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Sample records for metal-ceramic functionally gradient

  1. Gradient composite metal-ceramic foam as supportive component for planar SOFCs and MIEC membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorygo, Oleg; Mikutski, Vitali; Marukovich, Alexander; Sadykov, Vladislav; Usoltsev, Vladimir; Mezentseva, Natalia; Borodinecs, Anatolijs; Bobrenok, Oleg

    2011-06-01

    A novel approach to the design of planar gradient porous supports for the thin-film SOFCs and MIEC membranes is described. The support's thermal expansion is controlled by the creation of a two-component composite metal-ceramic foam structure. Thin MIEC membranes and SOFCs were prepared on the composite supports by the layerwise deposition of composite functional layers including complex fluorites and perovskites. Lab-scale studies demonstrated promising performance of both MIEC membrane and SOFC.

  2. 3rd Workshop on metal ceramic materials for functional applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korb, G.

    1997-01-01

    This workshop contains contributions about materials and processing, characterization and modeling of properties and applications of metallic ceramics and composite structures. It was held on behalf of the Taiwan-Austrian scientific collaboration in Vienna, June 4 th - 6 th 1997. (Suda)

  3. Marginal Strength of Collarless Metal Ceramic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikka Swati

    2010-01-01

    fracture strength at margins of metal ceramic crowns cemented to metal tooth analogs. Crowns evaluated with different marginal configurations, shoulder and shoulder bevel with 0 mm, 0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 1.5 mm, were selected. Methods. Maxillary right canine typhodont tooth was prepared to receive a metal ceramic crown with shoulder margin. This was duplicated to get 20 metal teeth analogs. Then the same tooth was reprepared to get shoulder bevel configuration. These crowns were then cemented onmetal teeth analogs and tested for fracture strength atmargin on an Instron testing machine. A progressive compressive load was applied using 6.3 mm diameter rod with crosshead speed of 2.5 mm per minute. Statisticaly analysis was performed with ANOVA, Student's “t” test and “f” test. Results. The fracture strength of collarless metal ceramic crowns under study exceeded the normal biting force. Therefore it can be suggested that collarless metal ceramic crowns with shoulder or shoulder bevel margins up to 1.5 mm framework reduction may be indicated for anteriormetal ceramic restorations. Significance. k Collarless metal ceramic crowns have proved to be successful for anterior fixed restorations. Hence, it may be subjected to more clinical trials.

  4. Scientific activity within the targeted research project: Metallic, ceramic and organic nanomaterials: processing - structure - properties - applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonowicz, M.; Kurzydlowski, K.

    2003-01-01

    In november 2000 Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) launched a Targeted Research Project 'Metallic, ceramic and organic nanomaterials: processing - structure - properties - applications'. The structural materials, covered by the project, comprise analysis of the suitability of heavy deformation routes for nanocrystallization of metals and alloys, Al-based glass-ceramics, ceramic matrix nanocomposites, gradient materials. Also surface engineering methods and polymer matrix nanocomposites are studied. Novel methods for the processing and compacting of nanomaterials are also researched. Among functional materials: materials for batteries soft and hard magnetic materials and nanomaterials, giant magnetoresistance and light emitting materials are studied. Basic phenomena such as mechanics of superplastic deformation of ceramics, demagnetization processes in ferromagnetic nanomaterials, transport processes in ionic conductivity materials are also investigated. Overview of the main research direction and selected achievements of the project are presented. (author)

  5. Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metalceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface thickness. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Per six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C were made each. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Analysis Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX (Oxford Instruments and Scanning Electon Microscop (SEM analysis (JEOL were used to determine thickness of metal-ceramic interface together with PC Software for quantification of visual information's (KVI POPOVAC. Results. Results of this research introduced significant differences between thickness of metal-ceramic interface in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on thickness of metal-ceramic interface of the examined alloys. This research showed almost linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 12th generation of recycling. Conclusion. Recasting of nickel-chromium and cobaltchromium alloys is not recommended because of reduced thickness of metal-ceramic interface of these alloys. Instead of recycling, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturers.

  6. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Morrow, S. Marvin; Rexford, Donald

    1999-01-01

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  7. Colloidal forming of metal/ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Gutierrez, C.A.; Millan, A.J.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Metal/Ceramic composites have very attractive properties as either structural or electronic materials. For certain applications, complex microstructures and shapes are required. Colloidal processing of ceramics has proved to provide better properties and allows to obtain near net complex shaped parts. However colloidal processing has not received a similar attention in powder metallurgy. This work deals with the colloidal approach to the forming of metallic and metal/ceramic composites in an aqueous medium. Rheological behavior of concentrated pure nickel, nickel/alumina and nickel/zirconia suspensions is studied and optimized for obtaining flat surfaces or near net shaped parts by tape casting and gel casting respectively. In each case the influence of the processing additives (acrylic binders for tape casting and carrageenans for gel casting) on the rheological behavior of the slurries is determined. Pure nickel and nickel/ceramic composites with different compositions have been prepared. Static and dynamic sintering studies were performed at different conditions in order to control the porosity and microstructure of the final bodies, which were characterized by optical microscopy. (orig.)

  8. Study of solid metal/ceramic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehan, R.L.; Jackson, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    In advanced energy systems, ceramics may allow higher operating temperatures for greater efficiency. However, compressive contacts at joints with metals are required by the poor tensile behavior of ceramics. Compression at these interfaces excludes oxygen, and oxides do not form. Reactions under inert or reducing conditions (as in metal matrix composites) have been studied, as have reactions of complex superalloys with SiC, Si/SiC and Si 3 N 4 . The reactions were complex, dictating a phenomenological study with no treatment of their basic nature or the phase equilibria. With a model alloy containing only Ni, Cr and Al, the present experiments and analyses are an attempt to gain a more basic understanding of metal/ceramic reactions

  9. Metal-ceramic alloys in dentistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Howard W; Berzins, David W; Moore, B Keith; Charlton, David G

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to review basic information about the alloys used for fabricating metal-ceramic restorations in dentistry. Their compositions, properties, advantages, and disadvantages are presented and compared. In addition to reviewing traditional noble-metal and base-metal metal-ceramic alloys, titanium and gold composite alloys are also discussed. A broad search of the published literature was performed using Medline to identify pertinent current articles on metal-ceramic alloys as well as articles providing a historical background about the development of these alloys. Textbooks, the internet, and manufacturers' literature were also used to supplement this information. The review discusses traditional as well as more recently-developed alloys and technologies used in dentistry for fabricating metal-ceramic restorations. Clear advantages and disadvantages for these alloy types are provided and discussed as well as the role that compositional variations have on the alloys' performance. This information should enable clinicians and technicians to easily identify the important physical properties of each type and their primary clinical indications. A number of alloys and metals are available for metal-ceramic use in dentistry. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, primarily based on its specific composition. Continuing research and development are resulting in the production of new technologies and products, giving clinicians even more choices in designing and fabricating metal-ceramic restorations.

  10. Velocity Gradient Power Functional for Brownian Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Schmidt, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    We present an explicit and simple approximation for the superadiabatic excess (over ideal gas) free power functional, admitting the study of the nonequilibrium dynamics of overdamped Brownian many-body systems. The functional depends on the local velocity gradient and is systematically obtained from treating the microscopic stress distribution as a conjugate field. The resulting superadiabatic forces are beyond dynamical density functional theory and are of a viscous nature. Their high accuracy is demonstrated by comparison to simulation results.

  11. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-01-01

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  12. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Scott O' Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  13. A prospective 10-year study of metal ceramic single crowns and fixed dental prosthesis retainers in private practice settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitemeier, Bernd; Hänsel, Kristina; Kastner, Christian; Weber, Anke; Walter, Michael H

    2013-03-01

    Metal ceramic restorations are widely used in prosthodontics, but long-term data on their clinical performance in private practice settings based on prospective trials are sparse. This clinical trial was designed to provide realistic long-term survival rates for different outcomes related to tooth loss, crown loss, and metal ceramic defect. Ninety-five participants were provided with 190 noble metal ceramic single crowns and 138 participants with 276 fixed dental prosthesis retainer crowns on vital posterior teeth. Follow-up examinations were scheduled 2 weeks after insertion, annually up to 8 years, and after 10 years. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses, Mantel-Cox logrank tests, and Cox regression analyses were conducted. Because of variations in the time of the last examinations, the maximum observation period was 12.1 years. For the primary outcome 'loss of crown or tooth', the Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 94.3% ±1.8% (standard error) at 8.0 years (last outcome event) for single crowns and 94.4% ±1.5% at 11.0 years for fixed dental prosthesis retainer crowns. The difference between the survival functions was not significant (P>.05). For the secondary outcome 'metal ceramic defect', the survival rate was 88.8% ±3.2% at 11.0 years for single crowns and 81.7% ±3.5% at 11.0 years for fixed dental prosthesis retainer crowns. In Cox regression models, the only significant covariates for the outcome event 'metal ceramic defect' were bruxism in the medical history (single crowns) and signs and symptoms of bruxism (fixed dental prosthesis retainer crowns) with hazard ratios of 3.065 (95% CI 1.063 - 8.832) and 2.554 (95% CI 1.307 - 4.992). Metal ceramic crowns provided in private practice settings show good longevity. Bruxism appears to indicate a risk for metal ceramic defects. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ant functional responses along environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnan, Xavier; Cerdá, Xim; Retana, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Understanding species distributions and diversity gradients is a central challenge in ecology and requires prior knowledge of the functional traits mediating species' survival under particular environmental conditions. While the functional ecology of plants has been reasonably well explored, much less is known about that of animals. Ants are among the most diverse, abundant and ecologically significant organisms on earth, and they perform a great variety of ecological functions. In this study, we analyse how the functional species traits present in ant communities vary along broad gradients in climate, productivity and vegetation type in the south-western Mediterranean. To this end, we compiled one of the largest animal databases to date: it contains information on 211 local ant communities (including eight climate variables, productivity, and vegetation type) and 124 ant species, for which 10 functional traits are described. We used traits that characterize different dimensions of the ant functional niche with respect to morphology, life history and behaviour at both individual and colony level. We calculated two complementary functional trait community indices ('trait average' and 'trait dissimilarity') for each trait, and we analysed how they varied along the three different gradients using generalized least squares models that accounted for spatial autocorrelation. Our results show that productivity, vegetation type and, to a lesser extent, each climate variable per se might play an important role in shaping the occurrence of functional species traits in ant communities. Among the climate variables, temperature and precipitation seasonality had a much higher influence on functional responses than their mean values, whose effects were almost lacking. Our results suggest that strong relationships might exist between the abiotic environment and the distribution of functional traits among south-western Mediterranean ant communities. This finding indicates that

  15. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong

    2012-01-01

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced

  16. Collarless metal ceramic restorations to obscure the umbrella effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afroz Shaista

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthetics with porcelain fused to metal restoration in the anterior region can be adversely affected due to the inadequate teeth preparations and design of the prosthesis. We presented here a case report where esthetics was compromised due to darkening of the interdental papilla and marginal gingival and overcontoured restorations in relation to porcelain fused to metal restorations. Good esthetic results were obtained by using basic principles of tooth preparation and using collarless metal ceramic restorations.

  17. Study of Thermal Properties of Cast Metal- Ceramic Composite Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Gawdzińska K.; Chybowski L.; Przetakiewicz W.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to its properties, metallic foams can be used as insulation material. Thermal properties of cast metal-ceramic composite foams have applications in transport vehicles and can act as fire resistant and acoustic insulators of bulkheads. This paper presents basic thermal properties of cast and foamed aluminum, the values of thermal conductivity coefficient of selected gases used in foaming composites and thermal capabilities of composite foams (AlSi11/SiC). A certificate of non-combustibil...

  18. The esthetic metal-ceramic margin: a comparison of techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, J; Donovan, T

    1983-08-01

    Metal-ceramic crowns with all-porcelain labial margins may have esthetic and biologic advantages. Several techniques for making these restorations have been described in the prosthodontic literature. The authors used all the techniques and compared the results in terms of quality and degree of difficulty in construction. Clinically acceptable results can be achieved with all described techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are summarized in Table I.

  19. Stress and Reliability Analysis of a Metal-Ceramic Dental Crown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Sokolowski, Todd M.; Hojjatie, Barry; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of mechanical and thermal stresses with the flaws and microcracks within the ceramic region of metal-ceramic dental crowns can result in catastrophic or delayed failure of these restorations. The objective of this study was to determine the combined influence of induced functional stresses and pre-existing flaws and microcracks on the time-dependent probability of failure of a metal-ceramic molar crown. A three-dimensional finite element model of a porcelain fused-to-metal (PFM) molar crown was developed using the ANSYS finite element program. The crown consisted of a body porcelain, opaque porcelain, and a metal substrate. The model had a 300 Newton load applied perpendicular to one cusp, a load of 30ON applied at 30 degrees from the perpendicular load case, directed toward the center, and a 600 Newton vertical load. Ceramic specimens were subjected to a biaxial flexure test and the load-to-failure of each specimen was measured. The results of the finite element stress analysis and the flexure tests were incorporated in the NASA developed CARES/LIFE program to determine the Weibull and fatigue parameters and time-dependent fracture reliability of the PFM crown. CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/Or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program.

  20. Life testing of metal-ceramic CO2 lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlen, T. S.; Radecki, D. J.; Reynolds, R. S.; Targ, R.

    1971-01-01

    The main purpose of this program was to determine the life characteristics of nine space-qualified, metal-ceramic CO2 lasers. Lifetimes ranged between about 400 hours to over 2000 hours (the limit of testing) with a high degree of consistency in like groups. In all cases the tubes which had failed could be restored to near their original power by doubling the cathode current for 30 minutes. Periodic rejuvenation allowed operation for the full 2000 hours on all tubes. The failure mechanism appears to involve formation of NiO and C on the nickel cathode emission surface with subsequent absorption of tube gases.

  1. Generating substrate bound functional chemokine gradients in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Hansen, Morten; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2009-01-01

    Microcontact printing (mCP) is employed to generate discontinuous microscale gradients of active fractalkine, a chemokine expressed by endothelial cells near sites of inflammation where it is believed to form concentration gradients descending away from the inflamed area. In vivo, fractalkine is ...... surface-bound chemokines (haptotactic gradients). The use of a capture antibody facilitates control of the orientation of tagged molecules, thereby ensuring a high degree of bio-functionality through correct presentation and reduced protein denaturation....

  2. Viscoelastic analysis of a dental metal-ceramic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özüpek, Şebnem; Ünlü, Utku Cemal

    2012-11-01

    Porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations used in prosthetic dentistry contain thermal stresses which develop during the cooling phase after firing. These thermal stresses coupled with the stresses produced by mechanical loads may be the dominant reasons for failures in clinical situations. For an accurate calculation of these stresses, viscoelastic behavior of ceramics at high temperatures should not be ignored. In this study, the finite element technique is used to evaluate the effect of viscoelasticity on stress distributions of a three-point flexure test specimen, which is the current international standard, ISO 9693, to characterize the interfacial bond strength of metal-ceramic restorative systems. Results indicate that the probability of interfacial debonding due to normal tensile stress is higher than that due to shear stress. This conclusion suggests modification of ISO 9693 bond strength definition from one in terms of the shear stress only to that accounting for both normal and shear stresses.

  3. Gradient waveform pre-emphasis based on the gradient system transfer function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, Manuel; Wech, Tobias; Slawig, Anne; Ringler, Ralf; Dewdney, Andrew; Greiser, Andreas; Ruyters, Gudrun; Bley, Thorsten A; Köstler, Herbert

    2018-02-25

    The gradient system transfer function (GSTF) has been used to describe the distorted k-space trajectory for image reconstruction. The purpose of this work was to use the GSTF to determine the pre-emphasis for an undistorted gradient output and intended k-space trajectory. The GSTF of the MR system was determined using only standard MR hardware without special equipment such as field probes or a field camera. The GSTF was used for trajectory prediction in image reconstruction and for a gradient waveform pre-emphasis. As test sequences, a gradient-echo sequence with phase-encoding gradient modulation and a gradient-echo sequence with a spiral read-out trajectory were implemented and subsequently applied on a structural phantom and in vivo head measurements. Image artifacts were successfully suppressed by applying the GSTF-based pre-emphasis. Equivalent results are achieved with images acquired using GSTF-based post-correction of the trajectory as a part of image reconstruction. In contrast, the pre-emphasis approach allows reconstruction using the initially intended trajectory. The artifact suppression shown for two sequences demonstrates that the GSTF can serve for a novel pre-emphasis. A pre-emphasis based on the GSTF information can be applied to any arbitrary sequence type. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. The dynamic properties of sandwich structures based on metal-ceramic foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The present research program has studied the fracture properties of closed pore metal-ceramic foams for their potential applications as core systems in sandwich structures. The composite foams were created at Fireline, Inc. (Youngstown, OH) using the...

  5. Retention of metal-ceramic crowns with contemporary dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Zhang, Hai; Wataha, John C

    2009-09-01

    New types of crown and bridge cement are in use by practitioners, and independent studies are needed to assess their effectiveness. The authors conducted a study in three parts (study A, study B, and study C) and to determine how well these new cements retain metal-ceramic crowns. The authors prepared teeth with a 20-degree taper and a 4-millimeter length. They cast high-noble metal-ceramic copings, then fitted and cemented them with a force of 196 newtons. The types of cements they used were zinc phosphate, resin-modified glass ionomer, conventional resin and self-adhesive modified resin. They thermally cycled the cemented copings, then removed them. They recorded the removal force and calculated the stress of dislodgment by using the surface area of each preparation. They used a single-factor analysis of variance to analyze the data (alpha = .05). The mean stresses necessary to remove crowns, in megapascals, were 8.0 for RelyX Luting (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), 7.3 for RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), 5.7 for Panavia F (Kuraray America, New York) and 4.0 for Fuji Plus (GC America, Alsip, Ill.) in study A; 8.1 for RelyX Luting, 2.6 for RelyX Luting Plus (3M ESPE) and 2.8 for Fuji CEM (GC America) in study B; and 4.9 for Maxcem (Kerr, Orange, Calif.), 4.0 for BisCem (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.), 3.7 for RelyX Unicem Clicker (3M ESPE), 2.9 for iCEM (Heraeus Kulzer, Armonk, N.Y.) and 2.3 for Fleck's Zinc Cement (Keystone Industries, Cherry Hill, N.J.) in study C. Powder-liquid versions of new cements were significantly more retentive than were paste-paste versions of the same cements. The mean value of crown removal stress for the new self-adhesive modified-resin cements varied appreciably among the four cements tested. All cements retained castings as well as or better than did zinc phosphate cement. Powder-liquid versions of cements, although less convenient to mix, may be a better clinical choice when crown retention is an issue. All cements tested will retain castings

  6. Noble metal alloys for metal-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1985-10-01

    A review of the comparative characteristics and properties of noble metal alloys used for metal-ceramic restorations has been presented. Selection of an alloy for one's practice should be based on long-term clinical data, physical properties, esthetic potential, and laboratory data on metal-ceramic bond strength and thermal compatibility with commercial dental porcelains. Although gold-based alloys, such as the Au-Pt-Pd, Au-Pd-Ag, and Au-Pd classes, may appear to be costly compared with the palladium-based alloys, they have clearly established their clinical integrity and acceptability over an extended period of time. Other than the relatively low sag resistance of the high gold-low silver content alloys and the potential thermal incompatibility with some commercial porcelain products, few clinical failures have been observed. The palladium-based alloys are less costly than the gold-based alloys. Palladium-silver alloys require extra precautions to minimize porcelain discoloration. Palladium-copper and palladium-cobalt alloys may also cause porcelain discoloration, as copper and cobalt are used as colorants in glasses. The palladium-cobalt alloys are least susceptible to high-temperature creep compared with all classes of noble metals. Nevertheless, insufficient clinical data exist to advocate the general use of the palladium-copper and palladium-cobalt alloys at the present time. One should base the selection and use of these alloys in part on their ability to meet the requirements of the ADA Acceptance Program. A list of acceptable or provisionally acceptable alloys is available from the American Dental Association and is published annually in the Journal of the American Dental Association. Dentists have the legal and ethical responsibility for selection of alloys used for cast restorations. This responsibility should not be delegated to the dental laboratory technician. It is advisable to discuss the criteria for selection of an alloy with the technician and the

  7. Study of Thermal Properties of Cast Metal- Ceramic Composite Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its properties, metallic foams can be used as insulation material. Thermal properties of cast metal-ceramic composite foams have applications in transport vehicles and can act as fire resistant and acoustic insulators of bulkheads. This paper presents basic thermal properties of cast and foamed aluminum, the values of thermal conductivity coefficient of selected gases used in foaming composites and thermal capabilities of composite foams (AlSi11/SiC. A certificate of non-combustibility test of cast aluminum-ceramic foam for marine applications was included inside the paper. The composite foam was prepared by the gas injection method, consisting in direct injection of gas into liquid metal. Foams with closed and open cells were examined. The foams were foaming with foaming gas consisting of nitrogen or air. This work is one of elements of researches connected with description of properties of composite foams. In author's other works acoustic properties of these materials will be presented.

  8. Effect of Jig Design and Assessment of Stress Distribution in Testing Metal-Ceramic Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Kojima, Alberto Noriyuki; Nishioka, Renato Sussumu; Mesquita, Alfredo Mikail Melo; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Filho, Gilberto Duarte

    2016-12-01

    In testing adhesion using shear bond test, a combination of shear and tensile forces occur at the interface, resulting in complex stresses. The jig designs used for this kind of test show variations in published studies, complicating direct comparison between studies. This study evaluated the effect of different jig designs on metal-ceramic bond strength and assessed the stress distribution at the interface using finite element analysis (FEA). Metal-ceramic (Metal: Ni-Cr, Wiron 99, Bego; Ceramic: Vita Omega 900, Vita) specimens (N = 36) (diameter: 4 mm, veneer thickness: 4 mm; base diameter: 5 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were fabricated and randomly divided into three groups (n = 12 per group) to be tested using one of the following jig designs: (a) chisel (CH) (ISO 11405), (b) steel strip (SS), (c) piston (PI). Metal-ceramic interfaces were loaded under shear until debonding in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). Failure types were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FEA was used to study the stress distribution using different jigs. Metal-ceramic bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The jig type significantly affected the bond results (p = 0.0001). PI type of jig presented the highest results (MPa) (p Metal-ceramic bond strength was affected by the jig design. Accordingly, the results of in vitro studies on metal-ceramic adhesion should be evaluated with caution. When adhesion of ceramic materials to metals is evaluated in in vitro studies, it should be noted that the loading jig type affects the results. Clinical observations should report on the location and type of ceramic fractures in metal-ceramic reconstructions so that the most relevant test method can be identified. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Optimum material gradient composition for the functionally graded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the relation between the material gradient properties and the optimum sensing/actuation design of the functionally graded piezoelectric beams. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis has been employed for the prediction of an optimum composition profile in these types of sensors and ...

  10. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metalceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C, according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. Results. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p < 0.01 and elastic modulus (p < 0.001 of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Conclusion. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  11. Small scale experiments on corium-metal-ceramic interaction by oxygen diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froment, K.; Valin, F.; Seiler, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that molten oxidic corium can dissolve ceramics such as zirconia if they are in direct contact. A possibility of mitigation of this direct attack is to insert a metal layer between the ceramic and the oxidic corium. For instance, pure iron does not react with pure zirconia under inert atmosphere. However, in real reactor conditions (for core catcher applications), it is difficult to assume such an inert atmosphere : oxygen is generally present in the vessel or containment atmosphere (vapour), and also into the ceramic itself and in the molten oxidic corium layer. This oxygen may migrate through the metallic layer towards the ceramic- metal interface, form metallic oxides at this interface and then attack the ceramic. To investigate this effect, small scale experiments have been launched at CEA/Saclay. This paper first describes briefly the tests configurations and gives the main results concerning the ceramic ablation velocity. A tendency analysis based on a diffusion model of oxygen through the metallic layer and thermodynamic calculations is then introduced : estimations performed with this model are shown to provide a good order of magnitude for the zirconia dissolution velocity, taking into account the diffusion phenomena and estimations of convection which may be induced by small temperature gradients inside the crucible. A second part of the paper deals with thermodynamic estimations of the boundary oxygen potential at the metal / molten corium and metal / ceramic interfaces, which is supposed to be the driving force for the oxygen transfer through the metallic layer. Some predictions of the influence of additives into the metallic layer (chromium for instance, as an oxygen getter) on the ablation of zirconia are also examined. (orig.)

  12. Structure, chemistry and adhesion of ion-plated metal/ceramic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigsbee, J.M.; Scott, P.A.; Knipe, R.K.; Ju, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    Cu and Ti elemental films have been deposited onto cordierite-type ceramic substrates by ion-plating. This paper presents the initial results of a research program which addresses how the structure and chemistry of the metal/ceramic interface is modified as a function of the deposition process parameters and the substrate surface roughness. While evaporated Cu films on polished substrates had essentially zero adhesion, films deposited with an applied substrate bias showed increasing adhesive strength with increasing bias. Microchemical analysis indicated that this enhanced adhesion is directly correlated with the development of a chemically graded interface region. The adhesive strength of the ion plated Cu films was also found to be improved with increasing substrate smoothness. Although the generally superior adhesion of Ti was evident for films either evaporated or deposited with low bias voltage/current, this adhesion actually decreased for films deposited with high bias voltage/current. This effect results from the formation of a compound at the Ti/ceramic interface region. Results indicate that the thickness of this apparently brittle compound plays a critical role in film adhesion. (author)

  13. Free vibration of symmetric and sigmoid functionally graded nanobeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, M. A.; Eltaher, M. A.; Sadoun, A. M.; Almitani, K. H.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this paper was the investigation of vibration characteristics of both nonlinear symmetric power and sigmoid functionally graded nonlocal nanobeams. The volume fractions of metal and ceramic are assumed to be distributed through a beam thickness by sigmoid law distribution and symmetric power function. Structures with symmetric distribution with mid-plane such as ceramic-metal-ceramic and metal-ceramic-metal are proposed. Nonlocal differential Eringen's elasticity is exploited to incorporate size dependency of nanobeam. The kinematic relations of Euler-Bernoulli beam are proposed, with the assumption of a small strain. A nonlocal equation of motion of nanobeam is derived by using principle of virtual work and then discretized by finite element method to obtain numerical solution. Numerical results show the effects of the function distribution, gradient index and nonlocal parameter on natural frequencies of macro- and nanobeam. This model is helpful in the mechanical design of nanoelectromechanical systems manufactured from FGM.

  14. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiodt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns.......To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns....

  15. A Review on Functionally Gradient Materials (FGMs) and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavar, Valmik; Kattire, Prakash; Thakare, Sandeep; patil, Sachin; Singh, RKP, Dr.

    2017-09-01

    Functionally gradient materials (FGM) are innovative materials in which final properties varies gradually with dimensions. It is the recent development in traditional composite materials which retains their strengths and eliminates their weaknesses. It can be formed by varying chemical composition, microstructure or design attributes from one end to other as per requirement. This feature allows FGM to have best material properties in required quantities only where it is needed. Though there are several methods available for manufacturing FGMs, additive based metal deposition (by laser, electron beam, plasma etc.) technologies are reaping particular interest owing to their recent developments. This paper presents evolution, current status and challenges of functionally gradient materials (FGMs). Various manufacturing processes of different types of FGMs are also presented. In addition, applications of FGMs in various fields including aerospace, defence, mining, power and tools manufacturing sectors are discussed in detail.

  16. Analytical gradients for density functional calculations with approximate spin projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Toru; Thiel, Walter

    2012-11-08

    We have derived and implemented analytical gradients for broken-symmetry unrestricted density functional calculations (BS-UDFT) with removal of spin contamination by Yamaguchi's approximate spin projection method. Geometry optimizations with these analytical gradients (AGAP-opt) yield results consistent with those obtained with the previously available numerical gradients (NAP-opt). The AGAP-opt approach is found to be more precise, efficient, and robust than NAP-opt. It allows full geometry optimizations for large open-shell systems. We report results for three types of organic diradicals and for a binuclear vanadium(II) complex to demonstrate the merits of removing the spin contamination effects during geometry optimization (AGAP-opt vs BS-UDFT) and to illustrate the superior performance of the analytical gradients (AGAP-opt vs NAP-opt). The results for the vanadium(II) complex indicate that the AGAP-opt method is capable of handling pronounced spin contamination effects in large binuclear transition metal complexes with two magnetic centers.

  17. Lifetime prediction of zirconia and metal ceramic crowns loaded on marginal ridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardin, Vinicius P; de Paula, Vitor Guarconi; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G; Bonfante, Gerson

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the fatigue life of zirconia-veneered and metal-ceramic crowns comprised by an even thickness or a modified framework design when loaded on marginal ridges. Eighty marginal ridges were present after fabrication of forty molar crowns cemented onto composite-resin replicas and divided (n=20/each), in the following groups: metal-ceramic with even thickness (MCev) or with a modified framework design (MCm, lingual collar with proximal struts); porcelain-fused to zirconia with even thickness (PFZev) or with the modified framework design (PFZm). Each marginal ridge (mesial and distal) was subjected to cyclic loading separately with a lithium disilicate indenter for 10 6 cycles or until fracture. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon matched pair test (pzirconia than for metal ceramic crowns, regardless of framework design. Zirconia-veneered crowns presented decreased fracture rates compared to metal ceramics, even when loaded at marginal ridges, regardless of framework design. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Methods for surface treating metals, ceramics, and plastics before adhesive bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althouse, L.P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for pretreating the surfaces of metals, ceramics, and plastics before they are coated with adhesive and used in assembly are described. The treatments recommended have been used successfully in the laboratory at LLL. Many are used in the assembly of nuclear devices. However, an unusual alloy or complex configuration may require trials before a specific surface treatment is chosen

  19. colorimetric evaluation of Cercon zirconia and metal ceramic restorations in two thicknesses of veneering porcelain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorriz H

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of zirconia and base metal cores on the color of restorations. Furthermore, the effect of different backings on the color of cercon zirconia was evaluated."nMaterials and Methods: The specimens were Cercon zirconia and metal ceramic discs with "high Au" and "base metal" alloys. Cercon zirconia discs were veneered with veneering shade of A2 and two thickness of porcelain"n(0.7 mm, 1.2 mm. There were 3 discs in each group. Metal ceramic discs were made of "nickel-chromium" alloy (Verobond and "high Au" alloy (World 89 and two shades (A2, A3.5 and two thicknesses of veneering porcelain. 3 types of backing (high Au, nickel-chromium and A3 shade composite were made for Cercon zirconia discs. Spectrophotometric evaluation of zirconia discs (on 3 backings and metal ceramic discs was done. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for data analysis."nResults: There were no significant differences between the amounts of L*, a*, b* for Cercon zirconia on different backings (P>0.05. In comparison between different core groups, a* was significantly higher in metal ceramic groups compared with that of zirconia groups (P<0.05."nConclusion: Cercon zirconia can completely mask the underlying backing.

  20. Practice-based clinical evaluation of metal-ceramic and zirconia molar crowns: 3-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, S; Schäfer, S; Lange, K; Gersdorff, N; Roediger, M

    2013-03-01

    This practice-based study evaluates the clinical performance of conventionally luted metal-ceramic and zirconia molar crowns fabricated with pronounced anatomical core design and a prolonged cooling period of the veneering porcelain. Fifty-three patients were treated from 07/2008 until 07/2009 with either metal-ceramic crowns (MCC) (high-noble alloy + low-fusing porcelain) or zirconia crowns (Cercon System, DeguDent, Germany). Forty-nine patients (30 women/19 men) with 100 restorations (metal-ceramic: 48/zirconia: 52, mean observational period: 36·5 ± 6 months) participated in a clinical follow-up examination and were included in the study. Time-dependent survival (in situ criteria), success (event-free restorations) and chipping rates (defects of the veneering ceramics) were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method and analysed in relation to the crown fabrication technique, using a Cox regression model (P zirconia: 2) were recorded (survival rate after 3 years: metal-ceramic: 97·6%, zirconia: 95·2%). Of the metal-ceramic restorations, 90·9% remained event-free (two ceramic fractures, one endodontic treatment), whereas the success rate for the zirconia was 86·8% (two ceramic fractures, one endodontic treatment, one secondary caries). No significant differences in survival (P = 0·53), success (P = 0·49) and ceramic fracture rates (P = 0·57) were detected. The combination of a pronounced anatomical core design and a modified firing of the veneering porcelain for the fabrication of zirconia molar crowns resulted in a 3-year survival, success and chipping rate comparable to MCC. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Clinical marginal and internal fit of metal ceramic crowns fabricated with a selective laser melting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhuoli; Zhang, Lu; Zhu, Jingwei; Zhang, Xiuyin

    2015-06-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) technology has been introduced to fabricate dental restorations. However, the fit of these restorations still needs further study. The purpose of this in vivo investigation was to compare the marginal and internal fit of SLM metal ceramic crowns with 2 lost-wax cast metal ceramic crowns and to evaluate the influence of tooth type on the marginal and internal fit of these crowns. A total of 330 metal ceramic crowns were evaluated. The metal copings were fabricated with SLM Co-Cr, cast Au-Pt, and cast Co-Cr alloy (n=110). The marginal and internal gaps of crowns were recorded by using a replica technique. The anterior and premolar replicas were sectioned 2 times, and molar replicas were sectioned 4 times. The marginal and internal gap width of each cross section was examined by stereomicroscope at ×30 magnification. Two-way analysis of variance was performed to identify the statistical difference among the groups. The marginal fit of the SLM Co-Cr group (75.6 ±32.6 μm) was not different from the cast Au-Pt group (76.8 ±32.1 μm) (P>.05) but was better than the cast Co-Cr group (91.0 ±36.3 μm) (P.05). The mean occlusal gap width of the SLM Co-Cr group (309.8 ±106.6 μm) was significantly higher than that of the cast Au-Pt group (254.6 ±109.6 μm) and the cast Co-Cr group (249.6 ±110.4 μm) (P.05). Also, no significant difference was found in the axial fit among the anterior group (138.3 ±52.5 μm), the premolar group (132.9 ±50.4 μm), and the molar group (134.4 ±52.5 μm) (P>.05). The anterior group (267.6 ±110.2 μm) did not differ from the premolar group (270.2 ±112.8 μm) and the molar group (268.6 ±110.5 μm) in occlusal fit (P>.05). The marginal fit of SLM Co-Cr metal ceramic crowns was similar to that of the cast Au-Pt metal ceramic crowns and was better than that of the cast Co-Cr metal ceramic crowns. The SLM Co-Cr metal ceramic crowns were not significantly different from the 2 cast metal ceramic crowns in axial

  2. Inaudible functional MRI using a truly mute gradient echo sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcar, V.L. [University of Zurich, Department of Psychology, Neuropsychology, Treichlerstrasse 10, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland); Girard, F. [GE Medical Systems SA, 283, rue de la Miniere B.P. 34, 78533 Buc Cedex (France); Rinkel, Y.; Schneider, J.F.; Martin, E. [University Children' s Hospital, Neuroradiology and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Steinwiesstrasse 75, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-11-01

    We performed functional MRI experiments using a mute version of a gradient echo sequence on adult volunteers using either a simple visual stimulus (flicker goggles: 4 subjects) or an auditory stimulus (music: 4 subjects). Because the mute sequence delivers fewer images per unit time than a fast echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence, we explored our data using a parametric ANOVA test and a non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test in addition to performing a cross-correlation analysis. All three methods were in close agreement regarding the location of the BOLD contrast signal change. We demonstrated that, using appropriate statistical analysis, functional MRI using an MR sequence that is acoustically inaudible to the subject is feasible. Furthermore compared with the ''silent'' event-related procedures involving an EPI protocol, our mGE protocol compares favourably with respect to experiment time and the BOLD signal. (orig.)

  3. Limiting similarity and functional diversity along environmental gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwilk, D.W.; Ackerly, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in community models emphasize the importance of incorporating stochastic processes (e.g. ecological drift) in models of niche-structured community assembly. We constructed a finite, spatially explicit, lottery model to simulate the distribution of species in a one-dimensional landscape with an underlying gradient in environmental conditions. Our framework combines the potential for ecological drift with environmentally-mediated competition for space in a heterogeneous environment. We examined the influence of niche breadth, dispersal distances, community size (total number of individuals) and the breadth of the environmental gradient on levels of species and functional trait diversity (i.e. differences in niche optima). Three novel results emerge from this model: (1) niche differences between adjacent species (e.g. limiting similarity) increase in smaller communities, because of the interaction of competitive effects and finite population sizes; (2) immigration from a regional species pool, stochasticity and niche-assembly generate a bimodal distribution of species residence times ('transient' and 'resident') under a heterogeneous environment; and (3) the magnitude of environmental heterogeneity has a U-shaped effect on diversity, because of shifts in species richness of resident vs. transient species. These predictions illustrate the potential importance of stochastic (although not necessarily neutral) processes in community assembly. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  4. [Comparison of color reappearance between metal-ceram restoration and foundry-ceram restoration using crystaleye spectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tao; Zhang, Ning; Kong, Fan-wen; Zhan, De-song

    2010-10-01

    To study the color reappearance effect of metal-ceram restoration and foundry-ceram restoration using Crystaleye spectrophotometer. 58 metal-ceram restorations and 58 foundry-ceram restorations according to the result of the Crystaleye spectrophotometer were made respectively. The deltaE between restorations and natural teeth as referenced were analyzed. And satisfaction of dentists and patients were evaluated. The deltaE between metal-ceram restorations and natural teeth was 7.13 +/- 0.74. The deltaE between foundry-ceram restorations and teeth was 1.47 +/- 0.84. There were statistical differences between the deltaE (P spectrophotometer can provide accurate reference for foundry-ceram restoration, but for metal-ceram restoration it is not accurate.

  5. Electroceramic functional gradient materials. Final report 1995 - 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toft Soerensen, O. [ed.

    1999-10-01

    In this programme the research and development is focused on electroceramic materials, which are of direct interest for the Danish producers of electronic components (AMP Danmark) and ceramic gas sensors (PBI-Dansensor) as well as companies involved in development of fuel cells (Haldor Topsoee). The R and D work has been focused on strategic materials research, both application oriented and more basic research, and on development of new techniques for fabrication of EFGM (Electroceramic Functional Gradient Materials) of three types: LC circuit materials (electronic noise filters), oxides for electrochemical reactors and solid oxide fuel cell applications (SOFC) and materials (semiconductors, oxygen ion conductors) for oxygen sensors. This work has been carried out in five projects: 1) Integrated filter components; 2) Electrochemical reactor materials; 3) Oxygen sensors based on semiconductors and oxygen ion conductors; 4) Interface models - synthesis and characterisation; 5) Suppression of cracking in multilayered ceramic materials. (EHS)

  6. Similar Marginal Precision of Zirconia- and Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Maj Høygaard; Bahrami, Golnosh; Schropp, Lars

    Similar Marginal Precision of Zirconia- and Metal-Ceramic Posterior Fixed Dental Prostheses Objective: An increased gap between restoration and prepared tooth causes more luting material to be exposed to the oral environment resulting in increased deterioration, leading to bacterial accumulation...... which can cause marginal periodontitis and secondary caries. The purpose of this randomized clinical study was to compare the marginal precision of CAD/CAM Zirconia-ceramic (ZC) and cast gold alloy metal-ceramic (MC) posterior fixed dental prostheses. Methods: As part of an ongoing randomized controlled...... clinical trial, 34 patients were randomized into two groups to receive a 3-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) replacing a second premolar or a first molar. 17 ZC FDPs (BeCe CAD Zirkon, BEGO with Vita VM9, VITA ) and 17 MC FDPs (Bio PontoStar, BEGO with Vita VM13, VITA). All FDPs were made in accordance...

  7. Influence of framework design on the cervical color of metal ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniz, Gianluca; Kim, Yongjeong; Abualsaud, Haythem; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2011-11-01

    The replication of natural teeth, especially for single tooth restorations in patients with high esthetic needs, represents a challenge. The purpose of the study was to analyze the color of the cervical portion of single metal ceramic crowns fabricated with different metal framework designs. The color, as measured on the CIELAB color scale, of 3 different groups of restorations (n=10) fabricated with a high noble metal alloy (V-Deltaloy) and feldspathic porcelain (Noritake Super Porcelain) was analyzed with a colorimeter. Conventional metal ceramic crowns with metal facial margins were compared to metal ceramic crowns with porcelain facial margins and a horizontal reduction of the metal framework (1.0 mm reduction) or an additional vertical reduction (1.0 mm reduction). In all specimens, the finish line was positioned at a subgingival or equigingival level. The 6 groups obtained by the combination of the levels of the 2 factors (framework extension and finish line location) were examined with an ANOVA Fisher's F-test and a post hoc Tukey's HSD test (α=.05). The mean color difference for all the groups was clinically acceptable (ΔEcrowns showed higher differences in relation to finish line location (ΔE=2.34), while a vertical reduction of the framework was related to lower values (ΔE=0.96). Mean Lab* values were reported for all the groups of crowns. Statistically significant differences were present for L*, a*, and b* values when related to framework extension. Considering each value in relation to the interaction between framework extension and finish line location factors, significant differences were present only for L* and a* values. No significant differences in base shade were present among the investigated crowns. Nevertheless metal ceramic crowns with vertical cut-back and porcelain facial margins presented more consistent results that tended to be closer to those of natural teeth. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic

  8. Creep of crystals: High-temperature deformation processes in metals, ceramics and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, J. P.

    An introductory text describing high-temperature deformation processes in metals, ceramics, and minerals is presented. Among the specific topics discussed are: the mechanical aspects of crystal deformation; lattice defects; and phenomenological and thermodynamical analysis of quasi-steady-state creep. Consideration is also given to: dislocation creep models; the effect of hydrostatic pressure on deformation; creep polygonization; and dynamic recrystallization. The status of experimental techniques for the study of transformation plasticity in crystals is also discussed.

  9. Twenty-year follow-up of metal-ceramic single crowns: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näpänkangas, Ritva; Raustia, Aune

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this clinical retrospective study was to evaluate the survival and success of single metal-ceramic crowns after 20 years. The biologic and technical complications as well as patient satisfaction were recorded. Fifty patients treated with 100 single metal-ceramic crowns attended the clinical 20-year follow-up examination. The mean follow-up time was 18.8 years (17.5 to 20.5 years). Twenty-one teeth with single crowns were extracted because of root fractures or esthetic or periodontal reasons. Ninety-seven percent of the subjects had no complaints about the esthetics of the crowns. The most common clinical findings were supragingival crown margins caused by gingival recessions, gingival bleeding on probing, and occlusal wear in opposing teeth. The success of the crowns after 20 years was 75%, and the survival was 78%. In the 20-year follow-up of single metal-ceramic crowns, there were few biologic and technical complications, and patients were satisfied with the crowns. Crown removal was in most cases the result of root fractures in single crowns with endodontic posts.

  10. Fracture of a metal/ceramic couple: Tantalum[titanium]/sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the fracture behavior of a model metal/ceramic diffusion bonded couple was performed using the system Ta[Ti]/Al 2 O 3 . Residual stress cracking due to thermal expansion misfit between the metal and ceramic was examined. Depending on composition, the alloy could have a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) greater than or less than that of the sapphire. When the CTE of the alloy was greater than that of the sapphire, cracking occurred in the ceramic upon cooling down from bonding temperatures. Conversely, when the CTE of the metal was less than the sapphire, failure occurred along the metal/ceramic interface. Mechanical test specimens were fabricated in order to study fracture along a metal/ceramic interface containing reaction products. The formation of these reaction products was in accord with the Ti-Ta-Al ternary phase diagram. Concentration profiles were measured in the TEM and allowed for interdiffusion coefficients in the α 2 phase at 900 C to be determined

  11. Metal-ceramic bond strength of Co-Cr alloy fabricated by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Nan; Xin, Xian-Zhen; Chen, Jie; Wei, Bin

    2012-06-01

    This study was to evaluated the metal-ceramic bond strength of a Co-Cr dental alloy prepared using a selective laser melting (SLM) technique. Two groups comprised of twenty Co-Cr metal bars each were prepared using either a SLM or traditional lost-wax casting method. Ten bars from each group were moulded into standard ISO 9693:1999 dimensions of 25 mm × 3 mm × 0.5 mm with 1.1 mm of porcelain fused onto an 8 mm × 3 mm rectangular area in the centre of each bar. Metal-ceramic bonding was assessed using a three-point bending test. Fracture mode analysis and area fraction of adherence porcelain (AFAP) were determined by measuring Si content of specimens by SEM/EDS. Student's t-test within the groups demonstrated no significant difference for the mean bond strength between the SLM and traditional cast sample groups. While SEM/EDS analysis indicated a mixed fracture mode on the debonding interface of both the SLM and the cast groups, the SLM group showed significantly more porcelain adherence than the control group (p<0.05). The SLM metal-ceramic system exhibited a bonding strength that exceeds the requirement of ISO 9691:1999(E) and it even showed a better behaviour in porcelain adherence test comparable to traditional cast methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical study to evaluate the wear of natural enamel antagonist to zirconia and metal ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhe, Kailas; Jain, Veena; Pruthi, Gunjan; Shah, Naseem

    2015-09-01

    Tooth wear is a complex process, which, if not prevented, may adversely affect the integrity of the stomatognathic system. Different restorative dental materials may affect the amount of wear on natural enamel antagonists. The purpose of this in vivo study was to evaluate and compare the wear of enamel opposing natural enamel, zirconia, and metal ceramic crowns after 1 year. Ten participants between 18 and 35 years of age requiring 2 complete crowns, 1 on either side of maxillary or mandibular molar region, and having healthy natural teeth in the opposing arch were selected. For each participant, 1 monolithic polished zirconia crown and 1 glazed metal ceramic crown were fabricated and cemented. To evaluate the wear of the antagonistic natural enamel (premolar and molar), polyvinyl siloxane impressions were made immediately (baseline) and at 1 year after cementation. The wear of natural enamel against natural enamel was evaluated as the control. The resulting casts were scanned (using a 3D white light scanner), and 3D software was used to calculate the maximum amount of linear wear. One-way repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to analyze data. Mean ±SD occlusal wear of the antagonistic enamel 1 year after the cementation of metal ceramic crowns was 69.20 ±4.10 μm for premolar teeth and 179.70 ±8.09 μm for molar teeth, whereas for zirconia crowns, it was 42.10 ±4.30 μm for premolar teeth and 127.00 ±5.03 μm for molar teeth. Occlusal wear of natural enamel opposing natural enamel was 17.30 ±1.88 μm in the premolar region and 35.10 ±2.60 μm in the molar region. The Bonferroni post hoc test revealed that the occlusal wear of antagonistic enamel 1 year after the cementation of a metal ceramic crown was significantly higher (Pzirconia crown or natural enamel. Zirconia crowns led to less wear of antagonist enamel than metal ceramic crowns, but more than natural enamel. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by

  13. Surface analysis applied to metal-ceramic and bioceramic interfacial bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, R.St.C.; Arora, P.S.; Steveson, M.; Kawashima, N.; Cavallaro, G.P.; Ming, H.; Skinner, W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Low temperature plasma reactions, combined with sol-gel coatings, have been used to produce a variety of ceramic surface layers on metal substrates and interfacial layers between metals and oxides or other ceramics. These layers can be designed to be compositionally and functionally graded from the metal to bulk ceramic material, eg. silica, alumina, hydroxyapatite. The graded layers are generally <50nm thick, continuous, fully bonded to the substrate and deformable without disbonding. The objectives in design of these layers have been to produce: metal surfaces protected from oxidation, corrosion and acid attack; improved metal-ceramic bonding; and bioceramic titanium-based interfaces to bioactive hydroxyapatite for improved dental and medical implants. Modified Auger parameter studies for Si in XPS spectra show that the structure on the metal surfaces grades from amorphous, dehydroxylated silica on the outer surface through layer silicates, chain silicates, pyrosilicates to orthosilicates close to the metal interface. At the metal interface, detached grains of the metal are imaged with interpenetration of the oxide and silicate species linking the layer to the oxidised metal surface. The ∼30nm layer has a substantially increased frictional load compared with the untreated oxidised metal, i.e. behaviour consistent with either stronger adhesion of the coating to the substrate or a harder surface. The composition, structure and thickness of these layers can be controlled by the duration of each plasma reaction and the choice of the final reagent. The mechanisms of reaction in each process step have been elucidated with a combination of XPS, TOF-SIMS, TEM, SEM and FTIR. Similar, graded titanium/oxide/silicate/silica ceramic surface layers have been shown to form using the low temperature plasma reactions on titanium alloys used in medical and dental implants. Thicker (i.e. μm) overlayers of ceramic materials can be added to the graded surface layers

  14. A functionally gradient variational porosity architecture for hollowed scaffolds fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoda, A K M; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Koc, Bahattin

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a novel continuous tool-path planning methodology for hollowed scaffold fabrication in tissue engineering. A new functionally gradient porous architecture is proposed with a continuous material deposition planning scheme. A controllable variational pore size and hence the porosity have been achieved with a combination of two geometrically oriented consecutive layers. The desired porosity has been achieved with consecutive layers by geometrically partitioning each layer into sub-regions based on the area and the tissue scaffold design constraints. A continuous, interconnected and optimized tool-path for layers has been generated for a three-dimensional biomaterial deposition/printing process. A zigzag pattern tool-path has been proposed for an accumulated sub-region layer, and a concentric spiral-like optimal tool-path pattern has been generated for the successive layer to ensure continuity along the structure. Three-dimensional layers, formed by the proposed tool-path plan, vary the pore size and the porosity based on the biological and mechanical requirements. Several examples demonstrate the proposed methodology along with illustrative results. Also a comparative study between the proposed design and conventional Cartesian coordinate scaffolds has been performed. The results demonstrate a significant reduction in design error with the proposed method. Moreover, sample examples have been fabricated using a micro-nozzle biomaterial deposition system, and characterized for validation.

  15. Randomized Clinical Trial of Implant-Supported Ceramic-Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Clark, Arthur E.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the survival rates over time of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic prostheses as a function of core-veneer thickness ratio, gingival connector embrasure design, and connector height. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study involving 55 patients missing three teeth in either one or two posterior areas. These patients (34 women; 21 men; age range 52–75 years) were recruited for the study to receive a 3-unit implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Two implants were placed for each of the 72 FDPs in the study. The implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech), which were made of titanium, were grit blasted. A gold-shaded, custom-milled titanium abutment (Atlantis, Astra Tech), was secured to each implant body. Each of the 72 FDPs in 55 patients were randomly assigned based on one of the following options: (1) A. Material: ceramic-ceramic (Yttria-stabilized zirconia core, pressable fluorapatite glass-ceramic, IPS e.max ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar Vivadent) B. metal-ceramic (palladium-based noble alloy, Capricorn, Ivoclar Vivadent, with press-on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic veneer, IPS InLine POM, Ivoclar Vivadent); (2) occlusal veneer thickness (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm); (3) curvature of gingival embrasure (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mm diameter); and (4) connector height (3, 4, and 5 mm). FDPs were fabricated and cemented with dual-cure resin cement (RelyX, Universal Cement, 3M ESPE). Patients were recalled at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. FDPs were examined for cracks, fracture, and general surface quality. Results Recall exams of 72 prostheses revealed 10 chipping fractures. No fractures occurred within the connector or embrasure areas. Two-sided Fisher’s exact tests showed no significant correlation between fractures and type of material system (p = 0.51), veneer thickness (p = 0.75), radius of curvature of gingival embrasure

  16. Outcome of bonded vs all-ceramic and metal- ceramic fixed prostheses for single tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The conventional treatment of a single missing tooth is most frequently based on the provision of a fixed dental prosthesis (FDPs). A variety of designs and restorative materials are available which have an impact on the treatment outcome. Consequently, it was the aim of this review to compare resin-bonded, all-ceramic and metal-ceramic FDPs based on existing evidence. An electronic literature search using "metal-ceramic" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, all-ceramic" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, resin-bonded" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, fiber reinforced composite" AND "clinical, monolithic" AND "zirconia" AND "clinical" was conducted and supplemented by the manual searching of bibliographies from articles already included. A total of 258 relevant articles were identified. Metal-ceramic FDPs still show the highest survival rates of all tooth-supported restorations. Depending on the ceramic system used, all-ceramic restorations may reach comparable survival rates while the technical complications, i.e. chipping fractures of veneering materials in particular, are more frequent. Resin-bonded FDPs can be seen as long-term provisional restorations with the survival rate being higher in anterior locations and when a cantilever design is applied. Inlay-retained FDPs and the use of fiber-reinforced composites overall results in a compromised long-term prognosis. Recently advocated monolithic zirconia restorations bear the risk of low temperature degradation. Several variables affect treatment planning for a given patient situation, with survival and success rates of different restorative options representing only one factor. The broad variety of designs and materials available for conventional tooth-supported restorations should still be considered as a viable treatment option for single tooth replacement.

  17. Correlation between metal-ceramic bond strength and coefficient of linear thermal expansion difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Crosara Lopes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond strength (MCBS of 6 metal-ceramic pairs (2 Ni-Cr alloys and 1 Pd-Ag alloy with 2 dental ceramics and correlate the MCBS values with the differences between the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CTEs of the metals and ceramics. Verabond (VB Ni-Cr-Be alloy, Verabond II (VB2, Ni-Cr alloy, Pors-on 4 (P, Pd-Ag alloy, and IPS (I and Duceram (D ceramics were used for the MCBS test and dilatometric test. Forty-eight ceramic rings were built around metallic rods (3.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length made from the evaluated alloys. The rods were subsequently embedded in gypsum cast in order to perform a tensile load test, which enabled calculating the CMBS. Five specimens (2.0 mm in diameter and 12.0 mm in length of each material were made for the dilatometric test. The chromel-alumel thermocouple required for the test was welded into the metal test specimens and inserted into the ceramics. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed significant differences (p=0.01 for the MCBS test results (MPa, with PI showing higher MCBS (67.72 than the other pairs, which did not present any significant differences. The CTE (10-6 oC-1 differences were: VBI (0.54, VBD (1.33, VB2I (-0.14, VB2D (0.63, PI (1.84 and PD (2.62. Pearson's correlation test (r=0.17 was performed to evaluate of correlation between MCBS and CTE differences. Within the limitations of this study and based on the obtained results, there was no correlation between MCBS and CTE differences for the evaluated metal-ceramic pairs.

  18. Correlation between metal-ceramic bond strength and coefficient of linear thermal expansion difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Stella Crosara; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Rollo, João Manuel Domingos de Almeida; Leal, Mônica Barbosa; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond strength (MCBS) of 6 metal-ceramic pairs (2 Ni-Cr alloys and 1 Pd-Ag alloy with 2 dental ceramics) and correlate the MCBS values with the differences between the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CTEs) of the metals and ceramics. Verabond (VB) Ni-Cr-Be alloy, Verabond II (VB2), Ni-Cr alloy, Pors-on 4 (P), Pd-Ag alloy, and IPS (I) and Duceram (D) ceramics were used for the MCBS test and dilatometric test. Forty-eight ceramic rings were built around metallic rods (3.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length) made from the evaluated alloys. The rods were subsequently embedded in gypsum cast in order to perform a tensile load test, which enabled calculating the CMBS. Five specimens (2.0 mm in diameter and 12.0 mm in length) of each material were made for the dilatometric test. The chromel-alumel thermocouple required for the test was welded into the metal test specimens and inserted into the ceramics. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed significant differences (p=0.01) for the MCBS test results (MPa), with PI showing higher MCBS (67.72) than the other pairs, which did not present any significant differences. The CTE (10(-6) oC(-1)) differences were: VBI (0.54), VBD (1.33), VB2I (-0.14), VB2D (0.63), PI (1.84) and PD (2.62). Pearson's correlation test (r=0.17) was performed to evaluate of correlation between MCBS and CTE differences. Within the limitations of this study and based on the obtained results, there was no correlation between MCBS and CTE differences for the evaluated metal-ceramic pairs.

  19. Comparison of the fracture strengths of metal-ceramic crowns and three ceromer crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chul-Whoi; Park, Sang-Won; Yang, Hong-So

    2002-08-01

    The fracture strength of a number of new ceromer systems for the fabrication of anterior fixed partial dentures is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture strengths of metal-ceramic crowns and 3 types of ceromer crowns in a simulated anterior tooth preparation. A resin maxillary central incisor analog was prepared with a 5-degree convergence angle and a 90-degree, 1-mm shoulder. The incisal edge was reduced by 2 mm, and the axiogingival and axioincisal line angles were rounded. A mold of this tooth was made with vinyl polysiloxane impression material. Ten wax patterns were made from the mold and cast in a nickel-chromium alloy for the fabrication of metal dies, from which 10 metal-ceramic crowns were fabricated. Ten crowns for each of 3 ceromer systems (Artglass, Sculpture, and Targis) were fabricated from the same metal die. Each crown group was prepared, polymerized, air-particle abraded, and finished in accordance with the specific manufacturer's instructions. All 4 types of finished crowns were luted to the dies and embedded in polymethyl methacrylate resin blocks. Their fracture resistance was tested in a universal testing machine. The load was directed at the incisolingual line angle, at 130 degrees to the long axis of each specimen, until catastrophic failure occurred. A 7-mm-diameter rod was used to load the artificial crowns, with the center of the rod in contact with the crown surfaces. Analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple comparisons test (Pceromer crowns (1317 vs 602 N, respectively) (Pceromer crowns tested, although significantly lower than the values for metal-ceramic crowns, still exceeded normal occlusal forces.

  20. CORRELATION BETWEEN METAL-CERAMIC BOND STRENGTH AND COEFFICIENT OF LINEAR THERMAL EXPANSION DIFFERENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Stella Crosara; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Rollo, João Manuel Domingos de Almeida; Leal, Mônica Barbosa; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond strength (MCBS) of 6 metal-ceramic pairs (2 Ni-Cr alloys and 1 Pd-Ag alloy with 2 dental ceramics) and correlate the MCBS values with the differences between the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CTEs) of the metals and ceramics. Verabond (VB) Ni-Cr-Be alloy, Verabond II (VB2), Ni-Cr alloy, Pors-on 4 (P), Pd-Ag alloy, and IPS (I) and Duceram (D) ceramics were used for the MCBS test and dilatometric test. Forty-eight ceramic rings were built around metallic rods (3.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length) made from the evaluated alloys. The rods were subsequently embedded in gypsum cast in order to perform a tensile load test, which enabled calculating the CMBS. Five specimens (2.0 mm in diameter and 12.0 mm in length) of each material were made for the dilatometric test. The chromel-alumel thermocouple required for the test was welded into the metal test specimens and inserted into the ceramics. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed significant differences (p=0.01) for the MCBS test results (MPa), with PI showing higher MCBS (67.72) than the other pairs, which did not present any significant differences. The CTE (10-6 °C-1) differences were: VBI (0.54), VBD (1.33), VB2I (-0.14), VB2D (0.63), PI (1.84) and PD (2.62). Pearson's correlation test (r=0.17) was performed to evaluate of correlation between MCBS and CTE differences. Within the limitations of this study and based on the obtained results, there was no correlation between MCBS and CTE differences for the evaluated metal-ceramic pairs. PMID:19274398

  1. High cycle fatigue study of metal-ceramic co-continuous composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavese, Matteo [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, 10129 Turin (Italy)]. E-mail: matteo.pavese@polito.it; Fino, Paolo [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, 10129 Turin (Italy); Ugues, Daniele [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, 10129 Turin (Italy); Badini, Claudio [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    Co-continuous metal-ceramic composites synthesised by the reactive metal penetration method, starting from silica prms and a 99.5% pure aluminium alloy, were characterised in high cycle tension-compression fatigue. The tests were performed at ambient temperature, in load control and with R = -1; the fracture surfaces were observed in a scanning electron microscope. The Woehler curve is rather flat, suggesting that these composites behave similarly to ceramics, and the fatigue limit at 10{sup 7} cycles is 91 MPa.

  2. Magnetron deposition of metal-ceramic protective coatings on glasses of windows of space vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Sergeev, Viktor Petrovich; Panin, Viktor Evgenyevich; Psakhie, Sergey Grigorievich; Chernyavskii, Alexandr; Svechkin, Valerii; Khristenko, Yurii; Kalashnikov, Mark Petrovich; Voronov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Transparent refractory metal-ceramic nanocomposite coatings with a high coefficient of elasticrecovery and microhardness on the basis of Ni/Si-Al-N are formed on a glass substrate by the pulse magnetron deposition method. The structure-phase states were investigated by TEM, SEM. It was established that the first layer consists of Ni nanograins with a fcc crystalline lattice, the second layer is two-phase: 5-10 nm nanocrystallites of the AlN phase with the hcp crystalline lattice in amorphous ...

  3. Differences in forest plant functional trait distributions across land-use and productivity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret M. Mayfield; John M. Dwyer; Loic Chalmandrier; Jessie A. Wells; Stephen P. Bonser; Carla P. Catterall; Fabrice DeClerck; Yi Ding; Jennifer M. Fraterrigo; Daniel J. Metcalfe; Cibele Queiroz; Peter A. Vesk; John W. Morgan

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of study: Plant functional traits are commonly used as proxies for plant responses to environmental challenges, yet few studies have explored how functional trait distributions differ across gradients of land-use change. By comparing trait distributions in intact forests with those across land-use change gradients, we can improve our understanding of the ways...

  4. [Clinical evaluation of the possibilities of restoring the dental and periodontal esthetics using veneers vs. metal ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poroch, Livia; Forna, Norina Consuela

    2010-01-01

    Achiving the esthetic balance is one of the most important aims of the restorations used for the anterior area of the dental arches. To evaluate the possibilities of veneers and metal ceramic crowns to restore dental and periodontal esthetics. We have evaluated 90 restorations, 40 veneers and 50 metal ceramic crowns, analysing the following parametres: gingival index, bleeding index, plaque index, also restorations margins index, presence/absence of secondary decays, marginal integrity index and the aspect of the restorations surfaces. The study also evaluates patient satisfaction using questionares. Even the veneers seem to be more indicated to restore dental and periodontal esthetics, the esthetic outcome depends mainly on the way the clinician evaluates and manages the tissues and less on the technique used (all ceramic or metal ceramic).

  5. Wear Behavior and Self Tribofilm Formation of Infiltration-Type TiC/FeCrWMoV Metal Ceramics Under Dry Sliding Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yanjun; Yang, Zhenyu; Han, Liying

    2015-01-01

    A new type high temperature self-lubrication TiC/FeCrWMoV metal ceramic was fabricated successfully by applying an innovating technology which molten solid lubricant (60Pb40Sn-15Ag-0.5RE) was infiltrated into metal ceramic preforms with an interpenetrating network using a vacuum high pressure...

  6. Experimental Investigations on the Influence of Adhesive Oxides on the Metal-Ceramic Bond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Enghardt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to test the influence of selected base metals, which act as oxide formers, on the metal-ceramic bond of dental veneer systems. Using ion implantation techniques, ions of Al, In and Cu were introduced into near-surface layers of a noble metal alloy containing no base metals. A noble metal alloy with base metals added for oxide formation was used as a reference. Both alloys were coated with a low-temperature fusing dental ceramic. Specimens without ion implantation or with Al2O3 air abrasion were used as controls. The test procedures comprised the Schwickerath shear bond strength test (ISO 9693-1, profile height (surface roughness measurements (ISO 4287; ISO 4288; ISO 25178, scanning electron microscopy (SEM imaging, auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. Ion implantation resulted in no increase in bond strength. The highest shear bond strengths were achieved after oxidation in air and air abrasion with Al2O3 (41.5 MPa and 47.8 MPa respectively. There was a positive correlation between shear bond strength and profile height. After air abrasion, a pronounced structuring of the surface occurred compared to ion implantation. The established concentration shifts in alloy and ceramic could be reproduced. However, their positive effects on shear bond strength were not confirmed. The mechanical bond appears to be of greater importance for metal-ceramic bonding.

  7. Gradient approximated exchange energy functionals with improved performances for two-dimensional quantum dot systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Subrata; Patra, Abhilash; Samal, Prasanjit

    2018-03-01

    Semilocal exchange-correlation functionals are frequently used to accurately describe the complex many-electron effects of two-dimensional quantum systems. Most of these functionals are designed using the reduced density gradient as the main ingredient. A semilocal functional for the exchange and the corresponding enhancement factor is constructed using the inhomogeneity parameter of the generalized gradient approximations by analyzing the small and large-density gradient expansion of the exchange hole. This exchange functional significantly reduces the error compared to the existing gradient approximations. Performance of the proposed semilocal functional is demonstrated by considering parabolic and Gaussian quantum dots with varying particle number and confinement strength. The results are also compared with that of the exact exchange formalism by considering it as the standard.

  8. Probability of survival of implant-supported metal ceramic and CAD/CAM resin nanoceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante, Estevam A; Suzuki, Marcelo; Lorenzoni, Fábio C; Sena, Lídia A; Hirata, Ronaldo; Bonfante, Gerson; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the probability of survival and failure modes of implant-supported resin nanoceramic relative to metal-ceramic crowns. Resin nanoceramic molar crowns (LU) (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE, USA) were milled and metal-ceramic (MC) (Co-Cr alloy, Wirobond C+, Bego, USA) with identical anatomy were fabricated (n=21). The metal coping and a burnout-resin veneer were created by CAD/CAM, using an abutment (Stealth-abutment, Bicon LLC, USA) and a milled crown from the LU group as models for porcelain hot-pressing (GC-Initial IQ-Press, GC, USA). Crowns were cemented, the implants (n=42, Bicon) embedded in acrylic-resin for mechanical testing, and subjected to single-load to fracture (SLF, n=3 each) for determination of step-stress profiles for accelerated-life testing in water (n=18 each). Weibull curves (50,000 cycles at 200N, 90% CI) were plotted. Weibull modulus (m) and characteristic strength (η) were calculated and a contour plot used (m versus η) for determining differences between groups. Fractography was performed in SEM and polarized-light microscopy. SLF mean values were 1871N (±54.03) for MC and 1748N (±50.71) for LU. Beta values were 0.11 for MC and 0.49 for LU. Weibull modulus was 9.56 and η=1038.8N for LU, and m=4.57 and η=945.42N for MC (p>0.10). Probability of survival (50,000 and 100,000 cycles at 200 and 300N) was 100% for LU and 99% for MC. Failures were cohesive within LU. In MC crowns, porcelain veneer fractures frequently extended to the supporting metal coping. Probability of survival was not different between crown materials, but failure modes differed. In load bearing regions, similar reliability should be expected for metal ceramics, known as the gold standard, and resin nanoceramic crowns over implants. Failure modes involving porcelain veneer fracture and delamination in MC crowns are less likely to be successfully repaired compared to cohesive failures in resin nanoceramic material. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials

  9. 21 CFR 888.3353 - Hip joint metal/ceramic/polymer semi-constrained cemented or nonporous uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented or nonporous uncemented prosthesis. 888.3353 Section 888.3353 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/ceramic/polymer semi-constrained cemented or nonporous uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a hip joint. This device limits...

  10. Post-fatigue fracture resistance of metal core crowns: press-on metal ceramic versus a conventional veneering system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solá-Ruiz, M Fernanda; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Campos-Estellés, Carlos; Labaig-Rueda, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the mechanical failure behavior and to analyze fracture characteristics of metal ceramic crowns with two veneering systems - press-on metal (PoM) ceramic versus a conventional veneering system - subjected to static compressive loading. Forty-six crowns were constructed and divided into two groups according to porcelain veneer manufacture. Group A: 23 metal copings with porcelain IPS-InLine veneering (conventional metal ceramic). Group B: 23 metal copings with IPS-InLine PoM veneering porcelain. After 120,000 fatigue cycles, the crowns were axially loaded to the moment of fracture with a universal testing machine. The fractured specimens were examined under optical stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscope. Fracture resistance values showed statistically significant differences (Student's t-test) regarding the type of ceramic veneering technique (p=0.001): Group A (conventional metal ceramics) obtained a mean fracture resistance of 1933.17 N, and Group B 1325.74N (Press-on metal ceramics). The most common type of fracture was adhesive failure (with metal exposure) (p=0.000). Veneer porcelain fractured on the occlusal surface following a radial pattern. Metal ceramic crowns made of IPS InLine or IPS InLine PoM ceramics with different laboratory techniques all achieved above-average values for clinical survival in the oral environment according to ISO 6872. Crowns made with IPS InLine by conventional technique resisted fracture an average of 45% more than IPS InLine PoM fabricated with the press-on technique. Key words:Mechanical failure, conventional feldspathic, pressable ceramic, chewing simulator, thermocycling, compressive testing, fracture types, scanning electron microscope.

  11. Metal/ceramic X-ray tubes for non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartl, W.; Peter, D.; Reiber, K.

    1984-01-01

    As a wall material for X-ray tubes, glass has a number of disadvantages. The tube is relatively fragile, charge builds up on the tube wall, and current poths may form due to ''hopping'' of electrons. These problems can be avoided by means of metal/ceramic technology and an improved tube geometry. In a new generation of X-ray tubes for macroscopic testing of materials it has been possible to halve the linear dimensions and to reduce the weight to a quarter of that of conventional tubes with a glass wall. The new tubes have an earthed metal wall, so that there was no need for insulating oil around the tube. Typical examples of applications of the new tubes are presented. (orig.) [de

  12. Direct conversion of radioactive and chemical waste containing metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (CMODS) is a new process for direct conversion of radioactive, mixed, and chemical wastes to glass. The wastes can be in the chemical forms of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics. GMODS destroys organics and it incorporates heavy metals and radionuclides into a glass. Processable wastes may include miscellaneous spent fuels (SF), SF hulls and hardware, plutonium wastes in different forms, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, ion-exchange resins, failed equipment, and laboratory wastes. Thermodynamic calculations indicate theoretical feasibility. Small-scale laboratory experiments (< 100 g per test) have demonstrated chemical laboratory feasibility for several metals. Additional work is needed to demonstrate engineering feasibility

  13. Optimum material gradient composition for the functionally graded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Functionally graded piezoelectric actuators can produce not only large displacements but also reduce the internal stress concentrations and consequently improve significantly the lifetime of piezoelectric actuators. Now, the functionally graded piezoelectric materials, as intelligent materials, have been used extensively in.

  14. Electrophoretic Deposition for the Fabrication of High-Performance Metal-Ceramic Hybrid Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Junghwan; Jung, Yangil; Park, Dongjun; Kim, Hyungil; Park, Jeongyong; Koo, Yanghyun

    2014-01-01

    Metal-ceramic hybrid cladding consisting of a Zr liner and SiC f /SiC composite is one of the candidate systems. To achieve a high-performance metal-ceramic hybrid cladding, it is important to synthesize the SiC f /SiC composites with high flexural strength. The most common interphases, such as pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and boron nitride (BN) coating, have been applied on the surface of SiC fibers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). In addition, the SiC matrix phase for SiC f /SiC composites has been commonly formed by CVI and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP), which are very costly and complicated processes. For this reason, the fabrication process of SiC f /SiC composites that is low-cost and simple has been strongly needed. In this study, weak phase coating using a commercial colloidal carbon black suspension was performed on SiC fibers through electrophoretic deposition (EPD), and carbon-coated SiC f /SiC composites were fabricated by EPD. The mechanical properties at room temperature were evaluated to investigate the effect of the carbon interfacial layer on the mechanical properties of carbon-coated SiC f /SiC composites. In this study, it was concluded that the EPD method is effective for homogeneous carbon black coating on SiC fibers, and that the carbon coating layer on SiC fibers plays an important role in optimizing the interface between fibers and the matrix, and enhances the toughness of carbon-coated SiC f /SiC composites during fracture

  15. Internal fit of two all-ceramic systems and metal-ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Moura Martins

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the internal fit (IF of glass-infiltrated alumina (ICA - In-Ceram Alumina, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP - IPS e.max ZirCAD, and metal-ceramic (MC - Ni-Cr alloy crowns. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty standardized resin-tooth replicas of a maxillary first molar were produced for crown placement and divided into 3 groups (n=20 each according to the core material used (metal, ICA or Y-TZP. The IF of the crowns was measured using the replica technique, which employs a light body polyvinyl siloxane impression material to simulate the cement layer thickness. The data were analyzed according to the surfaces obtained for the occlusal space (OS, axial space (AS and total mean (TM using two-way ANOVA with Tukey ’s multiple comparison test (p<0.05. RESULTS: No differences among the different areas were detected in the MC group. For the Y-TZP and ICA groups, AS was statistically lower than both OS and TM. No differences in AS were observed among the groups. However, OS and TM showed significantly higher values for ICA and Y-TZP groups than MC group. Comparisons of ICA and Y-TZP revealed that OS was significantly lower for Y-TZP group, whereas no differences were observed for TM. CONCLUSIONS: The total mean achieved by all groups was within the range of clinical acceptability. However, the metal-ceramic group demonstrated significantly lower values than the all-ceramic groups, especially in OS.

  16. Microleakage of Four Dental Cements in Metal Ceramic Restorations With Open Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Farzaneh, Babak; Azarsina, Mohadese; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima; Afshari, Aisooda; Mahshid, Minu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed prosthodontics is a routine dental treatment and microleakage is a major cause of its failure. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the marginal microleakage of four cements in metal ceramic restorations with adapted and open margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty sound human premolars were selected for this experimental study performed in Tehran, Iran and prepared for full-crown restorations. Wax patterns were formed leaving a 300 µm gap on one of the proximal margins. The crowns were cast and the samples were randomly divided into four groups based on the cement used. Copings were cemented using zinc phosphate cement (Fleck), Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer, Panavia F2.0 resin cement, or G-Cem resin cement, according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution. After 24 hours, dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope and analyzed using the respective software. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, paired t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The least microleakage occurred in the Panavia F2.0 group (closed margin, 0.18 mm; open margin, 0.64 mm) and the maximum was observed in the Fleck group (closed margin, 1.92 mm; open margin, 3.32 mm). The Fleck group displayed significantly more microleakage compared to the Fuji Plus and Panavia F2.0 groups (P cement exhibited better sealing ability in closed and open margins compared to G-Cem and Fleck cements. When using G-Cem and Fleck cements for full metal ceramic restorations, clinicians should try to minimize marginal gaps in order to reduce restoration failure. In situations where there are doubts about perfect marginal adaptation, the use of Fuji Plus cement may be helpful. PMID:26730349

  17. Gold-functionalized DNAzyme Nanosensors to Quantify Heavy Metal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaens, P.; Vannela, R.

    2005-12-01

    The presence of heavy metals in environmental systems is characterized by steep gradients due to the presence of solid and soluble redox species. The capability to selectively quantify low concentrations of individual redox species continues to present a challenge for site characterization and risk assessment. Recently, DNAzymes, single-stranded DNA molecules with catalytic capabilities that are isolated from random-sequence DNA libraries by ``in vitro selection'', have come to the fore as unique molecular tools for metal detection in aqueous environment. Here we describe the selection and characterization of an RNA-cleaving autocatalytic DNAzyme that links chemical catalysis with real-time fluorescence signaling in the single molecule. From a random pool of 40-nt templates, we have isolated Hg-active DNAzymes using in vitro selection procedures in combination with non-homologous random recombination (NRR). However, significant cleavage was seen for DNA sequences isolated in generation G5. By G8 cycle, more than 32% of the DNA construct was cleaved after 3-h incubation. After eight rounds of selection and amplification, the amount of eluted DNA after respective reaction was found to produce active sequences leading to 32 % catalysis. The introduction of nonhomologous random recombination at 9th cycle yielded drastic increase in catalysis to 55% of the total oligonucleotide pool. DNA sequences from the 9th round of selection (G9) were amplified by PCR and cloned into a vector. DNA sequencing was performed and the M-fold software revealed variety of different families of sequences in the active pool - with DNA-010 sequence being dominant in each family. Similar experiments conducted with As5+ and selection did not show any cleavage until the 8th cycle, with cleavage increasing to 18 % at 14th cycle. Since the catalytic activity can be characterized in terms of metal specificity, speciation and affinity, the catalytic DNA serves as a sensor for a variety of metal ion

  18. A Novel Gradient Vector Flow Snake Model Based on Convex Function for Infrared Image Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Shiping; Zhou, Qin

    2016-10-21

    Infrared image segmentation is a challenging topic because infrared images are characterized by high noise, low contrast, and weak edges. Active contour models, especially gradient vector flow, have several advantages in terms of infrared image segmentation. However, the GVF (Gradient Vector Flow) model also has some drawbacks including a dilemma between noise smoothing and weak edge protection, which decrease the effect of infrared image segmentation significantly. In order to solve this problem, we propose a novel generalized gradient vector flow snakes model combining GGVF (Generic Gradient Vector Flow) and NBGVF (Normally Biased Gradient Vector Flow) models. We also adopt a new type of coefficients setting in the form of convex function to improve the ability of protecting weak edges while smoothing noises. Experimental results and comparisons against other methods indicate that our proposed snakes model owns better ability in terms of infrared image segmentation than other snakes models.

  19. Origination and immigration drive latitudinal gradients in marine functional diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Berke

    Full Text Available Global patterns in the functional attributes of organisms are critical to understanding biodiversity trends and predicting biotic responses to environmental change. In the first global marine analysis, we find a strong decrease in functional richness, but a strong increase in functional evenness, with increasing latitude using intertidal-to-outer-shelf bivalves as a model system (N = 5571 species. These patterns appear to be driven by the interplay between variation in origination rates among functional groups, and latitudinal patterns in origination and range expansion, as documented by the rich fossil record of the group. The data suggest that (i accumulation of taxa in spatial bins and functional categories has not impeded continued diversification in the tropics, and (ii extinctions will influence ecosystem function differentially across latitudes.

  20. Dynamics of environmental gradients on plant functional groups ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Importance values (IV) of every dominant and companion species in plant functional groups composition were calculated and the correlation between elevation and species IV was analyzed. We showed that elevation was the most important environmental factor affecting the distribution pattern of plant functional groups ...

  1. Standardizing failure, success, and survival decisions in clinical studies of ceramic and metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2012-01-01

    -dependent survival probability of ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Based on the review of clinical trials and systematic reviews of these trials, the present study was designed to develop guidelines for classifying the functional performance, success, survival, and susceptibility to chipping fracture, and subsequent treatment of ceramic and metal-ceramic restorations. To develop comprehensive descriptive guidelines and a clinical reporting form to assist dental scientists in their analyses of chipping fracture behavior of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic prostheses with particular emphasis on veneered-zirconia restorations. These guidelines are required to optimize the recording of fracture features that can be used to differentiate ceramic chipping fracture from bulk fracture and to assist dentists in identifying subsequent treatment that may minimize the need to replace affected restorations. A recording form for clinical fracture observations must be sufficiently clear and complete so that dental health professionals can translate the most relevant information in a context that allows their patients to fully understand the potential risks and benefits of treatment with ceramic restorations. It should clearly allow a clinician to determine whether or not a ceramic fracture constitutes a failure, which requires replacement of the prosthesis, or whether the fracture surface is relatively small or located in a nonfunctional area, i.e., one that is not contribute to occlusion, esthetics, proximal contacts, or food impaction. To accomplish this task, a review of the relevant publications of clinical trials was necessary to identify the variability in reporting of fracture events. The reviews were focused on clinical research studies of zirconia-based FDPs and PFM FDPs, which had been monitored through recall exams for three years or more. These reports and systematic reviews of all relevant publications were published in English dental journals between 2004 and 2010.The primary

  2. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiodt, Morten; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns. Thirty-six patients with premolar agenesis were randomly treated with 38 all-ceramic (AC) and 37 metal-ceramic (MC) implant-supported single-tooth restorations. A quasi-randomisation of consecutively included restorations in patients with one or more implants was used, i.e. a combination of parallel group (for 13 patients with one restoration) and split-mouth (for 23 patients with ≥2 restorations). All patients were recalled for baseline and 1-year followup examinations. Biological and technical outcomes, including complications, were clinically and radiographically registered. The Copenhagen Index Score and visual analogue scale (VAS) score were used to assess professional and patient-reported aesthetic outcomes, respectively, by blinded assessors. One-year after loading, no patient dropped out and no implant failed, though one MC restoration had to be remade. The marginal bone loss was not significantly different between AC and MC restorations (AC: mean 0.08 mm, SD 0.25; MC: mean 0.10 mm, SD 0.17). Seven out of 10 inflammatory reactions were registered at AC restorations. Two technical complications, one loss of retention and one chipping of veneering porcelain were recorded at two metal-ceramic crowns. The marginal adaptation of the all-ceramic crowns was significantly less optimal than the metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.014). The professional-reported colour match of all-ceramic crowns was significantly better than metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.031), but other aesthetic parameters as well as the VAS scores demonstrated no statistically significant difference between AC and MC restorations. Marginal bone loss and the aesthetic outcomes were not significantly different between AC and MC restorations in this short-term follow-up study, though inflammatory reactions in the peri-implant mucosa as well as less optimal marginal adaptation were

  3. Dynamics of environmental gradients on plant functional groups ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... the northern slope of the Fu-Niu Mountain Nature Reserve. Using community ecology techniques, these researchers examined the influences of elevation on plant functional group (PFG) dynamics and population interactions at elevations between 855 and 1920 m on the northern slope of the Fu-Niu.

  4. Decomposing the land-use specific response of plant functional traits along environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Veronika; Kohler, Marina; Niedrist, Georg; Bahn, Michael; Tappeiner, Ulrike; Frenck, Georg

    2017-12-01

    Environmental conditions affect functional trait variability within communities and thus shape ecosystem properties. With the ability of plants to adapt morphologically and physiologically to changing abiotic conditions, gradient analysis was shown to be a suitable tool to identify the drivers which determine trait values. Apart from direct environmental drivers and indirect gradients such as elevation, also anthropogenic effects (e.g. irrigation, grazing) can influence trait variability. Our aim was to assess the interactive effects of different environmental drivers on major plant traits and to investigate how these are modulated within two different land-use types (hay meadow vs. pasture). An elevational gradient spanning 1000m was decomposed into its underlying direct components (temperature, water input, length of growing season) for the investigation of gradual responses of five prominent functional traits (aboveground dry weight (AGDW), vegetative height (VegHt), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf dry matter content (LDMC), leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC)) for key species from two functional groups (grasses, forbs) in the two land-use/management regimes. The present study revealed that the detailed analysis of single direct gradients provides substantial additional information on trait response which remains hidden or is even reversed if only indirect gradients such as elevation are analysed. However, trait response to the combination of the three direct gradients aligned surprisingly well with trait response to the indirect gradient underpinning the adequate representation of temperature, water input and length of growing season by elevation. The response of traits significantly depended on the management regime and corresponding intensity which was shown to play an overriding role and constrained and attenuated response ranges of traits to climatic gradients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Using a chewing simulator for fatigue testing of metal ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, S D; Eser, A; Monreal, D; Rousson, V

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic loading is a more important predictor for the clinical longevity of ceramic crowns than static loading. However, dynamic loading machines are costly and mostly have only one test station. The SD Mechatronik Chewing Simulator (formerly Willytec) may be a cost-effective alternative to evaluate the fatigue resistance of metal ceramic crowns. Four metal ceramic materials were tested on lower first molar crowns: GC InitiaI, Creation (Willy Geller), IPS InLine (Ivoclar Vivadent) and the new low-fusion IPS Style Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent). The ceramic material was manually layered on frames made of the nickel-chromium alloy 4all (Ivoclar Vivadent) by using a silicone mould. The crowns were adhesively luted to PMMA dies. Dynamic loading was carried out with a SD Mechatronik Chewing Simulator using additional bars with weights. A steel antagonist (Ø 4mm) with 40mm/s downward speed hit the disto-buccal cusp of the crown with minimal impulse while sliding for a distance of 0.7mm. The starting load was 250N. The forces at each load level had been verified with a 3D force sensor (Kistler). Four crowns per group and load were submitted to four decreasing load levels for 200,000 cycles with a resulting simulation frequency of 0.9Hz and simultaneous thermocycling (5°C/55°C) until all four crowns no longer showed chippings. Statistical analyses had been carried out using an exponential, a Weibull and a lognormal model. The fatigue resistance was defined as the maximal load for which one would observe less than 1% failure after 200,000 cycles. In addition to the fatigue testing of the molar crowns, simulations of finite element method (FEM) were conducted in order to investigate the influence of the mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) between the PMMA die and the molar crown on the fatigue resistance. The 3D-force measurements revealed that the summarised forces were very similar to the force of the dead weights that were put on the bars. The failure modes

  6. Microbial community composition and functions are resilient to metal pollution along two forest soil gradients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azarbad, H.; Niklinska, M.; Laskowski, R.; van Straalen, N.M.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Zhou, J.; He, Z.; Wen, C.; Roling, W.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the global importance of forests, it is virtually unknown how their soil microbial communities adapt at the phylogenetic and functional level to long-term metal pollution. Studying 12 sites located along two distinct gradients of metal pollution in Southern Poland revealed that functional

  7. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six patients with premolar agenesis were randomly treated with 38 all-ceramic (AC) and 37 metal-ceramic (MC) implant......-supported single-tooth restorations. A quasi-randomisation of consecutively included restorations in patients with one or more implants was used, i.e. a combination of parallel group (for 13 patients with one restoration) and split-mouth (for 23 patients with =2 restorations). All patients were recalled......, by blinded assessors. RESULTS: One-year after loading, no patient dropped out and no implant failed, though one MC restoration had to be remade. The marginal bone loss was not significantly different between AC and MC restorations (AC: mean 0.08 mm, SD 0.25; MC: mean 0.10 mm, SD 0.17). Seven out of 10...

  8. A Study Of Stress Distribution At The Cement Interface Of Metal Ceramic Restoration-Dentin By Finite ElementAnalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emamieh M. Emamieh S

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available  Since three decade ago, the application of the concept of finite element analysis (EEA have received a keen interest among dental investigators. In practice the FEA provides detailed stress information regarding to a non-homogenious body such as craniofocal skeletal growth, tooth post ceramo-metal crowns and etc. The aim of this study was the determination of the influence of stress distribution at the cement interface of metal ceramic restoration-dentin."nMaterials and Methods: An idealized metal-ceramic crown model was developed. The model was divided into very small segments. Various loading conditions was applied to the model. A super sap software was used for analyzing the stress distribution."nResults & Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that the higher shear stress was developed in the cervical region by two dimensional methods."n"n"n"n"n 

  9. Color change during the surface preparation stages of metal ceramic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Tuncer Burak; Yilmaz, Burak; Ozcan, Isil; Wee, Alvin G

    2011-07-01

    Even though metal ceramic restorations (MCRs) are widely used by clinicians, the influence of the metal on the color of overlaying porcelain is unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze the color alterations of different types of metal ceramic alloys during several stages of metal surface preparation and to determine the effect of those changes on the resulting color of opaque porcelain (OP). Seven different types of alloys (3 base metal, 3 noble, and 1 high noble) were used to prepare disk-shaped specimens (1 mm × 10 mm, n=3), followed by OP application (0.1 mm). L*a*b* values of specimens were recorded after different stages of metal surface preparation (ingot, after casting, after oxidation, and after the OP application) in addition to the shade tab of OP B1 (target shade). L*a*b* values of alloys were measured from the ingot structure to the OP application stage and statistically analyzed (Repeated measures ANOVA, and Bonferroni corrected paired t test, α=.05). L*a*b* values of OP applied groups and the OP shade tab (target shade) were analyzed (1-way ANOVA with Dunnett's multiple comparison test, α=.05). The color differences of the target shade both before and after OP application were calculated and statistically analyzed (1-way ANOVA, Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch Multiple Range Test, α=.05). The L* values of all alloys changed significantly after each stage except for 2 alloys (V-Deltaloy SF (N-VDSF)) and (Gnathos Plus (HN-GP)) after casting and airborne-particle abrasion (Palloys increased after casting. Changes in the a* coordinate were significant except for one of the base metal alloys (Palloys showed variation in direction after oxidation and OP application (Palloys showed variation in direction after each stage (Palloys were significantly different from that of the OP shade tab (Palloy-target shade)) of 2 OP-applied alloys (Cerapall 2 (N-CP2) and Ceradelta (N-CD)) were significantly different (Palloys. The achromatic color behavior of

  10. The evaluation and comparison of marginal adaptation in metal ceramic and all ceramic restorations fabricated by two methods: CAD/CAM and conventional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghahremanloo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Marginal fit is a key factor for long term clinical success through any dental restorations. Poor marginal adaptation causes cement dissolution. This can lead to dental caries, gingival irritation, periodontal diseases, and finally treatment failure. The aim of this study was measurement and comparison of marginal gap quantities in metal ceramic and all ceramic dental restorations fabricated by various methods. Methods & Materials: A total of 60 complete crowns in 6 groups (n=10 were fabricated as. Follows: Group A: Conventional metal-ceramic collarless restorations. Group B: Metal-ceramic collarless restorations with CAD/CAM wax copings and porcelain layering. Group C: Metal-ceramic collarless restorations with Ceramill Sintron metal copings and porcelain layering. Group D: All ceramic e-max. Press (lithium disilicate restorations. Group E: All ceramic restorations with CAD/CAM zirconia copings and porcelain layering. Group F: All ceramic CAD/CAM translucent zirconia (Zolid. Replica technique and optical microscope (60 x magnifications used to gap measurement. Mann whitney and kruskal-wallis tests used to analyze the data. Results: The lowest mean marginal gap seen in group C (29.12 and the highest mean marginal gap seen in group E(78.19The mean marginal adaptation was better in metal ceramic restorations than all ceramic restorations and the difference was significant (P˂0.001. Conclusion: According to our study, marginal gap of metal ceramic and all ceramic restorations was clinically acceptable (less than 120 microns.

  11. Longevity of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement: a prospective clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Lucas Pradebon; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Wandsher, Vinicius Felipe; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil; Valandro, Luis Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin

    2017-04-10

    Resin cements are often used for single crown cementation due to their physical properties. Self-adhesive resin cements gained widespread due to their simplified technique compared to regular resin cement. However, there is lacking clinical evidence about the long-term behavior of this material. The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to assess the survival rates of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement up to six years. One hundred and twenty-nine subjects received 152 metal-ceramic crowns. The cementation procedures were standardized and performed by previously trained operators. The crowns were assessed as to primary outcome (debonding) and FDI criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier statistics and descriptive analysis. Three failures occurred (debonding), resulting in a 97.6% survival rate. FDI criteria assessment resulted in scores 1 and 2 (acceptable clinical evaluation) for all surviving crowns. The use of self-adhesive resin cement is a feasible alternative for metal-ceramic crowns cementation, achieving high and adequate survival rates.

  12. Marginal Fit Metal-Ceramic and In-Ceram Single Crown Cement retained in Implant-supported Abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Valdimar S; Francischone, Carlos E; Vilarinho Soares de Moura, C D; Francischone, C E; Silva, Antonio M; Ribeiro, Izabella S; Filho, E M Maia; Bandéca, Matheus C; Tonetto, Mateus R; de Jesus Tavarez, R R

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the cervical fit of cemented metal-ceramic and In-Ceram implant-supported crowns, before and after the cementing procedure. Twenty crowns cemented on implant abutments are divided into two groups (n = 10): Group 1 -cemented metal-ceramic crowns and group 2 - cemented In-Ceram crowns. The marginal adaptations before and after cementation were evaluated in a comparison microscope with an error of 1 μm. All crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement. The cervical misalignment of cemented crowns before cementation (52.65 ± 11.83 and 85.73 ± 14.06 μm) was lower than that after cementation (66.80 ± 15.86 and 89.36 ± 22.66 μm). The cementing procedure interferes with the marginal fit of cemented crowns on implant abutments, with the prosthesis having better adaptation before cementation. Cemented metal-ceramic crowns exhibited better cervical adaptation than In-Ceram crowns cemented before and after the cementing procedure. The maintenance of gum health and the longevity of prosthetic restorations are closely related to the restoration's marginal integrity.

  13. Longevity of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement: a prospective clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Pradebon BRONDANI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resin cements are often used for single crown cementation due to their physical properties. Self-adhesive resin cements gained widespread due to their simplified technique compared to regular resin cement. However, there is lacking clinical evidence about the long-term behavior of this material. The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to assess the survival rates of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement up to six years. One hundred and twenty-nine subjects received 152 metal-ceramic crowns. The cementation procedures were standardized and performed by previously trained operators. The crowns were assessed as to primary outcome (debonding and FDI criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier statistics and descriptive analysis. Three failures occurred (debonding, resulting in a 97.6% survival rate. FDI criteria assessment resulted in scores 1 and 2 (acceptable clinical evaluation for all surviving crowns. The use of self-adhesive resin cement is a feasible alternative for metal-ceramic crowns cementation, achieving high and adequate survival rates.

  14. Investigation of metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials for engineered barrier applications in nuclear-waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    An effort to develop licensable engineered barrier systems for the long-term (about 1000 yr) containment of nuclear wastes under conditions of deep continental geologic disposal has been underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory since January 1979, under the auspices of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program. In the present work, the barrier system comprises the hard or structural elements of the package: the canister, the overpack(s), and the hole sleeve. A number of candidate metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials were put through mechanical, corrosion, and leaching screening tests to determine their potential usefulness in barrier-system applications. Materials demonstrating adequate properties in the screening tests will be subjected to more detailed property tests, and, eventually, cost/benefit analyses, to determine their ultimate applicability to barrier-system design concepts. The following materials were investigated: two titanium alloys of Grade 2 and Grade 12; 300 and 400 series stainless steels, Inconels, Hastelloy C-276, titanium, Zircoloy, copper-nickel alloys and cast irons; total of 14 ceramic materials, including two grades of alumina, plus graphite and basalt; and polymers such as polyamide-imide, polyarylene, polyimide, polyolefin, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, fluoropolymer, epoxy, furan, silicone, and ethylene-propylene terpolymer (EPDM) rubber. The most promising candidates for further study and potential use in engineered barrier systems were found to be rubber, filled polyphenylene sulfide, fluoropolymer, and furan derivatives

  15. Clinical evaluation of CAD/CAM metal-ceramic posterior crowns fabricated from intraoral digital impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamim, Hazem; Skjerven, Henrik; Ekfeldt, Anders; Rønold, Hans Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vivo study was to evaluate the accuracy of metal-ceramic crowns fabricated using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in conjunction with intraoral digital impressions. Fifty patients in a general practice participated in the study. Patients were provided with crowns fabricated from digital impressions taken with an intraoral chairside scanner. Prior to crown insertion, the marginal integrity, esthetics, and occlusal and articulation contacts were evaluated using California Dental Association (CDA) criteria. The precementation space of the crowns was evaluated with the replica technique. No adjustments were needed for any of the interproximal contact points. Adjustments of occlusion and articulation contacts were needed in 20% of the restorations. Clinical evaluation of the marginal integrity showed satisfactory results according to the CDA criteria. The 50 silicone replicas showed a median precementation space of 46 μm at the marginal measurement location, 94 μm at the midaxial location, and 185 μm at the centro-occlusal location. The precementation spaces of the crowns were within the acceptable range for CAD/CAM restorations.

  16. Mathematical and numerical modeling of melting in metal-ceramic composite beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, Mohammad Pervez

    2006-05-01

    Many of the ceramics used in the manufacture of the metal-ceramic composites are available as powders, which has encouraged investigators to develop tool less manufacturing techniques. Innovative processes like combustion synthesis and laser sintering processes offer great potential for specific material combinations. These processes involve heat and mass transfer in porous matrix with melting, solidification and may be chemical reaction. Since the resulting transport is relatively complex, there are few mathematical models available. In the present study, melting and transport of metal is demonstrated for a one-dimensional bed with uniform heat generation and convectively cooled boundaries. The effects of different Bond, Biot and Prandtl numbers are discussed using constant and temperature varying material properties. At low bond number the transport is controlled by capillary forces and temperature and saturation distribution is symmetric about the center of the bed. For Biot number larger than ten the process is internally controlled. Effect of Prandtl number is opposite of that of the Bond number. Use of constant properties overpredicts the process rate by 13%.

  17. Damage evolution in freeze cast metal/ceramic composites exhibiting lamellar microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Simpson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The damage evolution in a single domain aluminium/alumina freeze-cast composite has been examined using 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT. A single domain was extracted and loaded incrementally at an orientation of 45° to the lamellae, with the damage being assessed after each of eight compressive loading steps. Prior to loading, significant damage was observed at the metal-ceramic interface – this is thought to have formed during machining and can be ascribed to weak interfacial bonding associated with the Cu coating applied to the ceramic preform prior to metal infiltration. Further interfacial damage was seen to initiate after loading to 170MPa and to develop with each subsequent load step. Damage was also observed in the ceramic lamellae, with a series of parallel cracks forming across the alumina, perpendicular to the domain orientation. These sets of parallel, intra-lamellae cracks were closely spaced, but initiated independently, with coalescence only occurring at higher loads. Both the interfacial and intra-lamellae cracking initiated after loading to 170MPa, with the intra-lamellae cracks propagating into the metal matrix after loading to 240MPa. The cracks in the ceramic lamellae were found to form and develop independent of the interfacial cracks, with discrete crack paths and morphologies being observed in each case. Despite this, the underlying driving force was the same for each damage mode, with crack propagation being driven by an elastic-plastic mismatch between the metal matrix and ceramic lamellae.

  18. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Rodrigues-Filho, Leonardo Eloy; Pinto, Marcelo Mendes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (EL) tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM), fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD), with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p alloy" and 'casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99), and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch). Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property.

  19. Optimizing the vacuum plasma spray deposition of metal, ceramic, and cermet coatings using designed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingswell, R.; Scott, K. T.; Wassell, L. L.

    1993-06-01

    The vacuum plasma spray (VPS) deposition of metal, ceramic, and cermet coatings has been investigated using designed statistical experiments. Processing conditions that were considered likely to have a significant influence on the melting characteristics of the precursor powders and hence deposition efficiency were incorporated into full and fractional factorial experimental designs. The processing of an alumina powder was very sensitive to variations in the deposition conditions, particularly the injection velocity of the powder into the plasma flame, the plasma gas composition, and the power supplied to the gun. Using a combination of full and fractional factorial experimental designs, it was possible to rapidly identify the important spraying variables and adjust these to produce a deposition efficiency approaching 80 percent. The deposition of a nickel-base alloy metal powder was less sensitive to processing conditions. Generally, however, a high degree of particle melting was achieved for a wide range of spray conditions. Preliminary experiments performed using a tungsten carbide/cobalt cermet powder indicated that spray efficiency was not sensitive to deposition conditions. However, microstructural analysis revealed considerable variations in the degree of tungsten carbide dissolution. The structure and properties of the optimized coatings produced in the factorial experiments are also discussed.

  20. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto de Oliveira Bauer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS and elongation (EL tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM, fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD, with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p < 0.05. The factors 'alloy" and 'casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99, and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch. Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property.

  1. Influence of metal-ceramic fixed dental restorations on the occurrence of discoloration of gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Ljubiša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adverse effects of dental cast alloys on the health of patients are the problem in clinical practice. The aim of this paper was to describe the case of a patient with discolorated gingivae in the presence of fixed dental restorations and used diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Case report. A 30-year old patient, presented with the complaints about unsatisfactory esthetic of his fixed dental restorations. He complained about the greyish discoloration of gingivae, inappropriate color of the crowns, and a larger space between the central incisors. Both discolorated and normal gingivae around the fixed dental restorations were taken by excision and the samples of gingivae were examined histopathologically, and by using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry test (AAS. Histopathological examination of the discolorated gingivae showed the presence of non-specific inflammation with a foreign body. AAS revealed the presence of various metals in the samples and the higher metal contents in the samples of discolorated gingivae as compared with the samples of normal gingivae. New metal-ceramic crowns were made for the patient. Conclusion. A main cause of greyish discoloration of gingivae was presence of a metal in gingival tissue. After the excision of discolorated gingivae old metalceramic crowns should be replaced with new crowns.

  2. Applications of fuzzy theory to the design of Functionally Gradient Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Tohru; Teraki, Junichi; Yamada, Tomohiko

    1991-01-01

    Application of Fuzzy Set Theory to the design of Functionally Gradient Materials (FGM) is presented. Membership functions are introduced for the treatment of the fuzzy transition in phase composition and microstructures of FGM. Fuzzy reasoning process for the effective macro properties is explained. Then, the parameters defining the membership functions are identified from the measured effective property data. Finally, a design example of FGM to be used in a fusion reactor is also presented. (author)

  3. Evaluation of metal-ceramic bond characteristics of three dental Co-Cr alloys prepared with different fabrication techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongmei; Feng, Qing; Li, Ning; Xu, Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Limited information is available regarding the metal-ceramic bond strength of dental Co-Cr alloys fabricated by casting (CAST), computer numerical control (CNC) milling, and selective laser melting (SLM). The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond characteristics of 3 dental Co-Cr alloys fabricated by casting, computer numerical control milling, and selective laser melting techniques using the 3-point bend test (International Organization for Standardization [ISO] standard 9693). Forty-five specimens (25×3×0.5 mm) made of dental Co-Cr alloys were prepared by CAST, CNC milling, and SLM techniques. The morphology of the oxidation surface of metal specimens was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After porcelain application, the interfacial characterization was evaluated by SEM equipped with energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis, and the metal-ceramic bond strength was assessed with the 3-point bend test. Failure type and elemental composition on the debonding interface were assessed by SEM/EDS. The bond strength was statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and Tukey honest significant difference test (α=.05). The oxidation surfaces of the CAST, CNC, and SLM groups were different. They were porous in the CAST group but compact and irregular in the CNC and SLM groups. The metal-ceramic interfaces of the SLM and CNC groups showed excellent combination compared with those of the CAST group. The bond strength was 37.7 ±6.5 MPa for CAST, 43.3 ±9.2 MPa for CNC, and 46.8 ±5.1 MPa for the SLM group. Statistically significant differences were found among the 3 groups tested (P=.028). The debonding surfaces of all specimens exhibited cohesive failure mode. The oxidation surface morphologies and thicknesses of dental Co-Cr alloys are dependent on the different fabrication techniques used. The bond strength of all 3 groups exceed the minimum acceptable value of 25 MPa recommended by ISO 9693; hence, dental Co-Cr alloy

  4. Development of gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functionals in the density functional theory; Developpement de fonctionnelles corrigees du gradient en theorie de la fonctionnelle de la densite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembarki, A.

    1994-12-01

    In this work, we have developed some gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functionals. This study is in keeping with the density functional theory (DFT) formalism. In the first part of this memory, a description of Hartree-Fock (HF), post-HF and density functional theories is given. The second part is devoted the study the different approximations of DFT exchange-correlation functionals which have been proposed in the last years. In particular, we have underlined the approximations used for the construction of these functionals. The third part of this memory consists in the development of new gradient-corrected functionals. In this study, we have established a new relation between exchange energy, correlation energy and kinetic energy. We have deduced two new possible forms of exchange or correlation functionals, respectively. In the fourth part, we have studied the exchange potential, for which the actual formulation does not satisfy some theoretical conditions, such as the asymptotic behavior -1/r. Our contribution lies in the development of an exchange potential with a correct asymptotic -1/r behavior for large values of r. In this chapter, we have proposed a model which permits the obtention of the exchange energy from the exchange potential, using the virial theorem. The fifth part of this memory is devoted the application of these different functionals to simple systems (H{sub 2}O, CO, N{sub 2}O, H{sub 3}{sup +} and H{sub 5}{sup +}) in order to characterize the performance of DFT calculations in regards to those obtained with post-HF methods. (author). 215 refs., 8 figs., 28 tabs.

  5. The influence of veneering porcelain thickness of all-ceramic and metal ceramic crowns on failure resistance after cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakura, Akihiko; Lee, Heeje; Geminiani, Alessandro; Ercoli, Carlo; Feng, Changyong

    2009-02-01

    In some clinical situations, the length of either a prepared tooth or an implant abutment is shorter than ideal, and the thickness of a porcelain crown must be increased. Thickness of the coping and the veneering porcelain should be considered to prevent mechanical failure of the crown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of veneering porcelain thickness for all-ceramic and metal ceramic crowns on failure resistance after cyclic loading. All-ceramic and metal ceramic crowns (n=20) were fabricated on an implant abutment (RN Solid Abutment) for the study. Two different framework designs with 2 different incisal thicknesses of veneering porcelain (2 mm and 4 mm) were used for each all-ceramic and metal ceramic crown system, resulting in 4 experimental groups (n=10) with identically shaped crowns. The all-ceramic crown consisted of alumina (Procera AllCeram) frameworks and veneering porcelain (Cerabien), while metal ceramic crowns were made of high noble metal (Leo) frameworks and veneering porcelain (IPS Classic). All crowns were cemented on the corresponding abutments using a resin cement (Panavia 21). They were subjected to 1000 cycles of thermal cycling (5 degrees C and 55 degrees C; 5-second dwell time). The crowns were tested with a custom-designed cyclic loading apparatus which delivered simultaneous unidirectional cyclic loading at 135 degrees, vertically, at an rpm of 250, with a load of 49 N. Each specimen was loaded for 1.2 x 106 cycles or until it failed. The specimens were thoroughly evaluated for cracks and/or bulk fracture with an optical stereomicroscope (x10) and assigned a score of success, survival, or failure. The specimens without bulk fracture after cyclic loading were loaded along the long axis of the tooth, on the incisal edge, in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.5 mm/min, until fracture. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the success and survival rate between the 2 different materials (alpha=.05

  6. Static high-gradient magnetic fields affect the functionality of monocytic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syrovets, T.; Schmidt, Z.; Buechele, B.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Dempsey, N.; Simmet, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-2 ISSN 0892-6638 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : static high-gradient * magnet ic fields * affect the functionality * monocytic cells Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.)

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Surface Residual Stress in Functionally Gradient Cemented Carbide Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chuangnan; Liu, Deshun; Tang, Siwen; Li, Pengnan; Qiu, Xinyi

    2018-03-01

    A component distribution model is proposed for three-component functionally gradient cemented carbide (FGCC) based on electron probe microanalysis results obtained for gradient layer thickness, microstructure, and elemental distribution. The residual surface stress of FGCC-T5 tools occurring during the fabrication process is analyzed using an ANSYS-implemented finite element method (FEM) and X-ray diffraction. A comparison of the experimental and calculated values verifies the feasibility of using FEM to analyze the residual surface stress in FGCC-T5 tools. The effects of the distribution index, geometrical shape, substrate thickness, gradient layer thickness, and position of the cobalt-rich layer on residual surface stress are studied in detail.

  8. Fabrication and microstructures of functional gradient SiBCN–Nb composite by hot pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Min, E-mail: lcxsunmin@163.com [Beijing Institute of Control Engineering, Beijing 100190 (China); Fu, Ruoyu; Chen, Jun; Mao, Xiaofang; Zhang, Jie [Beijing Institute of Control Engineering, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Zhihua; Liang, Bin [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2016-04-15

    A functional gradient material with five layers composed of SiBCN ceramic and niobium (Nb) was prepared successfully by hot pressing. The phase composition, morphology features and microstructures were investigated in each layer of the gradient material. The Nb-containing compounds involving NbC, Nb{sub 6}C{sub 5}, Nb{sub 4}C{sub 3}, Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and NbN increase with the volume fraction of Nb increasing in the sub-layer. They are randomly scattered (≤ 25 vol.% Nb), then strip-like, and finally distribute continuously (≥ 75 vol.% Nb). The size of BN(C) and SiC grains in Nb-containing layers is larger than in 100% SiBCN layer due to the loss of the capsule-like structures. No distinct interfaces form in the transition regions indicating the gradual changes in phase composition and microstructures. - Highlights: • A functional gradient SiBCN–Nb material was prepared successfully by hot pressing. • Phase composition, morphology features and microstructures were investigated. • Thermodynamic calculation was used to aid in the phase analysis. • No distinct interfaces form typical of the functional gradient material.

  9. Effects of soldering methods on tensile strength of a gold-palladium metal ceramic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadhanfari, Husain A; Khajah, Hasan M; Monaco, Edward A; Kim, Hyeongil

    2014-10-01

    The tensile strength obtained by conventional postceramic application soldering and laser postceramic welding may require more energy than microwave postceramic soldering, which could provide similar tensile strength values. The purpose of the study was to compare the tensile strength obtained by microwave postceramic soldering, conventional postceramic soldering, and laser postceramic welding. A gold-palladium metal ceramic alloy and gold-based solder were used in this study. Twenty-seven wax specimens were cast in gold-palladium noble metal and divided into 4 groups: laser welding with a specific postfiller noble metal, microwave soldering with a postceramic solder, conventional soldering with the same postceramic solder used in the microwave soldering group, and a nonsectioned control group. All the specimens were heat treated to simulate a normal porcelain sintering sequence. An Instron Universal Testing Machine was used to measure the tensile strength for the 4 groups. The means were analyzed statistically with 1-way ANOVA. The surface and fracture sites of the specimens were subjectively evaluated for fracture type and porosities by using a scanning electron microscope. The mean (standard deviation) ultimate tensile strength values were as follows: nonsectioned control 818 ±30 MPa, microwave 516 ±34 MPa, conventional 454 ±37 MPa, and laser weld 191 ±39 MPa. A 1-way ANOVA showed a significant difference in ultimate tensile strength among the groups (F3,23=334.5; Ptensile strength for gold and palladium noble metals than either conventional soldering or laser welding. Conventional soldering resulted in a higher tensile strength than laser welding. Under the experimental conditions described, either microwave or conventional postceramic soldering would appear to satisfy clinical requirements related to tensile strength. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dung Beetles along a Tropical Altitudinal Gradient: Environmental Filtering on Taxonomic and Functional Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Cássio Alencar; Braga, Rodrigo Fagundes; Figueira, José Eugênio Cortes; Neves, Frederico de Siqueira; Fernandes, G Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Mountains provide an interesting context in which to study the many facets of biodiversity in response to macroclimate, since environmental conditions change rapidly due to elevation. Although the decrease in biodiversity with increasing elevation is generally accepted, our understanding of the variation of functional diversity along altitudinal gradients is still poorly known. The partitioning of diversity into spatial components can help to understand the processes that influence the distribution of species, and these studies are urgently needed in face of the increasing threats to mountain environments throughout the world. We describe the distribution of dung beetle diversity along an altitudinal gradient on a tropical mountain in southeastern Brazil, including the spatial partitioning of taxonomic and functional diversities. The altitudinal gradient ranged from 800 up to 1400 m a.s.l. and we collected dung beetles at every 100 m of altitude. We used the Rao Index to calculate γ, α and β diversity for taxonomic and functional diversity of dung beetles. Climatic, soil and vegetation variables were used to explain variation in community attributes along the altitudinal gradient. Dung beetle richness declined with altitude and was related to climatic and vegetation variables, but functional diversity did not follow the same pattern. Over 50% of γ taxonomic diversity was caused by among altitudes diversity (β), while almost 100% of functional diversity was due to the α component. Contrasting β taxonomic with β functional diversity, we suggest that there is ecological redundancy among communities and that the environment is filtering species in terms of the Grinnellian niche, rather than the Eltonian niche. β taxonomic diversity is caused mainly by the turnover component, reinforcing the hypothesis of environmental filtering. Global warming may have strong effects on mountain communities due to upslope range shifts and extinctions, and these events will

  11. Analytical gradients for subsystem density functional theory within the slater-function-based amsterdam density functional program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüns, Danny; Franchini, Mirko; Götz, Andreas W; Neugebauer, Johannes; Jacob, Christoph R; Visscher, Lucas

    2017-02-05

    We present a new implementation of analytical gradients for subsystem density-functional theory (sDFT) and frozen-density embedding (FDE) into the Amsterdam Density Functional program (ADF). The underlying theory and necessary expressions for the implementation are derived and discussed in detail for various FDE and sDFT setups. The parallel implementation is numerically verified and geometry optimizations with different functional combinations (LDA/TF and PW91/PW91K) are conducted and compared to reference data. Our results confirm that sDFT-LDA/TF yields good equilibrium distances for the systems studied here (mean absolute deviation: 0.09 Å) compared to reference wave-function theory results. However, sDFT-PW91/PW91k quite consistently yields smaller equilibrium distances (mean absolute deviation: 0.23 Å). The flexibility of our new implementation is demonstrated for an HCN-trimer test system, for which several different setups are applied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Metal-ceramic crowns cemented with two luting agents: short-term results of a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowarczyk, Andree; Schick, Karina; Lauer, Hans-Christoph

    2012-06-01

    A prospective, randomized, controlled, split-mouth trial was performed to evaluate the cementation modes for metal-ceramic crowns. A total of 40 fully veneered metal-ceramic crowns were delivered in the posterior jaw segments of 20 patients using either a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem Aplicap, 3M ESPE; n = 20) or a zinc oxide phosphate cement (Hoffmann's Cement, Hoffmann; n = 20). Thirteen parameters related to the abutment teeth and their periodontal status were evaluated. A visual analog scale was used to assess the sensitivity of the abutment teeth by patient-based outcomes. Data were statistically analyzed by a single-classification ANOVA (α = 0.05) and logistic regression analysis. The results presented were obtained after a mean observation period of 1.8 years. The dropout rate was 0%. None of the abutment teeth exhibited secondary caries at the restoration margins. No significant differences were demonstrated between the luting agents based on visual analog scale (p > 0.05), hypersensitivity (OR = 1.31), abutment mobility (p > 0.05), or probing depths (p > 0.05). Based on the sulcus fluid flow rates, a significantly greater mean difference was obtained with zinc oxide phosphate cement than with self-adhesive resin cement (9.2 units; p = 0.0006). Significant differences between the baseline examination and the follow-up examinations for sulcus bleeding index (p = 0.0013) and plaque index (p cement types showed scarcely any differences between the parameters investigated. The outcomes of cementing fully veneered metal-ceramic crowns were equally good with self-adhesive resin cement as with the clinically proven zinc oxide phosphate cement.

  13. Accuracy of Three Shade-matching Devices in Replicating the Shade of Metal Ceramic Restorations: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhanpal, Shruti; Neelima, Menon S

    2016-12-01

    In restorative dentistry, the clinician commonly encounters the challenge of replicating the color of natural teeth due to the subjectivity of perceptual evaluation. Recent advances in photography and computing have resulted in the widespread use of the digital camera for color imaging. These instruments can be used effectively for shade matching and communication to yield predictable results. The study sample consisted of 20 freshly extracted noncarious premolars. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) L*a*b* values of the tooth were obtained through a spectrophotometer, digital camera, and digital camera with a polarizer. Shade selection was carried out using VITA 3D Master and calculating the Euclidian distance. The fabricated metal ceramic crowns were then evaluated to check the shade replication by comparing the CIE L*a*b* values of the crowns with the reference shade tab images. The three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and comparative analysis using Bonferroni test reveals that the difference in the mean L*a* values between spectrophotometer and polarization dental imaging modality (PDIM) was insignificant. The difference in the mean L*a*b* of spectrophotometer and digital camera was statistically significant. The mean ΔE for metal ceramic crowns and shade tabs was 4.2 that was greater than the clinically acceptable level (3.2). A statistically significant correlation was found to exist between the spectrophotometer and PDIM for all CIE L*, a*, and b* color coordinates. The present study was undertaken to assess the shade-matching ability of three shade-matching devices, such as spectrophotometer, digital camera, and PDIM, in the accuracy of replication of metal ceramic restorations.

  14. Computer-aided study of key factors determining high mechanical properties of nanostructured surface layers in metal-ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, Igor S.; Shilko, Evgeny V.; Ovcharenko, Vladimir E.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the movable cellular automaton method. It is based on numerical models of surface layers of the metal-ceramic composite NiCr-TiC modified under electron beam irradiation in inert gas plasmas. The models take into account different geometric, concentration and mechanical parameters of ceramic and metallic components. The authors study the contributions of key structural factors in mechanical properties of surface layers and determine the ranges of their variations by providing the optimum balance of strength, strain hardening and fracture toughness.

  15. FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS microstructural analysis of metal-ceramic and zirconia-ceramic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Sebastiani, M; Battaini, P; Menghini, P; Bemporad, E

    2012-01-10

    Recently introduced FIB/SEM analysis in microscopy seems to provide a high-resolution characterization of the samples by 3D (FIB) cross-sectioning and (SEM) high resolution imaging. The aim of this study was to apply the FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS analysis to the interfaces of a metal-ceramic vs. two zirconia-ceramic systems. Plate samples of three different prosthetic systems were prepared in the dental lab following the manufacturers' instructions, where metal-ceramic was the result of a ceramic veneering (porcelain-fused-to-metal) and the two zirconia-ceramic systems were produced by the dedicated CAD-CAM procedures of the zirconia cores (both with final sintering) and then veneered by layered or heat pressed ceramics. In a FIB/SEM equipment (also called DualBeam), a thin layer of platinum (1 μm) was deposited on samples surface crossing the interfaces, in order to protect them during milling. Then, increasingly deeper trenches were milled by a focused ion beam, first using a relatively higher and later using a lower ion current (from 9 nA to 0.28 nA, 30KV). Finally, FEG-SEM (5KV) micrographs (1000-50,000X) were acquired. In a SEM the analysis of the morphology and internal microstructure was performed by 13KV secondary and backscattered electrons signals (in all the samples). The compositional maps were then performed by EDS probe only in the metal-ceramic system (20kV). Despite the presence of many voids in all the ceramic layers, it was possible to identify: (1) the grain structures of the metallic and zirconia substrates, (2) the thin oxide layer at the metal-ceramic interface and its interactions with the first ceramic layer (wash technique), (3) the roughness of the two different zirconia cores and their interactions with the ceramic interface, where the presence of zirconia grains in the ceramic layer was reported in two system possibly due to sandblasting before ceramic firing.

  16. Systematic investigation of a family of gradient-dependent functionals for solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Philipp; Tran, Fabien; Blaha, Peter; Pedroza, Luana S.; da Silva, Antonio J. R.; Odashima, Mariana M.; Capelle, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Eleven density functionals are compared with regard to their performance for the lattice constants of solids. We consider standard functionals, such as the local-density approximation and the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), as well as variations of PBE GGA, such as PBEsol and similar functionals, PBE-type functionals employing a tighter Lieb-Oxford bound, and combinations thereof. On a test set of 60 solids, we perform a system-by-system analysis for selected functionals and a full statistical analysis for all of them. The impact of restoring the gradient expansion and of tightening the Lieb-Oxford bound is discussed, and confronted with previous results obtained from other codes, functionals or test sets. No functional is uniformly good for all investigated systems, but surprisingly, and pleasingly, the simplest possible modifications to PBE turn out to have the most beneficial effect on its performance. The atomization energy of molecules was also considered and on a testing set of six molecules, we found that the PBE functional is clearly the best, the others leading to strong overbinding.

  17. Analytic calculations of hyper-Raman spectra from density functional theory hyperpolarizability gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringholm, Magnus; Ruud, Kenneth [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø (Norway); Bast, Radovan [Theoretical Chemistry and Biology, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); PDC Center for High Performance Computing, Royal Institute of Technology, S-10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Oggioni, Luca [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø (Norway); Department of Physics G. Occhialini, University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della scienza 3, 20126 Milan (Italy); Ekström, Ulf [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, 0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-10-07

    We present the first analytic calculations of the geometrical gradients of the first hyperpolarizability tensors at the density-functional theory (DFT) level. We use the analytically calculated hyperpolarizability gradients to explore the importance of electron correlation effects, as described by DFT, on hyper-Raman spectra. In particular, we calculate the hyper-Raman spectra of the all-trans and 11-cis isomers of retinal at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density-functional levels of theory, also allowing us to explore the sensitivity of the hyper-Raman spectra on the geometrical characteristics of these structurally related molecules. We show that the HF results, using B3LYP-calculated vibrational frequencies and force fields, reproduce the experimental data for all-trans-retinal well, and that electron correlation effects are of minor importance for the hyper-Raman intensities.

  18. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single...... abutment materials. The frequency of biological complications was higher at restorations with all-ceramic restorations than metal-ceramic crowns. Loss of retention, which was only observed at metal-ceramic crowns, was the most frequent technical complication, and the marginal adaptations of all-ceramic...... restoration materials were registered. After 3 years, the patient-reported outcome variables at different restoration materials were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: The biological outcomes at the zirconia and metal abutments were comparable. All-ceramic crowns demonstrated better colour match...

  19. Functional diversity supports the physiological tolerance hypothesis for plant species richness along climatic gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasojevic, Marko J.; Grace, James B.; Harrison, Susan; Damschen, Ellen Ingman

    2013-01-01

    1. The physiological tolerance hypothesis proposes that plant species richness is highest in warm and/or wet climates because a wider range of functional strategies can persist under such conditions. Functional diversity metrics, combined with statistical modeling, offer new ways to test whether diversity-environment relationships are consistent with this hypothesis. 2. In a classic study by R. H. Whittaker (1960), herb species richness declined from mesic (cool, moist, northerly) slopes to xeric (hot, dry, southerly) slopes. Building on this dataset, we measured four plant functional traits (plant height, specific leaf area, leaf water content and foliar C:N) and used them to calculate three functional diversity metrics (functional richness, evenness, and dispersion). We then used a structural equation model to ask if ‘functional diversity’ (modeled as the joint responses of richness, evenness, and dispersion) could explain the observed relationship of topographic climate gradients to species richness. We then repeated our model examining the functional diversity of each of the four traits individually. 3. Consistent with the physiological tolerance hypothesis, we found that functional diversity was higher in more favorable climatic conditions (mesic slopes), and that multivariate functional diversity mediated the relationship of the topographic climate gradient to plant species richness. We found similar patterns for models focusing on individual trait functional diversity of leaf water content and foliar C:N. 4. Synthesis. Our results provide trait-based support for the physiological tolerance hypothesis, suggesting that benign climates support more species because they allow for a wider range of functional strategies.

  20. Orientations of Liquid Crystals in Contact with Surfaces that Present Continuous Gradients of Chemical Functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clare, B.; Efimenko, K.; Fischer, D.; Genzer, J.; Abbott, N.

    2006-01-01

    We report the formation of continuous spatial gradients in the density of grafted semifluorinated chains on silicon oxide surfaces by vapor-phase diffusion of semifluorinated silanes. We quantify the orientations of the nematic liquid crystal (LC) 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl on these surfaces as a function of local surface composition obtained by using NEXAFS. These measurements demonstrate that it is possible to obtain the full range of tilt angles of a LC on these surfaces. We also use the data provided by these gradient surfaces to test hypotheses regarding the nature of the interaction between the LC and surfaces that give rise to the range of tilted orientations of the LC. We conclude that the orientations of the LC are not determined solely by the density of grafted semifluorinated chains or by the density of residual hydroxyl groups presented at these surfaces following reactions with the silanes. Instead, our results raise the possibility that the tilt angles of the semifluorinated chains on these surfaces (which are a function of the density of the grafted chains) may influence the orientation of the LC. These results, when combined, demonstrate the potential utility of gradient surfaces for screening surface chemistries that achieve desired orientations of LCs as well as for rapidly assembling experimental data sets that can be used to test propositions regarding mechanisms of anchoring LCs at surfaces

  1. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single-tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation of crowns, cement excess and technical complications. The aesthetic outcome was assessed by using the Copenhagen Index Score, and the patient-reported outcomes were recorded using the OHIP-49 questionnaire. The statistical analyses were mainly performed by using mixed model of ANOVA for quantitative data and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three abutment materials. The frequency of biological complications was higher at restorations with all-ceramic restorations than metal-ceramic crowns. Loss of retention, which was only observed at metal-ceramic crowns, was the most frequent technical complication, and the marginal adaptations of all-ceramic crowns were significantly less optimal than metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.020). The professional-reported aesthetic outcome demonstrated significantly superior colour match of all-ceramic over metal-ceramic

  2. Marginal Vertical Discrepancies of Monolithic and Veneered Zirconia and Metal-Ceramic Three-Unit Posterior Fixed Dental Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Suarez, Carlos; Gonzalo, Esther; Pelaez, Jesus; Serrano, Benjamin; Suarez, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the marginal fit of posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) made of monolithic and veneered computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) zirconia ceramic with metal-ceramic posterior FDPs. Thirty standardized steel dies were prepared to receive posterior three-unit FDPs. Specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10): (1) metal-ceramic (control group), (2) veneered zirconia, and (3) monolithic zirconia. All FDPs were cemented using a glass-ionomer cement. The specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (5°C to 55°C). A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a magnification of ×500 was used for measurements. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and paired t test. Both zirconia groups showed similar vertical marginal discrepancies, and no significant differences (P = .661) in marginal adaptation were observed among the groups. No differences were observed in either group in marginal discrepancies between surfaces or abutments. Monolithic zirconia posterior FDPs exhibit similar vertical marginal discrepancies to veneered zirconia posterior FDPs. No influence of localization measurements was observed.

  3. The effect of occlusal surface relief of dies on marginal adaptation of metal-ceramic casting copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Fariba Saleh; Abolfazli, Nader; Mahboub, Farhang; Razavi, Fariba Emadian

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of occlusal relief of dies on internal adaptation of metal-ceramic casting copings. Standardized preparations were made on 80 extracted third molar teeth. Impressions were made with poly(vinyl siloxane), and stone dies were prepared. Dies were covered with four layers of die spacer, covering the entire preparation together with the occlusal surface excluding the apical 0.5 mm of the preparation in group 1 (40 specimens), and covering the same area excluding the occlusal surface in group 2 (40 specimens). Copings were cast using nickel-chromium-based metal ceramic alloy and cemented using zinc phosphate cement. The specimens were sectioned along the long axis. Internal discrepancies were recorded with a 0.001-mm resolution stereoscope at 6 points: the middle of the occlusal surface (MO), middle of the lingual wall (ML), middle of the buccal wall (MB), middle of the buccal shoulder finish line (MSH), middle of the lingual chamfer finish line (MCH), and middle of the buccal bevel finish line (MBL). Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Significance level was set at p die with no relief. Leaving the occlusal part of the die uncovered with the die spacer improved the crown seating considerably in the occlusal surface as well as shoulder and bevel margins. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Differential abundance of microbial functional groups along the elevation gradient from the coast to the Luquillo Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon A. Cantrell; D. Jean Lodge; Carlos A. Cruz; Luis M. García; Jose R. Pérez-Jiménez; Marirosa. Molina

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities respond to multiple abiotic and biotic factors that change along elevation gradients. We compare changes in microbial community composition in soil and review previous research on differential abundance of microbial functional groups along an elevation gradient in eastern Puerto Rico. Previous studies within the Luquillo Mountains showed that...

  5. On the Worst-Case Complexity of the Gradient Method with Exact Line Search for Smooth Strongly Convex Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, Etienne; Glineur, Francois; Taylor, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    We consider the gradient (or steepest) descent method with exact line search applied to a strongly convex function with Lipschitz continuous gradient. We establish the exact worst-case rate of convergence of this scheme, and show that this worst-case behavior is exhibited by a certain convex

  6. On the worst-case complexity of the gradient method with exact line search for smooth strongly convex functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, Etienne; Glineur, Francois; Taylor, Adrien

    2017-01-01

    We consider the gradient (or steepest) descent method with exact line search applied to a strongly convex function with Lipschitz continuous gradient. We establish the exact worst-case rate of convergence of this scheme, and show that this worst-case behavior is exhibited by a certain convex

  7. Effects of WC Particle Size and Co Content on the Graded Structure in Functionally Gradient WC-Co Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yigao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functionally gradient WC-Co composites having a Co depleted surface zone and not comprising the h phase can be manufactured via carburizing process. During carburizing, besides carburizing process parameters, the microstructural parameters of WC-Co materials, such as WC grain size and Co content, also have significant influences on the formation of Co gradient structure. In this study, the effects of WC particle size and Co content on the gradient structure within gradient hardmetals have been studied, based on a series of carburizing experiments of WC-Co materials with different WC particle sizes and cobalt contents. The results show that both the thickness and the amplitude of the gradients within gradient WC-Co materials increase with increasing initial WC particle size and Co content of WC-Co alloys. The reason for this finding is discussed.

  8. The shape gradient of the least-squares objective functional in optimal shape design problems of radiative heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukolaine, Sergey A.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal shape design problems of steady-state radiative heat transfer are considered. The optimal shape design problem (in the three-dimensional space) is formulated as an inverse one, i.e., in the form of an operator equation of the first kind with respect to a surface to be optimized. The operator equation is reduced to a minimization problem via a least-squares objective functional. The minimization problem has to be solved numerically. Gradient minimization methods need the gradient of a functional to be minimized. In this paper the shape gradient of the least-squares objective functional is derived with the help of the shape sensitivity analysis and adjoint problem method. In practice a surface to be optimized may be (or, most likely, is to be) given in a parametric form by a finite number of parameters. In this case the objective functional is, in fact, a function in a finite-dimensional space and the shape gradient becomes an ordinary gradient. The gradient of the objective functional, in the case that the surface to be optimized is given in a finite-parametric form, is derived from the shape gradient. A particular case, that a surface to be optimized is a 'two-dimensional' polyhedral one, is considered. The technique, developed in the paper, is applied to a synthetic problem of designing a 'two-dimensional' radiant enclosure.

  9. First-row diatomics: Calculation of the geometry and energetics using self-consistent gradient-functional approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzler, F.W.; Painter, G.S.

    1992-01-01

    A fully self-consistent series of nonlocal (gradient) density-functional calculations has been carried out using the augmented-Gaussian-orbital method to determine the magnitude of gradient corrections to the potential-energy curves of the first-row diatomics, Li 2 through F 2 . Both the Langreth-Mehl-Hu and the Perdew-Wang gradient-density functionals were used in calculations of the binding energy, bond length, and vibrational frequency for each dimer. Comparison with results obtained in the local-spin-density approximation (LSDA) using the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair functional, and with experiment, reveals that bond lengths and vibrational frequencies are rather insensitive to details of the gradient functionals, including self-consistency effects, but the gradient corrections reduce the overbinding commonly observed in the LSDA calculations of first-row diatomics (with the exception of Li 2 , the gradient-functional binding-energy error is only 50--12 % of the LSDA error). The improved binding energies result from a large differential energy lowering, which occurs in open-shell atoms relative to the diatomics. The stabilization of the atom arises from the use of nonspherical charge and spin densities in the gradient-functional calculations. This stabilization is negligibly small in LSDA calculations performed with nonspherical densities

  10. Variance gradients and uncertainty budgets for nonlinear measurement functions with independent inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanelli, Mark; Kacker, Raghu; Kessel, Rüdiger

    2013-01-01

    A novel variance-based measure for global sensitivity analysis, termed a variance gradient (VG), is presented for constructing uncertainty budgets under the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) framework for nonlinear measurement functions with independent inputs. The motivation behind VGs is the desire of metrologists to understand which inputs' variance reductions would most effectively reduce the variance of the measurand. VGs are particularly useful when the application of the first supplement to the GUM is indicated because of the inadequacy of measurement function linearization. However, VGs reduce to a commonly understood variance decomposition in the case of a linear(ized) measurement function with independent inputs for which the original GUM readily applies. The usefulness of VGs is illustrated by application to an example from the first supplement to the GUM, as well as to the benchmark Ishigami function. A comparison of VGs to other available sensitivity measures is made. (paper)

  11. Microbial community composition and functions are resilient to metal pollution along two forest soil gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbad, Hamed; Niklińska, Maria; Laskowski, Ryszard; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Wen, Chongqing; Röling, Wilfred F M

    2015-01-01

    Despite the global importance of forests, it is virtually unknown how their soil microbial communities adapt at the phylogenetic and functional level to long-term metal pollution. Studying 12 sites located along two distinct gradients of metal pollution in Southern Poland revealed that functional potential and diversity (assessed using GeoChip 4.2) were highly similar across the gradients despite drastically diverging metal contamination levels. Metal pollution level did, however, significantly impact bacterial community structure (as shown by MiSeq Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes), but not bacterial taxon richness and community composition. Metal pollution caused changes in the relative abundance of specific bacterial taxa, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria. Also, a group of metal-resistance genes showed significant correlations with metal concentrations in soil. Our study showed that microbial communities are resilient to metal pollution; despite differences in community structure, no clear impact of metal pollution levels on overall functional diversity was observed. While screens of phylogenetic marker genes, such as 16S rRNA genes, provide only limited insight into resilience mechanisms, analysis of specific functional genes, e.g. involved in metal resistance, appears to be a more promising strategy. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Fungal Communities and Functional Guilds Shift Along an Elevational Gradient in the Southern Appalachian Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veach, Allison M; Stokes, C Elizabeth; Knoepp, Jennifer; Jumpponen, Ari; Baird, Richard

    2017-12-04

    Nitrogen deposition alters forest ecosystems particularly in high elevation, montane habitats where nitrogen deposition is greatest and continues to increase. We collected soils across an elevational (788-1940 m) gradient, encompassing both abiotic (soil chemistry) and biotic (vegetation community) gradients, at eight locations in the southern Appalachian Mountains of southwestern North Carolina and eastern Tennessee. We measured soil chemistry (total N, C, extractable PO 4 , soil pH, cation exchange capacity [ECEC], percent base saturation [% BS]) and dissected soil fungal communities using ITS2 metabarcode Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Total soil N, C, PO 4 , % BS, and pH increased with elevation and plateaued at approximately 1400 m, whereas ECEC linearly increased and C/N decreased with elevation. Fungal communities differed among locations and were correlated with all chemical variables, except PO 4 , whereas OTU richness increased with total N. Several ecological guilds (i.e., ectomycorrhizae, saprotrophs, plant pathogens) differed in abundance among locations; specifically, saprotroph abundance, primarily attributable to genus Mortierella, was positively correlated with elevation. Ectomycorrhizae declined with total N and soil pH and increased with total C and PO 4 where plant pathogens increased with total N and decreased with total C. Our results demonstrate significant turnover in taxonomic and functional fungal groups across elevational gradients which facilitate future predictions on forest ecosystem change in the southern Appalachians as nitrogen deposition rates increase and regional temperature and precipitation regimes shift.

  13. Effects of centrifugation through three different discontinuous Percoll gradients on boar sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matás, C; Vieira, L; García-Vázquez, F A; Avilés-López, K; López-Úbeda, R; Carvajal, J A; Gadea, J

    2011-08-01

    In this study, different combinations of 2-step, discontinuous gradient centrifugation were used, consisting of three different combinations of isotonic Percoll (45/60, 60/75 and 45/90%) that allowed us to select different sperm subpopulations from fertile and normozoospermic boars. Our objective in this study is to evaluate the effects of centrifugation through three different discontinuous Percoll gradients on sperm function parameters (motility, viability, morphology, acrosome status, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, ROS generation, tyrosine phosphorylation and intracellular calcium concentration) and the sperm penetrating capacity in an IVF system. All the Percoll treatments evaluated increased the percentage of spermatozoa with normal morphology, the proportion of un-damaged DNA, normal chromatin condensation, motion parameters measured by CASA and the percentage of capacitated spermatozoa with tyrosine phosphorylated proteins compared to control group. Finally, the in vitro oocyte penetrating capacity of boar spermatozoa was significantly affected by Percoll centrifugation. All the Percoll treatments increased the penetration rates and mean number of sperm per penetrated oocyte. Despite the efficiency of all three of the sperm treatments tested in selecting spermatozoa with improved sperm parameters and capacity to penetrate oocytes in vitro, the optimum performance of this system was demonstrated after preselecting spermatozoa by centrifugation on a discontinuous 45/90 Percoll gradient. The P45/90 treatment leads to obtain a higher percentage of spermatozoa which develop properly the capacitation process as it was shown measuring tyrosine phosphorylation and intracellular calcium concentration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional traits reveal the expansion and packing of ecological niche space underlying an elevational diversity gradient in passerine birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pigot, Alex L.; Trisos, Christopher H.; Tobias, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Variation in species richness across environmental gradients may be associated with an expanded volume or increased packing of ecological niche space. However, the relative importance of these alternative scenarios remains unknown, largely because standardized information on functional traits and

  15. Full Waveform Inversion Using an Energy-Based Objective Function with Efficient Calculation of the Gradient

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2017-05-26

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) using an energy-based objective function has the potential to provide long wavelength model information even without low frequency in the data. However, without the back-propagation method (adjoint-state method), its implementation is impractical for the model size of general seismic survey. We derive the gradient of the energy-based objective function using the back-propagation method to make its FWI feasible. We also raise the energy signal to the power of a small positive number to properly handle the energy signal imbalance as a function of offset. Examples demonstrate that the proposed FWI algorithm provides a convergent long wavelength structure model even without low-frequency information, which can be used as a good starting model for the subsequent conventional FWI.

  16. Gradient flow for the one-dimensional Mumford-Shah functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobbino, M.

    1998-01-01

    In order to introduce a notion of gradient flow for the one-dimensional Mumford-Shah functional M S(u), the article considers a family {F hatε} of regular functionals, defined in spaces of piecewise constant functions, which converge in a variational sense to M S(u). Moreover, given an initial datum U 0 , with M S(u 0 ) 0ε } of piecewise constant approximations of u 0 , the evolution problems are considered. For large classes of initial data, the family {u ε (t)} converges, as ε→0 + , to a certain u(t), which is the solution of the heat equation with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions in a suitable variable domain. On the other hand, for some special u 0 , the family {u ε (t)} has infinitely many limit points as ε→0 +

  17. On the worst-case complexity of the gradient method with exact line search for smooth strongly convex functions

    OpenAIRE

    de Klerk, Etienne; Glineur, François; Taylor, Adrien B.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the gradient (or steepest) descent method with exact line search applied to a strongly convex function with Lipschitz continuous gradient. We establish the exact worst-case rate of convergence of this scheme, and show that this worst-case behavior is exhibited by a certain convex quadratic function. We also give the tight worst-case complexity bound for a noisy variant of gradient descent method, where exact line-search is performed in a search direction that differs from negative...

  18. All-ceramic or metal-ceramic tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs)? A systematic review of the survival and complication rates. Part I: Single crowns (SCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Makarov, Nikolay Alexandrovich; Thoma, Daniel Stefan; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pjetursson, Bjarni Elvar

    2015-06-01

    To assess the 5-year survival of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic tooth-supported single crowns (SCs) and to describe the incidence of biological, technical and esthetic complications. Medline (PubMed), Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) searches (2006-2013) were performed for clinical studies focusing on tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with a mean follow-up of at least 3 years. This was complimented by an additional hand search and the inclusion of 34 studies from a previous systematic review [1,2]. Survival and complication rates were analyzed using robust Poisson's regression models to obtain summary estimates of 5-year proportions. Sixty-seven studies reporting on 4663 metal-ceramic and 9434 all-ceramic SCs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Seventeen studies reported on metal-ceramic crowns, and 54 studies reported on all-ceramic crowns. Meta-analysis of the included studies indicated an estimated survival rate of metal-ceramic SCs of 94.7% (95% CI: 94.1-96.9%) after 5 years. This was similar to the estimated 5-year survival rate of leucit or lithium-disilicate reinforced glass ceramic SCs (96.6%; 95% CI: 94.9-96.7%), of glass infiltrated alumina SCs (94.6%; 95% CI: 92.7-96%) and densely sintered alumina and zirconia SCs (96%; 95% CI: 93.8-97.5%; 92.1%; 95% CI: 82.8-95.6%). In contrast, the 5-year survival rates of feldspathic/silica-based ceramic crowns were lower (pcrowns exhibited significantly lower survival rates in the posterior region (pcrown types performed similarly. Densely sintered zirconia SCs were more frequently lost due to veneering ceramic fractures than metal-ceramic SCs (p<0.001), and had significantly more loss of retention (p<0.001). In total higher 5 year rates of framework fracture were reported for the all-ceramic SCs than for metal-ceramic SCs. Survival rates of most types of all-ceramic SCs were similar to those reported for metal-ceramic SCs, both in anterior and posterior regions. Weaker

  19. Functional, size and taxonomic diversity of fish along a depth gradient in the deep sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindel, Beth L; Neat, Francis C; Trueman, Clive N; Webb, Thomas J; Blanchard, Julia L

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity is well studied in ecology and the concept has been developed to include traits of species, rather than solely taxonomy, to better reflect the functional diversity of a system. The deep sea provides a natural environmental gradient within which to study changes in different diversity metrics, but traits of deep-sea fish are not widely known, hampering the application of functional diversity to this globally important system. We used morphological traits to determine the functional richness and functional divergence of demersal fish assemblages along the continental slope in the Northeast Atlantic, at depths of 300-2,000 m. We compared these metrics to size diversity based on individual body size and species richness. Functional richness and size diversity showed similar patterns, with the highest diversity at intermediate depths; functional divergence showed the opposite pattern, with the highest values at the shallowest and deepest parts of the study site. Species richness increased with depth. The functional implications of these patterns were deduced by examining depth-related changes in morphological traits and the dominance of feeding guilds as illustrated by stable isotope analyses. The patterns in diversity and the variation in certain morphological traits can potentially be explained by changes in the relative dominance of pelagic and benthic feeding guilds. All measures of diversity examined here suggest that the deep areas of the continental slope may be equally or more diverse than assemblages just beyond the continental shelf.

  20. Distribution of functional traits in subtropical trees across environmental and forest use gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundo, Cecilia; Malizia, Lucio R.; González-Espinosa, Mario

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between functional traits and environmental factors contribute to understanding community structure and predicting which species will be able to elude environmental filters in different habitats. We selected 10 functional traits related to morphology, demography and regeneration niche in 54 subtropical premontane tree species to describe their main axes of functional differentiation. We derived species traits, environmental variables and species abundance data from 20 1-ha permanent plots established in a seasonal subtropical premontane forest in northwestern Argentina. We analyzed the relationship between species functional traits and environmental factors through RLQ and fourth-corner analyzes. We found an axis of structural differentiation that segregates understory from canopy species, and an axis of functional differentiation that segregates species that maximize resource acquisition from those that promote resource conservation. Environmental and forest use gradients operate hierarchically over subtropical premontane tree species influencing the distribution of demographic and morphological traits. The interaction between climatic and topographic factors influences the distribution of species functional traits at the regional scale. In addition, the history of forest use seems to operate at the landscape scale and explains the distribution of species traits reflecting a trade-off between resource acquisition and resource conservation strategies in secondary forests across different successional stages. Our results support the idea that functional traits may be used to analyze community structure and dynamics through niche differentiation and environmental filtering processes.

  1. Density functional theory for molecular and periodic systems using density fitting and continuous fast multipole method: Analytical gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łazarski, Roman; Burow, Asbjörn Manfred; Grajciar, Lukáš; Sierka, Marek

    2016-10-30

    A full implementation of analytical energy gradients for molecular and periodic systems is reported in the TURBOMOLE program package within the framework of Kohn-Sham density functional theory using Gaussian-type orbitals as basis functions. Its key component is a combination of density fitting (DF) approximation and continuous fast multipole method (CFMM) that allows for an efficient calculation of the Coulomb energy gradient. For exchange-correlation part the hierarchical numerical integration scheme (Burow and Sierka, Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation 2011, 7, 3097) is extended to energy gradients. Computational efficiency and asymptotic O(N) scaling behavior of the implementation is demonstrated for various molecular and periodic model systems, with the largest unit cell of hematite containing 640 atoms and 19,072 basis functions. The overall computational effort of energy gradient is comparable to that of the Kohn-Sham matrix formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Phase Composition and Microstructure of Hot-Pressing Sintered Ti2AlN Metal-Ceramic Bulk Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANG Suying

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ti2AlN metal-ceramic bulk material was fabricated by hot-pressing sintering (HPS using TiN, Ti and Al powder in a stoichiometric ratio of 1:1:1.03 after mechanical mixing. XRD, SEM and TEM were employed to investigate the phase composition and microstructures of the products. The results show that the high purity Ti2AlN can be obtained by HPS at 1300 ℃ for 2.5 h. The sintered Ti2AlN presented a hexagonal system layered structure with an anisotropy. Twins are found in the Ti2AlN. There were a few nano-scale TiN particles in the products.

  3. Some metal-graphite and metal-ceramic composites for use as high energy brake lining materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Materials were studied as candidates for development as potential new aircraft brake lining materials. These families were (1) copper-graphite composites; (2) nickel-graphite composites; (3) copper - rare-earth-oxide (gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) or lanthanum oxide (La2O3)) composites and copper - rare-earth-oxide (La2O3) - rare-earth-fluoride (lanthanum fluoride (LaF3)) composites; (4) nickel - rare-earth-oxide composites and nickel - rare-earth-oxide - rare-earth-fluoride composites. For comparison purposes, a currently used metal-ceramic composite was also studied. Results showed that the nickel-Gd2O3 and nickel-La2O3-LaF3 composites were comparable or superior in friction and wear performance to the currently used composite and therefore deserve to be considered for further development.

  4. Cubic spline interpolation of functions with high gradients in boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatov, I. A.; Zadorin, A. I.; Kitaeva, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    The cubic spline interpolation of grid functions with high-gradient regions is considered. Uniform meshes are proved to be inefficient for this purpose. In the case of widely applied piecewise uniform Shishkin meshes, asymptotically sharp two-sided error estimates are obtained in the class of functions with an exponential boundary layer. It is proved that the error estimates of traditional spline interpolation are not uniform with respect to a small parameter, and the error can increase indefinitely as the small parameter tends to zero, while the number of nodes N is fixed. A modified cubic interpolation spline is proposed, for which O((ln N/N)4) error estimates that are uniform with respect to the small parameter are obtained.

  5. Husimi functions at gradient index cavities designed by conformal transformation optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inbo; Cho, Jinhang; Kim, Yushin; Min, Bumki; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Rim, Sunghwan; Choi, Muhan

    2018-03-19

    Dielectric cavity systems, which have been studied extensively so far, have uniform refractive indices of their cavities, and Husimi functions, the most widely used phase space representation of optical modes formed in the cavities, accordingly were derived only for these homogeneous index cavities. For the case of the recently proposed gradient index dielectric cavities (called as transformation cavities) designed by optical conformal mapping, we show that the phase space structure of resonant modes can be revealed through the conventional Husimi functions by constructing a reciprocal virtual space. As examples, the Husimi plots were obtained for an anisotropic whispering gallery mode (WGM) and a short-lived mode supported in a limaçon-shaped transformation cavity. The phase space description of the corresponding modes in the reciprocal virtual space is compatible with the far-field directionality of the resonant modes in the physical space.

  6. Effects of metal primers on the bonding of an adhesive resin cement to noble metal ceramic alloys after thermal cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hiroyuki; Murahara, Sadaaki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2011-12-01

    Although the effectiveness of primers for resin bonding to noble alloys has been demonstrated, no effective clinical technique for bonding to noble metal ceramic alloys has been established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of metal primers on the shear bond strength of an adhesive resin to noble metal ceramic alloys after thermal cycling. Sixty-three disk-shaped specimens (10 × 2.5 mm) were cast from high-gold-content alloys (Super Metal W-85: W85 or IFK88 GR: IFK88), a high-palladium-content alloy (Super Metal N-40: N40), and an Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy (Castwell M.C.12: MC12). Smaller-sized disk-shaped specimens (8 × 2.5 mm) were fabricated with MC12. Bonding surfaces were finished with 600-grit SiC-paper and airborne-particle abraded with 50-μm alumina. Pairs of disks were primed (V-Primer: VP; ML Primer: ML; or Metaltite: MT) and bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B). The bond strengths were determined before and after 20,000 and 50,000 thermal cycles (n=7). Data were analyzed by using a 3-way ANOVA and the Bonferroni test (α=.05). Failure modes were determined by optical microscope and SEM observation. Bond strengths to high-gold-content alloys with VP and MT significantly decreased after the thermal cycling (Palloys were not degraded up to 50,000 thermal cycles when primed with ML. None of the primers evaluated was effective for high-palladium-content alloy. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Controls on plant functional surface cover types along a precipitation gradient in the Negev Desert of Israel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buis, E.; Veldkamp, A.; Boeken, B.; Breemen, van N.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the controls on functional surface cover types in four catchments along a semi-arid to arid precipitation gradient in the northern Negev Desert of Israel. First, we selected four functional types, based on their unique water use and redistribution functionality: shrubs, Asphodelus

  8. Fabrication of functionally gradient materials with internal channels in ceramics and ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyea-Weon

    Functionally Gradient Materials (FGMs) are inhomogeneous materials whose compositions vary from one phase to another. By tailoring the inhomogeneous properties, FGMs can be used to reduce the stresses that are caused by severe thermal gradients. Thermal gradient loading can further be compensated by heat transfer into a cooling fluid circulating in a network of channels and manifolds. In an envisioned application, heat from a localized source is transferred to the cooling fluid, easing sharp thermal loads while minimizing the unwanted spread of heat energy to the ambient surroundings. This study reports on the fabrication of functionally gradient ceramics and the embedding of simple internal channels within these ceramics. Functional gradiency (variation of composition) is built in via the layering of different components across the thickness of a plate sample. Traditional powder processing techniques are applied to fabricate the test pieces, and recently developed methods of joining are used to build assemblies from individually sintered plate layers. For a well-formed FGM to be made, materials parameters need to be selected based on mechanical, thermal and chemical properties. As a class, ceramics are hard, wear-resistant, refractory, electrically and thermally insulative, nonmagnetic, chemically stable, and oxidation-resistant. However, because of their brittleness, ceramics with minute channels are difficult to machine. Instead, for this study, a graphite fugitive phase is used as a spacer to support channel volumes within a ceramic powder compact; during pre-sintering, the graphite burns out to expose a network of channels. Full sintering fixes the final shape. At the operating temperatures of the ovens used in our fabrication study, sintering of alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, fully stabilized zirconia and hydroxyapatite have been successful, and these ceramic powders form the basis of the present fabrication studies. Inhomogeneities inherent in the

  9. Functional strategies drive community assembly of stream fishes along environmental gradients and across spatial scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troia, Matthew J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Gido, Keith B. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Trade-offs among functional traits produce multi-trait strategies that shape species interactions with the environment and drive the assembly of local communities from regional species pools. Stream fish communities vary along stream size gradients and among hierarchically structured habitat patches, but little is known about how the dispersion of strategies varies along environmental gradients and across spatial scales. We used null models to quantify the dispersion of reproductive life history, feeding, and locomotion strategies in communities sampled at three spatial scales in a prairie stream network in Kansas, USA. Strategies were generally underdispersed at all spatial scales, corroborating the longstanding notion of abiotic filtering in stream fish communities. We tested for variation in strategy dispersion along a gradient of stream size and between headwater streams draining different ecoregions. Reproductive life history strategies became increasingly underdispersed moving from downstream to upstream, suggesting that abiotic filtering is stronger in headwaters. This pattern was stronger among reaches compared to mesohabitats, supporting the premise that differences in hydrologic regime among reaches filter reproductive life history strategies. Feeding strategies became increasingly underdispersed moving from upstream to downstream, indicating that environmental filters associated with stream size affect the dispersion of feeding and reproductive life history in opposing ways. Weak differences in strategy dispersion were detected between ecoregions, suggesting that different abiotic filters or strategies drive community differences between ecoregions. Lastly, given the pervasiveness of multi-trait strategies in plant and animal communities, we conclude that the assessment of strategy dispersion offers a comprehensive approach for elucidating mechanisms of community assembly.

  10. The Biogeographic Pattern of Microbial Functional Genes along an Altitudinal Gradient of the Tibetan Pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Qi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As the highest place of the world, the Tibetan plateau is a fragile ecosystem. Given the importance of microbial communities in driving soil nutrient cycling, it is of interest to document the microbial biogeographic pattern here. We adopted a microarray-based tool named GeoChip 4.0 to investigate grassland microbial functional genes along an elevation gradient from 3200 to 3800 m above sea level open to free grazing by local herdsmen and wild animals. Interestingly, microbial functional diversities increase with elevation, so does the relative abundances of genes associated with carbon degradation, nitrogen cycling, methane production, cold shock and oxygen limitation. The range of Shannon diversities (10.27–10.58 showed considerably smaller variation than what was previously observed at ungrazed sites nearby (9.95–10.65, suggesting the important role of livestock grazing on microbial diversities. Closer examination showed that the dissimilarity of microbial community at our study sites increased with elevations, revealing an elevation-decay relationship of microbial functional genes. Both microbial functional diversity and the number of unique genes increased with elevations. Furthermore, we detected a tight linkage of greenhouse gas (CO2 and relative abundances of carbon cycling genes. Our biogeographic study provides insights on microbial functional diversity and soil biogeochemical cycling in Tibetan pastures.

  11. The Biogeographic Pattern of Microbial Functional Genes along an Altitudinal Gradient of the Tibetan Pasture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Qi; Zhao, Mengxin; Wang, Shiping; Ma, Xingyu; Wang, Yuxuan; Gao, Ying; Lin, Qiaoyan; Li, Xiangzhen; Gu, Baohua; Li, Guoxue; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2017-06-13

    As the highest place of the world, the Tibetan plateau is a fragile ecosystem. Given the importance of microbial communities in driving soil nutrient cycling, it is of interest to document the microbial biogeographic pattern here. We adopted a microarray-based tool named GeoChip 4.0 to investigate grassland microbial functional genes along an elevation gradient from 3200 to 3800 m above sea level open to free grazing by local herdsmen and wild animals. Interestingly, microbial functional diversities increase with elevation, so does the relative abundances of genes associated with carbon degradation, nitrogen cycling, methane production, cold shock and oxygen limitation. The range of Shannon diversities (10.27–10.58) showed considerably smaller variation than what was previously observed at ungrazed sites nearby (9.95–10.65), suggesting the important role of livestock grazing on microbial diversities. Closer examination showed that the dissimilarity of microbial community at our study sites increased with elevations, revealing an elevation-decay relationship of microbial functional genes. Both microbial functional diversity and the number of unique genes increased with elevations. Furthermore, we detected a tight linkage of greenhouse gas (CO2) and relative abundances of carbon cycling genes. Our biogeographic study provides insights on microbial functional diversity and soil biogeochemical cycling in Tibetan pastures.

  12. Implementation of Molecular Gradients for Local Hybrid Density Functionals Using Seminumerical Integration Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawohn, Sascha; Bahmann, Hilke; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-09-13

    We present the first implementation of the derivative of the local hybrid exchange-correlation energy with respect to the displacement of nuclei in a Gaussian-type atomic basis set. This extends a recent efficient implementation of local hybrid functionals for self-consistent Kohn-Sham and linear-response TDDFT calculations into the TURBOMOLE program package. In contrast to seminumerical schemes for global exact-exchange admixtures and to the related SCF and TDDFT implementations of local hybrid functionals, additional analytical integrals have to be evaluated at each grid point in the case of molecular gradients. The overall efficiency of the present scheme is improved through prescreening with the density matrix (P-junctions), as well as with spherical overlap estimates (S-junctions). Comparative timings for structure optimizations with local vs global hybrid functionals are discussed while gauging the accuracy for S- and P-junctions using varying thresholds. Local hybrids are furthermore assessed for structure optimization and harmonic vibrational frequency calculations (using numerical second derivatives) of a selection of test systems, comparing with experimental data and some widely used density functionals.

  13. The gradient flow coupling in the Schrödinger functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Patrick; Ramos, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    We study the perturbative behavior of the Yang-Mills gradient flow in the Schrödinger Functional, both in the continuum and on the lattice. The energy density of the flow field is used to define a running coupling at a scale given by the size of the finite volume box. From our perturbative computation we estimate the size of cutoff effects of this coupling to leading order in perturbation theory. On a set of N f = 2 gauge field ensembles in a physical volume of L ~ 0 .4 fm we finally demonstrate the suitability of the coupling for a precise continuum limit due to modest cutoff effects and high statistical precision.

  14. Functional diversity of benthic ciliate communities in response to environmental gradients in a wetland of Yangtze Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Fan, Xinpeng; Warren, Alan; Zhang, Liquan; Xu, Henglong

    2018-02-01

    Researches on the functional diversity of benthic ecosystems have mainly focused on macrofauna, and studies on functional structure of ciliate communities have been based only on trophic- or size-groups. Current research was carried out on the changing patterns of classical and functional diversity of benthic ciliates in response to environmental gradients at three sites in a wetland in Yangtze Estuary. The results showed that changes of environmental factors (e.g. salinity, sediment grain size and hydrodynamic conditions) in the Yangtze Estuary induce variability in species composition and functional trait distribution. Furthermore, increased species richness and diversity did not lead to significant changes in functional diversity due to functional redundancy. However, salt water intrusion of Yangtze Estuary during the dry season could cause reduced functional diversity of ciliate communities. Current study provides the first insight into the functional diversity of ciliate communities in response to environmental gradients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Versatile van der Waals Density Functional Based on a Meta-Generalized Gradient Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haowei Peng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A “best-of-both-worlds” van der Waals (vdW density functional is constructed, seamlessly supplementing the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN meta-generalized gradient approximation for short- and intermediate-range interactions with the long-range vdW interaction from rVV10, the revised Vydrov–van Voorhis nonlocal correlation functional. The resultant SCAN+rVV10 is the only vdW density functional to date that yields excellent interlayer binding energies and spacings, as well as intralayer lattice constants in 28 layered materials. Its versatility for various kinds of bonding is further demonstrated by its good performance for 22 interactions between molecules; the cohesive energies and lattice constants of 50 solids; the adsorption energy and distance of a benzene molecule on coinage-metal surfaces; the binding energy curves for graphene on Cu(111, Ni(111, and Co(0001 surfaces; and the rare-gas solids. We argue that a good semilocal approximation should (as SCAN does capture the intermediate-range vdW through its exchange term. We have found an effective range of the vdW interaction between 8 and 16 Å for systems considered here, suggesting that this interaction is negligibly small at the larger distances where it reaches its asymptotic power-law decay.

  16. In Vitro Comparison of Marginal and Internal Fit of Press-on-Metal Ceramic (PoM) Restorations with Zirconium-Supported and Conventional Metal Ceramic Fixed Partial Dentures Before and After Veneering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Seda; Kulak-Özkan, Yasemin

    2015-07-01

    To compare marginal and internal fit between 3- and 4-unit press-on-metal (PoM) ceramic, zirconia-supported, and conventional metal ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPDs) before and after veneering. Ten pieces for each 3- and 4-unit MC, IPS InLine PoM, and IPS e.max ZirCAD/Zir Press FPDs were produced. Cross-sections from silicone replicas were examined and measured with a light microscope. Occlusal, axial, intermarginal, and marginal mean adaptation scores of cross-sectioned replicas and means of measurements obtained from 4 sites were calculated independently. Mean values for molars were 78.44 ± 32.01 μm (MC), 89.84 ± 29.20 μm (PoM), and 85.17 ± 28.49 μm (Zir). Premolar values were 76.08 ± 27.92 μm (MC), 89.94 ± 23.49 μm (PoM), and 87.18 ± 28.25 μm (Zir). No difference existed between the means of 3- and 4-unit FPDs except the molar-intermarginal region. The mean value of 4-unit FPDs (93.88 ± 25.41 μm) was less than the 3-unit FPDs (103.68 ± 24.55 μm) at the molar-inter marginal region. A gap increase was observed in all sites except the molar-axio-occlusal region after veneering. According to the mean difference, gap increases at the molar-marginal, molar-intermarginal, and premolar-intermarginal regions were statistically significant. A statistical difference was found at the molar-marginal region for 4-unit MCR (p = 0.041) and 4-unit PoM FPDs (p = 0.042) before and after veneering. Gap increase after veneering of 4-unit metal ceramics at molar-intermarginal, premolar-marginal, and premolar-intermarginal regions (p = 0.020; p = 0.015; p = 0.004) was significant. The gap measurements of the IPS InLine PoM and IPS e.max ZirCAD/Zir Press groups were all clinically acceptable. No studies on marginal and internal fit in the IPS InLine PoM system have been published to date. This study should be supported with future studies. No significant increase was observed after press-veneering the IPS e.max ZirCAD frameworks with an IPS e.max ZirPress material

  17. On the constrained minimization of smooth Kurdyka—Łojasiewicz functions with the scaled gradient projection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Marco; Bonettini, Silvia; Loris, Ignace; Porta, Federica; Rebegoldi, Simone

    2016-10-01

    The scaled gradient projection (SGP) method is a first-order optimization method applicable to the constrained minimization of smooth functions and exploiting a scaling matrix multiplying the gradient and a variable steplength parameter to improve the convergence of the scheme. For a general nonconvex function, the limit points of the sequence generated by SGP have been proved to be stationary, while in the convex case and with some restrictions on the choice of the scaling matrix the sequence itself converges to a constrained minimum point. In this paper we extend these convergence results by showing that the SGP sequence converges to a limit point provided that the objective function satisfies the Kurdyka-Łojasiewicz property at each point of its domain and its gradient is Lipschitz continuous.

  18. Non-Random Variability in Functional Composition of Coral Reef Fish Communities along an Environmental Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plass-Johnson, Jeremiah G; Taylor, Marc H; Husain, Aidah A A; Teichberg, Mirta C; Ferse, Sebastian C A

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the coral reef complex can affect predator-prey relationships, resource availability and niche utilisation in the associated fish community, which may be reflected in decreased stability of the functional traits present in a community. This is because particular traits may be favoured by a changing environment, or by habitat degradation. Furthermore, other traits can be selected against because degradation can relax the association between fishes and benthic habitat. We characterised six important ecological traits for fish species occurring at seven sites across a disturbed coral reef archipelago in Indonesia, where reefs have been exposed to eutrophication and destructive fishing practices for decades. Functional diversity was assessed using two complementary indices (FRic and RaoQ) and correlated to important environmental factors (live coral cover and rugosity, representing local reef health, and distance from shore, representing a cross-shelf environmental gradient). Indices were examined for both a change in their mean, as well as temporal (short-term; hours) and spatial (cross-shelf) variability, to assess whether fish-habitat association became relaxed along with habitat degradation. Furthermore, variability in individual traits was examined to identify the traits that are most affected by habitat change. Increases in the general reef health indicators, live coral cover and rugosity (correlated with distance from the mainland), were associated with decreases in the variability of functional diversity and with community-level changes in the abundance of several traits (notably home range size, maximum length, microalgae, detritus and small invertebrate feeding and reproductive turnover). A decrease in coral cover increased variability of RaoQ while rugosity and distance both inversely affected variability of FRic; however, averages for these indices did not reveal patterns associated with the environment. These results suggest that increased

  19. Non-Random Variability in Functional Composition of Coral Reef Fish Communities along an Environmental Gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah G Plass-Johnson

    Full Text Available Changes in the coral reef complex can affect predator-prey relationships, resource availability and niche utilisation in the associated fish community, which may be reflected in decreased stability of the functional traits present in a community. This is because particular traits may be favoured by a changing environment, or by habitat degradation. Furthermore, other traits can be selected against because degradation can relax the association between fishes and benthic habitat. We characterised six important ecological traits for fish species occurring at seven sites across a disturbed coral reef archipelago in Indonesia, where reefs have been exposed to eutrophication and destructive fishing practices for decades. Functional diversity was assessed using two complementary indices (FRic and RaoQ and correlated to important environmental factors (live coral cover and rugosity, representing local reef health, and distance from shore, representing a cross-shelf environmental gradient. Indices were examined for both a change in their mean, as well as temporal (short-term; hours and spatial (cross-shelf variability, to assess whether fish-habitat association became relaxed along with habitat degradation. Furthermore, variability in individual traits was examined to identify the traits that are most affected by habitat change. Increases in the general reef health indicators, live coral cover and rugosity (correlated with distance from the mainland, were associated with decreases in the variability of functional diversity and with community-level changes in the abundance of several traits (notably home range size, maximum length, microalgae, detritus and small invertebrate feeding and reproductive turnover. A decrease in coral cover increased variability of RaoQ while rugosity and distance both inversely affected variability of FRic; however, averages for these indices did not reveal patterns associated with the environment. These results suggest that

  20. Marginal and Internal Discrepancies of Posterior Zirconia-Based Crowns Fabricated with Three Different CAD/CAM Systems Versus Metal-Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Rocio; Gonzalo, Esther; Gomez-Polo, Miguel; Suárez, María J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the marginal and internal fit of metalceramic and zirconia-based crowns. Forty standardized steel specimens were prepared to receive posterior crowns and randomly divided into four groups (n = 10): (1) metal-ceramic, (2) NobelProcera Zirconia, (3) Lava Zirconia, and (4) VITA In-Ceram YZ. All crowns were cemented with glass-ionomer agent and sectioned buccolingually. A scanning electron microscope was used for measurements. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed rank test (α = .05) statistical analyses were conducted. Significant differences (P zirconia groups. No differences were found for the axial wall fit (P = .057). Significant differences were shown among the groups in discrepancies at the occlusal cusp (P = .0012) and at the fossa (P = .0062). No differences were observed between surfaces. All zirconia groups showed better values of marginal discrepancies than the metal-ceramic group. Procera Zirconia showed the lowest gaps.

  1. Functional traits of the understory plant community of a pyrogenic longleaf pine forest across environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Gregory M; Anderson, Steven M; Ungberg, Eric A; Wright, Justin P

    2017-08-01

    Understanding and predicting the response of plant communities to environmental changes and disturbances such as fire requires an understanding of the functional traits present in the system, including within and across species variability, and their dynamics over time. These data are difficult to obtain as few studies provide comprehensive information for more than a few traits or species, rarely cover more than a single growing season, and usually present only summary statistics of trait values. As part of a larger study seeking to understand the dynamics of plant communities in response to different prescribed fire regimes, we measured the functional traits of the understory plant communities located in over 140 permanent plots spanning strong gradients in soil moisture in a pyrogenic longleaf pine forest in North Carolina, USA, over a four-year period from 2011 and 2014. We present over 120,000 individual trait measurements from over 130 plant species representing 91 genera from 47 families. We include data on the following 18 traits: specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content, leaf area, leaf length, leaf width, leaf perimeter, plant height, leaf nitrogen, leaf carbon, leaf carbon to nitrogen ratio, water use efficiency, time to ignition, maximum flame height, maximum burn temperature, mass-specific burn time, mass-specific smolder time, branching architecture, and the ratio of leaf matter consumed by fire. We also include information on locations, soil moisture, relative elevation, soil bulk density, and fire histories for each site. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. Microbial functional diversity associated with plant litter decomposition along a climatic gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Chen; Steinberger, Yosef

    2012-08-01

    Predicted changes in climate associated with increased greenhouse gas emissions can cause increases in global mean temperature and changes in precipitation regimes. These changes may affect key soil processes, e.g., microbial CO(2) evolution and biomass, mineralization rates, primary productivity, biodiversity, and litter decomposition, which play an important role in carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Our study examined the changes in litter microbial communities and decomposition along a climatic gradient, ranging from arid desert to humid Mediterranean regions in Israel. Wheat straw litter bags were placed in arid, semi-arid, Mediterranean, and humid Mediterranean sites. Samples were collected seasonally over a 2-year period in order to evaluate mass loss, litter moisture, C/N ratio, bacterial colony-forming units (CFUs), microbial CO(2) evolution and biomass, microbial functional diversity, and catabolic profile. Decomposition rate was the highest during the first year of the study at the Mediterranean and arid sites. Community-level physiological profile and microbial biomass were the highest in summer, while bacterial CFUs were the highest in winter. Microbial functional diversity was found to be highest at the humid Mediterranean site, whereas substrate utilization increased at the arid site. Our results support the assumption that climatic factors control litter degradation and regulate microbial activity.

  3. Global Convergence of Arbitrary-Block Gradient Methods for Generalized Polyak-{\\L} ojasiewicz Functions

    KAUST Repository

    Csiba, Dominik

    2017-09-09

    In this paper we introduce two novel generalizations of the theory for gradient descent type methods in the proximal setting. First, we introduce the proportion function, which we further use to analyze all known (and many new) block-selection rules for block coordinate descent methods under a single framework. This framework includes randomized methods with uniform, non-uniform or even adaptive sampling strategies, as well as deterministic methods with batch, greedy or cyclic selection rules. Second, the theory of strongly-convex optimization was recently generalized to a specific class of non-convex functions satisfying the so-called Polyak-{\\\\L}ojasiewicz condition. To mirror this generalization in the weakly convex case, we introduce the Weak Polyak-{\\\\L}ojasiewicz condition, using which we give global convergence guarantees for a class of non-convex functions previously not considered in theory. Additionally, we establish (necessarily somewhat weaker) convergence guarantees for an even larger class of non-convex functions satisfying a certain smoothness assumption only. By combining the two abovementioned generalizations we recover the state-of-the-art convergence guarantees for a large class of previously known methods and setups as special cases of our general framework. Moreover, our frameworks allows for the derivation of new guarantees for many new combinations of methods and setups, as well as a large class of novel non-convex objectives. The flexibility of our approach offers a lot of potential for future research, as a new block selection procedure will have a convergence guarantee for all objectives considered in our framework, while a new objective analyzed under our approach will have a whole fleet of block selection rules with convergence guarantees readily available.

  4. Realizing ecosystem services: wetland hydrologic function along a gradient of ecosystem condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Daniel L; Cohen, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Wetlands provide numerous ecosystem services, from habitat provision to pollutant removal, floodwater storage, and microclimate regulation. Delivery of particular services relies on specific ecological functions, and thus to varying degree on wetland ecological condition, commonly quantified as departure from minimally impacted reference sites. Condition assessments are widely adopted as regulatory indicators of ecosystem function, and for some services (e.g., habitat) links between condition and function are often direct. For others, however, links are more tenuous, and using condition alone to enumerate ecosystem value (e.g., for compensatory mitigation) may underestimate important services. Hydrologic function affects many services cited in support of wetland protection both directly (floodwater retention, microclimate regulation) and indirectly (biogeochemical cycling, pollutant removal). We investigated links between condition and hydrologic function to test the hypothesis, embedded in regulatory assessment of wetland value, that condition predicts function. Condition was assessed using rapid and intensive approaches, including Florida's official wetland assessment tool, in 11 isolated forested wetlands in north Florida (USA) spanning a land use intensity gradient. Hydrologic function was assessed using hydrologic regime (mean, variance, and rates of change of water depth), and measurements of groundwater exchange and evapotranspiration (ET). Despite a wide range in condition, no systematic variation in hydrologic regime was observed; indeed reference sites spanned the full range of variation. In contrast, ET was affected by land use, with higher rates in intensive (agriculture and urban) landscapes in response to higher leaf area. ET determines latent heat exchange, which regulates microclimate, a valuable service in urban heat islands. Higher ET also indicates higher productivity and thus carbon cycling. Groundwater exchange regularly reversed flow direction

  5. Effect of electric arc, gas oxygen torch and induction melting techniques on the marginal accuracy of cast base-metal and noble metal-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cogolludo, Pablo; Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Lynch, Christopher D; Suárez-García, María-Jesús

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most appropriate alloy composition and melting technique by evaluating the marginal accuracy of cast metal-ceramic crowns. Seventy standardised stainless-steel abutments were prepared to receive metal-ceramic crowns and were randomly divided into four alloy groups: Group 1: palladium-gold (Pd-Au), Group 2: nickel-chromium-titanium (Ni-Cr-Ti), Group 3: nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and Group 4: titanium (Ti). Groups 1, 2 and 3 were in turn subdivided to be melted and cast using: (a) gas oxygen torch and centrifugal casting machine (TC) or (b) induction and centrifugal casting machine (IC). Group 4 was melted and cast using electric arc and vacuum/pressure machine (EV). All of the metal-ceramic crowns were luted with glass-ionomer cement. The marginal fit was measured under an optical microscope before and after cementation using image analysis software. All data was subjected to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Duncan's multiple range test was run for post-hoc comparisons. The Student's t-test was used to investigate the influence of cementation (α=0.05). Uncemented Pd-Au/TC samples achieved the best marginal adaptation, while the worst fit corresponded to the luted Ti/EV crowns. Pd-Au/TC, Ni-Cr and Ti restorations demonstrated significantly increased misfit after cementation. The Ni-Cr-Ti alloy was the most predictable in terms of differences in misfit when either torch or induction was applied before or after cementation. Cemented titanium crowns exceeded the clinically acceptable limit of 120μm. The combination of alloy composition, melting technique, casting method and luting process influences the vertical seal of cast metal-ceramic crowns. An accurate use of the gas oxygen torch may overcome the results attained with the induction system concerning the marginal adaptation of fixed dental prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Loosening torque of prosthetic screws in metal-ceramic or metal-acrylic resin implant-supported dentures with different misfit levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Paludo, Litiane; Ferraz Mesquita, Marcelo; Schuh, Christian; Federizzi, Leonardo; Oro Spazzin, Aloísio

    2013-04-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the prosthesis material (metal-acrylic resin or metal-ceramic) on loosening torque of the prosthetic screws in an implant-supported mandibular denture under two levels of vertical misfit. Ten frameworks were fabricated with commercially pure titanium, and five of them received acrylic resin and acrylic artificial teeth as veneering material and the other five were veneered with porcelain. Two levels of vertical fit were also created by fabricating 20 cast models to obtain four experimental groups according to the prosthesis material and misfit: Group 1 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a passive fit); Group 2 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a non-passive fit); Group 3 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a passive fit); and Group 4 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a non-passive fit). Two hundred prosthetic titanium-alloy screws were divided in 40 sets (five screws per set, n=10). After 24h, the loosening torque of the screws was evaluated using a digital torque meter. The results were submitted to two-way ANOVA analysis of variance followed by a Tukey's test (α=0.05). The mean values and standard deviations for each group were G1=7.05 (1.64), G2=5.52 (0.90), G3=6.46 (1.34), and G4=4.35 (0.99). Overall, the prosthesis material and misfit factors showed a statistically significant influence on the loosening torque (p<0.05). Metal-ceramic prosthesis and misfits decreased the loosening of the torque of the prosthetic screws. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of recasting on the elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems determines their flexural strength and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Recycling of basic alloys is often a clinical practice, despite the possible effects on the quality of the future metal-ceramic dentures. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the elastic modulus of metalceramic systems in making fixed partial dentures. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C were made. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Three- point bending test was used to determine elastic modulus, recommended by the standard ISO 9693:1999. Fracture load for damaging ceramic layer was recorded on the universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with the speed of 0,05 mm/min. Results. The results of this research revealed significant differences between elasticity modules of metal-ceramic samples in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on the elastic modulus of the examined alloys. This research showed the slight linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 6th generation of recycling. After the 6th recycling there was a sudden fall of elastic modulus. Conclusion. Recasting of nickelchromium and cobalt-chromium alloys is not recommended because of the reduced elastic modulus of these alloys. Instead of reusing previously recasted alloys, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturer. .

  8. Evaluation of marginal and internal gaps of metal ceramic crowns obtained from conventional impressions and casting techniques with those obtained from digital techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathika Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accuracy in fit of cast metal restoration has always remained as one of the primary factors in determining the success of the restoration. A well-fitting restoration needs to be accurate both along its margin and with regard to its internal surface. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the marginal fit of metal ceramic crowns obtained by conventional inlay casting wax pattern using conventional impression with the metal ceramic crowns obtained by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technique using direct and indirect optical scanning. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study on preformed custom-made stainless steel models with former assembly that resembles prepared tooth surfaces of standardized dimensions comprised three groups: the first group included ten samples of metal ceramic crowns fabricated with conventional technique, the second group included CAD/CAM-milled direct metal laser sintering (DMLS crowns using indirect scanning, and the third group included DMLS crowns fabricated by direct scanning of the stainless steel model. The vertical marginal gap and the internal gap were evaluated with the stereomicroscope (Zoomstar 4; post hoc Turkey's test was used for statistical analysis. One-way analysis of variance method was used to compare the mean values. Results and Conclusion: Metal ceramic crowns obtained from direct optical scanning showed the least marginal and internal gap when compared to the castings obtained from inlay casting wax and indirect optical scanning. Indirect and direct optical scanning had yielded results within clinically acceptable range.

  9. Clinical heterogeneity among people with high functioning autism spectrum conditions: evidence favouring a continuous severity gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodbury-Smith Marc

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASCs are characterized by a high degree of clinical heterogeneity, but the extent to which this variation represents a severity gradient versus discrete phenotypes is unclear. This issue has complicated genetic studies seeking to investigate the genetic basis of the high hereditability observed clinically in those with an ASC. The aim of this study was to examine the possible clustering of symptoms associated with ASCs to determine whether the observed distribution of symptom type and severity supported either a severity or a symptom subgroup model to account for the phenotypic variation observed within the ASCs. Methods We investigated the responses of a group of adults with higher functioning ASCs on the fifty clinical features examined in the Autism Spectrum Quotient, a screening questionnaire used in the diagnosis of higher functioning ASCs. In contrast to previous studies we have used this instrument with no a priori assumptions about any underlying factor structure of constituent items. The responses obtained were analyzed using complete linkage hierarchical cluster analysis. For the members of each cluster identified the mean score on each Autism Spectrum Quotient question was calculated. Results Autism Spectrum Quotient responses from a total of 333 individuals between the ages of 16.6 and 78.0 years were entered into the hierarchical cluster analysis. The four cluster solution was the one that generated the largest number of clusters that did not also include very small cluster sizes, defined as a membership comprising 10 individuals or fewer. Examination of these clusters demonstrated that they varied in total Autism Spectrum Quotient but that the profiles across the symptoms comprising the Autism Spectrum Quotient did not differ independently of this severity factor. Conclusion These results are consistent with a unitary spectrum model, suggesting that the clinical heterogeneity observed

  10. Design and fabrication of integrated micro/macrostructure for 3D functional gradient systems based on additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming; Xie, Luofeng; Jiang, Weifeng; Yin, Guofu

    2018-05-01

    Functional gradient systems have important applications in many areas. Although a 2D dielectric structure that serves as the gradient index medium for controlling electromagnetic waves is well established, it may not be suitable for application in 3D case. In this paper, we present a method to realize functional gradient systems with 3D integrated micro/macrostructure. The homogenization of the structure is studied in detail by conducting band diagram analysis. The analysis shows that the effective medium approximation is valid even when periodicity is comparable to wavelength. The condition to ensure the polarization-invariant, isotropic, and frequency-independent property is investigated. The scheme for the design and fabrication of 3D systems requiring spatial material property distribution is presented. By using the vat photopolymerization process, a large overall size of macrostructure at the system level and precise fine features of microstructure at the unit cell level are realized, thus demonstrating considerable scalability of the system for wave manipulation.

  11. A follow-up study of up to 5 years of metal-ceramic crowns in maxillary central incisors for different gingival biotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianxiang; Wu, Ying; Chen, Jianrong; Su, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the outcomes of metal-ceramic crown restorations in maxillary central incisors for different gingival biotypes in a Chinese population. One hundred single metal-ceramic crowns were fabricated for 100 patients (50 for thin gingival type and 50 for thick gingival type) from April 2007 to October 2007 and evaluated according to the World Dental Federation criteria at baseline and annually at all follow-up examinations for 5 years. Gingival recession was recorded at the same time, as well. The failure-free rate over the 5-year clinical trial for thin gingival type (78.0%) was significantly lower than that for thick gingival type (94.0%; P = .02). Seven crowns were ranked as failures because of esthetic problems in patients with a thin gingival type. The restored teeth with a thin gingival type exhibited more gingival recession (1.09 ± 0.22 mm) than the control teeth (0.31 ± 0.16 mm; P = .01). Gingival biotype had a significant effect on the outcomes of metal-ceramic crown restorations in maxillary central incisors.

  12. Host Plant Physiology and Mycorrhizal Functioning Shift across a Glacial through Future [CO2] Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becklin, Katie M; Mullinix, George W R; Ward, Joy K

    2016-10-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO 2 ]) may modulate the functioning of mycorrhizal associations by altering the relative degree of nutrient and carbohydrate limitations in plants. To test this, we grew Taraxacum ceratophorum and Taraxacum officinale (native and exotic dandelions) with and without mycorrhizal fungi across a broad [CO 2 ] gradient (180-1,000 µL L -1 ). Differential plant growth rates and vegetative plasticity were hypothesized to drive species-specific responses to [CO 2 ] and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. To evaluate [CO 2 ] effects on mycorrhizal functioning, we calculated response ratios based on the relative biomass of mycorrhizal (M Bio ) and nonmycorrhizal (NM Bio ) plants (R Bio = [M Bio - NM Bio ]/NM Bio ). We then assessed linkages between R Bio and host physiology, fungal growth, and biomass allocation using structural equation modeling. For T. officinale, R Bio increased with rising [CO 2 ], shifting from negative to positive values at 700 µL L -1 [CO 2 ] and mycorrhizal effects on photosynthesis and leaf growth rates drove shifts in R Bio in this species. For T. ceratophorum, R Bio increased from 180 to 390 µL L -1 and further increases in [CO 2 ] caused R Bio to shift from positive to negative values. [CO 2 ] and fungal effects on plant growth and carbon sink strength were correlated with shifts in R Bio in this species. Overall, we show that rising [CO 2 ] significantly altered the functioning of mycorrhizal associations. These symbioses became more beneficial with rising [CO 2 ], but nonlinear effects may limit plant responses to mycorrhizal fungi under future [CO 2 ]. The magnitude and mechanisms driving mycorrhizal-CO 2 responses reflected species-specific differences in growth rate and vegetative plasticity, indicating that these traits may provide a framework for predicting mycorrhizal responses to global change. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Analysis of adhesion test methods and the evaluation of their use for ion-beam-mixed metal/ceramic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, J.E.

    1988-07-01

    Several thin film adhesion tests have been examined to determine which provides the most reliable method for the measurement of the adhesion of thin metallic films to ceramic substrate. An attempt was made to use the testing techniques described to measure adhesion changes caused by ion beam mixing for a variety of metal/ceramic systems. The techniques analyzed were the scratch test, the acoustic-emission test, and the pull test. The major variables of the scratch test include film thickness, substrate hardness, and stylus radius, but it is not known precisely what effects changes in these have on the measurement of adhesion. The scratch analyses methods discussed in the literature, each describing a load or stress on the system that is presumed to cause de-adhesion, do not always hold because none of the analyses account for both plastic and elastic deformation or incorporate many of the important parameters. The scratch test was much more likely to reveal a critical value for de-adhesion for relatively brittle films such as chromium than for ductile films such as nickel. 65 refs, 29 figs, 17 tabs.

  14. Revealing Soil Structure and Functional Macroporosity along a Clay Gradient Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Arthur, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The influence of clay content in soil-pore structure development and the relative importance of macroporosity in governing convective fluid flow are two key challenges toward better understanding and quantifying soil ecosystem functions. In this study, soil physical measurements (soil......-water retention and air permeability) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning were combined and used from two scales on intact soil columns (100 and 580 cm3). The columns were sampled along a natural clay gradient at six locations (L1, L2, L3, L4, L5 and L6 with 0.11, 0.16, 0.21, 0.32, 0.38 and 0.46 kg kg−1...... clay content, respectively) at a field site in Lerbjerg, Denmark. The water-holding capacity of soils markedly increased with increasing soil clay content, while significantly higher air permeability was observed for the L1 to L3 soils than for the L4 to L6 soils. Higher air permeability values...

  15. High temperature thermo-physical properties of SPS-ed W–Cu functional gradient materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatanu, Magdalena; Enculescu, Monica; Galatanu, Andrei

    2018-02-01

    The divertor of a fusion reactor like DEMO requires materials able to withstand high heat fluxes and neutron irradiation for several years. For the water cooling concept of this essential part of the reactor, the most likely plasma facing material will be W, while the heatsink material considered is CuCrZr or an improved version of such a Cu-based alloy. To realize W–Cu alloy joints able to withstand thousands of thermal cycles can be difficult due to the difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of these materials. In this work we investigate the possibility to realize such joints by using W–Cu functional gradient materials (FGMs) produced from nanometric and micrometric metallic powders mixtures and consolidated by spark plasma sintering at about 900 °C. Morphological and thermal properties investigations, performed for typical compositions, shows that the best results are obtained using powders with micrometric dimensions. A resulting 1 mm thick, 3 layers W–Cu FGM produced by this simple method shows a remarkable almost constant thermal conductivity value of 200 W m‑1 K‑1, from room temperature up to 1000 °C.

  16. Evaluation of renal function with dynamic MRI-T2-weighted gradient echo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Katsuya

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic MRI of kidneys in healthy volunteers and patients with different 24-hour creatinine clearance (Ccr) levels, a dynamic study that employed the T2 weighted gradient echo technique (FLASH: TR/TE=34/25 msec, flip angle= 20 degrees) with single images during breathhold was performed on 10 healthy volunteers and 35 patients, all examined for the Ccr and suspected of having renal parenchymal disease after a phantom study. T1-weighted and dynamic MR imagings were obtained with a 1.5T imager. I analyzed the time-intensity curve of renal cortex and medulla, and defined a cortex decreased ratio (CDR) and medulla decreased ratio (MDR) in comparison with the Ccr. The cortico-medullary difference ratio (CMDR) of T1WI was also compared with the Ccr. The parameters of the T2 dynamic MRI study (CDR, MDR) better correlated with the Ccr than CMDR. Renal function can be quantitatively evaluated with the T2 dynamic MRI and there is a possibility that we can qualitatively evaluate the renal dysfunction and estimate its cause. (author)

  17. SDSS-IV MaNGA: stellar population gradients as a function of galaxy environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, D.; Thomas, D.; Maraston, C.; Westfall, K.; Etherington, J.; Riffel, R.; Mallmann, N. D.; Zheng, Z.; Argudo-Fernández, M.; Bershady, M.; Bundy, K.; Drory, N.; Law, D.; Yan, R.; Wake, D.; Weijmans, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Brownstein, J.; Lane, R. R.; Maiolino, R.; Masters, K.; Merrifield, M.; Nitschelm, C.; Pan, K.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.

    2017-02-01

    We study the internal radial gradients of stellar population properties within 1.5 Re and analyse the impact of galaxy environment. We use a representative sample of 721 galaxies with masses ranging between 109 M⊙ and 1011.5 M⊙ from the SDSS-IV survey MaNGA. We split this sample by morphology into early-type and late-type galaxies. Using the full spectral fitting code FIREFLY, we derive the light and mass-weighted stellar population properties, age and metallicity, and calculate the gradients of these properties. We use three independent methods to quantify galaxy environment, namely the Nth nearest neighbour, the tidal strength parameter Q and distinguish between central and satellite galaxies. In our analysis, we find that early-type galaxies generally exhibit shallow light-weighted age gradients in agreement with the literature and mass-weighted median age gradients tend to be slightly positive. Late-type galaxies, instead, have negative light-weighted age gradients. We detect negative metallicity gradients in both early- and late-type galaxies that correlate with galaxy mass, with the gradients being steeper and the correlation with mass being stronger in late-types. We find, however, that stellar population gradients, for both morphological classifications, have no significant correlation with galaxy environment for all three characterizations of environment. Our results suggest that galaxy mass is the main driver of stellar population gradients in both early and late-type galaxies, and any environmental dependence, if present at all, must be very subtle.

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Multilayered and Functionally Gradient Tribological Coatings With Measured Material Properties (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kang, Young S; Sharma, Shashi K; Sanders, Jeffrey H; Voevodin, Andrey A

    2006-01-01

    ...) gradient coatings with diamond like carbon (DLC) coating on 440C stainless steel substrate were assumed as a series of perfectly bonded layers with unique material properties and layer thickness...

  19. Functional traits reveal the expansion and packing of ecological niche space underlying an elevational diversity gradient in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Alex L; Trisos, Christopher H; Tobias, Joseph A

    2016-01-13

    Variation in species richness across environmental gradients may be associated with an expanded volume or increased packing of ecological niche space. However, the relative importance of these alternative scenarios remains unknown, largely because standardized information on functional traits and their ecological relevance is lacking for major diversity gradients. Here, we combine data on morphological and ecological traits for 523 species of passerine birds distributed across an Andes-to-Amazon elevation gradient. We show that morphological traits capture substantial variation in species dietary (75%) and foraging niches (60%) when multiple independent trait dimensions are considered. Having established these relationships, we show that the 14-fold increase in species richness towards the lowlands is associated with both an increased volume and density of functional trait space. However, we find that increases in volume contribute little to changes in richness, with most (78%) lowland species occurring within the range of trait space occupied at high elevations. Taken together, our results suggest that high species richness is mainly associated with a denser occupation of functional trait space, implying an increased specialization or overlap of ecological niches, and supporting the view that niche packing is the dominant trend underlying gradients of increasing biodiversity towards the lowland tropics. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Excited state geometry optimizations by analytical energy gradient of long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Mahito; Tsuneda, Takao; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2006-04-14

    An analytical excitation energy gradient of long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory (LC-TDDFT) is presented. This is based on a previous analytical TDDFT gradient formalism, which avoids solving the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham equation for each nuclear degree of freedom. In LC-TDDFT, exchange interactions are evaluated by combining the short-range part of a DFT exchange functional with the long-range part of the Hartree-Fock exchange integral. This LC-TDDFT gradient was first examined by calculating the excited state geometries and adiabatic excitation energies of small typical molecules and a small protonated Schiff base. As a result, we found that long-range interactions play a significant role even in valence excited states of small systems. This analytical LC-TDDFT gradient was also applied to the investigations of small twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) systems. By comparing with calculated ab initio multireference perturbation theory and experimental results, we found that LC-TDDFT gave much more accurate absorption and fluorescence energies of these systems than those of conventional TDDFTs using pure and hybrid functionals. For optimized excited state geometries, LC-TDDFT provided fairly different twisting and wagging angles of these small TICT systems in comparison with conventional TDDFT results.

  1. Radial gradients in initial mass function sensitive absorption features in the Coma brightest cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Thatte, Niranjan; Davies, Roger L.; Vaughan, Sam P.

    2017-02-01

    Using the Oxford Short Wavelength Integral Field specTrograph, we trace radial variations of initial mass function (IMF)-sensitive absorption features of three galaxies in the Coma cluster. We obtain resolved spectroscopy of the central 5 kpc for the two central brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) NGC4889, NGC4874, and the BCG in the south-west group NGC4839, as well as unresolved data for NGC4873 as a low-σ* control. We present radial measurements of the IMF-sensitive features: sodium Na ISDSS, calcium triplet CaT, and iron-hydride FeH0.99, along with the magnesium Mg I0.88 and titanium oxide TiO0.89 features. We employ two separate methods for both telluric correction and sky subtraction around the faint FeH feature to verify our analysis. Within NGC4889 we find strong gradients of Na ISDSS and CaT but a flat FeH profile, which, from comparing to stellar population synthesis models, suggests an old, α-enhanced population with a Chabrier, or even bottom-light IMF. The age and abundance are in line with previous studies but the normal IMF is in contrast to recent results suggesting an increased IMF slope with increased velocity dispersion. We measure flat Na ISDSS and FeH profiles within NGC4874, and determine an old, possibly slightly α-enhanced and Chabrier IMF population. We find an α-enhanced, Chabrier IMF population in NGC4873. Within NGC4839 we measure both strong Na ISDSS and strong FeH, although with a large systematic uncertainty, suggesting a possible heavier IMF. The IMFs we infer for these galaxies are supported by published dynamical modelling. We stress that IMF constraints should be corroborated by further spectral coverage and independent methods on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis.

  2. Floristic-functional variation of tree component along an altitudinal gradient in araucaria forest areas, in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleski, Vanessa F; Higuchi, Pedro; Silva, Ana Carolina DA; Silva, Mariele A F DA; Nunes, Amanda S; Loebens, Rodineli; Souza, Karine DE; Ferrari, Jheniffer; Lima, Carla L; Kilca, Ricardo V

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the taxonomic and functional variations of tree component of Araucaria Forest (AF) areas located along an altitudinal gradient (700, 900 and 1,600 m asl), in the southern region of Brazil. The functional traits determined were leaf area, specific leaf area, wood density, maximum potential height and dispersal syndromes and deciduousness. The data were analyzed through a functional and taxonomic dissimilarity dendrograms, community-weighted mean trait values, parametric and nonparametric tests, and Principal Component Analysis. The largest floristic-structural similarity was observed between the lower altitude areas (700 and 900 m asl), whose Bray-Curtis distance was 0.63. The area at 700 m asl was characterized by a predominance of deciduous and semi-deciduous species, with a high number of self- and wind-dispersed species, whereas the area at 1,600 m asl exhibited a predominance of animal-dispersed and evergreen species. It was also observed that there were significant variations for leaf traits, basic wood density and maximum potential height. Over all altitudinal gradient, the ordinations indicated that there was no evidence of functional differentiation among dispersal and deciduousness groups. In conclusion, the evaluated Araucaria Forest areas presented high floristic-functional variation of the tree component along the altitudinal gradient.

  3. Spatial patterns of littoral zooplankton assemblages along a salinity gradient in a brackish sea: A functional diversity perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Laura K.; Leskinen, Elina; Lehtonen, Hannu; Nurminen, Leena

    2017-11-01

    The distribution patterns and diversity of littoral zooplankton are both key baseline information for understanding the functioning of coastal ecosystems, and for identifying the mechanisms by which the impacts of recently increased eutrophication are transferred through littoral food webs. In this study, zooplankton community structure and diversity along a shallow coastal area of the northern Baltic Sea were determined in terms of horizontal environmental gradients. Spatial heterogeneity of the zooplankton community was examined along the gradient. Altogether 31 sites in shallow sandy bays on the coast of southwest Finland were sampled in the summer periods of 2009 and 2010 for zooplankton and environmental variables (surface water temperature, salinity, turbidity, wave exposure, macrophyte coverage, chlorophyll a and nutrients). Zooplankton diversity was measured as both taxonomic as well as functional diversity, using trait-based classification of planktonic crustaceans. Salinity, and to a lesser extent turbidity and temperature, were found to be the main predictors of the spatial patterns and functional diversity of the zooplankton community. Occurrence of cyclopoid copepods, as well as abundances of the calanoid copepod genus Acartia and the rotifer genus Keratella were found to be key factors in differentiating sites along the gradient. As far as we know, this is the first extensive study of functional diversity in Baltic Sea coastal zooplankton communities.

  4. Multilayer and functionally gradient films of plasma polymers intended as compatible interlayers for hybrid materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoferek, L.; Mistřík, J.; Trivedi, R.; Chen, K. S.; Peřina, Vratislav; Čech, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 254, SEP (2014), s. 49-53 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : multilayer * Gradient film * Plasma polymerization * ellipsometry * nanoindentation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.998, year: 2014

  5. An in vivo evaluation of fit of zirconium-oxide based ceramic single crowns, generated with two CAD/CAM systems, in comparison to metal ceramic single crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscaro, Leonello; Bonfiglioli, Roberto; Soattin, Massimo; Vigolo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess in vivo the marginal fit of single crowns produced using two CAD/CAM all-ceramic systems, in comparison to more traditional metal ceramic crowns. Thirty vital, caries-free, and previously untreated teeth were chosen in five patients who needed extraction for implant placement and therefore were included in this study. In the control group (C), 10 regular metal ceramic crowns with porcelain occlusal surfaces were fabricated. In the other two groups (Z and E), CAD/CAM technology was used for the fabrication of 20 zirconium-oxide-based ceramic single crowns with two systems. All zirconia crowns were cemented with glass-ionomer cement, always following the manufacturer's instructions. The same dentist carried out all clinical phases. The teeth were extracted 1 month later. Marginal gaps along vertical planes were measured for each crown, using a total of four landmarks for each tooth by means of a microscope at a magnification of 50×. On completion of microscopic evaluation, representative specimens from each group were prepared for ESEM evaluation. Mean and standard deviations of the four landmarks (mesial, distal, buccal, palatal) at each single crown were calculated for each group. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was performed to determine whether the four landmarks, taken into consideration together, differed between groups. Two-way ANOVA was performed to study in detail, for each landmark, how the three systems used to produce the FPDs affected the gap measurements. Differences were considered to be significant at p compared to more traditional metal ceramic crowns. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Modification of Structure and Tribological Properties of the Surface Layer of Metal-Ceramic Composite under Electron Irradiation in the Plasmas of Inert Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, K. V.; Mohovikov, A. A.; Yu, B.; Xu, Yu; Zhong, L.

    2018-01-01

    Metal-ceramic composites are the main materials for high-load parts in tribomechanical systems. Modern approaches to extend the operation life of tribomechanical systems are based on increasing the strength and tribological properties of the surface layer having 100 to 200 microns in depth. The essential improvement of the properties occurs when high dispersed structure is formed in the surface layer using high-energy processing. As a result of the dispersed structure formation the more uniform distribution of elastic stresses takes place under mechanical or thermal action, the energy of stress concentrators emergence significantly increases and the probability of internal defects formation reduces. The promising method to form the dispersed structure in the surface layer is pulse electron irradiation in the plasmas of inert gases combining electron irradiation and ion bombardment in one process. The present work reports upon the effect of pulse electron irradiation in plasmas of different inert gases with different atomic mass and ionization energy on the structure and tribological properties of the surface layer of TiC/(Ni-Cr) metal-ceramic composite with the volume ratio of the component being 50:50. It is experimentally shown that high-dispersed heterophase structure with a fraction of nanosized particles is formed during the irradiation. Electron microscopy study reveals that refining of the initial coarse TiC particles occurs via their dissolution in the molten metal binder followed by the precipitation of secondary fine particles in the interparticle layers of the binder. The depth of modified layer and the fraction of nanosized particles increase when the atomic number of the plasma gas increases and ionization energy decreases. The wear resistance of metal-ceramic composite improves in accordance to the formation of nanocrystalline structure in the surface layer.

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Metal-ceramic Bond Strengths of Nickel Chromium and Cobalt Chromium Alloys on Repeated Castings: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atluri, Kaleswara Rao; Vallabhaneni, Tapan Teja; Tadi, Durga Prasad; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Averneni, Premalatha

    2014-09-01

    Recasting the base metal alloys is done as a routine procedure in the dental laboratories whenever there is casting failure or to decrease the unit cost of a fixed partial denture. However, this procedure may affect the metal ceramic bond. Furthermore, it is unclear, as to which test closely predicts the bond strength of metal-ceramic interface. The aim was to compare the bond strength of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) alloys with dental ceramic on repeated castings using shear bond test with a custom made apparatus. Sixty metal ceramic samples were prepared using Wiron 99 and Wirobond C, respectively. Three subgroups were prepared for each of the groups. The first subgroup was prepared by casting 100% fresh alloy. The second and third subgroups were prepared by adding 50% of fresh alloy and the remnants of the previous cast alloy. The bond load (N) between alloy and dental porcelain was evaluated using universal testing machine using a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min, which had a 2500-kgf load cell. Mean values were compared using oneway analysis of variance with post-hoc Tukey's test and Student's t-test. The mean shear bond load of A0 (842.10N) was significantly higher than the load of A1 (645.50N) and A2 (506.28N). The mean shear bond load of B0 (645.57N) was significantly higher than the load of B1 (457.35N) and B2 (389.30N). Significant reduction in the bond strength was observed with the addition of the first recast alloy (A1 and B1) compared with the addition of second recast alloy (A2 and B2). Ni-Cr alloys (664.63N) showed higher bond strengths compared to that of Co-Cr alloys (497.41N). The addition of previously used base metal dental alloy for fabricating metal ceramic restorations is not recommended.

  8. Low speed sliding behavior of metal-ceramic couples at temperatures up to 800 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S. F.; Calabrese, Salvadore J.

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this work was to select a small number of alloys with favorable tribological characteristics and suitable high temperature properties, and evaluate their sliding performance against ceramics as a function of temperature. Five candidate alloys were chosen. They included four alloys containing cobalt and molybdenum, or tungsten and a nickel-base superalloy with good high-temperature strength. All of these alloys are known to form oxide films that protect sliding surfaces from damage at high temperature. These metals were slid against five ceramic flats of different compositions in slow speed reciprocating sliding tests. The test geometry was a metal pin sliding against a ceramic flat. Coefficients of friction and wear rates were measured over a temperature range from 25 to 800 C. Material transfer from the metals to the ceramics played a major role in most of the results. In the low-to intermediate-temperature range, the transferred films (with the exception of silicon carbide) coated the ceramic surface and sliding was essentially metal vs the transferred metal film. At higher temperatures, depending on the alloy composition, the transferred films oxidized and provided reasonable low friction and, in some instances, very low wear.

  9. Trait variation and functional diversity maintenance of understory herbaceous species coexisting along an elevational gradient in Yulong Mountain, Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahuang Luo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing trait variation across different ecological scales in plant communities has been viewed as a way to gain insights into the mechanisms driving species coexistence. However, little is known about how changes in intraspecific and interspecific traits across sites influence species richness and community assembly, especially in understory herbaceous communities. Here we partitioned the variance of four functional traits (maximum height, leaf thickness, leaf area and specific leaf area across four nested biological scales: individual, species, plot, and elevation to quantify the scale-dependent distributions of understory herbaceous trait variance. We also integrated the comparison of the trait variance ratios to null models to investigate the effects of different ecological processes on community assembly and functional diversity along a 1200-m elevational gradient in Yulong Mountain. We found interspecific trait variation was the main trait variation component for leaf traits, although intraspecific trait variation ranged from 10% to 28% of total variation. In particular, maximum height exhibited high plasticity, and intraspecific variation accounted for 44% of the total variation. Despite the fact that species composition varied across elevation and species richness decreased dramatically along the elevational gradient, there was little variance at our largest (elevation scale in leaf traits and functional diversity remained constant along the elevational gradient, indicating that traits responded to smaller scale influences. External filtering was only observed at high elevations. However, strong internal filtering was detected along the entire elevational gradient in understory herbaceous communities, possibly due to competition. Our results provide evidence that species coexistence in understory herbaceous communities might be structured by differential niche-assembled processes. This approach –– integrating different

  10. Partitioning the regional and local drivers of phylogenetic and functional diversity along temperate elevational gradients on an East Asian peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Chang-Bae

    2018-02-12

    Species-centric approaches to biodiversity in ecological research are limited in their ability to reflect the evolutionary history and functional diversity of community assembly. Recently, the introduction of alternative facets of biodiversity, such as phylogenetic and functional diversity, has shed light on this problem and improved our understanding of the processes underlying biodiversity patterns. Here, we investigated the phylogenetic and functional diversity patterns of α, β and γ components in woody plant assemblages along regional and local elevational gradients in South Korea. Although the patterns of phylogenetic and functional diversity varied along regional and local elevational transects, the main drivers were partitioned into two categories: regional area or climate for phylogenetic diversity, depending on whether the transect was at a regional or local scale; and habitat heterogeneity for functional diversity, which was derived in elevational bands. Moreover, environmental distance was more important than was geographic distance for phylogenetic and functional β diversity between paired elevational bands. These results support the hypothesis that niche-based deterministic processes such as environmental filtering and competitive exclusion are fundamental in structuring woody plant assemblages along temperate elevational gradients regardless of scale (regional vs. local) in our study areas.

  11. TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN MULTILAYER METAL-CERAMIC COATINGS UNDER NONSTATIONARY THERMAL EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy M. Samoilenko

    2017-01-01

    the proposed method it is possible to predict the performance of turbine blades, having the information about the intensity of phase transformations in the alloy and the temperature transitions in the process of gas turbine engine functioning (using the data of the on-board parameters monitoring and recording systems.

  12. New functionalities of potassium tantalate niobate deflectors enabled by the coexistence of pre-injected space charge and composition gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Campbell, Adrian L.; Henry, Michael G.; Yin, Stuart Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2017-10-01

    In most beam steering applications such as 3D printing and in vivo imaging, one of the essential challenges has been high-resolution high-speed multi-dimensional optical beam scanning. Although the pre-injected space charge controlled potassium tantalate niobate (KTN) deflectors can achieve speeds in the nanosecond regime, they deflect in only one dimension. In order to develop a high-resolution high-speed multi-dimensional KTN deflector, we studied the deflection behavior of KTN deflectors in the case of coexisting pre-injected space charge and composition gradient. We find that such coexistence can enable new functionalities of KTN crystal based electro-optic deflectors. When the direction of the composition gradient is parallel to the direction of the external electric field, the zero-deflection position can be shifted, which can reduce the internal electric field induced beam distortion, and thus enhance the resolution. When the direction of the composition gradient is perpendicular to the direction of the external electric field, two-dimensional beam scanning can be achieved by harnessing only one single piece of KTN crystal, which can result in a compact, high-speed two-dimensional deflector. Both theoretical analyses and experiments are conducted, which are consistent with each other. These new functionalities can expedite the usage of KTN deflection in many applications such as high-speed 3D printing, high-speed, high-resolution imaging, and free space broadband optical communication.

  13. Subjective Differences between Dentists and Patients about Relative Quality of Metal Ceramic Restorations placed in the Esthetic Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Moaleem, Mohammed M; Alkhayrat, Faisal M; Madkhali, Hussam A; Geathy, Ibrahim H; Qahhar, Mohammed Aw; Yaqoub, Ahmed; Mattoo, Khurshid A

    2017-02-01

    Esthetic perceptions could differ between the dentist and his patients among various regions and cultures. The aims of this study were to evaluate the subjective differences between the dentist and the patient in terms of esthetics of metal-ceramic crowns (MCcs). The study also aims to compare the mesiodistal (MD) and buccolingual (BL) dimensions of the cemented crown with its respective natural antimeric tooth. A total of 85 patients seeking treatment for a single crown (MC) were treated by the undergraduate students under supervision of respective academic staff. After cementation of the crowns, a 9-point questionnaire was given to patient and different dentists. A treatment cast for every single crown was poured. Then, the MD and BL dimensions of the crowns were compared against their respective antimeric tooth. The dentists and the patients agreed in the range of 50.5 to 90.5%. Least subjective differences were found for the length and width of the cemented crowns. The highest differences were noted for symmetry between the cemented crown and its antimeric natural tooth. A total of 31 to 38% of the patients differed from the dentist's evaluation for shade of the crown, color of the crown at the margin, contour of the crown, and the relationship of the crowns with the surrounding gingiva. The highest MD and BL dimensions were in the cemented crown of canines, while the lowest MD and BL diameters were for the cemented crowns of the lateral incisor crowns. Dentist and patient mostly agreed in terms of length (90%), width (81%) and relation of crown with free gingiva (74%). However, they differed mostly on the symmetry of the cemented crowns. The highest MD dimensions and BL diameter were in the cemented MCcs of canine, while the lowest were with lateral incisors. While fabricating a dental prosthesis, the dentist must know about patients' perception of esthetics; otherwise both clinical and laboratory efforts would not be enough to satisfy the esthetic needs of

  14. Development of an expert system for the simulation model for casting metal substructure of a metal-ceramic crown design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, Ivan; Hadzistevic, Miodrag; Vukelic, Djordje; Potran, Michal; Brajlih, Tomaz

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, the integrated CAD/CAE systems are favored solutions for the design of simulation models for casting metal substructures of metal-ceramic crowns. The worldwide authors have used different approaches to solve the problems using an expert system. Despite substantial research progress in the design of experts systems for the simulation model design and manufacturing have insufficiently considered the specifics of casting in dentistry, especially the need for further CAD, RE, CAE for the estimation of casting parameters and the control of the casting machine. The novel expert system performs the following: CAD modeling of the simulation model for casting, fast modeling of gate design, CAD eligibility and cast ability check of the model, estimation and running of the program code for the casting machine, as well as manufacturing time reduction of the metal substructure. The authors propose an integration method using common data model approach, blackboard architecture, rule-based reasoning and iterative redesign method. Arithmetic mean roughness values was determinated with constant Gauss low-pass filter (cut-off length of 2.5mm) according to ISO 4287 using Mahr MARSURF PS1. Dimensional deviation between the designed model and manufactured cast was determined using the coordinate measuring machine Zeiss Contura G2 and GOM Inspect software. The ES allows for obtaining the castings derived roughness grade number N7. The dimensional deviation between the simulation model of the metal substructure and the manufactured cast is 0.018mm. The arithmetic mean roughness values measured on the casting substructure are from 1.935µm to 2.778µm. The realized developed expert system with the integrated database is fully applicable for the observed hardware and software. Values of the arithmetic mean roughness and dimensional deviation indicate that casting substructures are surface quality, which is more than enough and useful for direct porcelain veneering. The

  15. Gradient of molecular Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov energy with a linear combination of atomic orbital quasiparticle wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masato

    2014-02-28

    The analytical gradient for the atomic-orbital-based Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) energy functional, the modified form of which was proposed by Staroverov and Scuseria to account for the static electron correlation [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 11107 (2002)], is derived. Interestingly, the Pulay force for the HFB energy is expressed with the same formula as that for the Hartree-Fock method. The efficiency of the present HFB energy gradient is demonstrated in the geometry optimizations of conjugated and biradical systems. The geometries optimized by using the HFB method with the appropriate factor ζ, which controls the degree of static correlation included, are found to show good agreement with those obtained by using a complete active-space self-consistent field method, although they are significantly dependent on ζ.

  16. A new macroscopically anisotropic pressure dependent yield function for metal matrix composite based on strain gradient plasticity for the microstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza; Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2013-01-01

    in addition to the elastic strain. Hill's classical anisotropic yield criterion is extended to cover the composite such that hydrostatic pressure dependency, Bauschinger stress and size-effects are considered. It is found that depending on the fiber volume fraction, the anisotropic yield surface......Metal matrix composites with long aligned elastic fibers are studied using an energetic rate independent strain gradient plasticity theory with an isotropic pressure independent yield function at the microscale. The material response is homogenized to obtain a conventional macroscopic model...... that exhibits anisotropic yield properties with a pressure dependence. At the microscale free energy includes both elastic strains and plastic strain gradients, and the theory demands higher order boundary conditions in terms of plastic strain or work conjugate higher order tractions. The mechanical response...

  17. A practice-based clinical evaluation of the survival and success of metal-ceramic and zirconia molar crowns: 5-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, S; Kramer, K; Bürgers, R; Roediger, M

    2016-02-01

    This practice-based study evaluates the survival and success of conventionally luted metal-ceramic and zirconia molar crowns fabricated by using a prolonged cooling period for the veneering porcelain. Fifty-three patients were treated from 07/2008 to 07/2009 with either metal-ceramic crowns (MCC) or zirconia crowns (ZC). Forty-five patients (26 female) with 91 restorations (obser-vational period: 64.0 ± 4.8 months) participated in a clinical follow-up examination and were included in the study. Estimated cumulative survival (ECSv), success (ECSc) and veneering ceramic success (ECVCSc) were calculated (Kaplan-Meier) and analysed by the crown fabrication technique and the position of the restoration (Cox regression model) (P crowns placed on tooth-neighboured abutments (n = 47), (5-year VCF-rate: 4.3%). In the present study, zirconia molar crowns demonstrated a 5-year ECSv, ECSc and ECVCSc comparable to MCCs. Irrespective of the fabrication technique, crowns on terminal abutments bear a significantly increased risk for VCFs. Clinical investigations with an increased number of restorations are needed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Marginal Adaptation, Gap Width, and Fracture Strength of Teeth Restored With Different All-Ceramic Vs Metal Ceramic Crown Systems: An in Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Carlo; Rosentritt, Martin; Llukacej, Altin; Baldissara, Paolo; Scotti, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated marginal adaptation before and after thermomechanical (TCML) loading, gap width and fracture strength of all-ceramic single crowns, as compared to porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM). Thirty extracted premolars were prepared with a round shoulder of 1.0 mm depth. Specimens were restored with zirconia-ceramic (Group 1), lithium disilicate (Group 2) and metal-ceramic single crowns (Group 3). The replica of each sample was observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to evaluate the crown-cement (c-c) and tooth-cement interface (t-c). After TCML, perfect margins decreased to 91.3% (c-c) and 93.9% (t-c) in Group 1, 94.6% (c-c) and 96.0% (t-c) in Group 2 and 73.5% (c-c) and 53.1% (t-c) in Group 3. The mean fracture strengths were 654.8 ± 98.1 N for Group 1, 551.3 ± 127 N for Group 2 and 501.43 ± 110.1 N for Group 3. All-ceramic systems could substitute for metal-ceramic crowns, but chipping of veneering ceramics, especially in zirconia-based crowns, should be investigated. Copyright© 2016 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  19. Microstructure and High Temperature Oxidation Property of Fe-Cr-B Based Metal/Ceramic Composite Manufactured by Powder Injection Molding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Yeun-Ah; Kim, Young-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Sik; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated the microstructure and high temperature oxidation property of Fe-Cr-B metal/ceramic composite manufactured using powder injection molding process. Observations of initial microstructure showed a unique structure where α-Fe and (Cr, Fe)2B form a continuous three-dimensional network. High temperature oxidation tests were performed at 900, 1000 and 1100 °C, for 24 h, and the oxidation weight gain according to each temperature condition was 0.13, 0.84 and 6.4 mg/cm2, respectively. The oxidation results according to time at 900 and 1000 °C conditions represented parabolic curves, and at 1100 °C condition formed a rectilinear curve. Observation and phase analysis results of the oxides identified Cr2O3 and SiO2 at 900 and 1000 °C. In addition to Cr2O3 and SiO2, CrBO3 and FeCr2O4 formed due to phase decomposition of boride were identified at 1100 °C. Based on the findings above, this study suggested the high temperature oxidation mechanism of Fe-Cr-B metal/ceramic composite manufactured using powder injection molding, and the possibility of its application as a high temperature component material was also discussed.

  20. Microstructure and High Temperature Oxidation Property of Fe-Cr-B Based Metal/Ceramic Composite Manufactured by Powder Injection Molding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Yeun-Ah; Kim, Young-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Sik; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the microstructure and high temperature oxidation property of Fe-Cr-B metal/ceramic composite manufactured using powder injection molding process. Observations of initial microstructure showed a unique structure where α-Fe and (Cr, Fe)2B form a continuous three-dimensional network. High temperature oxidation tests were performed at 900, 1000 and 1100 °C, for 24 h, and the oxidation weight gain according to each temperature condition was 0.13, 0.84 and 6.4 mg/cm2, respectively. The oxidation results according to time at 900 and 1000 °C conditions represented parabolic curves, and at 1100 °C condition formed a rectilinear curve. Observation and phase analysis results of the oxides identified Cr2O3 and SiO2 at 900 and 1000 °C. In addition to Cr2O3 and SiO2, CrBO3 and FeCr2O4 formed due to phase decomposition of boride were identified at 1100 °C. Based on the findings above, this study suggested the high temperature oxidation mechanism of Fe-Cr-B metal/ceramic composite manufactured using powder injection molding, and the possibility of its application as a high temperature component material was also discussed.

  1. Analysis of Partial Volume Effects on Arterial Input Functions Using Gradient Echo: A Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølby, Birgitte Fuglsang; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke; Pedersen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    of an AIF voxel including the relaxation properties of blood and tissue. Artery orientations parallel and perpendicular to the main magnetic field were investigated and AIF voxels were modeled to either include or be situated close to a large artery. The impact of partial volume effects on quantitative...... perfusion metrics was investigated for the gradient echo pulse sequence at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. It is shown that the tissue contribution broadens and introduces fluctuations in the AIF. Furthermore, partial volume effects bias perfusion metrics in a nonlinear fashion, compromising quantitative perfusion...

  2. Assessment of Gradient-Based Similarity Functions in the Stable Boundary Layer Derived from a Large-Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew

    2017-06-01

    Gradient-based similarity functions, evaluated based on data generated by a large-eddy simulation model of the stably stratified boundary layer, are compared with analogous similarity functions, derived from field observations in the surface layer during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment in the Arctic. The comparison is performed in terms of explicit and implicit local scaling systems, for the temperature and momentum fluxes, standard deviations of the vertical velocity and of temperature, as well as dissipation rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and for the temperature variance. The comparison shows the best agreement of the SHEBA-based similarity functions with analogous functions evaluated using the large-eddy simulation data in the range of the Richardson number 0.01<{ Ri}< 0.1.

  3. Voxel Spread Function (VSF) Method for Correction of Magnetic Field Inhomogeneity Effects in Quantitative Gradient-Echo-Based MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A; Sukstanskii, Alexander L; Luo, Jie; Wang, Xiaoqi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Macroscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities adversely affect different aspects of MRI images. In quantitative MRI when the goal is to quantify biological tissue parameters, they bias and often corrupt such measurements. The goal of this paper is to develop a method for correction of macroscopic field inhomogeneities that can be applied to a variety of quantitative gradient-echo-based MRI techniques. Methods We have re-analyzed a basic theory of gradient echo (GE) MRI signal formation in the presence of background field inhomogeneities and derived equations that allow for correction of magnetic field inhomogeneity effects based on the phase and magnitude of GE data. We verified our theory by mapping R2* relaxation rate in computer simulated, phantom, and in vivo human data collected with multi-GE sequences. Results The proposed technique takes into account voxel spread function (VSF) effects and allowed obtaining virtually free from artifacts R2* maps for all simulated, phantom and in vivo data except of the edge areas with very steep field gradients. Conclusion The VSF method, allowing quantification of tissue specific R2*-related tissue properties, has a potential to breed new MRI biomarkers serving as surrogates for tissue biological properties similar to R1 and R2 relaxation rate constants widely used in clinical and research MRI. PMID:23233445

  4. Functional traits variation explains the distribution of Aextoxicon punctatum (Aextoxicaceae in pronounced moisture gradients within fog-dependent forest fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz eSalgado-Negret

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and fragmentation are major threats to world forests. Understanding how functional traits related to drought tolerance change across small-scale, pronounced moisture gradients in fragmented forests is important to predict species’ responses to these threats. In the case of Aextoxicon punctatum, a dominant canopy tree in fog-dependent rain forest patches in semiarid Chile, we explored how the magnitude, variability and correlation patterns of leaf and xylem vessel traits and hydraulic conductivity varied across soil moisture gradients established within and among forest patches of different size, which are associated with differences in tree establishment and mortality patterns. Leaf traits varied across soil-moisture gradients produced by fog interception. Trees growing at drier leeward edges showed higher LMA (leaf mass per area, trichome and stomatal density than trees from the wetter core and windward zones. In contrast, xylem vessel traits (vessels diameter and density did not vary producing loss of hydraulic conductivity at drier leeward edges. We also detected higher levels of phenotypic integration and variability at leeward edges. The ability of A. punctatum to modify leaf traits in response to differences in soil moisture availability established over short distances (<500 m facilitates its persistence in contrasting microhabitats within forest patches. However, xylem anatomy showed limited plasticity, which increases cavitation risk at leeward edges. Greater patch fragmentation, together with fluctuations in irradiance and soil moisture in small patches, could result in higher risk of drought-related tree mortality, with profound impacts on hydrological balances at the ecosystem scale.

  5. Functionalized PDMS with versatile and scalable surface roughness gradients for cell culture

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Bingpu

    2015-07-21

    This manuscript describes a simple and versatile approach to engineering surface roughness gradients via combination of microfluidics and photo-polymerization. Through UV-mediated polymerization, N-isopropylacrylamide with concentration gradients are successfully grafted onto PDMS surface, leading to diverse roughness degrees on the obtained PDMS substrate. Furthermore, the extent of surface roughness can be controllably regulated via tuning the flow rate ratio between the monomer solution and deionized water. Average roughness ranging from 8.050 nm to 151.68 nm has well been achieved in this work. Such PDMS samples are also demonstrated to be capable of working as supporting substrates for controlling cell adhesion or detachment. Due to the different degrees of surface roughness on a single substrate, our method provides an effective approach for designing advanced surafecs for cell culture. Finally, the thermosensitive property of N-isopropylacrylamide makes our sample furnish as another means for controlling the cell detachment from the substrates with correspondence to the surrounding temperature.

  6. A taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic perspective on the community assembly of passerine birds along an elevational gradient in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuelian; Luo, Kang; Brown, Calum; Lin, Luxiang

    2018-03-01

    Integrating multiple facets of biodiversity to describe spatial and temporal distribution patterns is one way of revealing the mechanisms driving community assembly. We assessed the species, functional, and phylogenetic composition and structure of passerine bird communities along an elevational gradient both in wintering and breeding seasons in the Ailao Mountains, southwest China, in order to identify the dominant ecological processes structuring the communities and how these processes change with elevation and season. Our research confirms that the highest taxonomic diversity, and distinct community composition, was found in the moist evergreen broadleaf forest at high elevation in both seasons. Environmental filtering was the dominant force at high elevations with relatively cold and wet climatic conditions, while the observed value of mean pairwise functional and phylogenetic distances of low elevation was constantly higher than expectation in two seasons, suggested interspecific competition could play the key role at low elevations, perhaps because of relative rich resource result from complex vegetation structure and human-induced disturbance. Across all elevations, there was a trend of decreasing intensity of environmental filtering whereas increasing interspecific competition from wintering season to breeding season. This was likely due to the increased resource availability but reproduction-associated competition in the summer months. In general, there is a clear justification for conservation efforts to protect entire elevational gradients in the Ailao Mountains, given the distinct taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic compositions and also elevational migration pattern in passerine bird communities.

  7. Irradiance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, G.J.; Heckbert, P.S.; Technische Hogeschool Delft

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques

  8. Evaporation rate of water as a function of a magnetic field and field gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Cao, Hui-Ling; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Huan-Huan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Qian, Ai-Rong; Shang, Peng

    2012-12-11

    The effect of magnetic fields on water is still a highly controversial topic despite the vast amount of research devoted to this topic in past decades. Enhanced water evaporation in a magnetic field, however, is less disputed. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we present an investigation of the evaporation of water in a large gradient magnetic field. The evaporation of pure water at simulated gravity positions (0 gravity level (ab. g), 1 g, 1.56 g and 1.96 g) in a superconducting magnet was compared with that in the absence of the magnetic field. The results showed that the evaporation of water was indeed faster in the magnetic field than in the absence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the amount of water evaporation differed depending on the position of the sample within the magnetic field. In particular, the evaporation at 0 g was clearly faster than that at other positions. The results are discussed from the point of view of the evaporation surface area of the water/air interface and the convection induced by the magnetization force due to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility of water vapor and the surrounding air.

  9. Evaporation Rate of Water as a Function of a Magnetic Field and Field Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Cao, Hui-Ling; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Huan-Huan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Qian, Ai-Rong; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    The effect of magnetic fields on water is still a highly controversial topic despite the vast amount of research devoted to this topic in past decades. Enhanced water evaporation in a magnetic field, however, is less disputed. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we present an investigation of the evaporation of water in a large gradient magnetic field. The evaporation of pure water at simulated gravity positions (0 gravity level (ab. g), 1 g, 1.56 g and 1.96 g) in a superconducting magnet was compared with that in the absence of the magnetic field. The results showed that the evaporation of water was indeed faster in the magnetic field than in the absence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the amount of water evaporation differed depending on the position of the sample within the magnetic field. In particular, the evaporation at 0 g was clearly faster than that at other positions. The results are discussed from the point of view of the evaporation surface area of the water/air interface and the convection induced by the magnetization force due to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility of water vapor and the surrounding air. PMID:23443127

  10. Establishing Functional Relationships between Abiotic Environment, Macrophyte Coverage, Resource Gradients and the Distribution of Mytilus trossulus in a Brackish Non-Tidal Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonne Kotta

    Full Text Available Benthic suspension feeding mussels are an important functional guild in coastal and estuarine ecosystems. To date we lack information on how various environmental gradients and biotic interactions separately and interactively shape the distribution patterns of mussels in non-tidal environments. Opposing to tidal environments, mussels inhabit solely subtidal zone in non-tidal waterbodies and, thereby, driving factors for mussel populations are expected to differ from the tidal areas. In the present study, we used the boosted regression tree modelling (BRT, an ensemble method for statistical techniques and machine learning, in order to explain the distribution and biomass of the suspension feeding mussel Mytilus trossulus in the non-tidal Baltic Sea. BRT models suggested that (1 distribution patterns of M. trossulus are largely driven by separate effects of direct environmental gradients and partly by interactive effects of resource gradients with direct environmental gradients. (2 Within its suitable habitat range, however, resource gradients had an important role in shaping the biomass distribution of M. trossulus. (3 Contrary to tidal areas, mussels were not competitively superior over macrophytes with patterns indicating either facilitative interactions between mussels and macrophytes or co-variance due to common stressor. To conclude, direct environmental gradients seem to define the distribution pattern of M. trossulus, and within the favourable distribution range, resource gradients in interaction with direct environmental gradients are expected to set the biomass level of mussels.

  11. Evaluation of the onset of failure under mechanical and thermal stresses on luting agent for metal-ceramic and metal crowns by finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Agnihotri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term clinical failures of cemented prosthesis depend, to a large extent, on the integrity of the luting agent. The causative factors that lead to microfracture and, hence, failure of the luting agents are the stresses acting inside the oral cavity. Therefore, the present study was designed to develop an understanding of the relationship between stresses in the tooth and the failure potential of the luting agent. Two-dimensional finite element stress analysis was performed on the mandibular second premolar. The behavior of zinc-phosphate and glass-ionomer were studied under different crowns (metal-ceramic and metal crown and loading conditions (mechanical force of 450 N acting vertically over the occlusal surface, thermal loads of 60° and 0°C. It was observed from the study that failure threshold of the luting agent was influenced both by the elastic modulus of the luting agent and by the type of the crown.

  12. A simplified method to develop optimal gingival contours for the single implant-supported, metal-ceramic crown in the aesthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsel, Richard P; Capoferri, Daniele

    2008-05-01

    Prosthetic replacement of the missing single maxillary central incisor with an implant-supported crown represents a profound aesthetic challenge for the restorative dentist, laboratory technician, and surgeon. In addition to the visual fidelity of color, translucency, contour, and surface texture, the proper soft tissue outline is sacrosanct to the illusion of a natural tooth. The contrast between the uniformly round shoulder of the implant and the tooth's curvilinear cementoenamel junction is particularly problematic. This clinical report demonstrates a simplified method that precisely controls the facial gingival and proximal soft tissue contours for implant-supported, metal-ceramic crowns in the aesthetic zone, using the cervical anatomy of the maxillary incisor tooth as a guide. A new role for the provisional crown that is intended to maximize the volume of keratinized tissue is also described.

  13. Dissipation function and adaptive gradient reconstruction based smoke detection in video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Qiang; Shi, Chunlei

    2017-11-01

    A method for smoke detection in video is proposed. The camera monitoring the scene is assumed to be stationary. With the atmospheric scattering model, dissipation function is reflected transmissivity between the background objects in the scene and the camera. Dark channel prior and fast bilateral filter are used for estimating dissipation function which is only the function of the depth of field. Based on dissipation function, visual background extractor (ViBe) can be used for detecting smoke as a result of smoke's motion characteristics as well as detecting other moving targets. Since smoke has semi-transparent parts, the things which are covered by these parts can be recovered by poisson equation adaptively. The similarity between the recovered parts and the original background parts in the same position is calculated by Normalized Cross Correlation (NCC) and the original background's value is selected from the frame which is nearest to the current frame. The parts with high similarity are considered as smoke parts.

  14. Rethinking plant functional types in Earth System Models: pan-tropical analysis of tree survival across environmental gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. J.; Needham, J.; Xu, C.; Davies, S. J.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Giardina, C. P.; Condit, R.; Cordell, S.; Litton, C. M.; Hubbell, S.; Kassim, A. R. B.; Shawn, L. K. Y.; Nasardin, M. B.; Ong, P.; Ostertag, R.; Sack, L.; Tan, S. K. S.; Yap, S.; McDowell, N. G.; McMahon, S.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon cycling is a function of the growth and survival of trees. Current model representations of tree growth and survival at a global scale rely on coarse plant functional traits that are parameterized very generally. In view of the large biodiversity in the tropical forests, it is important that we account for the functional diversity in order to better predict tropical forest responses to future climate changes. Several next generation Earth System Models are moving towards a size-structured, trait-based approach to modelling vegetation globally, but the challenge of which and how many traits are necessary to capture forest complexity remains. Additionally, the challenge of collecting sufficient trait data to describe the vast species richness of tropical forests is enormous. We propose a more fundamental approach to these problems by characterizing forests by their patterns of survival. We expect our approach to distill real-world tree survival into a reasonable number of functional types. Using 10 large-area tropical forest plots that span geographic, edaphic and climatic gradients, we model tree survival as a function of tree size for hundreds of species. We found surprisingly few categories of size-survival functions emerge. This indicates some fundamental strategies at play across diverse forests to constrain the range of possible size-survival functions. Initial cluster analysis indicates that four to eight functional forms are necessary to describe variation in size-survival relations. Temporal variation in size-survival functions can be related to local environmental variation, allowing us to parameterize how demographically similar groups of species respond to perturbations in the ecosystem. We believe this methodology will yield a synthetic approach to classifying forest systems that will greatly reduce uncertainty and complexity in global vegetation models.

  15. Evaluation of hypersensitivity after the placement of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with two luting agents: Long-term results of a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozmacs, Carla; Schaper, Katharina; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2017-09-01

    Different luting materials are available for the cementation of fixed dental prostheses. Postcementation hypersensitivity is an occasional complication in the definitive delivery. How the choice of luting agent affects long-term postcementation sensitivity is unknown. The purpose of this prospective, randomized, controlled, split-mouth clinical trial was to compare the hypersensitivity of 2 cementation methods for metal-ceramic crowns. The primary endpoint was the evaluation of differences in hypersensitivity between the study groups over a study period of 5 years. The study investigated 20 participants with 40 metal-ceramic crowns cemented with either zinc phosphate cement or a self-adhesive resin cement, each in nonantagonistic contralateral quadrants (observation period of 5 years). The data regarding postcementation hypersensitivity included continuous patient-related outcome variables assessed using a visual analog scale (sign test; primary endpoint, level of significance α/3=.0167; secondary endpoint, level of significance, α=.05) and categorical variables represented by yes/no replies (absolute and relative frequencies). The sensitivity of teeth was controlled in relation to mastication, air streams, and hot and cold temperatures. The observation period was 5 years, with a dropout rate of 12.5% in the last 2 years. The results indicated no significant differences between the cement groups for patient- and clinical-related outcomes at any of the observed time points. As no differences were found between the 2 different cementation modes with respect to developing hypersensitivity after 5 years, the choice of a luting agent remains an individual practitioner decision. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of misfit on the occurrence of veneering porcelain fractures (chipping) in implant-supported metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses: an in vitro pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Nils; Larsson, Christel; Mattheos, Nikos; Janda, Martin

    2017-11-01

    Technical complications such as veneer fractures are more common in implant-supported than tooth-supported restorations. The underlying causes have not been fully identified. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether misfit between the restoration and the implant may affect the risk of veneer fractures. Twenty standardized five-unit implant-supported metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDP)s were manufactured and fixed in acrylic blocks. The test group consisted of ten FDPs fixed with a 150-μm misfit at the distal abutment. The remaining ten FDPs were fixed without misfit and acted as a control group. All FDPS underwent cyclic loading for a total of 100,000 cycles at 30-300 N. The FDPs were checked for cracks or chip-off fractures regularly. After cyclic load, the retorque value of all abutment screws was checked. Cracks within the veneering porcelain were noted in nine FDPs in the test group and one FDP in the control group. This difference was statistically significant (P veneering porcelain occurred in three FDPs in the test group. No fractures occurred in the control group. This difference was not statistically significant. There were no significant differences in retorque values neither between the groups nor between different abutment positions in the FDPs. Within the limitations of this in vitro pilot trial, it is suggested that misfit between a restoration and the supporting implant may increase the risk of cracking and/or chipping of the veneering porcelain for metal-ceramic FDPs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and porcelain shear bond strength comparison between cast and hot pressed CoCrMo alloy for metal-ceramic dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, B; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and metal-porcelain bond strength of a CoCrMo dental alloy obtained by two routes, cast and hot pressing. CoCrMo alloy substrates were obtained by casting and hot pressing. Substrates' microstructure was examined by the means of Optical Microscopy (OM) and by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness tests were performed in a microhardness indenter. The electrochemical behavior of substrates was investigated through potentiodynamic tests in a saline solution (8g NaCl/L). Substrates were bonded to dental porcelain and metal-porcelain bond strength was assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm/min) until fracture. Fractured surfaces as well as undestroyed interface specimens were examined with Stereomicroscopy and SEM-EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The t-test (pmicrostructures whereas hot pressed specimens exhibited a typical globular microstructure with a second phase spread through the matrix. The hardness registered for hot pressed substrates was greater than that of cast specimens, 438±24HV/1 and 324±8HV/1, respectively. Hot pressed substrates showed better corrosion properties than cast ones, i.e. higher OCP; higher corrosion potential (E(corr)) and lower current densities (i(corr)). No significant difference was found (p<0.05) in metal-ceramic bond strength between cast (116.5±6.9 MPa) and hot pressed (114.2±11.9 MPa) substrates. The failure type analysis revealed an adhesive failure for all specimens. Hot pressed products arise as an alternative to cast products in dental prosthetics, as they impart enhanced mechanical and electrochemical properties to prostheses without compromising the metal-ceramic bond strength. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Time-Parallel Solutions to Ordinary Differential Equations on GPUs with a New Functional Optimization Approach Related to the Sobolev Gradient Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    New Functional Optimization Approach Related to the Sobolev Gradient 5b. GRANT NUMBER Method 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Lederman , C...the Sobolev Gradient Method Carl Lederman and Jean-Luc Cambier Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate Spacecraft Branch (AFRL/RZSS...17] Lederman , C., Vese, L., and Chien, A., “Registration for 3D Morphological Comparison of Brain Aneurysm Growth” Advances in Visual Computing

  19. A guide for using functional diversity indices to reveal changes in assembly processes along ecological gradients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, N. W. H.; de Bello, Francesco; Mouillot, D.; Pavoine, S.; Dray, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2013), 794-806 ISSN 1100-9233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/12/1296 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Co-existence * Functional divergence * Null models Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.372, year: 2013

  20. Direct and Indirect Drivers of Moss Community Structure, Function, and Associated Microfauna Across a Successional Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micael Jonsson; Paul Kardol; Michael J. Gundale; Sheel Bansal; Marie-Charlotte Nilsson; Daniel B. Metcalfe; David A. Wardle

    2015-01-01

    Relative to vascular plants, little is known about what factors control bryophyte communities or how they respond to successional and environmental changes. Bryophytes are abundant in boreal forests, thus changes in moss community composition and functional traits (for example, moisture and nutrient content; rates of photosynthesis and respiration) may have important...

  1. Simultaneous loss of soil biodiversity and functions along a copper contamination gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Moldrup, Per; Arthur, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The impact of biodiversity loss on soil functions is well established via laboratory experiments that generally consider soil biota groups in isolation from each other, a condition rarely present in field soils. As a result, our knowledge about anthropogenic induced changes in biodiversity and as...

  2. The orthogonal gradients method: A radial basis functions method for solving partial differential equations on arbitrary surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Piret, Cécile

    2012-05-01

    Much work has been done on reconstructing arbitrary surfaces using the radial basis function (RBF) method, but one can hardly find any work done on the use of RBFs to solve partial differential equations (PDEs) on arbitrary surfaces. In this paper, we investigate methods to solve PDEs on arbitrary stationary surfaces embedded in . R3 using the RBF method. We present three RBF-based methods that easily discretize surface differential operators. We take advantage of the meshfree character of RBFs, which give us a high accuracy and the flexibility to represent the most complex geometries in any dimension. Two out of the three methods, which we call the orthogonal gradients (OGr) methods are the result of our work and are hereby presented for the first time. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  3. Quantitative Imaging of Cholinergic Interneurons Reveals a Distinctive Spatial Organization and a Functional Gradient across the Mouse Striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Matamales

    Full Text Available Information processing in the striatum requires the postsynaptic integration of glutamatergic and dopaminergic signals, which are then relayed to the output nuclei of the basal ganglia to influence behavior. Although cellularly homogeneous in appearance, the striatum contains several rare interneuron populations which tightly modulate striatal function. Of these, cholinergic interneurons (CINs have been recently shown to play a critical role in the control of reward-related learning; however how the striatal cholinergic network is functionally organized at the mesoscopic level and the way this organization influences striatal function remains poorly understood. Here, we systematically mapped and digitally reconstructed the entire ensemble of CINs in the mouse striatum and quantitatively assessed differences in densities, spatial arrangement and neuropil content across striatal functional territories. This approach demonstrated that the rostral portion of the striatum contained a higher concentration of CINs than the caudal striatum and that the cholinergic content in the core of the ventral striatum was significantly lower than in the rest of the regions. Additionally, statistical comparison of spatial point patterns in the striatal cholinergic ensemble revealed that only a minor portion of CINs (17% aggregated into cluster and that they were predominantly organized in a random fashion. Furthermore, we used a fluorescence reporter to estimate the activity of over two thousand CINs in naïve mice and found that there was a decreasing gradient of CIN overall function along the dorsomedial-to-ventrolateral axis, which appeared to be independent of their propensity to aggregate within the striatum. Altogether this work suggests that the regulation of striatal function by acetylcholine across the striatum is highly heterogeneous, and that signals originating in external afferent systems may be principally determining the function of CINs in the

  4. Environmental gradient favours functionally diverse macrobenthic community in a placer rich tropical bay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sivadas, S.K.; Ingole, B.S.; Fernandes, C.E.G.

    . Understanding the environmental variables that determine the biodiversity pattern will help in the effective conservation plans of coastal habitat. However, few studies have been carried out on the biodiversity-environment relation from the diverse tropical... is increasingly used to understand the biodiversity- environment relation and biodiversity-ecosystem function- ing and to decipher the effect of anthropogenic activities on ecosystem [9]. One of the greatest challenges when determining the impact from mining...

  5. Tree aboveground carbon storage correlates with environmental gradients and functional diversity in a tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Yu, Shixiao; Lian, Juyu; Shen, Hao; Cao, Honglin; Lu, Huanping; Ye, Wanhui

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests play a disproportionately important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, but it remains unclear how local environments and functional diversity regulate tree aboveground C storage. We examined how three components (environments, functional dominance and diversity) affected C storage in Dinghushan 20-ha plot in China. There was large fine-scale variation in C storage. The three components significantly contributed to regulate C storage, but dominance and diversity of traits were associated with C storage in different directions. Structural equation models (SEMs) of dominance and diversity explained 34% and 32% of variation in C storage. Environments explained 26–44% of variation in dominance and diversity. Similar proportions of variation in C storage were explained by dominance and diversity in regression models, they were improved after adding environments. Diversity of maximum diameter was the best predictor of C storage. Complementarity and selection effects contributed to C storage simultaneously, and had similar importance. The SEMs disengaged the complex relationships among the three components and C storage, and established a framework to show the direct and indirect effects (via dominance and diversity) of local environments on C storage. We concluded that local environments are important for regulating functional diversity and C storage. PMID:27278688

  6. Tree aboveground carbon storage correlates with environmental gradients and functional diversity in a tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Yu, Shixiao; Lian, Juyu; Shen, Hao; Cao, Honglin; Lu, Huanping; Ye, Wanhui

    2016-06-09

    Tropical forests play a disproportionately important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, but it remains unclear how local environments and functional diversity regulate tree aboveground C storage. We examined how three components (environments, functional dominance and diversity) affected C storage in Dinghushan 20-ha plot in China. There was large fine-scale variation in C storage. The three components significantly contributed to regulate C storage, but dominance and diversity of traits were associated with C storage in different directions. Structural equation models (SEMs) of dominance and diversity explained 34% and 32% of variation in C storage. Environments explained 26-44% of variation in dominance and diversity. Similar proportions of variation in C storage were explained by dominance and diversity in regression models, they were improved after adding environments. Diversity of maximum diameter was the best predictor of C storage. Complementarity and selection effects contributed to C storage simultaneously, and had similar importance. The SEMs disengaged the complex relationships among the three components and C storage, and established a framework to show the direct and indirect effects (via dominance and diversity) of local environments on C storage. We concluded that local environments are important for regulating functional diversity and C storage.

  7. Dung beetle community and functions along a habitat-disturbance gradient in the Amazon: a rapid assessment of ecological functions associated to biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Rodrigo F; Korasaki, Vanesca; Andresen, Ellen; Louzada, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in the effects of habitat disturbance on community attributes and the potential consequences for ecosystem functioning, objective approaches linking biodiversity loss to functional loss are uncommon. The objectives of this study were to implement simultaneous assessment of community attributes (richness, abundance and biomass, each calculated for total-beetle assemblages as well as small- and large-beetle assemblages) and three ecological functions of dung beetles (dung removal, soil perturbation and secondary seed dispersal), to compare the effects of habitat disturbance on both sets of response variables, and their relations. We studied dung beetle community attributes and functions in five land-use systems representing a disturbance gradient in the Brazilian Amazon: primary forest, secondary forest, agroforestry, agriculture and pasture. All response variables were affected negatively by the intensification of habitat disturbance regimes, but community attributes and ecological functions did not follow the same pattern of decline. A hierarchical partitioning analysis showed that, although all community attributes had a significant effect on the three ecological functions (except the abundance of small beetles on all three ecological functions and the biomass of small beetles on secondary dispersal of large seed mimics), species richness and abundance of large beetles were the community attributes with the highest explanatory value. Our results show the importance of measuring ecological function empirically instead of deducing it from community metrics.

  8. Dung beetle community and functions along a habitat-disturbance gradient in the Amazon: a rapid assessment of ecological functions associated to biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo F Braga

    Full Text Available Although there is increasing interest in the effects of habitat disturbance on community attributes and the potential consequences for ecosystem functioning, objective approaches linking biodiversity loss to functional loss are uncommon. The objectives of this study were to implement simultaneous assessment of community attributes (richness, abundance and biomass, each calculated for total-beetle assemblages as well as small- and large-beetle assemblages and three ecological functions of dung beetles (dung removal, soil perturbation and secondary seed dispersal, to compare the effects of habitat disturbance on both sets of response variables, and their relations. We studied dung beetle community attributes and functions in five land-use systems representing a disturbance gradient in the Brazilian Amazon: primary forest, secondary forest, agroforestry, agriculture and pasture. All response variables were affected negatively by the intensification of habitat disturbance regimes, but community attributes and ecological functions did not follow the same pattern of decline. A hierarchical partitioning analysis showed that, although all community attributes had a significant effect on the three ecological functions (except the abundance of small beetles on all three ecological functions and the biomass of small beetles on secondary dispersal of large seed mimics, species richness and abundance of large beetles were the community attributes with the highest explanatory value. Our results show the importance of measuring ecological function empirically instead of deducing it from community metrics.

  9. Electric Field Gradients of Light Impurities in TiO{sub 2} Calculated by the Full Potential KKR Green's Function Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, M., E-mail: agura@phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Akai, H. [Osaka University, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science (Japan)

    2004-11-15

    The electric field gradients (EFGs) of B, N, O and Na in TiO{sub 2} were calculated by the full potential Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) Greens function method in the framework of the density functional theory. The agreement with the experiments was much improved from the previous calculations that were based on the muffin-tin potential model.

  10. Optimal Design and Freeform Extrusion Fabrication of Functionally Gradient Smart Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Amir

    An extrusion-based additive manufacturing process, called the Ceramic On-Demand Extrusion (CODE) process, for producing three-dimensional ceramic components with near theoretical density was developed. In this process, an aqueous paste of ceramic particles with a very low binder content (manufacturing of functionally graded materials with an optimum distribution of material composition. As an application of the CODE process, advanced ceramic components with embedded sapphire optical fiber sensors were fabricated and properties of parts and sensors were evaluated using standard test methods.

  11. Distinct taxonomic and functional composition of soil microbiomes along the gradient forest-restinga-mangrove in southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Lucas William; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2018-01-01

    Soil microorganisms play crucial roles in ecosystem functioning, and the central goal in microbial ecology studies is to elucidate which factors shape community structure. A better understanding of the relationship between microbial diversity, functions and environmental parameters would increase our ability to set conservation priorities. Here, the bacterial and archaeal community structure in Atlantic Forest, restinga and mangrove soils was described and compared based on shotgun metagenomics. We hypothesized that each distinct site would harbor a distinct taxonomic and functional soil community, which is influenced by environmental parameters. Our data showed that the microbiome is shaped by soil properties, with pH, base saturation, boron and iron content significantly correlated to overall community structure. When data of specific phyla were correlated to specific soil properties, we demonstrated that parameters such as boron, copper, sulfur, potassium and aluminum presented significant correlation with the most number of bacterial groups. Mangrove soil was the most distinct site and presented the highest taxonomic and functional diversity in comparison with forest and restinga soils. From the total 34 microbial phyla identified, 14 were overrepresented in mangrove soils, including several archaeal groups. Mangrove soils hosted a high abundance of sequences related to replication, survival and adaptation; forest soils included high numbers of sequences related to the metabolism of nutrients and other composts; while restinga soils included abundant genes related to the metabolism of carbohydrates. Overall, our finds show that the microbial community structure and functional potential were clearly different across the environmental gradient, followed by functional adaptation and both were related to the soil properties.

  12. Ecological and Functional Traits in 99 Bird Species over a Large-Scale Gradient in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swen C. Renner

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A gap still exists in published data on variation of morphological and ecological traits for common bird species over a large area. To diminish this knowledge gap, we report here average values of 99 bird species from three sites in Germany from the Biodiversity Exploratories on 24 ecological and functional traits. We present our own data on morphological and ecological traits of 28 common bird species and provide additional measurements for further species from published studies. This is a unique data set from live birds, which has not been published and is available neither from museum nor from any other collection in the presented coverage. Dataset: available as the supplementary file. Dataset license: CC-BY

  13. Optimum gradient material for a functionally graded dental implant using metaheuristic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadollah, Ali; Bahreininejad, Ardeshir

    2011-10-01

    Despite dental implantation being a great success, one of the key issues facing it is a mismatch of mechanical properties between engineered and native biomaterials, which makes osseointegration and bone remodeling problematical. Functionally graded material (FGM) has been proposed as a potential upgrade to some conventional implant materials such as titanium for selection in prosthetic dentistry. The idea of an FGM dental implant is that the property would vary in a certain pattern to match the biomechanical characteristics required at different regions in the hosting bone. However, matching the properties does not necessarily guarantee the best osseointegration and bone remodeling. Little existing research has been reported on developing an optimal design of an FGM dental implant for promoting long-term success. Based upon remodeling results, metaheuristic algorithms such as the genetic algorithms (GAs) and simulated annealing (SA) have been adopted to develop a multi-objective optimal design for FGM implantation design. The results are compared with those in literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tracking the Spatial and Functional Gradient of Monocyte-To-Macrophage Differentiation in Inflamed Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Debasish; Jones, Stephen M.; Oswald, Erin M.; Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages are at the heart of the immune effector function in an inflammatory response. But because of the lack of an efficient imaging system to trace these cells live during their migration and maturation in their native environment at sub-cellular resolution, our knowledge is limited to data available from specific time-points analyzed by flow cytometry, histology, genomics and other immunological methods. Here, we have developed a ratiometric imaging method for measuring monocyte maturation in inflamed mouse lungs in situ using real-time using 2-photon imaging and complementary methods. We visualized that while undifferentiated monocytes were predominantly found only in the vasculature, a semi-differentiated monocyte/macrophage population could enter the tissue and resembled more mature and differentiated populations by morphology and surface phenotype. As these cells entered and differentiated, they were already selectively localized near inflamed airways and their entry was associated with changes in motility and morphology. We were able to visualize these during the act of differentiation, a process that can be demonstrated in this way to be faster on a per-cell basis under inflammatory conditions. Finally, our in situ analyses demonstrated increases, in the differentiating cells, for both antigen uptake and the ability to mediate interactions with T cells. This work, while largely confirming proposed models for in situ differentiation, provides important in situ data on the coordinated site-specific recruitment and differentiation of these cells and helps elaborate the predominance of immune pathology at the airways. Our novel imaging technology to trace immunogenic cell maturation in situ will complement existing information available on in situ differentiation deduced from other immunological methods, and assist better understanding of the spatio-temporal cellular behavior during an

  15. Tracking the Spatial and Functional Gradient of Monocyte-To-Macrophage Differentiation in Inflamed Lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Sen

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs, and macrophages are at the heart of the immune effector function in an inflammatory response. But because of the lack of an efficient imaging system to trace these cells live during their migration and maturation in their native environment at sub-cellular resolution, our knowledge is limited to data available from specific time-points analyzed by flow cytometry, histology, genomics and other immunological methods. Here, we have developed a ratiometric imaging method for measuring monocyte maturation in inflamed mouse lungs in situ using real-time using 2-photon imaging and complementary methods. We visualized that while undifferentiated monocytes were predominantly found only in the vasculature, a semi-differentiated monocyte/macrophage population could enter the tissue and resembled more mature and differentiated populations by morphology and surface phenotype. As these cells entered and differentiated, they were already selectively localized near inflamed airways and their entry was associated with changes in motility and morphology. We were able to visualize these during the act of differentiation, a process that can be demonstrated in this way to be faster on a per-cell basis under inflammatory conditions. Finally, our in situ analyses demonstrated increases, in the differentiating cells, for both antigen uptake and the ability to mediate interactions with T cells. This work, while largely confirming proposed models for in situ differentiation, provides important in situ data on the coordinated site-specific recruitment and differentiation of these cells and helps elaborate the predominance of immune pathology at the airways. Our novel imaging technology to trace immunogenic cell maturation in situ will complement existing information available on in situ differentiation deduced from other immunological methods, and assist better understanding of the spatio-temporal cellular

  16. Analytical gradients for MP2, double hybrid functionals, and TD‐DFT with polarizable embedding described by fluctuating charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnimeo, Ivan; Cappelli, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    A polarizable quantum mechanics (QM)/ molecular mechanics (MM) approach recently developed for Hartree–Fock (HF) and Kohn–Sham (KS) methods has been extended to energies and analytical gradients for MP2, double hybrid functionals, and TD‐DFT models, thus allowing the computation of equilibrium structures for excited electronic states together with more accurate results for ground electronic states. After a detailed presentation of the theoretical background and of some implementation details, a number of test cases are analyzed to show that the polarizable embedding model based on fluctuating charges (FQ) is remarkably more accurate than the corresponding electronic embedding based on a fixed charge (FX) description. In particular, a set of electronegativities and hardnesses has been optimized for interactions between QM and FQ regions together with new repulsion–dispersion parameters. After validation of both the numerical implementation and of the new parameters, absorption electronic spectra have been computed for representative model systems including vibronic effects. The results show remarkable agreement with full QM computations and significant improvement with respect to the corresponding FX results. The last part of the article provides some hints about computation of solvatochromic effects on absorption spectra in aqueous solution as a function of the number of FQ water molecules and on the use of FX external shells to improve the convergence of the results. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26399473

  17. Solar radiation and functional traits explain the decline of forest primary productivity along a tropical elevation gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyllas, Nikolaos M; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Shenkin, Alexander; Asner, Gregory P; Atkin, Owen K; Díaz, Sandra; Enquist, Brian J; Farfan-Rios, William; Gloor, Emanuel; Guerrieri, Rossella; Huasco, Walter Huaraca; Ishida, Yoko; Martin, Roberta E; Meir, Patrick; Phillips, Oliver; Salinas, Norma; Silman, Miles; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Zaragoza-Castells, Joana; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2017-06-01

    One of the major challenges in ecology is to understand how ecosystems respond to changes in environmental conditions, and how taxonomic and functional diversity mediate these changes. In this study, we use a trait-spectra and individual-based model, to analyse variation in forest primary productivity along a 3.3 km elevation gradient in the Amazon-Andes. The model accurately predicted the magnitude and trends in forest productivity with elevation, with solar radiation and plant functional traits (leaf dry mass per area, leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentration, and wood density) collectively accounting for productivity variation. Remarkably, explicit representation of temperature variation with elevation was not required to achieve accurate predictions of forest productivity, as trait variation driven by species turnover appears to capture the effect of temperature. Our semi-mechanistic model suggests that spatial variation in traits can potentially be used to estimate spatial variation in productivity at the landscape scale. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  18. Host Plant Physiology and Mycorrhizal Functioning Shift across a Glacial through Future [CO2] Gradient1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullinix, George W.R.; Ward, Joy K.

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) may modulate the functioning of mycorrhizal associations by altering the relative degree of nutrient and carbohydrate limitations in plants. To test this, we grew Taraxacum ceratophorum and Taraxacum officinale (native and exotic dandelions) with and without mycorrhizal fungi across a broad [CO2] gradient (180–1,000 µL L−1). Differential plant growth rates and vegetative plasticity were hypothesized to drive species-specific responses to [CO2] and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. To evaluate [CO2] effects on mycorrhizal functioning, we calculated response ratios based on the relative biomass of mycorrhizal (MBio) and nonmycorrhizal (NMBio) plants (RBio = [MBio − NMBio]/NMBio). We then assessed linkages between RBio and host physiology, fungal growth, and biomass allocation using structural equation modeling. For T. officinale, RBio increased with rising [CO2], shifting from negative to positive values at 700 µL L−1. [CO2] and mycorrhizal effects on photosynthesis and leaf growth rates drove shifts in RBio in this species. For T. ceratophorum, RBio increased from 180 to 390 µL L−1 and further increases in [CO2] caused RBio to shift from positive to negative values. [CO2] and fungal effects on plant growth and carbon sink strength were correlated with shifts in RBio in this species. Overall, we show that rising [CO2] significantly altered the functioning of mycorrhizal associations. These symbioses became more beneficial with rising [CO2], but nonlinear effects may limit plant responses to mycorrhizal fungi under future [CO2]. The magnitude and mechanisms driving mycorrhizal-CO2 responses reflected species-specific differences in growth rate and vegetative plasticity, indicating that these traits may provide a framework for predicting mycorrhizal responses to global change. PMID:27573369

  19. Effect of non-ionizing radio frequency signals of magnetic resonance imaging on physical properties of dental alloys and metal-ceramic adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bediwi, Abu Bakr; El-Fallal, Abeer; Saker, Samah; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-10-01

    To assess the influence of non-ionizing radio frequency signals of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on physical properties of dental alloys and metal-ceramic adhesion. A total of 120 disk-shaped wax patterns (10 mm x 10 mm x 1 mm) were cast in a base metal alloy (Ni-Cr alloy) and commercially pure titanium (Ti) following the manufacturing recommendation. After casting, air abrasion and ultrasonic cleaning, feldspathic ceramic was applied and fired according to manufacturer's instructions using a standard mold. The specimens were subjected to 3000 thermocycles in distilled water between 5°C and 55°C, then veneered alloy specimens were randomly assigned to three groups according to MRI exposure time: a) 15 min of MRI exposure, b) 30 min of MRI exposure and c) no MRI exposure (control group). The specimens were subjected to shear loading until failure. A separate set of Ni-Cr and Ti specimens were prepared, and after exposure to MRI for 15 and 30 min, x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, surface roughness, and Vicker's hardness were measured. Both the alloy type (p < 0.005) and exposure duration (p < 0.005) had a significant effect on the bond results. While the control group presented the highest bond strength for Ni-Cr and Ti (36.9 ± 1.4 and 21.5 ± 1.6 MPa, respectively), 30 min MRI exposure significantly decreased the bond strength for both alloys (29.4 ± 1.5 and 12.8 ± 1.5 MPa, respectively) (p < 0.05). XRD analysis indicated formation of the crystalline phase as well as change in crystal size and position for Ni-Cr and Ti after MRI. Compared to the control group where alloys were not exposed to MRI (Ni-Cr: 0.40 μm; Ti: 0.17 μm), surface roughness increased (Ni-Cr: 0.54 μm; Ti: 1.1 μm). Vicker's hardness of both alloys decreased after 30 min MRI (Ni-Cr: 329.5; Ti: 216.1) compared to the control group c (Ni-Cr: 356.1; Ti: 662.1), being more significant for Ti (p < 0.005). Ni-Cr alloy is recommended over Ti for the fabrication of metal-ceramic restorations

  20. Fracture of functionally graded materials: application to hydrided zircaloy; Fissuration des materiaux a gradient de proprietes: application au zircaloy hydrure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perales, F

    2005-12-15

    This thesis is devoted to the dynamic fracture of functionally graded materials. More particularly, it deals with the toughness of nuclear cladding at high burnup submitted to transient loading. The fracture is studied at local scale using cohesive zone model in a multi body approach. Cohesive zone models include frictional contact to take into account mixed mode fracture. Non smooth dynamics problems are treated within the Non-Smooth Contact Dynamics framework. A multi scale study is necessary because of the dimension of the clad. At microscopic scale, the effective properties of surface law, between each body, are obtained by periodic numerical homogenization. A two fields Finite Element formulation is so written. An extended formulation of the NSCD framework is obtained. The associated software allows to simulate, in finite deformation, from the crack initiation to post-fracture behavior in heterogeneous materials. At microscopic scale, random RVE calculations are made to determine effective properties. At macroscopic scale, calculations of part of clad are made to determine the role of the mean hydrogen concentration and gradient of hydrogen parameters in the toughness of the clad under dynamic loading. (author)

  1. Functional and compositional responses in soil microbial communities along two metal pollution gradients: does the level of historical pollution affect resistance against secondary stress?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azarbad, H.; Niklinska, M.; Nikiel, K.; van Straalen, N.M.; Röling, W.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    We examined how the exposure to secondary stressors affected the functional and compositional responses of microbial communities along two metal pollution gradients in Polish forests and whether responses were influenced by the level of metal pollution. Basal respiration rate and community

  2. Effect of gradient dielectric coefficient in a functionally graded material (FGM) substrate on the propagation behavior of love waves in an FGM-piezoelectric layered structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoshan; Shi, Junping; Jin, Feng

    2012-06-01

    The propagation behavior of Love waves in a layered structure that includes a functionally graded material (FGM) substrate carrying a piezoelectric thin film is investigated. Analytical solutions are obtained for both constant and gradient dielectric coefficients in the FGM substrate. Numerical results show that the gradient dielectric coefficient decreases phase velocity in any mode, and the electromechanical coupling factor significantly increases in the first- and secondorder modes. In some modes, the difference in Love waves' phase velocity between these two types of structure might be more than 1%, resulting in significant differences in frequency of the surface acoustic wave devices.

  3. Bone marrow-derived cells for cardiovascular cell therapy: an optimized GMP method based on low-density gradient improves cell purity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radrizzani, Marina; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Soncin, Sabrina; Bolis, Sara; Sürder, Daniel; Torre, Tiziano; Siclari, Francesco; Moccetti, Tiziano; Vassalli, Giuseppe; Turchetto, Lucia

    2014-09-27

    Cardiovascular cell therapy represents a promising field, with several approaches currently being tested. The advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) for the ongoing METHOD clinical study ("Bone marrow derived cell therapy in the stable phase of chronic ischemic heart disease") consists of fresh mononuclear cells (MNC) isolated from autologous bone marrow (BM) through density gradient centrifugation on standard Ficoll-Paque. Cells are tested for safety (sterility, endotoxin), identity/potency (cell count, CD45/CD34/CD133, viability) and purity (contaminant granulocytes and platelets). BM-MNC were isolated by density gradient centrifugation on Ficoll-Paque. The following process parameters were optimized throughout the study: gradient medium density; gradient centrifugation speed and duration; washing conditions. A new manufacturing method was set up, based on gradient centrifugation on low density Ficoll-Paque, followed by 2 washing steps, of which the second one at low speed. It led to significantly higher removal of contaminant granulocytes and platelets, improving product purity; the frequencies of CD34+ cells, CD133+ cells and functional hematopoietic and mesenchymal precursors were significantly increased. The methodological optimization described here resulted in a significant improvement of ATMP quality, a crucial issue to clinical applications in cardiovascular cell therapy.

  4. Review Article: recent advances in metal-ceramic brazing Artigo Revisão: avanços recentes em brasagem metal-cerâmica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. do Nascimento

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal-ceramic joining has slowly but steadily become an important manufacturing step. The evolution of joining processes has allowed ceramics to be used in combination with metals in a number of hybrid devices from traditional light bulbs and seals to improved cutting tools and modern monitoring and measuring electronic devices. New joining methods and newer approaches to conventional methods have been developed aiming at joints characterized by improved reliability, and interfaces capable of withstanding high-temperature resistance with minimum residual stresses. A summary of recent improvements on alternative approaches to ceramic-metal joining as well as new developments on brazing are presented herein. The present review also focuses on recent advances towards brazing metallized ceramics and the selection of filler alloys, since in a scenario that includes joining by laser and direct bonding with liquid transient phases, brazing continues to be by far the most widely used approach to joining as a result of its low-cost and possibility to join intricate geometries for large-scale production. Finally, methods to evaluate the mechanical strength and residual thermal stresses are presented in addition to alternative approaches to minimize residual stresses and, consequently, improve joint reliability.O interesse no estudo de métodos de junção-cerâmica para aplicações industriais tem crescido gradativamente ao longo dos anos. A evolução dos processos de união tem permitido a utilização de cerâmicas em conjunto com metais na fabricação de diversos componentes híbridos incluindo lâmpadas tradicionais, juntas para vácuo, ferramentas de corte de alto desempenho e modernos dispositivos eletrônicos de medição e monitoramento. Novos métodos de união e aprimoramentos de métodos convencionais têm sido estudados com o intuito de produzir-se juntas com alta confiabilidade e interfaces capazes de suportar altas temperaturas de

  5. The up to 25-year survival and clinical performance of 2,340 high gold-based metal-ceramic single crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Terry R

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to present the up to 25-year clinical performance and survival of 2,340 high gold-based metal-ceramic single crowns placed in a specialist prosthodontic practice. All crowns provided to 670 patients between 1984 and 2008 were sequentially recruited. Each crown/tooth combination was given a prognostic evaluation at cementation. Patients were recalled in 2008 and 2009 for examination, and patient records were scrutinized for any retreatment. Estimated cumulative survival, standard error, and differences in survival between groups were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, Greenwood formula, and log-rank test, respectively. Crown status (six-field classification) was reported within 5-year groupings and for 7, 10, and 12 years. The up to 10-year and 25-year estimated survival rates of the 2,211 favorably rated crowns were 97.08% ± 0.45% and 85.40% ± 2.19%, respectively. The up to 12-year survival for crowns in the postimplant era was 94.4% ± 2.78%. No significant differences related to sex, tooth type, or tooth position were demonstrated. Nonvital teeth had lower overall survival rates than vital teeth, but not in crowns placed in the postimplant era. Actual 10-year outcomes closely matched the estimated 10-year survival. Biologic factors accounted for 101 of the 133 failures, while mechanical factors accounted for 8 failures and patient concerns accounted for 24 failures. Porcelain fracture requiring replacement occurred in 4 crowns. The clinical performance of the crowns was excellent. Biologic factors accounted for the majority of failures. Material stability was excellent. Patient complaints of unacceptable esthetics resulted in 22 crowns being replaced after a mean clinical service time of 14 years.

  6. The Up-to-14-Year Survival and Complication Burden of 256 TiUnite Implants Supporting One-Piece Cast Abutment/Metal-Ceramic Implant-Supported Single Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Terry R

    To assess the estimated cumulative survival (ECS) and explore the technical and biologic complications of 256 TiUnite implants (Nobel Biocare) supporting one-piece cast abutment/metal-ceramic implant-supported single crowns (ISCs) in situ for up to 14 years. A prospective sequentially recruited cohort of 207 patients received 256 metal-ceramic ISCs on TiUnite implants between 2001 and 2014. All but 24 patients with 27 crowns were clinically evaluated between January 2014 and April 2015 in conjunction with or in addition to their tailored maintenance program. Radiographs were obtained, and any previously recorded treatments associated with the crowns were tabulated. The ECS and standard errors were calculated with the life table actuarial method and Greenwood's formula, respectively. The log rank test was applied to assess differences between anterior and posterior crowns. Complication incidence, severity, and economic burden, measured in time/cost accounting units (TAUs), were tallied and compared descriptively. Independent groups were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test and related groups with the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. The mean clinical service time of the crowns was 5.61 years (44 ≥ 10 years). The 14-year ECS was 95.95% ± 3.20% with no significant difference between anterior and posterior prostheses. Only seven implants lost marginal bone ≥ one thread from the time of crown insertion. There were 30 nonterminal complications (16 biologic, 14 mechanical). The associated economic burden was low (n = 35 TAUs). High gold-alloy one-piece cast abutment/metal-ceramic ISCs on TiUnite implants exhibited excellent longevity and few complications over 14 years.

  7. A study of metal-ceramic wettability in SiC-Al using dynamic melt infiltration of SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1993-01-01

    Pressure-assisted infiltration with a 2014 Al alloy of plain and Cu-coated single crystal platelets of alpha silicon carbide was used to study particulate wettability under dynamic conditions relevant to pressure casting of metal-matrix composites. The total penetration length of infiltrant metal in porous compacts was measured at the conclusion of solidification as a function of pressure, infiltration time, and SiC size for both plain and Cu-coated SiC. The experimental data were analyzed to obtain a threshold pressure for the effect of melt intrusion through SiC compacts. The threshold pressure was taken either directly as a measure of wettability or converted to an effective wetting angle using the Young-Laplace capillary equation. Cu coating resulted in partial but beneficial improvements in wettability as a result of its dissolution in the melt, compared to uncoated SiC.

  8. Convergent sum of gradient expansion of the kinetic-energy density functional up to the sixth order term using Padé approximant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, A.; Alharbi, F. H.; Jovanovic, R.; Kais, S.

    2016-04-01

    The gradient expansion of the kinetic energy density functional, when applied to atoms or finite systems, usually grossly overestimates the energy in the fourth order and generally diverges in the sixth order. We avoid the divergence of the integral by replacing the asymptotic series including the sixth order term in the integrand by a rational function. Padé approximants show moderate improvements in accuracy in comparison with partial sums of the series. The results are discussed for atoms and Hooke’s law model for two-electron atoms.

  9. Analytical energy gradients for explicitly correlated wave functions. I. Explicitly correlated second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Győrffy, Werner; Knizia, Gerald; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2017-12-07

    We present the theory and algorithms for computing analytical energy gradients for explicitly correlated second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2-F12). The main difficulty in F12 gradient theory arises from the large number of two-electron integrals for which effective two-body density matrices and integral derivatives need to be calculated. For efficiency, the density fitting approximation is used for evaluating all two-electron integrals and their derivatives. The accuracies of various previously proposed MP2-F12 approximations [3C, 3C(HY1), 3*C(HY1), and 3*A] are demonstrated by computing equilibrium geometries for a set of molecules containing first- and second-row elements, using double-ζ to quintuple-ζ basis sets. Generally, the convergence of the bond lengths and angles with respect to the basis set size is strongly improved by the F12 treatment, and augmented triple-ζ basis sets are sufficient to closely approach the basis set limit. The results obtained with the different approximations differ only very slightly. This paper is the first step towards analytical gradients for coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative treatment of triple excitations, which will be presented in the second part of this series.

  10. A comparative survey of bond strenght of different metal-ceramic-systems based on precious metal alloys and non-precious alloys in combination with conventional and low-fusing ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Derfert, Beate

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to show the differences of the bond strength of metal-ceramic-systems based on precious metal alloys (gold-reduced and high-gold-bearing) and non-precious alloys veneered with conventional and low-fusing dental ceramic. Vita Omega 900 was selected as representative of conventional dental ceramics and Duceragold was selected as representative of low-fusing dental ceramics. It was worked with Ponto Lloyd G, Bio Ponto Star (high-gold-bearing alloys veneered with Vit...

  11. Effects of functional monomers on retention behavior of small and large molecules in monolithic capillary columns at isocratic and gradient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Jiří; Jandera, Pavel; Langmaier, Pavel

    2011-08-01

    The polarity of (poly)methacrylate monolithic capillary columns was varied by using alkylmethacrylate monomers with butyl, cyclohexyl, 2-ethylhexyl, lauryl, and stearyl functional groups in the polymerization mixture. The hydrodynamic properties, as well as the retention characteristics in RP-LC of small molecules (alkylbenzenes) and of proteins under gradient elution conditions were studied. The RP selectivity depends on the type of alkyl chain in methacrylate monomer; however, there was no direct correlation between the size of the monomer molecule and methylene or aromatic selectivity of the monlithic column. The lowest selectivity was found for column based on lauryl methacrylate monomer. On the other hand, butyl methacrylate column shows high phenyl selectivity and the column with stearyl methacrylate possesses the highest methylene selectivity for small molecules. The retention increases with longer alkyl chain in methacrylate monomer, especially for high molar mass proteins on all prepared columns and showed gradient elution behavior of proteins in agreement with the linear solvent strength gradient model. The poly(laurylmethacrylate) column showed lowest hydrophobicity but best efficiency for proteins of all columns tested. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Validation for 2D/3D registration. II: The comparison of intensity- and gradient-based merit functions using a new gold standard data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendrin, Christelle; Markelj, Primoz; Pawiro, Supriyanto Ardjo; Spoerk, Jakob; Bloch, Christoph; Weber, Christoph; Figl, Michael; Bergmann, Helmar; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2011-03-01

    A new gold standard data set for validation of 2D/3D registration based on a porcine cadaver head with attached fiducial markers was presented in the first part of this article. The advantage of this new phantom is the large amount of soft tissue, which simulates realistic conditions for registration. This article tests the performance of intensity- and gradient-based algorithms for 2D/3D registration using the new phantom data set. Intensity-based methods with four merit functions, namely, cross correlation, rank correlation, correlation ratio, and mutual information (MI), and two gradient-based algorithms, the backprojection gradient-based (BGB) registration method and the reconstruction gradient-based (RGB) registration method, were compared. Four volumes consisting of CBCT with two fields of view, 64 slice multidetector CT, and magnetic resonance-T1 weighted images were registered to a pair of kV x-ray images and a pair of MV images. A standardized evaluation methodology was employed. Targets were evenly spread over the volumes and 250 starting positions of the 3D volumes with initial displacements of up to 25 mm from the gold standard position were calculated. After the registration, the displacement from the gold standard was retrieved and the root mean square (RMS), mean, and standard deviation mean target registration errors (mTREs) over 250 registrations were derived. Additionally, the following merit properties were computed: Accuracy, capture range, number of minima, risk of nonconvergence, and distinctiveness of optimum for better comparison of the robustness of each merit. Among the merit functions used for the intensity-based method, MI reached the best accuracy with an RMS mTRE down to 1.30 mm. Furthermore, it was the only merit function that could accurately register the CT to the kV x rays with the presence of tissue deformation. As for the gradient-based methods, BGB and RGB methods achieved subvoxel accuracy (RMS mTRE down to 0.56 and 0.70 mm

  13. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey eNatekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. A set of practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed.

  14. Functional reduced graphene oxide-based membranes with selective ion transport channels for zwitterionic ions separation based on the pH gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Ji, Hongyun; Yang, Feng; Meng, Yan; Wang, Yujue; Dai, Jianyuan; Ren, Haisheng; Tan, Guangqun; Xiao, Dan

    2018-01-18

    In this work, we report a method for the fabrication of a functional free-standing graphene membrane (FFGM) with high mechanical strength, enlarged interlayer spacing and ion channels for zwitterionic ions separation. To obtain the FFGM, the anionic dye Eosin Y (EY) was introduced into a graphene oxide (GO) and hydroquinone (HQ) mixture to prepare functional graphene-based membranes on Cu foil using simply a drop-casting method. In comparison with a GO membrane, the molar flux and the mechanical strength of the FFGM were dramatically increased. The FFGM was then equipped on custom-built glass reservoirs for zwitterionic amino acids (AAs) separation based on the inner pH gradient, which was formed by controlling H + and OH - (in the feed and receiver solution) migration in rGO/GO sheets via an external electric field. With the help of the inner pH gradient and external electric field, AAs could change their charge behaviors. The ionized AAs transport through the FFGM and finally separation was realized.

  15. APPLICATION OF VERTICAL GRADIENT METHODS OF MICROGRAVITY TIME FUNCTION TO DETERMINE GROUND WATER REDUCTION IN SEMARANG PERIOD OF 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Khumaedi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of Semarang city requires the availability of water for daily use and industry in line with population growth. Uncontrolled use of water will damage the groundwater system. The purpose of this study was to determine the zone of the decrease of water level to obtain information about area that utilizes excess water. The method used is a micro-gravity vertical gradient between times. Gravity measurements were done at 124 points spread evenly between May and October 2013. The results showed that there was a decrease in ground water level in the Industries area Kaligawe, Tanah Mas, and Tlogosori which was identified with the vertical gradient anomaly of micro gravity between the times from May to October 2013. The regions which have high negative changes in ground water level (1.2-1.4 m / year were the monitoring wells Madukoro 2, LIK Kaligawe and PT Aquaria which are the industrial areas. Exploitation of ground water in industrial areas is relatively high compared to the other regions.Perkembangan kota Semarang yang menuntut ketersediaan air untuk keperluan sehari-hari dan industri seiring dengan pertambahan jumlah penduduk. Pemanfaatan air yang tidak terkendali akan menyebabkan sistem  air tanah rusak. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menentukan zona penurunan muka air tanah untuk memperoleh informasi daerah yang memanfaatkan air secara berlebihan. Metode yang digunakan adalah gradien vertikal gaya berat mikro antar waktu. Pengukuran gaya berat di lakukan di 124 titik yang tersebar merata pada periode Mei dan Oktober 2013. Hasil peneltian menunjukkan telah terjadi penurunan muka air tanah di lingkungan Industri Kecil Kaligawe, perumahan Tanah Mas, Perumahan Tlogosori yang ditandai dengan anomali gradien vertikal gaya berat mikro antar waktu Mei-Oktober 2013. Wilayah yang memiliki perubahan muka air tanah negative tinggi (1,2-1,4 m/tahun, berada di sekitar sumur pantau Madukoro 2, LIK Kaligawe dan PT Aquaria dimana tutupan lahan di

  16. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  17. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.

    Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  18. Size-Dependent Bending, Buckling and Free Vibration Analyses of Microscale Functionally Graded Mindlin Plates Based on the Strain Gradient Elasticity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ansari

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, a size-dependent microscale plate model is developed to describe the bending, buckling and free vibration behaviors of microplates made of functionally graded materials (FGMs. The size effects are captured based on the modified strain gradient theory (MSGT, and the formulation of the paper is on the basis of Mindlin plate theory. The presented model accommodates the models based upon the classical theory (CT and the modified couple stress theory (MCST if all or two scale parameters are set to zero, respectively. By using Hamilton's principle, the governing equations and related boundary conditions are derived. The bending, buckling and free vibration problems are considered and are solved through the generalized differential quadrature (GDQ method. A detailed parametric and comparative study is conducted to evaluate the effects of length scale parameter, material gradient index and aspect ratio predicted by the CT, MCST and MSGT on the deflection, critical buckling load and first natural frequency of the microplate. The numerical results indicate that the model developed herein is significantly size-dependent when the thickness of the microplate is on the order of the material scale parameters.

  19. Sobolev gradients and differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, J W

    2010-01-01

    A Sobolev gradient of a real-valued functional on a Hilbert space is a gradient of that functional taken relative to an underlying Sobolev norm. This book shows how descent methods using such gradients allow a unified treatment of a wide variety of problems in differential equations. For discrete versions of partial differential equations, corresponding Sobolev gradients are seen to be vastly more efficient than ordinary gradients. In fact, descent methods with these gradients generally scale linearly with the number of grid points, in sharp contrast with the use of ordinary gradients. Aside from the first edition of this work, this is the only known account of Sobolev gradients in book form. Most of the applications in this book have emerged since the first edition was published some twelve years ago. What remains of the first edition has been extensively revised. There are a number of plots of results from calculations and a sample MatLab code is included for a simple problem. Those working through a fair p...

  20. Three-dimensional free vibration analysis of functionally graded material plates resting on an elastic foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, M. H.; Soleimani, M.; Rastgoo, A.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes a method for three-dimensional free vibration analysis of rectangular FGM plates resting on an elastic foundation using Chebyshev polynomials and Ritz's method. The thickness can vary from thin to very thick. The elastic foundation is considered as a Winkler model. The analysis is based on a linear, small-strain, three-dimensional elasticity theory. The proposed technique yields very accurate natural frequencies and mode shapes of rectangular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions. A simple and general programme has been used for this purpose. For a plate with geometric symmetry, the vibration modes can be classified into symmetric and antisymmetric ones in that direction. In such a case, the computational cost can be greatly reduced while maintaining the same level of accuracy. Convergence studies and a comparison have been carried out using isotropic and FGM square plates with four simply-supported and clamped edges as examples. The results show that the present method enables rapid convergence, stable numerical operation and very high computational accuracy. Parametric investigations are presented for two-constituent metal-ceramic functionally graded clamped square plates on an elastic foundation with respect to different thickness-side ratios, gradient indexes and foundation stiffnesses.

  1. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Ranieri

    Full Text Available In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA. Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate receptor inputs to cell function.

  2. Consistent functional response of meadow species and communities to land-use changes across productivity and soilmoisture gradients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Májeková, M.; Janeček, Štěpán; Mudrák, Ondřej; Horník, J.; Janečková, Petra; Bartoš, Michael; Fajmon, K.; Jiráská, Š.; Götzenberger, Lars; Šmilauer, P.; Lepš, J.; de Bello, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2016), s. 196-205 ISSN 1402-2001 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/12/1296 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Competition * Functional traits * Vegetation changes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.474, year: 2016

  3. Disentangling the local-scale drivers of taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity in woody plant assemblages along elevational gradients in South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hwa Chun

    Full Text Available Recently, new alternative matrices of biodiversity such as phylogenetic and functional diversity as a complement to species diversity have provided new insights into the mechanisms of community assembly. In this study, we analyzed the phylogenetic signals of five functional traits and the relative contribution of environmental variables and distance matrices to the alpha and beta components of taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity in woody plant assemblages along four local elevational transects on two different mountains. We observed low but significant phylogenetic signals of functional traits, which suggest that phylogenetic dispersion can provide a rough approximation of functional dispersion but not perfect correlations between phylogenetic and functional diversity. Taxonomic alpha diversity showed a monotonic decline with elevation, and climatic variables were the main drivers of this pattern along all studied transects. Furthermore, although the phylogenetic and functional alpha dispersions showed different elevational patterns including increase, decrease and no relationship, the underlying processes driving the patterns of both types of alpha dispersion could be explained by the gradients of climatic and habitat variables as well as biotic interactions such as competition. These results suggest that both alpha dispersion patterns may be significantly controlled by niche-based deterministic processes such as biotic interactions and environmental filtering in our study areas. Moreover, the beta diversity with geographical distances showed distance-decay relationships for all transects. Although the relative importance of the environmental and geographical distances for beta diversity varied across the three facets of diversity and the transects, we generally found that environmental distances were more important for the beta components of the three facets of diversity. However, we cannot discriminate the effects of both

  4. Disentangling the local-scale drivers of taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity in woody plant assemblages along elevational gradients in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Chang-Bae

    2017-01-01

    Recently, new alternative matrices of biodiversity such as phylogenetic and functional diversity as a complement to species diversity have provided new insights into the mechanisms of community assembly. In this study, we analyzed the phylogenetic signals of five functional traits and the relative contribution of environmental variables and distance matrices to the alpha and beta components of taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity in woody plant assemblages along four local elevational transects on two different mountains. We observed low but significant phylogenetic signals of functional traits, which suggest that phylogenetic dispersion can provide a rough approximation of functional dispersion but not perfect correlations between phylogenetic and functional diversity. Taxonomic alpha diversity showed a monotonic decline with elevation, and climatic variables were the main drivers of this pattern along all studied transects. Furthermore, although the phylogenetic and functional alpha dispersions showed different elevational patterns including increase, decrease and no relationship, the underlying processes driving the patterns of both types of alpha dispersion could be explained by the gradients of climatic and habitat variables as well as biotic interactions such as competition. These results suggest that both alpha dispersion patterns may be significantly controlled by niche-based deterministic processes such as biotic interactions and environmental filtering in our study areas. Moreover, the beta diversity with geographical distances showed distance-decay relationships for all transects. Although the relative importance of the environmental and geographical distances for beta diversity varied across the three facets of diversity and the transects, we generally found that environmental distances were more important for the beta components of the three facets of diversity. However, we cannot discriminate the effects of both distances on the three

  5. Structural and functional changes in Nothofagus pumilio forests along an altitudinal gradient in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, M.D.; Frangi, J.L.; Perdomo, M.H. [Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Forestales; Richter, L.L.; Pinedo, L.B. [CADIC, Ushuaia (Argentina)

    2000-04-01

    Structural (density, height, basal area, above-ground tree biomass, leaf area index) and functional (leaf phenology, growth rate, fine litter fall, leaf decomposition) traits were quantified in four mature forests of Notofagus pumilio (lenga) along an altitudinal sequence in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. Three erect forest stands at 220, 440 and 540 m and a krummholz stand at 640 m a.s.l. were selected. Along the altitudinal sequence, stem density increased while DBH, height, biomass, leaf-size and growth period, mean growth rate and decay rate decreased. Dead stems increased and basal area and fine-litter fall decreased with an increase in elevation among erect forests, but these trends inverted at krummholz. We suggest that krummholz is not only a morphological response to the adverse climate but is also a life form with functional advantages.

  6. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwaters with a gradient of contaminant levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, P.J.; Wu, L.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Schadt, C.W.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-06-15

    To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity but greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17-70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.

  7. Peak negative myocardial velocity gradient in early diastole as a noninvasive indicator of left ventricular diastolic function: comparison with transmitral flow velocity indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y; Uematsu, M; Shimizu, H; Nakamura, K; Yamagishi, M; Miyatake, K

    1998-11-01

    We sought to assess the clinical significance of peak negative myocardial velocity gradient (MVG) in early diastole as a noninvasive indicator of left ventricular (LV) diastolic function. Peak systolic MVG has been shown useful for the quantitative assessment of regional wall motion abnormalities, but limited data exist regarding the diastolic MVG as an indicator of LV diastolic function. Peak negative MVG was obtained from M-mode tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) in 43 subjects with or without impairment of systolic and diastolic performance: 12 normal subjects, 12 patients with hypertensive heart disease (HHD) with normal systolic performance and 19 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and was compared with standard Doppler transmitral flow velocity indices. In a subgroup of 30 patients, effects of preload increase on these indices were assessed by performing passive leg lifting. In an additional 11 patients with congestive heart failure at the initial examination, the measurements were repeated after 26+/-16 days of volume-reducing therapy. Peak negative MVG was significantly depressed both in HHD (-3.9+/-1.3/s, p indices failed to distinguish DCM from normal due to the pseudonormalization. Transmitral flow velocity indices were significantly altered (peak early/late diastolic filling velocity [E/A]=1.1+/-0.5 to 1.5+/-0.7, p indicator of LV diastolic function that is less affected by preload alterations than the transmitral flow velocity indices, and thereby could be used for the follow-up of patients with nonischemic LV dysfunction presenting congestive heart failure.

  8. Divergence of dominant factors in soil microbial communities and functions in forest ecosystems along a climatic gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Yu, Guirui; Zhang, Xinyu; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Wang, Shengzhong; Xu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Ruili; Zhao, Ning

    2018-03-01

    Soil microorganisms play an important role in regulating nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Most of the studies conducted thus far have been confined to a single forest biome or have focused on one or two controlling factors, and few have dealt with the integrated effects of climate, vegetation, and soil substrate availability on soil microbial communities and functions among different forests. In this study, we used phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to investigate soil microbial community structure and extracellular enzymatic activities to evaluate the functional potential of soil microbes of different types of forests in three different climatic zones along the north-south transect in eastern China (NSTEC). Both climate and forest type had significant effects on soil enzyme activities and microbial communities with considerable interactive effects. Except for soil acid phosphatase (AP), the other three enzyme activities were much higher in the warm temperate zone than in the temperate and the subtropical climate zones. The soil total PLFAs and bacteria were much higher in the temperate zone than in the warm temperate and the subtropical zones. The soil β-glucosidase (BG) and N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) activities were highest in the coniferous forest. Except for the soil fungi and fungi-bacteria (F/B), the different groups of microbial PLFAs were much higher in the conifer broad-leaved mixed forests than in the coniferous forests and the broad-leaved forests. In general, soil enzyme activities and microbial PLFAs were higher in primary forests than in secondary forests in temperate and warm temperate regions. In the subtropical region, soil enzyme activities were lower in the primary forests than in the secondary forests and microbial PLFAs did not differ significantly between primary and secondary forests. Different compositions of the tree species may cause variations in soil microbial communities and enzyme activities. Our results

  9. Networks of soil biota in a secondary succession gradient: Is it biodiversity or network structure that determines soil function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriën, Elly; Hannula, Emilia; Snoek, Basten; Hol, Gera; van Veen, Hans; van der Putten, Wim

    2017-04-01

    Land abandonment is considered an effective tool for restoring biodiversity and ecosystem functions. However, thus far little attention is given to the role of soil biodiversity. Here, we present results of a soil biodiversity development and ecosystem functioning from a chonosequence of ex-arable fields in The Netherlands. These fields are typically managed by low-intensive grazing while undergoing a transition from an arable system into a species-rich grassland. We manipulated soil biodiversity to be able to couple biodiversity loss to loss of soil functions. We hypothesized that biodiversity loss would lead to less N uptake by plants and slower C transfer to microbes. A greenhouse mesocosm experiment was performed in which sterilized soils from the chronosequence were re-inoculated with a dilution series of soil suspensions (filtered to include only bacteria, fungi and protozoa) to manipulate soil diversity. These mesocosms were planted with a community of plants that naturally occur in all of the grasslands along the chronosequence. We measured microbial community development with TRFLP and sequencing, plant C, N and biomass and using dual labelled 15N ammonium nitrate (15NH415NO3) and 13C in the form of 13CO2 fed to the plants to assess the short term fate, turnover and retention of recent plant assimilated carbon and nitrogen in soil. The faith of the C and N were followed by sequential sampling of aboveground and belowground plant tissues and soil bacterial and fungal PLFA and NLFA biomarkers. With the first method the role of microbial diversity and soil on plant carbon assimilation and nitrogen uptake was evaluated. This was further related to the amount of recently photosynthesized carbon plants allocated to different microbial groups in soils. Microbial end-communities were pyrosequenced to evaluate the end diversity. In this study we showed the effects of the loss of soil biodiversity to C and N cycling in plants and microbes. Next to this manipulative

  10. Spatial variations in drainage efficiency in a boreal wetland environment as a function of lidar and radar-derived deviations from the regional hydraulic gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, C.; Brisco, B.; Chasmer, L.; Devito, K.; Montgomery, J. S.; Patterson, S.; Petrone, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    The dense forest cover of the Western Boreal Plains of northern Alberta is underlain by a mix of glacial moraines, sandy outwash sediments and clay plains possessing spatially variable hydraulic conductivities. The region is also characterised by a large number of post-glacial surface depression wetlands that have seasonally and topographically limited surface connectivity. Consequently, drainage along shallow regional hydraulic gradients may be dominated either by variations in surface geology or local variations in Et. Long-term government lake level monitoring is sparse in this region, but over a decade of hydrometeorological monitoring has taken place around the Utikuma Regional Study Area (URSA), a research site led by the University of Alberta. In situ lake and ground water level data are here combined with time series of airborne lidar and RadarSat II synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to assess the spatial variability of water levels during late summer period characterised by flow recession. Long term Lidar data were collected or obtained by the authors in August of 2002, 2008, 2011 and 2016, while seasonal SAR data were captured approximately every 24 days during the summers of 2015, 2016 and 2017. Water levels for wetlands exceeding 100m2 in area across a north-trending 20km x 5km topographic gradient north of Utikuma Lake were extracted directly from the lidar and indirectly from the SAR. The recent seasonal variability in spatial water levels was extracted from SAR, while the lidar data illustrated more long term trends associated with land use and riparian vegetation succession. All water level data collected in August were combined and averaged at multiple scales using a raster focal statistics function to generate a long term spatial map of the regional hydraulic gradient and scale-dependent variations. Areas of indicated high and low drainage efficiency were overlain onto layers of landcover and surface geology to ascertain causal relationships

  11. Stochastic Gradient Monomial Gamma Sampler

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yizhe; Chen, Changyou; Gan, Zhe; Henao, Ricardo; Carin, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in stochastic gradient techniques have made it possible to estimate posterior distributions from large datasets via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). However, when the target posterior is multimodal, mixing performance is often poor. This results in inadequate exploration of the posterior distribution. A framework is proposed to improve the sampling efficiency of stochastic gradient MCMC, based on Hamiltonian Monte Carlo. A generalized kinetic function is leveraged, delivering ...

  12. Multi-taxa approach shows consistent shifts in arthropod functional traits along grassland land-use intensity gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Nadja K; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Gossner, Martin M

    2016-03-01

    Intensification of land use reduces biodiversity but may also shift the trait composition of communities. Understanding how land use affects single traits and community trait composition, helps to understand why some species are more affected by land use than others. Trait-based analyses are common for plants, but rare for arthropods. We collected literature-based traits for nearly 1000 insect and spider species to test how land- use intensity (including mowing, fertilization, and grazing) across 124 grasslands in three regions of Germany affects community-weighted mean traits across taxa and in single taxa. We additionally measured morphometric traits for more than 150 Heteroptera species and tested whether the weighted mean morphometric traits change with increasing land-use intensity. Community average body size decreased and community average dispersal ability increased from low to high land-use intensity. Furthermore, the relative abundance of herbivores and of specialists among herbivores decreased and the relative abundance of species using the herb layer increased with increasing land-use intensity. Community-weighted means of the morphometric traits in Heteroptera also changed from low to high land-use intensity toward longer and thinner shapes as well as longer appendices (legs, wings, and antenna). While changes in traits with increasing mowing and fertilization intensity were consistent with the combined land-use intensity, community average traits did often not change or with opposite direction under increasing grazing intensity. We conclude that high land-use intensity acts as an environmental filter selecting for on average smaller, more mobile, and less specialized species across taxa. Although trait collection across multiple arthropod taxa is laborious and needs clear trait definitions, it is essential for understanding the functional consequences of biodiversity loss due to land-use intensification.

  13. Seasonal variation in denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia process rates and corresponding key functional genes along an estuarine nitrate gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Wilson, John; Stott, Andrew; Osborn, A. Mark; Nedwell, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated spatial-temporal variation in benthic bacterial community structure, rates of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) processes and abundances of corresponding genes and transcripts at three sites—the estuary-head, mid-estuary and the estuary mouth (EM) along the nitrate gradient of the Colne estuary over an annual cycle. Denitrification rates declined down the estuary, while DNRA rates were higher at the estuary head and middle than the EM. In four out of the six 2-monthly time-points, rates of DNRA were greater than denitrification at each site. Abundance of gene markers for nitrate-reduction (nitrate reductase narG and napA), denitrification (nitrite reductase nirS) and DNRA (DNRA nitrite reductase nrfA) declined along the estuary with significant relationships between denitrification and nirS abundance, and DNRA and nrfA abundance. Spatially, rates of denitrification, DNRA and corresponding functional gene abundances decreased along the estuary. However, temporal correlations between rate processes and functional gene and transcript abundances were not observed. PMID:26082763

  14. Age and gender specific normal values of left ventricular mass, volume and function for gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allansdotter-Johnsson Ase

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about age-specific normal values for left ventricular mass (LVM, end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, stroke volume (SV and ejection fraction (EF by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR is of importance to differentiate between health and disease and to assess the severity of disease. The aims of the study were to determine age and gender specific normal reference values and to explore the normal physiological variation of these parameters from adolescence to late adulthood, in a cross sectional study. Methods Gradient echo CMR was performed at 1.5 T in 96 healthy volunteers (11–81 years, 50 male. Gender-specific analysis of parameters was undertaken in both absolute values and adjusted for body surface area (BSA. Results Age and gender specific normal ranges for LV volumes, mass and function are presented from the second through the eighth decade of life. LVM, ESV and EDV rose during adolescence and declined in adulthood. SV and EF decreased with age. Compared to adult females, adult males had higher BSA-adjusted values of EDV (p = 0.006 and ESV (p Conclusion LV volumes, mass and function vary over a broad age range in healthy individuals. LV volumes and mass both rise in adolescence and decline with age. EF showed a rapid decline in adolescence compared to changes throughout adulthood. These findings demonstrate the need for age and gender specific normal ranges for clinical use.

  15. Strain gradients in epitaxial ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalan, G.; Noheda, B.; McAneney, J.; Sinnamon, L.J.; Gregg, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray analysis of ferroelectric thin layers of Ba 1/2 Sr 1/2 TiO 3 with different thicknesses reveals the presence of strain gradients across the films and allows us to propose a functional form for the internal strain profile. We use this to calculate the influence of strain gradient, through flexoelectric coupling, on the degradation of the ferroelectric properties of films with decreasing thickness, in excellent agreement with the observed behavior. This paper shows that strain relaxation can lead to smooth, continuous gradients across hundreds of nanometers, and it highlights the pressing need to avoid such strain gradients in order to obtain ferroelectric films with bulklike properties

  16. A TLBO based gradient descent learning-functional link higher order ANN: An efficient model for learning from non-linear data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bighnaraj Naik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available All the higher order ANNs (HONNs including functional link ANN (FLANN are sensitive to random initialization of weight and rely on the learning algorithms adopted. Although a selection of efficient learning algorithms for HONNs helps to improve the performance, on the other hand, initialization of weights with optimized weights rather than random weights also play important roles on its efficiency. In this paper, the problem solving approach of the teaching learning based optimization (TLBO along with learning ability of the gradient descent learning (GDL is used to obtain the optimal set of weight of FLANN learning model. TLBO does not require any specific parameters rather it requires only some of the common independent parameters like number of populations, number of iterations and stopping criteria, thereby eliminating the intricacy in selection of algorithmic parameters for adjusting the set of weights of FLANN model. The proposed TLBO-FLANN is implemented in MATLAB and compared with GA-FLANN, PSO-FLANN and HS-FLANN. The TLBO-FLANN is tested on various 5-fold cross validated benchmark data sets from UCI machine learning repository and analyzed under the null-hypothesis by using Friedman test, Holm’s procedure and post hoc ANOVA statistical analysis (Tukey test & Dunnett test.

  17. Age and gender specific normal values of left ventricular mass, volume and function for gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging: a cross sectional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, Peter A; Ahl, Ragnhild; Hedstrom, Erik; Ugander, Martin; Allansdotter-Johnsson, Ase; Friberg, Peter; Arheden, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge about age-specific normal values for left ventricular mass (LVM), end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV) and ejection fraction (EF) by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is of importance to differentiate between health and disease and to assess the severity of disease. The aims of the study were to determine age and gender specific normal reference values and to explore the normal physiological variation of these parameters from adolescence to late adulthood, in a cross sectional study. Gradient echo CMR was performed at 1.5 T in 96 healthy volunteers (11–81 years, 50 male). Gender-specific analysis of parameters was undertaken in both absolute values and adjusted for body surface area (BSA). Age and gender specific normal ranges for LV volumes, mass and function are presented from the second through the eighth decade of life. LVM, ESV and EDV rose during adolescence and declined in adulthood. SV and EF decreased with age. Compared to adult females, adult males had higher BSA-adjusted values of EDV (p = 0.006) and ESV (p < 0.001), similar SV (p = 0.51) and lower EF (p = 0.014). No gender differences were seen in the youngest, 11–15 year, age range. LV volumes, mass and function vary over a broad age range in healthy individuals. LV volumes and mass both rise in adolescence and decline with age. EF showed a rapid decline in adolescence compared to changes throughout adulthood. These findings demonstrate the need for age and gender specific normal ranges for clinical use

  18. STOCHASTIC GRADIENT METHODS FOR UNCONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Krejić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This papers presents an overview of gradient based methods for minimization of noisy functions. It is assumed that the objective functions is either given with error terms of stochastic nature or given as the mathematical expectation. Such problems arise in the context of simulation based optimization. The focus of this presentation is on the gradient based Stochastic Approximation and Sample Average Approximation methods. The concept of stochastic gradient approximation of the true gradient can be successfully extended to deterministic problems. Methods of this kind are presented for the data fitting and machine learning problems.

  19. Coral Reef Functioning Along a Cross‐shelf Environmental Gradient: Abiotic and Biotic Drivers of Coral Reef Growth in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Roik, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Despite high temperature and salinity conditions that challenge reef growth in other oceans, the Red Sea maintains amongst the most biodiverse and productive coral reefs worldwide. It is therefore an important region for the exploration of coral reef functioning, and expected to contribute valuable insights towards the understanding of coral reefs in challenging environments. This dissertation assessed the baseline variability of in situ abiotic conditions (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and total alkalinity, among others) in the central Red Sea and highlights these environmental regimes in a global context. Further, focus was directed on biotic factors (biofilm community dynamics, calcification and bioerosion), which underlie reef growth processes and are crucial for maintaining coral reef functioning and ecosystem services. Using full‐year data from an environmental cross‐shelf gradient, the dynamic interplay of abiotic and biotic factors was investigated. In situ observations demonstrate that central Red Sea coral reefs were highly variable on spatial, seasonal, and diel scales, and exhibited comparably high temperature, high salinity, and low dissolved oxygen levels, which on the one hand reflect future ocean predictions. Under these conditions epilithic bacterial and algal assemblages were mainly driven by variables (i.e., temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen) which are predicted to change strongly in the progression of global climate change, implying an influential bottom up effect on reef‐building communities. On the other hand, measured alkalinity and other carbonate chemistry value were close to the estimates of preindustrial global ocean surface water and thus in favor of reef growth processes. Despite this beneficial carbonate chemistry, calcification and carbonate budgets in the reefs were not higher than in other coral reef regions. In this regard, seasonal calcification patterns suggest that summer temperatures may be exceeding the optima

  20. Functional and Aesthetic Full Mouth Rehabilitation of a Severely Worn Dentition to Restore Vertical Dimension: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raj Gaurav; Sinha, Pooja

    2014-12-01

    Deterioration or malfunction of any part should be viewed as an effect that has the direct or indirect result of one or more identifiable cause. The establishment of definitive goals is the foundation for the full mouth rehabilitation. Severe wear is common in prosthodontic patients whose teeth have been held in functional interference for long period of time. This case report presents a description of a patient's oral rehabilitation with metal ceramic restorations to increase vertical dimension while achieving canine guided occlusion.

  1. Analytical energy gradients for explicitly correlated wave functions. II. Explicitly correlated coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples corrections: CCSD(T)-F12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Győrffy, Werner; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2018-03-21

    We present an implementation of analytical energy gradients for the explicitly correlated coupled cluster singles and doubles method with perturbative triples corrections [CCSD(T)-F12]. The accuracy of the CCSD(T)-F12 analytical gradient technique is demonstrated by computing equilibrium geometries for a set of closed-shell molecules containing first- and second-row elements. Near basis-set limit equilibrium geometries are obtained with triple-zeta correlation consistent basis sets. Various approximations in the F12 treatment are compared, and the effects of these are found to be small.

  2. Preconditioning the modified conjugate gradient method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the convergence analysis of the conventional conjugate Gradient method was reviewed. And the convergence analysis of the modified conjugate Gradient method was analysed with our extension on preconditioning the algorithm. Convergence of the algorithm is a function of the condition number of M-1A.

  3. Seepage and seepage gradients in an homogeneous, isotropic aquifer with drains as a function of soil properties and flow region geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seepage and seepage gradients are important parameters in soil erosion processes and water quality problems on agricultural land. Traditionally, surface overland flow is viewed as one of the major soil erosive agents on those areas. In recent years, the role of the subsurface flow regime is increasi...

  4. Transcriptome sequencing reveals population differentiation in gene expression linked to functional traits and environmental gradients in the South African shrub Protea repens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Melis; Carlson, Jane E; Holsinger, Kent E; Latimer, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the environmental and genetic mechanisms underlying locally adaptive trait variation across the ranges of species is a major focus of evolutionary biology. Combining transcriptome sequencing with common garden experiments on populations spanning geographical and environmental gradients holds promise for identifying such mechanisms. The South African shrub Protea repens displays diverse phenotypes in the wild along drought and temperature gradients. We grew plants from seeds collected at 19 populations spanning this species' range, and sequenced the transcriptomes of these plants to reveal gene pathways associated with adaptive trait variation. We related expression in co-expressed gene networks to trait phenotypes measured in the common garden and to source population climate. We found that expression in gene networks correlated with source-population environment and with plant traits. In particular, the activity of gene networks enriched for growth related pathways correlated strongly with source site minimum winter temperature and with leaf size, stem diameter and height in the garden. Other gene networks with enrichments for photosynthesis related genes showed associations with precipitation. Our results strongly suggest that this species displays population-level differences in gene expression that have been shaped by source population site climate, and that are reflected in trait variation along environmental gradients. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Travelling gradient thermocouple calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    A short discussion of the origins of the thermocouple EMF is used to re-introduce the idea that the Peltier and Thompson effects are indistinguishable from one another. Thermocouples may be viewed as devices which generate an EMF at junctions or as integrators of EMF's developed in thermal gradients. The thermal gradient view is considered the more appropriate, because of its better accord with theory and behaviour, the correct approach to calibration, and investigation of service effects is immediately obvious. Inhomogeneities arise in thermocouples during manufacture and in service. The results of travelling gradient measurements are used to show that such effects are revealed with a resolution which depends on the length of the gradient although they may be masked during simple immersion calibration. Proposed tests on thermocouples irradiated in a nuclear reactor are discussed

  6. Na+,HCO3--cotransport is functionally upregulated during human breast carcinogenesis and required for the inverted pH gradient across the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Soojung; Mele, Marco; Vahl, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic and biochemical changes during breast carcinogenesis enhance cellular acid production. Extrusion of the acid load from the cancer cells raises intracellular pH, while it decreases extracellular pH creating an inverted pH gradient across the plasma membrane compared to normal cells....... Intracellular pH was measured by fluorescence microscopy, while protein expression was investigated by immunofluorescence imaging and immunoblotting. We found that cellular net acid extrusion increased during human breast carcinogenesis due to enhanced Na(+),HCO3 (-)-cotransport, which created an alkaline shift...... (~0.3 units of magnitude) in steady-state intracellular pH of human primary breast carcinomas compared to normal breast tissue. Na(+)/H(+)-exchange activity and steady-state intracellular pH in the absence of CO2/HCO3 (-) were practically unaffected by breast carcinogenesis. These effects were evident...

  7. Gradient Alloy for Optical Packaging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in additive manufacturing, such as Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS), enables the fabrication of compositionally gradient microstructures, i.e. gradient...

  8. Metal-ceramic joining by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, J.M.; Robin, M.

    1993-01-01

    Within the scope of increase in cutting tools efficiency, a CW CO 2 laser beam has been used for butt welding sintered tips containing cobalt and tungsten carbide to a medium carbon steel core. After optimization of the laser processing conditions, full penetrating, sound and homogeneous welds are observed. Hardness is found to be nearly constant across the entire weld bead cross-section. Micrographic observations in the same area show a fine dendritic microstructure ; microanalysis (EDS) as well as X-ray diffraction experiments reveal that dendrites contain mainly iron and cobalt, while tungsten has segregated in the interdendritic zone where complex (Fe - Co - W) rich carbides are likely to form. (orig.)

  9. Statistical properties of coastal long waves analysed through sea-level time-gradient functions: exemplary analysis of the Siracusa, Italy, tide-gauge data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bressan

    2016-01-01

    reconstructed sea level (RSL, the background slope (BS and the control function (CF. These functions are examined through a traditional spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT analysis and also through a statistical analysis, showing that they can be characterised by probability distribution functions PDFs such as the Student's t distribution (IS and RSL and the beta distribution (CF. As an example, the method has been applied to data from the tide-gauge station of Siracusa, Italy.

  10. Shape reconstruction from gradient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettl, Svenja; Kaminski, Jürgen; Knauer, Markus C; Häusler, Gerd

    2008-04-20

    We present a generalized method for reconstructing the shape of an object from measured gradient data. A certain class of optical sensors does not measure the shape of an object but rather its local slope. These sensors display several advantages, including high information efficiency, sensitivity, and robustness. For many applications, however, it is necessary to acquire the shape, which must be calculated from the slopes by numerical integration. Existing integration techniques show drawbacks that render them unusable in many cases. Our method is based on an approximation employing radial basis functions. It can be applied to irregularly sampled, noisy, and incomplete data, and it reconstructs surfaces both locally and globally with high accuracy.

  11. Stringy bounces and gradient instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Bouncing solutions are obtained from a generally covariant action characterized by a potential which is a nonlocal functional of the dilaton field at two separated space-time points. Gradient instabilities are shown to arise in this context but they are argued to be nongeneric. After performing a gauge-invariant and frame-invariant derivation of the evolution equations of the fluctuations, a heuristic criterium for the avoidance of pathological instabilities is proposed and corroborated by a number of explicit examples that turn out to be compatible with a quasi-flat spectrum of curvature inhomogeneities for typical wavelengths larger than the Hubble radius.

  12. Uniform gradient expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giovannini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  13. Uniform gradient expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  14. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, R.A.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Remsbottom, R.H.

    1987-07-01

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed

  15. Improving GOCE cross-track gravity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemes, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The GOCE gravity gradiometer measured highly accurate gravity gradients along the orbit during GOCE's mission lifetime from March 17, 2009, to November 11, 2013. These measurements contain unique information on the gravity field at a spatial resolution of 80 km half wavelength, which is not provided to the same accuracy level by any other satellite mission now and in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, the gravity gradient in cross-track direction is heavily perturbed in the regions around the geomagnetic poles. We show in this paper that the perturbing effect can be modeled accurately as a quadratic function of the non-gravitational acceleration of the satellite in cross-track direction. Most importantly, we can remove the perturbation from the cross-track gravity gradient to a great extent, which significantly improves the accuracy of the latter and offers opportunities for better scientific exploitation of the GOCE gravity gradient data set.

  16. Stability of gradient semigroups under perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão-Costa, E. R.; Caraballo, T.; Carvalho, A. N.; Langa, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we prove that gradient-like semigroups (in the sense of Carvalho and Langa (2009 J. Diff. Eqns 246 2646-68)) are gradient semigroups (possess a Lyapunov function). This is primarily done to provide conditions under which gradient semigroups, in a general metric space, are stable under perturbation exploiting the known fact (see Carvalho and Langa (2009 J. Diff. Eqns 246 2646-68)) that gradient-like semigroups are stable under perturbation. The results presented here were motivated by the work carried out in Conley (1978 Isolated Invariant Sets and the Morse Index (CBMS Regional Conference Series in Mathematics vol 38) (RI: American Mathematical Society Providence)) for groups in compact metric spaces (see also Rybakowski (1987 The Homotopy Index and Partial Differential Equations (Universitext) (Berlin: Springer)) for the Morse decomposition of an invariant set for a semigroup on a compact metric space).

  17. On the Convergence Analysis of the Optimized Gradient Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of unconstrained minimization of smooth convex functions having Lipschitz continuous gradients with known Lipschitz constant. We recently proposed the optimized gradient method for this problem and showed that it has a worst-case convergence bound for the cost function decrease that is twice as small as that of Nesterov's fast gradient method, yet has a similarly efficient practical implementation. Drori showed recently that the optimized gradient method has optimal complexity for the cost function decrease over the general class of first-order methods. This optimality makes it important to study fully the convergence properties of the optimized gradient method. The previous worst-case convergence bound for the optimized gradient method was derived for only the last iterate of a secondary sequence. This paper provides an analytic convergence bound for the primary sequence generated by the optimized gradient method. We then discuss additional convergence properties of the optimized gradient method, including the interesting fact that the optimized gradient method has two types of worstcase functions: a piecewise affine-quadratic function and a quadratic function. These results help complete the theory of an optimal first-order method for smooth convex minimization.

  18. Inversion gradients for acoustic VTI wavefield tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Vladimir

    2017-03-21

    Wavefield tomography can handle complex subsurface geology better than ray-based techniques and, ultimately, provide a higher resolution. Here, we implement forward and adjoint wavefield extrapolation for VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media using a generalized pseudospectral operator based on a separable approximation for the P-wave dispersion relation. This operator is employed to derive the gradients of the differential semblance optimization (DSO) and modified image-power objective functions. We also obtain the gradient expressions for a data-domain objective function that can more easily incorporate borehole information necessary for stable VTI velocity analysis. These gradients are similar to the ones obtained with a space-time finite-difference (FD) scheme for a system of coupled wave equations but the pseudospectral method is not hampered by the imprint of the shear-wave artifact. Numerical examples also show the potential advantages of the modified image-power objective function in estimating the anellipticity parameter η.

  19. Thermal shock resistance of SiC/C functionally gradient material prepared by chemical vapor deposition. CVD ho ni yori sakuseishita SiC/C keisha kino zairyo no tainetsu shogekisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, M.; Hirai, T. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). The Research Inst. for Iron, Steel and Other Metals); Hashida, T.; Takahashi, H. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1990-09-25

    The authors fabricated functionally gradient materials (FGM) having a composition distribution from C to SiC on a graphite substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and researched the thermal shock resistance under local heating. The thicknesses of the SiC/C FGM are 0.8 mm and 1.8 mm. Under local heating by carbon dioxide laser, SiC non FGM (NFGM) suffered cracking at heat flux density 5.8 MW/m {sup 2}, and SiC/C FGM suffered cracking at heat flux density 7.4 MW/m {sup 2}. As the thickness of FGM film increased from 0.8 mm to 1.8 mm, temperature difference in the film increased from 390K to 560K. From these experiments, it was clarified that the improvement of thermal shock resistance under local heating was achieved by SiC/CFGM coating. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Infrared image detail enhancement based on the gradient field specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenda; Xu, Zhijun; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Fan; Han, Xizhen

    2014-07-01

    Human vision is sensitive to the changes of local image details, which are actually image gradients. To enhance faint infrared image details, this article proposes a gradient field specification algorithm. First we define the image gradient field and gradient histogram. Then, by analyzing the characteristics of the gradient histogram, we construct a Gaussian function to obtain the gradient histogram specification and therefore obtain the transform gradient field. In addition, subhistogram equalization is proposed based on the histogram equalization to improve the contrast of infrared images. The experimental results show that the algorithm can effectively improve image contrast and enhance weak infrared image details and edges. As a result, it can give qualified image information for different applications of an infrared image. In addition, it can also be applied to enhance other types of images such as visible, medical, and lunar surface.

  1. The Electronic Structures and Optical Properties of Alkaline-Earth Metals Doped Anatase TiO2: A Comparative Study of Screened Hybrid Functional and Generalized Gradient Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Gang Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline-earth metallic dopant can improve the performance of anatase TiO2 in photocatalysis and solar cells. Aiming to understand doping mechanisms, the dopant formation energies, electronic structures, and optical properties for Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba doped anatase TiO2 are investigated by using density functional theory calculations with the HSE06 and PBE functionals. By combining our results with those of previous studies, the HSE06 functional provides a better description of electronic structures. The calculated formation energies indicate that the substitution of a lattice Ti with an AEM atom is energetically favorable under O-rich growth conditions. The electronic structures suggest that, AEM dopants shift the valence bands (VBs to higher energy, and the dopant-state energies for the cases of Ca, Sr, and Ba are quite higher than Fermi levels, while the Be and Mg dopants result into the spin polarized gap states near the top of VBs. The components of VBs and dopant-states support that the AEM dopants are active in inter-band transitions with lower energy excitations. As to optical properties, Ca/Sr/Ba are more effective than Be/Mg to enhance absorbance in visible region, but the Be/Mg are superior to Ca/Sr/Ba for the absorbance improvement in near-IR region.

  2. Distribution of Carbon Uptake Capacity of Plant Functional Groups Across the Canopy Gradient in Old-Growth Tropical Wet Forest in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbauer, S. F.; Cruz, H. O.; Ryan, M. G.; Clark, D. B.; Clark, D. A.; Olivas, P.

    2004-12-01

    Because of the difficulties of accessing leaves within tree crowns, little is known about the photosynthetic capacity of different functional groups within tropical rain forest canopies. To address this deficiency, we measured photosynthetic capacity (Amax) in situ along vertical transects through old-growth forest canopy using a mobile walkup tower at the La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. We asked: What groups are responsible for most C-fixation and at what height in the canopy does most C-fixation occur? Photosynthesis (using a LI-COR Li-6400) and total leaf area were measured for all vascular plant species encountered within the tower footprint (4.6 m2). Plants were grouped into trees, palms, ferns, lianas, epiphytes, herbs, Pentaclethra macroloba (the dominant canopy tree), and vines. Amax values differed among functional groups. The ranking of Amax among the groups was trees > P. macroloba > palms > lianas > vines > epiphytes > herbs > ferns. Trees and P. macroloba had the highest photosynthetic rates, but the maximum rates occur at different heights. Amax of P. macroloba increases with canopy height to a maximum 10.3 \\mumol m-2 s-1 at 17.5 m. Amax of trees increases with canopy height (r2 = 0.77) and attains the highest Amax at 32.5 m (10.6 \\mumol m-2 s-1). Palms and lianas presented similar patterns of Amax. However, lianas reach the canopy top whereas palms are shorter and were not observed above 27.5 m. The maximum photosynthetic rates for both groups were: lianas 9.2 \\mumol m-2 s-1 at 27.5 m and palms 9.6 \\mumol m-2 s-1 at 17.5 m. By scaling the functional group Amax values with their leaf area, we estimated that most of the photosynthetic capacity occurs between 17.5 m and 37.5 m and is attributed mainly to trees, followed by P. macroloba and then lianas.

  3. Temperature-gradient-induced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Glaser, Matt; Maclennan, Joe; Clark, Noel; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    Freely-suspended smectic films of sub-micrometer thickness and lateral extensions of several millimeters were used to study thermally driven migration and convection in the film plane. Film experiments were performed during the 6 minute microgravity phase of a TEXUS suborbital rocket flight (Texus 52, launched April 27, 2015). We have found an attraction of the smectic material towards the cold edge of the film in a temperature gradient, similar to the Soret effect. This process is reversed when this edge is heated up again. Thermal convection driven by two thermocontacts in the film is practically absent, even at temperature gradients up to 10 K/mm, with thermally driven convection only setting in when the hot post reaches the transition temperature to the nematic phase. The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) flight hardware was launched on SpaceX-6 in April 2015 and experiments on smectic bubbles were carried out on the International Space Station using four different smectic A and C liquid crystal materials in separate sample chambers. We observed that smectic islands on the surface of the bubbles migrated towards the colder part of the bubble in a temperature gradient. This work was supported by NASA Grant No. NNX-13AQ81G, by the Soft Materials Research Center under NSF MRSEC Grants No. DMR-0820579 and No. DMR-1420736, and by DLR Grants 50WM1127 and 50WM1430.

  4. Adaptive microfluidic gradient generator for quantitative chemotaxis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anielski, Alexander; Pfannes, Eva K. B.; Beta, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    Chemotactic motion in a chemical gradient is an essential cellular function that controls many processes in the living world. For a better understanding and more detailed modelling of the underlying mechanisms of chemotaxis, quantitative investigations in controlled environments are needed. We developed a setup that allows us to separately address the dependencies of the chemotactic motion on the average background concentration and on the gradient steepness of the chemoattractant. In particular, both the background concentration and the gradient steepness can be kept constant at the position of the cell while it moves along in the gradient direction. This is achieved by generating a well-defined chemoattractant gradient using flow photolysis. In this approach, the chemoattractant is released by a light-induced reaction from a caged precursor in a microfluidic flow chamber upstream of the cell. The flow photolysis approach is combined with an automated real-time cell tracker that determines changes in the cell position and triggers movement of the microscope stage such that the cell motion is compensated and the cell remains at the same position in the gradient profile. The gradient profile can be either determined experimentally using a caged fluorescent dye or may be alternatively determined by numerical solutions of the corresponding physical model. To demonstrate the function of this adaptive microfluidic gradient generator, we compare the chemotactic motion of Dictyostelium discoideum cells in a static gradient and in a gradient that adapts to the position of the moving cell.

  5. Gradientes de qualidade em abacaxi 'Pérola' em função do tamanho e do estádio de maturação do fruto Quality gradients in 'Pérola' pineapple in function of fruit size and maturation stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Haroldo Reinhardt

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Frutos compostos podem apresentar variações expressivas nas propriedades da polpa, exigindo cuidados especiais nos procedimentos de controle de qualidade. Este trabalho visou a determinar gradientes dos principais atributos da polpa do abacaxi 'Pérola', em função do tamanho e do estádio de maturação dos frutos. Estes foram colhidos em plantios comerciais em Itaberaba-BA, na safra 2002, determinando-se os teores de sólidos solúveis totais (SST, vitamina C (ácido ascórbico e da acidez titulável (AT, o pH e a relação SST/AT no suco. Em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, foram estudados os tratamentos distribuídos em esquema fatorial 2 (tamanho do fruto - pequeno e grande x 2 (estádio de maturação do fruto - verdoso/pintado e colorido x 3 (terços superior, mediano e inferior, com 15 repetições, no primeiro experimento, e em esquema fatorial 3 (terços superior, mediano, inferior x 3 (terços externo, central e interno, com sete repetições, no segundo. Os SST aumentaram da parte superior do fruto para a inferior e da externa para a interna, sendo mais altos em frutos coloridos, ocorrendo o contrário para a AT e a vitamina C. Frutos pequenos apresentaram maiores teores de SST e AT e menores de SST/AT e vitamina C. A amplitude dos gradientes observados no abacaxi 'Pérola' exige a utilização de amostras constituídas por seções longitudinais e horizontais completas do fruto, nos procedimentos de controle de qualidade.Composed fruits may present expressive variations in its pulp proprieties, requiring special attention to quality control procedures. This work aimed at determining the main attributes of 'Pérola' pineapple pulp, in function of fruit size and maturation stage. Fruits were harvested from commercial fields in Itaberaba, Bahia, Brazil, in the 2002 harvest season, and their contents of total soluble solids (TSS, vitamin C (ascorbic acid, titratable acidity (TA, TSS/TA ratio and pulp pH determined. In

  6. Improving dimensionality reduction with spectral gradient descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memisevic, Roland; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    We introduce spectral gradient descent, a way of improving iterative dimensionality reduction techniques. The method uses information contained in the leading eigenvalues of a data affinity matrix to modify the steps taken during a gradient-based optimization procedure. We show that the approach is able to speed up the optimization and to help dimensionality reduction methods find better local minima of their objective functions. We also provide an interpretation of our approach in terms of the power method for finding the leading eigenvalues of a symmetric matrix and verify the usefulness of the approach in some simple experiments.

  7. The Galactic metallicity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolleston, W. R. J.; Smartt, S. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Ryans, R. S. I.

    2000-11-01

    We have previously published intermediate to high resolution spectroscopic observations of approximately 80 early B-type main-sequence stars situated in 19 Galactic open clusters/associations with Galactocentric distances distributed over 6Twarog et al. \\cite{twa97}). However, there is no evidence to suggest that our data would be better fitted with a two-zone model. Moreover, we observe a N/O gradient of -0.04+/-0.02 dex kpc-1 which is consistent with that found for other spiral galaxies (Vila-Costas & Edmunds \\cite{vil93}).

  8. [Translaminar Gradient and Glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čmelo, J

    2017-01-01

    The cribriform plate is a threshold of the intraocular pressure (VOT) and of the intracranial pressure (IKT). The difference between the VOT and IKT is referred to as translaminar gradient (TLG). The goal was to evaluate the Glaucoma progression (visual field, fundus examination, HRT) with / without topical anti-glaucomatous therapy) in relation to the TLG. the significance of TLG has been studied in two groups. I. Group: 57 patients diagnosed and treatment of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (PGOU), 10 patients with Ocular hypertension (OH), 7 patients with Normal-Tension Glaucoma (NTG), and 75 healthy without glaucoma. The examinations of TLG were carried out once and retrospectively. In II. group there were prospectively studied 14 patients with OH and 24 patients with newly detected PGOU without local therapy. The examinations were performed 4 times at intervals of 10 to 11 months. All tests included a basic eye examination, ORA tonometry, HRT examination, gonioscopy, Color Doppler sonography of blood vessels of the eye and orbit. Venous pulsation pressure (VPT) has been recorded by the Ophthalmodynamometer Meditron (D-ODM). In case of spontaneous retinal venous pulsation, VPT was considered as the same pressure as the VOT. The TLG was calculated with formula of Querfurth: ICT = 0.29 + 0.74 (VOT / PI (AO)). [PI(AO) - Pulsatility index of the Ophthalmic artery (AO)]. I. group: TLG was in the control group without Glaucoma: 12.2 ± 2.0 torr. The NTG group: 9.0 ± 1.70 mm Hg. PGOU: 11.1 ± 1.91 mm Hg. OH: 12.6 ± 0.85 mm Hg. IKT alone does not show a significant relationship to the presence of glaucoma, ocular hypertension. II. Group: The average TLG in Ocular Hypertension (14 patients) has been 3.8 ± 1.2 torr. 2 patients (OH) had TLG 10 torr. and 15 torr. After 4 years in one of them (TLG = 15 torr.) there was recorded Glaucoma progression. In the PGOU group before antiglaucoma therapy, TLG was 15.0 ± 4.8 torr for all patients. After setting up local anti

  9. Gradient computation for VTI acoustic wavefield tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Vladimir

    2016-09-06

    Wavefield tomography can handle complex subsurface geology better than ray-based techniques and, ultimately, provide a higher resolution. Here, we implement forward and adjoint wavefield extrapolation for VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media using a pseudospectral operator that employes a separable approximation of the P-wave dispersion relation. This operator is employed to derive the gradients of the differential semblance optimization (DSO) and modified stack-power objective functions. We also obtain the gradient expressions for the data-domain objective function, which can incorporate borehole information necessary for stable VTI velocity analysis. These gradients are compared to the ones obtained with a space-time finite-difference (FD) scheme for a system of coupled wave equations. Whereas the kernels computed with the two wave-equation operators are similar, the pseudospectral method is not hampered by the imprint of the shear-wave artifact. Numerical examples also show that the modified stack-power objective function produces cleaner gradients than the more conventional DSO operator.

  10. Gradient-type methods in inverse parabolic problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabanikhin, Sergey; Penenko, Aleksey

    2008-01-01

    This article is devoted to gradient-based methods for inverse parabolic problems. In the first part, we present a priori convergence theorems based on the conditional stability estimates for linear inverse problems. These theorems are applied to backwards parabolic problem and sideways parabolic problem. The convergence conditions obtained coincide with sourcewise representability in the self-adjoint backwards parabolic case but they differ in the sideways case. In the second part, a variational approach is formulated for a coefficient identification problem. Using adjoint equations, a formal gradient of an objective functional is constructed. A numerical test illustrates the performance of conjugate gradient algorithm with the formal gradient.

  11. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  12. Stellar population gradients in isolated, local group dwarf galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidalgo S.L.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the detailed star formation as a function of radius that we have derived for the LCID galaxies, with particular emphasis on the stellar populations gradient and the effect of the UV-background.

  13. Substrate-Bound Protein Gradients to Study Haptotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien G. Ricoult

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells navigate in response to inhomogeneous distributions of extracellular guidance cues. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying migration in response to gradients of chemical cues have been investigated for over a century. Following the introduction of micropipettes and more recently microfluidics for gradient generation, much attention and effort was devoted to study cellular chemotaxis, which is defined as guidance by gradients of chemical cues in solution. Haptotaxis, directional migration in response to gradients of substrate-bound cues, has received comparatively less attention; however it is increasingly clear that in vivo many physiologically relevant guidance proteins – including many secreted cues – are bound to cellular surfaces or incorporated into extracellular matrix and likely function via a haptotactic mechanism. Here, we review the history of haptotaxis. We examine the importance of the reference surface, the surface in contact with the cell that is not covered by the cue, which forms a gradient opposing the gradient of the protein cue and must be considered in experimental designs and interpretation of results. We review and compare microfluidics, contact-printing, light patterning and 3D fabrication to pattern substrate-bound protein gradients in vitro, and focus on their application to study axon guidance. The range of methods to create substrate-bound gradients discussed herein make possible systematic analyses of haptotactic mechanisms. Furthermore, understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying cell motility will inform bioengineering approaches to program cell navigation and recover lost function.

  14. Regularized image denoising based on spectral gradient optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukić, Tibor; Lindblad, Joakim; Sladoje, Nataša

    2011-01-01

    Image restoration methods, such as denoising, deblurring, inpainting, etc, are often based on the minimization of an appropriately defined energy function. We consider energy functions for image denoising which combine a quadratic data-fidelity term and a regularization term, where the properties of the latter are determined by a used potential function. Many potential functions are suggested for different purposes in the literature. We compare the denoising performance achieved by ten different potential functions. Several methods for efficient minimization of regularized energy functions exist. Most are only applicable to particular choices of potential functions, however. To enable a comparison of all the observed potential functions, we propose to minimize the objective function using a spectral gradient approach; spectral gradient methods put very weak restrictions on the used potential function. We present and evaluate the performance of one spectral conjugate gradient and one cyclic spectral gradient algorithm, and conclude from experiments that both are well suited for the task. We compare the performance with three total variation-based state-of-the-art methods for image denoising. From the empirical evaluation, we conclude that denoising using the Huber potential (for images degraded by higher levels of noise; signal-to-noise ratio below 10 dB) and the Geman and McClure potential (for less noisy images), in combination with the spectral conjugate gradient minimization algorithm, shows the overall best performance

  15. Transport of nanoparticles in a temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Shawn; Cahill, David

    2006-03-01

    Thermodiffusion, mass transport in a temperature gradient, is commonly characterized by either the thermodiffusion coefficient DT or the Soret coefficient ST; e.g., at low particle concentration c, the particle flux of a colloidal suspension subjected to a temperature gradient ∇T is J=- cDT∇T-Dc∇c, where Dc is the diffusion coefficient and the Soret coefficient is ST= DT/Dc. We present our measured DT data for aqueous suspensions of charged polystyrene spheres, alumina nanoparticles, and globular proteins of lysozyme. Special emphasis is given to our published work on charged polystyrene spheres with different surface functionalities. For example, in solutions with large concentrations of monovalent salts, 100 mM, DT for 26 nm spheres with carboxyl functionality can be varied within the range -0.9 x10^- 7 cm^2 s-1 K-1 protein solutions of lysozyme.

  16. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherginskaya, S.A.; Cann, I.K.O.; Mackie, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    It is worthwhile considering that only some 30 species make up the bulk of the bacterial population in human faeces at any one time based on the classical cultivation-based approach. The situation in the rumen is similar. Thus, it is practical to focus on specific groups of interest within the complex community. These may be the predominant or the most active species, specific physiological groups or readily identifiable (genetic) clusters of phylogenetically related organisms. Several 16S rDNA fingerprinting techniques can be invaluable for selecting and monitoring sequences or phylogenetic groups of interest and are described below. Over the past few decades, considerable attention was focussed on the identification of pure cultures of microbes on the basis of genetic polymorphisms of DNA encoding rRNA such as ribotyping, amplified fragment length polymorphism and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. However, many of these methods require prior cultivation and are less suitable for use in analysis of complex mixed populations although important in describing cultivated microbial diversity in molecular terms. Much less attention was given to molecular characterization of complex communities. In particular, research into diversity and community structure over time has been revolutionized by the advent of molecular fingerprinting techniques for complex communities. Denaturing or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE/TGGE) methods have been successfully applied to the analysis of human, pig, cattle, dog and rodent intestinal populations

  17. Non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions associated with steep temperature gradients in the solar transition region. Paper 2: The effect of non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions on ionization equilibrium calculations for carbon, nitrogen and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1979-01-01

    Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution functions, previously computed for Dupree's model of the solar transition region are used to calculate ionization rates for ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Ionization equilibrium populations for these ions are then computed and compared with similar calculations assuming Maxwellian distribution functions for the electrons. The results show that the ion populations change (compared to the values computed with a Maxwellian) in some cases by several orders of magnitude depending on the ion and its temperature of formation.

  18. Characterization of gradient control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortés, Jorge; van der Schaft, Arjan; Crouch, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Given a general nonlinear affine control system with outputs and a torsion-free affine connection defined on its state space, we investigate the gradient realization problem: we give necessary and sufficient conditions under which the control system can be written as a gradient control system

  19. The geomagnetic field gradient tensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Olsen, Nils

    2012-01-01

    We develop the general mathematical basis for space magnetic gradiometry in spherical coordinates. The magnetic gradient tensor is a second rank tensor consisting of 3 × 3 = 9 spatial derivatives. Since the geomagnetic field vector B is always solenoidal (∇ · B = 0) there are only eight independent...... tensor elements. Furthermore, in current free regions the magnetic gradient tensor becomes symmetric, further reducing the number of independent elements to five. In that case B is a Laplacian potential field and the gradient tensor can be expressed in series of spherical harmonics. We present properties...... of the magnetic gradient tensor and provide explicit expressions of its elements in terms of spherical harmonics. Finally we discuss the benefit of using gradient measurements for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space, in particular the advantage of the various tensor elements for a better determination...

  20. Refined discrete and empirical horizontal gradients in VLBI analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landskron, Daniel; Böhm, Johannes

    2018-02-01

    Missing or incorrect consideration of azimuthal asymmetry of troposphere delays is a considerable error source in space geodetic techniques such as Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) or Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). So-called horizontal troposphere gradients are generally utilized for modeling such azimuthal variations and are particularly required for observations at low elevation angles. Apart from estimating the gradients within the data analysis, which has become common practice in space geodetic techniques, there is also the possibility to determine the gradients beforehand from different data sources than the actual observations. Using ray-tracing through Numerical Weather Models (NWMs), we determined discrete gradient values referred to as GRAD for VLBI observations, based on the standard gradient model by Chen and Herring (J Geophys Res 102(B9):20489-20502, 1997. https://doi.org/10.1029/97JB01739) and also for new, higher-order gradient models. These gradients are produced on the same data basis as the Vienna Mapping Functions 3 (VMF3) (Landskron and Böhm in J Geod, 2017.https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-017-1066-2), so they can also be regarded as the VMF3 gradients as they are fully consistent with each other. From VLBI analyses of the Vienna VLBI and Satellite Software (VieVS), it becomes evident that baseline length repeatabilities (BLRs) are improved on average by 5% when using a priori gradients GRAD instead of estimating the gradients. The reason for this improvement is that the gradient estimation yields poor results for VLBI sessions with a small number of observations, while the GRAD a priori gradients are unaffected from this. We also developed a new empirical gradient model applicable for any time and location on Earth, which is included in the Global Pressure and Temperature 3 (GPT3) model. Although being able to describe only the systematic component of azimuthal asymmetry and no short-term variations at all, even these

  1. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  2. Development of symmetric composition-gradient materials including hard particles in its surface layer; Hyosobu ni koshitsu ryushi wo fukumu taishogata sosei keisha zairyo no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Development of new materials with both thermal resistance and thermal shock resistance was studied on the basis of symmetric ceramics/metal/ceramics gradient composition. Al2O3/TiC/Ni/TiC/Al2O3 was used as material model of basic composition, and the system was selected where WC-Co system alloy hard particles were dispersed into the Al2O3 ceramic surface layer. The layered material was sintered in N2 gas atmosphere by SHS/HIP method using exothermic caused by nitriding reaction. Since cracks were generated in some specimens of 5-layer structure, improved specimens of 7-layer structure were prepared. To examine the effect of a particle size on toughness, WC-Co system alloy specimens with different particle sizes were also prepared. As a result, no cracks were found, and residual stress and fracture toughness were affected by particle size. In addition, the following were studied: technique of mass production, observation of fine structures, analysis of thermal stress, thermal shock resistance, and friction and abrasion characteristics. 13 refs., 65 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Canonical trivialization of gravitational gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermaier, Max

    2017-01-01

    A one-parameter family of canonical transformations is constructed that reduces the Hamiltonian form of the Einstein–Hilbert action to its strong coupling limit where dynamical spatial gradients are absent. The parameter can alternatively be viewed as the overall scale of the spatial metric or as a fractional inverse power of Newton’s constant. The generating function of the canonical transformation is constructed iteratively as a powerseries in the parameter to all orders. The algorithm draws on Lie–Deprit transformation theory and defines a ‘trivialization map’ with several bonus properties: (i) Trivialization of the Hamiltonian constraint implies that of the action while the diffeomorphism constraint is automatically co-transformed. (ii) Only a set of ordinary differential equations needs to be solved to drive the iteration via a homological equation where no gauge fixing is required. (iii) In contrast to (the classical limit of) a Lagrangian trivialization map the algorithm also produces series solutions of the field equations. (iv) In the strong coupling theory temporal gauge variations are abelian, nevertheless the map intertwines with the respective gauge symmetries on the action, the field equations, and their solutions. (paper)

  4. Canonical trivialization of gravitational gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermaier, Max

    2017-06-01

    A one-parameter family of canonical transformations is constructed that reduces the Hamiltonian form of the Einstein-Hilbert action to its strong coupling limit where dynamical spatial gradients are absent. The parameter can alternatively be viewed as the overall scale of the spatial metric or as a fractional inverse power of Newton’s constant. The generating function of the canonical transformation is constructed iteratively as a powerseries in the parameter to all orders. The algorithm draws on Lie-Deprit transformation theory and defines a ‘trivialization map’ with several bonus properties: (i) Trivialization of the Hamiltonian constraint implies that of the action while the diffeomorphism constraint is automatically co-transformed. (ii) Only a set of ordinary differential equations needs to be solved to drive the iteration via a homological equation where no gauge fixing is required. (iii) In contrast to (the classical limit of) a Lagrangian trivialization map the algorithm also produces series solutions of the field equations. (iv) In the strong coupling theory temporal gauge variations are abelian, nevertheless the map intertwines with the respective gauge symmetries on the action, the field equations, and their solutions.

  5. Model predictive control for wind power gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Tobias Gybel; Boyd, Stephen; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2015-01-01

    We consider the operation of a wind turbine and a connected local battery or other electrical storage device, taking into account varying wind speed, with the goal of maximizing the total energy generated while respecting limits on the time derivative (gradient) of power delivered to the grid. We...... wind data and modern wind forecasting methods. The simulation results using real wind data demonstrate the ability to reject the disturbances from fast changes in wind speed, ensuring certain power gradients, with an insignificant loss in energy production....... ranges. The system dynamics are quite non-linear, and the constraints and objectives are not convex functions of the control inputs, so the resulting optimal control problem is difficult to solve globally. In this paper, we show that by a novel change of variables, which focuses on power flows, we can...

  6. Structures and Strength of Gradient Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    distance from the surface forming a gradient structure. In this study [2], by shot peening of a low carbon steel a gradient structure has been produced extending to about 1 mm below the surface. A number of strengthening mechanisms have been analyzed as a basis for a calculation of the stress and strain......A recent study [1] has shown that a microstructure can be refined to a record low of 5 nm and that dislocation glide is still a controlling mechanism at this length scale. The nanostructure was produced in Cu by applying a very high strain in friction. The stress and strain decrease with increasing...... as a function of the distance from the surface. The results are evaluated by a finite element investigation of shot peening....

  7. Optimizing sampling approaches along ecological gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, Andreas; Irl, Severin D. H.; Steinbauer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    1. Natural scientists and especially ecologists use manipulative experiments or field observations along gradients to differentiate patterns driven by processes from those caused by random noise. A well-conceived sampling design is essential for identifying, analysing and reporting underlying...... patterns in a statistically solid and reproducible manner, given the normal restrictions in labour, time and money. However, a technical guideline about an adequate sampling design to maximize prediction success under restricted resources is lacking. This study aims at developing such a solid...... and reproducible guideline for sampling along gradients in all fields of ecology and science in general. 2. We conducted simulations with artificial data for five common response types known in ecology, each represented by a simple function (no response, linear, exponential, symmetric unimodal and asymmetric...

  8. Development and characterization of 430L matrix composites gradient materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Maria Ruiz-Navas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new concept that is Functionally Gradient Materials (FGM. The materials developed in this work are constituted by a 430L matrix core and composite materials with this matrix and gradient concentration with NbC reinforcement, from the core to the surface, through different steps. Composite powders of different content in NbC were produced through high energy milling in order to obtain the gradient composition. The morphology and microhardness of these powders were characterised and subsequently were processed through conventional P/M techniques, pressing and sintering. The materials obtained show improved wear behaviour.

  9. Gradient estimates on the weighted p-Laplace heat equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin Feng

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, by a regularization process we derive new gradient estimates for positive solutions to the weighted p-Laplace heat equation when the m-Bakry-Émery curvature is bounded from below by -K for some constant K ≥ 0. When the potential function is constant, which reduce to the gradient estimate established by Ni and Kotschwar for positive solutions to the p-Laplace heat equation on closed manifolds with nonnegative Ricci curvature if K ↘ 0, and reduce to the Davies, Hamilton and Li-Xu's gradient estimates for positive solutions to the heat equation on closed manifolds with Ricci curvature bounded from below if p = 2.

  10. Gradient Index Optics at DARPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    sodium, is submerged into a bath of molten salt containing a different ion, such as lithium bromide. Ions from the salt bath diffuse into the glass...molecules, creating a gradient of index of refraction (Mohr et al. 1979). • Crystal growing. From a silver- chloride /sodium- chloride bath, starting with a...sodium chloride seed, a crystal is pulled that begins to deplete the sodium in the bath and starts to pull silver, forming a gradient (Houde-Walter

  11. Waves in gradient metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Shvartsburg, Alexander B

    2013-01-01

    This book opens a new avenue to an engendering field of applied physics, located at the “crossing” of modern photonics, electromagnetics, acoustics and material science. It also highlights the concept of “non-locality”, which proves to be not a special feature of quantum phenomena, but is shown to have an important counterpart in classical physics and its engineering applications too. Furthermore, it visualizes the physical results by means of simple analytical presentations, reduced sometimes to the elementary functions.

  12. A Novel 3D Printer to Support Additive Manufacturing of Gradient Metal Alloy Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gradient metal alloy structures possess multi-functional properties that conventional monolithic metal counterparts do not have. Such structures can potentially...

  13. A Novel 3D Printer to Support Additive Manufacturing of Gradient Metal Alloy Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gradient metal alloy structures possess multi-functional properties that conventional monolithic metal counterparts do not have. Such structures can potentially...

  14. Speed-gradient principle for nonstationary processes in thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Fradkov, Alexander L.

    2007-01-01

    The speed-gradient variational principle (SG-principle) is formulated and applied to thermodynamical systems. It is shown that Prigogine's principle of minimum entropy production and Onsager's symmetry relations can be interpreted in terms of the SG-principle and, therefore, are equivalent to each other. In both cases entropy of the system plays a role of the goal functional. The speed-gradient formulation of thermodynamic principles provide their extended versions, describing transient dynam...

  15. Color Gradients Within Globular Clusters: Restricted Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jong Sohn

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of a restricted numerical simulation for the color gradients within globular clusters have been presented. The standard luminosity function of M3 and Salpeter's initial mass functions were used to generate model clusters as a fundamental population. Color gradients with the sample clusters for both King and power law cusp models of surface brightness distributions are discussed in the case of using the standard luminosity function. The dependence of color gradients on several parameters for the simulations with Salpeter's initial mass functions, such as slope of initial mass functions, cluster ages, metallicities, concentration parameters of King model, and slopes of power law, are also discussed. No significant radial color gradients are shown to the sample clusters which are regenerated by a random number generation technique with various parameters in both of King and power law cusp models of surface brightness distributions. Dynamical mass segregation and stellar evolution of horizontal branch stars and blue stragglers should be included for the general case of model simulations to show the observed radial color gradients within globular clusters.

  16. Mimicking natural cell environments: design, fabrication and application of bio-chemical gradients on polymeric biomaterial substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benetti, Edmondo Maria; Klein Gunnewiek, Michel; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Vancso, Gyula J.; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Gradients of biomolecules on synthetic, solid substrates can efficiently mimic the natural, graded variation of properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Such gradients represent accessible study platforms for the understanding of cellular activities, and they also provide functional supports

  17. Polyacrylamide temperature gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglasky, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TGGE) is a form of electrophoresis in which temperature gradient is used to denature molecules as they move through either acrylamide or agarose gel. TGGE can be applied to analyze DNA, RNA, protein-DNA complexes, and, less commonly, proteins. Separation of double-stranded DNA molecules during TGGE relies on temperature-dependent melting of the DNA duplex into two single-stranded DNA molecules. Therefore, the mobility of DNA reflects not only the size of the molecule but also its nucleotide composition, thereby allowing separation of DNA molecules of similar size with different sequences. Depending on the relative orientation of electric field and temperature gradient, TGGE can be performed in either a parallel or a perpendicular mode. The former is used to analyze multiple samples in the same gel, whereas the later allows detailed analysis of a single sample. This chapter is focused on analysis of DNA by polyacrylamide TGGE using the perpendicular mode.

  18. Computational Strain Gradient Crystal Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    element solution method is presented, which delivers the slip-rate field and the velocity-field based on two minimum principles. Some plane deformation problems relevant for certain specific orientations of a face centered cubic crystal under plane loading conditions are studied, and effective in......A model for strain gradient crystal visco-plasticity is formulated along the lines proposed by Fleck andWillis (2009) for isotropic plasticity. Size-effects are included in the model due to the addition of gradient terms in both the free energy as well as through a dissipation potential. A finite...

  19. Conditioning the full waveform inversion gradient to welcome anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-08-05

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the complex nonlinearity in the objective function, compounded by the eventual tradeoff between the model parameters. A hierarchical approach based on frequency and arrival time data decimation to maneuver the complex nonlinearity associated with this problem usually falls short in anisotropic media. In place of data decimation, I use a model gradient filter approach to access the parts of the gradient more suitable to combat the potential nonlinearity and parameter trade off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain in which the small scattering angles of the gradient update is initially muted out. A model update hierarchical filtering strategy includes applying varying degree of filtering to the different parameter updates. A feature not easily accessible to simple data decimation. Using both FWI and reection based FWI (RFWI), two strategies to combat the tradeoff between anisotropic parameters are outlined.

  20. Formation of actin networks in microfluidic concentration gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalja eStrelnikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of cytoskeletal networks are contributors in a number of mechanical responses of cells including cellular deformation and locomotion, and are crucial for the proper action of living cells. Local chemical gradients modulate cytoskeletal functionality including the interactions of the cytoskeleton with other cellular components. Actin is a major constituent of the cytoskeleton. Introducing a microfluidic-based platform, we explored the impact of concentration gradients on the formation and structural properties of actin networks. Microfluidics-controlled flow-free steady state experimental conditions allow for the generation of chemical gradients of different profiles, such as linear or step-like. We discovered specific features of actin networks emerging in defined gradients. In particular, we analyzed the effects of spatial conditions on network properties, bending rigidities of network links, and the network elasticity.

  1. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  2. Comparing species interaction networks along environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellissier, Loïc; Albouy, Camille; Bascompte, Jordi; Farwig, Nina; Graham, Catherine; Loreau, Michel; Maglianesi, Maria Alejandra; Melián, Carlos J; Pitteloud, Camille; Roslin, Tomas; Rohr, Rudolf; Saavedra, Serguei; Thuiller, Wilfried; Woodward, Guy; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Gravel, Dominique

    2017-09-22

    Knowledge of species composition and their interactions, in the form of interaction networks, is required to understand processes shaping their distribution over time and space. As such, comparing ecological networks along environmental gradients represents a promising new research avenue to understand the organization of life. Variation in the position and intensity of links within networks along environmental gradients may be driven by turnover in species composition, by variation in species abundances and by abiotic influences on species interactions. While investigating changes in species composition has a long tradition, so far only a limited number of studies have examined changes in species interactions between networks, often with differing approaches. Here, we review studies investigating variation in network structures along environmental gradients, highlighting how methodological decisions about standardization can influence their conclusions. Due to their complexity, variation among ecological networks is frequently studied using properties that summarize the distribution or topology of interactions such as number of links, connectance, or modularity. These properties can either be compared directly or using a procedure of standardization. While measures of network structure can be directly related to changes along environmental gradients, standardization is frequently used to facilitate interpretation of variation in network properties by controlling for some co-variables, or via null models. Null models allow comparing the deviation of empirical networks from random expectations and are expected to provide a more mechanistic understanding of the factors shaping ecological networks when they are coupled with functional traits. As an illustration, we compare approaches to quantify the role of trait matching in driving the structure of plant-hummingbird mutualistic networks, i.e. a direct comparison, standardized by null models and hypothesis

  3. Gradient flow and IR fixed point in SU(2) with Nf=8 flavors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leino, Viljami; Karavirta, Tuomas; Rantaharju, Jarno

    2015-01-01

    We study the running of the coupling in SU(2) gauge theory with 8 massless fundamental representation fermion flavours, using the gradient flow method with the Schr\\"odinger functional boundary conditions. Gradient flow allows us to measure robust continuum limit for the step scaling function...

  4. Bathymetry predicted from vertical gravity gradient anomalies and ship soundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Minzhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the admittance function between seafloor undulations and vertical gravity gradient anomalies was derived. Based on this admittance function, the bathymetry model of 1 minute resolution was predicted from vertical gravity gradient anomalies and ship soundings in the experimental area from the northwest Pacific. The accuracy of the model is evaluated using ship soundings and existing models, including ETOPOl, GEBCO, DTU10 and V15. 1 from SIO. The model's STD is 69.481m, comparable with V15. 1 which is generally believed to have the highest accuracy.

  5. A Projected Conjugate Gradient Method for Sparse Minimax Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kaj; Jonasson, Kristjan

    1993-01-01

    as it only requires that software for sparse linear programming and a sparse symmetric positive definite equation solver are available. On each iteration a special linear/quadratic model of the function is minimized, but contrary to the usual practice in trust region methods the quadratic model is only...... defined on a one dimensional path from the current iterate to the boundary of the trust region. Conjugate gradients are used to define this path. One iteration involves one LP subproblem and requires three function evaluations and one gradient evaluation. Promising numerical results obtained...

  6. Spheroidal Integral Equations for Geodetic Inversion of Geopotential Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Pavel; Šprlák, Michal

    2017-12-01

    The static Earth's gravitational field has traditionally been described in geodesy and geophysics by the gravitational potential (geopotential for short), a scalar function of 3-D position. Although not directly observable, geopotential functionals such as its first- and second-order gradients are routinely measured by ground, airborne and/or satellite sensors. In geodesy, these observables are often used for recovery of the static geopotential at some simple reference surface approximating the actual Earth's surface. A generalized mathematical model is represented by a surface integral equation which originates in solving Dirichlet's boundary-value problem of the potential theory defined for the harmonic geopotential, spheroidal boundary and globally distributed gradient data. The mathematical model can be used for combining various geopotential gradients without necessity of their re-sampling or prior continuation in space. The model extends the apparatus of integral equations which results from solving boundary-value problems of the potential theory to all geopotential gradients observed by current ground, airborne and satellite sensors. Differences between spherical and spheroidal formulations of integral kernel functions of Green's kind are investigated. Estimated differences reach relative values at the level of 3% which demonstrates the significance of spheroidal approximation for flattened bodies such as the Earth. The observation model can be used for combined inversion of currently available geopotential gradients while exploring their spectral and stochastic characteristics. The model would be even more relevant to gravitational field modelling of other bodies in space with more pronounced spheroidal geometry than that of the Earth.

  7. Spheroidal Integral Equations for Geodetic Inversion of Geopotential Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Pavel; Šprlák, Michal

    2018-03-01

    The static Earth's gravitational field has traditionally been described in geodesy and geophysics by the gravitational potential (geopotential for short), a scalar function of 3-D position. Although not directly observable, geopotential functionals such as its first- and second-order gradients are routinely measured by ground, airborne and/or satellite sensors. In geodesy, these observables are often used for recovery of the static geopotential at some simple reference surface approximating the actual Earth's surface. A generalized mathematical model is represented by a surface integral equation which originates in solving Dirichlet's boundary-value problem of the potential theory defined for the harmonic geopotential, spheroidal boundary and globally distributed gradient data. The mathematical model can be used for combining various geopotential gradients without necessity of their re-sampling or prior continuation in space. The model extends the apparatus of integral equations which results from solving boundary-value problems of the potential theory to all geopotential gradients observed by current ground, airborne and satellite sensors. Differences between spherical and spheroidal formulations of integral kernel functions of Green's kind are investigated. Estimated differences reach relative values at the level of 3% which demonstrates the significance of spheroidal approximation for flattened bodies such as the Earth. The observation model can be used for combined inversion of currently available geopotential gradients while exploring their spectral and stochastic characteristics. The model would be even more relevant to gravitational field modelling of other bodies in space with more pronounced spheroidal geometry than that of the Earth.

  8. Elemental gradients in macrophytes from a reactor effluent gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grace, J.B.; Tilly, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    The tissues of submersed macrophtes from along the thermal gradient were analyzed for phosphorus to determine whether any pattern correspondent to standing crop distributions could be detected. Although water concentrations of phosphorus showed no detectable relationship to the thermal effluent, tissue concentrations of this element in submersed macrophytes declined with distance from the effluent entry point. The occurrence of this concentration pattern suggests that phosphorus availability is greater near the discharge. Because phosphorus is the element most often determined to limit aquatic productivity, its greater availability may partially account for the apparent enhancement of macrophte growth near the thermal discharge. A patter of macrophyte abundance which indicated enchancement related to the discharge gradient in the reactor-cooling reservoir, Par Pond is reported. Correlative data tended to implicate light and temperature as important in influencing the differential abundance pattern

  9. Vertebrate pressure-gradient receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The eardrums of all terrestrial vertebrates (tetrapods) are connected through Eustachian tubes or interaural canals. In some of the animals, these connections create pressure-gradient directionality, an enhanced directionality by interaction of sound arriving at both sides of the eardrum and stro......The eardrums of all terrestrial vertebrates (tetrapods) are connected through Eustachian tubes or interaural canals. In some of the animals, these connections create pressure-gradient directionality, an enhanced directionality by interaction of sound arriving at both sides of the eardrum....... Recent vertebrates form a continuum from perfect interaural transmission (0 dB in a certain frequency band) and pronounced eardrum directionality (30-40 dB) in the lizards, over somewhat attenuated transmission and limited directionality in birds and frogs, to the strongly attenuated interaural...

  10. Primordial vorticity and gradient expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The evolution equations of the vorticities of the electrons, ions and photons in a pre-decoupling plasma are derived, in a fully inhomogeneous geometry, by combining the general relativistic gradient expansion and the drift approximation within the Adler-Misner-Deser decomposition. The vorticity transfer between the different species is discussed in this novel framework and a set of general conservation laws, connecting the vorticities of the three-component plasma with the magnetic field intensity, is derived. After demonstrating that a source of large-scale vorticity resides in the spatial gradients of the geometry and of the electromagnetic sources, the total vorticity is estimated to lowest order in the spatial gradients and by enforcing the validity of the momentum constraint. By acknowledging the current bounds on the tensor to scalar ratio in the (minimal) tensor extension of the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm the maximal comoving magnetic field induced by the total vorticity turns out to be, at most, of the or...

  11. Optimization in Quaternion Dynamic Systems: Gradient, Hessian, and Learning Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongpo; Xia, Yili; Mandic, Danilo P

    2016-02-01

    The optimization of real scalar functions of quaternion variables, such as the mean square error or array output power, underpins many practical applications. Solutions typically require the calculation of the gradient and Hessian. However, real functions of quaternion variables are essentially nonanalytic, which are prohibitive to the development of quaternion-valued learning systems. To address this issue, we propose new definitions of quaternion gradient and Hessian, based on the novel generalized Hamilton-real (GHR) calculus, thus making a possible efficient derivation of general optimization algorithms directly in the quaternion field, rather than using the isomorphism with the real domain, as is current practice. In addition, unlike the existing quaternion gradients, the GHR calculus allows for the product and chain rule, and for a one-to-one correspondence of the novel quaternion gradient and Hessian with their real counterparts. Properties of the quaternion gradient and Hessian relevant to numerical applications are also introduced, opening a new avenue of research in quaternion optimization and greatly simplified the derivations of learning algorithms. The proposed GHR calculus is shown to yield the same generic algorithm forms as the corresponding real- and complex-valued algorithms. Advantages of the proposed framework are illuminated over illustrative simulations in quaternion signal processing and neural networks.

  12. Human impact gradient on mammalian biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Munguía

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Drastic changes have been caused by human influence in natural landscapes, which may exert an intensive effect on species loss. However, species loss from human pressure is not random but depends on a series of environmentally associated factors. Linking species traits to environmental attributes may allow us to detect the ecological impacts of habitat so that meaningful habitat degradation gradients can be identified. The relationships between environmental factors and species traits provide the basis for identifying those biological traits that make species more sensitive to disturbance. These relationships are also helpful to detect the geographic distribution of latent risk to reveal areas where biodiversity is threatened. Here, we identify a “Human Impact Gradient for Biodiversity (HIGB” based on a three-table ordination method (RLQ analysis and fourth-corner analysis to identify key species traits that are associated with environmental gradient. Species distribution and environmental geographic data were gathered nationwide to analyze 68 localities, which represent 27% of Mexico’s surface, including 211 species of mammals. Nine environmental variables (including biophysical, geophysical and land-use impacts were analyzed by using the Geographic Information System. Three types of species’ traits were evaluated: locomotion, trophic habit and body size. We identified a human impact gradient, which was mainly determined by the percentage of the area that was covered by seedlings, the plant richness, the understory coverage percentage and the human settlement index. The most important species traits that are associated with non-human-impacted sites were carnivores, frugivores–herbivores and a body size that was greater than 17.8 kg; 25 species were selected by the decision criteria framework for species that were sensitive to degradation based on ecological function information. Conversely, granivores, fossorial and semifossorial

  13. Instabilities in power law gradient hardening materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    Tension and compression instabilities are investigated for specimens with dimensions in the micron range. A finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity theory is implemented in a finite element scheme capable of modeling power law hardening materials. Effects...... of gradient hardening are found to delay the onset of localization under plane strain tension, and significantly reduce strain gradients in the localized zone. For plane strain compression gradient hardening is found to increase the load-carrying capacity significantly....

  14. Gradient remediability in linear distributed parabolic systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is the introduction of a new concept that concerned the analysis of a large class of distributed parabolic systems. It is the general concept of gradient remediability. More precisely, we study with respect to the gradient observation, the existence of an input operator (gradient efficient actuators) ensuring ...

  15. Estimation of gradients from scattered data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stead, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    Many techniques for producing a surface from scattered data require gradients at the data points. Since only positional data are usually known, the gradients must be estimated before the surface can be computed. The quality of the surface depends on the estimated gradients; so it is important to compute accurate estimates.

  16. An education gradient in health, a health gradient in education, or a confounded gradient in both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jamie L; von Hippel, Paul T

    2016-04-01

    There is a positive gradient associating educational attainment with health, yet the explanation for this gradient is not clear. Does higher education improve health (causation)? Do the healthy become highly educated (selection)? Or do good health and high educational attainment both result from advantages established early in the life course (confounding)? This study evaluates these competing explanations by tracking changes in educational attainment and Self-rated Health (SRH) from age 15 to age 31 in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, 1997 cohort. Ordinal logistic regression confirms that high-SRH adolescents are more likely to become highly educated. This is partly because adolescent SRH is associated with early advantages including adolescents' academic performance, college plans, and family background (confounding); however, net of these confounders adolescent SRH still predicts adult educational attainment (selection). Fixed-effects longitudinal regression shows that educational attainment has little causal effect on SRH at age 31. Completion of a high school diploma or associate's degree has no effect on SRH, while completion of a bachelor's or graduate degree have effects that, though significant, are quite small (less than 0.1 points on a 5-point scale). While it is possible that educational attainment would have greater effect on health at older ages, at age 31 what we see is a health gradient in education, shaped primarily by selection and confounding rather than by a causal effect of education on health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhang, Yu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu; Tang, Liguo [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Cao, Wenwu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Li, Songhai [Sanya Key Laboratory of Marin Mammal and Marine Bioacoustics, Sanya Institute of Deep-Sea Science and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Sanya 57200 (China); Zhang, Sai [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2016-07-04

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  18. Temperature Gradient in Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staack, D.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma potentials and electron temperatures were deduced from emissive and cold floating probe measurements in a 2 kW Hall thruster, operated in the discharge voltage range of 200-400 V. An almost linear dependence of the electron temperature on the plasma potential was observed in the acceleration region of the thruster both inside and outside the thruster. This result calls into question whether secondary electron emission from the ceramic channel walls plays a significant role in electron energy balance. The proportionality factor between the axial electron temperature gradient and the electric field is significantly smaller than might be expected by models employing Ohmic heating of electrons

  19. On Nonconvex Decentralized Gradient Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    difference between each local point and their global average is subject to a bound proportional to the step size. This note then establishes similar...estimation, and control. When fi’s are convex, the existing algorithms include the (sub)gradient meth- ods [5], [7], [10], [11], [18], [14], [15], and the...set of n nodes and E is the edge set. Any edge (i, j) ∈ E represents an arc between node i and node j. Let x(i) ∈ Rp denote the local copy of x at node

  20. Generalized Gradient Approximation Made Simple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdew, J.P.; Burke, K.; Ernzerhof, M.

    1996-01-01

    Generalized gradient approximations (GGA close-quote s) for the exchange-correlation energy improve upon the local spin density (LSD) description of atoms, molecules, and solids. We present a simple derivation of a simple GGA, in which all parameters (other than those in LSD) are fundamental constants. Only general features of the detailed construction underlying the Perdew-Wang 1991 (PW91) GGA are invoked. Improvements over PW91 include an accurate description of the linear response of the uniform electron gas, correct behavior under uniform scaling, and a smoother potential. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. A higher-order nonlocal elasticity and strain gradient theory and its applications in wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C. W.; Zhang, G.; Reddy, J. N.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years there have been many papers that considered the effects of material length scales in the study of mechanics of solids at micro- and/or nano-scales. There are a number of approaches and, among them, one set of papers deals with Eringen's differential nonlocal model and another deals with the strain gradient theories. The modified couple stress theory, which also accounts for a material length scale, is a form of a strain gradient theory. The large body of literature that has come into existence in the last several years has created significant confusion among researchers about the length scales that these various theories contain. The present paper has the objective of establishing the fact that the length scales present in nonlocal elasticity and strain gradient theory describe two entirely different physical characteristics of materials and structures at nanoscale. By using two principle kernel functions, the paper further presents a theory with application examples which relates the classical nonlocal elasticity and strain gradient theory and it results in a higher-order nonlocal strain gradient theory. In this theory, a higher-order nonlocal strain gradient elasticity system which considers higher-order stress gradients and strain gradient nonlocality is proposed. It is based on the nonlocal effects of the strain field and first gradient strain field. This theory intends to generalize the classical nonlocal elasticity theory by introducing a higher-order strain tensor with nonlocality into the stored energy function. The theory is distinctive because the classical nonlocal stress theory does not include nonlocality of higher-order stresses while the common strain gradient theory only considers local higher-order strain gradients without nonlocal effects in a global sense. By establishing the constitutive relation within the thermodynamic framework, the governing equations of equilibrium and all boundary conditions are derived via the variational

  2. The effect of blood inflow and B(1)-field inhomogeneity on measurement of the arterial input function in axial 3D spoiled gradient echo dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Caleb; Little, Ross; Watson, Yvonne; Zhao, Sha; Buckley, David L; Parker, Geoff J M

    2011-01-01

    A major potential confound in axial 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging studies is the blood inflow effect; therefore, the choice of slice location for arterial input function measurement within the imaging volume must be considered carefully. The objective of this study was to use computer simulations, flow phantom, and in vivo studies to describe and understand the effect of blood inflow on the measurement of the arterial input function. All experiments were done at 1.5 T using a typical 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging sequence, and arterial input functions were extracted for each slice in the imaging volume. We simulated a set of arterial input functions based on the same imaging parameters and accounted for blood inflow and radiofrequency field inhomogeneities. Measured arterial input functions along the vessel length from both in vivo and the flow phantom agreed with simulated arterial input functions and show large overestimations in the arterial input function in the first 30 mm of the vessel, whereas arterial input functions measured more centrally achieve accurate contrast agent concentrations. Use of inflow-affected arterial input functions in tracer kinetic modeling shows potential errors of up to 80% in tissue microvascular parameters. These errors emphasize the importance of careful placement of the arterial input function definition location to avoid the effects of blood inflow. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  4. Error analysis of stochastic gradient descent ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-06-01

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error.

  5. A hybrid optimization method for biplanar transverse gradient coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Feng; Tang Xin; Jin Zhe; Jiang Zhongde; Shen Yifei; Meng Bin; Zu Donglin; Wang Weimin

    2007-01-01

    The optimization of transverse gradient coils is one of the fundamental problems in designing magnetic resonance imaging gradient systems. A new approach is presented in this paper to optimize the transverse gradient coils' performance. First, in the traditional spherical harmonic target field method, high order coefficients, which are commonly ignored, are used in the first stage of the optimization process to give better homogeneity. Then, some cosine terms are introduced into the series expansion of stream function. These new terms provide simulated annealing optimization with new freedoms. Comparison between the traditional method and the optimized method shows that the inhomogeneity in the region of interest can be reduced from 5.03% to 1.39%, the coil efficiency increased from 3.83 to 6.31 mT m -1 A -1 and the minimum distance of these discrete coils raised from 1.54 to 3.16 mm

  6. Strain gradient effects on cyclic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2010-01-01

    Size effects on the cyclic shear response are studied numerically using a recent higher order strain gradient visco-plasticity theory accounting for both dissipative and energetic gradient hardening. Numerical investigations of the response under cyclic pure shear and shear of a finite slab between...... rigid platens have been carried out, using the finite element method. It is shown for elastic–perfectly plastic solids how dissipative gradient effects lead to increased yield strength, whereas energetic gradient contributions lead to increased hardening as well as a Bauschinger effect. For linearly...... hardening materials it is quantified how dissipative and energetic gradient effects promote hardening above that of conventional predictions. Usually, increased hardening is attributed to energetic gradient effects, but here it is found that also dissipative gradient effects lead to additional hardening...

  7. Conditioning the full-waveform inversion gradient to welcome anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-04-23

    Multiparameter full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from complex nonlinearity in the objective function, compounded by the eventual trade-off between the model parameters. A hierarchical approach based on frequency and arrival time data decimation to maneuver the complex nonlinearity associated with this problem usually falls short in anisotropic media. In place of data decimation, I use a model gradient filter approach to access the parts of the gradient more suitable to combat the potential nonlinearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which small scattering-angles of the gradient update are initially muted out. The model update hierarchical filtering strategy include applying varying degrees of filtering to the different anisotropic parameter updates, a feature not easily accessible to simple data decimation. Using FWI and reflection-based FWI, when the modeled data are obtained with the single-scattering theory, allows access to additional low model wavenumber components. Combining such access to wavenumbers with scattering-angle filters applied to the individual parameter gradients allows for multiple strategies to avoid complex FWI nonlinearity as well as the parameter trade-off.

  8. Avoiding vacuum arcs in high gradient normal conducting RF structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sjøbæk, Kyrre Ness; Adli, Erik; Grudiev, Alexej; Wuensch, Walter

    In order to build the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC), accelerating structures reaching extremely high accelerating gradients are needed. Such structures have been built and tested using normal-conducting copper, powered by X-band RF power and reaching gradients of 100 MV/m and above. One phenomenon that must be avoided in order to reliably reach such gradients, is vacuum arcs or “breakdowns”. This can be accomplished by carefully designing the structure geometry such that high surface fields and large local power flows are avoided. The research presented in this thesis presents a method for optimizing the geometry of accelerating structures so that these breakdowns are made less likely, allowing the structure to operate reliably at high gradients. This was done primarily based on a phenomenological scaling model, which predicted the maximum gradient as a function of the break down rate, pulse length, and field distribution in the structure. The model is written in such a way that it allows direct comparis...

  9. Mobile phase compensation to improve NMR spectral properties during solvent gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawickrama, Dimuthu A; Wolters, Andrew M; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2003-05-01

    A solvent compensation method based on flow injection analysis is used to obtain high quality nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra during solvent gradients. Using a binary solvent system containing D2O and CD3OD, NMR line broadening and chemical shift changes are observed with a 10% methanol per min solvent composition gradient. However, by creating a second equal but reverse gradient and combining the two solvent gradients before the NMR detector, the composition of solvent reaching the NMR flow cell is kept constant. We demonstrate a system using flow injection analysis of combining solvent gradients and show constant NMR spectral performance as a function of time as the combined flow has a constant solvent composition irrespective of the initial solvent gradient. Using this approach, methods can be developed to measure high quality NMR spectra during on-flow gradient LC-NMR experiments. The ultimate ability of this approach depends on the ability to compensate for the disturbance of the solvent gradient and reverse gradient by a pair of LC columns (the analytical and reverse gradient columns).

  10. Enhanced fluidity liquid chromatography of inulin fructans using ternary solvent strength and selectivity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Raffeal; Olesik, Susan V

    2018-01-25

    The value of exploring selectivity and solvent strength ternary gradients in enhanced fluidity liquid chromatography (EFLC) is demonstrated for the separation of inulin-type fructans from chicory. Commercial binary pump systems for supercritical fluid chromatography only allow for the implementation of ternary solvent strength gradients which can be restrictive for the separation of polar polymeric analytes. In this work, a custom system was designed to extend the capability of EFLC to allow tuning of selectivity or solvent strength in ternary gradients. Gradient profiles were evaluated using the Berridge function (RF 1 ), normalized resolution product (NRP), and gradient peak capacity (P c ). Selectivity gradients provided the separation of more analytes over time. The RF 1 function showed favor to selectivity gradients with comparable P c to that of solvent strength gradients. NRP did not strongly correlate with P c or RF 1 score. EFLC with the hydrophilic interaction chromatography, HILIC, separation mode was successfully employed to separate up to 47 fructan analytes in less than 25 min using a selectivity gradient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Slurry erosion and abrasion of metal-ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagues, A.A.; Spencer, D.K.; Sethi, V.K.; Sargent, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Four coatings, including tungsten carbide wear-resistant and cobalt-base corrosion-resistant materials, were tested for abrasion and erosion performance in silica sand and in Alundum slurries. A 1018 carbon steel sample was also tested for comparison. The abrasion tests were conducted with a wet sand rubber wheel device, whereas a slurry jet impingement apparatus was used in the erosion tests. The results revealed that the abrasive wear performance improves dramatically as the coating hardness increases. By contrast, the erosion performance was not clearly related to the hardness of the materials tested. The wear mechanisms and the suitability of the test methods to evaluate coatings are discussed

  12. Metal-ceramic interfaces: joining silicon nitride-stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, R.; De Pablos, A.; Miranzo, P.; Osendi, M. I.

    2004-11-01

    Joining of hot pressed silicon nitride using three types of stainless steel (AISI 304, 316 and 321) as interlayer was done by diffusion bonding at 1100 °C for 120 min. An extensive reaction zone of about 7 μm was formed in the contact region, where Cr2N, FexSiy and α-Fe were observed, outside that region the austenitic phase with precipitates of chromium nitride was observed. In the Mo-containing stainless steel (AISI 316) formation of Mo3Si was also detected. Moderate strengths were measured by shear testing for these joints.

  13. Modeling of thermal explosion under pressure in metal ceramic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, M.; Dudko, V.; Skachek, B.; Matvienko, A.; Gotman, I.; Gutmanas, E.Y.

    1998-01-01

    The process of reactive in situ synthesis of dense ceramic matrix composites in Ti-B-C, Ti-B-N, Ti-Si-N systems is modeled. These ceramics are fabricated on the basis of compacted blends of ceramic powders, namely Ti-B 4 C and/or Ti-BN. The objectives of the project are to identify and investigate the optimal thermal conditions preferable for production of fully dense ceramic matrix composites. Towards this goal heat transfer and combustion in dense and porous ceramic blends are investigated during monotonous heating at a constant rate. This process is modeled using a heat transfer-combustion model with kinetic parameters determined from the differential thermal analysis of the experimental data. The kinetic burning parameters and the model developed are further used to describe the thermal explosion synthesis in a restrained die under pressure. It is shown that heat removal from the reaction zone affects the combustion process and the final phase composition

  14. METAL-CERAMIC INTERFACES PRODUCED BY LASER MELT INJECTION PROCESSING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEHOSSON, JTM; VANDENBURG, M; Burg, M. van den

    1995-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. It is concluded that a firmly bonded coating of Cr2O3 on steel could be produced by high power laser processing. The actual interface strength of a

  15. Noble Metal/Ceramic Composites in Flame Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Heiko; Madler, Lutz; Strobel, Reto

    conditions influence the resulting noble metal particles size in those systems [1]. For every specific application the particle size and the metal/metal oxide interaction affect the performance of these nano-composite materials [2]. Recently, aerosol processes have been successfully used to produce platinum...... [3,4], palladium [5], silver [6] and gold [7] crystallites on Al2O3 [3,5], SiO2 [7] and TiO2 [4,6,7] in a single step.. The as-prepared materials exhibited a high external specific surface area (40 – 320 m2 g-1) [3-7] with a high degree of crystallinity and an excellent noble metal distribution [3...... size is mainly dependent on its loading [3,7]. In this study, the role of the supporting metal oxide on the noble metal particle size was systematically investigated for the flame spray pyrolysis process. The materials were produced at fixed process conditions such as resident time of the particles...

  16. Analysis of macro and micro residual stresses in functionally graded materials by diffraction methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dantz, D; Reimers, W

    1999-01-01

    The residual stress state in microwave sintered metal-ceramic functionally graded materials (FGM) consisting of 8Y-ZrO/sub 2//Ni and 8Y-ZrO/sub 2//NiCr8020, respectively, was analysed by non- destructive diffraction methods. In $9 order to get knowledge of the complete residual stress state in the near surface region as well as in the interior of the material, complementary methods were applied. Whereas the surface was characterised by X-ray techniques using $9 conventional sources, the stresses within the bulk of the material were investigated by means of high energy synchrotron radiation. The stress state was found to obey the differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion $9 (micro-stresses) on the one hand and the inhomogeneous cooling conditions (macrostresses) on the other hand. (7 refs).

  17. Wavefront reconstruction from its gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Amos; Ribak, Erez N

    2006-02-01

    Wavefronts reconstructed from measured gradients are composed of a straightforward integration of the measured data, plus a correction term that disappears when there are no measurement errors. For regions of any shape, this term is a solution of Poisson's equation with Dirichlet conditions (V = 0 on the boundaries). We show that for rectangular regions, the correct solution is not a periodic one, but one expressed with Fourier cosine series. The correct solution has a lower variance than the periodic Fourier transform solution. Similar formulas exist for a circular region with obscuration. We present a near-optimal solution that is much faster than fast-Fourier-transform methods. By use of diagonal multigrid methods, a single iteration brings the correction term to within a standard deviation of 0.08, two iterations, to within 0.0064, etc.

  18. FY 1998 report on the results of the international cooperation project, 'the joint R and D of the industrial base technology.' Development of functionally gradient materials; 1998 nendo sangyo kiban gijutsu kyodo kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Keisha kinosei zairyo no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For the purpose of developing the thermal stress relaxation type heat resistant large size bulk functionally gradient materials (FGM/LB) which are adaptable to high efficiency engine members, experimental researches were conducted, and the FY 1998 results were reported. As to the development of heat resistant use FGM/LB manufacturing technology, examinational researches were carried out on the dimensional evaluation of a spark discharge sintering method associated with the enlargement of the sintering process, examination of shape effect, examination of microstructures of large size sintered body, and mechanical properties. As a result of the study, FGM/LB sintered body was manufactured of diameter of 150mm which is composed of the ceramic simple substance material, metal simple substance material, and 9 layers of the intermediate gradient layer of the mixed material (11 layers in total). Concerning the development of large size FGM/LB evaluation technology, test pieces were manufactured of FGM/LB with diameter of 100mm and 150mm of ZrO2(3Y)-stainless steel base. The structural observation by SEM, hardness distribution measurement, etc. were conducted to get the basic property data. Moreover, to examine the heat resistant impact property, a test on thermal cycles was conducted. The occurrence of cracks was caught by AE sensor, and the correlation with heating temperature was studied. (NEDO)

  19. Jupiter's evolution with primordial composition gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Vazan, A.; Helled, R.; Guillot, T.

    2018-01-01

    Recent formation and structure models of Jupiter suggest that the planet can have composition gradients and not be fully convective (adiabatic). This possibility directly affects our understanding of Jupiter's bulk composition and origin. In this Letter we present Jupiter's evolution with a primordial structure consisting of a relatively steep heavy-element gradient of 40 Earth masses. We show that for a primordial structure with composition gradients, most of the mixing occurs in the outer p...

  20. Thermal conduction down steep temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, A.R.; Evans, R.G.; Nicholas, D.J.

    1980-08-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation has been solved numerically in one spatial and two velocity dimensions in order to study thermal conduction in large temperature gradients. An initially cold plasma is heated at one end of the spatial grid producing temperature gradients with scale lengths of a few times the electron mean free path. The heat flow is an order of magnitude smaller than that predicted by the classical theory which is valid in the limit of small temperature gradients. (author)

  1. Testing the limits of gradient sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinal Lakhani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to detect a chemical gradient is fundamental to many cellular processes. In multicellular organisms gradient sensing plays an important role in many physiological processes such as wound healing and development. Unicellular organisms use gradient sensing to move (chemotaxis or grow (chemotropism towards a favorable environment. Some cells are capable of detecting extremely shallow gradients, even in the presence of significant molecular-level noise. For example, yeast have been reported to detect pheromone gradients as shallow as 0.1 nM/μm. Noise reduction mechanisms, such as time-averaging and the internalization of pheromone molecules, have been proposed to explain how yeast cells filter fluctuations and detect shallow gradients. Here, we use a Particle-Based Reaction-Diffusion model of ligand-receptor dynamics to test the effectiveness of these mechanisms and to determine the limits of gradient sensing. In particular, we develop novel simulation methods for establishing chemical gradients that not only allow us to study gradient sensing under steady-state conditions, but also take into account transient effects as the gradient forms. Based on reported measurements of reaction rates, our results indicate neither time-averaging nor receptor endocytosis significantly improves the cell's accuracy in detecting gradients over time scales associated with the initiation of polarized growth. Additionally, our results demonstrate the physical barrier of the cell membrane sharpens chemical gradients across the cell. While our studies are motivated by the mating response of yeast, we believe our results and simulation methods will find applications in many different contexts.

  2. Wireless SAW Based Temperature Gradient Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prime Photonics proposes design and development of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature gradient sensor for instrumentation of thermal protection systems...

  3. Community and ecosystem responses to elevational gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Maja K.; Sanders, Nate; Wardle, David A.

    2013-01-01

    elevational gradients for understanding community and ecosystem responses to global climate change at much larger spatial and temporal scales than is possible through conventional ecological experiments. However, future studies that integrate elevational gradient approaches with experimental manipulations...... will provide powerful information that can improve predictions of climate change impacts within and across ecosystems.......Community structure and ecosystem processes often vary along elevational gradients. Their responses to elevation are commonly driven by changes in temperature, and many community- and ecosystem-level variables therefore frequently respond similarly to elevation across contrasting gradients...

  4. On lower order strain gradient plasticity theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    the tangent moduli governing increments of stress and strain. It is shown that the modification is far from benign from a mathematical standpoint, changing the qualitative character of solutions and leading to a new type of localization that is at odds with what is expected from a strain gradient theory......By way of numerical examples, this paper explores the nature of solutions to a class of strain gradient plasticity theories that employ conventional stresses, equilibrium equations and boundary conditions. Strain gradients come into play in these modified conventional theories only to alter....... The findings raise questions about the physical acceptability of this class of strain gradient theories....

  5. Functional Self-Assembled Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, A.; Wendorff, J. H.

    Electrospinning constitutes a unique technique for the production of nanofibers with diameters down to the range of a few nanometers. In strong contrast to conventional fiber producing techniques, it relies on self-assembly processes driven by the Coulomb interactions between charged elements of the fluids to be spun to nanofibers. The transition from a macroscopic fluid object such as a droplet emerging from a die to solid nanofibers is controlled by a set of complex physical instability processes. They give rise to extremely high extensional deformations and strain rates during fiber formation causing among others a high orientational order in the nanofibers as well as enhanced mechanical properties. Electrospinning is predominantly applied to polymer based materials including natural and synthetic polymers, but, more recently, its use has been extended towards the production of metal, ceramic and glass nanofibers exploiting precursor routes. The nanofibers can be functionalized during electrospinning by introducing pores, fractal surfaces, by incorporating functional elements such as catalysts, quantum dots, drugs, enzymes or even bacteria. The production of individual fibers, random nonwovens, or orientationally highly ordered nonwovens is achieved by an appropriate selection of electrode configurations. Broad areas of application exist in Material and Life Sciences for such nanofibers, including not only optoelectronics, sensorics, catalysis, textiles, high efficiency filters, fiber reinforcement but also tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing. The basic electrospinning process has more recently been extended towards compound co-electrospinning and precision deposition electrospinning to further broaden accessible fiber architectures and potential areas of application.

  6. Constrained Optimization via Stochastic approximation with a simultaneous perturbation gradient approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with a projection algorithm for stochastic approximation using simultaneous perturbation gradient approximation for optimization under inequality constraints where no direct gradient of the loss function is available and the inequality constraints are given as explicit functions...... of the optimization parameters. It is shown that, under application of the projection algorithm, the parameter iterate converges almost surely to a Kuhn-Tucker point, The procedure is illustrated by a numerical example, (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  7. A study of gradient strengthening based on a finite-deformation gradient crystal-plasticity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouriayevali, Habib; Xu, Bai-Xiang

    2017-11-01

    A comprehensive study on a finite-deformation gradient crystal-plasticity model which has been derived based on Gurtin's framework (Int J Plast 24:702-725, 2008) is carried out here. This systematic investigation on the different roles of governing components of the model represents the strength of this framework in the prediction of a wide range of hardening behaviors as well as rate-dependent and scale-variation responses in a single crystal. The model is represented in the reference configuration for the purpose of numerical implementation and then implemented in the FEM software ABAQUS via a user-defined subroutine (UEL). Furthermore, a function of accumulation rates of dislocations is employed and viewed as a measure of formation of short-range interactions. Our simulation results reveal that the dissipative gradient strengthening can be identified as a source of isotropic-hardening behavior, which may represent the effect of irrecoverable work introduced by Gurtin and Ohno (J Mech Phys Solids 59:320-343, 2011). Here, the variation of size dependency at different magnitude of a rate-sensitivity parameter is also discussed. Moreover, an observation of effect of a distinctive feature in the model which explains the effect of distortion of crystal lattice in the reference configuration is reported in this study for the first time. In addition, plastic flows in predefined slip systems and expansion of accumulation of GNDs are distinctly observed in varying scales and under different loading conditions.

  8. Gradient Flow Convolutive Blind Source Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Nielsen, Chinton Møller

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that the performance of instantaneous gradient flow beamforming by Cauwenberghs et al. is reduced significantly in reverberant conditions. By expanding the gradient flow principle to convolutive mixtures, separation in a reverberant environment is possible. By use of a circ...

  9. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient

  10. 40 CFR 230.25 - Salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salinity gradients. 230.25 Section 230.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b... Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.25 Salinity gradients. (a) Salinity...

  11. Patterns of macromycete community assemblage along an elevation gradient: options for fungal gradient and metacommunity analyse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko Gómez-Hernández; Guadalupe Williams-Linera; Roger Guevara; D. Jean Lodge

    2012-01-01

    Gradient analysis is rarely used in studies of fungal communities. Data on macromycetes from eight sites along an elevation gradient in central Veracruz, Mexico, were used to demonstrate methods for gradient analysis that can be applied to studies of communities of fungi. Selected sites from 100 to 3,500 m altitude represent tropical dry forest, tropical montane cloud...

  12. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  13. Plant pollinator networks along a gradient of urbanisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Geslin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Habitat loss is one of the principal causes of the current pollinator decline. With agricultural intensification, increasing urbanisation is among the main drivers of habitat loss. Consequently studies focusing on pollinator community structure along urbanisation gradients have increased in recent years. However, few studies have investigated how urbanisation affects plant-pollinator interaction networks. Here we assessed modifications of plant-pollinator interactions along an urbanisation gradient based on the study of their morphological relationships. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Along an urbanisation gradient comprising four types of landscape contexts (semi-natural, agricultural, suburban, urban, we set up experimental plant communities containing two plant functional groups differing in their morphological traits ("open flowers" and "tubular flowers". Insect visitations on these communities were recorded to build plant-pollinator networks. A total of 17 857 interactions were recorded between experimental plant communities and flower-visitors. The number of interactions performed by flower-visitors was significantly lower in urban landscape context than in semi-natural and agricultural ones. In particular, insects such as Syrphidae and solitary bees that mostly visited the open flower functional group were significantly impacted by urbanisation, which was not the case for bumblebees. Urbanisation also impacted the generalism of flower-visitors and we detected higher interaction evenness in urban landscape context than in agricultural and suburban ones. Finally, in urban context, these modifications lowered the potential reproductive success of the open flowers functional group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings show that open flower plant species and their specific flower-visitors are especially sensitive to increasing urbanisation. These results provide new clues to improve conservation measures within urbanised areas

  14. Design of a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Trbojevic

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a design of nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerators (FFAG minimizing the dispersion action function H. The design is considered both analytically and via computer modeling. We present the basic principles of a nonscaling FFAG lattice and discuss optimization strategies so that one can accelerate over a broad range of momentum with reasonable apertures. Acceleration schemes for muons are discussed.

  15. Dynamics of Reactive Microbial Hotspots in Concentration Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, A.; Farasin, J.; Tabuteau, H.; Dufresne, A.; Meheust, Y.; Le Borgne, T.

    2017-12-01

    In subsurface environments, bacteria play a major role in controlling the kinetics of a broad range of biogeochemical reactions. In such environments, nutrients fluxes and solute concentrations needed for bacteria metabolism may be highly variable in space and intermittent in time. This can lead to the formation of reactive hotspots where and when conditions are favorable to particular microorganisms, hence inducing biogeochemical reaction kinetics that differ significantly from those measured in homogeneous model environments. To investigate the impact of chemical gradients on the spatial structure and temporal dynamics of subsurface microorganism populations, we develop microfluidic cells allowing for a precise control of flow and chemical gradient conditions, as well as quantitative monitoring of the bacteria's spatial distribution and biofilm development. Using the non-motile Escherichia coli JW1908-1 strain and Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2 as model organisms, we investigate the behavior and development of bacteria over a range of single and double concentration gradients in the concentrations of nutrients, electron donors and electron acceptors. We measure bacterial activity and population growth locally in precisely known hydrodynamic and chemical environments. This approach allows time-resolved monitoring of the location and intensity of reactive hotspots in micromodels as a function of the flow and chemical gradient conditions. We compare reactive microbial hotspot dynamics in our micromodels to classic growth laws and well-known growth parameters for the laboratory model bacteria Escherichia coli.We also discuss consequences for the formation and temporal dynamics of biofilms in the subsurface.

  16. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  17. New convergence results for the scaled gradient projection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonettini, S.; Prato, M.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to deepen the convergence analysis of the scaled gradient projection (SGP) method, proposed by Bonettini et al in a recent paper for constrained smooth optimization. The main feature of SGP is the presence of a variable scaling matrix multiplying the gradient, which may change at each iteration. In the last few years, extensive numerical experimentation showed that SGP equipped with a suitable choice of the scaling matrix is a very effective tool for solving large scale variational problems arising in image and signal processing. In spite of the very reliable numerical results observed, only a weak convergence theorem is provided establishing that any limit point of the sequence generated by SGP is stationary. Here, under the only assumption that the objective function is convex and that a solution exists, we prove that the sequence generated by SGP converges to a minimum point, if the scaling matrices sequence satisfies a simple and implementable condition. Moreover, assuming that the gradient of the objective function is Lipschitz continuous, we are also able to prove the {O}(1/k) convergence rate with respect to the objective function values. Finally, we present the results of a numerical experience on some relevant image restoration problems, showing that the proposed scaling matrix selection rule performs well also from the computational point of view.

  18. Gradient of learnability in teaching English pronunciation to Korean learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Young; Hwang, Hyosung

    2016-04-01

    This paper aims to propose a gradient of learnability as a criterion for setting priorities in pronunciation teaching. A total of 40 Korean subjects (mostly aged 12 year) were tested on their discrimination ability of English sounds before and after participating in a high variability phonetic training (HVPT) program for 4 weeks. This study shows highly promising results for pronunciation teaching with the HVPT method. First, lower level learners show greater improvements in phoneme discrimination ability compared to upper level learners. Second, consonants are better discriminated than vowels and greater improvements are seen with consonant contrasts than with vowels that have a lower functional load. Third, many of the sounds with high functional load have a high learnability. Fourth, greater improvements are seen with sounds that are poorly identified before the training than sounds that are well-identified. Fifth, young learners also benefit from the HVPT, much like highly motivated adult learners. A learnability gradient was established on the basis of the phoneme learnability index and the pairwise learnability index. On the basis of the constructed gradient of learnability and the concept of functional load, a set of priorities was provided for teaching English pronunciation to young Korean learners.

  19. Simulation of concomitant magnetic fields on fast switched gradient coils used in advanced application of MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Muciño, G.; Torres-García, E.; Hidalgo-Tobon, S.

    2012-10-01

    The process to produce an MR image includes nuclear alignment, RF excitation, spatial encoding, and image formation. To form an image, it is necessary to perform spatial localization of the MR signals, which is achieved using gradient coils. MRI requires the use of gradient coils that generate magnetic fields, which vary linearly with position over the imaging volume. Safety issues have been a motivation to study deeply the relation between the interaction of gradient magnetic field and the peripheral nerve stimulation. In this work is presented a numerical modeling between the concomitant magnetic fields produced by the gradient coils and the electric field induced in a cube with σ conductivity by the gradient field switching in pulse sequences as Eco planar Imaging (EPI), due to this kind of sequence is the most used in advance applications of magnetic resonance imaging as functional MRI, cardiac imaging or diffusion.

  20. Intracellular chemical gradients: morphing principle in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Robert G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in computational biology allow systematic investigations to ascertain whether internal chemical gradients can be maintained in bacteria – an open question at the resolution limit of fluorescence microscopy. While it was previously believed that the small bacterial cell size and fast diffusion in the cytoplasm effectively remove any such gradient, a new computational study published in BMC Biophysics supports the emerging view that gradients can exist. The study arose from the recent observation that phosphorylated CtrA forms a gradient prior to cell division in Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium known for its complicated cell cycle. Tropini et al. (2012 postulate that such gradients can provide an internal chemical compass, directing protein localization, cell division and cell development. More specifically, they describe biochemical and physical constraints on the formation of such gradients and explore a number of existing bacterial cell morphologies. These chemical gradients may limit in vitro analyses, and may ensure timing control and robustness to fluctuations during critical stages in cell development.

  1. Satellite gravity gradient grids for geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Fuchs, Martin; Sebera, Josef; Lieb, Verena; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Haagmans, Roger; Novak, Pavel

    2016-02-11

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite aimed at determining the Earth's mean gravity field. GOCE delivered gravity gradients containing directional information, which are complicated to use because of their error characteristics and because they are given in a rotating instrument frame indirectly related to the Earth. We compute gravity gradients in grids at 225 km and 255 km altitude above the reference ellipsoid corresponding to the GOCE nominal and lower orbit phases respectively, and find that the grids may contain additional high-frequency content compared with GOCE-based global models. We discuss the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model of the North-East Atlantic region, which shows that the depth sensitivity differs from gradient to gradient. In addition, the relative signal power for the individual gradient component changes comparing the 225 km and 255 km grids, implying that using all components at different heights reduces parameter uncertainties in geophysical modelling. Furthermore, since gravity gradients contain complementary information to gravity, we foresee the use of the grids in a wide range of applications from lithospheric modelling to studies on dynamic topography, and glacial isostatic adjustment, to bedrock geometry determination under ice sheets.

  2. Novel Techniques for Pulsed Field Gradient NMR Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, William Wallace

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) techniques now find application in multiple quantum filtering and diffusion experiments as well as in magnetic resonance imaging and spatially selective spectroscopy. Conventionally, the gradient fields are produced by azimuthal and longitudinal currents on the surfaces of one or two cylinders. Using a series of planar units consisting of azimuthal and radial current elements spaced along the longitudinal axis, we have designed gradient coils having linear regions that extend axially nearly to the ends of the coil and to more than 80% of the inner radius. These designs locate the current return paths on a concentric cylinder, so the coils are called Concentric Return Path (CRP) coils. Coils having extended linear regions can be made smaller for a given sample size. Among the advantages that can accrue from using smaller coils are improved gradient strength and switching time, reduced eddy currents in the absence of shielding, and improved use of bore space. We used an approximation technique to predict the remaining eddy currents and a time-domain model of coil performance to simulate the electrical performance of the CRP coil and several reduced volume coils of more conventional design. One of the conventional coils was designed based on the time-domain performance model. A single-point acquisition technique was developed to measure the remaining eddy currents of the reduced volume coils. Adaptive sampling increases the dynamic range of the measurement. Measuring only the center of the stimulated echo removes chemical shift and B_0 inhomogeneity effects. The technique was also used to design an inverse filter to remove the eddy current effects in a larger coil set. We added pulsed field gradient and imaging capability to a 7 T commercial spectrometer to perform neuroscience and embryology research and used it in preliminary studies of binary liquid mixtures separating near a critical point. These techniques and coil designs will find

  3. Gradient-based methods for production optimization of oil reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwartadi, Eka

    2012-07-01

    Production optimization for water flooding in the secondary phase of oil recovery is the main topic in this thesis. The emphasis has been on numerical optimization algorithms, tested on case examples using simple hypothetical oil reservoirs. Gradientbased optimization, which utilizes adjoint-based gradient computation, is used to solve the optimization problems. The first contribution of this thesis is to address output constraint problems. These kinds of constraints are natural in production optimization. Limiting total water production and water cut at producer wells are examples of such constraints. To maintain the feasibility of an optimization solution, a Lagrangian barrier method is proposed to handle the output constraints. This method incorporates the output constraints into the objective function, thus avoiding additional computations for the constraints gradient (Jacobian) which may be detrimental to the efficiency of the adjoint method. The second contribution is the study of the use of second-order adjoint-gradient information for production optimization. In order to speedup convergence rate in the optimization, one usually uses quasi-Newton approaches such as BFGS and SR1 methods. These methods compute an approximation of the inverse of the Hessian matrix given the first-order gradient from the adjoint method. The methods may not give significant speedup if the Hessian is ill-conditioned. We have developed and implemented the Hessian matrix computation using the adjoint method. Due to high computational cost of the Newton method itself, we instead compute the Hessian-timesvector product which is used in a conjugate gradient algorithm. Finally, the last contribution of this thesis is on surrogate optimization for water flooding in the presence of the output constraints. Two kinds of model order reduction techniques are applied to build surrogate models. These are proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and the discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM

  4. Systematic interpolation method predicts protein chromatographic elution with salt gradients, pH gradients and combined salt/pH gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Arch; Barker, Gregory; Carta, Giorgio

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is presented to predict protein elution behavior from an ion exchange column using both individual or combined pH and salt gradients based on high-throughput batch isotherm data. The buffer compositions are first optimized to generate linear pH gradients from pH 5.5 to 7 with defined concentrations of sodium chloride. Next, high-throughput batch isotherm data are collected for a monoclonal antibody on the cation exchange resin POROS XS over a range of protein concentrations, salt concentrations, and solution pH. Finally, a previously developed empirical interpolation (EI) method is extended to describe protein binding as a function of the protein and salt concentration and solution pH without using an explicit isotherm model. The interpolated isotherm data are then used with a lumped kinetic model to predict the protein elution behavior. Experimental results obtained for laboratory scale columns show excellent agreement with the predicted elution curves for both individual or combined pH and salt gradients at protein loads up to 45 mg/mL of column. Numerical studies show that the model predictions are robust as long as the isotherm data cover the range of mobile phase compositions where the protein actually elutes from the column. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Feng [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Physics & Electronic Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking.

  6. On fracture in finite strain gradient plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    predictions. These differences increase significantly when large strains are taken into account, as a consequence of the contribution of strain gradients to the work hardening of the material. The magnitude of stress elevation at the crack tip and the distance ahead of the crack where GNDs significantly alter......In this work a general framework for damage and fracture assessment including the effect of strain gradients is provided. Both mechanism-based and phenomenological strain gradient plasticity (SGP) theories are implemented numerically using finite deformation theory and crack tip fields...

  7. Speciation gradients and the distribution of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Dolph; Pennell, Matthew W

    2017-05-31

    Global patterns of biodiversity are influenced by spatial and environmental variations in the rate at which new species form. We relate variations in speciation rates to six key patterns of biodiversity worldwide, including the species-area relationship, latitudinal gradients in species and genetic diversity, and between-habitat differences in species richness. Although they sometimes mirror biodiversity patterns, recent rates of speciation, at the tip of the tree of life, are often highest where species richness is low. Speciation gradients therefore shape, but are also shaped by, biodiversity gradients and are often more useful for predicting future patterns of biodiversity than for interpreting the past.

  8. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-01-01

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking

  9. A Bidirectional Flow Joint Sobolev Gradient for Image Interpolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An energy functional with bidirectional flow is presented to sharpen image by reducing its edge width, which performs a forward diffusion in brighter lateral on edge ramp and backward diffusion that proceeds in darker lateral. We first consider the diffusion equations as L2 gradient flows on integral functionals and then modify the inner product from L2 to a Sobolev inner product. The experimental results demonstrate that our model efficiently reconstructs the real image, leading to a natural interpolation with reduced blurring, staircase artifacts and preserving better the texture features of image.

  10. Maximum gradient method for optimization of some reactor operating parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miasnikov, A.

    1976-03-01

    The method and the algorithm ensuing therefrom are described for the determination of the optimum operating state of a reactor. The optimum operating state is considered to be the extreme of the selected functional of the radial power distribution. The functional extreme is determined numerically, using a method which is one of the possible variants of the maximum gradient method. The radial distribution of the neutron absorption in regulating rods and the fuel element burnup are considered to be the variable parameters used in the optimization. (author)

  11. Detecting changes in insect herbivore communities along a pollution gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatough Jones, Michele; Paine, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    The forests surrounding the urban areas of the Los Angeles basin are impacted by ozone and nitrogen pollutants arising from urban areas. We examined changes in the herbivore communities of three prominent plant species (ponderosa pine, California black oak and bracken fern) at six sites along an air pollution gradient. Insects were extracted from foliage samples collected in spring, as foliage reached full expansion. Community differences were evaluated using total herbivore abundance, richness, Shannon-Weiner diversity, and discriminant function analysis. Even without conspicuous changes in total numbers, diversity or richness of herbivores, herbivore groups showed patterns of change that followed the air pollution gradient that were apparent through discriminant function analysis. For bracken fern and oak, chewing insects were more dominant at high pollution sites. Oak herbivore communities showed the strongest effect. These changes in herbivore communities may affect nutrient cycling in forest systems. - Differences in insect herbivore communities were associated with an ambient air pollution gradient in the mixed conifer forest outside the Los Angeles area

  12. Algorithm for ion beam figuring of low-gradient mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Changjun; Li, Shengyi; Xie, Xuhui

    2009-07-20

    Ion beam figuring technology for low-gradient mirrors is discussed. Ion beam figuring is a noncontact machining technique in which a beam of high-energy ions is directed toward a target workpiece to remove material in a predetermined and controlled fashion. Owing to this noncontact mode of material removal, problems associated with tool wear and edge effects, which are common in conventional contact polishing processes, are avoided. Based on the Bayesian principle, an iterative dwell time algorithm for planar mirrors is deduced from the computer-controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) principle. With the properties of the removal function, the shaping process of low-gradient mirrors can be approximated by the linear model for planar mirrors. With these discussions, the error surface figuring technology for low-gradient mirrors with a linear path is set up. With the near-Gaussian property of the removal function, the figuring process with a spiral path can be described by the conventional linear CCOS principle, and a Bayesian-based iterative algorithm can be used to deconvolute the dwell time. Moreover, the selection criterion of the spiral parameter is given. Ion beam figuring technology with a spiral scan path based on these methods can be used to figure mirrors with non-axis-symmetrical errors. Experiments on SiC chemical vapor deposition planar and Zerodur paraboloid samples are made, and the final surface errors are all below 1/100 lambda.

  13. Connectivity Gradients Between the Default Mode and Attention Control Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Michael A.; Lopez-Larson, Melissa; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Functional imaging studies have shown reduced activity within the default mode network during attention-demanding tasks. The network circuitry underlying this suppression remains unclear. Proposed hypotheses include an attentional switch in the right anterior insula and reciprocal inhibition between the default mode and attention control networks. We analyzed resting state blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) data from 1278 subjects from 26 sites and constructed whole-brain maps of functional connectivity between 7266 regions of interest (ROIs) covering the gray matter at ∼5 mm resolution. ROIs belonging to the default mode network and attention control network were identified based on correlation to six published seed locations. Spatial heterogeneity of correlation between the default mode and attention control networks was observed, with smoothly varying gradients in every hub of both networks that ranged smoothly from weakly but significantly anticorrelated to positively correlated. Such gradients were reproduced in 3 separate groups of subjects. Anticorrelated subregions were identified in major hubs of both networks. Between-network connectivity gradients strengthen with age during late adolescence and early adulthood, with associated sharpening of the boundaries of the default mode network, integration of the insula and cingulate with frontoparietal attentional regions, and decreasing correlation between the default mode and attention control networks with age. PMID:22076305

  14. Novel joining of dissimilar ceramics in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system using polytypoid functional gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Caroline Sunyong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    A unique approach to crack-free joining of heterogeneous ceramics is demonstrated by the use of sialon polytypoids as Functionally Graded Materials (FGM) as defined by the phase diagram in the system, Si3N4-Al2O3. Polytypoids in the Al2O3-Si3N4 system offer a path to compatibility for such heterogeneous ceramics. The first part of the dissertation describes successful hot press sintering of multilayered FGM's with 20 layers of thickness 500 mm each. Transmission Electron Microscopy was used to identify the polytypoids at the interfaces of different areas of the joint. It has been found that the 15R polytypoid was formed in the Al2O3-contained layers and the 12H polytypoid was formed in the Si3N4-contained layers. The second part of the dissertation discusses the mechanical properties of these polytypoidally joined Si3N4-Al2O3. The thermal stresses of this FGM junction were analyzed using a finite element analysis program (FEAP) taking into account both coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and modulus variations. From this analysis, the result showed a dramatic decrease in radial, axial and hoop stresses as the FGM changes from three layers to 20 graded layers. Scaling was considered, showing that the graded transition layer should constitute about 75 percent or more of the total sample thickness to reach a minimal residual stress. Oriented Vickers indentation testing was used to qualitatively characterize the strengths of the joint and the various interfaces. The indentation cracks were minimally or not deflected at the sialon layers, implying strong interfaces. Finally, flexural testing was conducted at room temperature and at high temperature. The average strength at room temperature was found to be 581 MPa and the average strength at high temperature (1200 °C) was found

  15. Cell Growth on ("Janus") Density Gradients of Bifunctional Zeolite L Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehr, Nermin Seda; Motealleh, Andisheh; Schäfer, Andreas H

    2016-12-28

    Nanoparticle density gradients on surfaces have attracted interest as two-dimensional material surfaces that can mimic the complex nano-/microstructure of the native extracellular matrix, including its chemical and physical gradients, and can therefore be used to systematically study cell-material interactions. In this respect, we report the preparation of density gradients made of bifunctional zeolite L crystals on glass surfaces and the effects of the density gradient and biopolymer functionalization of zeolite L crystals on cell adhesion. We also describe how we created "Janus" density gradient surfaces by gradually depositing two different types of zeolite L crystals that were functionalized and loaded with different chemical groups and guest molecules onto the two distinct sides of the same glass substrate. Our results show that more cells adhered on the density gradient of biopolymer-coated zeolites than on uncoated ones. The number of adhered cells increased up to a certain surface coverage of the glass by the zeolite L crystals, but then it decreased beyond the zeolite density at which a higher surface coverage decreased fibroblast cell adhesion and spreading. Additionally, cell experiments showed that cells gradually internalized the guest-molecule-loaded zeolite L crystals from the underlying density gradient containing bifunctional zeolite L crystals.

  16. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    Cell polarization along the axis of movement is required for migration. The localization of proteins and regulators of the migratory machinery to either the cell front or its rear results in a spatial asymmetry enabling cells to simultaneously coordinate cell protrusion and retraction. Protons...... might function as such unevenly distributed regulators as they modulate the interaction of focal adhesion proteins and components of the cytoskeleton in vitro. However, an intracellular pH (pH(i)) gradient reflecting a spatial asymmetry of protons has not been shown so far. One major regulator of p......H(i), the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1, is essential for cell migration and accumulates at the cell front. Here, we test the hypothesis that the uneven distribution of NHE1 activity creates a pH(i) gradient in migrating cells. Using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, pH(i) was measured in five cell lines (MV...

  17. A gradient enhanced plasticity-damage microplane model for concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreid, Imadeddin; Kaliske, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Computational modeling of concrete poses two main types of challenges. The first is the mathematical description of local response for such a heterogeneous material under all stress states, and the second is the stability and efficiency of the numerical implementation in finite element codes. The paper at hand presents a comprehensive approach addressing both issues. Adopting the microplane theory, a combined plasticity-damage model is formulated and regularized by an implicit gradient enhancement. The plasticity part introduces a new microplane smooth 3-surface cap yield function, which provides a stable numerical solution within an implicit finite element algorithm. The damage part utilizes a split, which can describe the transition of loading between tension and compression. Regularization of the model by the implicit gradient approach eliminates the mesh sensitivity and numerical instabilities. Identification methods for model parameters are proposed and several numerical examples of plain and reinforced concrete are carried out for illustration.

  18. Two New PRP Conjugate Gradient Algorithms for Minimization Optimization Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonglin Yuan

    Full Text Available Two new PRP conjugate Algorithms are proposed in this paper based on two modified PRP conjugate gradient methods: the first algorithm is proposed for solving unconstrained optimization problems, and the second algorithm is proposed for solving nonlinear equations. The first method contains two aspects of information: function value and gradient value. The two methods both possess some good properties, as follows: 1 βk ≥ 0 2 the search direction has the trust region property without the use of any line search method 3 the search direction has sufficient descent property without the use of any line search method. Under some suitable conditions, we establish the global convergence of the two algorithms. We conduct numerical experiments to evaluate our algorithms. The numerical results indicate that the first algorithm is effective and competitive for solving unconstrained optimization problems and that the second algorithm is effective for solving large-scale nonlinear equations.

  19. Strain gradient elasticity within the symmetric BEM formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Terravecchia,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The symmetric Galerkin Boundary Element Method is used to address a class of strain gradient elastic materials featured by a free energy function of the (classical strain and of its (first gradient. With respect to the classical elasticity, additional response variables intervene, such as the normal derivative of the displacements on the boundary, and the work-coniugate double tractions. The fundamental solutions - featuring a fourth order partial differential equations (PDEs system - exhibit singularities which in 2D may be of the order 1/ r 4 . New techniques are developed, which allow the elimination of most of the latter singularities. The present paper has to be intended as a research communication wherein some results, being elaborated within a more general paper [1], are reported.

  20. Predicting Escherichia coli's chemotactic drift under exponential gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sibendu; Layek, Ritwik; Kar, Shantimoy; Raj, M. Kiran; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial species are known to show chemotaxis, i.e., the directed motions in the presence of certain chemicals, whereas the motion is random in the absence of those chemicals. The bacteria modulate their run time to induce chemotactic drift towards the attractant chemicals and away from the repellent chemicals. However, the existing theoretical knowledge does not exhibit a proper match with experimental validation, and hence there is a need for developing alternate models and validating experimentally. In this paper a more robust theoretical model is proposed to investigate chemotactic drift of peritrichous Escherichia coli under an exponential nutrient gradient. An exponential gradient is used to understand the steady state behavior of drift because of the logarithmic functionality of the chemosensory receptors. Our theoretical estimations are validated through the experimentation and simulation results. Thus, the developed model successfully delineates the run time, run trajectory, and drift velocity as measured from the experiments.

  1. Vegetation patterns and environmental gradients in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adomou, A.

    2005-01-01

    Key words: West Africa, Benin, vegetation patterns, floristic areas, phytogeography, chorology, floristic gradients, climatic factors, water availability, Dahomey Gap, threatened plants, biodiversity, conservation.Understanding plant species distribution patterns and the underlying factors is a

  2. Flexoelectricity: strain gradient effects in ferroelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Wenhui [Department of Physics, Shantou Unversity, Shantou, Guangdong 515063 (China)

    2007-12-15

    Mechanical strain gradient induced polarization effect or flexoelectricity in perovskite-type ferroelectric and relaxor ferroelectric ceramics was investigated. The flexoelectric coefficients measured at room temperature ranged from about 1 {mu} C m{sup -1} for lead zirconate titanate to 100 {mu} C m{sup -1} for barium strontium titanate. Flexoelectric effects were discovered to be sensitive to chemical makeup, phase symmetry, and domain structures. Based on phenomenological discussion and experimental data on flexoelectricity, the present study proposed that mechanical strain gradient field could influence polarization responses in a way analogous to electric field. Flexoelectric coefficients were found to be nonlinearly enhanced by dielectric permittivity and strain gradient. Interfacial mismatch in epitaxial thin films can give rise to high strain gradients, enabling flexoelectric effects to make a significant impact in properly engineered ferroelectric heterostructure systems.

  3. Flexoelectricity: strain gradient effects in ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Wenhui

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical strain gradient induced polarization effect or flexoelectricity in perovskite-type ferroelectric and relaxor ferroelectric ceramics was investigated. The flexoelectric coefficients measured at room temperature ranged from about 1 μ C m -1 for lead zirconate titanate to 100 μ C m -1 for barium strontium titanate. Flexoelectric effects were discovered to be sensitive to chemical makeup, phase symmetry, and domain structures. Based on phenomenological discussion and experimental data on flexoelectricity, the present study proposed that mechanical strain gradient field could influence polarization responses in a way analogous to electric field. Flexoelectric coefficients were found to be nonlinearly enhanced by dielectric permittivity and strain gradient. Interfacial mismatch in epitaxial thin films can give rise to high strain gradients, enabling flexoelectric effects to make a significant impact in properly engineered ferroelectric heterostructure systems

  4. Integral Field Spectroscopy Surveys: Oxygen Abundance Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.

    2017-07-01

    We present here the recent results on our understanding of oxygen abundance gradients derived using Integral Field Spectroscopic surveys. In particular we analyzed more than 2124 datacubes corresponding to individual objects observed by the CALIFA (˜ 734 objects) and the public data by MaNGA (˜ 1390 objects), deriving the oxygen abundance gradient for each galaxy. We confirm previous results that indicate that the shape of this gradient is very similar for all galaxies with masses above 109.5M⊙, presenting in average a very similar slope of ˜ -0.04 dex within 0.5-2.0 re, with a possible drop in the inner regions (r109.5M⊙) the gradient seems to be flatter than for more massive ones. All these results agree with an inside-out growth of massive galaxies and indicate that low mass ones may still be growing in an outside in phase.

  5. Unimodal and crossmodal gradients of spatial attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Föcker, J.; Hötting, K.; Gondan, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) studies have shown that spatial attention is gradually distributed around the center of the attentional focus. The present study compared uni- and crossmodal gradients of spatial attention to investigate whether the orienting of auditory and visual...... spatial attention is based on modality specific or supramodal representations of space. Auditory and visual stimuli were presented from five speaker locations positioned in the right hemifield. Participants had to attend to the innermost or outmost right position in order to detect either visual...... or auditory deviant stimuli. Detection rates and event-related potentials (ERPs) indicated that spatial attention is distributed as a gradient. Unimodal spatial ERP gradients correlated with the spatial resolution of the modality. Crossmodal spatial gradients were always broader than the corresponding...

  6. A new portable device for automatic controlled-gradient cryopreservation of blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Albeck, G; Hansen, B

    1993-01-01

    -controlled freezing devices. While such equipment offers large capacity and secures maximum survival and functional integrity of the lymphocytes upon thawing, it is quite costly and strictly stationary. We have previously developed and tested an alternative, manual device for controlled-gradient lymphocyte freezing......, which has proved suitable for field conditions. We report here the development and testing of a similar micro-controller regulated device, allowing unattended and automatic controlled-gradient cell freezing. The equipment exploits the temperature gradient present between the liquid N2 surface...

  7. Novel cross-linked polyacrylamide matrices: an investigation using gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, M J; Purss, H K; Solomon, D H

    2001-12-01

    Gradient gel electrophoresis was used to examine the separation properties of novel cross-linking compounds for polyacrylamide (PAAm). At low %T and at the same %C protein migration difference is accentuated for bismethacrylamide cross-linked networks relative to bisacrylamide cross-linked networks. Similar properties were observed for cyclic monomers at low %T. This trend is maintained throughout the gradient. However, at higher %T migration differential relative to N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) was less pronounced. Evidence from gradient gels suggests that reactivity and functionality of vinyl groups impose an overriding control over network formation.

  8. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient.

  9. Tolman temperature gradients in a gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Jessica; Visser, Matt

    2018-01-01

    Tolman's relation for the temperature gradient in an equilibrium self-gravitating general relativistic fluid is broadly accepted within the general relativity community. However, the concept of temperature gradients in thermal equilibrium continues to cause confusion in other branches of physics, since it contradicts naive versions of the laws of classical thermodynamics. In this paper we discuss the crucial role of the universality of free fall, and how thermodynamics emphasises the great di...

  10. Ultimate gradient in solid-state accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittum, D.H.

    1998-08-01

    The authors recall the motivation for research in high-gradient acceleration and the problems posed by a compact collider. They summarize the phenomena known to appear in operation of a solid-state structure with large fields, and research relevant to the question of the ultimate gradient. They take note of new concepts, and examine one in detail, a miniature particle accelerator based on an active millimeter-wave circuit and parallel particle beams.

  11. Ultimate gradient in solid-state accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.

    1998-08-01

    The authors recall the motivation for research in high-gradient acceleration and the problems posed by a compact collider. They summarize the phenomena known to appear in operation of a solid-state structure with large fields, and research relevant to the question of the ultimate gradient. They take note of new concepts, and examine one in detail, a miniature particle accelerator based on an active millimeter-wave circuit and parallel particle beams

  12. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel M.; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T. S. Karin; Simon, M. Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm3) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1–6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  13. A new portable device for automatic controlled-gradient cryopreservation of blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Albeck, G; Hansen, B

    1993-01-01

    , which has proved suitable for field conditions. We report here the development and testing of a similar micro-controller regulated device, allowing unattended and automatic controlled-gradient cell freezing. The equipment exploits the temperature gradient present between the liquid N2 surface......Protection of the functional integrity of mononuclear cells stored in liquid N2 requires careful control of the freezing procedure. Consequently, optimal quality of cryopreserved cells is usually assured by freezing according to a specified time-temperature gradient generated by computer-controlled...... freezing devices. While such equipment offers large capacity and secures maximum survival and functional integrity of the lymphocytes upon thawing, it is quite costly and strictly stationary. We have previously developed and tested an alternative, manual device for controlled-gradient lymphocyte freezing...

  14. Functional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedoua Gandia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to investigate the effects of inhaled Mg alone and associated with F in the treatment of bronchial hyperresponsiveness. 43 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups and exposed to inhaled NaCl 0.9%, MeCh, MgSO4 and MgF2. Pulmonary changes were assessed by means of functional tests and quantitative histological examination of lungs and trachea. Results revealed that delivery of inhaled Mg associated with F led to a significant decrease of total lung resistance better than inhaled Mg alone (p < 0.05. Histological examinations illustrated that inhaled Mg associated with F markedly suppressed muscular hypertrophy (p = 0.034 and bronchoconstriction (p = 0.006 in MeCh treated rats better than inhaled Mg alone. No histological changes were found in the trachea. This study showed that inhaled Mg associated with F attenuated the main principle of the central components of changes in MeCh provoked experimental asthma better than inhaled Mg alone, potentially providing a new therapeutic approach against asthma.

  15. Application of the Normalized Full Gradient (NFG) Method to Resistivity Data

    OpenAIRE

    AYDIN, ALİ

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes the application of the normalized full gradient (NFG) method to resistivity studies and illustrates that the method can greatly reduce the time and work load needed in detecting buried bodies using resistivity measurement. The NFG method calculates resistivity values at desired electrode offsets by extrapolation of a function of resistivity measurements (i.e. the gradient) to other depth levels using resistivity measurements done at one electrode offset only. The performan...

  16. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Mingji; Or, Siu Wing

    2017-01-01

    We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME) transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG) technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME vo...

  17. Stronger tests of mechanisms underlying geographic gradients of biodiversity: insights from the dimensionality of biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Stevens

    Full Text Available Inference involving diversity gradients typically is gathered by mechanistic tests involving single dimensions of biodiversity such as species richness. Nonetheless, because traits such as geographic range size, trophic status or phenotypic characteristics are tied to a particular species, mechanistic effects driving broad diversity patterns should manifest across numerous dimensions of biodiversity. We develop an approach of stronger inference based on numerous dimensions of biodiversity and apply it to evaluate one such putative mechanism: the mid-domain effect (MDE. Species composition of 10,000-km(2 grid cells was determined by overlaying geographic range maps of 133 noctilionoid bat taxa. We determined empirical diversity gradients in the Neotropics by calculating species richness and three indices each of phylogenetic, functional and phenetic diversity for each grid cell. We also created 1,000 simulated gradients of each examined metric of biodiversity based on a MDE model to estimate patterns expected if species distributions were randomly placed within the Neotropics. For each simulation run, we regressed the observed gradient onto the MDE-expected gradient. If a MDE drives empirical gradients, then coefficients of determination from such an analysis should be high, the intercept no different from zero and the slope no different than unity. Species richness gradients predicted by the MDE fit empirical patterns. The MDE produced strong spatially structured gradients of taxonomic, phylogenetic, functional and phenetic diversity. Nonetheless, expected values generated from the MDE for most dimensions of biodiversity exhibited poor fit to most empirical patterns. The MDE cannot account for most empirical patterns of biodiversity. Fuller understanding of latitudinal gradients will come from simultaneous examination of relative effects of random, environmental and historical mechanisms to better understand distribution and abundance of the

  18. A Novel Method for Characterizing the Impact Response of Functionally Graded Plates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larson, Reid A

    2008-01-01

    .... Metal-ceramic FGM plates have been proposed for use in thermal protection systems where a metal-rich interior surface of the plate gradually transitions to a ceramic-rich exterior surface of the plate...

  19. Composite Functional Gradient Learning of Generative Adversarial Models

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Rie; Zhang, Tong

    2018-01-01

    Generative adversarial networks (GAN) have become popular for generating data that mimic observations by learning a suitable variable transformation from a random variable. However, empirically, GAN is known to suffer from instability. Also, the theory provided based on the minimax optimization formulation of GAN cannot explain the widely-used practical procedure that uses the so-called logd trick. This paper provides a different theoretical foundation for generative adversarial methods which...

  20. Bi-layer functionally gradient thick film semiconducting methane ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gas sensors based on metal oxide semiconductors like tin dioxide are widely used for the detection of toxic and combustible gases like carbon monoxide, methane and LPG. One of the problems of such sensors is their lack of sensitivity, which to some extent, can be circumvented by using different catalysts. However, highly ...

  1. Functional trait space and the latitudinal diversity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamanna, Christine; Blonder, Benjamin; Violle, Cyrille

    2014-01-01

    spanning the temperate and tropical New World. Alpha-scale trait volume decreases with absolute latitude and is often lower than sampling expectation, consistent with environmental filtering theory. Beta-scale overlap decays with geographic distance fastest in the temperate zone, again consistent...... with environmental filtering theory. In contrast, gamma-scale trait space shows a hump-shaped relationship with absolute latitude, consistent with no theory. Furthermore, the overall temperate trait hypervolume was larger than the overall tropical hypervolume, indicating that the temperate zone permits a wider range...... of trait combinations or that niche packing is stronger in the tropical zone. Although there are limitations in the data, our analyses suggest that multiple processes have shaped trait diversity in trees, reflecting no consistent support for any one theory....

  2. Parallel implementation of electronic structure energy, gradient, and Hessian calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotrich, V.; Flocke, N.; Ponton, M.; Yau, A. D.; Perera, A.; Deumens, E.; Bartlett, R. J.

    2008-05-01

    ACES III is a newly written program in which the computationally demanding components of the computational chemistry code ACES II [J. F. Stanton et al., Int. J. Quantum Chem. 526, 879 (1992); [ACES II program system, University of Florida, 1994] have been redesigned and implemented in parallel. The high-level algorithms include Hartree-Fock (HF) self-consistent field (SCF), second-order many-body perturbation theory [MBPT(2)] energy, gradient, and Hessian, and coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] energy and gradient. For SCF, MBPT(2), and CCSD(T), both restricted HF and unrestricted HF reference wave functions are available. For MBPT(2) gradients and Hessians, a restricted open-shell HF reference is also supported. The methods are programed in a special language designed for the parallelization project. The language is called super instruction assembly language (SIAL). The design uses an extreme form of object-oriented programing. All compute intensive operations, such as tensor contractions and diagonalizations, all communication operations, and all input-output operations are handled by a parallel program written in C and FORTRAN 77. This parallel program, called the super instruction processor (SIP), interprets and executes the SIAL program. By separating the algorithmic complexity (in SIAL) from the complexities of execution on computer hardware (in SIP), a software system is created that allows for very effective optimization and tuning on different hardware architectures with quite manageable effort.

  3. Gradient-based model calibration with proxy-model assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Wesley; Doherty, John

    2016-02-01

    Use of a proxy model in gradient-based calibration and uncertainty analysis of a complex groundwater model with large run times and problematic numerical behaviour is described. The methodology is general, and can be used with models of all types. The proxy model is based on a series of analytical functions that link all model outputs used in the calibration process to all parameters requiring estimation. In enforcing history-matching constraints during the calibration and post-calibration uncertainty analysis processes, the proxy model is run for the purposes of populating the Jacobian matrix, while the original model is run when testing parameter upgrades; the latter process is readily parallelized. Use of a proxy model in this fashion dramatically reduces the computational burden of complex model calibration and uncertainty analysis. At the same time, the effect of model numerical misbehaviour on calculation of local gradients is mitigated, this allowing access to the benefits of gradient-based analysis where lack of integrity in finite-difference derivatives calculation would otherwise have impeded such access. Construction of a proxy model, and its subsequent use in calibration of a complex model, and in analysing the uncertainties of predictions made by that model, is implemented in the PEST suite.

  4. Fabrication of a Ti-Al2O3 functionally graded material by dry-jet spraying of ultrafine particles and subsequent temperature-gradient sintering; Chobiryushi funsha sekisoho oyobi ondo keisha fuka shoketsuho ni yoru Ti-Al2O3 keisha kino zairyo no shisaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, A.; Tanizaki, H.; Iwasaki, K. [Nisshin Steel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-04-15

    Investigations are conducted and efforts are exerted for the prevention of some problems from arising in the process of sintering of films formed by dry jet spraying of ultrafine particles. Such problems involve the exfoliation of films from the substrate, emergence of voids in the functionally graded material (FGM) when the composition of the material is altered, and initiation of cracks. A Ti-Al2O3-base stepped cylinder shape FGM is tentatively fabricated by the lamination-forming ultrafine particle dry-jet spraying method and temperature-gradient sintering method. The occurrence of defects during the sintering process may be avoided by the following steps. Addition of ultrafine hydride particles to the powder which is to be compacted into a base substrate makes the shrinkage rate of this substrate slightly higher than that of the FGM layer, and this prevents cracks due to difference in shrinkage rate. The size of pores in the FGM can be reduced if the high shrinkage rate range r=1 through r=0.5 (r=Ti/(Ti+Al2O3)) is skipped in the laminate deposition process. When the compacting pressure is appropriately chosen after lamination, cracks are prevented from occurring in parts of extraordinary shape of the substrate before it is subjected to sintering. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Free water transport, small pore transport and the osmotic pressure gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikova, Alena; Smit, Watske; Zweers, Machteld M; Struijk, Dirk G; Krediet, Raymond T

    2008-07-01

    Water transport in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients occurs through the small pores and water channels, the latter allowing free water transport (FWT). The osmotic gradient is known to be one of the major determinants of water transport. The objective of the study was to analyse the relation between each transport route and the osmotic gradient. The 4-h standard peritoneal permeability analyses of 80 stable PD patients were studied. Small pore transport (SPT) was calculated based on the transported amount of sodium. FWT was calculated by subtracting SPT from transcapillary ultrafiltration (TCUF). Water transport rates were determined. The osmotic gradient was calculated. The slope of the relation between FWT rate and osmotic gradient (slope(FWT)), and the elimination constant (K(e)) of the exponential relation between SPT rate and osmotic gradient (K(SPT)) were calculated for every patient. The FWT rate was related to the osmotic gradient (P = 0.001). A similar correlation was also found between the SPT rate and osmotic gradient when fitted exponentially (P = 0.005). The rates of FWT decreased significantly between each time point during the whole dwell. The SPT rates decreased significantly within the first half of the dwell and levelled off thereafter. No correlations were found between the slope(FWT), K(SPT) and PD duration. The slope(FWT) of the relationship between the FWT and the osmotic gradient is an indirect measurement of the amount of functioning water channels. Similarly, the K(SPT) value represents the number of functioning small pores. The absence of a relationship of these parameters with the duration of PD suggests opposing mechanisms, for instance a lower number of functioning pores in combination with an increased vascular surface area. Conclusion. The curves of the relationship between FWR, SPT and OG support the assumption that FWR is much more dependent on the OG than SPT. Non-osmotic determinants are likely to be important in small pore fluid

  6. Jupiter's evolution with primordial composition gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazan, Allona; Helled, Ravit; Guillot, Tristan

    2018-02-01

    Recent formation and structure models of Jupiter suggest that the planet can have composition gradients and not be fully convective (adiabatic). This possibility directly affects our understanding of Jupiter's bulk composition and origin. In this Letter we present Jupiter's evolution with a primordial structure consisting of a relatively steep heavy-element gradient of 40 M⊕. We show that for a primordial structure with composition gradients, most of the mixing occurs in the outer part of the gradient during the early evolution (several 107 yr), leading to an adiabatic outer envelope (60% of Jupiter's mass). We find that the composition gradient in the deep interior persists, suggesting that 40% of Jupiter's mass can be non-adiabatic with a higher temperature than the one derived from Jupiter's atmospheric properties. The region that can potentially develop layered convection in Jupiter today is estimated to be limited to 10% of the mass. Movies associated to Figs. 1-3 are available at http://https://www.aanda.org

  7. Evidence of counter-gradient growth in western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) across thermal gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snover, Melissa; Adams, Michael J.; Ashton, Donald T.; Bettaso, Jamie B.; Welsh, Hartwell H.

    2015-01-01

    Counter-gradient growth, where growth per unit temperature increases as temperature decreases, can reduce the variation in ectothermic growth rates across environmental gradients. Understanding how ectothermic species respond to changing temperatures is essential to their conservation and management due to human-altered habitats and changing climates.

  8. Using Spatial Gradients to Model Localization Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.J.Bammann; D.Mosher; D.A.Hughes; N.R.Moody; P.R.Dawson

    1999-07-01

    We present the final report on a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project, Using Spatial Gradients to Model Localization Phenomena, performed during the fiscal years 1996 through 1998. The project focused on including spatial gradients in the temporal evolution equations of the state variables that describe hardening in metal plasticity models. The motivation was to investigate the numerical aspects associated with post-bifurcation mesh dependent finite element solutions in problems involving damage or crack propagation as well as problems in which strain Localizations occur. The addition of the spatial gradients introduces a mathematical length scale that eliminates the mesh dependency of the solution. In addition, new experimental techniques were developed to identify the physical mechanism associated with the numerical length scale.

  9. Subduction zones seen by GOCE gravity gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Švarc, Mario; Herceg, Matija; Cammarano, Fabio

    . Few pattern recognition methods were tested on all 6 gravity gradient tensor components represented as global scale maps with resolution of 100km (corresponds to the resolution of the GOCE satellite data). By adjusting pattern recognition methods’ features and optimizing various input patterns...... and used as starting point for analysis based on image processing. On obtained maps, locations of known subduction zones were represented with characteristic elongated patterns and cross-sections. Cross sections of well-known subduction zones were used as input patterns for pattern recognition method......, the best method was applied. That is a combination of methods based on SURF (Speeded Up Robust Features) and MSER (Maximally Stable Extremal Regions) algorithms provided in MATLAB’s Computer Vision System Toolbox. Based on 6 gravity gradient components, the global gradient anomaly maps were produced...

  10. Nonlinear conjugate gradient methods in micromagnetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fischbacher

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Conjugate gradient methods for energy minimization in micromagnetics are compared. The comparison of analytic results with numerical simulation shows that standard conjugate gradient method may fail to produce correct results. A method that restricts the step length in the line search is introduced, in order to avoid this problem. When the step length in the line search is controlled, conjugate gradient techniques are a fast and reliable way to compute the hysteresis properties of permanent magnets. The method is applied to investigate demagnetizing effects in NdFe12 based permanent magnets. The reduction of the coercive field by demagnetizing effects is μ0ΔH = 1.4 T at 450 K.

  11. Substrate curvature gradient drives rapid droplet motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cunjing; Chen, Chao; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2014-07-11

    Making small liquid droplets move spontaneously on solid surfaces is a key challenge in lab-on-chip and heat exchanger technologies. Here, we report that a substrate curvature gradient can accelerate micro- and nanodroplets to high speeds on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Experiments for microscale water droplets on tapered surfaces show a maximum speed of 0.42  m/s, 2 orders of magnitude higher than with a wettability gradient. We show that the total free energy and driving force exerted on a droplet are determined by the substrate curvature and substrate curvature gradient, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict nanoscale droplets moving spontaneously at over 100  m/s on tapered surfaces.

  12. Conjugate gradient algorithms using multiple recursions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, T.; Manteuffel, T.

    1996-12-31

    Much is already known about when a conjugate gradient method can be implemented with short recursions for the direction vectors. The work done in 1984 by Faber and Manteuffel gave necessary and sufficient conditions on the iteration matrix A, in order for a conjugate gradient method to be implemented with a single recursion of a certain form. However, this form does not take into account all possible recursions. This became evident when Jagels and Reichel used an algorithm of Gragg for unitary matrices to demonstrate that the class of matrices for which a practical conjugate gradient algorithm exists can be extended to include unitary and shifted unitary matrices. The implementation uses short double recursions for the direction vectors. This motivates the study of multiple recursion algorithms.

  13. Be-Cu gradient materials through controlled segregation. Basic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muecklich, F.; Lorinser, M.; Hartmann, S.; Beinstingel, S. [Saarland Univ., Saarbruecken (Germany); Linke, J.; Roedig, M.

    1998-01-01

    The joining of materials has a fundamental problematic nature: Creating a sharp interface between two different materials causes a more or less extreme jump in the properties at this point. This may result in the failure of the component under mechanical or thermal loads. In some cases there are further difficulties caused by using a third component (e.g. the transformation of Ag-lead into Cd by neutron beams). The solution may be the creating of a functionally gradient material (FGM) Be-Cu. We discuss the advantage of such a FGM and the probabilities of an new procedure for manufacturing 1-dimensional FGMs. (author)

  14. Review of new shapes for higher gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    High-gradient superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed for energy frontier superconducting accelerators. Progress has been made over the past decades and the accelerating gradient E acc has been increased from a few MV/m to ∼42 MV/m in SRF niobium cavities. The corresponding peak RF magnetic field H pk on the niobium cavity surface is approaching the intrinsic RF critical magnetic field H crit,RF , a hard physical limit at which superconductivity breaks down. Pushing the gradient envelope further by adopting new cavity shapes with a lower ratio of H pk /E acc has been recently proposed. For a reduced H pk /E acc , a higher ultimate E acc is sustained when H pk finally strikes H crit,RF . The new cavity geometry include the re-entrant shape conceived at Cornell University and the so-called 'Low-loss' shape proposed by a DESY/JLAB/KEK collaboration. Experimental work is being pursued at Cornell, KEK and JLAB. Results of single-cell cavities are encouraging. A record gradient of 47 MV/m was first demonstrated in a 1.3 GHz re-entrant niobium cavity at Cornell University. At the time of writing, a new record of 52 MV/m has been realized with another 1.3 GHz re-entrant cavity, designed and built at Cornell and processed and tested at KEK. Single-cell low-loss cavities have reached equally high gradients in the range of 45-51 MV/m at KEK and JLAB. Owing to their higher gradient potential and the encouraging single-cell cavity results, the new cavity shapes are becoming attractive for their possible use in the international linear collider (ILC). Experimental work on multi-cell niobium cavities of new shapes is currently under active exploration

  15. Frequency Analysis of Gradient Estimators in Volume Rendering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Lichtenbelt, Barthold B.A.; Malzbender, Tom

    1996-01-01

    Gradient information is used in volume rendering to classify and color samples along a ray. In this paper, we present an analysis of the theoretically ideal gradient estimator and compare it to some commonly used gradient estimators. A new method is presented to calculate the gradient at arbitrary

  16. Measurement of gradient magnetic field temporal characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartusek, K.; Jflek, B.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a technique of measuring the time dependence and field distortions of magnetic fields due to eddy currents (EC) produced by time-dependent magnetic field gradients. The EC measuring technique makes use of a large volume sample and selective RF excitation pulses and free induction decay (FID) (or a spin or gradient echo) to measure the out-of-phase component of the FID, which is proportional to γδB, i.e. the amount the signal is off resonance. The measuring technique is sensitive, easy to implement and interpret, and used for determining pre-emphasis compensation parameters

  17. Relativistic klystron research for high gradient accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.

    1988-06-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron--positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our first klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 7 figs

  18. Crack Tip Mechanics in Distortion Gradient Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuentes-Alonso, Sandra; Martínez Pañeda, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    The important role of geometrically necessary dislocations in structural integrity assessment has encouraged an extensive use of strain gradient plasticity theories to characterize the behavior at the small scales involved in crack tip deformation. However, despite the popularity of Distortion...... Gradient Plasticity (DGP), the influence on crack tip mechanics of DGP's distinguishing features that entail superior modelling capabilities has not been investigated yet. In this work crack tip fields are thoroughly examined by implementing the higher order theory of DGP in an implicit finite element...

  19. Gradient Learning Algorithms for Ontology Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhu, Linli

    2014-01-01

    The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting. PMID:25530752

  20. Realizable planar gradient-index solar lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsidas, Panagiotis; Modi, Vijay; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2012-04-01

    The design of single element planar hemispherical gradient-index solar lenses that can accommodate the constraints of realistic materials and fabrication techniques are presented, and simulated with an extended and polychromatic solar source for concentrator photovoltaics at flux concentration values exceeding 1000 suns. The planar hemispherical far-field lens is created from a near-field unit magnification spherical gradient-index design, and illustrated with an f/1.40 square solar lens that allows lossless packing within a concentrator module.

  1. Gradient Elasticity Formulations for Micro/Nanoshells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohua Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is on illustrating how to extend the second author’s gradient theory of elasticity to shells. Three formulations are presented based on the implicit gradient elasticity constitutive relation 1 -ld2∇2σij=Cijkl(1-ls2∇2εkl and its two approximations 1+ls2∇2-ld2∇2σij=Cijklεkl and σij=Cijkl(1+ld2∇2-ls2∇2εkl.

  2. Gradient learning algorithms for ontology computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhu, Linli

    2014-01-01

    The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting.

  3. On lower order strain gradient plasticity theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    By way of numerical examples, this paper explores the nature of solutions to a class of strain gradient plasticity theories that employ conventional stresses, equilibrium equations and boundary conditions. Strain gradients come into play in these modified conventional theories only to alter...... the tangential moduli governing increments of stress and strain. It is shown that the modification is far from benign from a mathematical standpoint, changing the qualitative character of solutions and leading to a new type of localization that appears to be unphysical....

  4. Gradient Learning Algorithms for Ontology Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting.

  5. Temperature Gradient Approach for Rapidly Assessing Sensor Binding Kinetics and Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Caleb E; Macedo, Lucyano J A; Opdahl, Aric

    2015-08-04

    We report a highly resolved approach for quantitatively measuring the temperature dependence of molecular binding in a sensor format. The method is based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging measurements made across a spatial temperature gradient. Simultaneous recording of sensor response over the range of temperatures spanned by the gradient avoids many of the complications that arise in the analysis of SPR measurements where temperature is varied. In addition to simplifying quantitative analysis of binding interactions, the method allows the temperature dependence of binding to be monitored as a function of time, and provides a straightforward route for calibrating how temperature varies across the gradient. Using DNA hybridization as an example, we show how the gradient approach can be used to measure the temperature dependence of binding kinetics and thermodynamics (e.g., melt/denaturation profile) in a single experiment.

  6. Growth and chemosensory behavior of sulfate-reducing bacteria in oxygen-sulfide gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, Andrea M.; Wieland, Andrea Eschemann; Kühl, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Growth and chemotactic behavior in oxic–anoxic gradients were studied with two freshwater and four marine strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria related to the genera Desulfovibrio, Desulfomicrobium or Desulfobulbus. Cells were grown in oxygen–sulfide counter-gradients within tubes filled with agar...... to actively change the extension and slope of the gradients by oxygen reduction with lactate or even sulfide as electron donor. Generally, the chemotactic behavior was in agreement with a defense strategy that re-establishes anoxic conditions, thus promoting anaerobic growth and, in a natural community...... chemotactically to lactate, nitrate, sulfate and thiosulfate, and even sulfide functioned as an attractant. In oxic–anoxic gradients the bacteria moved away from high oxygen concentrations and formed bands at the outer edge of the oxic zone at low oxygen concentration (

  7. 3D printing for the design and fabrication of polymer-based gradient scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracaglia, Laura G; Smith, Brandon T; Watson, Emma; Arumugasaamy, Navein; Mikos, Antonios G; Fisher, John P

    2017-07-01

    To accurately mimic the native tissue environment, tissue engineered scaffolds often need to have a highly controlled and varied display of three-dimensional (3D) architecture and geometrical cues. Additive manufacturing in tissue engineering has made possible the development of complex scaffolds that mimic the native tissue architectures. As such, architectural details that were previously unattainable or irreproducible can now be incorporated in an ordered and organized approach, further advancing the structural and chemical cues delivered to cells interacting with the scaffold. This control over the environment has given engineers the ability to unlock cellular machinery that is highly dependent upon the intricate heterogeneous environment of native tissue. Recent research into the incorporation of physical and chemical gradients within scaffolds indicates that integrating these features improves the function of a tissue engineered construct. This review covers recent advances on techniques to incorporate gradients into polymer scaffolds through additive manufacturing and evaluate the success of these techniques. As covered here, to best replicate different tissue types, one must be cognizant of the vastly different types of manufacturing techniques available to create these gradient scaffolds. We review the various types of additive manufacturing techniques that can be leveraged to fabricate scaffolds with heterogeneous properties and discuss methods to successfully characterize them. Additive manufacturing techniques have given tissue engineers the ability to precisely recapitulate the native architecture present within tissue. In addition, these techniques can be leveraged to create scaffolds with both physical and chemical gradients. This work offers insight into several techniques that can be used to generate graded scaffolds, depending on the desired gradient. Furthermore, it outlines methods to determine if the designed gradient was achieved. This review

  8. Up-gradient transport in a probabilistic transport model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, J.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    The transport of particles or heat against the driving gradient is studied by employing a probabilistic transport model with a characteristic particle step length that depends on the local concentration or heat gradient. When this gradient is larger than a prescribed critical value, the standard....... These results supplement recent works by van Milligen [Phys. Plasmas 11, 3787 (2004)], which applied Levy distributed step sizes in the case of supercritical gradients to obtain the up-gradient transport. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics....

  9. Large Airborne Full Tensor Gradient Data Inversion Based on a Non-Monotone Gradient Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Meng, Zhaohai; Li, Fengting

    2018-03-01

    Following the development of gravity gradiometer instrument technology, the full tensor gravity (FTG) data can be acquired on airborne and marine platforms. Large-scale geophysical data can be obtained using these methods, making such data sets a number of the "big data" category. Therefore, a fast and effective inversion method is developed to solve the large-scale FTG data inversion problem. Many algorithms are available to accelerate the FTG data inversion, such as conjugate gradient method. However, the conventional conjugate gradient method takes a long time to complete data processing. Thus, a fast and effective iterative algorithm is necessary to improve the utilization of FTG data. Generally, inversion processing is formulated by incorporating regularizing constraints, followed by the introduction of a non-monotone gradient-descent method to accelerate the convergence rate of FTG data inversion. Compared with the conventional gradient method, the steepest descent gradient algorithm, and the conjugate gradient algorithm, there are clear advantages of the non-monotone iterative gradient-descent algorithm. Simulated and field FTG data were applied to show the application value of this new fast inversion method.

  10. Carotenoids in a food chain along a pollution gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Saila; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Lehikoinen, Esa; Toivonen, Eija; Eeva, Tapio

    2008-11-15

    Carotenoids are synthesized by plants, therefore insects and birds must obtain them from their diet. They function in pigmentation and as antioxidants. We studied the carotenoid profiles in a model food chain (plant-insect-bird) in an air pollution gradient to find out whether heavy metal pollution affects the transfer of carotenoids across the trophic levels. Birch leaves showed higher beta-carotene and, one of the birch species (Betula pendula), higher total carotenoids levels in the polluted area. There was no difference in the lutein concentration of caterpillars' food source, birch leaves, between the study areas. Autumnal moth larvae accumulated lutein more efficiently than beta-carotene while sawfly larvae accumulated beta-carotene over lutein. Because of different antioxidant profiles in different leaf chewing insects their sensitivity to pollution stress may differ. The lutein concentration of plasma and feathers of Great tit nestlings did not differ along the pollution gradient. The lack of difference in lutein concentration of autumnal moth larvae along pollution gradient may partly explain the lutein concentrations of Great tit nestlings, since the abundance of autumnal moth larvae peak during the nestling phase of Great tit. The lutein concentration of autumnal moth larvae was positively associated to circulating plasma lutein level of Great tit indicating the importance of carotenoid rich diet during the nestling phase. In addition, the higher the plasma lutein concentration the more lutein was deposited to feathers, irrespective of the other possible functions of lutein in nestlings. We found that carotenoid levels differed between the polluted and the unpolluted area especially at lower levels of food chain: in birches and in caterpillars.

  11. Annular beam with segmented phase gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubo Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An annular beam with a single uniform-intensity ring and multiple segments of phase gradients is proposed in this paper. Different from the conventional superposed vortices, such as the modulated optical vortices and the collinear superposition of multiple orbital angular momentum modes, the designed annular beam has a doughnut intensity distribution whose radius is independent of the phase distribution of the beam in the imaging plane. The phase distribution along the circumference of the doughnut beam can be segmented with different phase gradients. Similar to a vortex beam, the annular beam can also exert torques and rotate a trapped particle owing to the orbital angular momentum of the beam. As the beam possesses different phase gradients, the rotation velocity of the trapped particle can be varied along the circumference. The simulation and experimental results show that an annular beam with three segments of different phase gradients can rotate particles with controlled velocities. The beam has potential applications in optical trapping and optical information processing.

  12. Subspace learning from image gradient orientations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the notion of subspace learning from image gradient orientations for appearance-based object recognition. As image data is typically noisy and noise is substantially different from Gaussian, traditional subspace learning from pixel intensities fails very often to estimate reliably the

  13. Considerations of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    The ion temperature gradient driven instability is considered in this paper. Physical pictures are presented to clarify the nature of the instability. The saturation of a single eddy is modeled by a simple nonlinear equation. We show that eddies which are elongated in the direction of the temperature gradient are the most unstable and have the highest saturation amplitudes. In a sheared magnetic field, such elongated eddies twist with the field lines. This structure is shown to be alternative to the usual Fourier mode picture in which the mode is localized around the surface where k parallel = 0. We show how these elongated twisting eddies, which are an integral part of the ''ballooning mode'' structure, could survive in a torus. The elongated eddies are shown to be unstable to secondary instabilities that are driven by the large gradients in the long eddy. We argue that this mechanism isotropizes ion temperature gradient turbulence. We further argue that the ''mixing length'' is set by this nonlinear process, not by a linear eigenmode width. 17 refs., 6 figs

  14. Gradient realization of nonlinear control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortes monforte, J.; Cortés, J.; Crouch, P.E.; Astolfi, A.; van der Schaft, Arjan; Gordillo, F.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate necessary and su?cient conditions under which a nonlinear afine control system with outputs can be written as a gradient control system corresponding to some pseudo-Riemannian metric defined on the state space. The results rely on a suitable notion of compatibility of the system with

  15. Lactate uptake against a concentration gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Carl-Henrik; Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Nielsen, Hans Boye

    2014-01-01

    The recently published article by Jalloh et al (Jalloh I, Helmy A, Shannon RJ, Gallagher CN, Menon D, Carpenter K, Hutchinson P. Lactate uptake by the injured human brain - evidence from an arterio-venous gradient and cerebral microdialysis study. J Neurotrauma. 2013 Aug 22. [Epub ahead of print]...... is of fundamental importance the misconception should be corrected....

  16. Instabilities in power law gradient hardening materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    Tension and compression instabilities are investigated for specimens with dimensions in the micron range. A finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity theory is implemented in a finite element scheme capable of modeling power law hardening materials. Effects...

  17. Gradient based filtering of digital elevation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thomas; Andersen, Rune Carbuhn

    We present a filtering method for digital terrain models (DTMs). The method is based on mathematical morphological filtering within gradient (slope) defined domains. The intention with the filtering procedure is to improbé the cartographic quality of height contours generated from a DTM based on ...

  18. Stochastic gradient versus recursive least squares learning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodyan, Sergey; Bogomolova, Anna; Kolyuzhnov, Dmitri

    -, č. 309 (2006), s. 1-21 ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : constant gain adaptive learning * stochastic gradient learning * recursive least squares Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp309.pdf

  19. Exploring Nf=2 +1 QCD thermodynamics from the gradient flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yusuke; Ejiri, Shinji; Iwami, Ryo; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Umeda, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Naoki; WHOT-QCD Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The energy-momentum tensor plays an important role in QCD thermodynamics. Its expectation value contains information of the pressure and the energy density as its diagonal part. Further properties like viscosity and specific heat can be extracted from its correlation function. A nonperturbative evaluation of it on the lattice is called. Recently, a new method based on the gradient flow was introduced to calculate the energy-momentum tensor on the lattice and has been successfully applied to quenched QCD. In this paper, we apply the gradient flow method to calculate the energy-momentum tensor in (2 +1 )-flavor QCD adopting a nonperturbatively O (a )-improved Wilson quark action and the renormalization group-improved Iwasaki gauge action. As the first application of the method with dynamical quarks, we study at a single but fine lattice spacing a ≃0.07 fm with heavy u and d quarks (mπ/mρ≃0.63 ) and approximately physical s quark (mηss/mϕ≃0.74 ). With the fixed-scale approach, temperature is varied by the temporal lattice size Nt at a fixed lattice spacing. Performing simulations on lattices with Nt=16 to 4, the temperature range of T ≃174 - 697 MeV is covered. We find that the results of the pressure and the energy density by the gradient flow method are consistent with the previous results using the T -integration method at T ≲280 MeV (Nt≳10 ), while the results show disagreement at T ≳350 MeV (Nt≲8 ), presumably due to the small-Nt lattice artifact of O ((a T )2) =O (1 /Nt2) . We also apply the gradient flow method to evaluate the chiral condensate taking advantage of the gradient flow method that renormalized quantities can be directly computed avoiding the difficulty of explicit chiral violation with lattice quarks. We compute the renormalized chiral condensate in the MS ¯ scheme at renormalization scale μ =2 GeV with a high precision to study the temperature dependence of the chiral condensate and its disconnected susceptibility. Even with

  20. Extracellular Processing of Molecular Gradients by Eukaryotic Cells Can Improve Gradient Detection Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segota, Igor; Franck, Carl

    2017-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells sense molecular gradients by measuring spatial concentration variation through the difference in the number of occupied receptors to which molecules can bind. They also secrete enzymes that degrade these molecules, and it is presently not well understood how this affects the local gradient perceived by cells. Numerical and analytical results show that these enzymes can substantially increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the receptor difference and allow cells to respond to a much broader range of molecular concentrations and gradients than they would without these enzymes.

  1. Extracellular Processing of Molecular Gradients by Eukaryotic Cells Can Improve Gradient Detection Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segota, Igor; Franck, Carl

    2017-12-15

    Eukaryotic cells sense molecular gradients by measuring spatial concentration variation through the difference in the number of occupied receptors to which molecules can bind. They also secrete enzymes that degrade these molecules, and it is presently not well understood how this affects the local gradient perceived by cells. Numerical and analytical results show that these enzymes can substantially increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the receptor difference and allow cells to respond to a much broader range of molecular concentrations and gradients than they would without these enzymes.

  2. State-space models - from the EM algorithm to a gradient approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Rasmus Kongsgaard; Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Lehn-Schiøler, Tue

    2007-01-01

    Slow convergence is observed in the EM algorithm for linear state-space models. We propose to circumvent the problem by applying any off-the-shelf quasi-Newton-type optimizer, which operates on the gradient of the log-likelihood function. Such an algorithm is a practical alternative due to the fact...... that the exact gradient of the log-likelihood function can be computed by recycling components of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. We demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method in three relevant instances of the linear state-space model. In high signal-to-noise ratios, where EM is particularly...

  3. Interacting Eigenmodes of a plasma diode with a density gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loefgren, T.; Gunell, H.

    1997-08-01

    The formation of narrow high frequency electric field spikes in plasma density gradients is investigated using one-dimensional particle in cell simulations. It is found that the shape of the plasma density gradient is very important for the spike formation. The spike appears also in simulations with immobile ions showing that a coupling to the ion motion, as for example in wave interactions, is not necessary for the formation of HF spikes. However, the HF spike influences the ion motion, and ion waves are seen in the simulations. It has been found, in experiments and simulations, that the electron velocity distribution function deviates from the Maxwellian distribution. Dispersion relations are calculated using realistic distribution functions. The spike can be seen as a coupled system of two Eigenmodes of a plasma diode fed by the beam-plasma interaction. Based on a simplified fluid description of such Eigenmodes, explanations for the localization of the spike, spatially and in frequency, are given. The density amplitude is comparable with the DC density level close to the cathode. Space charge limits of waves in this region seem to determine the amplitude of the spike through the Poisson's equation

  4. Three-dimensional Gravity Inversion with a New Gradient Scheme on Unstructured Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S.; Yin, C.; Gao, X.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, B.

    2017-12-01

    Stabilized gradient-based methods have been proved to be efficient for inverse problems. Based on these methods, setting gradient close to zero can effectively minimize the objective function. Thus the gradient of objective function determines the inversion results. By analyzing the cause of poor resolution on depth in gradient-based gravity inversion methods, we find that imposing depth weighting functional in conventional gradient can improve the depth resolution to some extent. However, the improvement is affected by the regularization parameter and the effect of the regularization term becomes smaller with increasing depth (shown as Figure 1 (a)). In this paper, we propose a new gradient scheme for gravity inversion by introducing a weighted model vector. The new gradient can improve the depth resolution more efficiently, which is independent of the regularization parameter, and the effect of regularization term will not be weakened when depth increases. Besides, fuzzy c-means clustering method and smooth operator are both used as regularization terms to yield an internal consecutive inverse model with sharp boundaries (Sun and Li, 2015). We have tested our new gradient scheme with unstructured grids on synthetic data to illustrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. Gravity forward modeling with unstructured grids is based on the algorithm proposed by Okbe (1979). We use a linear conjugate gradient inversion scheme to solve the inversion problem. The numerical experiments show a great improvement in depth resolution compared with regular gradient scheme, and the inverse model is compact at all depths (shown as Figure 1 (b)). AcknowledgeThis research is supported by Key Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (41530320), China Natural Science Foundation for Young Scientists (41404093), and Key National Research Project of China (2016YFC0303100, 2017YFC0601900). ReferencesSun J, Li Y. 2015. Multidomain petrophysically constrained inversion and

  5. Arbitrary magnetic field gradient waveform correction using an impulse response based pre-equalization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goora, Frédéric G; Colpitts, Bruce G; Balcom, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    The time-varying magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance applications result in the induction of eddy currents on conductive structures in the vicinity of both the sample under investigation and the gradient coils. These eddy currents typically result in undesired degradations of image quality for MRI applications. Their ubiquitous nature has resulted in the development of various approaches to characterize and minimize their impact on image quality. This paper outlines a method that utilizes the magnetic field gradient waveform monitor method to directly measure the temporal evolution of the magnetic field gradient from a step-like input function and extracts the system impulse response. With the basic assumption that the gradient system is sufficiently linear and time invariant to permit system theory analysis, the impulse response is used to determine a pre-equalized (optimized) input waveform that provides a desired gradient response at the output of the system. An algorithm has been developed that calculates a pre-equalized waveform that may be accurately reproduced by the amplifier (is physically realizable) and accounts for system limitations including system bandwidth, amplifier slew rate capabilities, and noise inherent in the initial measurement. Significant improvements in magnetic field gradient waveform fidelity after pre-equalization have been realized and are summarized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Doppler derived gradient of ST Jude Mechanical Prosthesis, early postoperative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.H.; Hanif, B.; Adil, A.; Hashimi, S.; Qazi, H.A.; Mujtaba, I.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the doppler derived mean gradients of St Jude mechanical prosthesis in early postoperative period in patients undergoing valve replacement at a tertiary care cardiac centre. Methods: Medical records of 190 consecutive patients who underwent 233 mitral, aortic or dual (mitral and aortic) valve replacement by St Jude bileaflet mechanical prosthesis at Tabba Heart Institute, between March 2006 to December 2008 were reviewed. Doppler derived mean gradients were assessed predischarge and recorded. Results: There were 98 (51.5%) males and 92 (48.5%) females in the study cohort. The mean age was 40 +- 14 years. Of the total, 101 (53%) had mitral, 46 (24.2%) had aortic and 43 (22.6%) patients had dual valve replacement. Doppler derived mean gradient was assessed across 144 mitral and 89 aortic St Jude mechanical prosthesis. Doppler derived mean gradient for St Jude mitral prosthesis was 3.5 mm Hg and for St Jude aortic prosthesis was 10.2 mm Hg. Conclusions: The study determines baseline gradients across mitral and aortic St Jude mechanical prosthesis in our population. These can be used as reference gradients to assess St Jude prosthetic valve function in patients who did not have early postoperative doppler assessment. (author)

  7. Reversal of Magnetisation in Ising Ferromagnet by the Field Having Gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, Abyaya; Acharyya, Muktish

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the reversal of magnetisation in Ising ferromagnet by the field having gradient along a particular direction. We employed the Monte Carlo simulation with Metropolis single spin flip algorithm. The average lifetime of the metastable state was observed to increase with the magnitude of the gradient of applied field. In the high gradient regime, the system was observed to show two distinct region of up and down spins. The interface or the domain wall was observed to move as one increases the gradient. The displacement of the mean position of the interface was observed to increase with the gradient as hyperbolic tangent function. The roughness of the interface was observed to decay exponentially as the gradient increases. The number of spin flip per site was observed to show a discontinuity in the vicinity of the domain wall. The amount of the discontinuity was found to diverge with the system size as a power law fashion with an exponent 5/3. (paper)

  8. Modified cuckoo search: A new gradient free optimisation algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, S.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.; Brown, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Modified cuckoo search (MCS) is a new gradient free optimisation algorithm. → MCS shows a high convergence rate, able to outperform other optimisers. → MCS is particularly strong at high dimension objective functions. → MCS performs well when applied to engineering problems. - Abstract: A new robust optimisation algorithm, which can be regarded as a modification of the recently developed cuckoo search, is presented. The modification involves the addition of information exchange between the top eggs, or the best solutions. Standard optimisation benchmarking functions are used to test the effects of these modifications and it is demonstrated that, in most cases, the modified cuckoo search performs as well as, or better than, the standard cuckoo search, a particle swarm optimiser, and a differential evolution strategy. In particular the modified cuckoo search shows a high convergence rate to the true global minimum even at high numbers of dimensions.

  9. Climatic effects on decomposing litter and substrate chemistry along climatological gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, B.

    2009-04-01

    Climatic effects on decomposing litter and substrate chemistry along climatological gradients. B. Berg, Dipartimento Biologia Strutturale e Funzionale, Complesso Universitario, Monte San Angelo, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli, Italy and Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland. Studies of several processes, using climatic gradients do provide new information as compared with studies at e.g. a single site. Decomposition of plant litter in such gradients give response in decomposition rates to natural climate conditions. Thus Scots pine needle litter incubated in a climate gradient with annual average temperature (AVGT) ranging from -0.5 to 6.8oC had a highly significant increase in initial mass-loss rate with R2 = 0.591 (p<0.001) and a 5o increase in temperature doubled the mass-loss rate. As a contrast - needle litter of Norway spruce incubated in the same transect had no significant response to climate and for initial litter a 5o increase increased mass-loss rate c. 6%. For more decomposed Scots pine litter we could see that the effect of temperature on mass-loss rate gradually decreased until it disappeared. Long-term decomposition studies revealed differences in litter decomposition patterns along a gradient, even for the same type of litter. This could be followed by using an asymptotic function that gave, (i) a measure a maximum level of decomposition, (ii) the initial decomposition rate. Over a gradient the calculated maximum level of decomposition decreased with increasing AVGT. Other gradient studies revealed an effect of AVGT on litter chemical composition. Pine needle litter from stands under different climate conditions had nutrient concentrations related to AVGT. Thus N, P, K, and S were positively related to AVGT and Mn negatively, all of them significantly. This information may be used to explain the changing pattern in decomposition over the gradient.

  10. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingji; Or, Siu Wing

    2017-10-25

    We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME) transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG) technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME voltage between the two ME composites and is calibrated against transverse MFGs to give a high detection sensitivity of 0.4-30.6 V/(T/m), a strong common-mode magnetic field noise rejection rate of 35 mm. An analysis of experimental gradient noise spectra obtained in a magnetically-unshielded laboratory environment reveals the domination of the pink (1/ f ) noise, dielectric loss noise, and power-frequency noise below 3 kHz, in addition to the circuit noise above 3 kHz, in the gradient sensor. The high detection performance, together with the added merit of passive and direct ME conversion by the large ME effect in the ME composites, makes the gradient sensor suitable for the passive, direct, and broadband detection of transverse MFGs.

  11. Optimal random perturbations for stochastic approximation using a simultaneous perturbation gradient approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Spall, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    The simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation (SPSA) algorithm has attracted considerable attention for challenging optimization problems where it is difficult or impossible to obtain a direct gradient of the objective (say, loss) function. The approach is based on a highly efficient...... simultaneous perturbation approximation to the gradient based on loss function measurements. SPSA is based on picking a simultaneous perturbation (random) vector in a Monte Carlo fashion as part of generating the approximation to the gradient. This paper derives the optimal distribution for the Monte Carlo...... process. The objective is to minimize the mean square error of the estimate. The authors also consider maximization of the likelihood that the estimate be confined within a bounded symmetric region of the true parameter. The optimal distribution for the components of the simultaneous perturbation vector...

  12. Optimal random perturbations for stochastic approximation using a simultaneous perturbation gradient approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Spall, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    The simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation (SPSA) algorithm has recently attracted considerable attention for optimization problems where it is difficult or impossible to obtain a direct gradient of the objective (say, loss) function. The approach is based on a highly efficient...... simultaneous perturbation approximation to the gradient based on loss function measurements. SPSA is based on picking a simultaneous perturbation (random) vector in a Monte Carlo fashion as part of generating the approximation to the gradient. This paper derives the optimal distribution for the Monte Carlo...... process. The objective is to minimize the mean square error of the estimate. We also consider maximization of the likelihood that the estimate be confined within a bounded symmetric region of the true parameter. The optimal distribution for the components of the simultaneous perturbation vector is found...

  13. Auditory and visual connectivity gradients in frontoparietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Rodrigo M; Hellyer, Peter J; Wise, Richard J S; Leech, Robert

    2017-01-01

    A frontoparietal network of brain regions is often implicated in both auditory and visual information processing. Although it is possible that the same set of multimodal regions subserves both modalities, there is increasing evidence that there is a differentiation of sensory function within frontoparietal cortex. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans was used to investigate whether different frontoparietal regions showed intrinsic biases in connectivity with visual or auditory modalities. Structural connectivity was assessed with diffusion tractography and functional connectivity was tested using functional MRI. A dorsal-ventral gradient of function was observed, where connectivity with visual cortex dominates dorsal frontal and parietal connections, while connectivity with auditory cortex dominates ventral frontal and parietal regions. A gradient was also observed along the posterior-anterior axis, although in opposite directions in prefrontal and parietal cortices. The results suggest that the location of neural activity within frontoparietal cortex may be influenced by these intrinsic biases toward visual and auditory processing. Thus, the location of activity in frontoparietal cortex may be influenced as much by stimulus modality as the cognitive demands of a task. It was concluded that stimulus modality was spatially encoded throughout frontal and parietal cortices, and was speculated that such an arrangement allows for top-down modulation of modality-specific information to occur within higher-order cortex. This could provide a potentially faster and more efficient pathway by which top-down selection between sensory modalities could occur, by constraining modulations to within frontal and parietal regions, rather than long-range connections to sensory cortices. Hum Brain Mapp 38:255-270, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Temperature Gradient Driven Lasing and Stimulated Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandner, K.; Ritsch, H.

    2012-11-01

    A laser can be understood as a thermodynamic engine converting heat to a coherent single mode field close to Carnot efficiency. To achieve lasing, spectral shaping of the excitation light is used to generate a higher effective temperature on the pump than on the gain transition. Here, using a toy model of a quantum well structure with two suitably designed tunnel-coupled wells kept at different temperatures, we predict that lasing can also occur on an actual spatial temperature gradient between the pump and gain regions. Gain and narrow band laser emission require a sufficiently large temperature gradient and resonator quality. Lasing appears concurrent with amplified heat flow between the reservoirs and points to a new form of stimulated solid state cooling. In addition, such a mechanism could reduce intrinsic heating and thus extend the operating regime of quantum cascade lasers by substituting phonon emission driven injection by a phonon absorption step.

  15. Colloidal attraction induced by a temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leonardo, R; Ianni, F; Ruocco, G

    2009-04-21

    Colloidal crystals are of extreme importance for applied research and for fundamental studies in statistical mechanics. Long-range attractive interactions, such as capillary forces, can drive the spontaneous assembly of such mesoscopic ordered structures. However, long-range attractive forces are very rare in the colloidal realm. Here we report a novel strong, long-ranged attraction induced by a thermal gradient in the presence of a wall. By switching the thermal gradient on and off, we can rapidly and reversibly form stable hexagonal 2D crystals. We show that the observed attraction is hydrodynamic in nature and arises from thermally induced slip flow on particle surfaces. We used optical tweezers to measure the force law directly and compare it to an analytical prediction based on Stokes flow driven by Marangoni-like forces.

  16. Gradient effects on the fracture of inhomogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Terrence Lee [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) have a spatial variation in physical properties that can be tailored to meet the needs of a specific application and/or to minimize internal stresses arising from thermal and elastic mismatch. Modeling these materials as inhomogeneous continua allows assessment of the role of the gradient without requiring detailed knowledge of the microstructure. Motivated by the relative difficulty of obtaining analytical solutions to boundary value problems for FGMs, an accurate finite-element code is developed for obtaining numerical planar and axisymmetric linear thermoelastic solutions. In addition an approximate analytical technique for mapping homogeneous-modulus solutions to those for FGMs is assessed and classes of problems to which it applies accurately are identified. The fracture mechanics analysis of FGMs can be characterized by the classic stress intensities, KI and KII, but there has been scarce progress in understanding the role of the modulus gradient in determining fracture initiation and propagation. To address this question, a statistical fracture model is used to correlate near-tip stresses with brittle fracture initiation behavior. This describes the behavior of a material experiencing fracture initiation away from the crack tip. Widely dispersed zones of fracture initiation sites are expected. Finite-length kinks are analyzed to describe the crack path for continuous crack growth. For kink lengths much shorter than the gradient dimension, a parallel stress term describes the deviation of the kinking angle from that for homogeneous materials. For longer kinks there is a divergence of the kink angle predicted by the maximum energy release rate and the pure opening mode criteria.

  17. CERN/KEK: Very high accelerating gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: A world-wide effort is under way to develop linear electron-positron colliders so that physics experiments can be extended into a range of energies where circular machines (necessarily much larger than CERN's 27-kilometre LEP machine) would be crippled by synchrotron radiation. CERN is studying the feasibility of building a 2 TeV machine called CLIC powered not by individual klystrons, but by a high intensity electron 'drive' linac running parallel to the main linac (November 1990, page 7). This drive linac will itself be powered by similar superconducting cavities to those developed for LEP. A high gradient is an obvious design aim for any future high energy linear collider because it makes it shorter and therefore cheaper - the design figure for the CLIC machine is 80 MV/m. The CLIC study group has taken a significant step forward in demonstrating the technical feasibility of their machine by achieving peak and average accelerating gradients of 137 MV/m and 84 MV/m respectively in a short section of accelerating structure during high gradient tests at the Japanese KEK Laboratory last year. This result obtained within the framework of a CERN/KEK collaboration on linear colliders was obtained using a 20-cell accelerating section built at CERN using state-of the- art technology which served both as a model for CLIC studies as well as a prototype for the Japanese Linear Collider studies. The operating frequency of the model accelerating section is 2.6 times lower than the CLIC frequency but was chosen because a high power r.f. source and pulse compression scheme has been developed for this frequency at KEK. Testing CLIC models at 11.4 GHz is however more stringent than at 30 GHz because the chance of electrical breakdown increases as the frequency is lowered. This recent result clearly demonstrates that a gradient of 80 MV/m is feasible

  18. Advanced concepts for high-gradient acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittum, D.H.

    1998-08-01

    The promise of high-gradient accelerator research is a future for physics beyond the 5-TeV energy scale. Looking beyond what can be engineered today, the authors examine basic research directions for colliders of the future, from mm-waves to lasers, and from solid-state to plasmas, with attention to material damage, beam-dynamics, a workable collision scheme, and energetics.

  19. Quantized Concentration Gradient in Picoliter Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jong Wook

    2010-10-01

    Generation of concentration gradient is of paramount importance in the success of reactions for cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, drug-discovery, chemotaxis, cell culture, biomaterials synthesis, and tissue engineering. In conventional method of conducting reactions, the concentration gradients is achieved by using pipettes, test tubes, 96-well assay plates, and robotic systems. Conventional methods require milliliter or microliter volumes of samples for typical experiments with multiple and sequential reactions. It is a challenge to carry out experiments with precious samples that have strict limitations with the amount of samples or the price to pay for the amount. In order to overcome this challenge faced by the conventional methods, fluidic devices with micrometer scale channels have been developed. These devices, however, cause restrictions on changing the concentration due to the fixed gradient set based on fixed fluidic channels.ootnotetextJambovane, S.; Duin, E. C.; Kim, S-K.; Hong, J. W., Determination of Kinetic Parameters, KM and kcat, with a Single Experiment on a Chip. textitAnalytical Chemistry, 81, (9), 3239-3245, 2009.^,ootnotetextJambovane, S.; Hong, J. W., Lorenz-like Chatotic System on a Chip In The 14th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (MicroTAS), The Netherlands, October, 2010. Here, we present a unique microfluidic system that can generate quantized concentration gradient by using series of droplets generated by a mechanical valve based injection method.ootnotetextJambovane, S.; Rho, H.; Hong, J., Fluidic Circuit based Predictive Model of Microdroplet Generation through Mechanical Cutting. In ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, USA, October, 2009.^,ootnotetextLee, W.; Jambovane, S.; Kim, D.; Hong, J., Predictive Model on Micro Droplet Generation through Mechanical Cutting. Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, 7, (3), 431-438, 2009

  20. Designing optimal nanofocusing with a gradient hyperlens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lian; Prokopeva, Ludmila J.; Chen, Hongsheng; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2017-11-01

    We report the design of a high-throughput gradient hyperbolic lenslet built with real-life materials and capable of focusing a beam into a deep sub-wavelength spot of λ/23. This efficient design is achieved through high-order transformation optics and circular effective-medium theory (CEMT), which are used to engineer the radially varying anisotropic artificial material based on the thin alternating cylindrical metal and dielectric layers. The radial gradient of the effective anisotropic optical constants allows for matching the impedances at the input and output interfaces, drastically improving the throughput of the lenslet. However, it is the use of the zeroth-order CEMT that enables the practical realization of a gradient hyperlens with realistic materials. To illustrate the importance of using the CEMT versus the conventional planar effective-medium theory (PEMT) for cylindrical anisotropic systems, such as our hyperlens, both the CEMT and PEMT are adopted to design gradient hyperlenses with the same materials and order of elemental layers. The CEMT- and PEMT-based designs show similar performance if the number of metal-dielectric binary layers is sufficiently large (9+ pairs) and if the layers are sufficiently thin. However, for the manufacturable lenses with realistic numbers of layers (e.g. five pairs) and thicknesses, the performance of the CEMT design continues to be practical, whereas the PEMT-based design stops working altogether. The accurate design of transformation optics-based layered cylindrical devices enabled by CEMT allow for a new class of robustly manufacturable nanophotonic systems, even with relatively thick layers of real-life materials.