AISI 304 stainless steel substrate. The microstructure of as-sprayed coatings was characterized by partial decomposition of the WC particles, lamellar morphology and micro-porosity among the solidified splats. Tribological behavior was studied under sliding friction conditions using a Si3N4 ball as counterbody and the friction coefficient and volume loss were determined as a function of the cermet fraction. Microscopic examinations of the wear tracks and relevant cross sections identified the wear mechanisms involved. Coatings containing only the metallic phase were worn out through a combination of ploughing, micro-cracking and splat exfoliation, whilst those containing only the cermet phase primarily by micro-cracking at the individual splat scale. The wear mechanisms of the composite coatings were strongly affected by their randomly stratified structure. In-depth cracks almost perpendicular to the coating/ substrate interface occurring at the wear track boundaries resulted in cermet trans-splat fracture.

  14. An investigation into the mechanism of the polygonal wear of metro train wheels and its effect on the dynamic behaviour of a wheel/rail system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuesong; Wu, Lei; Fang, Jianying; Zhong, Shuoqiao; Ling, Liang

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation conducted into the mechanism of the polygonal wear of metro train wheels through extensive experiments conducted at the sites. The purpose of the experimental investigation is to determine from where the resonant frequency that causes the polygonal wear of the metro train wheels originates. The experiments include the model tests of a vehicle and its parts and the tracks, the dynamic behaviour test of the vehicle in operation and the observation test of the polygonal wear development of the wheels. The tracks tested include the viaducts and the tunnel tracks. The structure model tests show that the average passing frequency of a polygonal wheel is approximately close to the first bending resonant frequency of the wheelset that is found by the wheelset model test and verified by the finite element analysis of the wheelset. Also, the dynamic behaviour test of the vehicle in operation indicates the main frequencies of the vertical acceleration vibration of the axle boxes, which are dominant in the vertical acceleration vibration of the axle boxes and close to the passing frequency of a polygonal wheel, which shows that the first bending resonant frequency of the wheelset is very exciting in the wheelset operation. The observation test of the polygonal wear development of the wheels indicates an increase in the rate of the polygonal wear of the wheels after their re-profiling. This paper also describes the dynamic models used for the metro vehicle coupled with the ballasted track and the slab track to analyse the effect of the polygonal wear of the wheels on the wheel/rail normal forces.

  15. Comparative wear mapping techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, J.; Sørensen, Ole Toft; Jensen, S.

    1996-01-01

    Pin surfaces were analysed by laser profilometry. Two roughness parameters, R(a) and the fractal dimension, were investigated as a first step towards methods of quantitative wear mechanism mapping. Both parameters were analysed for their relationship to the severity and prevalence of a mechanism....

  16. Understanding the Effect of Ni on Mechanical and Wear Properties of Low-Carbon Steel from a View-Point of Electron Work Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Huang, Xiaochen; Hou, Runfang; Li, D. Y.

    2018-04-01

    Electron work function (EWF) is correlated to intrinsic properties of metallic materials and can be an alternative parameter to obtain supplementary clues for guiding material design and modification. A higher EWF corresponds to a more stable electronic state, leading to higher resistance to any attempt to change the material structure and properties. In this study, effects of Ni as a solute with a higher EWF on mechanical, electrochemical, and tribological properties of low-carbon steel were investigated. Added Ni, which has more valence electrons, enhanced the electrons-nuclei interaction in the steel, corresponding to higher EWF. As a result, the Ni-added steel showed increased mechanical strength and corrosion resistance, resulting in higher resistances to wear and corrosive wear. Mechanism for the improvements is elucidated through analyzing EWF-related variations in Young's modulus, hardness, corrosion potential, and tribological behavior.

  17. Consideration of Wear Rates at High Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    tionally, the texts by Bayer [3; 4], Rabinowicz [30], and Stachowiak [32] thoroughly cover the topic of wear mechanisms. A summary of the material is...Metals at High Sliding Speeds,” Wear, 44(1):109–125, August 1977. 32. Stachowiak , G. W. Wear - Materials, Mechanisms and Practice. Tribology in

  18. Influence of Plasma Transferred Arc Process Parameters on Structure and Mechanical Properties of Wear Resistive NiCrBSi-WC/Co Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitvydas GRUZDYS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-fluxing NiCrBSi and related coatings received considerable interest due to their good wear as well as corrosion resistance at moderate and elevated temperatures. Hard tungsten carbide (WC particles can be included in NiCrBSi for further increase of the coating hardness and abrasive wear resistance. Flame spray technique is widely used for fabrication of NiCrBSi films. However, in such a case, subsequent remelting of the deposited coatings by flame, arc discharge or high power laser beam is necessary. In present study NiCrBSi-WC/Co coatings were formed using plasma transferred arc process. By adjusting plasma parameters, such as current, plasma gas flow, shielding gas flow, a number of coatings were formed on steel substrates. Structure of the coatings was investigated using X-ray diffractometry. Microstructure of cross-sectioned coatings was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Hardness of the coating was evaluated by means of the Vickers hardness tests. Wear tests were also performed on specimens to determine resistance to abrasive wear. Acquired results allowed estimating the influence of the deposition process parameters on structure and mechanical properties of the coatings.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.2.482

  19. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  20. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy as a Valuable Tool to Investigate the Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene Wear Mechanisms and Debris in Hip Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappo, Henrique; Gindri, Izabelle M; Cubillos, Patrícia O; Maru, Marcia M; Salmoria, Gean V; Roesler, Carlos R M

    2018-01-01

    The use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) was investigated to understand the wear mechanisms from a metal-on-polyethylene bearing couple. Morphological features of femoral head acetabular liner, and isolated particles resulting from hip wear testing were evaluated. EDS was proposed to investigate the polymeric nature of the particles isolated from the wear testing. In this work, 28-mm conventional ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene acetabular liners paired with metallic heads were tested in a hip wear simulator over 2 million cycles. SEM-EDS was employed to investigate wear mechanisms on hip implant components and associated wear debris. SEM showed worn surfaces for both hip components, and a significant volume of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear particles resulting from hip wear testing. Particles were classified into 3 groups, which were then correlated to wear mechanisms. Group I had particles with smooth surfaces, group II consisted of particles with rough surfaces, and group III comprised aggregate-like particles. Group I EDS revealed that particles from groups I and II had a high C/O ratio raising a concern about the particle source. On the other hand, particles from group III had a low C/O ratio, supporting the hypothesis that they resulted from the wear of acetabular liner. Most of particles identified in group III were in the biologically active size range (0.3 to 20 μm). The use of optical and electron microscopy enabled the morphological characterization of worn surfaces and wear debris, while EDS was essential to elucidate the chemical composition of isolated debris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanical Wear and Lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McConnell, Bobby

    1962-01-01

    .... The basic principles of lubrication are presented with emphasis on the journal bearing. Common lubrication techniques are described with particular reference to the selection of lubricants according to their physical and chemical properties...

  2. Relationships of wear resistance to phase composition and mechanical properties of newly developed high-nitrogen iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannykh, O.A.; Blinov, V.M.; Kosytina, M.V.; Filippov, M.A.; Khadyev, M.S.; Nemirovskij, Yu.R.; Belozerova, T.A.

    2000-01-01

    Comparative tests for resistance against abrasive wear are performed using newly developed high-nitrogen (0.424-1.281 % N) chromium (14.93-23.85 % Cr) laboratory steel melts and commercial steel 110G13L. A layer-by-layer analysis of phase composition in the steels being tested are carried out in the direction from the surface into the base metal. The abrasive wear resistance of all steels is shown to be dependent on the development of martensitic transformation in the layer contacting with abrasive particles, as well as on the degree of strain hardening of the austenite of the layer. The laboratory steels after hardening and tempering in a wide temperature range essentially surpasses the steel 110G13L in wear resistance. The results obtained confirm the possibility of the use of high-nitrogen chromium steels as substitutes for steel 110G13L [ru

  3. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - ...

  4. Wear Analysis of Top Piston Ring to Reduce Top Ring Reversal Bore Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ilanthirayan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The piston rings are the most important part in engine which controls the lubricating oil consumption and blowby of the gases. The lubricating film of oil is provided to seal of gases towards crankcase and also to give smooth friction free translatory motion between rings and liner. Of the three rings present top ring is more crucial as it does the main work of restricting gases downwards the crankcase. Boundary lubrication is present at the Top dead centre (TDC and Bottom dead centre (BDC of the liner surface. In addition to this, top ring is exposed to high temperature gases which makes the oil present near the top ring to get evaporated and decreasing its viscosity, making metal-metal contact most of the time. Due to this at TDC, excess wear happens on the liner which is termed as Top ring reversal bore wear. The wear rate depends upon many parameters such as lubrication condition, viscosity index, contact type, normal forces acting on ring, geometry of ring face, surface roughness, material property. The present work explores the wear depth for different geometries of barrel ring using Finite Element model with the help of Archard wear law and the same is validated through experimentation. The study reveals that Asymmetric barrel rings have less contact pressure which in turn reduces the wear at Top dead centre.

  5. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3210 Section 888.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal (finger) joint...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3550 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3550 Section 888.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3550 Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a device...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3200 Section 888.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal or...

  8. A Rh III-N-heterocyclic carbene complex from metal-metal singly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metal-metal singly bonded [Rh2(CO)4(acac)2][OTf]2 (1) has been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. A density functional theory ... to each rhodium. This work demonstrates the general utility of the metal-metal bonded compounds for the easy synthesis of metal-NHC compounds.

  9. Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI: Influence of Austempering Temperature on Microstructure, Mechanical and Wear Properties and Energy Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhukumar Sellamuthu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alloyed Ductile iron, austenitized at 840 °C for 30 min in a special sealed austempering furnace, was austempered for 30 min in molten salt mixture at 4 trial temperatures of 300 °C, 320 °C, 340 °C and 360 °C. Tensile strength, yield strength, percentage elongation and impact energy were evaluated for the as-cast and austempered samples. Microstructures were investigated using microscopy, coupled with analyzing software and a scanning electron microscopy. The specific wear of samples was tested using pin-on-disc wear testing machine. X-ray diffraction was performed to calculate the amount of retained austenite present in the ausferrite matrix. As-cast microstructure consists of ferrite and pearlite, whereas austempered ductile iron (ADI contains a mixture of acicular ferrite and carbon enriched austenite, called “ausferrite”. Hardness and strength decreased, whereas ductility and impact strength improved with an increase in the austempering temperature. XRD analysis revealed that the increase in austempering temperature increased the retained austenite content. A decrease in wear resistance with austempering temperature was observed. Modified Quality Index (MQI values were envisaged, incorporating tensile strength, elongation and wear resistance. MQI for samples austempered at 340 °C and 360 °C showed a better combination of properties. About an 8% reduction in energy consumption was gained when the heat treatment parameters were optimized.

  10. Mechanism of Friction and Wear in MoS2 and ZDDP/F-PTFE Greases under Spectrum Loading Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujay D. Bagi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two different greases formulated using MoS2 and a combination of ZDDP and functionalized PTFE (F-PTFE were examined under spectrum loading conditions where loads, frequency, and duration of the steps were treated as variables. Combination of ZDDP and F-PTFE were synergistic resulting in a significant reduction in the wear and friction under spectrum loading condition. Decreasing the time step during the ramp up and ramp down cycles resulted in larger wear for the grease containing MoS2 particles in comparison to ZDDP/F-PTFE in grease. The tribofilm formed on the surface was analyzed using various characterization techniques like SEM, EDS, and Stereo Optical Microscopy. Tribofilms from MoS2 additives had extensive amounts of abrasive and adhesive wear and showed the formation of MoS2 on the surface on the other hand the tribofilms from ZDDP/F-PTFE had smaller amounts of severe wear and exhibited patchy tribofilms of Zn-phosphates as well as sulfides of Zn and Fe.

  11. Microstructure, mechanical and tribological characterization of CrN/DLC/Cr-DLC multilayer coating with improved adhesive wear resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xudong; Liu, Jinyu; Zhang, Shuaituo; Yang, Jun; Hao, Junying

    2018-05-01

    Adhesive wear is one of the major reasons for the failure of components during various tribological application, especially for rubbing with viscous materials. This study presents CrN/DLC/Cr-DLC multilayer composite coatings prepared on a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) device with the close field unbalanced magnetron sputtering ion plating (CFUBMSIP) technique. SEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the structure of multilayer coatings. It was found that the multilayer coatings are composed by the alternating CrN and DLC layers. Compared with the single CrN coatings, the friction coefficient of the CrN/DLC/Cr-DLC multilayer coating decreases about more than seven times after sliding a distance of 500 m. This helps to reduce the adhesive wear of multilayer coatings. Compared with the single CrN and DLC coating, the wear rate of the CrN/DLC/Cr-DLC multilayer coating is reduced by an order of magnitude to 7.10 × 10-17 (sliding with AISI 440C) and 2.64 × 10-17 (sliding with TC4) m3/(N m). The improved tribological performance of multilayer coatings mainly attributes to the introduction of lubricant DLC and hard support CrN layers, the enhancement of crack propagation inhibition, and the increment of elastic recovery value We (71.49%) by multilayer design method.

  12. The impact of uropygial gland secretions on mechanically induced wearing of barn owl and pigeon body feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Benjamin; Müsse, Annika; Wagner, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    Bird feathers are remarkable structures light but yet durable providing insulation and the ability of flight. Owls are highly specialized birds of prey, widely known for their ability to y silently which is enabled by (micro-) structural specializations of the feathers. The barn owl replaces feathers less frequently in comparison to other same sized birds like pigeons, indicating a much better resistance against material fatigue of these delicate microstructures. We used axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) of water drop contact angles as a non-destructive method of characterizing wearing processes in feathers. We hypothesized that feathers become more wettable when worn. We also investigated the impact of ethanol treatment in order to remove fatty residues of the uropygial gland secretions, barn owls and pigeons use for preening, on ageing processes. Ethanol treatment resulted in a slight, but significant increase of water repellency in barn owl but not in pigeon flight feathers. Our preliminary data also suggest that the uropygial gland secretions decelerate the wearing process of the feather keratin. We observed this effect in both species, however, it was more distinct for barn owl uropygial gland secretions. The results of this study, obtained by contact angle measurements used as a non-destructive evaluation method of material fatigue, yield insights into the material fatigue of feathers and the decelerating effect of uropygial gland secretions on wear on the other hand.

  13. Friction & Wear Under Very High Electromagnetic Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cowan, Richard S; Danyluk, Steven; Moon, Francis; Ford, J. C; Brenner, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    This document summarizes initial progress toward advancing the fundamental understanding of the friction, wear and mechanics of interfaces subjected to extreme electromagnetic stress, high relative...

  14. Corrosion and wear behavior of Ni60CuMoW coatings fabricated by combination of laser cladding and mechanical vibration processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongxi, E-mail: piiiliuhx@sina.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Xu, Qian [Faculty of Adult Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650051 (China); Wang, Chuanqi; Zhang, Xiaowei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2015-02-05

    Highlights: • Ni60CuMoW coatings were fabricated by mechanical vibration assisted laser cladding hybrid process. • The maximum micro-hardness of the coating with mechanical vibration increases by 16%. • The mass loss and friction coefficient of the coating decreases by 17% and 16%, respectively. • The E{sub corr} positive shifts 1134.9 mV and i{sub corr} decreases by nearly one order of magnitude. • The ideal vibration parameters is vibration frequency 200 Hz and vibration amplitude 140 μm. - Abstract: Ni60CuMoW composite coatings were fabricated on 45 medium carbon steel using mechanical vibration assisted laser cladding surface modification processing. The microstructure, element distribution, phase composition, microhardness, wear and corrosion resistance of cladding coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS), hardness tester, friction and wear apparatus and electrochemical workstation. The results indicate that the microstructure of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} or (Fe, Ni){sub 23}C{sub 6}) carbide dispersion strengthening phase is uniformly distributed in eutectic (Ni, Fe) phase. The in-situ BCr and MoC compounds distribute in lamellar structure Fe{sub 3}B and dendrite Fe{sub 3}Ni{sub 3}Si, and some new W{sub 2}C phases also generated in Ni60CuMoW coating. In addition, the coarse dendrite has been replaced by some fine grain structure at the bonding interface. The fine grain hard phase makes the average microhardness of cladding coating increase from 720 to 835 HV{sub 0.5}. Under the condition of 200 Hz mechanical vibration frequency, the wear mass loss and friction coefficient of Ni60CuMoW coating are 7.6 mg and 0.068, 17% and 16% lower than the coating without mechanical vibration, respectively. The corrosion potential of cladding coating with mechanical vibration increases by 1134.9 mV and the corrosion current density decreases by nearly one order of

  15. Mechanical Properties and Wear Behavior of AA5182/WC Nanocomposite Fabricated by Friction Stir Welding at Different Tool Traverse Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paidar, Moslem; Asgari, Ali; Ojo, Olatunji Oladimeji; Saberi, Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Grain growth inhibition at the heat-affected zone, improved weld strength and superior tribological properties of welds are desirable attributes of modern manufacturing. With the focused on these attributes, tungsten carbide (WC) nanoparticles were employed as reinforcements for the friction stir welding of 5-mm-thick AA5182 aluminum alloy by varying tool traverse speeds. The microstructure, microhardness, ultimate tensile strength, fracture and wear behavior of the resultant WC-reinforced welds were investigated, while unreinforced AA5182 welds were employed as controls for the study. The result shows that the addition of WC nanoparticles causes substantial grain refinement within the weld nugget. A decrease in traverse speed caused additional particle fragmentation, improved hardness value and enhanced weld strength in the reinforced welds. Improved wear rate and friction coefficient of welds were attained at a reduced traverse speed of 100 mm/min in the WC-reinforced welds. This improvement is attributed to the effects of reduced grain size/grain fragmentation and homogeneous dispersion of WC nanoparticles within the WC-reinforced weld nugget.

  16. Tribo-Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotubes: Friction and Wear Behavior of CNT-Reinforced Nickel Matrix Composites and CNT-Coated Bulk Nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leander Reinert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nickel matrix composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes (CNTs are compared to unreinforced CNT-coated (by drop-casting bulk nickel samples in terms of their friction and wear behavior, thus gaining significant knowledge regarding the tribological influence of CNTs and the underlying tribo-mechanism. It has been shown that the frictional behavior is mainly influenced by the CNTs present in the contact zone, as just minor differences in the coefficient of friction between the examined samples can be observed during run-in. Consequently, the known effect of a refined microstructure, thus leading to an increased hardness of the CNT reinforced samples, seems to play a minor role in friction reduction compared to the solid lubrication effect induced by the CNTs. Additionally, a continuous supply of CNTs to the tribo-contact can be considered isolated for the reinforced composites, which provides a long-term friction reduction compared to the CNT-coated sample. Finally, it can be stated that CNTs can withstand the accumulated stress retaining to some extent their structural state for the given strain. A comprehensive study performed by complementary analytical methods is employed, including Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to understand the involved friction and wear mechanisms.

  17. Synthesis, Characterization, and Ultrafast Dynamics of Metal, Metal Oxide, and Semiconductor Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Damon Andreas

    2013-01-01

    SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND ULTRAFAST DYNAMICS OF METAL, METAL OXIDE, AND SEMICONDUCTOR NANOMATERIALSABSTRACTThe optical properties of each of the three main classes of inorganic nanomaterials, metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors differ greatly due to the intrinsically different nature of the materials. These optical properties are among the most fascinating and useful aspects of nanomaterials with applications spanning cancer treatment, sensors, lasers, and solar cells. One techn...

  18. Non-contact evaluation of mechanical properties of electroplated wear resistant Ni-P layer from the velocity dispersion of laser SAW; Laser reiki Rayleigh ha no sokudo bunsan wo mochiita taimamo Ni-P mekkiso tokusei no hisesshoku hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Y.; Cho, H.; Takemoto, M. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Nakayama, T. [Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1996-11-01

    We developed a new laser surface acoustic wave (SAW) system and applied this to estimate the mechanical properties of the wear-resistant Ni-P layer electroplated on a stainless steel. The velocity dispersions of Rayleigh wave of the as -plated and heat-treated Ni-P layer were obtained by the one point time domain signal processing. The Ni-P layers with excellent wear resistance produced by the heated treatment higher than 725K were found to show higher Rayleigh velocities than that of the substrate steel, while the Ni-P layer with poor wear resistance showed lower velocities. Young`s moduli of the Ni-P layer, estimated so as the computed velocity dispersion agreed with the measured one, increased with the increase of wear resistance. 10 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Vertically aligned TiO2 nanorods-woven carbon fiber for reinforcement of both mechanical and anti-wear properties in resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jie; Zhang, Chao; Luo, Dan; Cui, Yali; Li, Hejun; Lu, Zhaoqing; Huang, Jianfeng

    2018-03-01

    A series of TiO2 nanorods were successfully grown on woven carbon fiber by hydrothermal method to reinforce the resin composite. The TiO2 nanorods improved the mechanical interlocking among woven carbon fibers and resin matrix, resulting in better fibers/resin interfacial bonding. Compared with desized-woven carbon fiber, the uniform TiO2 nanorods array resulted in an improvement of 84.3% and 73.9% in the tensile and flexural strength of the composite. However, the disorderly TiO2 nanorods on woven carbon fiber leaded to an insignificant promotion of the mechanical strength. The enhanced performance of well-proportioned TiO2 nanorods-woven carbon fiber was also reflected in the nearly 56% decrease of wear rate, comparing to traditional woven carbon fiber reinforced composite.

  20. Influence of Al2O3 Particle Size on Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Abrasive Wear Behavior of Flame-Sprayed and Remelted NiCrBSi Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, K. A.; Cano, D. L.; Caudet, C. T.; Damra, M. S.; Cervera, I.; Bellés, J.; Ortells, P.

    2017-04-01

    The influence of micrometric alumina (low surface area-to-volume ratio) and nanometric alumina (high surface area-to-volume ratio) on microstructure, hardness and abrasive wear of a NiCrBSi hardfacing alloy coating applied to an AISI 304 substrate using flame spraying (FS) combined with surface flame melting (SFM) is studied. Remelting after spraying improved the mechanical and tribological properties of the coatings. Microstructural characterization using XRD, SEM and EDS indicated that alumina additions produced similar phases (NiSi, Ni3B, CrC and Ni31Si12) regardless of the alumina size, but the phases differed in morphology, size distribution and relative proportions from one coating to another. The addition of 12 wt.% nanometric Al2O3 increased the phases concentration more than five- to sixfold and reduced the hard phases size about four-to threefold compared with NiCrBSi + 12 wt.% micrometric Al2O3. Nanoalumina led to reduced mass loss during abrasive wear compared to micrometric alumina and greater improvement in hardness.

  1. Nanoscale friction and wear maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Nikhil S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-04-28

    Friction and wear are part and parcel of all walks of life, and for interfaces that are in close or near contact, tribology and mechanics are supremely important. They can critically influence the efficient functioning of devices and components. Nanoscale friction force follows a complex nonlinear dependence on multiple, often interdependent, interfacial and material properties. Various studies indicate that nanoscale devices may behave in ways that cannot be predicted from their larger counterparts. Nanoscale friction and wear mapping can help identify some 'sweet spots' that would give ultralow friction and near-zero wear. Mapping nanoscale friction and wear as a function of operating conditions and interface properties is a valuable tool and has the potential to impact the very way in which we design and select materials for nanotechnology applications.

  2. Wear behaviour of Al 261

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mathan Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Al 2618 matrix material was mixed with the Silicon Nitride (Si3N4, Aluminium Nitride (AlN and Zirconium Boride (ZrB2 reinforced particles. AMC was synthesized successfully by the stir casting method with the various X-wt.% of reinforcements (X = 0,2,4,6,8. Tribological behaviour was studied in this composite with various temperature conditions. The working conditions were Temperature (°C, Load (N, Velocity (m/s and Sliding Distances (m. Before wear testing the mechanical behaviour has been analysed. EDAX was confirmed by the matrix material composition. The Al 2618 alloy and the reinforcement mixers were confirmed by the X-ray Diffraction analysis. Wear rate (mm3/m, Wear resistance (m/mm3, Specific Wear rate (m/Nm and Co-efficient of friction (μ were analysed with various conditions. The worn surfaces were analysed before and after wear testing by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Influence of process parameters and Percentage of contribution were analysed by Taguchi and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA methods. Genetic Algorithm (GA was adopted for optimizing the best and mean of the wear rate and to identify the exact influence of input parameters.

  3. Investigation of corrosion and wear mechanisms in hard material-reinforced duplex steel coatings; Untersuchungen zum Korrosions- und Verschleissverhalten von hartstoffverstaerkten `Duplex`-Schutzschichten. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouaifi, B. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Schweisstechnik und Trennende Fertigungsverfahren; Goellner, J. [Technische Univ. Magdeburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik und Werkstoffpruefung

    1998-09-30

    The hard-material reinforced duplex steel coatings were deposited by plasma arc two-powder surfacing. By varying the angle of the hard materials feeding process, the deposition of the carbides was optimized so that they are deposited into the matrix in the trailing zone of the welding torch under conditions of very low thermal effects near the freezing point of the weld pool. Microstructural studies revealed that the deposition of the hard materials prevents devlopment of the typical, ferritic-austenitic microstructure of duplex steels. Due to a dissolution and diffusion process, the microstructure of the matrix takes up carbon and chromium or tungsten, depending on the carbide, thus enhancing the austenitic material in the microstructure. The wear behaviour of the surface deposits was found to be very good, wear being reduced by a factor of 6, irrespective of the type of carbide. The friction-affected surfaces showed no dissolving effects or cracking. The corrosion behaviour in sulfuric acid is also good. The welded deposits exhibited the typical behaviour of a passive material. Wear mechanisms slightly reduce the resistance. The behaviour of various specimens in artificial seawater could be distinctly assessed. Small grain fractions and pre-heating temperatures of 100 C have a beneficial effect on the corrosion resistance. The technique recommends itself for applications such as coatings for baffle plates used in flue gas desulfurisation, pipes, pump components, flanges or nozzles, or for recurrent coating of system components affected by abrasive corrosion. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Zur Herstellung hartstoffverstaerkter Duplex-Beschichtungen wurde das Plasma-Zwei-Pulver-Auftragschweissverfahren verwendet. Hierbei wurde durch Variation des Zufuhrwinkels der Hartstoffe der Einbringungsort der Karbide optimiert, so dass diese im Nachlauf des Schweissbrenners mit sehr geringer thermischer Beeinflussung im erstarrungsnahen Schmelzbadbereich in die Matrix eingelagert

  4. Effect of bias voltage on microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of Al-Si-N coatings deposited by cathodic arc evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chi-Lung; Huang, Chi-Song

    2011-01-01

    Al-Si-N coatings were deposited on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) and silicon wafer substrates using Cr and AlSi (12 at.% Si) alloy targets using a dual cathode source with short straight-duct filter in the cathode arc evaporation system. Al-Si-N coatings were synthesized under a constant flow of nitrogen, using various substrate bias voltages at a fixed AlSi cathode power. To enhance adhesive strength, the Cr/(Cr x Al y Si z )N graduated layer between the top coating and the substrate was deposited as a buffer interlayer. The effects of bias voltage on the microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of the Al-Si-N films were investigated. Experimental results reveal that the Al-Si-N coatings exhibited a nanocomposite structure of nano-crystalline h-AlN, amorphous Si 3 N 4 and a small amount of free Si and oxides. It was also observed that the deposition rate of as-deposited films gradually decreased from about 25.1 to 18.8 nm/min when the substrate bias was changed from - 30 to - 150 V. The XRD results revealed that h-AlN preferred orientation changed from (002) to (100) as the bias voltage increased. The maximum hardness of approximately 35 GPa was obtained at the bias voltage of -90 V. Moreover, the grain size was inversely proportional to the hardness of the film. Wear test results reveal that the Al-Si-N film had a lower coefficient of friction, between 0.5 and 0.7, than that 0.7 of the AlN film.

  5. Atomic insight into tribochemical wear mechanism of silicon at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface in aqueous environment: Molecular dynamics simulations using ReaxFF reactive force field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Jialin; Ma, Tianbao [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Weiwei; Psofogiannakis, George; Duin, Adri C.T. van [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao [Tribology Research Institute, Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Hu, Yuanzhong [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lu, Xinchun, E-mail: xclu@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • New ReaxFF reactive force field was applied to simulate the tribochemical wear process at Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. • Wear of silicon atoms is due to the breaking of Si–O–Si bonds and Si–Si–O–Si bond chains on the Si substrate. • Interfacial bridge bonds play an important role during the tribochemical wear process. • Higher pressures applied to the silica phase can cause more Si atoms to be removed by forming more interfacial bridge bonds. • Water plays an opposing role in the wear process because of its both chemical and mechanical effects. - Abstract: In this work, the atomic mechanism of tribochemical wear of silicon at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface in aqueous environment was investigated using ReaxFF molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two types of Si atom removal pathways were detected in the wear process. The first is caused by the destruction of stretched Si–O–Si bonds on the Si substrate surface and is assisted by the attachment of H atoms on the bridging oxygen atoms of the bonds. The other is caused by the rupture of Si–Si bonds in the stretched Si–Si–O–Si bond chains at the interface. Both pathways effectively remove Si atoms from the silicon surface via interfacial Si–O–Si bridge bonds. Our simulations also demonstrate that higher pressures applied to the silica phase can cause more Si atoms to be removed due to the formation of increased numbers of interfacial Si–O–Si bridge bonds. Besides, water plays a dual role in the wear mechanism, by oxidizing the Si substrate surface as well as by preventing the close contact of the surfaces. This work shows that the removal of Si atoms from the substrate is a result of both chemical reaction and mechanical effects and contributes to the understanding of tribochemical wear behavior in the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and Si chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process.

  6. Al-Ca and Al-Fe metal-metal composite strength, conductivity, and microstructure relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyong June [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Deformation processed metal-metal composites (DMMC’s) are composites formed by mechanical working (i.e., rolling, swaging, or wire drawing) of two-phase, ductile metal mixtures. Since both the matrix and reinforcing phase are ductile metals, the composites can be heavily deformed to reduce the thickness and spacing of the two phases. Recent studies have shown that heavily drawn DMMCs can achieve anomalously high strength and outstanding combinations of strength and conductivity. In this study, Al-Fe wire composite with 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2 volume fractions of Fe filaments and Al-Ca wire composite with 0.03, 0.06, and 0.09 volume fractions of Ca filaments were produced in situ, and their mechanical properties were measured as a function of deformation true strain. The Al-Fe composites displayed limited deformation of the Fe phase even at high true strains, resulting in little strengthening effect in those composites. Al-9vol%Ca wire was deformed to a deformation true strain of 13.76. The resulting Ca second-phase filaments were deformed to thicknesses on the order of one micrometer. The ultimate tensile strength increased exponentially with increasing deformation true strain, reaching a value of 197 MPa at a true strain of 13.76. This value is 2.5 times higher than the value predicted by the rule of mixtures. A quantitative relationship between UTS and deformation true strain was determined. X-ray diffraction data on transformation of Al + Ca microstructures to Al + various Al-Ca intermetallic compounds were obtained at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Electrical conductivity was measured over a range of true strains and post-deformation heat treatment schedules.

  7. Mécanisme de l'usure par polissage des cylindres de moteurs diesel Bore Polishing Wear Mechanism in Diesel Engine Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayard J. C.

    2006-11-01

    particulier, l'usure des segments ainsi que les débits de gaz de soufflage, sont plus faibles qu'avec une chemise normale. Enfin, le mécanisme de l'usure par polissage par abrasion douce à deux et à trois corps est parfaitement confirmé par une exploration micrographique et une microanalyse des surfaces polies. A fast and economical method for evaluating lubricants and fuels in relation to the bore polishing wear of super charged diesel-engine cylinders has been developed using a single-cylinder laboratory engine within the framework of an Société Nationale Elf Aquitaine - Institut Français du Pétrole (SNEA-lFP research agreement. This method bears the reference IFP-UP-4/80.It also serves to evaluate the deposit-forming and sticking tendency, ring wear and the oil-consumption tendency of lubricants. It is in good correlation with the CEC-Ford Tornado test and makes an excellent discrimination between the Coordinating European Council (CEC reference cils RL 47 and RL 48. The method is used for investigating the bore polishingwear mechanism by searching for the influence exerted by the principal parameters: (a Composition of the lubricant: the phenomenon is influenced by the base oil and its viscosity, by the amount of polymers improving the viscosity index and especially by the choice of detergent additives. As a first approximation and for homogeneous oil familles, polishing wear increases when the thermal stability of the oil decreases. (b Engine running: polishing increases very fart with the engine load after a certain threshold, and its evolution in time as observed by endoscopic rating shows a characteristic S shape as polishing begins on the thrust side and at the top of the cylinder. (c Composition of the fuel: the increase in the sulfur content of diesel fuel considerably decreases polishing wear caused by an oil reputed to be poorfrom this standpoint but has no effect on a goodoil. (d Surface finish of the cylinder: prepolishing the liner by extremely fine

  8. 21 CFR 888.3640 - Shoulder joint metal/metal or metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3640 Section 888.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3640 Shoulder joint metal/metal or metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/metal or metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device...

  9. The interactions between attrition, abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellis, R Peter; Addy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Knowledge of these tooth wear processes and their interactions is reviewed. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence is insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear, especially through formation of pellicle, but cannot prevent it. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Valence-Bond Concepts in Coordination Chemistry and the Nature of Metal-Metal Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, Linus; Herman, Zelek S.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the valence-bond method, applying it to some coordination compounds of metals, especially those involving metal-metal bonds. Suggests that transition metals can form as many as nine covalent bonds, permitting valence-theory to be extended to transition metal compounds in a more effective way than has been possible before. (JN)

  11. Dental wear, wear rate, and dental disease in the African apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart, Alison A

    2010-06-01

    The African apes possess thinner enamel than do other hominoids, and a certain amount of dentin exposure may be advantageous in the processing of tough diets eaten by Gorilla. Dental wear (attrition plus abrasion) that erodes the enamel exposes the underlying dentin and creates additional cutting edges at the dentin-enamel junction. Hypothetically, efficiency of food processing increases with junction formation until an optimal amount is reached, but excessive wear hinders efficient food processing and may lead to sickness, reduced fecundity, and death. Occlusal surfaces of molars and incisors in three populations each of Gorilla and Pan were videotaped and digitized. The quantity of incisal and molar occlusal dental wear and the lengths of dentin-enamel junctions were measured in 220 adult and 31 juvenile gorilla and chimpanzee skulls. Rates of dental wear were calculated in juveniles by scoring the degree of wear between adjacent molars M1 and M2. Differences were compared by principal (major) axis analysis. ANOVAs compared means of wear amounts. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the relationship between molar wear and incidence of dental disease. Results indicate that quantities of wear are significantly greater in permanent incisors and molars and juvenile molars of gorillas compared to chimpanzees. The lengths of dentin-enamel junctions were predominantly suboptimal. Western lowland gorillas have the highest quantities of wear and the most molars with suboptimal wear. The highest rates of wear are seen in Pan paniscus and Pan t. troglodytes, and the lowest rates are found in P.t. schweinfurthii and G. g. graueri. Among gorillas, G. b. beringei have the highest rates but low amounts of wear. Coefficients between wear and dental disease were low, but significant when all teeth were combined. Gorilla teeth are durable, and wear does not lead to mechanical senescence in this sample.

  12. Abrasive wear of intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.A.; Alman, D.E.; Wilson, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines is investigating the wear behavior of a variety of advanced materials. Among the many materials under evaluation are intermetallic alloys based on the compounds: Fe 3 Al, Ti 3 Al, TiAl, Al 3 Ti, NiAl and MoSi 2 . The high hardness, high modulus, low density, and superior environmental stability of these compounds make them attractive for wear materials. This paper reports on the abrasive wear of alloys and composites based on the above compounds. The abrasive wear behavior of these alloys and composites are compared to other engineering materials used in wear applications

  13. Wear monitoring of single point cutting tool using acoustic emission ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper examines the flank and crater wear characteristics of coated carbide tool inserts during dry turning of steel workpieces. A brief review of tool wear mechanisms is presented together with new evidence showing that wear of the TiC layer on both flank and rake faces is dominated by discrete plastic deformation, ...

  14. Effects of sintering process on wear and mechanical behavior properties of titanium carbide/hexagonal boron nitrid/steel 316L base nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadooghi, Ali; Payganeh, Gholamhassan

    2018-02-01

    Powder metallurgy process is one of the approaches to manufacture nanocomposite samples, in which the product quality depends upon the pressure, temperature, and sintering time. In this manuscript, steel is selected as the base material together with 2% carbon-based reinforcing TiC particles, and 2% hBN particles as the self-lubricant material. The powders were mixed for 5 h in high ball milling, and compacted with two pressures of 350 and 450 MPa, sintered in the furnace for 2 and 4 h, and sintering temperatures of 1350 and 1450 °C were utilized. SEM, XRD, and EDX tests are performed to identify the nanocomposite structure, and DTA tests are carried out to specify the temperature graph of the material. Finally, hardness, wear, and bending tests are done to find the corresponding mechanical properties of the samples. As a result, the optimum process parameters, including pressure, temperature and sintering duration is achieved. Results show that adding the reinforcing particles into a steel matrix increase the hardness, as well as flexural strength of the nanocomposite product. Also, coefficient of friction shows a decreases.

  15. Impact wear of structural steel with yield strength of 235 MPa in various liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    The wear of pipelines, used in slurry transport, results in high costs for maintenance and replacement. The wear mechanism involves abrasion, corrosion, impact, and the interaction among them. In this work, we study the effect of impact on the wear mechanism and wear rate. Results show that when the

  16. Sliding wear of conventional and nanostructured cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, K. [Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Fischer, T.E. [Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The sliding wear mechanisms of cemented carbide and the effects of the microstructure scale on the wear resistance were investigated by performing a series of unlubricated sliding wear tests in air with pins of WC-Co composites sliding against silicon nitride disks. In the first approximation, the wear rate is proportional to the hardness with a wear coefficient k=6.9x10{sup -6} for all materials. In the conventional cermets, the wear coefficient k also depends on the grain size; materials with smaller WC grains exhibit a smaller wear resistance. This reduction, however, does not extend to the nanostructured materials which exhibit the above value for k: Their wear resistance is higher than that of conventional cermets in proportion to their hardness. The data can also be expressed in terms of cobalt content: The lower the cobalt content, the lower the wear; but two different such dependencies exist, one for the conventional and one for the nanostructured materials with lower wear. The sliding wear of WC-Co composites occurs on a very small scale: The worn surfaces show no evidence of fracture of plastic deformation. This wear behavior is explained by the hexagonal structure and the anisotropic mechanical behavior of the WC grains that are capable of shear in a limited number of planes but are not capable of triaxial deformation. The higher wear resistance of the nanostructured composites is related to their hardness which decreases the real area of contact. (orig.)

  17. Wear Calculation Approach for Sliding - Friction Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springis, G.; Rudzitis, J.; Lungevics, J.; Berzins, K.

    2017-05-01

    One of the most important things how to predict the service life of different products is always connected with the choice of adequate method. With the development of production technologies and measuring devices and with ever increasing precision one can get the appropriate data to be used in analytic calculations. Historically one can find several theoretical wear calculation methods but still there are no exact wear calculation model that could be applied to all cases of wear processes because of difficulties connected with a variety of parameters that are involved in wear process of two or several surfaces. Analysing the wear prediction theories that could be classified into definite groups one can state that each of them has shortcomings that might impact the results thus making unnecessary theoretical calculations. The offered wear calculation method is based on the theories of different branches of science. It includes the description of 3D surface micro-topography using standardized roughness parameters, explains the regularities of particle separation from the material in the wear process using fatigue theory and takes into account material’s physical and mechanical characteristics and definite conditions of product’s working time. The proposed wear calculation model could be of value for prediction of the exploitation time for sliding friction pairs thus allowing the best technologies to be chosen for many mechanical details.

  18. Application of the method of dimensionality reduction to simulate the fretting wear of anisotropic indenter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, A. I.

    2015-10-01

    In the paper we consider the fretting wear of two contacting bodies (indenter and half-space). Due to heterogeneity the indenter in contact area can have different mechanical properties. With an increasing number of cycles, the wear profile tends towards a limiting shape, in which no further wear occurs. Nonlinear dependence between final wear volume and indenter shear modulus was found. In accordance with our results the soft indenter provides less wear volume under fretting wear.

  19. Wear characteristics of INCONEL 690 and INCONEL 600 in elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, S.H.; Lee, Y.Z.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the fretting wear characteristics of INCONEL 690 (I-690) and INCONEL 600 (I-600) was evaluated to verity the wear mechanism and the wear life. Because of the excellent corrosion-resistance of nickel-based alloy, those materials are used for steam generator tube in nuclear power plants. Sometimes the tubes are damaged due to small amplitude vibration, so called fretting wear. To verify the fretting wear mechanisms the wear experiment was carried with the crossed-cylinder wear tester, which used a cam to oscillate the specimen. The test was carried out at loads of 40N and 90N in elevated temperatures of water. The temperatures of water were 20 C, 50 C and 80 C. The increase of water temperature causes the oxidation of the contact area to be delayed, and the amount of wear on oxide layer to be reduced. The main wear mechanisms of fretting were abrasive wear and oxidation wear. (orig.)

  20. Vibrational characteristics and wear of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmugar, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel rod wear, due to vibration, is a continuing concern in the design of liquid-cooled reactors. In my report, the methodology and models that are used to predict fuel rod vibrational response and vibratory wear, in a light water reactor environment, are discussed. This methodology is being followed at present in the design of Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel. Fuel rod vibrations are expressed as the normal bending modes, and sources of rod vibration are examined with special emphasis on flow-induced mechanisms in the stable flow region. In a typical Westinghouse PWR fuel assembly design, each fuel rod is supported at multiple locations along the rod axis by a square-shaped 'grid cell'. For a fuel rod /grid support system, the development of small oscillatory motions, due to fluid flow at the rod/grid interface, results in material wear. A theoretical wear mode is developed using the Archard Theory of Adhesive Wear as the basis. Without question certainty, fretting wear becomes a serious problem if it progresses to the stage where the fuel cladding is penetrated and fuel is exposed to the coolant. Westinghouse fuel is designed to minimize fretting wear by limiting the relative motion between the fuel rod and its supports. The wear producing motion between the fuel rod and its supports occurs when the vibration amplitude exceeds the slippage threshold amplitude

  1. Corrosion of amalgams under sliding wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, K; Meletis, E I

    1996-05-01

    During mastication, dental amalgams are simultaneously subjected to corrosion by the oral environment and to a sliding-wear process by biting forces. In the present study, the effect of sliding wear on the corrosion behavior of two high-copper dental amalgams was investigated. An experimental apparatus was utilized that allows electrochemical testing under sliding-wear conditions. Corrosion potential measurements and anodic polarization scans were conducted in 0.1 M NaCl solution under sliding wear to characterize the behavior of two commercial, high-copper, single composition dental amalgams. In addition, long duration tests were conducted to assess possible corrosion and wear synergistic effects. The results showed that sliding wear caused a sharp reduction in the corrosion potential, a significant increase in the corrosion rate and a decrease in the repassivation rate of both amalgams. These effects are due to the mechanical removal by the wear process of the surface protective film formed on dental amalgams. The simultaneous action of sliding wear and corrosion can also induce embrittlement that leads to cracking. The present evidence suggests that this cracking may be one of the major contributors to marginal failures of dental amalgam restorations.

  2. Polymer wear evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerbon, Mikkel; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2012-01-01

    Polymer wear plays an increasing role in manufacturing of machine parts for e.g. medical devices. Some of these have an expected lifetime of five to eight years during which very little wear of the components is acceptable. Too much wear compromises the dosage accuracy of the device and thereby...... the safety of the patients. Prediction of the wear of polymers is complicated by the low thermal conductivity of this kind of material. It implies that any acceleration of testing conditions by increased contact pressure and/or sliding velocity will make the polymer fail due to exaggerated heat buildup....... This is not the kind of wear observed in medical devices. In the present work a method was developed capable of evaluating the wear progression in polymer-polymer contacts. The configuration of the setup is injection moulded specimens consisting of an upper part having a toroid shape and a lower flat part. The sliding...

  3. Wear Behavior of an Ultra-High-Strength Eutectoid Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alok; Maity, Joydeep

    2018-02-01

    Wear behavior of an ultra-high-strength AISI 1080 steel developed through incomplete austenitization-based combined cyclic heat treatment is investigated in comparison with annealed and conventional hardened and tempered conditions against an alumina disk (sliding speed = 1 m s-1) using a pin-on-disk tribometer at a load range of 7.35-14.7 N. On a gross scale, the mechanism of surface damage involves adhesive wear coupled with abrasive wear (microcutting effects in particular) at lower loads. At higher loads, mainly the abrasive wear (both microcutting and microploughing mechanisms) and evolution of adherent oxide are observed. Besides, microhardness of matrix increases with load indicating substantial strain hardening during wear test. The rate of overall wear is found to increase with load. As-received annealed steel with the lowest initial hardness suffers from severe abrasive wear, thereby exhibiting the highest wear loss. Such a severe wear loss is not observed in conventional hardened and tempered and combined cyclic heat treatment conditions. Combined cyclic heat-treated steel exhibits the greatest wear resistance (lowest wear loss) due to its initial high hardness and evolution of hard abrasion-resistant tribolayer during wear test at higher load.

  4. Wear of control rod cluster assemblies and of instrumentation thimbles: first results obtained with the vibrateau wear simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, M.; Hersant, D.

    1993-07-01

    Several REP components are affected by a particular sort of damage called impact/sliding wear. This kind of wear, originating from flow induced vibrations, affects loosely supported tubular structures. The main involved components are: - the RCCAs claddings and the guides tubes, - the instrumentation thimbles, - the fuel rods claddings, - the SG tubes. The R and D Division is concerned with studies aiming to understand and to master the phenomena leading to this wear. The MTC Branch is charged of the study of the wear itself. Tests are carried out on wear rigs to understand and to model wear mechanisms. The following work is related to the two first wear tests campaigns on the VIBRATEAU wear simulator: - a reproducibility test series in order to assess the spreading of the experimental results, - a comparative test series on surface treatments used to improve the components war resistance. (authors). 7 figs., 2 tabs., 4 refs

  5. Resistance to abrasive wear and mechanical properties of ferritic-martensitic and ferritic-austenitic structures of the steels C 22, C 45, and X 2 CrNiMoN 22 5 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenheinrich, M.

    1989-01-01

    Two-phase, ferritic-martensitic structures were produced with the help of the unalloyed carbon steels C 22 and C 45, and ferritic-austenitic structures were produced by thermal and/or thermo-mechanical treatment with the help of the high-alloy steel X2CrNiMoN 22 5 3. The phase portion, distribution, form and size were varied. The structures were analyzed quantitatively and described with the help of structure factors such as duplex and dispersion parameters. The mechanical characteristics of structures in tensile, impact and rolling tests were studied. The abrasive wear resistance of the structures against flint was determined in a tribological system in accordance with the abrasive-paper method. The mechanical characteristics were influenced by the structure factors. An optimum of wear resistance was exhibited by ferritic-martensitic structures with an island-shaped coarse and hard martensite stored in a ferritic matrix. The abrasive wear resistance of the ferrite-austenite structure increased as the percentage of austenite increased, although the structure hardness decreased. (orig.) With 62 figs., 28 tabs [de

  6. Prediction of wear rates in comminution equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lucas Roald Dörig; Fundal, Erling; Møller, Per

    2010-01-01

    -resistant high chromium white cast iron (21988/JN/HBW555XCr21), a heat-treated wear resistant steel (Hardox 400) and a plain carbon construction steel (S235). Quartz, which accounts for the largest wear loss in the cement industry, was chosen as abrasive. Other process parameters such as velocity (1–7 m....../s) and pressure (70–1400 kPa) were chosen to closely imitate real industrial processes. The authors are aware that a number of wear mechanisms such as erosion, fatigue and abrasion may occur simultaneously in comminution equipment. Nonetheless, this paper aims at discussing abrasion only due to its large...

  7. Adhesive Wear of Rollers in Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaeef, Iqbal; Krantz, Timothy L.

    2012-01-01

    This work was done to support NASA's James Webb Space Telescope that is equipped with a Near Infrared Camera and Spectrograph and Micro Shutter Assembly (MSA). A MSA mechanism's qualification test in cryogenic vacuum at 30deg K for 96K cycles resulted in roller wear and formation of some debris. Lab tests in vacuum were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to understand the wear of Ti6Al4V mated with 440F steel rollers. Misalignment angle was found to have the most significant effect on debris formation. At misalignment angle of 1.4deg, significant amount of wear debris were formed within 50,000 cycles. Very few wear particles were found for a zero misalignment angle, and the total wear was small even after 367,000 cycles. The mode of wear in all the tests was attributed to adhesion, which was clearly evident from video records as well as the plate-like amalgamated debris material from both rollers. The adhesive wear rate was found to be approximately proportional to the misalignment angle. The wear is a two-way phenomenon, and the mixing of both roller materials in wear debris was confirmed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and EDX spectra. While there was a net loss of mass from the steel rollers, XRF and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra showed peaks of Ti on steel rollers, and peaks of Fe on Ti rollers. These results are useful for designers in terms of maintaining appropriate tolerances to avoid misalignment of rolling elements and the resulting severe wear

  8. Uptake of heavy metals by Typha capensis from wetland sites polluted by effluent from mineral processing plants: implications of metal-metal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaranyika, M F; Nyati, W

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to demonstrate the existence of metal-metal interactions in plants and their implications for the absorption of toxic elements like Cr. Typha capensis , a good accumulator of heavy metals, was chosen for the study. Levels of Fe, Cr, Ni, Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn were determined in the soil and roots, rhizomes, stems and leaves of T. capensis from three Sites A, B and C polluted by effluent from a chrome ore processing plant, a gold ore processing plant, and a nickel ore processing plant, respectively. The levels of Cr were extremely high at Site A at 5415 and 786-16,047 μg g -1 dry weight in the soil and the plant, respectively, while the levels of Ni were high at Site C at 176 and 24-891 μg g -1 in the soil and the plant, respectively. The levels of Fe were high at all three sites at 2502-7500 and 906-13,833 μg g -1 in the soil and plant, respectively. For the rest of the metals, levels were modest at 8.5-148 and 2-264 μg g -1 in the soil and plant, respectively. Pearson's correlation analysis confirmed mutual synergistic metal-metal interactions in the uptake of Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Fe, and Cr, which are attributed to the similarity in the radii and coordination geometry of the cations of these elements. The implications of such metal-metal interactions (or effects of one metal on the behaviour of another) on the uptake of Cr, a toxic element, and possible Cr detoxification mechanism within the plant, are discussed.

  9. MetalS(3), a database-mining tool for the identification of structurally similar metal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valasatava, Yana; Rosato, Antonio; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Andreini, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a database search tool to identify metal sites having structural similarity to a query metal site structure within the MetalPDB database of minimal functional sites (MFSs) contained in metal-binding biological macromolecules. MFSs describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure. Such a local environment has a determinant role in tuning the chemical reactivity of the metal, ultimately contributing to the functional properties of the whole system. The database search tool, which we called MetalS(3) (Metal Sites Similarity Search), can be accessed through a Web interface at http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it/tools/metals3/ . MetalS(3) uses a suitably adapted version of an algorithm that we previously developed to systematically compare the structure of the query metal site with each MFS in MetalPDB. For each MFS, the best superposition is kept. All these superpositions are then ranked according to the MetalS(3) scoring function and are presented to the user in tabular form. The user can interact with the output Web page to visualize the structural alignment or the sequence alignment derived from it. Options to filter the results are available. Test calculations show that the MetalS(3) output correlates well with expectations from protein homology considerations. Furthermore, we describe some usage scenarios that highlight the usefulness of MetalS(3) to obtain mechanistic and functional hints regardless of homology.

  10. Thin layer activation: measuring wear and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvigne, T.; Leyman, D.; Oxorn, K.

    1995-01-01

    The technique known as thin layer activation (TLA) is explained and assessed in this article. Widely used, in for example the automotive industry, TLA allows on-line monitoring of the loss of matter from a critical surface, by wear erosion and corrosion. The technique offers extremely high sensitivity thus leading to reduced test times. On-line wear phenomena can be assessed during operation of a mechanical process, even through thick engine walls. (UK)

  11. An investigation of mechanical properties and material removal rate, tool wear rate in EDM machining process of AL2618 alloy reinforced with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, AlN and ZrB{sub 2} composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N. Mathan, E-mail: mathannagarajbe@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mining Machinery Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (ISM), Dhanbad 826004, Jharkhand (India); Kumaran, S. Senthil, E-mail: sskumaran@ymail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, RVS Educational Trust' s Group of Institutions, RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul 624005, Tamilnadu (India); Kumaraswamidhas, L.A., E-mail: lakdhas1978@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mining Machinery Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (ISM), Dhanbad 826004, Jharkhand (India)

    2015-11-25

    It is submitted that new approach is tried to find out what would be the outcome if Aluminum 2618 reinforced by AlN (Aluminum Nitride), Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (Silicon Nitride) & ZrB{sub 2}(Zirconium Boride) particles were fabricated in Wt % (x = 0,2,4,6,8) by stir casting method. If the wt% is increased, the mechanical properties of the composite will proportionally increase. There will be no other promising technique than Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) for machining metal matrix composites when they were conducted on the Aluminum 2618 composite work piece using a copper electrode in an EDM machining. It becomes very vital in the field machines and mechanism to find out Current(I), Pulse on time(T{sub ON}), Pulse off time (T{sub OFF}) on Metal Removal Rate (MRR),Tool Wear Rate(TWR) on the machining of hybrid Al2618 metal matrix composites. Taghuchi's design of experiment was used to analyse the machining characteristics of hybrid composites. To effect the parameters like current (I), Pulse on time(T{sub ON}), Pulse off time (T{sub OFF}) has been chosen as the input parameters of this work. Machining results go to show that Al2618 composites have improved mechanical properties and as a result of Material Removal Rate (MRR) and Tool Wear Rate (TWR) are reduced. Hence ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and signal to Noise ratio are used to determine the influence of input parameters on the Material Removal Rate and Tool Wear Rate (TWR). - Highlights: • Increasing mechanical properties with addition of reinforcements. • EDM machining on AL2618 alloy reinforced with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, AlN and ZrB{sub 2} composites in insitu-composites. • To find out the best process parameters using Taguchi and ANOVA method. • Material removal rate (MRR) and tool wear rate (TWR) are minimized. • Composite is the best process parameter on influencing material removal rate (MRR) and tool wear rate (TWR) and depth.

  12. Corrosion and corrosion-friction properties of plasma cladding wear-resistant layer on Fe-based alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dekun; Yu, Ruoqi; Chen, Kai; Yang, Xuehui; Liu, Yuan; Yin, Yan

    2018-02-01

    Plasma cladding technology is used to prepare a plasma cladding gradient wear-resistant layer, and the corrosion and corrosion-friction properties of the plasma cladding wear-resistant layer are analyzed. The results indicate that under pure immersion corrosion, the plasma gradient cladding wear-resisting layer has better corrosion resistance compared with that of single cladding specimen. No obvious corrosion traces occur on the corrosion surface. Under corrosion-friction conditions, the variety law of friction coefficient can be divided into four stages: rapid decline zone, slight increase zone, fluctuation zone and steady zone. The fluctuation ranges of friction coefficient and wear loss greatly reduce compared with those of dry friction. Furthermore, the wear scar has no obvious corrosion traces. The wear mechanism of the substrate is corrosion wear, adhesive wear, abrasive wear and fatigue wear, while the plasma cladding gradient wear-resistant layer is given priority to with adhesive wear and abrasive wear.

  13. STUDIES ON TOOL WEAR CONDITION MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Metin ERTUNÇ

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, wear mechanisms on cutting tools, especially for the drill bits, during the cutting operation have been investigated. As the importance of full automation in industry has gained substantial importance, tool wear condition monitoring during the cutting operation has been the subject of many investigators. Tool condition monitoring is very crucial in order to change the tool before breakage. Because tool breakage can cause considerable economical damage to both the machine tool and workpiece. In this paper, the studies on the monitoring of drill bit wear in literature have been introduced; the direct/indirect techniques used and sensor fusion techniques have been summarized. The methods which were proposed to determine tool wear evolution as processing the sensor signals collected have been provided and their references have been given for detailed information.

  14. Research on dynamic wear behavior at elevated temperature of HVOF sprayed nanostructured WC-17Co coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan; Chen Hui; Gou Guoqing; Tu Mingjing

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructured WC-17Co coatings have been prepared by means of High Velocity Oxy-fuel (HVOF) technique. The wear resistance at the elevated temperature (500 0 C) of nanostructured coatings was compared using GCr15 steel as counterpart in sliding wear tests. The results show that when at the temperature of 500 0 C, the wear failure mechanism turns from plastic deformation to fracture resulted from crack propagation and adhesive wear. With the wear going, abrasive wear dominate in the coating, then turns into adhesive wear with changes of microscope.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of metal--metal bonded dimers of tantalum and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templeton, Joseph Leslie [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1975-12-01

    A search for innovative synthetic routes to new metal-metal bonded metal-halide clusters resulted in isolation of two completely independent dimeric species. The syntheses and characterizations of Ta2X6(SC4H8)3 (X = Cl, Br) and ((n-C3H7)4N)2(W2Br9) followed entirely different experimental routes, yet occasionally similar properties linked the two projects.

  16. Study on biocompatibility, tribological property and wear debris characterization of ultra-low-wear polyethylene as artificial joint materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Gang; Jin, Zhong-Min; Xin, Shi-Xuan; Hua, Zi-Kai; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2018-03-10

    Ultra-low-wear polyethylene (ULWPE) is a new type polyethylene made by experts who are from China petrochemical research institute, which is easy to process and implant. Preliminary test showed it was more resistant to wear than that of Ultra-high-molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). The purpose of the research is to study biocompatibility, bio-tribological properties and debris characterization of ULWPE. Cytotoxicity test, hemolysis test, acute/chronic toxicity and muscular implantation test were conducted according to national standard GB/T-16886/ISO-10993 for evaluation requirements of medical surgical implants. We obtained that this novel material had good biocompatibility and biological safety. The wear performance of ULWPE and UHMWPE was evaluated in a pin-on-disc (POD) wear tester within two million cycles and a knee wear simulator within six million cycles. We found that the ULWPE was higher abrasion resistance than the UHMWPE, the wear rate of ULWPE by POD test and knee wear simulator was 0.4 mg/10 6 cycles and (16.9 ± 1.8)mg/10 6 cycles respectively, while that of UHMWPE was 1.8 mg/10 6 cycles and (24.6 ± 2.4)mg/10 6 cycles. The morphology of wear debris is also an important factor to evaluate artificial joint materials, this study showed that the ULWPE wear debris gotten from the simulator had various different shapes, including spherical, block, tear, etc. The morphology of worn surface and wear debris analysis showed that wear mechanisms of ULWPE were adhesion wear, abrasive wear and fatigue wear and other wear forms, which were consistent with that of UHMWPE. Thus we conclude that ULWPE is expected to be a lifetime implantation of artificial joint. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Wear resistance of hydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, MA; Abenojar, J.; Pantoja, M.; López de Armentia, S.

    2017-05-01

    Nature has been an inspiration source to develop artificial hydrophobic surfaces. During the latest years the development of hydrophobic surfaces has been widely researched due to their numerous ranges of industrial applications. Industrially the use of hydrophobic surfaces is being highly demanded. This is why many companies develop hydrophobic products to repel water, in order to be used as coatings. Moreover, these coating should have the appropriated mechanical properties and wear resistance. In this work wear study of a hydrophobic coating on glass is carried out. Hydrophobic product used was Sika Crystal Dry by Sika S.A.U. (Alcobendas, Spain). This product is currently used on car windshield. To calculate wear resistance, pin-on-disk tests were carried out in dry and water conditions. The test parameters were rate, load and sliding distance, which were fixed to 60 rpm, 5 N and 1000 m respectively. A chamois was used as pin. It allows to simulate a real use. The friction coefficient and loss weight were compared to determinate coating resistance

  18. Investigation on wear characteristic of biopolymer gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Wafiuddin Bin Md; Daing Idris, Daing Mohamad Nafiz Bin; Sofian, Azizul Helmi Bin; Basrawi, Mohamad Firdaus bin; Khalil Ibrahim, Thamir

    2017-10-01

    Polymer is widely used in many mechanical components such as gear. With the world going to a more green and sustainable environment, polymers which are bio based are being recognized as a replacement for conventional polymers based on fossil fuel. The use of biopolymer in mechanical components especially gear have not been fully explored yet. This research focuses on biopolymer for spur gear and whether the conventional method to investigate wear characteristic is applicable. The spur gears are produced by injection moulding and tested on several speeds using a custom test equipment. The wear formation such as tooth fracture, tooth deformation, debris and weight loss was observed on the biopolymer spur gear. It was noted that the biopolymer gear wear mechanism was similar with other type of polymer spur gears. It also undergoes stages of wear which are; running in, linear and rapid. It can be said that the wear mechanism of biopolymer spur gear is comparable to fossil fuel based polymer spur gear, thus it can be considered to replace polymer gears in suitable applications.

  19. Nitrogen implantation of steels: A treatment which can initiate sustained oxidative wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, E.B.; Reinbold, R.; Missouri Univ., Rolla; Kohser, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Falex wear tests on mild (SAE 3135) steel samples treated by either nitrogen implantation (2.5x10 17 N 2 + cm -2 at 180 keV) or low temperature (about 315 0 C) oxidation are reported. The results show that both treatments lead to about an order-of-magnitude reduction in the long-term wear rate of the steel. In addition to the wear rate measurements, the wear member asymmetry behavior, scanning electron microscopy studies, Auger spectra and sputter profiles all indicate that the wear modes induced by both treatments are the same and are oxidative wear. These results confirm the previously proposed initiator-sustainer wear model in which implanted nitrogen simply acts as an initiator of favorable oxidative wear but is not directly involved in maintaining the sustained wear resistance. Possible mechanisms for both the initiation process and the sustained wear process are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  20. Theory of powdery rubber wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B N J

    2009-12-02

    Rubber wear typically involves the removal of small rubber particles from the rubber surface. On surfaces with not too sharp roughness, e.g. most road surfaces, this involves (slow) crack propagation. In this paper I shall present a theory of mild rubber wear. I shall derive the distribution of wear particle sizes Φ(D), which is in excellent agreement with experiment. I shall also show that the calculated wear rate is consistent with experimental data for tire tread block wear.

  1. Theory of powdery rubber wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-12-02

    Rubber wear typically involves the removal of small rubber particles from the rubber surface. On surfaces with not too sharp roughness, e.g. most road surfaces, this involves (slow) crack propagation. In this paper I shall present a theory of mild rubber wear. I shall derive the distribution of wear particle sizes PHI(D), which is in excellent agreement with experiment. I shall also show that the calculated wear rate is consistent with experimental data for tire tread block wear.

  2. THE WEAR RESISTANCE INCREASE OF CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Ilyushenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the tests on the wear resistance of chromium cast irons of different compositions obtained in sand forms. It has been shown that increase of the wear resistance and mechanical properties of the cast iron is possible to obtain using the casting in metal molds. A further increase in wear resistance of parts produced in metal molds is possible by changing the technological parameters of casting and alloying by titanium.

  3. Mehanizam trenja i trošenja vodećeg prstena projektila / Friction and wear mechanism of the projectile rotating band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Ristić

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available U radu je opisan mehanizam trenja i trošenja vodećeg prstena projektila usled zagrevanja i topljenja kontaktne površine projektila. Primenjen je model hidrodinamičkog klizanja vodećeg prstena i postavljena Rejnoldsova jednačina za "fluid" (otopljeni film. Pretpostavlja se da je temperatura fluida konstantna i jednaka temperaturi topljenja na kontaktnim površinama. Na osnovu ukupnog prelaza toplote sa filma koji je stvoren između topljive i netopljive površine (model Landan određeni su rezultati za debljinu filma, koeficijent trenja i trošenje materijala. U raduje određena veličina trošenja vodećeg prstena i uticaj nekih parametara na silu trenja i debljinu filma otopljenog materijala prstena. Dobijeni rezultati ilustrovani su na odabranom primeru. / Friction and wear model of rotating band, due to, heating and melting material between the contact surface of a bore and projectile is described in this paper. The hydrodynamic slider-bearing model of the metal rotating band is applied and the Reynold's equation for the "fluid" (melting film has been used in this work. The fluid temperature was assumed to be constant and equal to the melting temperature on the contact surface. Based on the total heat transfer from the film, which is made, between the melting on the non-melting surface (Landan model and certain results of the film thickness, the coefficient of melt friction and the material wear were achieve. The size wears of the projectile rotating band and influence of certain parameters on the friction force and the film thickness are given in this paper. The achieved results have been illustrated by chosen example.

  4. Wear characterization of abrasive waterjet nozzles and nozzle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Madhusarathi

    Parameters that influence nozzle wear in the abrasive water jet (AWJ) environment were identified and classified into nozzle geometric, AWJ system, and nozzle material categories. Regular and accelerated wear test procedures were developed to study nozzle wear under actual and simulated conditions, respectively. Long term tests, using garnet abrasive, were conducted to validate the accelerated test procedure. In addition to exit diameter growth, two new measures of wear, nozzle weight loss and nozzle bore profiles were shown to be invaluable in characterizing and explaining the phenomena of nozzle wear. By conducting nozzle wear tests, the effects of nozzle geometric, and AWJ system parameters on nozzle wear were systematically investigated. An empirical model was developed for nozzle weight loss rate. To understand the response of nozzle materials under varying AWJ system conditions, erosion tests were conducted on samples of typical nozzle materials. The effect of factors such as jet impingement angle, abrasive type, abrasive size, abrasive flow rate, water pressure, traverse speed, and target material was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on eroded samples as well as worn nozzles to understand the wear mechanisms. The dominant wear mechanism observed was grain pullout. Erosion models were reviewed and along the lines of classical erosion theories a semi-empirical model, suitable for erosion of nozzle materials under AWJ impact, was developed. The erosion data correlated very well with the developed model. Finally, the cutting efficiency of AWJ nozzles was investigated in conjunction with nozzle wear. The cutting efficiency of a nozzle deteriorates as it wears. There is a direct correlation between nozzle wear and cutting efficiency. The operating conditions that produce the most efficient jets also cause the most wear in the nozzle.

  5. Determination of a Wear Initiation Cycle by using a Contact Resistance Measurement in Nuclear Fuel Fretting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu

    2008-01-01

    In nuclear fuel fretting, the improving of the contact condition with a modified spring shape is a useful method for increasing the wear resistance of the nuclear fuel rod. This is because the fretting wear resistance between the fuel rod and grid spring is mainly affected by the grid spring shape rather than the environment, the contact modes, etc. In addition, the wear resistance is affected by the wear debris behavior between contact surfaces. So, it is expected that the wear initiation of each spring shape should be determined in order to evaluate a wear resistance. However, it is almost impossible to measure the wear behavior in contact surfaces on a real time basis because the contact surfaces are always hidden. Besides, the results of the worn surface observation after the fretting wear tests are restricted to archive the information on the wear debris behavior and the formation mechanism of the wear scar. In order to evaluate the wear behavior during the fretting wear tests, it is proposed that the contact resistance measurement is a useful method for examining the wear initiation cycle and modes. Generally, fretting wear damages are rapidly progressed by a localized plastic deformation between the contact surfaces, crack initiation and fracture of the deformed surface with a strain hardening difference between a surface and a subsurface and finally a detachment of wear debris. After this, wear debris is easily oxidized by frictional heat, test environment, etc. At this time, a small amount of electric current applied between the contact surfaces will be influenced by the wear debris, which could be an obstacle to an electric current flow. So, it is possible to archive the information on the wear behavior by measuring the contact resistance. In order to determine the wear initiation cycle during the fretting wear tests, in this study, fretting wear tests have been performed by applying a constant electric current in room temperature air

  6. Role of hybrid ratio in microstructural, mechanical and sliding wear properties of the Al5083/Graphitep/Al2O3p a surface hybrid nanocomposite fabricated via friction stir processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafapour Asl, A.; Khandani, S.T.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid ratio of each reinforcement phase in hybrid composite can be defined as proportion of its volume to total reinforcement volume of the composite. The hybrid ratio is an important factor which controls the participation extent of each reinforcement phase in overall properties of hybrid composites. Hence, in the present work, surface hybrid nanocomposites of Al5083/Graphite p /Al 2 O 3p with different hybrid ratios were fabricated by friction stir processing method. Subsequently, effect of hybrid ratio on microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties of the nanocomposite was investigated. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to perform microstructural observation on the samples. Hardness value measurements, tensile and pin on disk dry sliding wear tests were carried out to investigate effect of hybrid ratio on mechanical and tribological properties of the nanocomposites. Microstructural investigations displayed better distribution with less agglomeration of reinforcement for lower volume fraction of reinforcement for both alumina and graphite particles. Hardness value, yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and wear rate of the nanocomposites revealed a two stage form along with hybrid ratio variation. The results are discussed based on microstructural observations of the nanocomposites and worn surface analyses.

  7. Overview of PVD wear resistant coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeter, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The combined functionality of wear-resistant and low-friction multilayer coatings has widened application possibilities for a new generation of coated tools. For the first time tool wear mechanisms are comprehensively addressed both at the cutting edge and contact areas away from the edge where chip evacuation is facilitated. Since its recent market introduction a combined TiA1N and WC/C PVD coating has been proven to increase cutting performance in various metal cutting operations, notably drilling and tapping of steels and aluminum alloys. Significant improvements have been obtained under dry as well as with coolant conditions. The results of laboratory metal cutting tests and field trials to date will be described. Correlations between chip formation / wear mechanisms and coating properties are given to explain the effectiveness of this coating. (author)

  8. Investigation of piston ring – cylinder liner dry wear using a block-on-ring test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe; Klit, Peder; Felter, Christian L.

    Characterization of the wear of piston rings and cylinder liner is an important aspect of large two stroke diesel engine design. Two major wear mechanisms exist; corrosive wear and mechanical wear. This paper deals with the most aggressive form of the latter, which is known as scuffing. Different...... that ceramic coating on the piston ring decreases the dry wear rate of both piston ring and liner, while the coefficient of friction is increased....

  9. Friction and wear in polymer-based materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bely, V A; Petrokovets, M I

    1982-01-01

    Friction and Wear in Polymer-Based Materials discusses friction and wear problems in polymer-based materials. The book is organized into three parts. The chapters in Part I cover the basic laws of friction and wear in polymer-based materials. Topics covered include frictional interaction during metal-polymer contact and the influence of operating conditions on wear in polymers. The chapters in Part II discuss the structure and frictional properties of polymer-based materials; the mechanism of frictional transfer when a polymer comes into contact with polymers, metals, and other materials; and

  10. Inner Coordination Sphere Control of Metal-Metal Superexchange in Ruthenium Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Ali R.; Bensimon, Corinne; Cromp, Benoit; Reber, Christian; Greedan, J. E.; Kondratiev, Veniamin V.; Crutchley, Robert J.

    1997-07-16

    The dinuclear Ru(III) complexes trans-[{(NH(3))(4)Ru(py)}(2)(&mgr;-L)][PF(6)](4), where py represents pyridine and L represents 1,4-dicyanamidobenzene dianion (dicyd(2)(-)) derivatives dicyd(2)(-) (1), Me(2)dicyd(2)(-) (2), Cl(2)dicyd(2)(-) (3), and Cl(4)dicyd(2)(-) (4), have been prepared and characterized by electronic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. A crystal structure of the complex trans-[{(NH(3))(4)Ru(py)}(2)(&mgr;-dicyd)][PF(6)](4).(1)/(2)H(2)O showed the dicyd(2)(-) ligand to be approximately planar with the cyanamido groups in a syn configuration. Crystal structure data are space group P2(1), with a, b, and c = 7.826(3), 20.455(7), and 14.428(5) Å, respectively, beta = 95.76 (3) degrees, V = 2296.7(14) Å(3), and Z = 2. The structure was refined by using 3292 reflections with I > 2.5sigma(I) to an R factor of 0.069. Solid state magnetic susceptibility measurements of the Ru(III)-Ru(III) dimers showed diamagnetic behavior at room temperature, and this is suggested to be due to strong antiferromagnetic superexchange via the HOMO of the dicyd(2)(-) ligand. The bridging ligand dependence of metal-metal coupling in the Ru(III)-Ru(II) complexes of 1, 2, 3, and 4 in acetonitrile solution was demonstrated by the trend in comproportionation constants, 1.5 x 10(6), 5.7 x 10(6), 1.4 x 10(4), and 1.1 x 10(3), respectively. In addition, comparison to the analogous pentaammineruthenium dimers showed that the magnitude of metal-metal superexchange could be controlled by the nature of the spectator ligand. Spectroelectrochemical methods were used to acquire the absorption spectra of the mixed-valence complexes, and the intervalence band properties were modeled with PKS theory. Metal-metal coupling in the Ru(III)-Ru(II) complexes of 1, 2, 3, and 4 was analyzed by using Hush and CNS theories.

  11. Charge transport properties of metal/metal-phthalocyanine/n-Si structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Afzal

    2010-12-16

    In present work the charge transport properties of metal/metal-phthalocyanine/n-Si structures with low (N{sub D} = 4 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), medium (N{sub D}=1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) and high (N{sub D}=2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) doped n-Si as injecting electrode and the effect of air exposure of the vacuum evaporated metal-phthalocyanine film in these structures is investigated. The results obtained through temperature dependent electrical characterizations of the structures suggest that in terms of dominant conduction mechanism in the corresponding devices Schottky-type conduction mechanism dominates the charge transport in low-bias region of these devices up to 0.8 V, 0.302 V and 0.15 V in case of low, medium and high doped n-Silicon devices. For higher voltages, in each case of devices, the space-charge-limited conduction, controlled by exponential trap distribution, is found to dominate the charge transport properties of the devices. The interface density of states at the CuPc/n-Si interface of the devices are found to be lower in case of lower work function difference at the CuPc/n-Si interface of the devices. The results also suggest that the work function difference at the CuPc/n-Si interface of these devices causes charge transfer at the interface and these phenomena results in formation of interface dipole. The width of the Schottky depletion region at the CuPc/n-Si interface of these devices is found to be higher with higher work function difference at the interface. The investigation of charge transport properties of Al/ZnPc/medium n-Si and Au/ZnPc/ medium n-Si devices suggest that the Schottky depletion region formed at the ZnPc/n-Si interface of these devices determines the charge transport in the low-bias region of both the devices. Therefore, the Schottky-type (injection limited) and the space-charge-limited (bulk limited) conduction are observed in the low and the high bias regions of these devices, respectively. The determined width of the

  12. Friction and wear studies of nuclear power plant components in pressurized high temperature water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P.L.; Robertson, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies on wear mechanisms of nuclear power plant components have shown that depending on the operating conditions and the environment, different wear mechanisms could occur during a wear process. There is also evidence that in an environment of pressurized high temperature water the wear rate could be significantly different from those obtained from room temperature studies. An experimental facility that is capable of performing tests in pressurized high temperature water environment with feedback controlled impact and reciprocating sliding motion has been built. A research project aimed at gaining better understanding of the mechanisms and mechanics involved in vibratory wear in such environment has been carried out

  13. Effect of increasingly metallized hybrid reinforcement on the wear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tron microscopy identified abrasion and delamination as primary wear mechanisms in the hybrid nanocomposite. Oxidation was active in nanocomposite with higher copper content, tested under higher load and positively affected the wear resistance. Limited thermal softening was observed when tested at a relatively higher ...

  14. Effect of increasingly metallized hybrid reinforcement on the wear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Scanning electron microscopy identified abrasion and delamination as primary wear mechanisms in the hybrid nanocomposite.Oxidation was active in nanocomposite with higher copper content, tested under higher load and positively affected the wear resistance. Limited thermal softening was observed when tested at a ...

  15. Development of empirical relationships for prediction of mechanical and wear properties of AA6082 aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Processing (FSP has been established as a potential solid state production method to prepare aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. FSP was effectively applied to produce AA6082 AMCs reinforced with various ceramic particles such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC in this work. Empirical relationships were estimated to predict the influence of FSP process parameters on the properties such as area of stir zone, microhardness and wear rate of AMCs. FSP experiments were executed using a central composite rotatable design consisting of four factors and five levels. The FSP parameters analyzed were tool rotational speed, traverse speed, groove width and type of ceramic particle. The effect of those parameters on the properties of AMCs was deduced using the developed empirical relationships. The predicted trends were explained with the aid of observed macro and microstructures.

  16. Two-body in vitro wear study of some current dental composites and amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X; Marquis, P M; Shortall, A C

    1999-08-01

    Wear resistance of restorative materials is a major concern in clinical practice for restorations involving occlusion. The relatively poor wear resistance of dental composites in stress-bearing posterior situations has restricted even wider clinical application of this type of restorative material. This in vitro study compared the relative wear resistance of a selection of current dental composites and amalgams under cyclic loading to explore the wear mechanisms operating on these materials and to assess their relative potential clinical wear resistance under variable masticatory loads. A 2-body in vitro wear test was undertaken on a selection of 2 Ultrafine Compact-Filled composites, 1 microfilled composite, and 3 dental amalgams. An alternating sine curve load (0.5 to 15 N) was applied to the wear surface through a rotating countersample with a purpose-built system to simulate the variable loading pattern that occurs during mastication. Under conditions simulating the repetitive cyclic loading pattern that may occur intraorally in high stress occlusal contact situations, the Ultrafine Compact-Filled composites exhibited a delamination wear pattern and had a significantly lower wear resistance than the amalgams. By comparison, the microfilled composite (Silux Plus) displayed an improved wear resistance that was superior to some amalgams. Dispersalloy had the best wear resistance among the materials selected. The wear of Ultrafine Compact-Filled composite and microfilled composite differed and reflect different operative wear mechanisms. For amalgams, the size, shape, and composition of the particles had an effect on the wear resistance of the materials.

  17. [Detection of metal ions in hair after metal-metal hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Vaquero, D; Rodríguez de la Flor, M; Fernandez-Carreira, J M; Sariego-Muñiz, C

    2014-01-01

    There is an increase in the levels of metals in the serum and urine after the implantation of some models of metal-metal hip prosthesis. It has recently been demonstrated that there is an association between these levels and the levels found in hair. The aim of this study is to determine the presence of metals in hair, and to find out whether these change over time or with the removal of the implant. The levels of chromium, cobalt and molybdenum were determined in the hair of 45 patients at 3, 4, 5, and 6 years after a hip surface replacement. The mean age was 57.5 years, and two were female. Further surgery was required to remove the replacement and implant a new model with metal-polyethylene friction in 11 patients, 5 of them due to metallosis and a periarticular cyst. The mean levels of metals in hair were chromium 163.27 ppm, cobalt 61.98 ppm, and molybdenum 31.36 ppm, much higher than the levels found in the general population. A decrease in the levels of chromium (43.8%), molybdenum (51.1%), and cobalt (91.1%) was observed at one year in the patients who had further surgery to remove the prosthesis. High concentrations of metals in the hair are observed in hip replacements with metal-metal friction, which decrease when that implant is removed. The determination of metal ions in hair could be a good marker of the metal poisoning that occurs in these arthroplasty models. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermally-treated Pt-coated silicon AFM tips for wear resistance in ferroelectric data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Palacio, Manuel; Kwak, Kwang Joo

    2008-01-01

    In ferroelectric data storage, a conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe with a noble metal coating is placed in contact with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) film. The understanding and improvement of probe tip wear, particularly at high velocities, is needed for high data rate recording. A commercial Pt-coated silicon AFM probe was thermally treated in order to form platinum silicide at the near-surface. Nanoindentation, nanoscratch and wear experiments were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties and wear performance at high velocities. The thermally treated tip exhibited lower wear than the untreated tip. The tip wear mechanism is adhesive and abrasive wear with some evidence of impact wear. The enhancement in mechanical properties and wear resistance in the thermally treated film is attributed to silicide formation in the near-surface. Auger electron spectroscopy and electrical resistivity measurements confirm the formation of platinum silicide. This study advances the understanding of thin film nanoscale surface interactions

  19. The effect of Al–8B grain refiner and heat treatment conditions on the microstructure, mechanical properties and dry sliding wear behavior of an Al–12Zn–3Mg–2.5Cu aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alipour, M.; Azarbarmas, M.; Heydari, F.; Hoghoughi, M.; Alidoost, M.; Emamy, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effect of Al–8B on the properties of aluminum alloy was studied. ► Al–8B is an effective in reducing the grain and reagent fine microstructure. ► Al–8B is an effective in optimization of properties. -- Abstract: In this study the effect of Al–8B grain refiner on the structural and properties of Al–12Zn–3Mg–2.5Cu aluminum alloy were investigated. The optimum amount for B containing grain refiner was selected as 3.75 wt.%. The results showed that B containing grain refiner is more effective in reducing average grain size of the alloy. T6 heat treatment was applied for all specimens before tensile testing. Significant improvements in mechanical properties were obtained with the addition of grain refiner combined with T6 heat treatment. After the heat treatment, the average tensile strength increased from 479 MPa to 537 MPa for sample refined with 3.75 wt.% Al–8B. The fractography of the fractured faces and microstructure evolution was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. Dry sliding wear performance of the alloy was examined in normal atmospheric conditions. The experimental results showed that the T6 heat treatment considerably improved the resistance of Al–12Zn–3Mg–2.5Cu aluminum alloy to the dry sliding wear.

  20. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. 888.3330 Section 888.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis is a two-part device intended to be implanted to replace a hip joint. The device...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. 888.3320 Section 888.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis is a two-part device intended to be implanted to replace a hip joint. The device...

  2. High-Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating by Plasma Spraying Using Metal-Metal Clad Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Lan, Hao; Yu, Shouquan; Huang, Chuanbing; Du, Lingzhong; Zhang, Weigang

    2017-08-01

    NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating was fabricated by atmospheric plasma spray technology using clad powders as the feedstock. Its tribological properties at variable temperature were evaluated using a ball-on-disk high-temperature tribometer in air. The results showed that compared with NiCr, the NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating exhibited better lubrication effect and higher wear resistance at all test temperatures, especially above 600 °C. At 800 °C, NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating showed the lowest friction coefficient of about 0.2 and its corresponding wear rate reached 2.5 × 10-5 mm3/Nm. Characterizations of NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating revealed that at temperatures below 400 °C, Ag was smeared and spread onto the wear surface, reducing the friction and wear. At temperature above 500 °C, the Ag2MoO4 lubrication film formed by tribo-oxidation significantly improved the coating's lubrication effect and wear resistance.

  3. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp, to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders. It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  4. Sliding wear behavior of nanostructured WC-Co-Cr coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibin; Wang, Xuezheng; Song, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Xingwei

    2015-11-01

    The nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coatings were fabricated by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying using the in situ synthesized WC-Co nanocomposite powder with size of 70-200 nm and Cr addition. Through optimization of the processing conditions, the nanostructured WC-Co-Cr coating has only a small amount of decarburized phase, a dense microstructure and an excellent combination of hardness, fracture toughness and wear resistance. A series of sliding wear tests were performed to investigate the wear behavior of the nanostructured cermet coating. The evolution of the friction coefficient, wear characteristics and their mechanisms were studied for the nanostructured WC-Co-Cr coating with the change of the load. The present study proposes a new understanding of the occurrence and the related mechanisms of the wear of the cermet coatings.

  5. Wear Behavior of an Unstable Knee: Stabilization via Implant Design?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Reinders

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wear-related failures and instabilities are frequent failure mechanisms of total knee replacements. High-conforming designs may provide additional stability for the joint. This study analyzes the effects of a ligamentous insufficiency on the stability and the wear behavior of a high-conforming knee design. Methods. Two simulator wear tests were performed on a high-conforming total knee replacement design. In the first, a ligamentous-stable knee replacement with a sacrificed anterior cruciate ligament was simulated. In the second, a ligamentous-unstable knee with additionally insufficient posterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament was simulated. Wear was determined gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. Implant kinematics was recorded during simulation. Results. Significantly higher wear rates (P≤0.001 were observed for the unstable knee (14.58±0.56 mg/106 cycles compared to the stable knee (7.97 ± 0.87 mg/106 cycles. A higher number of wear particles with only small differences in wear particle characteristics were observed. Under unstable knee conditions, kinematics increased significantly for translations and rotations (P≤0.01. This increase was mainly attributed to higher tibial posterior translation and internal rotations. Conclusion. Higher kinematics under unstable test conditions is a result of insufficient stabilization via implant design. Due to the higher kinematics, increased wear was observed in this study.

  6. Assessment of wear facets produced by the ACTA wear machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana R; Larsen, Liselotte; Dowling, Adam H

    2016-01-01

    the 2D profile technique ranks RBC materials in terms of in-vitro wear performance. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Confidence in the wear volume measurements can only be achieved if the wear facet is analysed with sufficient resolution using a 3D digital measurement technique. However, the employment of 2D....... The mean wear depth was measured using the traditionally employed 2D and compared with the 3D profilometric (digital) techniques. Data were submitted to analyses of variance, Tukey's post hoc tests and Independent Samples Student's t-tests (where appropriate) at p... for mean wear depth calculations were similar whether the 2D or 3D techniques were employed. However, the mean wear depth values obtained from the 3D digital technique were significantly increased for two of the five RBC materials compared with the 2D methodology. The total volumetric wear data provided...

  7. Corrosive wear. Evaluation of wear and corrosive resistant materials; Noetningskorrosion. Utvaerdering av noetnings- och korrosionsbestaendiga material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, H.; Hjertsen, D.; Waara, P.; Prakash, B.; Hardell, J.

    2007-12-15

    With a new purchase of a waste conveyer screw at hand, for the 'A-warehouse' at the combined power and heating plant at E.ON Norrkoeping, the request for improved construction materials was raised. The previous screw required maintenance with very short intervals due to the difficult operation conditions. With the new screw the expectation is to manage 6 months of operation without interruption. The environment for the screw has two main components that sets the demand on the materials, on one hand the corrosive products that comes along and which forms at digestion of the waste and on the other hand the abrasive content in the waste. The term of the mechanism is wear-corrosion and can give considerably higher material loss than the two mechanisms wear and corrosion separately. Combination of a strong corrosive environment together with extensive wear is something that we today have limited knowledge about. The overall objective of the project has been to establish better wear and corrosive resistant construction materials for a waste conveyer screw that will lead to reduced operational disturbance costs. The evaluation has been performed in both controlled laboratory environments and in field tests, which has given us a better understanding of what materials are more suitable in this tough environment and has given us a tool for future predictions of the wear rate of the different material. The new conveyer screw, installed in February 2007 and with which the field test have been performed, has considerably reduced the wear of the construction and the target of 6 month maintenance-free operation is met with this screw for all the evaluated materials. The wear along the screw varies very much and with a clear trend for all the materials to increase towards the feeding direction of the screw. As an example, the wear plate SS2377 (stainless duplex steel) has a useful life at the most affected areas that is calculated to be 1077 days of operation with the

  8. Influence of heat treatment on the wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Chao; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Hanxiang; Qin, Jie; Shen, Yang; Zhang, Shihong

    2017-01-01

    Wear phenomenon has caused severe damage or failure of fracturing tools in oil and gas industry. In this paper, influence of heat treatment on the mechanical properties and wear resistance of fracturing tool made of lamellar graphite grey cast iron were investigated. The surface composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and metallographic microscope. Sliding wear tests were performed to study the tribological behavior. Tests results showed that wear rates of treated specimens decreased by 33 %. Besides, worn morphology and wear debris were analyzed using Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy dispersive Xray spectra (EDS). Wear failure mechanisms of specimens were identified. Furthermore, on-site experiment results indicated that wear loss of treated samples decreased by 37.5 %. The wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools can be improved obviously by the heat treatment

  9. Influence of heat treatment on the wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chao; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Hanxiang; Qin, Jie; Shen, Yang; Zhang, Shihong [China University of Petroleum, Qingdao (China)

    2017-02-15

    Wear phenomenon has caused severe damage or failure of fracturing tools in oil and gas industry. In this paper, influence of heat treatment on the mechanical properties and wear resistance of fracturing tool made of lamellar graphite grey cast iron were investigated. The surface composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and metallographic microscope. Sliding wear tests were performed to study the tribological behavior. Tests results showed that wear rates of treated specimens decreased by 33 %. Besides, worn morphology and wear debris were analyzed using Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy dispersive Xray spectra (EDS). Wear failure mechanisms of specimens were identified. Furthermore, on-site experiment results indicated that wear loss of treated samples decreased by 37.5 %. The wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools can be improved obviously by the heat treatment.

  10. Millisecond bearing wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blatchley, C.; Sioshansi, P.

    1987-01-01

    Radionuclides have been widely used for many purposes in medicine, metals, transportation, manufacturing and research. Approximately 200 artificially produced nuclides are commercially available from reactors or accelerator sources. Another 400 or so have properties which may make them useful if satisfactory methods of production can be developed. One of the most economically important industrial applications of radionuclides has been in wear measurement and condition monitoring in reciprocating engines. The general techniques developed for this purpose have also been applied in a number of other areas besides engine or lubrication studies. The wear of floor wax applied to linoleum, for example, has been measured by mixing shortlived radionuclides in the wax. In those applications where the material is tagged and then followed, the radionuclides are termed ''tracers,'' similar to the medical tracer materials used to measure uptake or metabolism of biologically active chemicals in the body. The alternate function for the radionuclides is to act as ''markers'' which indicate the amount of material which is remaining at the location of the original activation. Both approaches require that the debris removed from the surface must be carried away from the original site. The first application of radioactive tracers as a diagnostic tool in engines was in 1949. In this technique, an entire wearing part such as a piston ring or gear was first exposed to neutrons in a nuclear reactor. This caused the entire volume of the part to become radioactive. The part was next installed and exposed to wear in the operating engine. Detectors placed near the oil line, an oil filter or a sediment trap then determined the amount of debris from the part by counting the gamma rays escaping from the debris

  11. The wear properties of nuclear grade graphite IG-11 under different loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xiaowei; Zhang Lihong; Yu Suyuan

    2004-01-01

    The influence of normal load on wear performance of graphite used in a 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled reactor was investigated. The experiments included the wear between graphite and graphite specimens, and the wear between graphite and stainless steel specimens. The worn surfaces and abrasive particles were analysed with SEM and the wear mechanism was discussed. The sizes of abrasive particles were counted. (author)

  12. Fretting and wear of stainless and ferritic steels in LMFBR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.W.J.; Campbell, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Steam generators for LMFBR's may be subject to both fretting wear as a result of flow-induced vibrations and to wear from larger amplitude sliding movements from thermal changes. Results of tests simulating the latter are given for stainless and ferritic steels. For the assessment of fretting wear damage, vibration assessments must be combined with data on specific wear rates. Test mechanisms used to study fretting in sodium covering impact, impact-slide and pure rubbing are described and results presented. (author)

  13. Cast bulk metallic glass alloys: prospects as wear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Shiflet, Gary J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA)

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are single phase materials with unusual physical and mechanical properties. One intriguing area of possible use is as a wear material. Usually, pure metals and single phase dilute alloys do not perform well in tribological conditions. When the metal or alloy is lightweight, it is usually soft leading to galling in sliding situations. For the harder metals and alloys, their density is usually high, so there is an energy penalty when using these materials in wear situations. However, bulk metallic glasses at the same density are usually harder than corresponding metals and dilute single phase alloys, and so could offer better wear resistance. This work will discuss preliminary wear results for metallic glasses with densities in the range of 4.5 to 7.9 g/cc. The wear behavior of these materials will be compared to similar metals and alloys.

  14. Thermodynamical Description of Running Discontinuities: Application to Friction and Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Stolz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The friction and wear phenomena appear due to contact and relative motion between two solids. The evolution of contact conditions depends on loading conditions and mechanical behaviours. The wear phenomena are essentially characterized by a matter loss. Wear and friction are in interaction due to the fact that particles are detached from the solids. A complex medium appears as an interface having a strong effect on the friction condition. The purpose of this paper is to describe such phenomena taking account of different scales of modelization in order to derive some macroscopic laws. A thermodynamical approach is proposed and models of wear are analysed in this framework where the separation between the dissipation due to friction and that due to wear is made. Applications on different cases are presented.

  15. Stabilization of electrocatalytic metal nanoparticles at metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junction points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Chongmin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V; Park, Sehkyu; Aksay, Ilhan A; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

    2011-03-02

    Carbon-supported precious metal catalysts are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, and enhancement of catalyst dispersion and stability by controlling the interfacial structure is highly desired. Here we report a new method to deposit metal oxides and metal nanoparticles on graphene and form stable metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junctions for electrocatalysis applications. We first synthesize indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystals directly on functionalized graphene sheets, forming an ITO-graphene hybrid. Platinum nanoparticles are then deposited, forming a unique triple-junction structure (Pt-ITO-graphene). Our experimental work and periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the supported Pt nanoparticles are more stable at the Pt-ITO-graphene triple junctions. Furthermore, DFT calculations suggest that the defects and functional groups on graphene also play an important role in stabilizing the catalysts. These new catalyst materials were tested for oxygen reduction for potential applications in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, and they exhibited greatly enhanced stability and activity.

  16. Metal-metal interactions among dietary toxic and essential trace metals in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsenhans, B.; Schmolke, G.; Kolb, K.; Stokes, J.; Forth, W.

    1987-12-01

    Exposure to toxic and essential metals is thought to be reflected by corresponding metal concentrations in tissues. However, toxic and essential metals may influence each other in regard to their retention in the body. Therefore, a basic diet containing four toxic metals (As 7, Cd 9, Ni 13, and Pb 20 ppm) and adequate amounts of essential metals was fed to rats for 2 weeks. Test groups received the basic diet with increasing concentrations of one of the toxic metals (up to 90 ppm As, 180 ppm Cd, 365 ppm Ni, and 394 ppm Pb). As, Cd, Ni, Pb, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn were determined by atomic emission spectroscopy in liver, kidney, intestine, brain, muscle, bone, skin, hair, and blood. A linear relationship between diet and tissue concentration is observed for As and Ni in the kidney, for Cd in the liver, and for Pb in the bone. In other tissues saturation was observed. While Cd-Fe interactions were common to most of the tissues, other interactions were detected only in specific tissues, e.g., As-Cu in the kidney, Cd-Zn in the liver, and As-Mn, Cd-Mn, or Ni-Cu in the intestine. Increases of renal Pb and intestinal Cd by dietary Ni, and a decrease in bone As by dietary Pb were the most pronounced interactions between the toxic metals. The results demonstrate that potential target organs for the evaluation of metal exposure need to be carefully analyzed for interfering metal-metal interactions.

  17. Wear Properties of ECAP-Processed AM80 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, K. R.; Shivananda Nayaka, H.; Sahu, Sandeep

    2017-07-01

    AM80 magnesium alloy was subjected to equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP), and microstructural evolution was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Grain size was found to decrease up to 3 µm after four passes. An increase in number of ECAP passes led to a corresponding increase in hardness of the processed samples. Unprocessed and ECAP-processed samples were subjected to wear test using pin-on-disk wear test machine to study the wear behavior. Effects of varying loads (30 and 40 N) with sliding distances (2500 and 5000 m) were studied. The results showed reduction in wear mass loss for the ECAP-processed samples in comparison with unprocessed condition. Coefficient of friction (COF) was studied for different loads, and improvement in COF values was observed for ECAP-processed samples compared to unprocessed condition. Worn surfaces were studied using SEM and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer, and they exhibited plastic deformation, delamination, plowing, wear debris and oxidation in the sliding direction. X-ray diffraction analysis was conducted on the worn surfaces to identify the phases. It revealed the presence of magnesium oxide and magnesium aluminum oxide which led to oxidation wear in the sliding direction. Wear mechanism was found to be abrasive and oxidation wear.

  18. A study on wear behaviour of Al/6101/graphite composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep Sharma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The current research work scrutinizes aluminium alloy 6101-graphite composites for their mechanical and tribological behaviour in dry sliding environments. The orthodox liquid casting technique had been used for the manufacturing of composite materials and imperilled to T6 heat treatment. The content of reinforcement particles was taken as 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 wt.% of graphite to ascertain it is prospective as self-lubricating reinforcement in sliding wear environments. Hardness, tensile strength and flexural strength of cast Al6101 metal matrix and manufactured composites were evaluated. Hardness, tensile strength and flexural strength decreases with increasing volume fraction of graphite reinforcement as compared to cast Al6101 metal matrix. Wear tests were performed on pin on disc apparatus to assess the tribological behaviour of composites and to determine the optimum volume fraction of graphite for its minimum wear rate. Wear rate reduces with increase in graphite volume fraction and minimum wear rate was attained at 4 wt.% graphite. The wear was found to decrease with increase in sliding distance. The average co-efficient of friction also reduces with graphite addition and its minimum value was found to be at 4 wt.% graphite. The worn surfaces of wear specimens were studied through scanning electron microscopy. The occurrence of 4 wt.% of graphite reinforcement in the composites can reveal loftier wear possessions as compared to cast Al6101 metal matrix.

  19. Fretting wear characteristics of INCONEL 690 and INCONEL 600 in water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, S.H.; Lee, Y.Z.; Park, C.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Fretting is the oscillatory motion with very small amplitudes, which usually occurs between two solid surfaces in contact. Fretting wear is the removal of material from contacting surfaces through fretting action. Fretting wear of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plant becomes a serious problem in recent years. The materials for the tubes usually are INCONEL 690 (I-690) and INCONEL 600 (I-600). In this paper, fretting wear tests for I-690 and I-600 were performed under various applied loads in water at room temperature. Results showed that the fretting wear loss of I-690 and I-600 tubes was largely influenced by stick-slip. The fretting wear mechanisms were the abrasive wear in slip regime and the delamination wear in stick regime. Also, I-690 had somewhat better wear resistance than I-600. (orig.)

  20. Influence of stress state stiffness on wear resistance of materials under conditions of hydro- and impact abrasive wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogodaev, L.I.; Tsvetkov, Yu.N.; Khomyakova, N.F.

    1997-01-01

    Aimed to develop a universal criterion of wear resistance a wide range of steels and nonferrous alloys was tested and testing results were analyzed. The specimens were tested for hydro-abrasive and impact-abrasive wear. It is shown that wear resistance is dependent on the parameter which characterizes the stiffness of stressed state for thin wearing layers. The critical density of strain energy determined with regard to the stiffness of stressed state of surface layers is concluded to be an universal criterion of wear resistance. it is revealed that the stiffness of surface stressed state decreases with a hardness increase and with transition from tension to compression or shear. This phenomenon is considered as the protection of surface layers against catastrophic failure. The data on mechanical properties are presented for a great quantity of cast materials (stainless, chromium and manganese steels, aluminium and copper alloys)

  1. Optimization of pulsed DC PACVD parameters: Toward reducing wear rate of the DLC films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mansoureh; Mahboubi, Farzad; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza

    2016-12-01

    The effect of pulsed direct current (DC) plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) parameters such as temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH4 flow ratio on the wear behavior and wear durability of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied by using response surface methodology (RSM). DLC films were deposited on nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel. Wear rate and wear durability of the DLC films were examined with the pin-on-disk method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques were used for studying wear mechanisms, chemical structure, and hardness of the DLC films. RSM results show that duty cycle is one of the important parameters that affect the wear rate of the DLC samples. The wear rate of the samples deposited with a duty cycle of >75% decreases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. In contrast, for a duty cycle of <65%, the wear rate increases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. The wear durability of the DLC samples increases with an increase in the duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH4 flow ratio at the deposition temperature between 85 °C and 110 °C. Oxidation, fatigue, abrasive wear, and graphitization are the wear mechanisms observed on the wear scar of the DLC samples deposited with the optimum deposition conditions.

  2. Wear of polymers and composites

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelbary, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    In the field of tribology, the wear behaviour of polymers and composite materials is considered a highly non-linear phenomenon. Wear of Polymers and Composites introduces fundamentals of polymers and composites tribology. The book suggests a new approach to explore the effect of applied load and surface defects on the fatigue wear behaviour of polymers, using a new tribometer and thorough experiments. It discusses effects of surface cracks, under different static and cyclic loading parameters on wear, and presents an intelligent algorithm, in the form of a neural network, to map the relations

  3. CASTING OF DETAILS OF WEAR-RESISTANT CHROME CAST IRONS FOR CHROMIC MILLS IN COMBINED MOLDS AND CHILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Baranovskij

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Relative wear resistance of chrome cast irons of eutectic composition is determined in laboratory and industry conditions. Complex alloyed eutectic cast iron with increased wear resistance and mechanical characteristics is developed.

  4. Dry sliding wear behaviour of organo-modified montmorillonite filled epoxy nanocomposites using Taguchi's techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashmi; Renukappa, N.M.; Suresha, B.; Devarajaiah, R.M.; Shivakumar, K.N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Successful fabrication of OMMT filled epoxy nanocomposites by high-shear mixing mehod. → Systematic tribological behaviour of the nanocomposites was made using Taguchi method. → Worn surface morphologies of the samples were discussed for different wear mechanisms. → Generation of wear data for sliding/bearing parts for different industries. -- Abstract: The aim of the research article is to study the dry sliding wear behaviour of epoxy with different wt.% of organo-modified montmorillonite (OMMT) filled nanocomposites. An orthogonal array (L 9 ) was used to investigate the influence of tribological parameters. The results indicate that the sliding distance emerges as the most significant factor affecting wear rate of epoxy nanocomposites. Experimental results showed that the inclusion of 5 wt.% OMMT nanofiller increased the wear resistance of the epoxy nanocomposite significantly. Furthermore, the worn surfaces of the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the wear mechanisms and to correlate them with the wear test results.

  5. Abrasive wear response of aluminium alloy-sillimanite particle reinforced composite under low stress condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.; Mondal, D.P.; Das, S.

    2006-01-01

    The abrasive wear behaviour of aluminium alloy-sillimanite particle reinforced composite under low stress condition has been reported and the results have been compared with the corresponding matrix alloy which was produced and cast under similar conditions. The study showed that wear resistance (inverse of wear rate) of the composite was higher than the matrix alloy. The wear rate decreased with sliding distance and increased with applied load irrespective of materials. The worn surfaces and subsurfaces of the tested samples were examined in the scanning electron microscope in order to understand the material removal mechanism during low stress abrasive wear process

  6. Theoretical-experimental analysis of the fretting/impact wear in fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecos, Luis F.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power plant fuel elements are subjected to flow induced vibrations. A consequence of these vibrations is impact/fretting wear in fuel rods or sliding shoes. Because of the difficulties to assert the mechanism of impact/fretting wear phenomenon it is necessary to use semiempirical formulations in order to predict the wear rate of the components. The results of a series of experiments with Zr-4 specimens are presented in this work. A parameter called 'work-rate' was used to normalize the wear rates and interpret the results in terms of wear coefficient. (author) [es

  7. [Infants wearing teething necklaces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefer, A; Casasoprana, A; Cascarigny, F; Claudet, I

    2012-10-01

    Numerous infants wear teething necklaces, a quack remedy with a real risk of strangulation or aspiration of small beads. Evaluate parental perceptions and beliefs about the use of teething necklaces and analyze parental knowledge about the associated dangers. Between March and July 2011, in three different pediatric units of a tertiary children's hospital and a general hospital in Toulouse and Montauban (southwest France), voluntary parents were invited to be interviewed about their child wearing a teething necklace. The interviews were conducted following an anthropological approach: they were recorded and then fully transcribed and analyzed. Parents were informed that the conversation was recorded. During the study period, 48 children were eligible. Eleven families refused to participate, 29 parents were interviewed face to face. The children's mean age was 14 years ± 7 months, the male:female ratio was equal to 0.8 (12 boys, 15 girls). The mean age of children when necklace wearing was started was equal to 4 ± 2 months. The mean mother's age was 31 ± 5 years and 33 ± 4 years for fathers. The parents' religion was mostly Catholic (60%). Teething necklaces were mainly made of amber (n=23). Sales information about the risks associated with the necklaces was for the most part absent (92%). The most frequent positive parental perceptions were analgesic properties and a soothing remedy (73%); a birth accessory and memory (64%); an esthetic accessory (60%); a protective amulet (60%); and an alternative or additional element to other traditional therapeutics (55%). The negative parental perceptions (n=4) were an unnecessary accessory, costume jewelry, a pure commercial abuse of a popular belief, a dangerous item with a risk of strangulation, and the absence of proof of its efficacy. Although parents concede that teeth eruption is benign, they fear its related symptoms. To a natural phenomenon a natural response: they use a necklace to satisfy the analogy. The

  8. Friction and wear methodologies for design and control

    CERN Document Server

    Straffelini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the basic concepts of contact mechanics, friction, lubrication, and wear mechanisms, providing simplified analytical relationships that are useful for quantitative assessments. Subsequently, an overview on the main wear processes is provided, and guidelines on the most suitable design solutions for each specific application are outlined. The final part of the text is devoted to a description of the main materials and surface treatments specifically developed for tribological applications and to the presentation of tribological systems of particular engineering relevance. The text is up to date with the latest developments in the field of tribology and provides a theoretical framework to explain friction and wear problems, together with practical tools for their resolution. The text is intended for students on Engineering courses (both bachelor and master degrees) who must develop a sound understanding of friction, wear, lubrication, and surface engineering, and for technicians or professi...

  9. Tyre and road wear prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Both tyre wear and road polishing are complex phenomenon, which are obviously strongly related; the energy that polishes the road is the energy that wears the tyre. The both depend non-linearly on numerous parameters, like materials used, vehicle and road usage, environmental conditions (i.e.

  10. Wear Assessment of Conical Pick used in Coal Cutting Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath; Hloch, Sergej

    2015-09-01

    Conical pick is a widely used tool for cutting coal in mines. It has a cemented carbide tip inserted in a steel body. Cemented carbide has been in use for many years for coal/rock cutting because it has the optimum combination of hardness, toughness and resistance against abrasive wear. As coal/rock is a heterogeneous substance, the cutting tool has to undergo various obstructions at the time of excavation that cause the tool to wear out. The cracks and fractures developing in the cemented carbide limit the life of the tool. For a long time, different wear mechanisms have been studied to develop improved grades of cemented carbide with high wear resistance properties. The research is still continuing. Moreover, due to the highly unpredictable nature of coal/rock, it is not easy to understand the wear mechanisms. In the present work, an attempt has been made to understand the wear mechanisms in four conical picks, which were used in a continuous miner machine for underground mining of coal. The wearing pattern of the conical pick indicates damage in its cemented carbide tip as well as the steel body. The worn out parts of the tools have been critically examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) point analysis. Mainly four types of wear mechanisms, namely, coal/rock intermixing, plastic deformation, rock channel formation and crushing and cracking, have been detected. The presence of coal/rock material and their respective concentrations in the selected area of worn out surface were observed using the spectra generated by EDX analysis.

  11. Prolonging contact lens wear and making contact lens wear safer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulks, Gary N

    2006-02-01

    To summarize the present status of safety and efficacy of contact lens wear. Literature review. Ovid Medline searches were performed on records from 1966 through 2005 using keywords: keratitis, contact lens complications, extended-wear contact lenses, and silicone-hydrogel contact lenses. Patients desire comfort, clarity of vision, and prolonged contact lens wear when contact lenses are used to correct refractive error. Practitioners desire patient satisfaction but also require maintenance of the integrity of the eye and no complications that jeopardize vision or health of the eye. Improvements in the oxygen permeability of the contact lens materials, design of the contact lens and its surface, and solutions for the maintenance of the lens have reduced but not eliminated the risks of infection, inflammation, and conjunctival papillary reaction associated with contact lens wear. The lessons of past and recent history suggest that patient education and practitioner participation in the management of contact lens wear continue to be critical factors for patient satisfaction and safety in the extended wear of contact lenses. The availability of highly oxygen permeable contact lenses has increased the tolerance and safety of extended contact lens wear, but patient instruction and education in proper use and care of lenses is required and caution is advised.

  12. Tooth wear: when to treat, why, and how. Part two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Thomas D

    2009-01-01

    Tooth wear has been described in the literature as physiologic--that is, normal, expected over the life span of an individual, and not creating a pathologic condition. It has also been described in pathologic terms as caused by stress, corrosion, and friction, utilizing a variety of mechanisms and affected by a host of endogenous and exogenous factors. From a clinician's point of view, when should we decide to restore a tooth or change the conditions in the mouth to protect the teeth; and what should we consider using to either prevent or restore abnormal--i.e, pathologic--tooth wear? This review in Part One (Northwest Dentistry, September-October 2009) looked at what is normal, non-pathologic tooth wear and etiologies associated with all forms of tooth wear. Part Two will discuss the effects of tooth wear in enamel and dentin, when it may be advisable to intervene in the wear processes diagnosed on specific patients, and what methods of prevention and restoration can be utilized to restore or maintain the dentition. This review will not look at the need for full mouth reconstruction due to wear.

  13. Phenomenological modeling of abradable wear in turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoul, Bérenger; Batailly, Alain; Stainier, Laurent; Legrand, Mathias; Cartraud, Patrice

    2018-01-01

    Abradable materials are widely used as coatings within compressor and turbine stages of modern aircraft engines in order to reduce operating blade-tip/casing clearances and thus maximize energy efficiency. However, rubbing occurrences between blade tips and coating liners may lead to high blade vibratory levels and endanger their structural integrity through fatigue mechanisms. Accordingly, there is a need for a better comprehension of the physical phenomena at play and for an accurate modeling of the interaction, in order to predict potentially unsafe events. To this end, this work introduces a phenomenological model of the abradable coating removal based on phenomena reported in the literature and accounting for key frictional and wear mechanisms including plasticity at junctions, ploughing, micro-rupture and machining. It is implemented within an in-house software solution dedicated to the prediction of full three-dimensional blade/abradable coating interactions within an aircraft engine low pressure compressor. Two case studies are considered. The first one compares the results of an experimental abradable test rig and its simulation. The second one deals with the simulation of interactions in a complete low-pressure compressor. The consistency of the model with experimental observations is underlined, and the impact of material parameter variations on the interaction and wear behavior of the blade is discussed. It is found that even though wear patterns are remarkably robust, results are significantly influenced by abradable coating material properties.

  14. Wear aspects of internal combustion engine valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panţuru, M.; Chicet, D.; Paulin, C.; Alexandru, A.; Munteanu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Because the surface engineering is becoming an increasingly viable alternative to the constructive changes made to improve the efficiency of internal combustion engines, have been proposed and tested various types of coatings of some organs of internal combustion engines. One vital organ is the engine valves, which is subjected during operation to combined thermal, mechanical, corrosion and wear solicitations, which are leading to severe corrosion and complete breakdown. In this paper were analyzed aspects of valves wear and the active surfaces were coated using the atmospheric plasma spraying method (APS) with two commercial powders: Ni-Al and YSZ. Microstructural analyzes were made on these layers and also observations regarding the possibility of using them as thermal barrier and anti-oxidant coatings.

  15. Wear studies of materials for tubes and anti-vibration bars in nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P.L.; Taponat, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Wear occurs as a result of relative motion at the interface of two contacting bodies. In nuclear power steam generators, high flow rates can induce vibration of the tubes resulting in wear damage due to impact and sliding contacts between the tubes and their supports. A research project aiming to gain better understanding of the mechanisms and mechanics involved in vibratory wear and to develop a more versatile predictive wear model was carried out. Combinations of Inconel tubes against flat anti-vibration bars of 403 s.s. and electrolytic chrome plated Inconel 600 were tested under conditions of reciprocating sliding and impacting in water at room temperature and at 250 C. The results show that depending on the material combinations and the loading conditions distinctively different wear mechanisms and often drastically different wear rates can occur

  16. Exploring wear at the nanoscale with circular mode atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Noel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of atomic force microscopy (AFM has allowed wear mechanisms to be investigated at the nanometer scale by means of a single asperity contact generated by an AFM tip and an interacting surface. However, the low wear rate at the nanoscale and the thermal drift require fastidious quantitative measurements of the wear volume for determining wear laws. In this paper, we describe a new, effective, experimental methodology based on circular mode AFM, which generates high frequency, circular displacements of the contact. Under such conditions, the wear rate is significant and the drift of the piezoelectric actuator is limited. As a result, well-defined wear tracks are generated and an accurate computation of the wear volume is possible. Finally, we describe the advantages of this method and we report a relevant application example addressing a Cu/Al2O3 nanocomposite material used in industrial applications.

  17. High Temperature Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Performance of Laser Cladding WC/Ni Composite Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Jiao-xi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two different types of agglomerate and angular WC/Ni matrix composite coatings were deposited by laser cladding. The high temperature wear resistance of these composite coatings was tested with a ring-on-disc MMG-10 apparatus. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS for elemental composition. The results show that the high temperature wear resistance of the laser clad WC/Ni-based composite coatings is improved significantly with WC mass fraction increasing. The 60% agglomerate WC/Ni composite coating has optimal high temperature wear resistance. High temperature wear mechanism of 60% WC/Ni composite coating is from abrasive wear of low temperature into composite function of the oxidation wear and abrasive wear.

  18. Tool wear of a single-crystal diamond tool in nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Terano, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    Tool wear characteristics of a diamond tool in ductile mode machining are presented in this paper. Nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate was conducted to examine the tool wear rate of a single-crystal diamond tool. Effects of lubrication on the tool wear rate were also evaluated. A numerical simulation technique was developed to evaluate the tool temperature and normal stress acting on the wear surface. From the simulation results it was found that the tool temperature does not increase during the machining experiment. It is also demonstrated that tool wear is attributed to the abrasive wear mechanism, but the effect of the adhesion wear mechanism is minor in nano-groove machining. It is found that the tool wear rate is reduced by using water or kerosene as a lubricant. (paper)

  19. Wear deformation of ordered Fe-Al intermetallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maupin, H.E. (US Bureau of Mines, Albany Research Center, OR (United States)); Wilson, R.D. (US Bureau of Mines, Albany Research Center, OR (United States)); Hawk, J.A. (US Bureau of Mines, Albany Research Center, OR (United States))

    1993-04-13

    The Bureau of Mines conducted abrasive wear research on DO[sub 3] ordered and disordered Fe[sub 3]Al intermetallics. The effect of abrasion on these alloys was studied through mixroscopy, X-ray diffraction and hardness measurements. The region near the wear surface undergoes dynamic recrystallization, i.e. the original microstructural morphology of micron-size grains is replaced by one with nanosize grains. Abrasion of the Fe[sub 3]Al alloys also results in a loss of the DO[sub 3] ordering in the wear surface region. The bulk temperature rise of the specimen during abrasion was approximately 28 C which is insufficient to cause recrystallization in these alloys. Therefore, the flash temperature due to interface frictional heating is considered more important than the bulk temperature when considering dynamic recrystallization as the transformation mechanism in the near wear surface region. (orig.)

  20. Fretting wear behavior of TA 16 alloy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yafei; Zhang Xiaoyu; Zhu Minhao; Ren Pingdi; Li Changxiang

    2011-01-01

    The fretting wear behavior tests on cylinder contacts of TA16/0Cr18Ni9 have been carried out under the normal load (50 N and 80 N), frequency (2 Hz) and displacement amplitude (from 80 μm to 200 μm) using the hydraulic fretting test machine with a high precision. Experimental results showed that the normal loads and displacement amplitudes may have remarkable influence on the damage degree and injury mechanism of materials. Degree of injury of material increases with the increasing displacement amplitude and normal loads, however, the friction coefficients decrease. Three-body layer consists of two parts: plastic deformation layer and debris layer that has effect on the restriction and control in the fretting wear. The analysis found that there are some micro-crack and delamination in the plastic deformation layer, and the abrasive dust have based mainly on the oxide of titanium and titanium alloys, and attached on the surface of wear. Adhesive wear, abrasive wear and friction oxidation are the main fretting wear mechanism. (authors)

  1. Wear behavior of human enamel against lithium disilicate glass ceramic and type III gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahreum; Swain, Michael; He, Lihong; Lyons, Karl

    2014-12-01

    The wear behavior of human enamel that opposes different prosthetic materials is still not clear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare the friction and wear behavior of human tooth enamel that opposes 2 indirect restorative materials: lithium disilicate glass ceramic and Type III gold. Friction-wear tests on human enamel (n=5) that opposes lithium disilicate glass ceramic (n=5) and Type III gold (n=5) were conducted in a ball-on-flat configuration with a reciprocating wear testing apparatus. The wear pairs were subjected to a normal load of 9.8 N, a reciprocating amplitude of approximately 200 μm, and a reciprocating frequency of approximately 1.6 Hz for up to 1100 cycles per test under distilled water lubrication. The frictional force of each cycle was recorded, and the corresponding friction coefficient for different wear pairs was calculated. After wear testing, the wear scars on the enamel specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Type III gold had a significantly lower steady-state friction coefficient (P=.009) and caused less wear damage on enamel than lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Enamel that opposed lithium disilicate glass ceramic exhibited cracks, plow furrows, and surface loss, which indicated abrasive wear as the prominent wear mechanism. In comparison, the enamel wear scar that opposed Type III gold had small patches of gold smear adhered to the surface, which indicated a predominantly adhesive wear mechanism. A lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance were observed when human enamel was opposed by Type III gold than by lithium disilicate glass ceramic in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rubber glove wearing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Takada, Kaoru.

    1994-01-01

    Rubber groves are attached each to an upper end of a glove putting vessel having an air-sucking hole on the bottom by enlarging an opening end of the rubber glove and turning back the inside to the outside. When the sucking device is operated, air in the glove putting device is sucked and the rubber glove is expanded by an atmospheric pressure. After expansion of the rubber glove to some extent, the sucking device is stopped, and presence or absence of failures of the rubber glove is confirmed by shrinkage of the rubber glove and by an indication value of a pressure gauge for detecting the pressure change in the vessel. Then, a hand is inserted to the expanded rubber glove, and a detaching switch in the vessel is pushed by a finger tip. A detaching piece at the upper end of the vessel is protruded outwardly to enlarge the turned-back portion of the rubber glove to easily release the rubber glove from the putting vessel, and the rubber glove is put on. This enables to wear the rubber glove and conduct failure test simultaneously. Further, a user can put on the rubber glove without touching the outside of the rubber glove. (I.N.)

  3. High-speed wear testing of selected ceramics in abrasive slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailov, Arnold; Levänen, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Due to increased production speeds in modern process environments, the loading conditions in sliding contact applications have become more challenging. Therefore it is important to have good understanding of wear mechanisms in high-speed sliding conditions. A wear testing device was manufactured for the purpose of cost-efficient simulation of water-containing high-speed sliding conditions. Sliding speeds up to 40 meters per second can be achieved while abrasive-containing slurry is fed into the contact interface of material samples and a rubber coated drum. High-speed wear tests were run with three ceramic materials: silicon nitride, silicon carbide and partially stabilized zirconia. Wear behavior of these ceramics was analyzed as a function of sliding speed and slurry composition. Results indicate that in mild wear region increase in sliding speed reduced overall wear, whereas in severe wear conditions increasing speed accelerated wear. A transition from mild to severe wear was observed for silicon carbide when tested in alumina-containing slurry. For the materials that had high enough hardness, wear rates were dictated by the respective order of fracture toughness. Visual inspection of the worn samples supported the interpretation of wear mode transition

  4. Experimental and numerical study on casing wear in highly deviated drilling for oil and gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at studying the casing wear in the highly deviated well drilling, the experimental study on the casing wear was carried out in the first place. According to the test data and the linear wear model based on the energy dissipation proposed by White and Dawson, the tool joint–casing wear coefficient was obtained. The finite element model for casing wear mechanism research was established using ABAQUS. The nodal movement of the contact surface was employed to simulate the evolution of the wear depth, exploiting the Umeshmotion user subroutine. In addition, the time-dependent geometry of the contact surfaces between the tool joint and casing was being updated continuously. Consequently, the contact area and contact pressure were changed continuously during the casing wear process, which gives a more realistic simulation. Based on the shapes of worn casing, the numerical simulation research was carried out to determine the remaining collapse strength. Then the change curve of the maximum casing wear depth with time was obtained. Besides, the relationship between the maximum wear depth and remaining collapse strength was established to predict the maximum wear depth and the remaining strength of the casing after a period of accumulative wear, providing a theoretical basis for the safety assessment of worn casing.

  5. Erosive tooth wear in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; Lussi, A.; Jaeggi, T.; Gambon, D.L.; Lussi, A.; Ganss, C.

    2014-01-01

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. Besides the anatomical differences between deciduous and permanent teeth, additional histological differences may influence their susceptibility to dissolution. Considering laboratory studies alone, it is not clear whether deciduous teeth are

  6. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, Y.S. [Univ. of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States); Kingsbury, G.R. [Kingsbury (G.R.), Lyndhurst, OH (United States)

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  7. New Challenges in Tribology: Wear Assessment Using 3D Optical Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valigi, Maria Cristina; Logozzo, Silvia; Affatato, Saverio

    2017-05-18

    Wear is a significant mechanical and clinical problem. To acquire further knowledge on the tribological phenomena that involve freeform mechanical components or medical prostheses, wear tests are performed on biomedical and industrial materials in order to solve or reduce failures or malfunctions due to material loss. Scientific and technological advances in the field of optical scanning allow the application of innovative devices for wear measurements, leading to improvements that were unimaginable until a few years ago. It is therefore important to develop techniques, based on new instrumentations, for more accurate and reproducible measurements of wear. The aim of this work is to discuss the use of innovative 3D optical scanners and an experimental procedure to detect and evaluate wear, comparing this technique with other wear evaluation methods for industrial components and biomedical devices.

  8. Surface/structure functionalization of copper-based catalysts by metal-support and/or metal-metal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsolakis, Michalis; Ioakeimidis, Zisis

    2014-11-01

    Cu-based catalysts have recently attracted great attention both in catalysis and electro-catalysis fields due to their excellent catalytic performance and low cost. Given that their performance is determined, to a great extent, by Cu sites local environment, considerable efforts have been devoted on the strategic modifications of the electronic and structural properties of Cu sites. In this regard, the feasibility of tuning the local structure of Cu entities by means of metal-support or metal-metal interactions is investigated. More specifically, the physicochemical properties of Cu entities are modified by employing: (i) different oxides (CeO2, La2O3, Sm2O3), or (ii) ceria-based mixed oxides (Ce1-xSmxOδ) as supporting carriers, and (iii) a second metal (Cobalt) adjacent to Cu (bimetallic Cu-Co/CeO2). A characterization study, involving BET, XRD, TPR, and XPS, reveal that significant modifications on structural, redox and electronic properties of Cu sites can be induced by adopting either different oxide carriers or bimetallic complexes. Fundamental insights into the tuning of Cu local environment by metal-support or metal-metal interactions are provided, paving the way for real-life industrial applications.

  9. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Properties of Clean Surfaces: Adhesion, Friction, and Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter presents the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of smooth, atomically clean surfaces of solid-solid couples, such as metal-ceramic couples, in a clean environment. Surface and bulk properties, which determine the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of solid-solid couples, are described. The primary emphasis is on the nature and character of the metal, especially its surface energy and ductility. Also, the mechanisms of friction and wear for clean, smooth surfaces are stated.

  10. Hydrogen ion induced ultralow wear of PEEK under extreme load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuai; Wang, Anying; Fei, Jixiong; Wang, Zhenyang; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Lin, Bin

    2018-03-01

    As a high-performance engineering polymer, poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is a perfect candidate material for applications under extreme working conditions. However, its high wear rate greatly shortens its service life. In this study, ultralow friction and wear between PEEK and silicon nitride (Si3N4) under extreme-load conditions (with a mean contact pressure above 100 MPa) are found in acid lubricating solutions. Both friction and wear decrease sharply with decreasing pH. At pH = 1, the friction coefficient decreases by an order of magnitude and the wear rate of the PEEK decreases by two orders of magnitude compared to the results with water lubrication. These reductions in friction and wear occur for different speed, load, and surface roughness conditions. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the formation of hydrogen-ion-induced electrical double layers on the surfaces of PEEK and Si3N4. The combined effect of the resulting repulsive force, electro-viscosity, and low shear strength of the water layer dramatically reduces both friction and wear.

  11. Abrasive Wear Resistance of the Iron- and WC-based Hardfaced Coatings Evaluated with Scratch Test Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vencl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abrasive wear is one of the most common types of wear, which makesabrasive wear resistance very important in many industries. Thehard facing is considered as useful and economical way to improve theperformance of components submitted to severe abrasive wear conditions, with wide range of applicable filler materials. The abrasive wear resistance of the three different hardfaced coatings (two iron‐based and one WC‐based, which were intended to be used for reparation of the impact plates of the ventilation mill, was investigated and compared. Abrasive wear tests were carried‐out by using the scratch tester under the dry conditions. Three normal loads of 10, 50 and 100 N and the constant sliding speed of 4 mm/s were used. Scratch test was chosen as a relatively easy and quick test method. Wear mechanism analysis showed significant influence of the hardfaced coatings structure, which, along with hardness, has determined coatings abrasive wear resistance.

  12. Effect of soot on oil properties and wear of engine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D A; Lewis, R

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the work outlined in this paper was to increase the understanding of the wear mechanisms that occur within a soot contaminated contact zone, to help in future development of a predictive wear model to assist in the automotive engine valve train design process. The paper builds on previous work by the author, through testing of different lubricants and increased levels of soot contamination. Wear testing has been carried out using specimens operating under realistic engine conditions, using a reciprocating test-rig specifically designed for this application, where a steel disc is held in a heated bath of oil and a steel ball is attached to a reciprocating arm (replicating a sliding elephant's foot valve train contact). Detailed analysis of the test specimens has been performed using scanning electron microscopy to identify wear features relating to the proposed wear mechanisms. Analysis of worn engine components from durability engine tests has also been carried out for a comparison between specimen tests and engine testing. To assist the understanding of the wear test results obtained, the physical properties of contaminated lubricants were investigated, through viscosity, traction and friction measurements. The results have revealed how varying lubrication conditions change the wear rate of engine components and determine the wear mechanism that dominates in specific situations. Testing has also shown the positive effects of advanced engine lubricants to reduce the amount of wear produced with soot present

  13. Effect of soot on oil properties and wear of engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D. A.; Lewis, R.

    2007-09-01

    The objective of the work outlined in this paper was to increase the understanding of the wear mechanisms that occur within a soot contaminated contact zone, to help in future development of a predictive wear model to assist in the automotive engine valve train design process. The paper builds on previous work by the author, through testing of different lubricants and increased levels of soot contamination. Wear testing has been carried out using specimens operating under realistic engine conditions, using a reciprocating test-rig specifically designed for this application, where a steel disc is held in a heated bath of oil and a steel ball is attached to a reciprocating arm (replicating a sliding elephant's foot valve train contact). Detailed analysis of the test specimens has been performed using scanning electron microscopy to identify wear features relating to the proposed wear mechanisms. Analysis of worn engine components from durability engine tests has also been carried out for a comparison between specimen tests and engine testing. To assist the understanding of the wear test results obtained, the physical properties of contaminated lubricants were investigated, through viscosity, traction and friction measurements. The results have revealed how varying lubrication conditions change the wear rate of engine components and determine the wear mechanism that dominates in specific situations. Testing has also shown the positive effects of advanced engine lubricants to reduce the amount of wear produced with soot present.

  14. The corneal stroma during contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Isabelle; Stapleton, Fiona

    2005-03-01

    Recent technological advances have lead to novel descriptions of the microanatomy of the corneal stroma. In the first section of this review, these findings and the role they play in the maintenance of vital properties such as corneal transparency, mechanical strength, homeostasis, wound-healing response and metabolism are described. In the second part, contact lens induced stromal alterations such as acidosis, oedema, striae, thinning and opacities are reviewed as well as the more recently described phenomenon of microdot deposits and keratocyte loss with an emphasis on how lens wearing stromal effects can be minimised.

  15. [Metal ion concentrations in patients with metal-metal bearings in prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzer, J P; Van Der Straeten, C; Sonntag, R; Müller, U; Streit, M; Moradi, B; Jäger, S; Reinders, J

    2013-08-01

    Increased wear leads to elevated systemic and local metal ion concentrations for patients treated with metal-on-metal bearings. The local metal ion content in the close environment of the joint replacement (e.g. joint aspirate or tissue) is several times higher compared to the systemic metal content (e.g. in blood or serum). As a result of increased metal ion levels, local and systemic effects, such as osteolysis, pseudotumors, sensitization or in rare cases toxicity may occur. Although the definition of a specific threshold to define clinical problems is difficult due to a lack of sensitivity, the systemic metal concentration is frequently measured clinically. Currently a threshold for cobalt and chromium between 4 µg/l and 7 µg/l is under debate. Very high levels (≥ 20 µg/l) or a steady increase over time should be a warning sign; however, metal ion levels should not be interpreted as a single diagnostic tool but rather in the entire context of the clinical, radiological and cross-sectional imaging, metal artefact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) findings.

  16. Preparation, characterization and wear behavior of carbon coated magnesium alloy with electroless plating nickel interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Yan [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Academician Expert Office Workstation (Jiansheng Pan), Lin’an, Zhejiang Province (China); Feng, Kai, E-mail: fengkai@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Academician Expert Office Workstation (Jiansheng Pan), Lin’an, Zhejiang Province (China); Guo, Xingwu [National Engineering Research Center of Light Alloys Net Forming (LAF), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhou, Zhifeng [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Dong, Jie [National Engineering Research Center of Light Alloys Net Forming (LAF), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wu, Yixiong [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Academician Expert Office Workstation (Jiansheng Pan), Lin’an, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • The carbon film with nickel interlayer (Ni + C coating) is deposited on GW83. • In Ni + C composite coating the carbon coating has good adhesion with the nickel interlayer. • The wear track of Ni + C coating is narrower compared to the bare one. • The wear resistance of GW83 is greatly improved by the Ni + C coating. - Abstract: Poor wear resistance of rare earth magnesium alloys has prevented them from wider application. In this study, composite coating (PVD carbon coating deposited on electroless plating nickel interlayer) is prepared to protect GW83 magnesium alloys against wear. The Ni + C composite coating has a dense microstructure, improved adhesion strength and hardness due to the effective support of Ni interlayer. The wear test result shows that the Ni + C composite coating can greatly prolong the wear life of the magnesium alloy. The wear track of the Ni + C coated magnesium alloy is obviously narrower and shows less abrasive particles as compared with the bare one. Abrasive wear is the wear mechanism of the coatings at the room temperature. In conclusion, the wear resistance of the GW83 magnesium alloy can be greatly improved by the Ni + C composite coating.

  17. Unlubricated Gross Slip Fretting Wear of Metallic Plasma Sprayed Coatings for Ti6A14V Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hager, Jr., Carl H; Sanders, Jeffrey H; Sharma, Shashi K

    2006-01-01

    .... The combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface profilometry, surface chemistry (EDS), and friction analysis were used to study coating performance and evaluate the interfacial wear mechanisms...

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2016-01-06

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2015-01-07

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2014-01-06

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  1. Effects of heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ni60/h-BN self-lubricating anti-wear composite coatings on 304 stainless steel by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Yu, Peng-Cheng; Zhai, Yong-Jie; Qiao, Shi-Jie; Wang, Ming-Di; Wang, Yong-Guang; Chen, Yao

    2015-11-01

    Laser clad Ni60/h-BN self-lubricating anti-wear composite coating on 304 stainless steel were heat treated at 600 °C (stress relief annealing) for 1 h and 2 h, respectively. Effects of the phase compositions, microstructure, microhardness, nano-indentation and tribological properties of the composite coatings with and without heat treatment had been investigated systemically. Results indicated that three coatings mainly consist of the matrix γ-(Ni, Fe) solid solution, the CrB ceramic phases and the h-BN lubricating phases. The maximum microhardness of the coatings was first increased from 667.7 HV0.5 to 765.0 HV0.5 after heat treatment for 1 h, and then decreased to 698.3 HV0.5 after heat treatment for 2 h. The hardness of γ-(Ni, Fe) solid solution without heat treatment and after heat treatment 1 h and 2 h were 5.09 GPa, 7.20 GPa and 3.77 GPa, respectively. Compared with the coating without heat treatment, the friction coefficients of the coating after heat treatment were decreased obviously. Effects of the heat treatment time on friction coefficient were negligible, but were significant on wear volume loss. Comparatively speaking, the laser clad self-lubricating anti-wear composite coating after heat treatment for 1 h presented the best anti-wear and friction reduction properties.

  2. Reliability modelling for wear out failure period of a single unit system

    OpenAIRE

    Arekar, Kirti; Ailawadi, Satish; Jain, Rinku

    2012-01-01

    The present paper deals with two time-shifted density models for wear out failure period of a single unit system. The study, considered the time-shifted Gamma and Normal distributions. Wear out failures occur as a result of deterioration processes or mechanical wear and its probability of occurrence increases with time. A failure rate as a function of time deceases in an early failure period and it increases in wear out period. Failure rates for time shifted distributions and expression for m...

  3. Experimental wear behaviour of cryogenically treated aluminium 6063 and 8011 materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Padmanabhan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to focus on the effect of cryogenic treatment on the microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of Al 6061 and Al 8011. The first objective was to understand the degree to which wear behaviour has shown improvement with aluminium grades being treated cryogenically on the specimens. To conduct wear test Aluminium experimental investigation has been carried out on aluminium alloys with cryogenic coolants. The cryogenic coolant has increased the wear resistance properties of aluminium upto 25% when compared to wear of non-cryogenically treated aluminium. The cryogenic treatment was carried out under three different timings for three different rpm’s under varying loads. The paper also studies the micro structural changes under these varying conditions. The experimental investigation of the paper concludes that cryogenically treated aluminium shows increase in wear resistance of nearly 25%.

  4. Influence of Multiple Bionic Unit Coupling on Sliding Wear of Laser-Processed Gray Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Peng; Sui, Qi; Zhao, Kai; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Luquan

    2017-04-01

    In this study, in effort to improve the sliding wear resistance of gray cast iron under wet lubrication conditions, specimens with different bionic units were manufactured and modified according to bionic theory. Inspired by the structure and appearance of biological wear-resistant skin, two kinds of bionic units were processed by laser on the specimen surfaces. We investigated the wear resistance properties of the samples via indentation method and then observed the wear surface morphology of specimens and the stress distributions. The results indicated that coupling the bionic units enhanced the wear resistance of the cast iron considerably compared to the other samples. We also determined the mechanism of wear resistance improvement according to the results.

  5. A comparative study of the abrasive wear behavior of MoSi2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.A.; Alman, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    This study is a preliminary assessment of the abrasive wear behavior of monolithic MoSi 2 . Comparisons with the wear behavior of other advanced materials, such as refractory metals, intermetallic compounds (i.e., TiAl, Fe 3 Al), and ceramics (i.e., Si 3 N 4 , ZrO 2 , and Al 2 O 3 ), are made. In general, the wear behavior of MoSi 2 is similar to oxide ceramics, due in large part to the high relative hardness of the compound. However, as with most brittle materials, as the hardness of the abrasive increases relative to the hardness of the wearing material (i.e., MoSi 2 abraded on garnet at 13 GPa versus abrasion on SiC at 24 GPa), volume wear increases; and the dominant wear mechanism changes, from one of primarily edge fracture to one combining micro-cutting with significant micro-fracture and grain pull-out

  6. Wear behavior of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plant operating condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In-Sup; Hong, Jin-Ki; Kim, Hyung-Nam; Jang, Ki-Sang

    2003-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding wear tests were performed on steam generator tubes materials at steam generator operating temperature. The material surfaces react with oxygen to form oxides. The oxide properties such as formation rate and mechanical properties are varied with the test temperature and alloy composition. So, it is important to investigate the wear properties of each steam generator tube materials in steam generator operating condition. The tests results indicated that the wear coefficient in work rate model of alloy 690 was faster than that of alloy 800. From the scanning electron microscopy observation, the wear scars were similar each other and worn surfaces were covered with oxide layers. It seemed that the oxide layers were formed by wear debris sintering or cold welding and these layer properties affected the wear rate of steam generator tube materials. (author)

  7. A new production technique for wear resistant ring-hammers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shifeng

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on a great number of laboratory experiments, a new technique has been developed for producing wear resistant ring-hammers. In this technology, lost foam casting with iron sand was combined to make mold; a special alloy was used to inoculate the molten steel, and proper heat treatment was used to further improve mechanical properties of wear resistant ring-hammers. The influence of this new production technology on the microstructure and mechanical properties of wear resistant ring-hammers was studied. Results show that iron sand molding, having the inherent characteristic of sand molding, changes the type of metallic compounds, refines crystal grains and increases the fineness of microstructure. Practical experience verified that the properties of the ring-hammers produced with this new technique are as follows: tensile strength (Rm 720 MPa, impact toughness (ak > 210 J•cm-2 and hardness > 200 HB. After water quenching from 1,080℃ (holding for 4 h and tempering at 320℃ for 3 h, the best wear resistance is obtained, and the wear resistance is 1.6 times higher than that of common high manganese ring-hammers.

  8. Calculation of wear (f.i. wear modulus) in the plastic cup of a hip joint prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    The wear equation is applied to the wear process in a hip joint prosthesis and a wear modulus is defined. The sliding distance, wear modulus, wear volume, wear area, contact angle and the maximum normal stress were calculated and the theoretical calculations applied to test results. During the wear

  9. Wear behavior of tetragonal zirconia polycrystal versus titanium and titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbara, Tsunemichi; Yajima, Yasutomo [Department of Oral Implantology, Tokyo Dental College, 1-2-2 Masago, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8502 (Japan); Yoshinari, Masao, E-mail: yosinari@tdc.ac.jp [Division of Oral Implant Research, Oral Health Science Center, Tokyo Dental College, 1-2-2 Masago, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8502 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (TZP) on the two-body wear behavior of titanium (Ti). Two-body wear tests were performed using TZP, two grades of cp-Ti or Ti alloy in distilled water, and the cross-sectional area of worn surfaces was measured to evaluate the wear behavior. In addition, the surface hardness and coefficient of friction were determined and an electron probe microanalysis performed to investigate the underlying mechanism of wear. The hardness of TZP was much greater than that of Ti. The coefficient of friction between Ti and Ti showed a higher value than the Ti/TZP combination. Ti was more susceptible to wear by both TZP and Ti than TZP, indicating that the mechanism of wear between TZP and Ti was abrasive wear, whereas that between Ti and Ti was adhesive wear. No remarkable difference in the amount of wear in Ti was observed between TZP and Ti as the opposite material, despite the hardness value of Ti being much smaller than that of TZP. (communication)

  10. Formulation and Validation of Multidisciplinary Design Problem on Wear and Fatigue Life of Lead Screw Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Meruva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidisciplinary design optimization has been widely applied in the optimization of large-scale complex system and also in the design and optimization of components, which are involved in multidisciplinary behaviors. The wear and fatigue life of lead screw actuators is a typical multidisciplinary problem. The wear behaviors of actuators closely relate to many factors such as loads, lubrications, materials properties, surface properties, pressures, and temperature. Therefore, the wear and fatigue life of actuators cannot be modeled without a simultaneous consideration of solid mechanics, fluid dynamics, contact mechanics, and thermal dynamics. In this paper, the wear and fatigue life of a lead screw actuator is modeled and validated. Firstly, the theory of asperity contact and Archard’s model of sliding wear are applied to estimate the amount of wear under certain circumstances. Secondly, a test platform is developed based on a standard ASTM test protocol, and the wear phenomenon at the ball-on-flat sliding is measured to validate the developed wear model. Thirdly, finite element analysis is conducted using Nastran to assess the contact stresses in the lead screw and nut assembly model. The estimated data from the three sources are finally merged to formulate a mathematical model in predicting the wear and fatigue life for the optimization of lead screw actuators.

  11. Investigation of wear land and rate of locally made HSS cutting tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolalu, S. A.; Abioye, A. A.; Dirisu, J. O.; Okokpujie, I. P.; Ajayi, O. O.; Adetunji, O. R.

    2018-04-01

    Production technology and machining are inseparable with cutting operation playing important roles. Investigation of wear land and rate of cutting tool developed locally (C=0.56%) with an HSS cutting tool (C=0.65%) as a control was carried out. Wear rate test was carried out using Rotopol -V and Impact tester. The samples (12) of locally made cutting tools and one (1) sample of a control HSS cutting tool were weighed to get the initial weight and grit was fixed at a point for the sample to revolve at a specific time of 10 mins interval. Approach of macro transfer particles that involved mechanism of abrasion and adhesion which was termed as mechanical wear to handle abrasion adhesion processes was used in developing equation for growth wear at flank. It was observed from the wear test that best minimum wear rate of 1.09 × 10-8 and 2.053 × 10-8 for the tools developed and control were measured. MATLAB was used to simulate the wear land and rate under different conditions. Validated results of both the experimental and modeling showed that cutting speed has effect on wear rate while cutting time has predicted measure on wear land. Both experimental and modeling result showed best performances of tools developed over the control.

  12. Low-Velocity Impact Wear Behavior of Ball-to-Flat Contact Under Constant Kinetic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhang; Cai, Zhen-bing; Chen, Zhi-qiang; Sun, Yang; Zhu, Min-hao

    2017-11-01

    The impact tests were conducted on metallic materials with different bulk hardness and Young's moduli. Analysis of the dynamics response during the tribological process showed that the tested materials had similar energy absorption, where the peak contact force increased as the tests continued. Moreover, wear volume decreased with the increase in Young's modulus of metals, except for Cr with a relatively low hardness. Wear rate was gradually reduced to a steady stage with increasing cycles, which was attributed to the decrease in contact stress and work-hardening effect. The main wear mechanism of impact was characterized by delamination, and the specific surface degradation mechanisms were depending on the mechanical properties of materials. The absorbed energy was used to the propagation of micro-cracks in the subsurface instead of plastic deformation, when resistance of friction wear and plastic behavior was improved. Hence, both the hardness and Young's modulus played important roles in the impact wear of metallic materials.

  13. Effect of solid lubricants on friction and wear behaviour of alloyed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Solid lubricants; wear; friction; boundary lubrication. 1. Introduction. Many automotive components are made from gray cast iron which is known for its excellent properties such as good thermal conductivity, good machinability, vibration damping capacity along with good mechanical strength and wear resistance.

  14. Tribological properties of amorphous alloys and the role of surfaces in abrasive wear of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The research approach undertaken by the authors relative to the subject, and examples of results from the authors are reviewed. The studies include programs in adhesion, friction, and various wear mechanisms (adhesive and abrasive wear). The materials which have been studied include such ceramic and metallic materials as silicon carbide, ferrites, diamond, and amorphous alloys.

  15. Optimization of pulsed DC PACVD parameters: Toward reducing wear rate of the DLC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Mansoureh [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 1875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboubi, Farzad, E-mail: mahboubi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 1875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza [Research Laboratory of Green Organic Synthesis and Polymers, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16846, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Effect of pulsed DC PACVD deposition temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow and argon/CH4 flow ratio on the wear rate and durability of DLC films was studied. • Results show that wear rate of the DLC films, reduced from 14×E-4 mm3/Nm to 1×E-6 mm3/Nm with increasing the duty cycle from 50% to 80%. • In low duty cycle (around 50%), wear rate increases with increasing in Argon/CH4 flow ratio. • Oxidation, fatigue, abrasion and graphitization are main wear mechanisms in the DLC film. - Abstract: The effect of pulsed direct current (DC) plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) parameters such as temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH{sub 4} flow ratio on the wear behavior and wear durability of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied by using response surface methodology (RSM). DLC films were deposited on nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel. Wear rate and wear durability of the DLC films were examined with the pin-on-disk method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques were used for studying wear mechanisms, chemical structure, and hardness of the DLC films. RSM results show that duty cycle is one of the important parameters that affect the wear rate of the DLC samples. The wear rate of the samples deposited with a duty cycle of >75% decreases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. In contrast, for a duty cycle of <65%, the wear rate increases with an increase in the argon/CH{sub 4} ratio. The wear durability of the DLC samples increases with an increase in the duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH{sub 4} flow ratio at the deposition temperature between 85 °C and 110 °C. Oxidation, fatigue, abrasive wear, and graphitization are the wear mechanisms observed on the wear scar of the DLC samples deposited with the optimum deposition conditions.

  16. A comparative study of progressive wear of four dental monolithic, veneered glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Xuesong; Guo, Jiawen; Li, Ding; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the wear performance and wear mechanisms of four dental glass-ceramics, based on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the progressive wear process. Bar (N = 40, n = 10) and disk (N = 32, n = 8) specimens were prepared from (A) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (LD), (B) leucite reinforced glass-ceramic (LEU), (C) feldspathic glass-ceramic (FEL), and (D) fluorapatite glass-ceramic (FLU). The bar specimens were tested for three-point flexural strength, hardness, fracture toughness and elastic modulus. The disk specimens paired with steatite antagonists were tested in a pin-on-disk tribometer with 10N up to 1000,000 wear cycles. The wear analysis of glass-ceramics was performed using a 3D profilometer after every 200,000 wear cycles. Wear loss of steatite antagonists was calculated by measuring the weight and density using sensitive balance and Archimedes' method. Wear morphologies and microstructures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline phase compositions were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data. Multiple pair-wise comparison of means was performed by Tukey's post-hoc test. LD showed the highest fracture toughness, flexural strength, elastic modulus and crystallinity, followed by LEU and FEL, and FLU showed the lowest. However, the hardness of LD was lower than all the other three types of ceramics. For steatite antagonists, LD produced the least wear loss of antagonist, followed by LEU and FEL, and FLU had the most wear loss. For glass-ceramic materials, LD exhibited similar wear loss as LEU, but more than FLU and FEL did. Moreover, fracture occurred on the wear surface of FLU. In the progressive wear process, veneering porcelains showed better wear resistance but fluorapatite veneering porcelains appeared fracture surface. Monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramics with higher mechanical properties showed more wear loss, however

  17. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the performance of centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W G; Li, Y B; Wang, X Y; Sun, J P; Wu, G X

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump. The existence of wear-ring not only has an effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump. Relative to the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some advantages, such as low cost, fast and efficient, and easy to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump.

  18. Wear resistance of cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    S. Pietrowski; G. Gumienny

    2008-01-01

    In this paper investigations of abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of different cast iron grades have been presented. Examinations showed, that the most advantageous pair of materials is the cast iron – the hardened steel with low-tempered martensite. It was found, that martensitic nodular cast iron with carbides is the most resistant material.

  19. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  20. Surface roughness and wear of resin cements after toothbrush abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kiyoshi ISHIKIRIAMA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased surface roughness and wear of resin cements may cause failure of indirect restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the surface roughness change and the vertical wear of four resin cements subjected to mechanical toothbrushing abrasion. Ten rectangular specimens (15 × 5 × 4 mm were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions for each group (n = 10: Nexus 3, Kerr (NX3; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE (ARC; RelyX U100, 3M ESPE (U100; and Variolink II, Ivoclar/Vivadent (VL2. Initial roughness (Ra, µm was obtained through 5 readings with a roughness meter. Specimens were then subjected to toothbrushing abrasion (100,000 cycles, and further evaluation was conducted for final roughness. Vertical wear (µm was quantified by 3 readings of the real profile between control and brushed surfaces. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. The Pearson correlation test was performed between the surface roughness change and wear (p < 0.05. The mean values of initial/final roughness (Ra, µm/wear (µm were as follows: NX3 (0.078/0.127/23.175; ARC (0.086/0.246/20.263; U100 (0.296/0.589/16.952; and VL2 (0.313/0.512/22.876. Toothbrushing abrasion increased surface roughness and wear of all resin cements tested, although no correlation was found between those variables. Vertical wear was similar among groups; however, it was considered high and may lead to gap formation in indirect restorations.

  1. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  2. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Asefi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow, Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists. A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  3. The synthesis and properties of some organometallic compounds containing group IV (Ge, Sn)-group II (Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Des Tombe, F.J.A.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der; Creemers, H.M.J.C.; Carey, N.A.D.; Noltes, J.G.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions of triphenylgermane and triphenyltin hydride with coordinatively saturated organozinc or organocadmium compounds give organometallic complexes containing Group IV (Ge, Sn)-Group II(Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds. The 2,2′-bipyridine complexes show solvent-dependent charge-transfer

  4. Wear performance of laser processed tantalum coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit, E-mail: amitband@wsu.edu

    2011-12-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10{sup -4} mm{sup 3}(N.m){sup -1}, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. Highlights: {yields} In vitro wear performance of laser processed Ta coatings on Ti was evaluated. {yields} Wear tests in SBF showed one order of magnitude less wear for Ta coatings than Ti. {yields} Ta coatings can minimize early-stage micro-motion induced wear debris generation.

  5. Complications Caused by Contact Lens Wearing

    OpenAIRE

    Beljan, Jasna; Beljan, Kristina; Beljan, Zdravko

    2013-01-01

    Complications in wearing contact lenses are very rare and caused by poor maintenance, over-extended wear and wearing of contact lenses in a polluted environment. Regular control by a professional person can efficiently reduce the number of complications. This paper describes the most common risks factors for complications, and complications of wearing contact lenses with the classification according to the anatomic parts of the eye: eyelids, tear film, limbus, corneal epithelium, corneal stro...

  6. How wear affects road surface texture and its impact on tire/road noise

    OpenAIRE

    Siebert, Doreen

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical pavement wear in the Nordic countries is essentially influenced by the use of studded tires during long winter seasons. The abrasive effect of the studded tires is the cause of significant damage on the pavement and a contributor to rutting. In addition, the mechanical aggregate removal due to the studded tires is the reason for significant changes in the road surface texture. At traditional dense asphalt pavements, the mechanical wear is initiated by the abrasion of the mortar, wh...

  7. Study on Composition, Microstructure and Wear Behavior of Fe-B-C Wear-Resistant Surfacing Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Minghui; Li, Muqin; Wang, Jun; Ma, Zhen; Yuan, Shidan

    2017-12-01

    Fe-B-C alloy layers with various microstructures were welded on Q235 steel plates using welding powders/H08Mn2Si and welding wires composite surfacing technology. The relationship existing between the chemical composition, microstructure and wear resistance of the surfacing alloy layers was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, electron backscatter diffraction and wear tests. The results demonstrated that the volume fractions and morphologies of the microstructures in the surfacing alloy layers could be controlled by adjusting the boron and carbon contents in the welding powders, which could further regulate the wear resistance of the surfacing alloy layers. The typical microstructures of the Fe-B-C surfacing alloy layers included dendritic Fe, rod-like Fe2B, fishbone-like Fe2B and daisy-like Fe3(C, B). The wear resistance of the alloy layers with various morphologies differed. The wear resistance order of the different microstructures was: rod-like Fe2B > fishbone-like Fe2B > daisy-like Fe3(C, B) > dendritic Fe. A large number of rod-like Fe2B with high microhardness could be obtained at the boron content of 5.70 5.90 wt.% and the carbon content of 0.50 0.60wt.%. The highest wear resistance of the Fe-B-C alloy layers reached the value of 24.1 g-1, which demonstrates the main microscopic cutting wear mechanism of the Fe-B-C alloy layers.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF ANGULAR BALL BEARING WEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Savchenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Wearing process of balls in an angular ball bearing has been investigated in the paper. Force affecting a separator from the side of balls is determined theoretically. Wear rate may be calculated with a formula for abrasive wear while substituting numerical parameter values of the investigated ball bearing for formula symbols.

  9. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  10. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  11. Dry sliding wear of Ni alloyed austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Akbarzadeh Chiniforush

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of dry sliding wear are presented for ductile irons with composition Fe-3.56C-2.67Si-0.25Mo-0.5Cu and Ni contents of 0.8 and 1.5 in wt.% with applied loads of 50, 100 and 150 N for austempering temperatures of 270, 320, and 370 °C after austenitizing at 870 °C for 120 min. The mechanical property measurements show that the grades of the ASTM 897M: 1990 Standard can be satisfied for the selected austempering conditions. The results show that wear resistance is independent of austempering temperature with an applied load of 50 N, but there is a strong dependence at higher austempering temperatures with applied loads of 100 and 150 N. Observations indicate that wear is due to subsurface fatigue with cracks nucleated at deformed graphite nodules.

  12. Wear Resistance of Austempered Ductile Iron with Nanosized Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleicheva, J. K.; Mishev, V.

    2018-01-01

    The wear resistance, microstructure and mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) with nanosized additives of cubic boron nitride cBN are investigated. Samples of ductile iron are put under austhempering at the following conditions: heating at 900°С, 1 h and isothermal retention at 280оС, 2 h and 380°С, 2 h with the aim to achieve a lower bainitic structure and an upper bainitic structure. The experimental wear testing of austempered ductile irons is performed in friction conditions of a fixed abrasive by a cinematic scheme „pin - disc” using an accelerated testing method and device. The microstructure of the ADI is investigated by metallographic and X-Ray analyses. The Vickers hardness testing and impact strength examination are carried out. The influence of the nanosized additives of cBN on the wear resistance, microstructure, impact strength and hardness of the ADI is investigated.

  13. Friction and wear behavior of glasses and ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of glasses and ionic solids are reviewed. These materials are shown to behave in a manner similar to other solids with respect to adhesion. Their friction characteristics are shown to be sensitive to environmental constituents and surface films. This sensitivity can be related to a reduction in adhesive bonding and the changes in surficial mechanical behavior associated with Rehbinder and Joffe effects. Both friction and wear properties of ionic crystalline solids are highly anisotropic. With metals in contact with ionic solids the fracture strength of the ionic solid and the shear strength in the metal and those properties that determine these will dictate which of the materials undergoes adhesive wear. The chemical activity of the metal plays an important role in the nature and strength of the adhesive interfacial bond that develops between the metal and a glass or ionic solid.

  14. Wear Characteristic of Stellite 6 Alloy Hardfacing Layer by Plasma Arc Surfacing Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and wear resistance of Stellite 6 alloy hardfacing layer at two different temperatures (room temperature and 300°C were investigated by plasma arc surfacing processes on Q235 Steel. Tribological test was conducted to characterize the wear property. The microstructure of Stellite 6 alloy coating mainly consists of α-Co and (Cr, Fe7C3 phases. The friction coefficient of Stellite 6 alloys fluctuates slightly under different loads at 300°C. The oxide layer is formed on the coating surface and serves as a special lubricant during the wear test. Abrasive wear is the dominant mechanism at room temperature, and microploughing and plasticity are the key wear mechanisms at 300°C.

  15. Wear Resistance of Sintered Composite Hardfacings under Different Abrasive Wear Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    SIMSON, Taavi; KULU, Priit; SURŽENKOV, Andrei; TARBE, Riho; GOLJANDIN, Dmitri; TARRASTE, Marek; VILJUS, Mart; TRAKSMAA, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    The article focuses on vacuum liquid phase sintered (PM) composite hardfacings and their behaviour under different abrasive wear conditions. Hardfacings studied contained 30 – 50 vol % fine, coarse or multimodal (fine and coarse) hardmetal reinforcement. For wear resistance studies, we used the Abrasive Rubber Wheel Wear (ARWW) test as a three-body abrasive wear test, the Abrasive Wheel Wear (AWW) test as a two-body abrasive wear test and the Abrasive-Impact Erosion wear (AIEW) test as an abr...

  16. Impact Fretting Wear Behavior of Alloy 690 Tubes in Dry and Deionized Water Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhen-Bing; Peng, Jin-Fang; Qian, Hao; Tang, Li-Chen; Zhu, Min-Hao

    2017-07-01

    The impact fretting wear has largely occurred at nuclear power device induced by the flow-induced vibration, and it will take potential hazards to the service of the equipment. However, the present study focuses on the tangential fretting wear of alloy 690 tubes. Research on impact fretting wear of alloy 690 tubes is limited and the related research is imminent. Therefore, impact fretting wear behavior of alloy 690 tubes against 304 stainless steels is investigated. Deionized water is used to simulate the flow environment of the equipment, and the dry environment is used for comparison. Varied analytical techniques are employed to characterize the wear and tribochemical behavior during impact fretting wear. Characterization results indicate that cracks occur at high impact load in both water and dry equipment; however, the water as a medium can significantly delay the cracking time. The crack propagation behavior shows a jagged shape in the water, but crack extended disorderly in dry equipment because the water changed the stress distribution and retarded the friction heat during the wear process. The SEM and XPS analysis shows that the main failure mechanisms of the tube under impact fretting are fatigue wear and friction oxidation. The effect of medium(water) on fretting wear is revealed, which plays a potential and promising role in the service of nuclear power device and other flow equipments.

  17. Microstructure and elevated temperature wear behavior of induction melted Fe-based composite coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ge; Meng, Huimin; Liu, Junyou

    2014-10-01

    Fe-based composite coating prepared onto the component of guide wheel using ultrasonic frequency inductive cladding (UFIC) technique has been investigated in terms of microstructure, phase constitutions, microhardness and elevated temperature wear behavior by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers microhardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results indicated that the primary phase in the coating contained austenite γ-Fe, eutectic γ-Fe/(Cr,Fe)2B, boride (Cr,Fe)2B and precipitation enriched in Mo. The average microhardness of the coating was 760 ± 10 HV0.2, which was three times higher than that of the substrate. With increasing temperature, the friction coefficients of the coating and high-chromium cast iron decreased gradually while the wear rates increased during dry sliding wear condition. The relative wear resistance of the coating was 1.63 times higher than that of the high-chromium cast iron at 500 °C, which was ascribed to the hard borides with high thermal stability uniformly embedded in the coating and the formation of dense transfer layer formed onto the worn surface. The high temperature wear mechanism of the coating was dominated by mild abrasive wear. The study revealed that Fe-based composite coating had excellent high temperature wear resistance under dry sliding wear condition.

  18. Wear Characteristics of Ceramic Coating Materials by Plasma Spray under the Lubricative Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Ho

    2001-02-01

    This paper is to investigate the wear behaviors of two types of ceramics, Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 , by coated plasma thermal spray method under the lubricative environment. The lubricative environments are grease fluids, a general hydraulic fluids, and bearing fluids. The wear testing machine used a pin on disk type. Wear characteristics, which were friction force, friction coefficient and the specific wear rate, according to the lubricative environments were obtained at the four kinds of load, and the sliding velocity is 0.2m/sec. After the wear experiments, the wear surfaces of the each test specimen were observed by a scanning electronic microscope. The obtained results are as follows. : 1. The friction coefficients of TiO 2 coating materials are 0.11 ∼ 0.16 range and those of Al 2 O 3 are 0.24 ∼ 0.39. The friction coefficient of two coating materials is relative to the hardness of these materials. 2. The friction coefficient of TiO 2 coating materials in three lubricative environments is almost same to each other in spite of changing of applied loads. 3. The friction coefficient of Al 2 O 3 coating materials is more large in low load than high load. And the friction coefficient in grease is more large than a general hydraulic and bearing fluids had almost same friction coefficient. 4. The specific wear rate in TiO 2 is greatly increasing according to change the applied loads, but that in Al 2 O 3 is slightly. And the wear in grease is the least among three lubricating environments. 5. On the wear mechanism by SEM image observation, the wear of Al 2 O 3 is adhesive wear and TiO 3 is abrasive wear

  19. The microstructural dependence of wear resistance in austenite containing plate steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Preston Charles

    The purpose of this project was to examine the microstructural dependence of wear resistance of various plate steels, with interests in exploring the influence of retained austenite (RA). Materials resistant to abrasive wear are desirable in the industrial areas of agriculture, earth moving, excavation, mining, mineral processing, and transportation. Abrasive wear contributes to significant financial cost associated with wear to the industry. The motivation for the current study was to determine whether it would be beneficial from a wear resistance perspective to produce plate steels with increased amounts of retained austenite. This thesis investigates this motivation through a material matrix containing AR400F, Abrasive (0.21 wt pct C, 1.26 wt pct Mn, 0.21 wt pct Si, 0.15 wt pct Ni, 0.18 wt pct Mo), Armor (0.46 wt pct C, 0.54 wt pct Mn, 0.36 wt pct Si, 1.74 wt pct Ni, 0.31 wt pct Mo), 9260, 301SS, Hadfield, and SAE 4325 steels. The Abrasive, Armor and 9260 steels were heat treated using different methods such as quench and temper, isothermal bainitic hold, and quench and partitioning (Q&P). These heat treatments yielded various microstructures and the test matrix allowed for investigation of steels with similar hardness and varying levels of RA. The wear test methods used consisted of dry sand rubber wheel (DSRW), impeller-tumbler impact-abrasion (impeller), and Bond abrasion wear testing. DSRW and impeller wear resistance was found to increase with hardness and retained austenite levels at certain hardness levels. Some Q&P samples exhibited similar or less wear than the Hadfield steels in DSRW and impeller tests. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of wear surfaces revealed different wear mechanisms for the different wear test methods ranging from micro-plowing, to micro-cutting and to fragmentation.

  20. INCREASING OF WEAR RESISTANCE OF THE GRAPHITIZED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Akimov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Graphitized steels are alloys, in which carbon is partly in form of graphite inclusions. Due to this such steels possess good antifriction properties, wear resistance, heat conductivity and a variety of other mechanical properties, which decently distinguish them from cast irons. However, such steels are not studied enough and practically are not used in mechanical engineering. Purpose of the work is the research of the possibility of wear resistance increase for graphitized steels in the conditions of metal-to-metal dry friction sliding to use them in the railway systems. Methodology. Graphitized hypoeutectoid, eutectoid and hypereutectoid steels have been used as a research material. Experimental alloys have been studied in the condition after thermal hardening. Hardness of alloys has been determined by the Vickers method. Wear resistance of steels has been studied in the conditions of metal-to-metal dry friction sliding with the use of МI-1 friction machine (disk to disk. Findings. Data, which allow assessing the wear resistance of experimental graphitized steels depending on carbon, silicon and copper content have been obtained in this work. The regression dependence obtained as a result of statistical processing of the experimental data allowed determining an optimal chemical content of the steel, which is characterized by high wear resistance. Originality. A dependence describing carbon, silicon and copper content on the specimen's weight loss during metal-to-metal dry friction tests has been obtained in the work. Practical value. The optimized content of the graphitized steel can be used for production of products working in the conditions of wear such as brake blocks of rolling stock, separators of high-speed bearings, dies and others.

  1. Superior wear resistance of aggregated diamond nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dub, Sergey; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2006-04-01

    The hardness of single-crystal diamond is superior to all other known materials, but its performance as a superabrasive is limited because of its low wear resistance. This is the consequence of diamond's low thermal stability (it graphitizes at elevated temperature), low fracture toughness (it tends to cleave preferentially along the octahedral (111) crystal plains), and large directional effect in polishing (some directions appear to be "soft", i.e., easy to abrade, because diamond is anisotropic in many of its physical properties). Here we report the results of measurements of mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness, and Young's modulus) of aggregated diamond nanorods (ADNRs) synthesized as a bulk sample. Our investigation has shown that this nanocrystalline material has the fracture toughness 11.1 +/- 1.2 MPa.m(0.5), which exceeds that of natural and synthetic diamond (that varies from 3.4 to 5.0 MPa.m(0.5)) by 2-3 times. At the same time, having a hardness and Young's modulus comparable to that of natural diamond and suppressed because of the random orientation of nanorods "soft" directions, ADNR samples show the enhancement of wear resistance up to 300% in comparison with commercially available polycrystalline diamonds (PCDs). This makes ADNRs extremely prospective materials for applications as superabrasives.

  2. Does wearing shoes affect your biomechanical efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Guillaume; Chambon, Nicolas; Guéguen, Nils; Berton, Eric; Delattre, Nicolas

    2015-02-05

    Studies involving minimalist shoes have dramatically increased this past 10 years. While a deeper knowledge of the related modifications has ensued regarding the kinematics, electromyographic, and dynamic patterns, little is known regarding the modifications at the muscle forces and muscle fiber levels. The aim of the present study was to assess at a muscular level the modifications brought up when running barefoot, using 0mm midsole height running shoe, or using classical midsole height running shoes. An EMG-Driven model that combines the kinematics, dynamics, and electromyographic data was used to estimate the Triceps Surae (TS) muscle forces and fiber behavior during running using different footwear conditions. Despite differences at the joint level between barefoot and shod running when looking at ankle joint range of motion, or foot-ground angle at touchdown, the results showed no effect of footwear neither on the maximal muscle forces nor on the relative amount of force produced by each muscle within the TS muscle group when wearing different footwear. On the contrary, different behaviors of muscle fibers were shown with lower amplitudes of fiber lengths for the Gastrocnemii biarticular muscles when running barefoot. This particular results reveal that wearing a shoe, even with a very thin sole, could deeply modify the intricate muscle-tendon mechanics of running. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of the time-dependent wear behavior of veneering ceramic in porcelain fused to metal crowns during chewing simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiawen; Tian, Beimin; Wei, Ran; Wang, Weiguo; Zhang, Hongyun; Wu, Xiaohong; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2014-12-01

    The excessive abrasion of occlusal surfaces in ceramic crowns limits the service life of restorations and their clinical results. However, little is known about the time-dependent wear behavior of ceramic restorations during the chewing process. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the dynamic evolution of the wear behavior of veneering porcelain in PFM crowns as wear progressed, as tested in a chewing simulator. Twenty anatomical metal-ceramic crowns were prepared using Ceramco III as the veneering porcelain. Stainless steel balls served as antagonists. The specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350N up to 2.4×10(6) loading cycles, with additional thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C. During the testing, several checkpoints were applied to measure the substance loss of the crowns' occlusal surfaces and to evaluate the microstructure of the worn areas. After 2.4×10(6) cycles, the entire wear process of the veneering porcelain in the PFM crowns revealed three wear stages (running-in, steady and severe wear stages). The occlusal surfaces showed traces of intensive wear on the worn areas during the running-in wear stage, and they exhibited the propagation of cracks in the subsurface during steady wear stage. When the severe wear stage was reached, the cracks penetrated the ceramic layer, causing the separation of porcelain pieces. It also exhibited a good correlation among the microstructure, the wear loss and the wear rate of worn ceramic restorations. The results suggest that under the conditions of simulated masticatory movement, the wear performance of the veneering porcelain in PFM crowns indicates the apparent similarity of the tribological characteristics of the traditional mechanical system. Additionally, the evaluation of the wear behavior of ceramic restorations should be based on these three wear stages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Wear Behavior and Microstructure of Mg-Sn Alloy Processed by Equal Channel Angular Extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jung-Hsuan; Shen, Yen-Chen; Chao, Chuen-Guang; Liu, Tzeng-Feng

    2017-11-16

    Mg-5wt.% Sn alloy is often used in portable electronic devices and automobiles. In this study, mechanical properties of Mg-5wt.% Sn alloy processed by Equal Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE) were characterized. More precisely, its hardness and wear behavior were measured using Vickers hardness test and a pin-on-disc wear test. The microstructures of ECAE-processed Mg-Sn alloys were investigated by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. ECAE process refined the grain sizes of the Mg-Sn alloy from 117.6 μm (as-cast) to 88.0 μm (one pass), 49.5 μm (two passes) and 24.4 μm (four passes), respectively. Meanwhile, the hardness of the alloy improved significantly. The maximum wear resistance achieved in the present work was around 73.77 m/mm³, which was obtained from the Mg-Sn alloy treated with a one-pass ECAE process with a grain size of 88.0 μm. The wear resistance improvement was caused by the grain size refinement and the precipitate of the second phase, Mg₂Sn against the oxidation of the processed alloy. The as-cast Mg-Sn alloy with the larger grain size, i.e., 117.6 μm, underwent wear mechanisms, mainly adhesive wear and abrasive wear. In ECAE-processed Mg-Sn alloy, high internal energy occurred due to the high dislocation density and the stress field produced by the plastic deformation, which led to an increased oxidation rate of the processed alloy during sliding. Therefore, the oxidative wear and a three-body abrasive wear in which the oxide debris acted as the three-body abrasive components became the dominant factors in the wear behavior, and as a result, reduced the wear resistance in the multi-pass ECAE-processed alloy.

  5. Anti-wear properties of Cr-C and Ni-Co alloy coatings as substitutes for conventional nanocrystalline Cr coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Zhixiang; Zhang Junyan

    2008-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Co, amorphous Cr-C alloy and nanocrystalline Cr-C coatings were electrodeposited from 'environmentally acceptable' electrolytes as potential substitutes for conventional nanocrystalline Cr coatings electrodeposited from noxious hexavalent chromium. The structure, morphology and hardness of coatings are investigated using a transmission electron microscope, a scanning electronic microscope and a Vickers hardness tester, respectively. Anti-wear properties are tested on a pin-on-plate vibrant wear tester. The correlation between the wear resistance, hardness, brittleness and the lubricated state is investigated. The results show that the wear behaviour of specimens significantly depends on their lubricated state, hardness and brittleness. Under the lubricated sliding condition, abrasive wear is the primary wear mechanism for all specimens. With respect to the abrasive wear mechanism, both the elastic and plastic deformations play important roles during the lubricated sliding process. Thus, the amorphous and nanocrystalline Cr-C alloy coatings, with both high brittleness and high hardness, exhibit a lower wear rate than the conventional Cr and Ni-Co coatings. On the other hand, under the dry sliding condition, the annealed Ni-Co coating, with an excellent compromise between high hardness and toughness, exhibits an abrasive wear mechanism and a relatively low wear rate; in contrast, the brittle Cr-matrix coatings exhibit a severe fatigue/delamination wear mechanism and high wear rate

  6. Wear rate optimization of Al/SiCnp/e-glass fibre hybrid metal matrix composites using Taguchi method and genetic algorithm and development of wear model using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongale, Arunkumar M.; Kumar, Satish; Sachit, T. S.; Jadhav, Priya

    2018-03-01

    Studies on wear properties of Aluminium based hybrid nano composite materials, processed through powder metallurgy technique, are reported in the present study. Silicon Carbide nano particles and E-glass fibre are reinforced in pure aluminium matrix to fabricate hybrid nano composite material samples. Pin-on-Disc wear testing equipment is used to evaluate dry sliding wear properties of the composite samples. The tests were conducted following the Taguchi’s Design of Experiments method. Signal-to-Noise ratio analysis and Analysis of Variance are carried out on the test data to find out the influence of test parameters on the wear rate. Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis and Energy Dispersive x-ray analysis are conducted on the worn surfaces to find out the wear mechanisms responsible for wear of the composites. Multiple linear regression analysis and Genetic Algorithm techniques are employed for optimization of wear test parameters to yield minimum wear of the composite samples. Finally, a wear model is built by the application of Artificial Neural Networks to predict the wear rate of the composite material, under different testing conditions. The predicted values of wear rate are found to be very close to the experimental values with a deviation in the range of 0.15% to 8.09%.

  7. Friction and wear in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.J.; Droher, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    In the design of a safe and reliable sodium-cooled reactor one of the more important problem areas is that of friction and wear of components immersed in liquid sodium or exposed to sodium vapor. Sodium coolant at elevated temperatures may severely affect most oxide-bearing surface layers which provide corrosion resistance and, to some extent, lubrication and surface hardness. Consequently, accelerated deterioration may be experienced on engaged-motion contact surfaces, which could result in unexpected reactor shutdown from component malfunction or failure due to galling and seizure. An overall view of the friction and wear phenomena encountered during oscillatory rubbing of surfaces in high-temperature, liquid-sodium environments is presented. Specific data generated at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) on this subject is also presented. (U.S.)

  8. Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000\\/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.

  9. Influence of graphite filler on two-body abrasive wear behaviour of carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresha, B.; Ramesh, B.N.; Subbaya, K.M.; Ravi Kumar, B.N.; Chandramohan, G.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of graphite filler additions on two-body abrasive wear behaviour of compression moulded carbon-epoxy (C-E) composites have been evaluated using reciprocating wear unit and pin-on-disc wear unit under single pass and multi-pass conditions respectively. The carbon fabric used in the present study is a plain one; each warp fiber pass alternately under and over each weft fiber. The fabric is symmetrical, with good stability and reasonable porosity. Abrasive wear studies were carried out under different loads/abrading distance using different grades of SiC abrasive paper (150 and 320 grit size). Graphite filler in C-E reduced the specific wear rate. Further, the wear volume loss drops significantly with increase in graphite content. Comparative wear performance of all the composites showed higher specific wear rate in two-body wear (single-pass conditions) compared to multi-pass conditions. Further, the tribo-performance of C-E indicated that the graphite filler inclusion resulted in enhancement of wear behaviour significantly. Wear mechanisms were suggested and strongly supported by worn surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Wear of dragline wire ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayawansa, D.; Kuruppu, M.; Mashiri, F.; Bartosiewicz, H. [Monash University (Caulfield Campus), Caulfield East, Vic. (Australia). Department of Mechanical Engineering,

    2005-07-01

    Wire ropes are one of the most heavily used components in a dragline. Hoist ropes are subjected to fatigue due to the cyclic nature of load handling as well as due to rope bending over the sheaves and the drum under load. This leads to wire breaks due to fatigue. Accumulation of a number of wire breaks close to each other can have a detrimental effect on the rope. Furthermore, to allow for the increasing demand for higher load capacity coupled with the inconvenience of having very large ropes, the factor of safety is often compromised, which increases the wear rate. Drag ropes are also subjected to heavy loads. More importantly, they are allowed to drag along the rough mine surface subjecting them to external physical abrasion. This makes the life of drag ropes one of the lowest among those used in a dragline. Suspension and IBS ropes are relatively uniformly loaded during their regular usage although they need to withstand dynamic load cycles as well as bending. Hence they tend to last for a number of years on average. The paper analyses the wear types and their severity of each of these rope applications, and suggests methods to determine rope wear rates and the resulting rope life. The paper further gives suggestions for good operating and maintenance practice that can extend the rope life and help reduce the large expenditure associated with every major rope change in a dragline. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Impact wear behavior of human tooth enamel under simulated chewing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing; Zeng, Yangyang; Wen, Jian; Zheng, Liang; Zhou, Zhongrong

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies mostly focused on the sliding wear behavior of human teeth, and little effort has been made so far to study the impact wear of human teeth. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact wear process and mechanism of human tooth enamel and the influence of water content within enamel. In this paper, the impact wear behaviors of fresh and dried human tooth enamel against SiC ceramic have been investigated using a specially designed impact test machine. Tests lasting up to 5×10(3), 5×10(4), 2.5×10(5), 5.5×10(5), 8×10(5) and 1×10(6) cycles were conducted, respectively. Results showed that for the fresh enamel, the surface damage was dominated by plastic deformation at the early stage of impact wear. Iridescent rings appeared around the impact mark as a result of the accumulation and spread of plastic deformation. As the impact wear progressed, delamination occurred on the surface of enamel, and thus the iridescent rings gradually disappeared. Wear loss increased rapidly with the increase of impact cycles. When a wear particle layer was formed on the enamel surface, the wear rate decreased. It was found that the surface hardness of enamel increased with the impact cycles, and no cracks appeared on the cross section of wear scar. Compared with the fresh enamel, the fracture toughness of dried enamel decreased, and thus there were microcracks appearing on the cross section of wear scar. More obvious delamination occurred on the worn surface of dried enamel, and no iridescent rings were observed. The wear loss of dried enamel was higher than that of fresh enamel. In summary, the impact wear behavior of sound human tooth enamel was metal-like to some degree, and no subsurface cracking occurred. The water content within enamel could increase its fracture toughness and protect the surface from impact wear. The wear mechanism of human tooth enamel is determined by its microstructure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dry sliding wear behavior of heat treated hybrid metal matrix composite using Taguchi techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiran, T.S.; Prasanna Kumar, M.; Basavarajappa, S.; Viswanatha, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ZA-27 alloy is used as matrix material and reinforced with SiC and Gr particles. • Heat treatment was carried out for all specimen. • Dry sliding wear test was done on pin-on-disc apparatus by Taguchi technique. • ZA-27/9SiC–3Gr showed superior wear resistance over the base alloy. • Ceramic mixed mechanical layer on contact surface of composite was formed. - Abstract: Dry sliding wear behavior of zinc based alloy and composite reinforced with SiCp (9 wt%) and Gr (3 wt%) fabricated by stir casting method was investigated. Heat treatment (HT) and aging of the specimen were carried out, followed by water quenching. Wear behavior was evaluated using pin on disc apparatus. Taguchi technique was used to estimate the parameters affecting the wear significantly. The effect of HT was that it reduced the microcracks, residual stresses and improved the distribution of microconstituents. The influence of various parameters like applied load, sliding speed and sliding distance on wear behavior was investigated by means and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Further, correlation between the parameters was determined by multiple linear regression equation for each response. It was observed that the applied load significantly influenced the wear volume loss (WVL), followed by sliding speed implying that increase in either applied load or sliding speed increases the WVL. Whereas for composites, sliding distance showed a negative influence on wear indicating that increase in sliding distance reduces WVL due to the presence of reinforcements. The wear mechanism of the worn out specimen was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The analysis shows that the formation and retention of ceramic mixed mechanical layer (CMML) plays a major role in the dry sliding wear resistance

  13. Physical and Constructive (Limiting) Criterions of Gear Wheels Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    We suggest using a generalized model of friction - the model of elastic-plastic deformation of the body element, which is located on the surface of the friction pairs. This model is based on our new engineering approach to the problem of friction-triboergodynamics. Friction is examined as transformative and dissipative process. Structural-energetic interpretation of friction as a process of elasto-plastic deformation and fracture contact volumes is proposed. The model of Hertzian (heavy-loaded) friction contact evolution is considered. The least wear particle principle is formulated. It is mechanical (nano) quantum. Mechanical quantum represents the least structural form of solid material body in conditions of friction. It is dynamic oscillator of dissipative friction structure and it can be examined as the elementary nanostructure of metal’s solid body. At friction in state of most complete evolution of elementary tribosystem (tribocontact) all mechanical quanta (subtribosystems) with the exception of one, elasticity and reversibly transform energy of outer impact (mechanic movement). In these terms only one mechanical quantum is the lost – standard of wear. From this position we can consider the physical criterion of wear and the constructive (limiting) criterion of gear teeth and other practical examples of tribosystems efficiency with new tribology notion – mechanical (nano) quantum.

  14. Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, P.; Gaffet, E.; Le Caër, G.; Mocellin, A.; Reynaud, E.; Rouxel, T.; Soulard, M.; Patarin, J.; Thilly, L.; Lecouturier, F.

    Inorganic reinforcements are used in rubber, and in particular in tyre treads for light vehicles, in order to improve the compromise between three key features of tyres: road holding performance or road adherence, especially when the road is wet or snow-covered (road safety), roll resistance (petrol consumption), and resistance to wear (lifetime of the tyre). Over the last ten years, highly dispersible silicas (HDS) developed by Rhodia have been more and more widely used as a substitute for the traditionally used carbon black. The advantage with HDS materials is that they improve road holding and reduce roll resistance, while maintaining the same level of resistance to wear.

  15. What are the risks accompanying the reduced wear benefit of low-clearance hip resurfacing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Joseph; Ziaee, Hena; Kamali, Amir; Pradhan, Chandra; McMinn, Derek

    2012-10-01

    Clearance is an important determinant of metal-metal bearing function. Tribologic theory and laboratory evidence suggest low clearance (LC) reduces wear but with a potential to increase friction and clinical reports show LC resurfacings have high implant failure rates. Thus, the role of LC is unclear. We asked: is in vivo wear as reflected by cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) levels reduced in LC bearings, and if so, is this benefit offset by increased friction as assessed by implant-bone interface changes? We retrospectively reviewed 26 patients with LC resurfacings. We assessed Co and Cr levels in blood and urine, hip function, and radiographic adverse features. These data were compared with those from 26 patients with a similar resurfacing but with conventional clearance (CC) from a previous study. Minimum followup was 4.0 years (mean, 4.1 years; range, 4.0-4.7 years). Co and Cr ion comparisons showed three phases: in the first 2 months, there was no difference between the cohorts; at 2 to 24 months, the CC group showed higher levels; and subsequently, levels in the two groups converged. A mean Oxford hip score of 13 and step activity of 1.9 million cycles per year in the LC group were similar to those of the CC group. Cup radiolucencies were seen in three patients in the LC group and none in the CC group. Lower Co and Cr levels suggest lower wear in the LC resurfacings in the intermediate term, but the presence of radiolucencies raises the concern that higher bearing friction is affecting implant fixation. A larger clearance than the theoretically predicted ideal may be required to allow for minor manufacturing imperfections, component deformation, and progressive changes in the in vivo lubricant. Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  16. Wear Resistance of Sintered Composite Hardfacings under Different Abrasive Wear Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taavi SIMSON

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on vacuum liquid phase sintered (PM composite hardfacings and their behaviour under different abrasive wear conditions. Hardfacings studied contained 30 – 50 vol % fine, coarse or multimodal (fine and coarse hardmetal reinforcement. For wear resistance studies, we used the Abrasive Rubber Wheel Wear (ARWW test as a three-body abrasive wear test, the Abrasive Wheel Wear (AWW test as a two-body abrasive wear test and the Abrasive-Impact Erosion wear (AIEW test as an abrasive-erosive wear test. Tested materials were compared to Hardox 400 steel and CDP112 wear plate (Castolin Eutectic® Ltd.. It was found that under three-body abrasion conditions (ARWW test hardfacings with high content of spehrical coarse reinforcement are suitable; their wear resistance is about two times higher than that of unreinforced hardfacings. Under two-body abrasive wear (AWW test, hardfacings with a high content of coarse reinforcement are recommended; their wear resistance is up to eight times higher than that of unreinforced hardfacings from the figures and graphs mentioned in the text. Under abrasive-erosive wear (AIEW test, unreinforced ductile materials are recommended; they have two to three times higher wear resistance than composite hardfacings reinforced with fine or multimodal reinforcement.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.3.16323

  17. Study of concentrated metal-ammonia solutions: magnetic properties and non metal-metal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelieur, Jean-Pierre

    1972-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of alkali metal-liquid ammonia solutions has been measured in the concentration range where the solutions show a progressive passage toward the metallic state. The Knight shift of the metal nuclei and the nitrogen nucleus have been determined as a function of concentration and temperature, in Na-NH 3 and Cs-NH 3 solutions. A phenomenological analysis of the transport properties of metal-ammonia solutions is also presented. This analysis permits the presentation of a model for the mechanism of the transition to the metallic state. (author) [fr

  18. The effects of homogenization treatment on wear resistance of AZ61 magnesium alloy fabricated by extrusion-shear process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H.-J.; Ying, Y.-L.; OU, Z.-W.; Wang, X.-Q.

    2017-12-01

    Wear resistance of extrusion shear-processed AZ61 magnesium samples with as-cast state and homogenization treatment state has been studied by wear tests using pin-on-disc experiments under dry sliding conditions. Wear rates and friction coefficients between AZ61 magnesium alloy and GCr15 steel have been used to evaluate wear resistances of AZ61 magnesium alloys, and obtained from dry sliding with different frequencies and loads. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) were used to analyze microstructures before and after the wear tests to find the wear mechanisms of AZ61 magnesium samples with as-cast state and homogenization treatment state. The wear resistances of the homogeneous state samples prepared by extrusion-shear process are close to those of as cast state, which are due to the little differences of microstructures. In addition, the wear mechanisms change from mild wear to severe wear with rise of exerted loads and reciprocating frequencies.

  19. Relationship Between Simulated Gap Wear and Generalized Wear of Resin Luting Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, A; Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Latta, M A; Miayazaki, M

    The relationship between the simulated gap wear and generalized wear of resin luting cements was investigated. Five resin luting cements, G-Cem LinkForce (GL), Multilink Automix (MA), NX3 Nexus, Panavia V5 (PV), and RelyX Ultimate were evaluated and subsequently subjected to a wear challenge in a Leinfelder-Suzuki (Alabama) wear simulation device. Half of the specimens from each resin luting cement were photo-cured for 40 seconds and the other half were not photo-cured. The simulated gap and generalized wear were generated using a flat-ended stainless steel antagonist. Wear testing was performed in a water slurry of polymethyl methacrylate beads, and the simulated gap and generalized wear were determined using a noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) in conjunction with the Proscan and AnSur 3D software. A strong relationship was found between the gap wear and generalized wear simulation models. The simulated gap wear and generalized wear of the resin luting cements followed similar trends in terms of both volume loss and mean depth of wear facets with each curing method. Unlike the simulated gap wear and generalized wear of GL and PV, those of MA, NX, and RU were influenced by the curing method. The results of this study indicate that simulated gap wear of resin luting cements is very similar to simulated generalized wear. In most cases, dual curing appears to ensure greater wear resistance of resin luting cements than chemical curing alone. The wear resistance of some resin luting cements appears to be material dependent and is not influenced by the curing method.

  20. Standard Terminology Relating to Wear and Erosion

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 The terms and their definitions given herein represent terminology relating to wear and erosion of solid bodies due to mechanical interactions such as occur with cavitation, impingement by liquid jets or drops or by solid particles, or relative motion against contacting solid surfaces or fluids. This scope interfaces with but generally excludes those processes where material loss is wholly or principally due to chemical action and other related technical fields as, for instance, lubrication. 1.2 This terminology is not exhaustive; the absence of any particular term from this collection does not necessarily imply that its use within this scope is discouraged. However, the terms given herein are the recommended terms for the concepts they represent unless otherwise noted. 1.3 Certain general terms and definitions may be restricted and interpreted, if necessary, to make them particularly applicable to the scope as defined herein. 1.4 The purpose of this terminology is to encourage uniformity and accuracy ...

  1. Transition radiation in metal-metal multilayer nanostructures as a medical source of hard x-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovsky, A. L.; Kaplan, A. E.; Shkolnikov, P. L.

    2006-01-01

    We show that a periodic metal-metal multilayer nanostructure can serve as an efficient source of hard x-ray transition radiation. Our research effort is aimed at developing an x-ray source for medical applications, which is based on using low-energy relativistic electrons. The approach toward choosing radiator-spacer couples for the generation of hard x-ray resonant transition radiation by few-MeV electrons traversing solid multilayer structures for the energies of interest to medicine (30-50 keV) changes dramatically compared with that for soft x-ray radiation. We show that one of the main factors in achieving the required resonant line is the absence of the contrast of the refractive indices between the spacer and the radiator at the far wings of the radiation line; for that purpose, the optimal spacer, as a rule, should have a higher atomic number than the radiator. Having experimental goals in mind, we have considered also the unwanted effects due to bremsstrahlung radiation, absorption and scattering of radiated photons, detector-related issues, and inhibited coherence of transition radiation due to random deviation of spacing between the layers. Choosing as a model example a Mo-Ag radiator-spacer pair of materials, we demonstrate that the x-ray transition radiation line can be well resolved with the use of spatial and frequency filtering

  2. Outstanding resistance and passivation behaviour of new Fe-Co metal-metal glassy alloys in alkaline media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijah M Emran

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of the oxide layers on two metal-metal glassy alloys, Fe78Co9Cr10Mo2Al1 (VX9and Fe49Co49V2 (VX50 (at.%, were studied using electrochemical techniques including electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and cyclic polarization (CP measurements. The morphology and composition of the alloy surfaces were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The corrosion rate and surface roughness of both alloys increased as the concentration of NaOH in aqueous solution was raised. The presence of some protective elements in the composition of the alloys led to the formation of a spontaneous passive layer on the alloy surface. The higher resistance values of both alloys were associated with the magnitude of the dielectric properties of the passive films formed on their surfaces. Both alloys are classified as having outstanding resistance to corrosion, which results from the formation of a passive film that acts as an efficient barrier to corrosion in alkaline solution.

  3. Outstanding resistance and passivation behaviour of new Fe-Co metal-metal glassy alloys in alkaline media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emran, Khadijah M; Al-Harbi, Albandaree K

    2018-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of the oxide layers on two metal-metal glassy alloys, Fe78Co9Cr10Mo2Al1 (VX9)and Fe49Co49V2 (VX50) (at.%), were studied using electrochemical techniques including electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic polarization (CP) measurements. The morphology and composition of the alloy surfaces were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The corrosion rate and surface roughness of both alloys increased as the concentration of NaOH in aqueous solution was raised. The presence of some protective elements in the composition of the alloys led to the formation of a spontaneous passive layer on the alloy surface. The higher resistance values of both alloys were associated with the magnitude of the dielectric properties of the passive films formed on their surfaces. Both alloys are classified as having outstanding resistance to corrosion, which results from the formation of a passive film that acts as an efficient barrier to corrosion in alkaline solution.

  4. Wear of Steel and Ti6Al4V Rollers in Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Timothy L.; Shareef, Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    This investigation was prompted by results of a qualification test of a mechanism to be used for the James Webb Space Telescope. Post-test inspections of the qualification test article revealed some loose wear debris and wear of the steel rollers and the mating Ti6Al4V surfaces. An engineering assessment of the design and observations from the tested qualification unit suggested that roller misalignment was a controlling factor. The wear phenomena were investigated using dedicated laboratory experiments. Tests were done using a vacuum roller rig for a range of roller misalignment angles. The wear in these tests was mainly adhesive wear. The measured wear rates were highly correlated to the misalignment angle. For all tests with some roller misalignment, the steel rollers lost mass while the titanium rollers gained mass indicating strong adhesion of the steel with the titanium alloy. Inspection of the rollers revealed that the adhesive wear was a two-way process as titanium alloy was found on the steel rollers and vice versa. The qualification test unit made use of 440F steel rollers in the annealed condition. Both annealed 440F steel rollers and hardened 440C rollers were tested in the vacuum roller rig to investigate possibility to reduce wear rates and the risk of loose debris formation. The 440F and 440C rollers had differing wear behaviors with significantly lesser wear rates for the 440C. For the test condition of zero roller misalignment, the adhesive wear rates were very low, but still some loose debris was formed

  5. Simulated studies of wear and friction in total hip prosthesis components with various ball sizes and surface finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swikert, M. A.; Johnson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a newly designed total hip joint simulator. The apparatus closely simulates the complex motions and loads of the human hip in normal walking. The wear and friction of presently used appliance configurations and materials were determined. A surface treatment of the metal femoral ball specimens was applied to influence wear. The results of the investigation indicate that wear can be reduced by mechanical treatment of metal femoral ball surfaces. A metallographic examination and surface roughness measurements were made.

  6. A metal/Al2O3/ZrO2/SiO2/Si (MAZOS) structure for high-performance non-volatile memory application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Qin; Long, Shibing; Zhang, Manhong; Liu, Ming

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report a metal/Al 2 O 3 /ZrO 2 /SiO 2 /Si (MAZOS) structure with a ZrO 2 charge-trapping layer for non-volatile memory application. The superiority of this device over the traditional metal/Al 2 O 3 /Si 3 N 4 /SiO 2 /Si (MANOS) devices is much better data retention and enhanced program/erase efficiency. The MAZOS device exhibits excellent memory characteristics, including a large memory window of 7.1 V under ±11 V capacitance–voltage sweep, and a greatly improved data retention (only 16% charge loss for 10 years time) along with good endurance. The MAZOS device has a strong potential for future high-performance non-volatile memory application

  7. Clinical and radiological evolution of Intervened patients of total arthroplasty of hip with prostheses of resuperficialization metal-metal - Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvan Villamarin, Fernando; Bernal Torres, Fabio A; Paez, Jose Mauricio and others

    2006-01-01

    The articular degeneration of the hip in young patients requires including therapeutical alternatives for the management of this population. The resurfacing prostheses with metal-metal surfaces is an alternative for this type of patients. Reports with short and medium follow up are very promising, besides the different studies of laboratory that bear, the theoretical bases for their success. In this descriptive study, observational cases series type is described the radiological and clinical evolution of patients intervened of total arthroplasty of hip with resurfacing prostheses metal-metal in the hospital el Tunal of Bogota. The results of 31 hips are presented (27 patients) with an age average of 50 years old and a medium follow up of 16 months, with a good post surgical functional result with a median of 96 in the Harris Scores. The complications presented in the patient series are described and their relation with the different factors analyzed

  8. Gear wear monitoring by modulation signal bispectrum based on motor current signal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiliang; Gu, Fengshou; Mansaf, Haram; Wang, Tie; Ball, Andrew D.

    2017-09-01

    Gears are important mechanical components for power transmissions. Tooth wear is one of the most common failure modes, which can present throughout a gear's lifetime. It is significant to accurately monitor gear wear progression in order to take timely predictive maintenances. Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is an effective and non-intrusive approach which is able to monitor faults from both electrical and mechanical systems. However, little research has been reported in monitoring the gear wear and estimating its severity based on MCSA. This paper presents a novel gear wear monitoring method through a modulation signal bispectrum based motor current signal analysis (MSB-MCSA). For a steady gear transmission, it is inevitable to exist load and speed oscillations due to various errors including wears. These oscillations can induce small modulations in the current signals of the driving motor. MSB is particularly effective in characterising such small modulation signals. Based on these understandings, the monitoring process was implemented based on the current signals from a run-to-failure test of an industrial two stages helical gearbox under a moderate accelerated fatigue process. At the initial operation of the test, MSB analysis results showed that the peak values at the bifrequencies of gear rotations and the power supply can be effective monitoring features for identifying faulty gears and wear severity as they exhibit agreeable changes with gear loads. A monotonically increasing trend established by these features allows a clear indication of the gear wear progression. The dismantle inspection at 477 h of operation, made when one of the monitored features is about 123% higher than its baseline, has found that there are severe scuffing wear marks on a number of tooth surfaces on the driving gear, showing that the gear endures a gradual wear process during its long test operation. Therefore, it is affirmed that the MSB-MSCA approach proposed is reliable

  9. Effect of distribution of striated laser hardening tracks on dry sliding wear resistance of biomimetic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Zhou, Ti; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Li, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Some biological surfaces were proved to have excellent anti-wear performance. Being inspired, Nd:YAG pulsed laser was used to create striated biomimetic laser hardening tracks on medium carbon steel samples. Dry sliding wear tests biomimetic samples were performed to investigate specific influence of distribution of laser hardening tracks on sliding wear resistance of biomimetic samples. After comparing wear weight loss of biomimetic samples, quenched sample and untreated sample, it can be suggested that the sample covered with dense laser tracks (3.5 mm spacing) has lower wear weight loss than the one covered with sparse laser tracks (4.5 mm spacing); samples distributed with only dense laser tracks or sparse laser tracks (even distribution) were proved to have better wear resistance than samples distributed with both dense and sparse tracks (uneven distribution). Wear mechanisms indicate that laser track and exposed substrate of biomimetic sample can be regarded as hard zone and soft zone respectively. Inconsecutive striated hard regions, on the one hand, can disperse load into small branches, on the other hand, will hinder sliding abrasives during wear. Soft regions with small range are beneficial in consuming mechanical energy and storing lubricative oxides, however, soft zone with large width (>0.5 mm) will be harmful to abrasion resistance of biomimetic sample because damages and material loss are more obvious on surface of soft phase. As for the reason why samples with even distributed bionic laser tracks have better wear resistance, it can be explained by the fact that even distributed laser hardening tracks can inhibit severe worn of local regions, thus sliding process can be more stable and wear extent can be alleviated as well.

  10. Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Hydrogels Containing Metal Ions and Metals/Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazli Wahid

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has caused a serious health problem. Scientists respond to the threat by developing new antimicrobial materials to prevent or control infections caused by these pathogens. Polymer-based nanocomposite hydrogels are versatile materials as an alternative to conventional antimicrobial agents. Cross-linking of polymeric materials by metal ions or the combination of polymeric hydrogels with nanoparticles (metals and metal oxide is a simple and effective approach for obtaining a multicomponent system with diverse functionalities. Several metals and metal oxides such as silver (Ag, gold (Au, zinc oxide (ZnO, copper oxide (CuO, titanium dioxide (TiO2 and magnesium oxide (MgO have been loaded into hydrogels for antimicrobial applications. The incorporation of metals and metal oxide nanoparticles into hydrogels not only enhances the antimicrobial activity of hydrogels, but also improve their mechanical characteristics. Herein, we summarize recent advances in hydrogels containing metal ions, metals and metal oxide nanoparticles with potential antimicrobial properties.

  11. Dislocation and Structural Studies at Metal-Metallic Glass Interface at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pradeep; Yedla, Natraj

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation deformation studies on the Al (metal)-Cu50Zr50 (metallic glass) model interface is carried out based on cohesive zone model. The interface is subjected to mode-I loading at a strain rate of 109 s-1 and temperature of 100 K. The dislocations reactions and evolution of dislocation densities during the deformation have been investigated. Atomic interactions between Al, Cu and Zr atoms are modeled using EAM (embedded atom method) potential, and a timestep of 0.002 ps is used for performing the MD simulations. A circular crack and rectangular notch are introduced at the interface to investigate the effect on the deformation behavior and fracture. Further, scale size effect is also investigated. The structural changes and evolution of dislocation density are also examined. It is found that the dominant deformation mechanism is by Shockley partial dislocation nucleation. Amorphization is observed in the Al regions close to the interface and occurs at a lower strain in the presence of a crack. The total dislocation density is found to be maximum after the first yield in both the perfect and defect interface models and is highest in the case of perfect interface with a density of 6.31 × 1017 m-2. In the perfect and circular crack defect interface models, it is observed that the fraction of Shockley partial dislocation density decreases, whereas that of strain rod dislocations increases with increase in strain.

  12. Wear behaviors of a Fe-based amorphous alloy in ambient atmosphere and in distilled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, B. T.; Kim, S. S.; Yi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Wear behaviors of a Fe-based bulk amorphous alloy with more 3MPa yield strength against AISI 304 disc were studied in different environment using a unidirectional tribometer. Friction behaviors were also investigated in the state of both amorphous pin on amorphous disc test set and the amorphous pin on AISI 304 disc test set with surface temperature using thermocouple embedded pin. Wear mechanisms of a Fe-based bulk amorphous alloy have been proposed based upon the microstructural analysis and surface temperature measurements during pin-on disc friction tests in ambient atmosphere and in distilled water, respectively. Delamination from the smooth friction surface was the main wear mechanism during the friction test in ambient atmosphere, while brittle fracture morphologies were apparent on the friction surface formed in a distilled water condition. Based upon the surface temperature measurements, difference in the heat removal efficiency on the friction surface due to different atmospheres was suggested to cause distinct wear mechanisms.

  13. Radiation tagging measures wear at speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Jon.

    1994-01-01

    A new non-invasive technique for performing accelerated wear and corrosion analysis is particularly relevant to power transmission systems. Wear tests that would normally take days or weeks to complete can now be performed in hours. A tiny patch of the wearing component is made mildly radioactive and the drop in activity as material is worn away is monitored. Known as Thin Layer Activation (TLA), the technology was originally developed and pioneered in-house by the Atomic Energy Authority. Since then, the dominant partner has been the automotive sector where TLA has been used extensively for engine wear and lubrication performance analysis. However, TLA could be used in any wear or corrosion environment. Applications include wear analysis of machine tool cutting surfaces, pump impellers and brake linings to the corrosion monitoring of process plant and pipelines. (author)

  14. The Delamination Theory of Wear - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    purposes: to predict wear arnd to reduce wear, Mathematical modelo are necessary in order to predict wear 40 qualitatively. They are also useful in the...Jersey 08540 The Ohio State University 116 West 19th Avenue Dr. E. Rudy .I Columbus, Ohio 43210 Oregon Graduate Center 19600 N.W. Walker Road Mr. W...Smith Baverton, Oregon 97005 Code 2832 Naval Ship Research and Development Dr. W. Ruff I Annopolis, Maryland 21401 National Bureau of Standards Department

  15. Study on torsional fretting wear behavior of a ball-on-socket contact configuration simulating an artificial cervical disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Song [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Fei [School of Material Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Liao, Zhenhua [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Biomechanics and Biotechnology Lab, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Wang, Qingliang [School of Material Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Liu, Yuhong [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Weiqiang, E-mail: weiqliu@hotmail.com [Biomechanics and Biotechnology Lab, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China); State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-10-01

    A ball-on-socket contact configuration was designed to simulate an artificial cervical disk in structure. UHMWPE (ultra high molecular weight polyethylene) hot pressed by powders and Ti6Al4V alloy were selected as the material combination of ball and socket. The socket surface was coated by a ~ 500 nm C-DLC (carbon ion implantation-diamond like carbon) mixed layer to improve its surface nano hardness and wear resistance. The torsional fretting wear behavior of the ball-on-socket model was tested at different angular displacements under 25% bovine serum lubrication with an axial force of 100 N to obtain more realistic results with that in vivo. The fretting running regimes and wear damage characteristics as well as wear mechanisms for both ball and socket were studied based on 2D (two dimension) optical microscope, SEM (scanning electron microscope) and 3D (three dimension) profiles. With the increase of angular displacement amplitude from 1° to 7°, three types of T-θ (Torsional torque-angular displacement amplitude) curves (i.e., linear, elliptical and parallelogram loops) corresponding to running regimes of PSR (partial slip regime), MR (mixed regime) and SR (slip regime) were observed and analyzed. Both the central region and the edge zone of the ball and socket were damaged. The worn surfaces were characterized by wear scratches and wear debris. In addition, more severe wear damage and more wear debris appeared on the central region of the socket at higher angular displacement amplitude. The dominant damage mechanism was a mix of surface scratch, adhesive wear and abrasive wear for the UHMWPE ball while that for the coated socket was abrasive wear by PE particles and some polishing and rolling process on the raised overgrown DLC grains. The frictional kinetic behavior, wear type, damage region and damage mechanism for the ball-on-socket model revealed significant differences with those of a ball-on-flat contact while showing better consistency with that of in

  16. Study on torsional fretting wear behavior of a ball-on-socket contact configuration simulating an artificial cervical disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Song; Wang, Fei; Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Qingliang; Liu, Yuhong; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    A ball-on-socket contact configuration was designed to simulate an artificial cervical disk in structure. UHMWPE (ultra high molecular weight polyethylene) hot pressed by powders and Ti6Al4V alloy were selected as the material combination of ball and socket. The socket surface was coated by a ~ 500 nm C-DLC (carbon ion implantation-diamond like carbon) mixed layer to improve its surface nano hardness and wear resistance. The torsional fretting wear behavior of the ball-on-socket model was tested at different angular displacements under 25% bovine serum lubrication with an axial force of 100 N to obtain more realistic results with that in vivo. The fretting running regimes and wear damage characteristics as well as wear mechanisms for both ball and socket were studied based on 2D (two dimension) optical microscope, SEM (scanning electron microscope) and 3D (three dimension) profiles. With the increase of angular displacement amplitude from 1° to 7°, three types of T-θ (Torsional torque-angular displacement amplitude) curves (i.e., linear, elliptical and parallelogram loops) corresponding to running regimes of PSR (partial slip regime), MR (mixed regime) and SR (slip regime) were observed and analyzed. Both the central region and the edge zone of the ball and socket were damaged. The worn surfaces were characterized by wear scratches and wear debris. In addition, more severe wear damage and more wear debris appeared on the central region of the socket at higher angular displacement amplitude. The dominant damage mechanism was a mix of surface scratch, adhesive wear and abrasive wear for the UHMWPE ball while that for the coated socket was abrasive wear by PE particles and some polishing and rolling process on the raised overgrown DLC grains. The frictional kinetic behavior, wear type, damage region and damage mechanism for the ball-on-socket model revealed significant differences with those of a ball-on-flat contact while showing better consistency with that of in

  17. Determination of rail wear and short-time wear measurements of rails applying radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohmann, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    An energetic model has been developed for calculating rail wear. Short-time wear tests on rails after surface activation and following activity measurements showed a good agreement with the calculated values

  18. Structure effect on wear resistance of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepina, A.I.; Sidorova, L.I.; Tolstenko, E.V.

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of wear resistance on hardness of steels with different microstructure is studied under conditions of gas-abrasion wear of surface layers. It is found out that at the same hardness the wear resistance of α-alloys is higher than that of γ-alloys in spite of considerable surface hardening of austenitic alloys. Fracture of surface in the process of abrasive wear occurs after achievement of definite values of microhardness and the width of a diffraction line for each structural class of alloys [ru

  19. Corrosion wear fracture of new {beta} biomedical titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinomi, M.; Fukunaga, K.-I. [Toyohashi Univ. of Technol. (Japan). Dept. of Production Syst. Eng.; Kuroda, D.; Morinaga, M.; Kato, Y.; Yashiro, T.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-05-15

    Metallic materials such as stainless steel, Co-Cr alloy, pure titanium and titanium alloys have been used for surgical implant materials. The {alpha} + {beta} type titanium alloy such as Ti-6Al-4V ELI has been most widely used as an implant material for artificial hip joint and dental implant because of its high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Toxicity of alloying elements in conventional biomedical titanium alloys like Al and V, and the high modulus of elasticity of these alloy as compared to that of bone have been, however, pointed out [1,2]. New {beta} type titanium alloys composed of non-toxic elements like Nb, Ta, Zr, Mo and Sn with lower moduli of elasticity, greater strength and greater corrosion resistance were, therefore, designed in this study. The friction wear properties of titanium alloys are, however, low as compared to those of other conventional metallic implant materials such as stainless steels and Co-Cr alloy. Tensile tests and friction wear tests in Ringer`s solution were conducted in order to investigate the mechanical properties of designed alloys. The friction wear characteristics of designed alloys and typical conventional biomedical titanium alloys were evaluated using a pin-on-disk type friction wear testing system and measuring the weight loss and width of groove of the specimen. (orig.) 8 refs.

  20. Wear behavior of an austempered ductile iron containing Mo-Ni-Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, S.; Rahimi, M.A. [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand Univ. of Technology, Tabriz (Iran)

    2005-07-01

    The aim of the this investigation is to study the influence of Ni on tribiological behavior of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing Mo, Ni and Cu. Ductile irons with chemical composition Fe-3.56%C-2.67%Si -0.25%Mo-0.5%Cu and Ni contents of 0.8 and 1.5% were cast into standard Y-blocks. Wear test samples were machined off from the bottom section of blocks. Austenitizing heat treatment was carried out at 870 C temperature followed by austempering at 270, 320, and 370 C for 5-1140 minutes. The wear test was carried out by using block-on-ring test machine. Sliding dry wear behavior was studied under applied loads of 50, 100 and 150 N. The results show that wear resistance is independent of austempering temperature with an applied load of 50 N, but there is a strong dependence at higher austempering temperatures with applied loads of 100 and 150 N. Wear mechanism is described as being due to subsurface fatigue, with cracks nucleated at plastically, deformed graphite interfaces. The wear controlling mechanism is the crack growth when wear shows a dependence on applied load and austempering temperature. (orig.)

  1. Effect of consolidation on adhesive and abrasive wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Rizwan M; McGarry, Frederick J; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Harris, William H

    2003-08-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) is widely performed to recover hip joint functions lost by trauma or disease and to relieve pain. The major cause of failure in THR is the wear of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component. The dominant wear mechanism in THR occurs through adhesion and abrasion. While poor consolidation of UHMWPE is known to increase the incidence of a different damage mode, delamination, which is the dominant wear mechanism in tibial inserts but uncommon in THR, the effect of consolidation on adhesive and abrasive wear of UHMWPE is not clear. In this study UHMWPE resin was subjected to hot isostatic pressing under a pressure of 138MPa at different temperatures (210 degrees C, 250 degrees C, and 300 degrees C) to achieve varying degrees of consolidation. The extent of consolidation was determined by optical microscopy using thin sections, and by scanning electron microscopy using cryofractured and solvent etched specimens. Wear behavior of the samples with varying degree of consolidation was determined using a bi-directional pin-on-disc machine simulating conditions in a hip joint. Increasing the processing temperature decreased the incidence of fusion defects and particle boundaries reflecting the powder flakes of the virgin resin, improving the consolidation. However, the bi-directional pin-on-disc wear rate did not change with the processing temperature, indicating that adhesive and abrasive wear is independent of the extent of consolidation in the range of parameters studied here.

  2. Wear behaviour and morphology of stir cast aluminium/SiC nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwir Alam, Md; Arif, Sajjad; Husain Ansari, Akhter

    2018-04-01

    Wear and friction play a vital role in the service life of components. Aluminium matrix nanocomposites possess tremendous potential for a number of applications in addition to their present uses. It is valuable to the field of newer materials for better performance in tribological applications. In this work, dry sliding wear, friction coefficient and morphology of aluminium alloy (A356) reinforced with silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiCn) were investigated. A356/SiCn nanocomposites (AMNCs) containing 1–5 weight percentage of SiCn were prepared through two-step stir casting process via mechanical ball milling. The wear test was conducted on pin-on-disc test apparatus. Regression analysis was performed to develop mathematical functions to fit the experimental data points. Morphological studies of Al and SiCn as-received, wear debris and worn surfaces were further analysed by SEM along with EDS. The occurrence of oxide layers was observed on worn surfaces. Iron trace was identified by wear debris. It was found that the wear loss and friction coefficient were strongly influenced by mechanical milling and SiCn content. The results exhibited that the friction coefficient reduces with the addition of SiCn as well as with the increase in load. However, wear resistance increases as the reinforcement content increases because of the embedding and wettability effects.

  3. Microstructural study and wear behavior of ductile iron surface alloyed by Inconel 617

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabi Jeshvaghani, R.; Jaberzadeh, M.; Zohdi, H.; Shamanian, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The Ni-base alloy was deposited on the surface of ductile iron by TIG welding process. • Microstructure of alloyed layer consisted of carbides embedded in Ni-rich dendrite. • Hardness and wear resistance of coated sample greatly improved. • The formation of oxide layer and delamination were dominant mechanisms of wear. - Abstract: In this research, microstructure and wear behavior of Ni-based alloy is discussed in detail. Using tungsten inert gas welding process, coating of nearly 1–2 mm thickness was deposited on ductile iron. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as X-ray diffraction analysis and electron probe microanalysis were used to characterize the microstructure of the surface alloyed layer. Micro-hardness and wear resistance of the alloyed layer was also studied. Results showed that the microstructure of the alloyed layer consisted of M 23 C 6 carbides embedded in Ni-rich solid solution dendrites. The partial melted zone (PMZ) had eutectic ledeburit plus martensite microstructure, while the heat affected zone (HAZ) had only a martensite structure. It was also noticed that hardness and wear resistance of the alloyed layer was considerably higher than that of the substrate. Improvement of wear resistance is attributed to the solution strengthening effect of alloying elements and also the presence of hard carbides such as M 23 C 6 . Based on worn surface analysis, the dominant wear mechanisms of alloyed layer were found to be oxidation and delamination

  4. ROLLING CONTACT FATIGUE AND WEAR OF CrL AND CrM MODE POWDER METALLURGY STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Rodziňák

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Contact fatigue properties of sintered steels type CrM and CrL with addition of 0,3-0,7 %C were examined on the device type „pin on disc“ and confronted with wear tests on the same principle. Achieved outcomes are better for CrM material; the higher carbon content the better they are. Fatigue strength ranges from 925 - 1410 MPa and is consistent with the value of hardness. Dry wear tests show that the wear is dependent on the hardness of carbide particles (microhardness and not on macrohardness of material. These causes wear of indentor. Between values obtained from tests of contact fatigue and wear testing is not possible to find relevant compliance. Both rupture mechanisms are based on breaches of other principles, particularly the PM materials are in the mode of wear that is not sufficiently explored.

  5. Relation between in-vitro wear and nanomechanical properties of commercial light-cured dental composites coated with surface sealants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Santos Jr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the correlation between the in-vitro wear resistance and the nanomechanical properties of dental sealants commercially available. Mechanical properties, namely hardness (H and elastic modulus (E, were assessed by nanoindentation technique. The coated samples presented lower H and E values than the Z250 composite resin substrate. Such measurements were used to calculate H/E ratios. Wear tests were carried out in water by using a pin-on-plate apparatus. Scars formed on the samples were qualitatively examined by optical microscopy, while their wear depths were measured by contact profilometry. Based on the findings, an empirical correlation between the wear depths and H/E was obtained. A high H/E ratio was associated to surfaces with enhanced wear resistance. For the tribological conditions here employed, the H/E ratio could be, therefore, considered a useful parameter for ranking the in-vitro wear of dental sealants.

  6. Abrasive wear behaviour of electrodeposited nanocrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Daehyun

    The effect of grain size refinement on the abrasive wear behaviour of nanocrystalline Ni, Ni-P and Co electrodeposits and the critical materials properties that influence the abrasive wear resistance were studied using the Taber wear test. As the grain size of Ni decreased from 90 mum to 13 nm, the dominant abrasive wear mode changed from ploughing to cutting and the Taber wear resistance was considerably improved by the increases in hardness and surface elastic properties. The abrasive wear behaviour of Ni with various grain sizes can be described using the attack angle model, which takes into consideration the randomly dispersed Al2O3 abrasive particles in the Taber wheel with various sizes, shapes and orientations. Depending on the phosphorus content, the nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) alloys containing up to 6 wt.% P had nanocrystalline or mixed nanocrystalline-amorphous structures and both regular and inverse Hall-Petch behaviour were observed as a result of the microstructural changes with increasing P content/decreasing grain size. The wear resistance, like hardness, followed the Hall-Petch type behaviour, demonstrating that the smallest grain size does not necessarily provide the best wear resistance. For all Ni-P alloys, the wear resistance was improved by heat treatment due to Ni3P precipitates and, for materials with high P content, nanocrystallization of the amorphous phase. For heat-treated Ni-P alloys, however, the highest hardness did not give the best wear resistance. Despite the grain size reduction of Co from 10 mum to 17 nm, there was no significant change in the wear resistance due to the unusually high degree of plastic deformation of the nanocrystalline material. In addition to hardness and surface elastic properties which are usually considered important material properties that control the abrasive wear resistance, Taber wear ductility was introduced as a new material intrinsic property which can be applied to explain abrasive wear resistance for

  7. Antagonist wear by polished zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartkamp, Oliver; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Reich, Sven

    The aim of this in vivo study was to measure antagonist wear caused by polished monolithic posterior zirconia crowns over a 24-month period using the intraoral digital impression (IDI) technique. Thirteen zirconia crowns were placed in nine patients. The crowns and adjacent teeth were captured using an intraoral scanner (Lava C.O.S.). The corresponding antagonist teeth and the respective neighboring teeth were also scanned. Scanning was performed immediately after the restoration (baseline) as well as 12 and 24 months after crown placement. Geomagic Qualify software was used to superimpose the follow-up data sets onto the corresponding baseline data set, identify wear sites, and measure maximum vertical height loss in each individual wear site. Overall antagonist wear was then determined as the mean of wear rates measured in all of the individual antagonist units. In addition, wear rates in enamel and ceramic antagonists were analyzed as part of the scope of this study. The maximum mean wear with standard deviation (SD) in the overall sample with a total of nine patients, 13 antagonist units, and 98 evaluable wear sites was 86 ± 23 µm at 12 months, and 103 ± 39 µm at 24 months. The maximum mean wear in the enamel antagonist subgroup was 87 ± 41 µm at 12 months, and 115 ± 71 µm at 24 months; and in the ceramic antagonist subgroup 107 ± 22 µm at 12 months, and 120 ± 27 µm at 24 months. The wear rates determined in this study are comparable to those of existing studies. The IDI technique of wear analysis can be carried out in a practical manner and produces useful results.

  8. Lubricated sliding wear behaviour of Ni-P-W multilayered alloy coatings produced by pulse plating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagopoulos, C. N.; Papachristos, V. D.; Christoffersen, Lasse

    2000-01-01

    The lubricated sliding wear behaviour of Ni-P-W multilayered alloy coatings sliding against hardened steel discs was studied, in a pin-on-disc set-up. The multilayered coatings had been deposited on mild steel pins by pulse plating and they consisted of ternary Ni-P-W layers of high and low W con...... lubrication regimes. The wear mechanisms in each lubrication regime were studied and in mixed lubrication regime, the effect of normal load and sliding speed on wear volume and friction coefficient was also studied. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved....

  9. Improvement of wear resistance of sprayed layer on 52100 steel by friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar-kelishami, A.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Hadavi, M. M.; Seraj, R. A.; Gerlich, A. P.

    2014-10-01

    The influence of friction stir processing (FSP) on wear resistance is studied on a thermally sprayed coating in terms of microstructure and mechanical properties. A high-chromium steel coating sprayed on AISI 52100 steel has been processed, and it is shown that FSP can improve the sprayed layer wear resistance compared to the as-sprayed and quenched and tempered condition. It is suggested that improved toughness is the main contribution to wear performance rather than hardness. It is observed that FSP provides increased hardness and toughness simultaneously, while tempering of the quenched AISI 52100 steel increases toughness while hardness decreases.

  10. Influence of kinematics on the wear of a total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Alexandra; Fisher, John; Suñer, Silvia; Brockett, Claire

    2017-02-28

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is an alternative to fusion, replacing the degenerated joint with a mechanical motion-preserving alternative. Minimal pre-clinical testing has been reported to date and existing wear testing standards lack definition. Ankle gait is complex, therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the effect on wear of a range of different ankle gait kinematic inputs. Five Zenith (Corin Group) TARs were tested in a modified knee simulator for twelve million cycles (Mc). Different combinations of IR rotation and AP displacement were applied every 2Mc to understand the effects of the individual kinematics. Wear was assessed gravimetrically every Mc and surface profilometry undertaken after each condition. With the initial unidirectional input with no AP displacement the wear rate measured 1.2±0.6mm 3 /Mc. The addition of 11° rotation and 9mm of AP displacement caused a statistically significant increase in the wear rate to 25.8±3.1mm 3 /Mc. These inputs seen a significant decrease in the surface roughness at the tibial articulation. Following polishing three displacement values were tested; 0, 4 and 9mm with no significant difference in wear rate ranging 11.8-15.2mm 3 /Mc. TAR wear rates were shown to be highly dependent on the addition of internal/external rotation within the gait profile with multidirectional kinematics proving vital in the accurate wear testing of TARs. Prior to surface polishing wear rates were significantly higher but once in a steady state the AP displacement had no significant effect on the wear. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. A Numerical Study on the Effect of Debris Layer on Fretting Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongyan Yue

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fretting wear is the material damage of two contact surfaces caused by micro relative displacement. Its characteristic is that debris is trapped on the contact surfaces. Depending on the material properties, the shapes of the debris, and the dominant wear mechanisms, debris can play different roles that either protect or harm interfaces. Due to the micro scale of the debris, it is difficult to obtain instantaneous information and investigate debris behavior in experiments. The Finite Element Method (FEM has been used to model the process of fretting wear and calculate contact variables, such as contact stress and relative slip during the fretting wear process. In this research, a 2D fretting wear model with a debris layer was developed to investigate the influence of debris on fretting wear. Effects of different factors such as thickness of the debris layer, Young’s modulus of the debris layer, and the time of importing the layer into the FE model were considered in this study. Based on FE results, here we report that: (a the effect of Young’s modulus of the debris layer on the contact pressure is not significant; (b the contact pressure between the debris layer and the flat specimen decreases with increasing thickness of the layer and (c by importing the debris layer in different fretting wear cycles, the debris layer shows different roles in the wear process. At the beginning of the wear cycle, the debris layer protects the contact surfaces of the first bodies (cylindrical pad and flat specimen. However, in the final cycle, the wear volumes of the debris layers exhibit slightly higher damage compared to the model without the debris layer in all considered cases.

  12. Fundamentals of friction and wear on the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Gnecco, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an updated review on the development of scanning probe microscopy and related techniques, and the availability of computational techniques not even imaginable a few decades ago. The 36 chapters cover instrumental aspects, theoretical models and selected experimental results, thus offering a broad panoramic view on fundamental issues in nanotribology which are currently being investigated. Compared to the first edition, several topics have been added, including triboluminescence, graphene mechanics, friction and wear in liquid environments, capillary condensation, and multisc

  13. Limitations imposed by wearing armour on Medieval soldiers' locomotor performance

    OpenAIRE

    Askew, Graham N.; Formenti, Federico; Minetti, Alberto E.

    2011-01-01

    In Medieval Europe, soldiers wore steel plate armour for protection during warfare. Armour design reflected a trade-off between protection and mobility it offered the wearer. By the fifteenth century, a typical suit of field armour weighed between 30 and 50 kg and was distributed over the entire body. How much wearing armour affected Medieval soldiers' locomotor energetics and biomechanics is unknown. We investigated the mechanics and the energetic cost of locomotion in armour, and determined...

  14. Aspects of wear and tear of tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Bill

    2010-03-01

    Lifestyle factors and the increased longevity of the dentition due to greater life expectancy have resulted in greater wear and tear (cracking) of teeth. Often there exists interplay between damage and repair. An understanding of these mechanisms of damage and repair will assist the clinician in correct diagnosis and treatment planning. Preventive strategies as well as interdisciplinary measures are required for optimal outcomes. However, are some of our restorative interventions causing further damage to tooth structure?

  15. Surface chemical modification for exceptional wear life of MEMS materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arvind Singh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS are built at micro/nano-scales. At these scales, the interfacial forces are extremely strong. These forces adversely affect the smooth operation and cause wear resulting in the drastic reduction in wear life (useful operating lifetime of actuator-based devices. In this paper, we present a surface chemical modification method that reduces friction and significantly extends the wear life of the two most popular MEMS structural materials namely, silicon and SU-8 polymer. The method includes surface chemical treatment using ethanolamine-sodium phosphate buffer, followed by coating of perfluoropolyether (PFPE nanolubricant on (i silicon coated with SU-8 thin films (500 nm and (ii MEMS process treated SU-8 thick films (50 μm. After the surface chemical modification, it was observed that the steady-state coefficient of friction of the materials reduced by 4 to 5 times and simultaneously their wear durability increased by more than three orders of magnitude (> 1000 times. The significant reduction in the friction coefficients is due to the lubrication effect of PFPE nanolubricant, while the exceptional increase in their wear life is attributed to the bonding between the -OH functional group of ethanolamine treated SU-8 thin/thick films and the -OH functional group of PFPE. The surface chemical modification method acts as a common route to enhance the performance of both silicon and SU-8 polymer. It is time-effective (process time ≤ 11 min, cost-effective and can be readily integrated into MEMS fabrication/assembly processes. It can also work for any kind of structural material from which the miniaturized devices are/can be made.

  16. Destructive investigations of decommissioned guide tubes: characterization of wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambard, A.; Lina, A.; Bosselut, D.; Deforge, D.; Robinot, P.; Thebault, Y.; Paulhies, M.; Maingot, S.

    2011-01-01

    The wear of control rods has been a major maintenance concern for EDF since the nineties. Surface treatment of the rods (nitriding, chrome plating) were developed to deal with this issue. However, the question came to know whether the guiding tube in which those new control rods are inserted are also worn. EDF interest into guide tube wear has been renewed by the slow increase of the drop time in B06 position. EDF performed field examinations and some laboratory experiments to answer to this question. Two guide tubes were extracted from various cores. They were chosen due to their different positions within the core and the different nature of their counter bodies (different control rods surface treatment). Their continuous part were sliced to reduce their activity. Their dimensions were measured and compared to the nominal dimensions. Wear was evidenced with a low level. It is mainly concentrated around the notch. Some distinctions could be made depending on the guiding tube examined. Metallographic examinations were performed using SEM. The wear patterns of the guiding tubes appear similar from those of the control rods, which means that similar wear mechanisms must be involved. A tentative explanation of the increase of the rod drop time in position B06 is proposed. A tentative explanation of the low increase of rod drop time is presented. It could result from the conjunction of a larger pressing force in B06 position than in other position of the core as well as the conformal contact observed. The conformal contact in itself could results from the larger pressing force and the use of hardened rods. The findings of these field examinations have comforted EDF strategy concerning B06 guide tubes: they are changed before their drop time reaches a critical value. (authors)

  17. Tooth Wear Inclination in Great Ape Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Sadler, Jordan; Fiorenza, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Primate dietary diversity is reflected in their dental morphology, with differences in size and shape of teeth. In particular, the tooth wear angle can provide insight into a species' ability to break down certain foods. To examine dietary and masticatory information, digitized polygon models of dental casts provide a basis for quantitative analysis of wear associated with tooth attrition. In this study, we analyze and compare the wear patterns of Pongo pygmaeus, Gorilla gorillagorilla and Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii lower molars, focusing on the degree of inclination of specific wear facets. The variation in wear angles appears to be indicative of jaw movements and the specific stresses imposed on food during mastication, reflecting thus the ecology of these species. Orangutans exhibit flatter wear angles, more typical of a diet consisting of hard and brittle foods, while gorillas show a wear pattern with a high degree of inclination, reflecting thus their more leafy diet. Chimpanzees, on the other hand, show intermediate inclinations, a pattern that could be related to their highly variable diet. This method is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for better understanding the relationship between food, mastication and tooth wear processes in living primates, and can be potentially used to reconstruct the diet of fossil species. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Abrasive tool wear in metal forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masen, Marc Arthur

    2004-01-01

    In this work a model is presented that quantifies this abrasive tool wear. The foundation of the model is on the level of surface roughness. The surface micro-geometry of both the abrasive surface and the wearing tool are measured using an interferometer. Based on this data, the surface geometry in

  19. Truck tyre wear assessment and prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.; Montanaro, F.; Donadio, D.; Gelosa, E.; Vis, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Tyre wear is a complex phenomenon. It depends non-linearly on numerous parameters, like tyre compound and design, vehicle type and usage, road conditions and road surface characteristics, environmental conditions (e.g., temperature) and many others. Yet, tyre wear has many economic and ecological

  20. Straylight Measurements in Contact Lens Wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, Ivanka J. E.; Engelbrecht, Leonore A.; van Vliet, Johannes M. J.; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; Mourits, Maarten P.; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; van den Berg, Thomas J. T. P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To quantify the effect of contact lens wear on straylight in rigid and soft contact lens wearers and (2) to relate findings to morphological changes and subjective complaints. Methods: Straylight was measured using the Oculus C-Quant during contact lens wear and after contact lens

  1. Enamel wear opposing polished and aged zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, J O; Janyavula, S; Lawson, N C; Lucas, T J; Cakir, D

    2014-01-01

    Aging of dental zirconia roughens its surface through low temperature degradation. We hypothesized that age-related roughening of zirconia crowns may cause detrimental wear to the enamel of an opposing tooth. To test our hypothesis, we subjected artificially aged zirconia and reference specimens to simulated mastication in a wear device and measured the wear of an opposing enamel cusp. Additionally, the roughness of the pretest surfaces was measured. The zirconia specimens, artificially aged by autoclave, showed no significant increase in roughness compared to the nonaged specimens. Furthermore, no significant difference in material or opposing enamel wear between the aged and nonaged zirconia was seen. All zirconia specimens showed less material and opposing enamel wear than the enamel to enamel control or veneering porcelain specimens. Scanning electron micrographs showed relatively smooth surfaces of aged and nonaged zirconia following wear testing. The micrographs of the veneering ceramic showed sharp fractured edges and fragments of wear debris. Zirconia may be considered a wear-friendly material for restorations opposing enamel, even after simulated aging.

  2. Sliding wear resistance of iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ordered intermetallic alloy (Johnson et al 1990, 1994,. 1996; Maupin et al 1992, 1993; Tu and Liu 1997; Kim and Kim 1998). Maupin et al (1992, 1993) had shown that the Fe3Al alloy having DO3 structure possesses mar- ginally lower wear rate than those with B2 structure. The wear resistance of Fe3Al alloy was found to ...

  3. Asphalt wear and pollution transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Asa [Division of Traffic Engineering, Lulea University of Technology Lulea (Sweden)

    1996-09-06

    Studded tires cause extensive wear of road surfaces during winter producing small particles. Besides transporting different adsorbed pollutants these particles also discharge metal ions by their own natural content. The major part (95%) of the asphalt is composed of stone fractions. The rest consists mainly of bitumen, which contains trace quantities of metals. Laboratory studies in this study have demonstrated different adsorbing properties of metal ions, as well as differences in adsorption when comparing stone materials. Two stone materials, a gabbro and a porphyry, have been tested for their adsorption properties concerning Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd. The gabbro showed better adsorption capacity than the porphyry. Gabbro has coarser grains, it is softer, and also has a higher content of most metals compared to the porphyry. In all tests lead and copper are more adsorbed than zinc and cadmium. All metal ions are released at about the same pH ({approx}4)

  4. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo...

  5. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo......M hip implant. A Danish surveillance programme has been initiated addressing these problems....

  6. Complications caused by contact lens wearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beljan, Jasna; Beljan, Kristina; Beljan, Zdravko

    2013-04-01

    Complications in wearing contact lenses are very rare and caused by poor maintenance, over-extended wear and wearing of contact lenses in a polluted environment. Regular control by a professional person can efficiently reduce the number of complications. This paper describes the most common risks factors for complications, and complications of wearing contact lenses with the classification according to the anatomic parts of the eye: eyelids, tear film, limbus, corneal epithelium, corneal stroma and corneal endothelium. Every complication has been described by the characteristic signs and symptoms, etiology and pathology, as well as therapy and prognosis. The paper describes how to select adequate customers as contact lens users, with proper education in order to ensure minimal incidence of complications due to contact lens wear, thus attracting a lot of satisfied and healthy customers.

  7. The friction wear of electrolytic composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starosta, R.

    2002-01-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of wear of galvanic composite coatings Ni-Al 2 O 3 and Ni-41%Fe-Al 2 O 3 . The diameter of small parts of aluminium oxide received 0.5; 3; 5 μm. Investigations of friction sliding were effected on PT3 device at Technical University of Gdansk. Counter sample constituted a funnel made of steel NC6 (750 HV). Increase of wear coatings together with the rise of iron content in matrix is observed. The rise of sizes of ceramic particles caused decrease of wear of composite coatings, but rise of steel funnel wear. The friction coefficient increased after ceramic particle s were built in coatings. The best wear resistance characterized Ni-41%Fe-Al 2 O 3 coatings containing 2.2x10 6 mm -2 ceramic particles. (author)

  8. Microstructure Evaluation and Wear-Resistant Properties of Ti-alloyed Hypereutectic High Chromium Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    High chromium cast iron (HCCI) is considered as one of the most useful wear resistance materials and their usage are widely spread in industry. The mechanical properties of HCCI mainly depend on type, size, number, morphology of hard carbides and the matrix structure (γ or α). The hypereutectic HCCI with large volume fractions of hard carbides is preferred to apply in wear applications. However, the coarser and larger primary M7C3 carbides will be precipitated during the solidification of the...

  9. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  10. Cerium Addition Improved the Dry Sliding Wear Resistance of Surface Welding AZ91 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqiang Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of cerium (Ce addition on the friction and wear properties of surface welding AZ91 magnesium alloys were evaluated by pin-on-disk dry sliding friction and wear tests at normal temperature. The results show that both the friction coefficient and wear rate of surfacing magnesium alloys decreased with the decrease in load and increase in sliding speed. The surfacing AZ91 alloy with 1.5% Ce had the lowest friction coefficient and wear rate. The alloy without Ce had the worst wear resistance, mainly because it contained a lot of irregularly shaped and coarse β-Mg17Al12 phases. During friction, the β phase readily caused stress concentration and thus formed cracks at the interface between β phase and α-Mg matrix. The addition of Ce reduced the size and amount of Mg17Al12, while generating Al4Ce phase with a higher thermal stability. The Al-Ce phase could hinder the grain-boundary sliding and migration and reduced the degree of plastic deformation of subsurface metal. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that the surfacing AZ91 alloy with 1.5% Ce had a total of four types of wear mechanism: abrasion, oxidation, and severe plastic deformation were the primary mechanisms; delamination was the secondary mechanism.

  11. Heat treated twin wire arc spray AISI 420 coatings under dry and wet abrasive wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; González, M. A.; Monjardín, H. R.; Jimenez, O.; Flores, M.; Ibarra, J.

    2017-11-01

    The influence of applying two different heat treatments such as: deep cryogenic and tempering on dry/wet abrasive wear resistance of twin wire arc spray martensitic AISI 420 coatings was evaluated by using a modified rubber wheel type test apparatus. A load dependency was observed on the abrasive wear rate behavior of both; dry and wet tests. Three body (rolling) and two body (sliding) wear mechanisms were identified in dry conditions, prevailing rolling at lower and higher loads. However, at higher loads, more presence of grooving and pits formation was observed. Coatings tempered at 205 °C/1 h displayed better wear resistance than cryogenic treated ones. A change in wear mechanism between dry and wet conditions was observed; two body wear mechanism predominated respect to three body. In both; dry and wet conditions the microstructure (several inter-splat oxides) as well as strain and residual stress promotes brittle material removal which was more evident in cryogenic and as-sprayed samples during dry test and at higher loads in wet conditions.

  12. Structure vs chemistry: friction and wear of Pt-based metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, A; Louzguine-Luzguin, D V; Bennewitz, R

    2013-11-13

    In comparison of a Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass with a Pt(111) single crystal we find that wearless friction is determined by chemistry through bond formation alloying, while wear is determined by structure through plasticity mechanisms. In the wearless regime, friction is affected by the chemical composition of the counter body and involves the formation of a liquid-like neck and interfacial alloying. The wear behavior of Pt-based metallic surfaces is determined by their structural properties and corresponding mechanisms for plastic deformation. In the case of Pt(111) wear occurs by dislocation-mediated homogeneous plastic deformation. In contrast the wear of Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass occurs through localized plastic deformation in shear bands that merge together in a single shear zone above a critical load and corresponds to the shear softening of metallic glasses. These results open a new route in the control of friction and wear of metals and are relevant for the development of self-lubricated and wear-resistant mechanical devices.

  13. Cerium Addition Improved the Dry Sliding Wear Resistance of Surface Welding AZ91 Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingqiang; Zhao, Zhihao; Zhu, Qingfeng; Wang, Gaosong; Tao, Kai

    2018-02-06

    In this study, the effects of cerium (Ce) addition on the friction and wear properties of surface welding AZ91 magnesium alloys were evaluated by pin-on-disk dry sliding friction and wear tests at normal temperature. The results show that both the friction coefficient and wear rate of surfacing magnesium alloys decreased with the decrease in load and increase in sliding speed. The surfacing AZ91 alloy with 1.5% Ce had the lowest friction coefficient and wear rate. The alloy without Ce had the worst wear resistance, mainly because it contained a lot of irregularly shaped and coarse β-Mg 17 Al 12 phases. During friction, the β phase readily caused stress concentration and thus formed cracks at the interface between β phase and α-Mg matrix. The addition of Ce reduced the size and amount of Mg 17 Al 12 , while generating Al₄Ce phase with a higher thermal stability. The Al-Ce phase could hinder the grain-boundary sliding and migration and reduced the degree of plastic deformation of subsurface metal. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that the surfacing AZ91 alloy with 1.5% Ce had a total of four types of wear mechanism: abrasion, oxidation, and severe plastic deformation were the primary mechanisms; delamination was the secondary mechanism.

  14. Application of grey-taguchi method for optimization of dry sliding wear properties of aluminum MMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriyala, Rajesh; Alluru, Gopala Krishna; Penmetsa, Rama Murthy Raju; Duraiselvam, Muthukannan

    2012-09-01

    Through a pin-on-disc type wear setup, the dry sliding wear behavior of SiC-reinforced aluminum composites produced using the molten metal mixing method was investigated in this paper. Dry sliding wear tests were carried on SiC-reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) and its matrix alloy sliding against a steel counter face. Different contact stresses, reinforcement percentages, sliding distances, and sliding velocities were selected as the control variables, and the responses were selected as the wear volume loss (WVL) and coefficient of friction (COF) to evaluate the dry sliding performance. An L25 orthogonal array was employed for the experimental design. Initially, the optimization of the dry sliding performance of the SiC-reinforced MMCs was performed using grey relational analysis (GRA). Based on the GRA, the optimum level parameters for overall grey relational grade in terms of WVL and COF were identified. Analysis of variance was performed to determine the effect of individual factors on the overall grey relational grade. The results indicated that the sliding velocity was the most effective factor among the control parameters on dry sliding wear, followed by the reinforcement percentage, sliding distance, and contact stress. Finally, the wear surface morphology and wear mechanism of the composites were investigated through scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Influence of microstructure on high-stress abrasive wear behaviour of a microalloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Bhattacharya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This investigation examines two-body abrasive wear behaviour of ferrite–pearlite (FP, ferrite–bainite (FB and ferrite–martensite (FM microstructures of a microalloyed steel with nearly same amount of second phase/phase mixture to understand the role microstructure on high-stress abrasive wear performance of steel. Wear tests of differently heat treated specimens against SiC abrasive paper have been conducted over a wide range of sliding distance and normal load. This has been supplemented by the examinations of worn surfaces and generated wear debris in addition to the characterization of microstructures and evaluation of mechanical properties. It has been observed that for all type of microstructures, wear rate increases with increasing load but remains constant with sliding distance. Interestingly, the magnitude of wear rate at any particular wear condition is found to decrease considerably in the order of FP, FB and FM structure due to increased resistance to plastic deformation and microcutting encountered during the course of abrasion.

  16. Un-lubricated sliding wear performance of unalloyed austempered ductile iron under high contact stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimba, J.; Samandi, M.; Yu, D.; Chandra, T.; Navara, E.; Simbi, D.J

    2004-08-15

    The dry sliding wear behaviour of unalloyed austempered ductile iron (ADI) was studied in a reciprocating tribotester using contact loads in the range 40-140 N. The results obtained show that austempering in the temperature range 325-375 deg. C significantly improves the tribological properties of the unalloyed spheroidal graphite iron. The friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of ten (10) with the wear resistance increasing by several orders of magnitude. The improvement in wear performance was attributed to: the lubricity inherent the graphite nodules, the increase in initial hardness brought about by the ausferrite structure, and the work hardening of the surface as retained austenite is transformed to martensite by plastic deformation, and in the process reducing considerably the sensitivity of the specific wear rate to loading. Optical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results pertaining to the wear tracks suggest that two main wear mechanisms are responsible for material removal in the unlubricated sliding wear of ADI, namely, plastic yielding and oxidation, with the latter producing hard oxide particles that act as abrasives. Massive plastic yielding followed by delamination and sometimes oxidation accounts for material loss in the much softer as cast ductile spheroidal graphite iron.

  17. Solutionizing temperature and abrasive wear behaviour of cast Al-Si-Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rajesh; Anesh; Dwivedi, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, the influence of solutionizing temperature during artificial age hardening treatment (T 6 ) of cast Al-(8, 12, 16%)Si-0.3%Mg on abrasive wear behaviour has been reported. Alloys were prepared by controlled melting and casting. Cast alloys were given artificial age hardening treatment having a sequence of solutionizing, quenching and artificial aging. All the alloys were solutionized at 450 deg. C, 480 deg. C, 510 deg. C, and 550 deg. C for 8 h followed by water quenching (30 deg. C) and aging hardening at 170 deg. C for 12 h. Abrasive wear tests were conducted against 320 grade SiC polishing papers at 5 N and 10 N normal loads. It was observed that the silicon content and solution temperature affected the wear resistance significantly. Increase in solution temperature improved the wear resistance. Hypereutectic alloy showed better wear resistance than the eutectic and hypoeutectic alloys under identical conditions. Optical microstructure study of alloys revealed that the increase in solutionizing temperature improved distribution of silicon grains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of wear surface was carried out to analyze the wear mechanism

  18. Wear Behaviour of Iron Matrix Composite Reinforced by ZTA Particles in Impact Abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, B.; Xing, S. M.; Dong, Q.

    2017-11-01

    Zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) particles reinforced high chromium cast iron composites (ZTA/Iron composites) were prepared by a two-step processing method, i.e. mixing particles by the molten metal and cohering by high pressure, which based on the squeeze casting process. The impact wear resistance under different impact energies were investigated using dynamically loaded abrasive wear tester at room temperature. For comparison, the wear tests of high chromium cast iron were also carried out under the same conditions. Worn surfaces of the samples were observed under scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive detector. The results showed that the composites have better impact wear resistance than that of high Cr cast iron regardless of impact energy level, and the wear resistance of the two materials all decrease with the increase of the impact energy. The main wear mechanisms of the high Cr cast iron were micro-cutting and fatigue peeling, while the wear of composites occurred through micro-cutting of the matrix (lower impact energy) and breaking and shedding of the reinforced particles (higher impact energy).

  19. Friction and wear performance of bearing ball sliding against diamond-like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenjiang; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Kar, Satyananda; Li, Dangjuan; Su, Junhong

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the tribological properties of bearing steel ball (Japan standard, SUJ2) sliding against tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) coatings and amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) coatings. The reciprocating sliding testes are performed with ball-on-plate friction tester in ambient air condition. Analysis of friction coefficient, wear volume and microstructure in wear scar are carried out using optical microscopy, atom force morphology (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show the SUJ2 on ta-C coating has low friction coefficient (around 0.15) but high wear loss. In contrast, the low wear loss of SUJ2 on a-C:H coating with high (around 0.4) and unsteady friction coefficient. Some Fe2O3, FeO and graphitization have been found on the wear scar of SUJ2 sliding against ta-C coating. Nearly no oxide materials exist on the wear scar of SUJ2 against a-C:H coating. The mechanism and hypothesis of the wear behavior have been investigated according to the measurement results. This study will contribute to proper selection and understand the tribological performance of bearing steels against DLC coatings.

  20. Wear resistance of alloy вт-22 with non-ferrous alloys at reverse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.М. Хімко

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available  The article presents the results of tests of non hardened titanium alloy ВТ-22 with aviation non-ferrous alloys in reverse sliding friction. The main objective of the work is the selection of the optimum combination of materials depending on changes in loading conditions. Study of alloy ВТ-22 wear resistance was carried out in pairs with БрОФ-10-1, БрБ2, БрАЖ-9-4, ВТ-22, МЛ5, Д16Т, 7Х21ГАН5Ш and 95Х18Ш. The dependencies of the materials wear at pressures 10, 20 and 30 Mpa we determined. The linear nature of titanium alloy wear curves indicates that the change in the wear mechanism occurs gradually. The histograms of non-ferrous materials wear and the total wear of the friction pair are presented. It is established that the bronze БрАЖ-9-4 is the most preferable material for contact with non hardened titanium alloy ВТ-22, the least wear among the tested materials. The established coefficients of the titanium alloy ВТ-22 friction in pair with aviation structural non-ferrous alloys are presented. The results of research will be relevant for the engineering industry, where non hardened titanium alloy ВТ-22 in pair with non-ferrous alloys is applied.

  1. Mimicking and Measuring Occlusal Erosive Tooth Wear with the "Rub&Roll" and Non-contact Profilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Jan L; Truin, Gert-Jan; Loomans, Bas A C; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D N J M

    2018-02-02

    Chewing, drinking, and occasional tooth grinding will result in physiological tooth wear during a lifetime. Extreme challenges, such as bruxism or habitual chewing on foreign objects, may lead to excessive wear. Recently, the role of erosion in accelerating mechanical tooth wear has been recognized, but the interplay between chemical and mechanical wear processes has not been extensively studied. Our laboratory recently introduced a novel oral wear simulation device, the Rub&Roll, that enables the user to perform wear and loading studies separately or simultaneously in an erosive and/or abrasive environment. This manuscript describes an application of the device: the combined mechanical and erosive loading of extracted human (pre)molars in a simulated chewing movement, with a controlled application of force, velocity, fluid, and time, and the application of non-contact profilometry in visualizing and measuring the resulting wear pattern. The occlusal morphology that was created in the experiment with the highest loading level is very similar to the clinical presentation of erosive wear.

  2. Computer system for identification of tool wear model in hot forging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkus Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to create a methodology that will enable effective and reliable prediction of the tool wear. The idea of the hybrid model, which accounts for various mechanisms of tool material deterioration, is proposed in the paper. The mechanisms, which were considered, include abrasive wear, adhesive wear, thermal fatigue, mechanical fatigue, oxidation and plastic deformation. Individual models of various complexity were used for separate phenomena and strategy of combination of these models in one hybrid system was developed to account for the synergy of various mechanisms. The complex hybrid model was built on the basis of these individual models for various wear mechanisms. The individual models expanded from phenomenological ones for abrasive wear to multi-scale methods for modelling micro cracks initiation and propagation utilizing virtual representations of granular microstructures. The latter have been intensively developed recently and they form potentially a powerful tool that allows modelling of thermal and mechanical fatigue, accounting explicitly for the tool material microstructure.

  3. A discussion on the measurement of grinding media wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Peres Massola

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Comminution operations are the most expensive and energy consuming in the mineral industry. Any action aiming at reducing the costs associated with that step is welcome, and lowering the consumption of grinding media figures among the main concerns related to decreasing comminution costs. To reach that goal, it is necessary to know and understand the wear mechanisms that take place during the grinding process, as well as to consider the details of such process like the inhomogeneous feed and the interaction between mineral slurry and grinding media. Wet grinding can also add a corrosive component to total wear mechanism, and then wear rates are expected to rise from synergies between corrosive and abrasive components. Though corrosion phenomena are broadly accepted to happen in wet grinding – even when the ball alloy has high chromium content – studies on verifying its importance are scarce. Tests in laboratory mills can simulate most of the conditions present in the industrial mill, despite being inexpensive and much faster than the tests performed with industrial equipment.

  4. Investigation of the Effect of Residual Stress Gradient on the Wear Behavior of PVD Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, B.; Nouveau, C.; Guillemot, G.; Besnard, A.; Barkaoui, A.

    2018-02-01

    The control of residual stresses has been seldom investigated in multilayer coatings dedicated to improvement of wear behavior. Here, we report the preparation and characterization of superposed structures composed of Cr, CrN and CrAlN layers. Nano-multilayers CrN/CrAlN and Cr/CrN/CrAlN were deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) onto Si (100) and AISI4140 steel substrates. The Cr, CrN and CrAlN monolayers were developed with an innovative approach in PVD coatings technologies corresponding to deposition with different residual stresses levels. Composition and wear tracks morphologies of the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and 3D-surface analyzer. The mechanical properties (hardness, residual stresses and wear) were investigated by nanoindentation, interferometry and micro-tribometry (fretting-wear tests). Observations suggest that multilayer coatings are composed mostly of nanocrystalline. The residual stresses level in the films has practically affected all the physicochemical and mechanical properties as well as the wear behavior. Consequently, it is demonstrated that the coating containing moderate stresses has a better wear behavior compared to the coating developed with higher residual stresses. The friction contact between coated samples and alumina balls shows also a large variety of wear mechanisms. In particular, the abrasive wear of the coatings was a combination of plastic deformation, fine microcracking and microspallation. The application of these multilayers will be wood machining of green wood.

  5. Investigation of the Effect of Residual Stress Gradient on the Wear Behavior of PVD Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, B.; Nouveau, C.; Guillemot, G.; Besnard, A.; Barkaoui, A.

    2018-01-01

    The control of residual stresses has been seldom investigated in multilayer coatings dedicated to improvement of wear behavior. Here, we report the preparation and characterization of superposed structures composed of Cr, CrN and CrAlN layers. Nano-multilayers CrN/CrAlN and Cr/CrN/CrAlN were deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) onto Si (100) and AISI4140 steel substrates. The Cr, CrN and CrAlN monolayers were developed with an innovative approach in PVD coatings technologies corresponding to deposition with different residual stresses levels. Composition and wear tracks morphologies of the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and 3D-surface analyzer. The mechanical properties (hardness, residual stresses and wear) were investigated by nanoindentation, interferometry and micro-tribometry (fretting-wear tests). Observations suggest that multilayer coatings are composed mostly of nanocrystalline. The residual stresses level in the films has practically affected all the physicochemical and mechanical properties as well as the wear behavior. Consequently, it is demonstrated that the coating containing moderate stresses has a better wear behavior compared to the coating developed with higher residual stresses. The friction contact between coated samples and alumina balls shows also a large variety of wear mechanisms. In particular, the abrasive wear of the coatings was a combination of plastic deformation, fine microcracking and microspallation. The application of these multilayers will be wood machining of green wood.

  6. State of art report for high temperature wear test of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Hu; Lee, Jae Seon; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Ji Ho; Kim, Jong In

    2000-03-01

    Wear resistance properties of machine elements has been more critical in view of its significant effect on life extension, economics and material saving because it has been recognized that nearly 80 percent of damages of mechanical elements in the friction pairs are due to the material loss by wear. And wear properties have direct influence on the life of a machine in a great extend under extremely severe operating condition. Therefore highly improved wear properties of machine elements operating in such circumstances is heavily required. The purpose of this report is to survey current technology for high temperature wear test in order to establish the test plan for the life evaluation of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing materials. Friction and wear test will be done under high pressure (170 MPa) and high temperature (350 degree C) with water as lubricant to simulate the operating condition of the nuclear power reactor. Because pump type for MCP is selected as the caned motor pump which needs no mechanical sealing, the rotating shaft on which bearing is fully submerged by main coolant with high temperature. So MCP bearing operates without additional lubricant. CEDM is adopted as the ball-screw type with fine controllability. So the driving part is designed as the immersed-in type by main coolant. Therefore the anti-wear and reliability of driving parts are much consequent to guarantee the lifetime and the safety of the whole system. Tribometer adapted to high temperature and pressure circumstance is needed to execute bearing material testing. Test parameters are material, sliding speed, sliding distance and applied load. In order to identify the wear mechanism, optical microscope and surface roughness testers are required. The result of this report will provide an elementary data to develop bearing materials and to estimate bearing lifetime for the bearings of MCP and CEDM in SMART. (author)

  7. A Multidirectional Tribo-System: Wear of UHMWPE under Sliding, Rolling, and Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Elias Wolfgang

    Total knee replacements (TKR) have become a successful surgical procedure for addressing end-stage osteoarthritis, with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and cobalt chrome alloy (UHMWPE/Co-Cr) serving as the bearing materials of choice for decades. However, more than 10% of TKRs fail and require revision surgery. The predominant challenge with UHMWPE is the particulate debris generated through wear-mediated processes; wear debris from the UHMWPE tibial bearing surface leading to loosening is still the main cause for post-fifth-year revisions. UHMWPE wear in hip arthroplasty has been linked to microstructural evolution at the surface from multidirectional sliding in the hip joint but little is known about how the microstructure responds to clinically relevant sliding conditions in the knee. This is likely because wear tests are typically performed under basic motion parameters with simplified geometry (pin-on-disk tests) while the knee has more complex kinematics: it is neither a ball-and-socket joint nor a simple hinge joint, but has 2D sliding, rolling/slip motion, and rotation. There is also disagreement over how to best quantify cross-shear and how to model how much wear it will cause. A custom multidirectional tribo-system was used to investigate the individual and combined effects of the different motions in TKR: 2D sliding, rolling, and rotation, for a total of eight separate kinematic conditions. The trends in wear rates and wear factors for these different motions were compared with many different definitions for magnitudes and ratios of cross-shear. Additionally, the wear surfaces were examined for wear mechanism and the microstructural changes in lamellae orientation for the different motions were analyzed. To mimic the tribological conditions of a condyle in a TKR, polished Co-Cr spheres were articulated against flat, smooth UHMWPE disks with physiologically relevant loading, speed, and lubrication conditions. The motion parameters were selected

  8. Brittle wear of silicate materials by Hertzian rubbing contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, N; Tordjeman, Ph; Augereau, F; Attal, J

    2008-01-01

    We studied the tribological properties of a structural series of 11 silicate materials to identify the main physical parameters that control the brittle wear of these materials. First, for each material we characterized Young's modulus E by ultrasonic microscopy, roughness σ by atomic force microscopy and crack pressure P c by Hertzian indentation testing. Second, we measured the static and dynamic friction coefficients μ S and μ D , respectively, with a ball probe tribometer for each material and for three hardnesses of the ball probe. The experiments showed that crack density, which quantified the brittle wear of the materials, was controlled by an adimensional number, C r = P c /μ S E. We show in this paper how this number takes into account the combined effects of the mechanical properties, the lubricating coating layer and the residual internal stresses of these materials

  9. Wear Characteristics of Metallic Biomaterials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Hussein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metals are extensively used in a variety of applications in the medical field for internal support and biological tissue replacements, such as joint replacements, dental roots, orthopedic fixation, and stents. The metals and alloys that are primarily used in biomedical applications are stainless steels, Co alloys, and Ti alloys. The service period of a metallic biomaterial is determined by its abrasion and wear resistance. A reduction in the wear resistance of the implant results in the release of incompatible metal ions into the body that loosen the implant. In addition, several reactions may occur because of the deposition of wear debris in tissue. Therefore, developing biomaterials with high wear resistance is critical to ensuring a long life for the biomaterial. The aim of this work is to review the current state of knowledge of the wear of metallic biomaterials and how wear is affected by the material properties and conditions in terms of the type of alloys developed and fabrication processes. We also present a brief evaluation of various experimental test techniques and wear characterization techniques that are used to determine the tribological performance of metallic biomaterials.

  10. Gaussian process regression for tool wear prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dongdong; Chen, Yongjie; Li, Ning

    2018-05-01

    To realize and accelerate the pace of intelligent manufacturing, this paper presents a novel tool wear assessment technique based on the integrated radial basis function based kernel principal component analysis (KPCA_IRBF) and Gaussian process regression (GPR) for real-timely and accurately monitoring the in-process tool wear parameters (flank wear width). The KPCA_IRBF is a kind of new nonlinear dimension-increment technique and firstly proposed for feature fusion. The tool wear predictive value and the corresponding confidence interval are both provided by utilizing the GPR model. Besides, GPR performs better than artificial neural networks (ANN) and support vector machines (SVM) in prediction accuracy since the Gaussian noises can be modeled quantitatively in the GPR model. However, the existence of noises will affect the stability of the confidence interval seriously. In this work, the proposed KPCA_IRBF technique helps to remove the noises and weaken its negative effects so as to make the confidence interval compressed greatly and more smoothed, which is conducive for monitoring the tool wear accurately. Moreover, the selection of kernel parameter in KPCA_IRBF can be easily carried out in a much larger selectable region in comparison with the conventional KPCA_RBF technique, which helps to improve the efficiency of model construction. Ten sets of cutting tests are conducted to validate the effectiveness of the presented tool wear assessment technique. The experimental results show that the in-process flank wear width of tool inserts can be monitored accurately by utilizing the presented tool wear assessment technique which is robust under a variety of cutting conditions. This study lays the foundation for tool wear monitoring in real industrial settings.

  11. Wear properties of dental ceramics and porcelains compared with human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Rondoni, Giuseppe D; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Contemporary pressable and computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramics exhibit good mechanical and esthetic properties. Their wear resistance compared with human enamel and traditional gold based alloys needs to be better investigated. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the 2-body wear resistance of human enamel, gold alloy, and 5 different dental ceramics, including a recently introduced zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic (Celtra Duo). Cylindrical specimens were fabricated from a Type III gold alloy (Aurocast8), 2 hot pressed ceramics (Imagine PressX, IPS e.max Press), 2 CAD/CAM ceramics (IPS e.max CAD, Celtra Duo), and a CAD/CAM feldspathic porcelain (Vitablocs Mark II) (n=10). Celtra Duo was tested both soon after grinding and after a subsequent glaze firing cycle. Ten flat human enamel specimens were used as the control group. All specimens were subjected to a 2-body wear test in a dual axis mastication simulator for 120000 loading cycles against yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal cusps. The wear resistance was analyzed by measuring the vertical substance loss (mm) and the volume loss (mm(3)). Antagonist wear (mm) was also recorded. Data were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA tests (α=.05). The wear depth (0.223 mm) of gold alloy was the closest to that of human enamel (0.217 mm), with no significant difference (P>.05). The greatest wear was recorded on the milled Celtra Duo (wear depth=0.320 mm), which appeared significantly less wear resistant than gold alloy or human enamel (Pceramics did not statistically differ in comparison with the human enamel. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Two-body wear rate of CAD/CAM resin blocks and their enamel antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Özcan, Mutlu; Trottmann, Albert; Schmutz, Felix; Roos, Malgorzata; Hämmerle, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resins exhibit good mechanical properties and can be used as long-term restorations. The wear rate of such resins and their enamel antagonists is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test and compare the 2-body wear rate of CAD/CAM resin blocks. Wear specimens (N=42, n=6) were made from 5 CAD/CAM resins: ZENO PMMA (ZP), artBloc Temp (AT), Telio CAD (TC), Blanc High-class (HC), CAD-Temp (CT); 1 manually polymerized resin: Integral esthetic press (negative control group, IEP); and 1 glass-ceramic: VITA Mark II (positive control group, VM2). The specimens for the wear resistance were aged in a thermomechanical loading machine (49 N, 1.67 Hz, 5/50°C) with human enamel antagonists. The material loss of all specimens before, during, and after aging was evaluated with a 3DS profilometer. The measured material loss data of all tested groups were statistically evaluated with linear mixed model analysis (a=.05). Manually polymerized resin showed significantly higher material wear (PCAD/CAM resins ZP, AT, HC, CT, and IES. CAD/CAM resin TC was not significantly different from the positive control group. Glass-ceramic showed the highest enamel wear values (PCAD/CAM resins showed lower wear rates than those conventionally polymerized. Only one CAD/CAM resin, TC, presented material wear values comparable with glass-ceramic. The tested glass-ceramic developed cracks in the enamel antagonist and showed the highest enamel wear values of all other tested groups. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomechanical Alignment of Main Wear-Pattern on MOM Total Hip Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Burton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the majority of retrievals, femoral heads and cups are sent for analysis with no designation as to positioning in-vivo. In addition, when patients retain the femoral prosthesis, evidence of neck impingement damage is lost. In this case report we studied head and cup wear-patterns and stripe damage in a novel case that included a large diameter metal-on-metal THA that was retrieved with the head still fused to the stem. This provided anatomical positioning of head wear-pattern and stripe damage as represented by the orientation of the femoral stem in radiographic images. We investigated (1 size, shape and location of head and cup wear-patterns, (2 cup-to-stem impingement damage, and (3 head stripe-wear. The head wear-pattern was elliptical in shape, 40mm diameter with area covering 2200 sq.mm. Its hemispherical ratio was 56% with aspect ratio 1.2 and typical of large-diameter MOM retrievals. Wear-pattern extended from 12° above superior head-margin to approximately 40° inferior to polar axis. Centroidal vector in coronal plane was 13° posterior to polar axis and in transverse plane was 19° superior to polar axis. These vector data corresponded well with biomechanical predictions of resultant load axes in gait studies. Stripe damage was identified on the head, and the cup rim could thereby be aligned to verify neck impingement and also head subluxation mechanisms. Cup wear-pattern was not centrally contained, indicating this patient had experienced repetitive edge-wear during gait. Thinning of the cup rim by 350- 400μm indicated that posterior impingement with repetitive anterior subluxation of the head had created this edge-wear.

  14. Synthesis of metal-metal oxide catalysts and electrocatalysts using a metal cation adsorption/reduction and adatom replacement by more noble ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to platinum-metal oxide composite particles and their use as electrocatalysts in oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells. The invention particularly relates to methods for preventing the oxidation of the platinum electrocatalyst in the cathodes of fuel cells by use of these platinum-metal oxide composite particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for producing electrical energy by supplying such a fuel cell with an oxidant, such as oxygen, and a fuel source, such as hydrogen. The invention also relates to methods of making the metal-metal oxide composites.

  15. Minimization of PWR reactor control rods wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni Filho, Pedro; Moura Angelkorte, Gunther de

    1995-01-01

    The Rod Cluster Control Assemblies (RCCA's) of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's) have experienced a continuously wall cladding wear when Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP's) are running. Fretting wear is a result of vibrational contact between RCCA rodlets and the guide cards which provide lateral support for the rodlets when RCCA's are withdrawn from the core. A procedure is developed to minimize the rodlets wear, by the shuffling and axial reposition of RCCA's every operating cycle. These shuffling and repositions are based on measurement of the rodlet cladding thickness of all RCCA's. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  16. The influence of machining condition and cutting tool wear on surface roughness of AISI 4340 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, A. R.; Ghani, J. A.; Che Haron, C. H.; Syarif, J.

    2018-01-01

    Sustainable machining by using cryogenic coolant as the cutting fluid has been proven to enhance some machining outputs. The main objective of the current work was to investigate the influence of machining conditions; dry and cryogenic, as well as the cutting tool wear on the machined surface roughness of AISI 4340 steel. The experimental tests were performed using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coated carbide inserts. The value of machined surface roughness were measured at 3 cutting intervals; beginning, middle, and end of the cutting based on the readings of the tool flank wear. The results revealed that cryogenic turning had the greatest influence on surface roughness when machined at lower cutting speed and higher feed rate. Meanwhile, the cutting tool wear was also found to influence the surface roughness, either improving it or deteriorating it, based on the severity and the mechanism of the flank wear.

  17. Effect of Reduced Graphene Oxide Reinforcement on the Wear Characteristics of Electroless Ni-P Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamilarasan, T. R.; Sanjith, U.; Rajendran, R.; Rajagopal, G.; Sudagar, J.

    2018-03-01

    Electroless composite coatings with various concentrations of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) particles were deposited onto mild steel substrate. The effects of adding rGO particles by varying their concentration from 0 to 100 mg/L on morphology, composition, microhardness, adhesion, wear and friction of the electroless composite coatings were investigated. Among the various parameters that influence the tribological behavior, sliding velocity was varied within a specific range for definite concentrations of rGO to obtain enhanced wear resistance in this study. The micrographs of the worn surfaces and indented spots were examined for the nature of wear mechanism and interfacial adhesion. The wear rate increased with increasing sliding velocity but was relatively stable for coatings with lower concentrations of rGO.

  18. Effects of Laser Energies on Wear and Tensile Properties of Biomimetic 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuhuan; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Guoping; Gao, Yang; Tao, Lixi; Chen, Heng; Zhang, Jianlong; Zhou, Hong

    2018-03-01

    Inspired by the non-smooth surface of certain animals, a biomimetic coupling unit with various sizes, microstructure, and hardness was prepared on the surface of 7075 aluminum alloy. Following experimental studies were conducted to investigate the wear and tensile properties with various laser energy inputs. The results demonstrated that the non-smooth surface with biomimetic coupling units had a positive effect on both the wear resistance and tensile property of 7075 aluminum alloy. In addition, the sample with the unit fabricated by the laser energy of 420.1 J/cm2 exhibited the most significant improvement on the wear and tensile properties owing to the minimum grain size and the highest microhardness. Also, the weight loss of the sample was one-third of the untreated one's, and the yield strength, the ultimate tensile strength, and the elongation improved by 20, 20, and 34% respectively. Moreover, the mechanisms of wear and tensile properties improvement were also analyzed.

  19. Friction and wear characteristics of ceramic nanocomposite coatings: Titanium carbide/amorphous hydrocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, D. M.; Feng, B.; Meng, W. J.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Khonsari, M. M.

    2001-07-16

    Friction and wear characteristics of titanium-containing amorphous hydrocarbon (Ti--C:H) coatings were measured during unlubricated sliding against WC--Co. These Ti--C:H coatings consist of nanocrystalline TiC clusters embedded in an amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H) matrix, i.e., they are TiC/a-C:H nanocomposites. The elastic modulus and hardness of the coatings exhibit smooth variations with increasing Ti composition. In contrast, a relatively abrupt transition occurs in the friction coefficient and wear rate of the coatings over a relatively narrow (20--30 at. %) Ti composition range. Our results reveal bimodal friction and wear behaviors for the TiC/a-C:H nanocomposites, a-C:H like at Ti compositions below 20%, and TiC like at Ti compositions above 30%. The two different wear mechanisms that operate as the volume fraction of nanocrystalline TiC clusters changes are discussed.

  20. Friction and wear characteristics of ceramic nanocomposite coatings: Titanium carbide/amorphous hydrocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, D. M.; Feng, B.; Meng, W. J.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Khonsari, M. M.

    2001-07-01

    Friction and wear characteristics of titanium-containing amorphous hydrocarbon (Ti-C:H) coatings were measured during unlubricated sliding against WC-Co. These Ti-C:H coatings consist of nanocrystalline TiC clusters embedded in an amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H) matrix, i.e., they are TiC/a-C:H nanocomposites. The elastic modulus and hardness of the coatings exhibit smooth variations with increasing Ti composition. In contrast, a relatively abrupt transition occurs in the friction coefficient and wear rate of the coatings over a relatively narrow (20-30 at. %) Ti composition range. Our results reveal bimodal friction and wear behaviors for the TiC/a-C:H nanocomposites, a-C:H like at Ti compositions below 20%, and TiC like at Ti compositions above 30%. The two different wear mechanisms that operate as the volume fraction of nanocrystalline TiC clusters changes are discussed.

  1. Surface Modification by Friction Stir Processing of Low-Carbon Steel: Microstructure Investigation and Wear Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Behnoosh; Shamanian, Morteza; Salimijazi, Farshid; Salehi, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    A low-carbon steel sheet with a thickness of 5 mm was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP) by one to four different passes. The microstructures of different regions were characterized using the optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The Vickers micro-harness was measured at the distance of 200 μm below the processed surfaces. The influence of pass numbers (PNs) on wear resistance was studied in terms of coefficients of friction (CoFs), weight losses and wear rates. SEM topographies of the worn surfaces were also studied to evaluate the wear mechanisms. Microstructure observations showed that Widmänstatten ferrite plates were formed in stir zones (SZs) and heat affected zones. As PN increased, these grains were widened due to the increment of the carbon diffusivity and lengthened because of the high heat input and microstructure anisotropy. Besides, increasing the PN causes increasing of the hardness and wear resistance, simultaneously. Specifically, the wear rate in the SZ was reduced from 2.8 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in base metal to 0.3 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in sample which was subjected to 4 FSP passes. However, variation in PN had no considerable effect on CoFs. Oxidative wear mechanism was observed on the worn surface of the steel and the FSPed samples while more debris was formed by increasing the PNs.

  2. Surface Modification by Friction Stir Processing of Low-Carbon Steel: Microstructure Investigation and Wear Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Behnoosh; Shamanian, Morteza; Salimijazi, Farshid; Salehi, Mehdi

    2018-02-01

    A low-carbon steel sheet with a thickness of 5 mm was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP) by one to four different passes. The microstructures of different regions were characterized using the optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The Vickers micro-harness was measured at the distance of 200 μm below the processed surfaces. The influence of pass numbers (PNs) on wear resistance was studied in terms of coefficients of friction (CoFs), weight losses and wear rates. SEM topographies of the worn surfaces were also studied to evaluate the wear mechanisms. Microstructure observations showed that Widmänstatten ferrite plates were formed in stir zones (SZs) and heat affected zones. As PN increased, these grains were widened due to the increment of the carbon diffusivity and lengthened because of the high heat input and microstructure anisotropy. Besides, increasing the PN causes increasing of the hardness and wear resistance, simultaneously. Specifically, the wear rate in the SZ was reduced from 2.8 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in base metal to 0.3 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in sample which was subjected to 4 FSP passes. However, variation in PN had no considerable effect on CoFs. Oxidative wear mechanism was observed on the worn surface of the steel and the FSPed samples while more debris was formed by increasing the PNs.

  3. Wear behaviors of HVOF sprayed WC-12Co coatings by laser remelting under lubricated condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejun, Kong; Tianyuan, Sheng

    2017-03-01

    A HVOF (high velocity oxygen fuel) sprayed WC-12Co coating was remelted with a CO2 laser. The surface-interface morphologies and phases were analyzed by means of SEM (scanning electron microscopy), and XRD (X-ray diffraction), respectively. The friction and wear behaviors of WC-12Co coating under the dry and lubricated conditions were investigated with a wear test. The morphologies and distributions of chemical elements on worn scar were analyzed with a SEM, and its configured EDS (energy diffusive spectrometer), respectively, and the effects of lubricated condition on COFs (coefficient of friction) and wear performance were also discussed. The results show that the adhesion between the coating and the substrate is stronger after laser remetling (LR), in which mechanical bonding, accompanying with metallurgical bonding, was found. At the load of 80 N, the average COF under the dry and lubricated friction conditions is 0.069, and 0.052, respectively, the latter lowers by 23.3% than the former, and the wear rate under the lubricated condition decreases by 302.3% than that under the dry condition. The wear mechanism under the dry and lubrication conditions is primarily composed of abrasive wear, cracking, and fatigue failure.

  4. Use of microhardness as a simple means of estimating relative wear resistance of carbide thermal spray coatings: Part 2. wear resistance of cemented carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Michael; Roman, Itzhak

    2002-12-01

    A selection of WC-Co and Cr3C2-25%NiCr coatings produced by plasma spray and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) deposition techniques were subjected to various wear tests designed to simulate abrasion, cavitation, sliding, and particle erosion type wear mechanisms. All of the coatings were at least 200 µm thick and were deposited onto stainless steel substrates. In Part 1 of this contribution, the microstructures of the coatings were characterized and their mechanical properties were assessed using microindentation procedures. In this second part of the article, the behavior of the coatings when subjected to the various wear tests is reported and the utility of microhardness testing as an indication of relative wear resistance is discussed. It is shown that correctly performed, appropriate microhardness measurements are a good indication of abrasion resistance and sliding wear resistance, and also correlate well with cavitation resistance in Cr3C2-NiCr. The measurements were less useful for predicting erosion resistance for both Cr3C2-NiCr and WC-Co, however, and for abrasion resistance when WC-Co was ground against SiC. Here the contribution of micromechanisms involving fracturing and brittle failure is greater than that indicated by the coating microhardness, which is essentially a measurement of resistance to plastic deformation under equilibrium conditions.

  5. The Wearing Out of Genre Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Joanna

    1971-01-01

    Scenes and plots wear out in three distinct stages: Innocence, Plausibility, and Decadence. Examines westerns, spy stories, nurse novels, detective stories, science fiction, pornography, avant-garde fiction, etc. (Author/RB)

  6. Third abrasive wear mode: is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Câmara Cozza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose an initial discussion on the characterization of a third abrasive wear mode. The results obtained in a previous work [1] under different test conditions revealed the occurrence of the superposition of the “rolling” and “grooving” abrasive wear modes. This phenomenon was denoted “micro-rolling abrasion” due to the observation that “rolling abrasion” was found to act on “grooving abrasion”.

  7. Biocompatible wear-resistant thick ceramic coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensitisation to immunologically active elements like chromium, cobalt or nickel and debris particle due to wear are serious problems for patients with metallic implants. We tested the approach of using a hard and thick ceramic coating as a wear-resistant protection of titanium implants, avoiding those sensitisation and foreign body problems. We showed that the process parameters strongly influence the coating porosity and, as a consequence, also its hardness.

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation in Cylinder Liners

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2014-03-20

    Every mechanical system is naturally subjected to some kind of wear process that, at some point, will cause failure in the system if no monitoring or treatment process is applied. Since failures often lead to high economical costs, it is essential both to predict and to avoid them. To achieve this, a monitoring system of the wear level should be implemented to decrease the risk of failure. In this work, we take a first step into the development of a multiscale indirect inference methodology for state-dependent Markovian pure jump processes. This allows us to model the evolution of the wear level and to identify when the system reaches some critical level that triggers a maintenance response. Since the likelihood function of a discretely observed pure jump process does not have an expression that is simple enough for standard nonsampling optimization methods, we approximate this likelihood by expressions from upscaled models of the data. We use the Master Equation (ME) to assess the goodness-of-fit and to compute the distribution of the hitting time to the critical level.

  9. Statistical models for expert judgement and wear prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulkkinen, U.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis studies the statistical analysis of expert judgements and prediction of wear. The point of view adopted is the one of information theory and Bayesian statistics. A general Bayesian framework for analyzing both the expert judgements and wear prediction is presented. Information theoretic interpretations are given for some averaging techniques used in the determination of consensus distributions. Further, information theoretic models are compared with a Bayesian model. The general Bayesian framework is then applied in analyzing expert judgements based on ordinal comparisons. In this context, the value of information lost in the ordinal comparison process is analyzed by applying decision theoretic concepts. As a generalization of the Bayesian framework, stochastic filtering models for wear prediction are formulated. These models utilize the information from condition monitoring measurements in updating the residual life distribution of mechanical components. Finally, the application of stochastic control models in optimizing operational strategies for inspected components are studied. Monte-Carlo simulation methods, such as the Gibbs sampler and the stochastic quasi-gradient method, are applied in the determination of posterior distributions and in the solution of stochastic optimization problems. (orig.) (57 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.)

  10. Pseudomembranous candidiasis in patient wearing full denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdiana Nurdiana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection of the oral cavity caused by an overgrowth of Candida species, the commonest being Candida albicans. Candida albicans is a harmless commensal organism inhabiting the mouths but it can change into pathogen and invade tissue and cause acute and chronic disease. Dentures predispose to infection with Candida in as many as 65% of elderly people wearing full upper dentures. Purpose: The purpose of this case report is to discuss thrush in patient wearing full denture which rapidly developed. Case: This paper report a case of 57 year-old man who came to the Oral Medicine Clinic Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University with clinical appearance of pseudomembranous candidiasis (thrush. Case Management: Diagnosis of this case is confirmed with microbiology examination. Patient was wearing full upper dentures, and from anamnesis known that patient wearing denture for 24 hours and he had poor oral hygiene. Patient was treated with topical (nystatin oral suspension and miconazole oral gel and systemic (ketoconazole antifungal. Patient also instructed not to wear his denture and cleaned white pseudomembrane on his mouth with soft toothbrush. Conclusion: Denture, habit of wearing denture for 24 hours, and poor oral hygiene are predisposing factors of thrush and it can healed completely after treated with topical and systemic antifungal.

  11. Development and Performance Evaluation of an Abrasive Wear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The wear of tillage tools is a major source of economic constraints to local farmers. Estimating wear in the field is time consuming and expensive. Abrasive wear testing machines developed in advanced countries are not available in Ghana. This makes the study of wear related problems at laboratory levels difficult in the ...

  12. The surgical options and clinical evidence for treatment of wear or corrosion occurring with THA or TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh, Charles A; Ho, Henry; Padgett, Douglas E

    2014-12-01

    Wear and corrosion occurring in patients with hip and knee arthroplasty are common causes of failure leading to revision surgery. A variety of surgical approaches to these problems have been described, with varying efficacy. Polyethylene wear, metal-on-metal (MoM) hip bearing wear, and problems associated with modular taper corrosion are the areas of greatest clinical impact; results of revisions for these problems are likely to dictate a large portion of revision resources for the foreseeable future, and so they call for specific study. We identified the most frequently reported procedures to treat hip polyethylene wear, knee polyethylene wear, MoM wear after THA, and modular taper corrosion and determined the timing and reasons these failed. We performed systematic reviews of the published literature on the four topics using MEDLINE(®) and Embase in October 2013; searches were supplemented by hand searches of bibliographies. Prespecified criteria resulted in the identification of 38 relevant articles, of which 33 were either case reports or Level IV evidence. Followup was generally at short term and ranged from 0.2 to 8 years. The most frequently reported procedures for treating clinically important wear were a partial or complete revision. When treating polyethylene wear, the more frequently reported reasons for hip and knee rerevisions were loosening, continued wear, and instability. Soft tissue reactions were more common and occasionally extensive in patients with MoM or modular taper corrosion. Patients with soft tissue reactions had more complications and higher rerevision rates. Studies with longer followup and higher levels of evidence are needed to direct the treatment of wear and corrosion. When soft tissue damage secondary to MoM wear or taper corrosion is present, the results of treatment can be poor. There is an urgent need to better understand these two mechanisms of failure.

  13. Analysis of impact-sliding wear property of aluminum bronze against titanium alloy and 2Cr13 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongqiang; Wang, Liqin

    2009-07-01

    Impact-sliding wear of aluminum bronze against titanium alloy and 2Cr13 steel have been conducted using impactsliding wear test rig which was developed independently. Some non-destructive examinations have been performed on worn specimens, using weighing, 2D and 3D profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and EDS technology. Using laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), it has been found that the surface of aluminum bronze which wears against titanium alloy is much coarser than the surface which wears against 2Cr13 steel. Results of wear volume show clearly that although the hardness of titanium alloy has greater value than aluminum bronze, the wear volume of titanium alloy has much greater value compared with aluminum bronze. It has been found that there is remarkable material transferring from titanium alloy to aluminum bronze and little material transfer from aluminum bronze to titanium alloy. For the impact-sliding wear between aluminum bronze against 2Cr13 steel, the hardness of aluminum bronze has greater value than 2Cr13 steel, the wear volume of aluminum bronze has much greater value compared with 2Cr13 steel, whose wear volume can be ignored. Using EDS technology, it has been found that there is material transferring from aluminum bronze to 2Cr13 steel and material transferring from 2Cr13 steel to aluminum bronze can be ignored. Through the SEM pictures of worn surfaces and worn debris, flaking, particles and micro-cracks can be found on the worn surfaces. The wear mechanism of aluminum bronze against titanium alloy and 2Cr13 steel is delamination wear.

  14. Wear Behavior of AZ31/Al2O3 Magnesium Matrix Surface Nanocomposite Fabricated via Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizieh, Mahdi; Larki, Arsham Norouzi; Tahmasebi, Mehdi; Bavi, Mehdi; Alizadeh, Ehsan; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to produce magnesium-based surface nanocomposites via friction stir processing and to investigate the effect of tool rotational speed on the microstructure, hardness and wear behavior. The surface of the nanocomposites was characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopes, as well as through microhardness and wear tests. The results indicated that with the increase in rotational speed, the grain size of the surface nanocomposites increased, but its hardness decreased despite the improved distribution of Al2O3 nanoparticles. It was also found that the wear resistance has a direct relation to the distribution of the Al2O3 nanoparticles. Furthermore, the addition of nano-Al2O3 changed the wear mechanism from the adhesive mode in the as-received AZ31 to the abrasive mode in the nanocomposite specimens. The rotational speed of 1400 rpm was an optimum parameter to achieve a suitable composite layer with the highest wear resistance.

  15. Wear calculation possibility of slide-friction pair "shaft-plain bearing" for four-stroke engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springis, Guntis; Rudzitis, Janis; Avisane, Anita; Kumermanis, Maris

    2013-12-01

    The issues of the service life and its prediction for main four stroke engine parts such as shaft-plain bearing have always been of particular importance. The article determines the most suitable mathematical calculation model allowing considering the set of parameters needed for the slide-friction pair's calculation, thus achieving a result as precise as possible. Since the wear process is variable and many-sided it is influenced by very many different parameters, for example, the surface geometry (roughness, waviness, form deviation, etc.), the physical and mechanical conditions of the upper layer, component material, wear regime, wear temperature, etc. The offered wear calculation model taking into consideration as much as possible wear affecting parameters is based on the fatigue theory regularities of the friction surface's destroying, using the approach of probability theory.

  16. Wear-resistance of Aluminum Matrix Microcomposite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kandeva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is developed for the study of wear of aluminum alloys AlSi7 obtained by casting, reinforced by TiC microparticles, before and after heat treatment. Tribological study is realized under conditions of friction on counterbody with fixed abrasive. Experimental results were obtained for mass wear, wear rate, wear intensity and wear-resistance of the alloys with different wt% of microparticles.

  17. Wear monitoring of single point cutting tool using acoustic emission ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It clearly indicates that the three stages of wear viz., Stage I, where the rate of wear is low, Stage II, where the rate of wear is moderate and. Stage III, where the rate of wear is faster and leading to the termination of tool life. In stage I, 0 to 8.5 min of the machining operation the tool wear is in the range of 0–8.3 μm only.

  18. The effect of lubrication on the friction and wear of Biolox®delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L; Rainforth, W M

    2012-07-01

    The performance of total hip-joint replacements depends strongly on the state of lubrication in vivo. In order to test candidate prosthetic materials, in vitro wear testing requires a lubricant that behaves in the same manner as synovial fluid. The current study investigated three lubricants and looked in detail at the lubrication conditions and the consequent effect on ball-on-flat reciprocating wear mechanisms of Biolox®delta against alumina. Biolox®delta, the latest commercial material for artificial hip-joint replacements, is an alumina-matrix composite with improved mechanical properties through the addition of zirconia and other mixed oxides. Three commonly used laboratory lubricants, ultra pure water, 25 vol.% new-born calf serum solution and 1 wt.% carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt (CMC-Na) solution, were used for the investigation. The lubrication regimes were defined by constructing Stribeck curves. Full fluid-film lubrication was observed for the serum solution whereas full fluid-film and mixed lubrications were observed in both water and the CMC-Na solution. The wear rates in the CMC-Na and new-born calf serum were similar, but were an order of magnitude higher in water. The worn surfaces all exhibited pitting, which is consistent with the transition from mild wear to severe or "stripe" wear. The extent of pitting was greatest in the serum solution, but least in the water. On all worn surfaces, the zirconia appeared to have fully transformed from tetragonal to monoclinic symmetry. However, there was no evidence of microcracking associated with the transformed zirconia. Nevertheless, AFM indicated that zirconia was lost preferentially to the alumina grains during sliding. Thus, the current study has shown conclusively that the wear mechanisms for Biolox®delta clearly depend on the lubricant used, even where wear rates were similar. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. On the geometry of the fuel rod supports concerning a fretting wear failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Lee, Young-Ho; Lee, Kang-Hee

    2008-01-01

    Geometrical conditions of spacer grid springs and dimples of a light water reactor fuel assembly are studied in this paper concerning a fuel rod's fretting wear failure. In this framework, the springs/dimples are categorized from the aspects of their orientation with respect to the fuel axis and the contact types. Possible motions on the contacts between the springs/dimples and fuel rods are estimated by conducting a flow-induced vibration test. Features of the wear scar and depth are investigated by independent fretting wear tests carried out with spring and dimple specimens of typical contact geometries. It is also attempted here to apply the contact mechanics theory to a fuel fretting wear analysis such as the prediction of a wear depth profile and its rate, which is influenced by the contact shape of the springs/dimples. It is shown that the theory can be applied to a dimensional control of a coining for the springs/dimples, which is usually carried out in a thin plate fabrication. From the results, the necessary conditions for a spring/dimple geometry for restraining a fretting wear failure are discussed

  20. Synergistic interactions between corrosion and wear at titanium-based dental implant connections: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaza-Bedoya, K; Tarce, M; Benfatti, C A M; Henriques, B; Mathew, M T; Teughels, W; Souza, J C M

    2017-12-01

    Two-piece implant systems are mainly used in oral implantology involving an osseointegrated implant connected to an abutment, which supports prosthetic structures. It is well documented that the presence of microgaps, biofilms and oral fluids at the implant-abutment connection can cause mechanical and biological complications. The aim of this review paper was to report the degradation at the implant-abutment connection by wear and corrosion processes taking place in the oral cavity. Most of the retrieved studies evaluated the wear and corrosion (tribocorrosion) of titanium-based materials used for implants and abutments in artificial saliva. Electrochemical and wear tests together with microscopic techniques were applied to validate the tribocorrosion behavior of the surfaces. A few studies inspected the wear on the inner surfaces of the implant connection as a result of fatigue or removal of abutments. The studies reported increased microgaps after fatigue tests. In addition, data suggest that micromovements occurring at the contacting surfaces can increase the wear of the inner surfaces of the connection. Biofilms and/or glycoproteins act as lubricants, although they can also amplify the corrosion of the surfaces. Consequently, loosening of the implant-abutment connection can take place during mastication. In addition, wear and corrosion debris such as ions and micro- and nanoparticles released into the surrounding tissues can stimulate peri-implant inflammation that can lead to pathologic bone resorption. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Single-crystal-silicon-based microinstrument to study friction and wear at MEMS sidewall interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, N; Ashurst, W R

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, friction and wear are considered as key factors that determine the lifetime and reliability of MEMS devices that contain contacting interfaces. However, to date, our knowledge of the mechanisms that govern friction and wear in MEMS is insufficient. Therefore, systematically investigating friction and wear at MEMS scale is critical for the commercial success of many potential MEMS devices. Specifically, since many emerging MEMS devices contain more sidewall interfaces, which are topographically and chemically different from in-plane interfaces, studying the friction and wear characteristics of MEMS sidewall surfaces is important. The microinstruments that have been used to date to investigate the friction and wear characteristics of MEMS sidewall surfaces possess several limitations induced either by their design or the structural film used to fabricate them. Therefore, in this paper, we report on a single-crystal-silicon-based microinstrument to study the frictional and wear behavior of MEMS sidewalls, which not only addresses some of the limitations of other microinstruments but is also easy to fabricate. The design, modeling and fabrication of the microinstrument are described in this paper. Additionally, the coefficients of static and dynamic friction of octadecyltrichlorosilane-coated sidewall surfaces as well as sidewall surfaces with only native oxide on them are also reported in this paper. (paper)

  2. Corrosion and Wear Behaviors of Cr-Doped Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S.; Mohan, L.; Bera, Parthasarathi; Kumar, V. Praveen; Barshilia, Harish C.; Anandan, C.

    2017-08-01

    A combination of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and magnetron sputtering techniques has been employed to deposit chromium-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on stainless steel, silicon and glass substrates. The concentrations of Cr in the coatings are varied by changing the parameters of the bipolar pulsed power supply and the argon/acetylene gas composition. The coatings have been studied for composition, morphology, surface nature, nanohardness, corrosion resistance and wear resistance properties. The changes in I D / I G ratio with Cr concentrations have been obtained from Raman spectroscopy studies. Ratio decreases with an increase in Cr concentration, and it has been found to increase at higher Cr concentration, indicating the disorder in the coating. Carbide is formed in Cr-doped DLC coatings as observed from XPS studies. There is a decrease in sp 3/ sp 2 ratios with an increase in Cr concentration, and it increases again at higher Cr concentration. Nanohardness studies show no clear dependence of hardness on Cr concentration. DLC coatings with lower Cr contents have demonstrated better corrosion resistance with better passive behavior in 3.5% NaCl solution, and corrosion potential is observed to move toward nobler (more positive) values. A low coefficient of friction (0.15) at different loads is observed from reciprocating wear studies. Lower wear volume is found at all loads on the Cr-doped DLC coatings. Wear mechanism changes from abrasive wear on the substrate to adhesive wear on the coating.

  3. Wear of different PVD coatings at industrial fine-blanking field tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liina Lind

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thin hard physical vapor deposited (PVD coatings play significant role on wear performance of fine-blanking punches in the presence of extremely high contact stresses. Nevertheless it seems that in blanking or fine-blanking the coatings are selected based on coincidence, trial-error-method or latest trends. There is limited information about planning and conducting the fine-blanking industrial field tests and measuring the wear of different coatings. In the present study a set of fine-blanking punches and laboratory specimens were prepared with three coatings – TiCN, nACRo and nACo. As substrate material Böhler S390 Microclean high speed steel was used. Coating mechanical properties (modulus of elasticity and nanohardness were measured and wear rate with alumina ball was determined using the reciprocating sliding test. Wear of coatings was measured from punches after industrial use. All of the tested coatings showed high variance of wear. However coatings nACo and nACRo have better average wear resistance in fine-blanking compared with the well-known TiCN. Industrial field tests show correlation to the ratio elastic strain to failure H/E.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7249

  4. Wear Behavior of Medium Carbon Steel with Biomimetic Surface Under Starved Lubricated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihui; Shao, Feixian; Liang, Yunhong; Lin, Pengyu; Tong, Xin; Ren, Luquan

    2017-07-01

    Friction and wear under starved lubrication condition are both key life-related factors for mechanical performance of many structural parts. In this paper, different surface morphologies on medium carbon steel were fabricated using laser, inspired by the surface coupling effect of biological system. The friction and sliding wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens (characterized by convex and concave units on the specimen surface) were studied under starved lubrication condition. The stress distribution on different sliding surfaces under sliding friction was studied using finite element method. The results showed that the tribological performance of studied surfaces under starved lubrication condition depended not only on the surface morphology but also on the structure of biomimetic units below surface (subsurface structure). The friction coefficient of biomimetic surface was effectively reduced by the concave unit depth, while the refined microstructure with higher hardness led to the much better wear resistance. In addition to lubricant reserving and wear debris trapping effect derived from the surface concave morphology, it was believed that the well-formed subsurface structure of biomimetic units could carry much heavy loads against tribopair, which enhanced the function of surface topography and resulted in complementary lubrication in the wear contact area. The uniform stress distribution on the entire biomimetic surface also played an important role in stabilizing the friction coefficient and reducing the wear cracks.

  5. Friction and Wear Behavior of Carbon Fabric-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Y.; De Baets, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    Besides intrinsic material properties, weight/energy savings and wear performance play an important role in the selection of materials for any engineering application. The tribological behavior of carbon fabric-reinforced epoxy composites produced by molding technique was investigated using a reciprocating pin-on-plate configuration. It was shown that the wear rate considerably decreased (by a factor of approx. 8) with the introduction of the reinforcing carbon fabric into the epoxy matrix. It was observed that the wear rate of the tested composites increased with an increase in normal load. Moreover, the coefficient of friction for epoxy/steel and composites/steel tribo-pairs was also determined and decreased with increasing load. By means of scanning electron microscopy of the wear tracks, different wear mechanisms such as matrix wear, matrix fatigue and cracking, matrix debris formation for neat epoxy together with fabric/fiber thinning, fabric breakage and fabric/matrix debonding for the reinforced epoxy could be distinguished.

  6. Micro-Abrasion Wear Resistance of Borided 316L Stainless Steel and AISI 1018 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reséndiz-Calderon, C. D.; Rodríguez-Castro, G. A.; Meneses-Amador, A.; Campos-Silva, I. E.; Andraca-Adame, J.; Palomar-Pardavé, M. E.; Gallardo-Hernández, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    The 316L stainless steel has high corrosion resistance but low tribological performance. In different industrial sectors (biomedical, chemical, petrochemical, and nuclear engineering), improvement upon wear resistance of 316L stainless steel components using accessible and inexpensive methods is critical. The AISI 1018 steel is widely used in industry, but its tribological performance is not the best among steels. Therefore, in this study the behavior of the borided 316L stainless steel and 1018 steel is evaluated under micro-abrasion wear. The boriding was carried out at 1223 K over 6 h of exposure time, resulting in a biphase layer composed of FeB/Fe2B phases. In order to evaluate Fe2B phase with no influence from FeB phase, AISI 1018 steel samples were borided at 1273 K for over 20 min and then diffusion annealed at 1273 K over 2 h to obtain a Fe2B mono-phase layer. Micro-abrasion wear resistance was evaluated by a commercial micro-abrasion testing rig using a mix of F-1200 SiC particles with deionized water as abrasive slurry. The obtained wear rates for FeB and Fe2B phases and for the 316L stainless steel were compared. Wear resistance of 316L stainless steel increases after boriding. The wear mechanisms for both phases and for the stainless steel were identified. Also, transient conditions for rolling and grooving abrasion were determined for the FeB and Fe2B phases.

  7. Carbon-Based Wear Coatings: Properties and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2003-01-01

    The technical function of numerous engineering systems - such as vehicles, machines, and instruments - depends on the processes of motion and on the surface systems. Many processes in nature and technology depend on the motion and dynamic behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. Smart surface systems are essential because of the recent technological push toward higher speeds, loads, and operating temperatures; longer life; lighter weight and smaller size (including nanotechnology); and harsh environments in mechanical, mechatronic, and biomechanical systems. If proper attention is not given to surface systems, then vehicles, machines, instruments, and other technical systems could have short lives, consume excessive energy, experience breakdowns, result in liabilities, and fail to accomplish their missions. Surface systems strongly affect our national economy and our lifestyles. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we believe that proper attention to surface systems, especially in education, research, and application, could lead to economic savings of between 1.3 and 1.6 percent of the gross domestic product. Wear coatings and surface systems continue to experience rapid growth as new coating and surface engineering technologies are discovered, more cost-effective coating and surface engineering solutions are developed, and marketers aggressively pursue, uncover, and exploit new applications for engineered surface systems in cutting tools and wear components. Wear coatings and smart surface systems have been used widely in industrial, consumer, automotive, aerospace, and biomedical applications. This presentation expresses the author's views of and insights into smart surface systems in wear coatings. A revolution is taking place in carbon science and technology. Diamond, an allotrope of carbon, joins graphite, fullerenes, and nanotubes as its major pure carbon structures. It has a unique combination of extreme properties: hardness and abrasion resistance; adhesion

  8. Artificial Neural Networks for the Prediction of Wear Properties of Al6061-TiO2 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeresh Kumar, G. B.; Pramod, R.; Shivakumar Gouda, P. S.; Rao, C. S. P.

    2017-08-01

    The exceptional performance of composite materials in comparison with the monolithic materials have been extensively studied by researchers. Among the metal matrix composites Aluminium matrix based composites have displayed superior mechanical properties. The aluminium 6061 alloy has been used in aeronautical and automotive components, but their resistance against the wear is poor. To enhance the wear properties, Titanium dioxide (TiO2) particulates have been used as reinforcements. In the present investigation Back propagation (BP) technique has been adopted for Artificial Neural Network [ANN] modelling. The wear experimentations were carried out on a pin-on-disc wear monitoring apparatus. For conduction of wear tests ASTM G99 was adopted. Experimental design was carried out using Taguchi L27 orthogonal array. The sliding distance, weight percentage of the reinforcement material and applied load have a substantial influence on the height damage due to wear of the Al6061 and Al6061-TiO2 filled composites. The Al6061 with 3 wt% TiO2 composite displayed an excellent wear resistance in comparison with other composites investigated. A non-linear relationship between density, applied load, weight percentage of reinforcement, sliding distance and height decrease due to wear has been established using an artificial neural network. A good agreement has been observed between experimental and ANN model predicted results.

  9. Effect of active screen plasma nitriding pretreatment on wear behavior of TiN coating deposited by PACVD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raoufi, M., E-mail: raoufi@iust.ac.ir [School of Metallurgical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirdamadi, Sh. [School of Metallurgical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboubi, F. [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahangarani, Sh. [Advanced Materials and Renewable Energies Dep., Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdipoor, M.S. [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Elmkhah, H. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    Titanium based alloys are used extensively for improving wear properties of different parts due to their high hardness contents. Titanium nitride (TiN) is among these coatings which can be deposited on surface using various techniques such as CVD, PVD and PACVD. Their weak interface with substrate is one major drawback which can increase the total wear in spite of favorite wear behavior of TiN. Disc shaped samples from AISI H13 (DIN 1.2344) steel were prepared in this study. Single TiN coating was deposited on some of them while others have experienced a TiN deposition by active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN). Hardness at the surface and depth of samples was measured through Vickers micro hardness test which revealed 1810 Hv hardness as the maximum values for a dual-layered ASPN-TiN. Pin-on-disc wear test was done in order to study the wear mechanism. In this regard, the wear behavior of samples was investigated against pins from 100Cr6 (Din 1.3505) bearing steel and tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) steel. It was evidenced that the dual-layer ASPN-TiN coating has shown the least weight loss with the best wearing behavior because of its high hardness values, stable interface and acceptable resistance against peeling during wearing period.

  10. An abrasive wear study of ordered Fe[sub 3]Al. [Fe[sub 73]Al[sub 27], Fe[sub 76]Al[sub 24], Fe[sub 77]Al[sub 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maupin, H.E.; Wilson, R.D.; Hawk, J.A. (US Bureau of Mines, Albany Research Center, OR (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Abrasive wear research has been conducted on ordered iron aluminide intermetallics. Pin-on-drum abrasive wear tests were performed on samples of varying long-range order. Wear surfaces were examined with optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The wear mechanism consisted of microplowing, micromachining and microfracture. Compositional variation near Fe[sub 3]Al and the degree of long-range ordering had only minor effects on the abrasive wear rates of iron aluminide samples. TEM analysis of the wear surfaces indicated that significant plastic deformation and recrystallization had occurred. The abrasive wear rates were compared with those of well-known abrasive wear-resistant materials. (orig.).

  11. Quantitive dynamical wear analysis and the convergent quest for significant wear reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellschop, F.; Kirsch, J.; Derry, T.; Marcus, R.

    1984-01-01

    The maturing of nuclear physics has made the development of ion beam modification of materials possible, bringing new skills and prospects to the world of materials science. In the following paper an outline is given of the history of ion beam modification of materials (IBMM) and its use for altering the surface of metals to combat wear and friction, and monitoring wear in engines

  12. In vitro wear of resin-based materials--simultaneous corrosive and abrasive wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correr, Gisele Maria; Bruschi Alonso, Roberta Caroline; Correr Sobrinho, Lourenço; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Ferracane, Jack Liborio

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the wear of resin-based materials caused by the association of abrasive and corrosive processes. Twenty specimens were prepared for each material, cast in epoxy in acrylic rings, polished, and profiled with an MTS 3D Profiler. Antagonists were made from deciduous molars. Specimens were distributed into eight groups (n = 10), according to the material (Filtek Supreme, Point 4, Dyract AP, and Fuji II LC) and the type of slurry (neutral and acidic), and then cycled 100,000 times in the OHSU oral wear simulator. The specimens were cleaned and reprofiled. Volume loss and maximum depth were determined. ANOVA and Tukey's test were used for data analysis (p wear facet on the antagonist was also measured. Composites displayed less wear than the compomer and the resin-modified glass ionomer. Significant differences also were found for cusp wear, with a significant positive correlation shown between cusp and material wear. The acidic slurry significantly increased the wear of the materials compared to the neutral slurry. Exposure to acidic slurry accelerated the wear of resin-based materials.

  13. A method for simultaneous determination of wear-resistance of structurally identical machine parts with mutual friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valigura, V.; Volyn'ski, A.

    1979-01-01

    There are mechanisms in the technique, boundary state of separate parts of which is determined by the process of wear of three elements of the mechanism, made of the same material (for example antifriction bearings). The main concept of wear determination in the case of such a mechanism is to conduct measurements by means of simultaneous application of three different methods, for example: the method of roentgen-fluorescence; the tracer technique with application of activation by means of irradiation by different elementary particles, practically by means of neutrons and protons; the method of artifical bases application. In the paper the method is presented having been developed in the Institute of Working Machines of the Poznan Polytechnic. This method of simultaneous investigation in the wear process of bearing rings, inner and outer, and rolling elements of roller bearings. All these elements of bearings are made of LX-15 steel. The method developed, permits to determine the wear sufficient for practical purposes sensitivity [ru

  14. Wear of carbide inserts with complex surface treatment when milling nickel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Sergey; Swe, Min Htet; Kapitanov, Alexey; Egorov, Sergey

    2018-03-01

    One of the effective ways of strengthening hard alloys is the creating structure layers on their surface with the gradient distribution of physical and mechanical properties between the wear-resistant coating and the base material. The article discusses the influence of the near-surface layer which is modified by low-energy high-current electron-beam alloying and the upper anti-friction layer in a multi-component coating on the wear mechanism of the replaceable multifaceted plates in the dry milling of the difficult to machine nickel alloys.

  15. Friction and wear performance of ion-beam deposited diamondlike carbon films on steel substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, A.; Nichols, F.A.; Pan, X.Z. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials and Components Technology Div.; Wei, R.; Wilbur, P. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the friction and wear performance of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike-carbon (DLC) films (1.5 {mu}m thick) on AISI 440C steel substrates. Furthermore, we ran a series of long-duration wear tests under 5, 10, and 20 N load to assess the load-bearing capacity and durability limits of these films under each load. Tests were performed on a ball-on-disk machine in open air at room temperature {approx} 22{plus_minus}1{degrees}C, and humidity, {approx} 30{plus_minus}5%. For the test conditions explored, we found that (1) the steady-state friction coefficients of pairs without a DLC film were in the range of 0.7 to 0.9 and the average wear rates of 440C balls (9.55 mm diameter) sliding against uncoated 440C disks were on the order of 10{sup {minus}5} mm{sup 3}/N.m, depending on contact load; (2) DLC films reduced the steady-state friction coefficients of test pairs by factors of 6 to 8, and the wear rates of pins by factors of 500 to 2000; (3) The wear of disks coated with a DLC film was virtually unmeasurable while the wear of uncoated disks was quite substantial, (4) these DLC films were able to endure the range of loads, 5 to 20 N, without any delamination and to last over a million cycles before wearing out. During long-duration wear tests, the friction coefficients were initially on the order of 0.15, but decreased to some low values of 0.05 to 0.07 after sliding for 15 to 25 km, depending on the load, and remained low until wearing out. This low-friction regime was correlated with the formation of a carbon-rich transfer film on the wear scar of 440C balls. Micro-laser-Raman spectroscopy and scanning-electron microscopy were used to examine the structure and chemistry of worn surfaces and to elucidate the wear- and friction-reducing mechanisms of the DLC film.

  16. Friction and wear performance of ion-beam deposited diamondlike carbon films on steel substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, A.; Nichols, F.A.; Pan, X.Z. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials and Components Technology Div.); Wei, R.; Wilbur, P. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the friction and wear performance of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike-carbon (DLC) films (1.5 [mu]m thick) on AISI 440C steel substrates. Furthermore, we ran a series of long-duration wear tests under 5, 10, and 20 N load to assess the load-bearing capacity and durability limits of these films under each load. Tests were performed on a ball-on-disk machine in open air at room temperature [approx] 22[plus minus]1[degrees]C, and humidity, [approx] 30[plus minus]5%. For the test conditions explored, we found that (1) the steady-state friction coefficients of pairs without a DLC film were in the range of 0.7 to 0.9 and the average wear rates of 440C balls (9.55 mm diameter) sliding against uncoated 440C disks were on the order of 10[sup [minus]5] mm[sup 3]/N.m, depending on contact load; (2) DLC films reduced the steady-state friction coefficients of test pairs by factors of 6 to 8, and the wear rates of pins by factors of 500 to 2000; (3) The wear of disks coated with a DLC film was virtually unmeasurable while the wear of uncoated disks was quite substantial, (4) these DLC films were able to endure the range of loads, 5 to 20 N, without any delamination and to last over a million cycles before wearing out. During long-duration wear tests, the friction coefficients were initially on the order of 0.15, but decreased to some low values of 0.05 to 0.07 after sliding for 15 to 25 km, depending on the load, and remained low until wearing out. This low-friction regime was correlated with the formation of a carbon-rich transfer film on the wear scar of 440C balls. Micro-laser-Raman spectroscopy and scanning-electron microscopy were used to examine the structure and chemistry of worn surfaces and to elucidate the wear- and friction-reducing mechanisms of the DLC film.

  17. Titanium aluminide intermetallic alloys with improved wear resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jun; Lin, Hua-Tay; Blau, Peter J.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2014-07-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy composition having an improved wear resistance, the method comprising heating a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy material in an oxygen-containing environment at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce a top oxide layer and underlying oxygen-diffused layer, followed by removal of the top oxide layer such that the oxygen-diffused layer is exposed. The invention is also directed to the resulting oxygen-diffused titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy, as well as mechanical components or devices containing the improved alloy composition.

  18. Assessment of fretting wear in Hanaro fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Lim, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Hark Rho

    1999-06-01

    Since the first fuel loading on Feb. 1995, various zero-power tests were performed in HANARO and power ascending tests followed. After the initial fuel loading, Hanaro operation staffs inspected only two fuel bundles which were evaluated to have the highest power at the end of each cycle and they did not recognize anything peculiar in the inspected bundles. At the end of 1996, Hanaro staffs found severe wear damages in the fuel components. After that, the 4th cycle core was re-arranged with fresh fuels only to investigate wear phenomena on the fuel components. The fuel inspections have been performed 25 times periodically since the core re-configuration. In this report, fretting wear characteristics of the fuel assemblies were evaluated and summarized. Wear damages of the improved fuel assembly to resolve the wear problem were compared with those of the original fuel assembly. Based on the results of the fuel inspections, we suggest that fuel inspection need not be done for the first 60 pump operation days in order to reduce the potential of damage by a fuel handling error and an operator's burden of the fuel inspection. (author). 6 refs., 10 tabs., 5 figs

  19. Brake wear particle emissions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoratos, Theodoros; Martini, Giorgio

    2015-02-01

    Traffic-related sources have been recognized as a significant contributor of particulate matter particularly within major cities. Exhaust and non-exhaust traffic-related sources are estimated to contribute almost equally to traffic-related PM10 emissions. Non-exhaust particles can be generated either from non-exhaust sources such as brake, tyre, clutch and road surface wear or already exist in the form of deposited material at the roadside and become resuspended due to traffic-induced turbulence. Among non-exhaust sources, brake wear can be a significant particulate matter (PM) contributor, particularly within areas with high traffic density and braking frequency. Studies mention that in urban environments, brake wear can contribute up to 55 % by mass to total non-exhaust traffic-related PM10 emissions and up to 21 % by mass to total traffic-related PM10 emissions, while in freeways, this contribution is lower due to lower braking frequency. As exhaust emissions control become stricter, relative contributions of non-exhaust sources-and therefore brake wear-to traffic-related emissions will become more significant and will raise discussions on possible regulatory needs. The aim of the present literature review study is to present the state-of-the-art of the different aspects regarding PM resulting from brake wear and provide all the necessary information in terms of importance, physicochemical characteristics, emission factors and possible health effects.

  20. Brush seal shaft wear resistant coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Harold

    1995-03-01

    Brush seals suffer from high wear, which reduces their effectiveness. This work sought to reduce brush seal wear by identifying and testing several industry standard coatings. One of the coatings was developed for this work. It was a co-sprayed PSZ with boron-nitride added for a high temperature dry lubricant. Other coatings tested were a PSZ, chrome carbide and a bare rotor. Testing of these coatings included thermal shocking, tensile testing and wear/coefficient of friction testing. Wear testing consisted of applying a coating to a rotor and then running a sample tuft of SiC ceramic fiber against the coating. Surface speeds at point of contact were slightly over 1000 ft/sec. Rotor wear was noted, as well as coefficient of friction data. Results from the testing indicates that the oxide ceramic coatings cannot withstand the given set of conditions. Carbide coatings will not work because of the need for a metallic binder, which oxidizes in the high heat produced by friction. All work indicated a need for a coating that has a lubricant contained within itself and the coating must be resistant to an oxidizing environment.

  1. Study of the laws governing wear of cutter bits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potrovka, S.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of the laws governing the change in drilling of a bit in the process of ramming depending on the wear of the cutter bit. Experiments were conducted on the drilling stand ZIF-1200A by 3-cutter bits V-140T with cemented fittings and surfacing of the rear part of the external cutter bit crowns. Experimental data are presented from studying the laws governing the change in the current drilling of the bit and the corresponding wear depending on the total number of bit rotations during drilling of gray granite. Dependences are also indicated for drilling on the bit of the current mechanical drilling velocity and the mechanical drilling velocity during one rotation on the total number of bit rotations, as well as the mechanical drilling velocity on drilling per bit during drilling of gray granite. It was established that the efficient time for stay of the bit on the face both with minimum cost of 1 m of drilling, and with maximum per-trip velocity depends on the parameters of the drilling regime, the strength of the rocks, the depth of drilling and the standard indicators for the cost of rolling the equipment in 1 min, and the cost of the drill bit. Experimental data were obtained which make it possible to rapidly determine the efficient time for lifting the bit and to use for this purpose simple resources of computers.

  2. Importance of preclinical evaluation of wear in hip implant designs using simulator machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Mello Trommer

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Total hip arthroplasty (THA is a surgical procedure that involves the replacement of the damaged joint of the hip by an artificial device. Despite the recognized clinical success of hip implants, wear of the articulating surfaces remains as one of the critical issues influencing performance. Common material combinations used in hip designs comprise metal-on-polymer (MoP, ceramic-on-polymer (CoP, metal-on-metal (MoM, and ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC. However, when the design of the hip implant is concerned besides the materials used, several parameters can influence its wear performance. In this scenario, where the safety and efficacy for the patient are the main issues, it is fundamental to evaluate and predict the wear rate of the hip implant design before its use in THA. This is one of the issues that should be taken into account in the preclinical evaluation step of the product, in which simulated laboratory tests are necessary. However, it is fundamental that the applied motions and loads can reproduce the wear mechanisms physiologically observed in the patient. To replicate the in vivo angular displacements and loadings, special machines known as joint simulators are employed. This article focuses on the main characteristics related to the wear simulation of hip implants using mechanical simulators, giving information to surgeons, researchers, regulatory bodies, etc., about the importance of preclinical wear evaluation. A critical analysis is performed on the differences in the principles of operation of simulators and their effects on the final results, and about future trends in wear simulation.

  3. A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    The work summarized here comprises the concluding effort of a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies. It supports the development of a better understanding of advanced diesel engine designs in which enhanced power density, energy efficiency, and emissions control place increasing demands upon the durability of engine materials. Many kinds of metallic alloys are used in engines depending on the operating stresses, temperatures, and chemical environments. Exhaust valves, for example, are subjected to high temperatures and repetitive surface contacts that place demands on durability and frictional characteristics of the materials. Valves must continue to seal the combustion chamber properly for thousands of hours of cyclic engine operation and under varying operating conditions. It was the focus of this effort to understand the wear processes in the valve-seat area and to develop a model for the surface deformation and wear of that important interface. An annotated bibliography is provided to illustrate efforts to understand valve wear and to investigate the factors of engine operation that affect its severity and physical manifestation. The project for which this modeling effort was the final task, involved construction of a high-temperature repetitive impact test system as well as basic tribology studies of the combined processes of mechanical wear plus oxidation at elevated temperatures. Several publications resulted from this work, and are cited in this report. The materials selected for the experimental work were high-performance alloys based on nickel and cobalt. In some cases, engine-tested exhaust valves were made available for wear analysis and to ensure that the modes of surface damage produced in experiments were simulative of service. New, production-grade exhaust valves were also used to prepare test specimens for experimental work along with the other alloy samples. Wear analysis of valves and seats

  4. Effect of surface oxidation on the nm-scale wear behavior of a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, A.; Louzguine-Luzguin, D. V.; Sharma, P.; Inoue, A.; Shluger, A.; Fecht, H.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Metallic glasses are good candidates for applications in micromechanical systems. With size reduction of mechanical components into the micrometer and submicrometer range, the native surface oxide layer starts playing an important role in contact mechanical applications of metallic glasses. We use atomic force microscopy to investigate the wear behavior of the Ni 62 Nb 38 metallic glass with a native oxide layer and with an oxide grown after annealing in air. After the annealing, the wear rate is found to have significantly decreased. Also the dependency of the specific wear on the velocity is found to be linear in the case of the as spun sample while it follows a power law in the case of the sample annealed in air. We discuss these results in relation to the friction behavior and properties of the surface oxide layer obtained on the same alloy.

  5. Friction and wear behaviour of tool steels sliding against 22MnB5 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gracia-Escosa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Boron steels are used in hot stamping process due to their good mechanical properties. During the stamping process, the dies are exposed to aggressive conditions including adhesive wear, abrasion, thermal stresses and fatigue. In the present work, QRO 90 and UNIMAX slid against 22MnB5 steel in four conditions: with and without hardening treatment and, with and without Al–10%Si coating, in order to evaluate the influence of both coating and austenitization treatment on friction and wear of tool steels. The results showed that Al–10%Si reduces the friction coefficient, while the hardening treatment results in an increase of COF due to Fe2Al5 brittle compounds. Wear mechanism of both tool steels is adhesive and oxidative when tested against coated and uncoated 22MnB5, respectively.

  6. A large taper mismatch is one of the key factors behind high wear rates and failure at the taper junction of total hip replacements: A finite element wear analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkanfar, Ariyan; Langton, David J; Joyce, Thomas J

    2017-05-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) is one of the most successful orthopaedic surgeries; however, failures can occur due to adverse reactions to wear debris. Recently, a large number of failures linked to the release of metal particles from the taper junction between femoral head and femoral stem have been reported. One possible reason for this may be design variations such as taper mismatches associated with the taper and trunnion angles. Could a large taper mismatch lead to inappropriate contact mechanics and increase relative micromotion and thus wear? In this study, 3D finite element (FE) models of a commercial THR from a perfectly matched interface to large taper mismatches and a wear algorithm were used to investigate the extent of wear that could occur at this junction and identify the optimum tolerances in order to reduce the wear. A co-ordinate measuring machine (CMM) was used to analyse the wear depth and volumetric wear rate of the tapers of 54 explanted 36mm diameter Cobalt Chromium femoral heads, which had been in service for 5.1 years in average, to validate the FE analyses. It was found that a large taper mismatch (e.g. 9.12´) results in a high wear rate (2.960mm 3 per million load cycles). Such wear rates can have a major negative effect on the clinical outcomes of these implants. It was also found that even a slight reduction in mismatch significantly reduced the magnitude of the wear rates (0.069mm 3 per million load cycles on average for 6´ taper mismatch). It is recommended that the cone angles of femoral head and femoral trunnion should be manufactured to produce a taper mismatch of less than 6´ at the taper junction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of three different food acids on the attrition-corrosion wear of human dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yichi; Arsecularatne, Joseph A.; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-07-01

    With increased consumption of acidic drinks and foods, the wear of human teeth due to attrition in acidic environments is an increasingly important issue. Accordingly, the present paper investigates in vitro the wear of human enamel in three different acidic environments. Reciprocating wear tests in which an enamel cusp slides on an enamel flat surface were carried out using acetic, citric and lactic acid lubricants (at pH 3-3.5). Distilled water was also included as a lubricant for comparison. Focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging were then used to investigate the enamel subsurfaces following wear tests. Nanoindentation was used to ascertain the changes in enamel mechanical properties. The study reveals crack generation along the rod boundaries due to the exposure of enamel to the acidic environments. The wear mechanism changes from brittle fracture in distilled water to ploughing or shaving of the softened layer in acidic environments, generating a smooth surface with the progression of wear. Moreover, nanoindentation results of enamel samples which were exposed to the above acids up to a duration of the wear tests show decreasing hardness and Young’s modulus with exposure time.

  8. Duke Power Company's control rod wear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culp, D.C.; Kitlan, M.S. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Recent examinations performed at several foreign and domestic pressurized water reactors have identified significant control rod cladding wear, leading to the conclusion that previously believed control rod lifetimes are not attainable. To monitor control rod performance and reduce safety concerns associated with wear, Duke Power Company has developed a comprehensive control rod wear program for Ag-In-Cd and boron carbide (B 4 C) rods at the McGuire and Catawba nuclear stations. Duke Power currently uses the Westinghouse 17 x 17 Ag-In-Cd control rod design at McGuire Unit 1 and the Westinghouse 17 x 17 hybrid B 4 C control rod design with a Ag-In-Cd tip at McGuire Unit 2 and Catawba Units 1 and 2. The designs are similar, with the exception of the absorber material and clad thickness. There are 53 control rods per unit

  9. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  10. Quantitative wear particle analysis for osteoarthritis assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meizhai; Lord, Megan S; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The aims of this study were (1) to quantitatively characterise the boundary and surface features of wear particles present in the synovial fluid of patients, (2) to select key numerical parameters that describe distinctive particle features and enable osteoarthritis assessment and (3) to develop a model to assess osteoarthritis conditions using comprehensive wear debris information. Discriminant analysis was used to statistically group particles based on differences in their numerical parameters. The analysis methods agreed with the clinical osteoarthritis grades in 63%, 50% and 61% of particles for no osteoarthritis, mild osteoarthritis and severe osteoarthritis, respectively. This study has revealed particle features specific to different osteoarthritis grades and provided further understanding of the cartilage degradation process through wear particle analysis - the technique that has the potential to be developed as an objective and minimally invasive method for osteoarthritis diagnosis.

  11. Abrasive wear resistance and microstructure of Ni-Cr-B-Si hardfacing alloys with additions of Al, Nb, Mo, Fe, Mn and C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berns, H.; Fischer, A.; Theisen, W.

    1987-01-01

    The development of new Ni-base hardfacing alloys for filler wire welding or metal spraying should result in materials with a good resistance against high temperature corrosion and abrasive wear. The first step is to design microstructures, which obtain a satisfactory abrasive wear behaviour at room temperature. Thus, different alloys are melted and scrutinized as to their microstructure and their abrasive wear resistance in laboratory. Compared to commercial Ni-base hardfacing alloys they show a higher volume fraction of coarse hard phases due to the additional, initial solidification of Nb-carbides and Cr-, and Mo-borides. Thus, the abrasive wear resistance is improved. For hard abrasive particles, such as corundum, the Ni-base alloys are more wear resistant than harder Fe-base alloys investigate earlier. This is due to the tougher Ni metal matrix that results in microcracking not to be the most significantly acting wear mechanism

  12. Correlation between microstructure and wear behavior of AZX915 Mg-alloy reinforced with 12 wt% TiC particles by stir-casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj M. Chelliah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work concerns with correlation between microstructure and wear behavior of AZX915 Mg-alloy reinforced with 12 wt% of TiC particles by stir-casting process. Dry sliding tests were performed under ambient environment by using a pin-on-disc (EN8 steel configuration with a normal load of 50 N at a constant sliding speed of 2.50 ms−1. While as-cast composite experienced delamination wear, heat treated composite suffered from delamination and oxidation wear during dry sliding contact. Moreover, the heat treated composite exhibited lower friction and higher wear rate as compared to the as-cast composite. Friction and wear behavior were correlated with microstructures based on the concept of oxidation tendency and crack nucleation/propagation. Further, a schematic model has been proposed illustrating wear mechanisms from the point of view of subsurface microstructural evolution of the AZX915-TiCp composite.

  13. Characterization and wear performance of boride phases over tool steel substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar E Vera Cárdenas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work was conducted to characterize boride phases, obtained from the powder-pack process, on AISI H13 and D2 steel substrates, and investigate their tribological behavior. The boriding was developed at a temperature of 1273 K with an exposure time of 8 h. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were conducted on the borided material to characterize the presence of the FeB, Fe2B, and CrB phases and the distribution of heavy elements on the surface of the substrates. The adherence of the boride layers was evaluated, in a qualitative form, through the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C indentation technique. Sliding wear tests were then performed using a reciprocating wear test machine. All tests were conducted in dry conditions at room temperature. A frequency of 10 Hz and 15-mm sliding distance were used. The applied Hertzian pressure was 2.01 GPa. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe and analyze the wear mechanisms. Additionally, the variation of the friction coefficient versus the number of cycles was obtained. Experimental results showed that the characteristic wear mechanism for the borided surface was plastic deformation and mild abrasive wear; for unborided substrates, cracking and spalling were observed.

  14. A Study on Abrasive Wear Behavior of Spacer Grid Materials for Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, J. K.; Jeon, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Spacer grid is one of the key components of a light water reactor (LWR) fuel assembly. The most important function of it is to hold the fuel rods to maintain the distance between the fuel rods inside a fuel assembly. At the reactor core in operating power plants, a fretting damage has been frequently reported between a nuclear fuel rod and its supporting spring/dimple of the fuel assemblies. This is due to a flow induced vibration (FIV), Which results from the primary coolant that rapidly passes around the fuel rod to remove the excess heat generated by the nuclear reaction. Fretting damage is generally caused by fretting wear, which includes various wear mechanisms such as an oxidative, adhesive, abrasive wear, etc., or fretting fatigue, which includes a surface or bulk fatigue. The purpose of the present work are to investigate the variation of the materials with increasing number of cycles and sliding velocity under abrasive wear test and to examine the wear mechanism at each test condition

  15. Fabrication, microstructural characterization and wear characteristics of A380 alloy-alumina composites

    KAUST Repository

    Nurani, Sheikh Jaber

    2016-03-10

    To obtain better mechanical and tribological properties than aluminium alloys aluminium is reinforced with alumina particles making aluminium metal matrix composites. In this work scrap piston A380 alloy was used as the matrix alloy. Alumina particles were added by 5%, 10% and 15% into matrix alloy respectively to form desired composites by stir casting technique. Pin on disc wear testing machine with counter surface as steel disc of hardness HRC 32 and surface roughness of 0.62 μm was used to conduct the wear test. In result composites showed superior wear resistance property over A380 alloy. The effect of load, sliding speed and sliding distance on wear behaviour were also examined in this study. Wear mechanism was identified from the worn surface. Both optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the composites was performed to determine the microstructures. Optical micrograph shows grain size decreases with addition of alumina particles. EDS analysis was performed to confirm the presence of α-Al matrix, primary Si particles and intermetallic. As a general method, phase compositions were analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Optical microstructures were consistent with the SEM micrographs. © 2015 IEEE.

  16. On the Physics of Machining Titanium Alloys: Interactions between Cutting Parameters, Microstructure and Tool Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nouari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The current work deals with the analysis of mechanisms involved during the machining process of titanium alloys. Two different materials were chosen for the study: Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-55531. The objective was to understand the effect of all cutting parameters on the tool wear behavior and stability of the cutting process. The investigations were focused on the mechanisms of the chip formation process and their interaction with tool wear. At the microstructure scale, the analysis confirms the intense deformation of the machined surface and shows a texture modification. As the cutting speed increases, cutting forces and temperature show different progressions depending on the considered microstructure (Ti-6Al-4V or Ti-55531 alloy. Results show for both materials that the wear process is facilitated by the high cutting temperature and the generation of high stresses. The analysis at the chip-tool interface of friction and contact nature (sliding or sticking contact shows that machining Ti55531 often exhibits an abrasion wear process on the tool surface, while the adhesion and diffusion modes followed by the coating delamination process are the main wear modes when machining the usual Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  17. Long-infrared InAs-based quantum cascade lasers operating at 291 K (λ=19 μm) with metal-metal resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chastanet, D.; Bousseksou, A., E-mail: adel.bousseksou@u-psud.fr; Julien, F.; Colombelli, R., E-mail: raffaele.colombelli@u-psud.fr [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris Sud, UMR 8622 CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France); Lollia, G.; Bahriz, M.; Laffaille, P.; Baranov, A. N.; Teissier, R., E-mail: teissier@univ-montp2.fr [Institut d' Electronique du Sud, Univ. Montpellier 2, UMR 5214 CNRS, 34095 Montpellier (France)

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate quantum cascade lasers in the InAs/AlSb material system emitting at wavelengths of λ = 19 μm and λ = 21 μm. The maximum operating temperatures are 291 K and 250 K, and the threshold current densities at 78 K are as low as 0.6 kA/cm{sup 2} and 1.3 kA/cm{sup 2} for the lasers emitting at λ = 19 μm and λ = 21 μm, respectively. These values represent the best performance to date for quantum cascade lasers operating above λ = 16 μm. Although the devices employ metal-metal waveguide geometries, the diffraction effects which typically hinder the output beam of THz devices are not observed.

  18. Wear Analysis of Wind Turbine Gearbox Bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Xu, Hanbing [ORNL; Parten, Randy J [ORNL; Qu, Jun [ORNL; Geer, Tom [ORNL

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to investigate and characterize the nature of surface damage and wear to wind turbine gearbox bearings returned from service in the field. Bearings were supplied for examination by S. Butterfield and J. Johnson of the National Wind Technology Center (NREL), Boulder, Colorado. Studies consisted of visual examination, optical and electron microscopy, dimensional measurements of wear-induced macro-scale and micro-scale features, measurements of macro- and micro-scale hardness, 3D imaging of surface damage, studies of elemental distributions on fracture surfaces, and examinations of polished cross-sections of surfaces under various etched and non-etched conditions.

  19. Surface engineering for enhanced performance against wear

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Surface Engineering constitutes a variety of processes and sub processes. Each chapter of this work covers specific processes by experts working in the area. Included for each topic are tribological performances for each process as well as results of recent research. The reader also will benefit from in-depth studies of diffusion coatings, nanocomposite films for wear resistance, surfaces for biotribological applications, thin-film wear, tribology of thermal sprayed coatings, hardfacing, plating for tribology and high energy beam surface modifications. Material scientists as well as engineers working with surface engineering for tribology will be particularly interested in this work.

  20. The effect of microstructure on abrasive wear of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kešner, A.; Chotëborský, R.; Linda, M.

    2017-09-01

    Abrasive wear of agricultural tools is one of the biggest problems in currently being. The amount of abrasive wear, depending on the microstructure, has been investigated in this work. Steels 25CrMo4 and 51CrV4 were used in this work to determine the effect of the microstructure on the abrasive wear. These steels are commonly used for components that have to withstand abrasive wear.SEM analysis was used to detect the microstructure. The standardized ASTM G65 method was used to compare the abrasive wear of steels. The results show that the abrasive wear depends on the microstructure of steels.

  1. Effect of Polypropylene Modification by Impregnation with Oil on Its Wear and Friction Coefficient at Variable Load and Various Friction Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Sędłak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratorial two-body wear testing was carried out in order to assess effects of polypropylene modification by impregnating it with oils on friction coefficient and wear in comparison to those parameters of unmodified polypropylene, Teflon, and polyamide during operation under conditions of sliding friction without lubrication. Wear behaviour of the tested specimens was investigated using ASTM G77-98 standard wear test equipment. Recording program made it possible to visualise and record the following parameters: rotational speed and load, linear wear, friction coefficient, temperature of the specimen, and ambient temperature. In addition, wear mechanisms of the analysed materials were determined with use of scanning electron microscopy. In the case of the remaining tested polymers, the most important mechanism of wear was adhesion (PP, PTFE, PA 6.6, and PA MoS2, microcutting (PTFE, PA 6.6, and PA MoS2, fatigue wear (PTFE, forming “roll-shaped particles” combined with plastic deformation (PA 6.6 and PA MoS2, and thermal wear (PP. Impregnation of polypropylene with engine oil, gear oil, or RME results in significant reduction of friction coefficient and thus of friction torque, in relation to not only unmodified polypropylene but also the examined polyamide and Teflon.

  2. Sliding-wear resistance of pure near fully-dense B4C under lubrication with water, diesel fuel, and paraffin oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortiz, Angel L.; Leal, Victor Manuel Candelario; Borrero-López, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    The sliding-wear resistance of pure near fully-dense B4C is investigated, and the wear mode/mechanisms identified, under lubrication with water, diesel fuel, and paraffin oil. It is found that the wear is mild in the three cases, with specific wear rates (SWRs) of 10−16–10−17 m3/N m. Nonetheless......, the wear resistance of the B4C ceramic is one order of magnitude greater under oil lubrication (1016 N m/m3) than under water lubrication (1015 N m/m3), and twice as great for the specific case of paraffin oil than diesel fuel, attributable to the lubricant’s viscosity. It is also found that the wear mode...... is always abrasion, and that the wear mechanisms are plastic deformation and localized fracture with grain pullout. However, in agreement with the macro-wear data, the severity of the wear damage is lower under lubrication with paraffin oil, followed by diesel fuel, and lastly water. Finally...

  3. Wear in Fluid Power Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-30

    the pole edges inside the tube in the equipment. Another device which could be used is a Franz -Isodynamic separator. Fig. [7] gives the schematic of...States Mechanics Div., Rensselaer Polytechnic Washington, DC 20510 Inst. Mr. M. E. Peterson Troy, NY 12181 Prof. J. Tichy 1 Air Force Aero Propulsion

  4. Effects of Load and Speed on Wear Rate of Abrasive Wear for 2014 Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabas, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of the normal load and sliding speed on wear rate of two-body abrasive wear for 2014 Al Alloy were investigated in detail. In order to understand the variation in wear behaviour with load and speed, wear tests were carried out at a sliding distance of 11 m, a speed of 0.36 m/s, a duration of 30 s and loads in the range 3-11 N using 220 grit abrasive paper, and at a speed range 0.09-0.90 m/s, a load of 5 N and an average sliding distance of 11 m using abrasive papers of 150 grit size under dry friction conditions. Before the wear tests, solution treatment of the 2014 Al alloy was carried out at temperatures of 505 and 520 °C for 1 h in a muffle furnace and then quenched in cold water at 15 °C. Later, the ageing treatment was carried out at 185 °C for 8 h in the furnace. Generally, wear rate due to time increased linearly and linear wear resistance decreased with increasing loads. However, the wear rate was directly proportional to the load up to a critical load of 7 N. After this load, the slope of the curves decreased because the excessive deformation of the worn surface and the instability of the abrasive grains began to increase. When the load on an abrasive grain reaches a critical value, the groove width is about 0.17 of the abrasive grain diameter, and the abrasive grains begin to fail. The wear rate due to time increased slightly as the sliding speed increased in the range 0.09-0.90 m/s. The reason for this is that changes arising from strain rate and friction heating are expected with increasing sliding speeds.

  5. Wear and Degradation Modes in Selected Vehicle Tribosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pantazopoulos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The wear and degradation mechanisms of two principle vehicle tribosystems are presented to elucidate the main causes of their premature failure. The first case study concerns the malfunction of an automotive cast iron pressure plate operated in an automobile clutch system. The second is related to the unexpected failure of a stainless steel brake disk of a high performance motorcycle. Both components are designed to function under sliding friction conditions that lead to the severe wear of consumable non-metallic parts of the tribosystems: the clutch disk and the brake pad, respectively. However, in both cases it was the unexpected failure of the conjugate metallic parts that resulted in terminal system damage. The experimental approach to identify the root cause of failure involved both microstructure characterization, as well as observations of the metallic contact surfaces by means of optical and scanning electron microscopy, in conjunction with microhardness and surface topography measurements. For the case of the stainless steel brake disk in particular, Finite Element Analysis was employed to simulate the operating tribosystem, identify the site(s prone for crack initiation and validate the failure mechanisms hypotheses.

  6. Study on torsional fretting wear behavior of a ball-on-socket contact configuration simulating an artificial cervical disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Wang, Fei; Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Qingliang; Liu, Yuhong; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-10-01

    A ball-on-socket contact configuration was designed to simulate an artificial cervical disk in structure. UHMWPE (ultra high molecular weight polyethylene) hot pressed by powders and Ti6Al4V alloy were selected as the material combination of ball and socket. The socket surface was coated by a ~500 nm C-DLC (carbon ion implantation-diamond like carbon) mixed layer to improve its surface nano hardness and wear resistance. The torsional fretting wear behavior of the ball-on-socket model was tested at different angular displacements under 25% bovine serum lubrication with an axial force of 100 N to obtain more realistic results with that in vivo. The fretting running regimes and wear damage characteristics as well as wear mechanisms for both ball and socket were studied based on 2D (two dimension) optical microscope, SEM (scanning electron microscope) and 3D (three dimension) profiles. With the increase of angular displacement amplitude from 1° to 7°, three types of T-θ (Torsional torque-angular displacement amplitude) curves (i.e., linear, elliptical and parallelogram loops) corresponding to running regimes of PSR (partial slip regime), MR (mixed regime) and SR (slip regime) were observed and analyzed. Both the central region and the edge zone of the ball and socket were damaged. The worn surfaces were characterized by wear scratches and wear debris. In addition, more severe wear damage and more wear debris appeared on the central region of the socket at higher angular displacement amplitude. The dominant damage mechanism was a mix of surface scratch, adhesive wear and abrasive wear for the UHMWPE ball while that for the coated socket was abrasive wear by PE particles and some polishing and rolling process on the raised overgrown DLC grains. The frictional kinetic behavior, wear type, damage region and damage mechanism for the ball-on-socket model revealed significant differences with those of a ball-on-flat contact while showing better consistency with that of in

  7. ERRATUM: Work smart, wear your hard hat

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An error appeared in the article «Work smart, wear your hard hat» published in Weekly Bulletin 27/2003, page 5. The impact which pierced a hole in the hard hat worn by Gerd Fetchenhauer was the equivalent of a box weighing 5 kg and not 50 kg.

  8. Wear-Out Sensitivity Analysis Project Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Adam

    2015-01-01

    During the course of the Summer 2015 internship session, I worked in the Reliability and Maintainability group of the ISS Safety and Mission Assurance department. My project was a statistical analysis of how sensitive ORU's (Orbital Replacement Units) are to a reliability parameter called the wear-out characteristic. The intended goal of this was to determine a worst case scenario of how many spares would be needed if multiple systems started exhibiting wear-out characteristics simultaneously. The goal was also to determine which parts would be most likely to do so. In order to do this, my duties were to take historical data of operational times and failure times of these ORU's and use them to build predictive models of failure using probability distribution functions, mainly the Weibull distribution. Then, I ran Monte Carlo Simulations to see how an entire population of these components would perform. From here, my final duty was to vary the wear-out characteristic from the intrinsic value, to extremely high wear-out values and determine how much the probability of sufficiency of the population would shift. This was done for around 30 different ORU populations on board the ISS.

  9. Healthy Contact Lens Wear and Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Jennifer Cope explains some basic steps for proper wear and care of soft contact lenses.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/4/2014.

  10. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, P.B. (Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth); Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  11. Effective tool wear estimation through multisensory information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On-line tool wear monitoring plays a significant role in industrial automation for higher productivity and product quality. In addition, an intelligent system is required to make a timely decision for tool change in machining systems in order to avoid the subsequent consequences on the dimensional accuracy and surface finish ...

  12. Tribology: Friction, lubrication, and wear technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: introduction and definitions of terms; friction concepts; lubrication technology concepts; wear technology concepts; and tribological transitions. This document is designed for educators who seek to teach these concepts to their students.

  13. Sliding wear resistance of iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    severe wear and erosion applications include cobalt- based alloys, high manganese stainless steels, and other chromium containing alloys. There is considerable inte- rest in replacing cobalt-based alloys for erosion resistance in nuclear power applications because of the problems with exposure of maintenance workers to ...

  14. Lubrication And Wear Of Hot Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.; Deadmore, D.; Miyoshi, K.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents results of experiments on tribological properties of ceramics. Describes friction and wear characteristics of some ceramics under consideration for use in gas turbines, diesel engines, and Stirling engines. Discusses formulation of composite plasma-sprayed ceramics containing solid lubricant additives, and data for carbide- and oxide-based composite coatings for use at temperatures up to at least 900 degree C.

  15. Obtainment, machining and wear of metal matrix composites processed by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Edilson Rosa Barbosa de.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was the obtainment of metal matrix composites (MMC) by the route of powder metallurgy, and the valuation of these materials with relation to their machining and wear characteristics. Firstly, were obtained pure commercial aluminium matrix composites materials, with 5, 10 and 15% volumetric fraction of silicon carbide particles. Was also obtained a material without reinforcement particles in order to verify by comparison, the influence of addition of reinforcement particles. The obtained materials were characterized physics (hydrostatic density), mechanics (hardness and tensile tests) and microstructurally (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). The results showed a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement particles in the composite, and improvement in the mechanical properties, mainly tensile strength (UTS) in comparison to the unreinforced material. After, tests were made to verify the materials behavior during machining and to check the performance of several tool materials (cemented carbide, ceramics and polycrystalline diamond). In these tests, values of the cutting force were measured by instrumented tool-holders. Phenomena such as tool wear, built-up edge formation and mechanism of chip formation were also observed and evaluated. The results from the cemented carbide tool tests, were utilised for the machinability index determination of each material. These results were applied to the Taylor equation and the equation constants for each material and test conditions were determined. The results showed that the inclusion of silicon carbide particles made extremely difficult the machining of the composites, and only with diamond tool, satisfactory results were obtained. At last, wear tests were performed to verify the influence of the reinforcement particles in the characteristics of wear resistance of the materials. The results obtained were utilized in the wear coefficient determination for each material. The

  16. Using a surrogate contact pair to evaluate polyethylene wear in prosthetic knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Anthony P; Lockard, Carly A; Weisenburger, Joel N; Haider, Hani; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2016-01-01

    With recent improvements to the properties of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) used in joint replacements, prosthetic knee and hip longevity may extend beyond two decades. However, it is difficult and costly to replicate such a long in vivo lifetime using clinically relevant in vitro wear testing approaches such as walking gait joint simulators. We advance a wear test intermediate in complexity between pin-on-disk and knee joint simulator tests. The test uses a surrogate contact pair, consisting of a surrogate femoral and tibial specimen that replicate the contact mechanics of any full-scale knee condyle contact pair. The method is implemented in a standard multi-directional pin-on-disk wear test machine, and we demonstrate its application via a two-million-cycle wear test of three different UHMWPE formulations. Further, we demonstrate the use of digital photography and image processing to accurately quantify fatigue damage based on the reduced transmission of light through a damage area in a UHMWPE specimen. The surrogate contact pairs replicate the knee condyle contact areas within -3% to +12%. The gravimetric wear test results reflect the dose of crosslinking radiation applied to the UHMWPE: 35 kGy yielded a wear rate of 7.4 mg/Mcycles, 55 kGy yielded 1.0 mg/Mcycles, and 75 kGy (applied to a 0.1% vitamin E stabilized UHMWPE) yielded 1.5 mg/Mcycles. A precursor to spalling fatigue is observed and precisely measured in the radiation-sterilized (35 kGy) and aged UHMWPE specimen. The presented techniques can be used to evaluate the high-cycle fatigue performance of arbitrary knee condyle contact pairs under design-specific contact stresses, using existing wear test machines. This makes the techniques more economical and well-suited to standardized comparative testing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comparison of two measurement techniques for clinical wear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, M C; Delong, R; Pintado, M R

    1999-01-01

    Clinical wear of restorations is generally evaluated by marginal integrity over time. In this study, both a subjective and an objective method for wear assessment are compared, and the relative advantages and disadvantages of each are considered....

  18. Is tooth wear in the primary dentition predictive of tooth wear in the permanent dentition? Report from a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, M A; Whelton, H P; Shirodaria, S C; O'Mullane, D M; Cronin, M S

    2010-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of tooth wear in the permanent dentition of a sample of 12-year-old school children and establish whether an association exists between tooth wear recorded now and tooth wear recorded in their primary dentition at age five. A prospective cohort study. At follow-up to a previous study complete data were available for 123 children; fieldwork was conducted in the child's primary school. Measurement of tooth wear used a scoring system modified from the Smith and Knight Tooth Wear Index (TWI). Tooth wear which had progressed to dentine was assessed on the occlusal surfaces of the four first permanent molars, the labial, lingual/palatal and incisal surfaces of the six upper and six lower anterior teeth; a total of 40 scoreable surfaces. Demographic data were collected from the parents, and a questionnaire on oral hygiene habits, diet and behaviours was completed by each child. In total 38% (n = 47) of subjects had tooth wear, if incisor teeth only were included, 33% (n = 40) had tooth wear and similarly if the occlusal surfaces of molar teeth only were included 10% (n = 12) had signs of tooth wear. Gender was significantly associated with tooth wear: males had more tooth wear. The presence of tooth wear with dentine exposed in the primary dentition was significantly associated with tooth wear on the occlusal surfaces of the first permanent molars. Males had more tooth wear than females. An association existed between tooth wear recorded at age 5 and molar tooth wear recorded at age 12. Tooth wear is a lifelong cumulative process and should be recorded in both the primary and permanent dentitions.

  19. The effect of lubricant selection on galling in a model wear test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Emile; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2001-01-01

    Galling is a known failure mechanism in sheet metal forming (SMF) processes. As a result of this wear process, the amount of waste increases, the production process becomes hard to control and eventually expensive maintenance is required in order to continue production. Delaying or avoiding galling

  20. WEAR OF THE FRICTION SURFACES PARTS IN THE PRESENSE OF SOLID PARTICLES CONTACTING ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Musaibov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of intensity of wear of details of the cars working in the oil polluted by abrasive particles, depending on mechanical properties of material of details and abrasive particles, their sizes, a form and concentration, loading, temperature of a surface of friction, speed of sliding, quality of lubricant are considered.