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Sample records for metal toxins nmr

  1. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opella, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    'The overall goal of the research is to apply the methods of structural biology, which have been previously used primarily in biomedical applications, to bioremediation. The authors are doing this by using NMR spectroscopy to determine the structures of proteins involved in the bacterial mercury detoxification system. The research is based on the premise that the proteins encoded in the genes of the bacterial detoxification system are an untapped source of reagents and, more fundamentally, chemical strategies that can be used to remove heavy metal toxins from the environment. The initial goals are to determine the structures of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification systems responsible for the sequestration and transport of the Hg(II) ions in to the cell where reduction to Hg(O) occurs. These proteins are meP, which is water soluble and can be investigated with multidimensional solution NMR methods, and merT, the transport protein in the membrane that requires solid-state NMR methods. As of June 1998, this report summarizes work after about one and half years of the three-year award. The authors have made significant accomplishments in three aspects of the NMR studies of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification system.'

  2. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opella, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    'There are enormous amounts of heavy metals in the environment, much of it in the form of organometallic compounds resulting from various types of industrial and military waste. Nearly all of these metals and compounds are highly toxic to biological organisms including humans. However, some bacteria thrive in the presence of high concentrations of heavy metal toxins because they possess efficient mechanisms for the detoxification of these metals and compounds. Heavy metals appear to be universally toxic because of their non-selective chemistry, for example Hg(II) reacts with essentially all exposed sulfhydryl groups on proteins, thus, it may seem surprising that any organism at all can survive these chemical insults much less those that grow in a toxic milieu. However, the prebiotic environment was undoubtedly heavily polluted with heavy metals from geological processes, and the most primitive organisms simply had to evolve mechanisms for dealing with them if they were going to be able to utilize Cys, His, and the other amino acids that contribute to metal binding sites in their proteins. Genes associated with bacterial resistance to Ag, AsO 2 , AsO 4 , Bi, Cd, Co, CrO 4 , Cu, Hg, iNi, TeO 3 , TI, Pb, Zn, and other metals of environmental concern have been described (Silver, 1992; Silver and Walderhaug, 1995).'

  3. Hydrogen-bonding interactions in T-2 toxin studied using solution and solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Praveen; Shank, Roxanne A; Montina, Tony; Goettel, James T; Foroud, Nora A; Hazendonk, Paul; Eudes, François

    2011-10-01

    The structure of T-2 toxin in the solid-state is limited to X-ray crystallographic studies, which lack sufficient resolution to provide direct evidence for hydrogen-bonding interactions. Furthermore, its solution-structure, despite extensive Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies, has provided little insight into its hydrogen-bonding behavior, thus far. Hydrogen-bonding interactions are often an important part of biological activity. In order to study these interactions, the structure of T-2 toxin was compared in both the solution- and solid-state using NMR Spectroscopy. It was determined that the solution- and solid-state structure differ dramatically, as indicated by differences in their carbon chemical shifts, these observations are further supported by solution proton spectral parameters and exchange behavior. The slow chemical exchange process and cross-relaxation dynamics with water observed between the hydroxyl hydrogen on C-3 and water supports the existence of a preferential hydrogen bonding interaction on the opposite side of the molecule from the epoxide ring, which is known to be essential for trichothecene toxicity. This result implies that these hydrogen-bonding interactions could play an important role in the biological function of T-2 toxin and posits towards a possible interaction for the trichothecene class of toxins and the ribosome. These findings clearly illustrate the importance of utilizing solid-state NMR for the study of biological compounds, and suggest that a more detailed study of this whole class of toxins, namely trichothecenes, should be pursued using this methodology.

  4. Protolytic properties of polyamine wasp toxin analogues studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Piazzi, Lorna; Olsen, Christian A

    2006-01-01

    Acid-base properties of the natural polyamine wasp toxin PhTX-433 (1) and seven synthetic analogues [PhTX-343 (2), PhTX-334 (3), PhTX-443 (4), PhTX-434 (5), PhTX-344 (6), PhTX-444 (7), and PhTX-333 (8)], each having four protolytic sites, were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Nonlinear, mul...

  5. Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions in T-2 Toxin Studied Using Solution and Solid-State NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Hazendonk

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The structure of T-2 toxin in the solid-state is limited to X-ray crystallographic studies, which lack sufficient resolution to provide direct evidence for hydrogen-bonding interactions. Furthermore, its solution-structure, despite extensive Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR studies, has provided little insight into its hydrogen-bonding behavior, thus far. Hydrogen-bonding interactions are often an important part of biological activity. In order to study these interactions, the structure of T-2 toxin was compared in both the solution- and solid-state using NMR Spectroscopy. It was determined that the solution- and solid-state structure differ dramatically, as indicated by differences in their carbon chemical shifts, these observations are further supported by solution proton spectral parameters and exchange behavior. The slow chemical exchange process and cross-relaxation dynamics with water observed between the hydroxyl hydrogen on C-3 and water supports the existence of a preferential hydrogen bonding interaction on the opposite side of the molecule from the epoxide ring, which is known to be essential for trichothecene toxicity. This result implies that these hydrogen-bonding interactions could play an important role in the biological function of T-2 toxin and posits towards a possible interaction for the trichothecene class of toxins and the ribosome. These findings clearly illustrate the importance of utilizing solid-state NMR for the study of biological compounds, and suggest that a more detailed study of this whole class of toxins, namely trichothecenes, should be pursued using this methodology.

  6. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-01-01

    119 Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown

  7. Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxins are substances created by plants and animals that are poisonous to humans. Toxins also include some medicines that are helpful in small doses, but poisonous in large amounts. Most toxins that cause problems ...

  8. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors.

  9. NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneeland, J.B.; Lee, B.C.P.; Whalen, J.P.; Knowles, R.J.R.; Cahill, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    Although still quite new, NMR imaging has already emerged as a safe, noninvasive, painless, and effective diagnostic modality requiring no ionizing radiation. Also, NMR appears already to have established itself as the method of choice for the examination of the brain spinal cord (excluding herniated disks). Another area in which NMR excels is in the examination of the pelvis. The use of surface coils offers the promise of visualizing structures with resolution unobtainable by any other means. In addition, NMR, with its superb visualization of vascular structures and potential ability to measure flow, may soon revolutionize the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Finally, NMR, through biochemically and physiologically based T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ indices or through spectroscopy, may provide a means of monitoring therapeutic response so as to permit tailoring of treatment to the individual patient. In short, NMR is today probably at the same stage as the x-ray was in Roentgen's day

  10. Studies of metal-biomolecule systems in liquids with beta-detected NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Michal

    2017-01-01

    My internship took place within a small research team funded via the European Research Council (ERC Starting Grant: Beta-Drop NMR) at ISOLDE. It was devoted to laser spin-polarization and beta-detected NMR techniques and their future applications in chemistry and biology. I was involved in the design and tests of the beta-NMR spectrometer which will be used in the upcoming experiments. In this way I have been exposed to many topics in physics (atomic and nuclear physics), experimental techniques (vacuum technology, lasers, beta detectors, electronics, DAQ software), as well as chemistry and biology (NMR on metal ions, metal ion binding to biomolecules, quantum chemistry calculations).

  11. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins include the closely related tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) toxins. Botulinum toxin is used to treat severe muscle disorders and as a cosmetic wrinkle reducer. Large quantities of botulinum toxin have also been produced by terrorists for use as a biological weapon. Because there are no known antidotes for these toxins, they thus pose a potential threat to human health whether by an accidental overdose or by a hostile deployment. Thus, the discovery of high specificity and affinity compounds that can inhibit their binding to neural cells can be used as antidotes or in the design of chemical detectors. Using the crystal structure of the C fragment of the tetanus toxin (TetC), which is the cell recognition and cell surface binding domain, and the computational program DOCK, sets of small molecules have been predicted to bind to two different sites located on the surface of this protein. While Site-1 is common to the TeNT and BoNTs, Site-2 is unique to TeNT. Pairs of these molecules from each site can then be linked together synthetically to thereby increase the specificity and affinity for this toxin. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy was used to experimentally screen each compound for binding. Mixtures containing binders were further screened for activity under biologically relevant conditions using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The screening of mixtures of compounds offers increased efficiency and throughput as compared to testing single compounds and can also evaluate how possible structural changes induced by the binding of one ligand can influence the binding of the second ligand. In addition, competitive binding experiments with mixtures containing ligands predicted to bind the same site could identify the best binder for that site. NMR transfer nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) confirm that TetC binds doxorubicin but that this molecule is displaced by N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) in a mixture that

  12. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins include the closely related tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) toxins. Botulinum toxin is used to treat severe muscle disorders and as a cosmetic wrinkle reducer. Large quantities of botulinum toxin have also been produced by terrorists for use as a biological weapon. Because there are no known antidotes for these toxins, they thus pose a potential threat to human health whether by an accidental overdose or by a hostile deployment. Thus, the discovery of high specificity and affinity compounds that can inhibit their binding to neural cells can be used as antidotes or in the design of chemical detectors. Using the crystal structure of the C fragment of the tetanus toxin (TetC), which is the cell recognition and cell surface binding domain, and the computational program DOCK, sets of small molecules have been predicted to bind to two different sites located on the surface of this protein. While Site-1 is common to the TeNT and BoNTs, Site-2 is unique to TeNT. Pairs of these molecules from each site can then be linked together synthetically to thereby increase the specificity and affinity for this toxin. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy was used to experimentally screen each compound for binding. Mixtures containing binders were further screened for activity under biologically relevant conditions using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The screening of mixtures of compounds offers increased efficiency and throughput as compared to testing single compounds and can also evaluate how possible structural changes induced by the binding of one ligand can influence the binding of the second ligand. In addition, competitive binding experiments with mixtures containing ligands predicted to bind the same site could identify the best binder for that site. NMR transfer nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) confirm that TetC binds doxorubicin but that this molecule is displaced by N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) in a mixture that

  13. In situ NMR measurement of macromolecule-bound metal ion concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlyuk, Natalia; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Lupták, Andrej; Martin, Rachel W

    2016-04-01

    Many nucleic acids and proteins require divalent metal ions such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) for folding and function. The lipophilic alignment media frequently used as membrane mimetics also bind these divalent metals. Here we demonstrate the use of (31)P NMR spectrum of a metal ion chelator (deoxycytidine diphosphate) to measure the bound [Mg(2+)] and [Ca(2+)] in situ for several biological model systems at relatively high divalent ion concentrations (1-10 mM). This method represents a general approach to measuring divalent metal ion binding in NMR samples where the amount and type of metal ion added to the system is known.

  14. Solid State NMR Characterization of Complex Metal Hydrides systems for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son-Jong Hwang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid state NMR is widely applied in studies of solid state chemistries for hydrogen storage reactions. Use of 11B MAS NMR in studies of metal borohydrides (BH4 is mainly focused, revisiting the issue of dodecaborane formation and observation of 11B{1H} Nuclear Overhauser Effect.

  15. NMR resonance assignments of NarE, a putative ADP-ribosylating toxin from Neisseria meningitidis

    OpenAIRE

    Carlier, Ludovic; Koehler, Christian; Veggi, Daniele; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Soriani, Marco; Boelens, Rolf; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2010-01-01

    NarE is a 16 kDa protein identified from Neisseria meningitidis, one of the bacterial pathogens responsible for meningitis. NarE belongs to the ADP-ribosyltransferase family and catalyses the transfer of ADP-ribose moieties to arginine residues in target protein acceptors. Many pathogenic bacteria utilize ADP-ribosylating toxins to modify and alter essential functions of eukaryotic cells. NarE was proposed to bind iron through a Fe–S center which is supposed to be implied in catalysis. We hav...

  16. Fluorescence quenching dynamics and mechanism of cry1ab toxin from bacillus thuringiensis by different metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction dynamics of Cry1Ab toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis with sodium, calcium and lead ions was studied by fluorescence quenching technique. Gradual quenching was observed by titration of Cry1Ab toxin with metal ions (Na+, Ca/sup 2+/ or Pb/sup 2+/). The quenched strength of these ions in the descending order was: lead ion > calcium ion > sodium ion. The quenching equilibrium of Cry1Ab toxin by metal ions reached within 60 min, and the quenching dynamics of Cry1Ab toxin could be expressed by the Elovich model. The toxin concentration, pH and temperature had influence on the quenching dynamics. The interaction between Cry1Ab toxin and metal ions is based on static quenching mechanism. (author)

  17. Identification of the okadaic acid-based toxin profile of a marine dinoflagellate strain Prorocentrum lima by LC-MS/MS and NMR spectroscopic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Li, Minyi; Pan, Jianyu; Liang, Jilin; Zhou, Yuan; Wu, Jun

    2012-04-01

    The marine dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima can produce toxins of okadaic acid and its congeners, which are mainly responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning syndrome. Since 1990s, cells of P. lima have been reported as epiphytes to seaweeds distributed along the coast of Hainan Island. However, its toxin profile has not hitherto been investigated. We report herein the first description and unequivocal evidence of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxin production in a cultured strain of P. lima isolated from the coast of Sanya, Hainan Island. Okadaic acid and its two longest diol esters, viz. okadaic acid-D10a and okadaic acid-D10b, have been characterized as the main diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxin congeners of this strain by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopic data. Okadaic acid-D10a and okadaic acid-D10b are first identified by NMR spectroscopic data from the dinoflagellate P. lima. The simultaneous presence of okadaic acid-D10a and okadaic acid-D10b in P. lima enlarges the range of target molecules that must be considered in future diarrhetic shellfish poisoning monitoring programs of Hainan Island, China. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Theoretical NMR spectroscopy of N-heterocyclic carbenes and their metal complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Falivene, Laura

    2016-12-26

    Recent theoretical analysis of the NMR properties of free N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC) and Metal-NHC complexes has complemented experiments, allowing the establishment of structure/property relationships and the rationalization of otherwise surprising experimental results. In this review, the main conclusions from recent literature are discussed, with the aim to offer a vision of the potential of theoretical analyses of NMR properties.

  19. Metal ion toxins and brain aquaporin-4 expression: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eXimenes-Da-Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal ions such as iron, zinc, and manganese are essential to metabolic functions, protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and antioxidant neuroprotective mechanisms. Conversely, non-essential metals such as mercury and lead are sources of human intoxication due to occupational activities or environmental contamination. Essential or non-essential metal accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS results in changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability, as well as triggering microglia activation and astrocyte reactivity and changing water transport through the cells, which could result in brain swelling. Aquaporin-4 is the main water channel in the CNS, is expressed in astrocyte foot processes in brain capillaries and along the circumventricular epithelium in the ventricles, and has important physiological functions in maintaining brain osmotic homeostasis and supporting brain excitability through regulation of the extracellular space. Some evidence has pointed to a role of AQP4 during metal intoxication in the brain, where it may act in a dual form as a neuroprotector or a mediator of the development of oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes, resulting in brain swelling and neuronal damage. This mini-review presents the way some metal ions affect changes in AQP4 expression in the CNS and discuss the ways in which water transport in brain cells can be involved in brain damage.

  20. NMR Structures and Dynamics in a Prohead RNA Loop that Binds Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaobo; Park, Sun-Young; Tonelli, Marco; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Xia, Tianbing; Zhong, Dongping; Schroeder, Susan J

    2016-10-06

    Metal ions are critical for RNA structure and enzymatic activity. We present the structure of an asymmetric RNA loop that binds metal ions and has an essential function in a bacteriophage packaging motor. Prohead RNA is a noncoding RNA that is required for genome packaging activity in phi29-like bacteriophage. The loops in GA1 and phi29 bacteriophage share a conserved adenine that forms a base triple, although the structural context for the base triple differs. NMR relaxation studies and femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy reveal the dynamic behavior of the loop in the metal ion bound and unbound forms. The mechanism of metal ion binding appears to be an induced conformational change between two dynamic ensembles rather than a conformational capture mechanism. These results provide experimental benchmarks for computational models of RNA-metal ion interactions.

  1. Mechanism of Metal Ion Activation of the Diphtheria Toxin Repressor DtxR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aquino,J.; Tetenbaum-Novatt, J.; White, A.; Berkovitch, F.; Ringe, D.

    2005-01-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is a metal ion-activated transcriptional regulator that has been linked to the virulence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Structure determination has shown that there are two metal ion binding sites per repressor monomer, and site-directed mutagenesis has demonstrated that binding site 2 (primary) is essential for recognition of the target DNA repressor, leaving the role of binding site 1 (ancillary) unclear. Calorimetric techniques have demonstrated that although binding site 1 (ancillary) has high affinity for metal ion with a binding constant of 2 x 10{sup -7}, binding site 2 (primary) is a low-affinity binding site with a binding constant of 6.3 x 10{sup -4}. These two binding sites act in an independent fashion, and their contribution can be easily dissected by traditional mutational analysis. Our results clearly demonstrate that binding site 1 (ancillary) is the first one to be occupied during metal ion activation, playing a critical role in stabilization of the repressor. In addition, structural data obtained for the mutants Ni-DtxR(H79A, C102D), reported here, and the previously reported DtxR(H79A) have allowed us to propose a mechanism of metal activation for DtxR.

  2. Solid NMR study of lithium ions accommodated in various transition metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzaki, Yasushi; Suzuki, Noriko

    2008-01-01

    Solid NMR was used to elucidate the lithium accommodation/extraction reaction in various transition metal oxides. The first study was the lithium ion exchange reaction of titanium antimonic acid (TiSbA). The effect of hydration on the selectivity of lithium ion in the solid phase was examined using 7 Li NMR. The second study was the irreversible ion exchange behavior of HNbO 3 . The selectivity for the lithium ion and the irreversible behavior were examined using 1 H and 7 Li NMR. The third study was the isotope separation between 6 Li and 7 Li in various inorganic ion exchangers. The high isotope separation coefficient was ascribed to the degree of dehydration during the ion exchange reaction. The degree of dehydration was examined by 1 H and 7 Li NMR studies. The last study was determining the mechanism of the lithium accommodation/extraction reaction of λ-MnO 2 in an aqueous solution. The different paths between the accommodation and extraction and the formation of MnO 4- during the accommodation were determined by chemical analysis. The Knight shift in the 7 Li MAS-NMR spectra of Li 0.5 MnO 2 suggested the localization of the electron density on the lithium nuclei. An XPS study also suggested the presence of an electron density on the lithium nuclei. A pH-independent redox couple was assumed to account for the accommodation/extraction reaction of lithium ions, such as Li(I)/Li(0). (author)

  3. Hierarchical Structure and Molecular Dynamics of Metal-Organic Framework as Characterized by Solid State NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic framework (MOF stands out as a promising material with great potential in application areas, such as gas separation and catalysis, due to its extraordinary properties. In order to fully characterize the structure of MOFs, especially those without single crystal, Solid State NMR (SSNMR is an indispensable tool. As a complimentary analytical technique to X-ray diffraction, SSNMR could provide detailed atomic level structure information. Meanwhile, SSNMR can characterize molecular dynamics over a wide dynamics range. In this review, selected applications of SSNMR on various MOFs are summarized and discussed.

  4. Towards Using NMR to Screen for Spoiled Tomatoes Stored in 1,000 L, Aseptically Sealed, Metal-Lined Totes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Pinter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy is used to track factory relevant tomato paste spoilage. It was found that spoilage in tomato paste test samples leads to longer spin lattice relaxation times T1 using a conventional low magnetic field NMR system. The increase in T1 value for contaminated samples over a five day room temperature exposure period prompted the work to be extended to the study of industry standard, 1,000 L, non-ferrous, metal-lined totes. NMR signals and T1 values were recovered from a large format container with a single-sided NMR sensor. The results of this work suggest that a handheld NMR device can be used to study tomato paste spoilage in factory process environments.

  5. Inositol phosphates from barley low-phytate grain mutants analysed by metal-dye detection HPLC and NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzack, F.; Hübel, F.; Zhang, W.

    2001-01-01

    Inositolphosphates from barley low-phytate grain mutants and their parent variety were analysed by metal-dye detection HPLC and NMR. Compound assignment was carried out by comparison of retention times using a chemical hydrolysate of phytate [Ins(1,2,3,4,5,6)P(6)] as a reference; Co...

  6. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmyreva, Anna A. [Center for Magnetic Resonance, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Safdari, Majid; Furó, István [Department of Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Dvinskikh, Sergey V., E-mail: sergeid@kth.se [Department of Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Laboratory of Biomolecular NMR, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-14

    Orders of magnitude decrease of {sup 207}Pb and {sup 199}Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T{sub 1} upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX{sub 2} (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(II) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T{sub 1} relative to that in a static sample is in PbI{sub 2}, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr{sub 2}, and not detectable in PbCl{sub 2}. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200–15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  7. On the use of atomistic simulations to aid bulk metallic glasses structural elucidation with solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ary R; Rino, José P

    2017-08-24

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) experimental 27 Al metallic shifts reported in the literature for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were revisited in the light of state-of-the-art atomistic simulations. In a consistent way, the Gauge-Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method was applied in conjunction with classical molecular dynamics (CMD). A series of Zr-Cu-Al alloys with low Al concentrations were selected as case study systems, for which realistic CMD derived structural models were used for a short- and medium-range order mining. That initial procedure allowed the detection of trends describing changes on the microstructure of the material upon Al alloying, which in turn were used to guide GIPAW calculations with a set of abstract systems in the context of ssNMR. With essential precision and accuracy, the ab initio simulations also yielded valuable trends from the electronic structure point of view, which enabled an overview of the bonding nature of Al-centered clusters as well as its influence on the experimental ssNMR outcomes. The approach described in this work might promote the use of ssNMR spectroscopy in research on glassy metals. Moreover, the results presented demonstrate the possibility to expand the applications of this technique, with deeper insight into nuclear interactions and less speculative assignments.

  8. Selective observation of the Cu(I)-amicyanin metal site by paramagnetic NMR on partially oxidised samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, Jesus; Kalverda, Arnout P.; Canters, Gerard W.

    1997-01-01

    The relaxation enhancement caused by paramagnetic copper(II) is used to observe selectively the metal site of copper(I)-amicyanin by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The paramagnetic effect is communicated to the diamagnetic protein through the electron self-exchange reaction in partially oxidised samples, and can be used for the selective detection of protons around the metal. Relaxation-selective NMR pulse sequences, like super-WEFT and WEFT-NOESY, are used to achieve the desired selection of the signals. The spectra obtained show well-resolved signals corresponding to protons within a radius of∼7 A from the metal, including almost all protons from the coordinated residues. A significant increase in resolution as well as selection of the most relevant part of the protein (close to the active centre) are the principal advantages of this technique, which can be used to obtain specific information about the metal site in blue copper proteins, to assist in the assignment of their NMR spectra and to determine functional properties like the electron self-exchange rate

  9. Experimental Determination of pK[subscript a] Values and Metal Binding for Biomolecular Compounds Using [superscript 31]P NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Mason A.; Tubergen, Philip J.; Tatko, Chad D.; Baker, Rachael A.

    2018-01-01

    This lab experiment uses [superscript 31]P NMR spectroscopy of biomolecules to determine pK[subscript a] values and the binding energies of metal/biomolecule complexes. Solutions of adenosine nucleotides are prepared, and a series of [superscript 31]P NMR spectra are collected as a function of pH and in the absence and presence of magnesium or…

  10. 1H NMR spectroscopic analysis detects metabolic disturbances in rat urine on acute exposure to heavy metal tungsten alloy based metals salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ritu; Rana, Poonam; Gupta, Mamta; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Srivastava, Shatakshi; Roy, Raja; Khushu, Subash

    2014-03-25

    Heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) have been found to be safer alternatives for making military munitions. Recently, some studies demonstrating the toxic potential of HMTAs have raised concern over the safety issues, and further propose that HMTAs exposure may lead to physiological disturbances as well. To look for the systemic effect of acute toxicity of HMTA based metals salt, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopic profiling of rat urine was carried out. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered (intraperitoneal) low and high dose of mixture of HMTA based metals salt and NMR spectroscopy was carried out in urine samples collected at 8, 24, 72 and 120 h post dosing (p.d.). Serum biochemical parameters and liver histopathology were also conducted. The (1)H NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate analysis techniques to show the time- and dose-dependent biochemical variations in post HMTA based metals salt exposure. Urine metabolomic analysis showed changes associated with energy metabolism, amino acids, N-methyl nicotinamide, membrane and gut flora metabolites. Multivariate analysis showed maximum variation with best classification of control and treated groups at 24h p.d. At the end of the study, for the low dose group most of the changes at metabolite level reverted to control except for the energy metabolites; whereas, in the high dose group some of the changes still persisted. The observations were well correlated with histopathological and serum biochemical parameters. Further, metabolic pathway analysis clarified that amongst all the metabolic pathways analysed, tricarboxylic acid cycle was most affected at all the time points indicating a switchover in energy metabolism from aerobic to anaerobic. These results suggest that exposure of rats to acute doses of HMTA based metals salt disrupts physiological metabolism with moderate injury to the liver, which might indirectly result from heavy metals induced oxidative stress. Copyright

  11. Unexpected crystallization patterns of zinc boron imidazolate framework ZBIF-1: NMR crystallography of integrated metal-organic frameworks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kobera, Libor; Rohlíček, Jan; Czernek, Jiří; Abbrent, Sabina; Strečková, M.; Sopčák, T.; Brus, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 24 (2017), s. 3576-3582 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-04109S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-13778S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : density functional calculations * metal-organic frameworks * NMR spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Physical chemistry (FZU-D) Impact factor: 3.075, year: 2016

  12. 1H-NMR spectroscopic investigation of reversed micellization in metal/organophosphorous surfactant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaonkar, A.G.; Neuman, R.D.; Garver, T.M. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Evidence for the formation of reversed micellar aggregates in the extraction system di(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP)/benzene/0.05 mol dm -3 CaCl 2 was obtained from proton magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR) spectroscopy. 1 H-NMR measurements indicate that the critical reversed micellar concentration is 6-11x10 -3 F and that the equilibrium constant for reversed micellization is 2.4x10 12 (mol/l) -5.6 . The interfacial tension, equilibrium calcium distribution coefficient and apparent molecular weight of the species in the equilibrated organic phase were also determined and are compared to the 1 H-NMR results. 21 refs.; 5 figs

  13. Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC)/NMR spectroscopic properties and dynamics of compounds containing metal ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcisauskaité, Vaida

    in proteins: • ZORA-4/BH&H for 199mHg PAC spectroscopic properties, • ZORA/BH&HLYP for 199Hg NMR spectroscopic properties. By using these methods we further examined in Section 6.5 the influence of the immediate crystal environment on these spectroscopic properties and concluded that it does matter, in some......199mHg PAC and 199Hg NMR spectroscopic properties, nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, Q, asymmetry parameters, , and chemical shifts, , respectively, are the fingerprint of the local molecular and electronic structure, at the probed Hg nuclei. For this reason, these spectroscopic techniques...... have been used to elucidate Hg coordination in proteins. Computational chemistry calculations have a potential to contribute to the interpretation of this spectroscopic data, as calculated diagonalised electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components (jVzzj jVyyj jVxxj) and NMR shielding constants...

  14. Stool C difficile toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toxin; Colitis - toxin; Pseudomembranous - toxin; Necrotizing colitis - toxin; C difficile - toxin ... be analyzed. There are several ways to detect C difficile toxin in the stool sample. Enzyme immunoassay ( ...

  15. Self-Assembly, Guest Capture, and NMR Spectroscopy of a Metal-Organic Cage in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Eun Bin; Srisuknimit, Veerasak; Cheng, Stephanie L.; Vosburg, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A green organic-inorganic laboratory experiment has been developed in which students prepare a self-assembling iron cage in D[subscript 2]O at room temperature. The tetrahedral cage captures a small, neutral molecule such as cyclohexane or tetrahydrofuran. [Superscript 1]H NMR analysis distinguishes captured and free guests through diagnostic…

  16. Development of protein based bioremediation and drugs for heavy metal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2001-09-18

    Structural studies were performed on several proteins of the bacterial detoxification system. These proteins are responsible for binding (MerP) and transport of heavy metals, including mercury, across membranes. The structural information obtained from NMR experiments provides insight into the selectivity and sequestration processes towards heavy metal toxins.

  17. Antibodies against a peptide of cholera toxin differing in cross-reactivity with the toxin differ in their specific interactions with the peptide as observed by sup 1 H NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglister, J.; Zilber, B. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1990-01-30

    The interactions between the aromatic residues of the monoclonal antibody TE34, and its peptide antigen CTP3, have been studied by 2D TRNOE difference spectroscopy. The sequence of CTP3 corresponds to residues 50-64 of the B subunit of cholera toxin (VEVPGSQHIDSQKKA). Unlike two previously studied anti-CTP3 antibodies (TE32 and TE33), the TE34 antibody does not bind the toxin. The off-rate of CTP3 from TE34 was found to be too slow to measure strong TRNOE cross-peaks between the antibody and the peptide. Much faster off-rates, resulting in a strong TRNOE, were obtained for two peptide analogues: (a) CTP3 with an amide in the C-terminus (VEVPGSQHIDSQKKA-NH{sub 2}) and (b) a truncated version of the peptide (N-acetyl-IDSQKKA). These modifications do not interfere significantly either with the interactions of the unmodified part of the peptide with the antibody or with intramolecular interactions occurring in the epitope recognized by the antibody. The combined use of these peptides allows us to study the interactions between the antibody and the whole peptide. Two tyrosine residues and one or more tryptophan and phenylalanine residues have been found to interact with histidine-8, isoleucine-9, aspartate-10, lysine-13 and/or lysine-14, and alanine-15 of the peptide. The strong interaction of TE34 with the negatively charged C-terminus of CTP3 is one of the main reasons for its lack of cross-reactivity with the native toxin. Similar use of modified peptides may extend the applicability of 2D TRNOE difference spectroscopy to the study of other antibody-peptide complexes involving slow peptide off-rates.

  18. Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC)/NMR spectroscopic properties and dynamics of compounds containing metal ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcisauskaité, Vaida

    199mHg PAC and 199Hg NMR spectroscopic properties, nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, Q, asymmetry parameters, , and chemical shifts, , respectively, are the fingerprint of the local molecular and electronic structure, at the probed Hg nuclei. For this reason, these spectroscopic techniques...... computationally demanding Coupled Cluster results. We also determined to what degree the computationally cheaper approximate relativistic methods ZORA(-4) and SR-ZORA-4 at the DFT level can reproduce fully-relativistic results. As a result, we proposed reliable computational methods applicable to Hg binding sites...

  19. Probing Interactions of N-Donor Molecules with Open Metal Sites within Paramagnetic Cr-MIL-101: A Solid-State NMR Spectroscopic and Density Functional Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Thomas; Mondal, Arobendo; Tschense, Carsten B L; Wittmann, Johannes J; Klimm, Ottokar; Siegel, Renée; Corzilius, Björn; Weber, Birgit; Kaupp, Martin; Senker, Juergen

    2018-02-14

    Understanding host-guest interactions is one of the key requirements for adjusting properties in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In particular, systems with coordinatively unsaturated Lewis acidic metal sites feature highly selective adsorption processes. This is attributed to strong interactions with Lewis basic guest molecules. Here we show that a combination of 13 C MAS NMR spectroscopy with state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations allows one to unravel the interactions of water, 2-aminopyridine, 3-aminopyridine, and diethylamine with the open metal sites in Cr-MIL-101. The 13 C MAS NMR spectra, obtained with ultrafast magic-angle spinning, are well resolved, with resonances distributed over 1000 ppm. They present a clear signature for each guest at the open metal sites. Based on competition experiments this leads to the following binding preference: water open metal sites, the NMR data offer additional information about the guest and framework dynamics. We expect that our strategy has the potential for probing the binding situation of adsorbate mixtures at the open metal sites of MOFs in general and thus accesses the microscopic interaction mechanisms for this important material class, which is essential for deriving structure-property relationships.

  20. NMR and IR spectroscopic examination of the hydrolytic stability of organic ligands in metal alkoxide complexes and of oxygen bridged heterometal bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Hoebbel, Dagobert; Reinert, Thomas; Schmidt, Helmut K.

    1996-01-01

    IR and 13C NMR investigations of the hydrolytic stabilites of the saturated and unsaturated beta-keto ligands acetylacetone (ACAC), ethylacetoacetate (EAA), allylacetoacetate (AAA), methacryloxyethyl-acetoacetate (MEAA) of the Al-, Ti- and Zr-butoxide complexes show a strong dependence on the type of the metal alkoxide and the structure of the organic ligands. The hydrolytic stabilities of the ligands decrease in the order Al-Zr-Ti-alkoxide and ACAC>AAA>EAA>=MEAA. Sol-gel reactions of complex...

  1. Structure, solvent, and relativistic effects on the NMR chemical shifts in square-planar transition-metal complexes: assessment of DFT approaches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vícha, J.; Novotný, J.; Straka, Michal; Repisky, M.; Ruud, K.; Komorovsky, S.; Marek, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 38 (2015), s. 24944-24955 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR chemical shifts * transition metal complexes * relativistic effects * method calibration Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/cp/c5cp04214c

  2. Assessment of clam ruditapes philippinarum as Heavy metal bioindicators using NMR-based metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Linbao; You, Liping [Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, CAS, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai (China); The Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Junbao; Cong, Ming; Wang, Qing; Li, Fei; Li, Lianzhen; Zhao, Jianmin; Li, Chenghua; Wu, Huifeng [Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, CAS, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai (China)

    2011-08-15

    There are mainly distributed three pedigrees (White, Liangdao Red, and Zebra) of Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum in Yantai population along the Bohai marine and coast. However, the biological differences to environmental stressors have been ignored in toxicology studies, which could lead to the distortion of biological interpretations of toxicological effects induced by environmental contaminants. In this study, we applied a system biology approach, metabolomics to compare the metabolic profiles in digestive gland from three pedigrees of clam and characterize and compare the metabolic responses induced by mercury in clam digestive gland tissues to determine a sensitive pedigree of clam as a preferable bioindicator for metal pollution monitoring and toxicology research. The most abundant metabolites, respectively, included branched-chain amino acids, alanine, and arginine in White samples, glutamate, dimethylglycine, and glycine in Zebra clams and acetylcholine, betaine, glucose, and glycogen in Liangdao Red clams. After 48 h exposure of 20 {mu}g L{sup -1} Hg{sup 2+}, the metabolic profiles from the three pedigrees of clams showed differentially significant changes in alanine, glutamate, succinate, taurine, hypotaurine, glycine, arginine, glucose, etc. Our findings indicate the toxicological effects of mercury exposure in Manila clams including the neurotoxicity, disturbances in energetic metabolisms and osmoregulation in the digestive glands and suggest that Liangdao Red pedigree of clam could be a preferable bioindicator for the metal pollution monitoring based on the more sensitive classes of metabolic changes from digestive glands compared with other two (White and Zebra) pedigrees of clams. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Polyamine toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Jensen, Lars S; Vogensen, Stine B

    2005-01-01

    Polyamine toxins, isolated from spiders and wasps, have been used as pharmacological tools for the study of ionotropic receptors, but their use have so far been hampered by their lack of selectivity. In this mini-review, we describe how careful synthetic modification of native polyamine toxins ha...

  4. Extraction and sensitive detection of toxins A and B from the human pathogen Clostridium difficile in 40 seconds using microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovleen Tina Joshi

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of antibiotic associated diarrhea in humans and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Thus the rapid and accurate identification of this pathogen in clinical samples, such as feces, is a key step in reducing the devastating impact of this disease. The bacterium produces two toxins, A and B, which are thought to be responsible for the majority of the pathology associated with the disease, although the relative contribution of each is currently a subject of debate. For this reason we have developed a rapid detection assay based on microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence which is capable of detecting the presence of 10 bacteria in unprocessed human feces within 40 seconds. These promising results suggest that this prototype biosensor has the potential to be developed into a rapid, point of care, real time diagnostic assay for C. difficile.

  5. 31P NMR probes of chemical dynamics: paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of the (1)H and (31)P NMR resonances of methyl phosphite and methylethyl phosphate anions by selected metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, J S; Hoogstraten, C G; Britt, R D; Base, K; Shaw, B R; Ribeiro, A A; Crumbliss, A L

    2001-12-17

    Methyl phosphite ((CH(3)O)P(H)(O)(2)(-); MeOPH) and methylethyl phosphate ((CH(3)O)P(OCH(2)CH(3))(O)(2)(-); MEP) are two members of a class of anionic ligands whose (31)P T(2) relaxation rates are remarkably sensitive to paramagnetic metal ions. The temperature dependence of the (31)P NMR line broadenings caused by the Mn(H(2)O)(6)(2+) ion and a water-soluble manganese(III) porphyrin (Mn(III)TMPyP(5+)) indicates that the extent of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement is a measure of the rate at which the anionic probes come into physical contact with the paramagnetic center (i.e., enter the inner coordination shell); that is, piDeltanu(par) = k(assn)[M], where Deltanu(par) is the difference between the line widths of the resonance in paramagnetic and diamagnetic solutions, and k(assn) is the second-order rate constant for association of the phosphorus ligand with the metal, M. Comparison of the (31)P T(1) and T(2) relaxation enhancements shows that rapid T(2) relaxation by the metal ion is caused by scalar interaction with the electronic spin. Relaxation of the phosphorus-bound proton of MeOPH ((1)H-P) by Mn(III)TMPyP(5+) displayed intermediate exchange kinetics over much of the observable temperature range. The field strength dependence of (1)H-P T(2) enhancement and the independence of the (31)P T(2) support these assertions. As in the case of the (31)P T(2), the (1)H-P T(2) relaxation enhancement results from scalar interaction with the electronic spin. The scalar coupling interpretation of the NMR data is supported by a pulsed EPR study of the interactions of Mn(H(2)O)(6)(2+) with the P-deuterated analogue of methyl phosphite, CH(3)OP((2)H)(O)(2)(-). The electron to (31)P and (2)H nuclear scalar coupling constants were found to be 4.6 and 0.10 MHz, respectively. In contrast, the effects of paramagnetic ions on the methoxy and ethoxy (1)H resonances of MeOPH and MEP are weak, and the evidence suggests that relaxation of these nuclei occurs by a dipolar mechanism

  6. Reaction of [rho]-hydroxycinnamyl alcohols with transition metal salts. 3, Preparation and NMR characterization of improved DHPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence L. Landucci

    2000-01-01

    Dehydropolymerization of [rho]-hydroxycinnamyl alcohols with manganese(III) acetate in either aqueous acetic acid or pyridine resulted in dehydropolymers (DHPs) that more closely approximate the structure of natural lignins than do DHPs produced by enzymic techniques. The 13C NMR spectrum of a "biomimetic" guaiacyl-DHP (G-DHP) from coniferyl alcohol was very...

  7. Botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigam P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin, one of the most poisonous biological substances known, is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum elaborates eight antigenically distinguishable exotoxins (A, B, C 1 , C 2 , D, E, F and G. All serotypes interfere with neural transmission by blocking the release of acetylcholine, the principal neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, causing muscle paralysis. The weakness induced by injection with botulinum toxin A usually lasts about three months. Botulinum toxins now play a very significant role in the management of a wide variety of medical conditions, especially strabismus and focal dystonias, hemifacial spasm, and various spastic movement disorders, headaches, hypersalivation, hyperhidrosis, and some chronic conditions that respond only partially to medical treatment. The list of possible new indications is rapidly expanding. The cosmetological applications include correction of lines, creases and wrinkling all over the face, chin, neck, and chest to dermatological applications such as hyperhidrosis. Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and side effects are few. A precise knowledge and understanding of the functional anatomy of the mimetic muscles is absolutely necessary to correctly use botulinum toxins in clinical practice.

  8. Solid-state (185/187)Re NMR and GIPAW DFT study of perrhenates and Re2(CO)10: chemical shift anisotropy, NMR crystallography, and a metal-metal bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdifield, Cory M; Perras, Frédéric A; Bryce, David L

    2015-04-21

    Advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) methods, such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), intricate pulse sequences, and increased applied magnetic fields, allow for the study of systems which even very recently would be impractical. However, SSNMR methods using certain quadrupolar probe nuclei (i.e., I > 1/2), such as (185/187)Re remain far from fully developed due to the exceedingly strong interaction between the quadrupole moment of these nuclei and local electric field gradients (EFGs). We present a detailed high-field (B0 = 21.1 T) experimental SSNMR study on several perrhenates (KReO4, AgReO4, Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O), as well as ReO3 and Re2(CO)10. We propose solid ReO3 as a new rhenium SSNMR chemical shift standard due to its reproducible and sharp (185/187)Re NMR resonances. We show that for KReO4, previously poorly understood high-order quadrupole-induced effects (HOQIE) on the satellite transitions can be used to measure the EFG tensor asymmetry (i.e., ηQ) to nearly an order-of-magnitude greater precision than competing SSNMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) approaches. Samples of AgReO4 and Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O enable us to comment on the effects of counter-ions and hydration upon Re(vii) chemical shifts. Calcium-43 and (185/187)Re NMR tensor parameters allow us to conclude that two proposed crystal structures for Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O, which would be considered as distinct, are in fact the same structure. Study of Re2(CO)10 provides insights into the effects of Re-Re bonding on the rhenium NMR tensor parameters and rhenium oxidation state on the Re chemical shift value. As overtone NQR experiments allowed us to precisely measure the (185/187)Re EFG tensor of Re2(CO)10, we were able to measure rhenium chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) for the first time in a powdered sample. Experimental observations are supported by gauge-including projector augmented-wave (GIPAW) density functional theory (DFT) calculations, with NMR tensor calculations also

  9. Qualitative Alterations of Bacterial Metabolome after Exposure to Metal Nanoparticles with Bactericidal Properties: A Comprehensive Workflow Based on (1)H NMR, UHPLC-HRMS, and Metabolic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimitakos, Theodoros G; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2016-09-02

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) have proven to be more toxic than bulk analogues of the same chemical composition due to their unique physical properties. The NPs, lately, have drawn the attention of researchers because of their antibacterial and biocidal properties. In an effort to shed light on the mechanism through which the bacteria elimination is achieved and the metabolic changes they undergo, an untargeted metabolomic fingerprint study was carried out on Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria species. The (1)H NMR spectroscopy, in conjunction with high resolution mass-spectrometry (HRMS) and an unsophisticated data processing workflow were implemented. The combined NMR/HRMS data, supported by an open-access metabolomic database, proved to be efficacious in the process of assigning a putative annotation to a wide range of metabolite signals and is a useful tool to appraise the metabolome alterations, as a consequence of bacterial response to NPs. Interestingly, not all the NPs diminished the intracellular metabolites; bacteria treated with iron NPs produced metabolites not present in the nonexposed bacteria sample, implying the activation of previously inactive metabolic pathways. In contrast, copper and iron-copper NPs reduced the annotated metabolites, alluding to the conclusion that the metabolic pathways (mainly alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism, beta-alanine metabolism, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism) were hindered by the interactions of NPs with the intracellular metabolites.

  10. Metallomics and NMR-based metabolomics of Chlorella sp. reveal the synergistic role of copper and cadmium in multi-metal toxicity and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlin; Tan, Nicole G J; Fu, Baohui; Li, Sam F Y

    2015-03-01

    Industrial wastewaters often contain high levels of metal mixtures, in which metal mixtures may have synergistic or antagonistic effects on aquatic organisms. A combination of metallomics and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR)-based metabolomics was employed to understand the consequences of multi-metal systems (Cu, Cd, Pb) on freshwater microalgae. Morphological characterization, cell viability and chlorophyll a determination of metal-spiked Chlorella sp. suggested synergistic effects of Cu and Cd on growth inhibition and toxicity. While Pb has no apparent effect on Chlorella sp. metabolome, a substantial decrease of sucrose, amino acid content and glycerophospholipid precursors in Cu-spiked microalgae revealed Cu-induced oxidative stress. Addition of Cd to Cu-spiked cultures induced more drastic metabolic perturbations, hence we confirmed that Cu and Cd synergistically influenced photosynthesis inhibition, oxidative stress and membrane degradation. Total elemental analysis revealed a significant decrease in K, and an increase in Na, Mg, Zn and Mn concentrations in Cu-spiked cultures. This indicated that Cu is more toxic to Chlorella sp. as compared to Cd or Pb, and the combination of Cu and Cd has a strong synergistic effect on Chlorella sp. oxidative stress induction. Oxidative stress is confirmed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis, which demonstrated a drastic decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio solely in Cu-spiked cultures. Interestingly, we observed Cu-facilitated Cd and Pb bioconcentration in Chlorella sp. The absence of phytochelatins and an increment of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) yields in Cu-spiked cultures suggested that the mode of bioconcentration of Cd and Pb is through adsorption of free metals onto the algal EPS rather than intracellular chelation to phytochelatins.

  11. (1)H-NMR and charge transport in metallic polypyrrole at ultra-low temperatures and high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugeshwar Singh, K; Clark, W G; Ramesh, K P; Menon, Reghu

    2008-11-19

    The temperature dependence of conductivity, proton spin relaxation time (T(1)) and magnetoconductance (MC) in metallic polypyrrole (PPy) doped with PF(6)(-) have been carried out at mK temperatures and high magnetic fields. At T50 K-relaxation is due to the dipolar interaction modulated by the reorientation of the symmetric PF(6) groups following the Bloembergen, Purcell and Pound (BPP) model. The data analysis shows that the Korringa ratio is enhanced by an order of magnitude. The positive and negative MC at TmK is due to the contributions from weak localization and Coulomb-correlated hopping transport, respectively. The role of EEI is observed to be consistent in conductivity, T(1) and MC data, especially at T<1 K.

  12. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (Puerto Rico); Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J., E-mail: arturoj.hernandez@upr.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (Puerto Rico)

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  13. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    2013-01-01

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation and structure of prorocentrolide B, a fast-acting toxin from Prorocentrum maculosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, T; deFreitas, A S; Curtis, J M; Oshima, Y; Walter, J A; Wright, J L

    1996-11-01

    A new toxin, prorocentrolide B (1), has been isolated following bioassay-guided fractionation of a BuOH extract of the tropical dinoflagellate, Prorocentrum maculosum Faust. This compound produces a rapid toxic response in the mouse bioassay, a type of activity not accounted for by other diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins produced by P. maculosum. The structure 1 was established by NMR and MS and is similar to prorocentrolide (2), a toxin from a strain of Prorocentrum lima. NMR data and the modeling program ConGen have been used to establish the relative stereochemistry of some individual ether ring systems and the hexahydroisoquinoline ring.

  15. The 'Nuts and Bolts' of 13C NMR Spectroscopy at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures for Monitoring In Situ CO2 Conversion to Metal Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. K.; Surface, J. A.; Skemer, P. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We will present details of newly-constructed specialized NMR designed to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies on unmixed slurries of minerals in the presence of CO2 or other gases. This static probe is capable of achieving 300 bar, 300C conditions, and it is designed to spectroscopically examine 13C signals in mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Ultimately, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. We will give details of the hardware setup, and we will show a variety of static in situ NMR, as well as ex situ 'magic-angle spinning' NMR to show the analyses that are possible of minerals in pure form and in mixtures. In addition, specific NMR pulse sequences, techniques, and modeling will be described in detail. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine conditions that affect the efficacy of carbonate formation in various targeted geological reservoirs (i.e., peroditite, or others). Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals, including metastable intermediates (such as hydromagnesite, or dypingite in the case of magnesium carbonate species, or vaterite in the case of calcium carbonate species). Such species are distinguishable from a combination of the 13C isotropic chemical shift, the static 13C lineshape, and changes in spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative

  16. Identification of euglenophycin--a toxin found in certain euglenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimba, Paul V; Moeller, Peter D; Beauchesne, Kevin; Lane, Hannah E; Triemer, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    Currently cyanoprokaryotic algae, diatoms, haptophytes, dinoflagellates, euglenoids, and rhaphidophytes are known to produce algal toxins. A previous study by the authors reported euglenoid algae producing toxin(s) in aquaculture ponds, with confirmation based on positive fish bioassays following exposure to the isolated clonal algal cultures. Toxicity was observed in euglenoid culture isolates obtained from the pond as well as a clonal, culture collection taxon. Here we provide conclusive evidence for euglenoid toxin production, including HPLC/MS, MS/MS, and NMR analyses of a clonal (non-axenic) isolate of Euglena sanguinea grown in batch culture. Following wet chemical serial fractionation, toxic activity was identified in both the methanol and hexane extracts. These extracts were then purified using HPLC. Bioassay-guided HPLC fractionation of these two extracts demonstrated that a single class of toxic compounds, identical in mass and similar in molecular structure, was produced by this organism. The toxic compounds exhibited a maximal UV absorbance at 238nm and gave diagnostic mass peaks at 306 (MH(+)) and 288 (MH(+)-H(2)O). Unambiguous molecular structural determination was carried out by high field NMR analysis operating in 1- and 2-dimensions. Though a predominant isomer represented the bulk of the toxin, several stereo- and structural isomers were evidenced by NMR, and HPLC/MS. This compound is an alkaloid similar in structure to fire ant venom. The compound exhibits ichthyotoxic, herbicidal and anticancer activity at low ppm to ppb dosages.

  17. Radiolabelling of cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, R.G.; Neves, Nicoli M.J.; Abdalla, L.F.; Brandao, R.L.; Etchehebehere, L.; Lima, M.E. de; Nicoli, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Binding of cholera toxin to ganglioside receptors of enterocyte microvilli catalyzes the activation of adenylate cyclase causing a rise in cAMP which final result is a copious diarrhea. Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast has been used to prevent diarrhea. Although the antidiarrheic properties of S. boulardii are widely recognized, this yeast has been used on empirical basis, and the mechanism of this protective effect is unknown. The addition of cholera toxin to S. boulardii induces the raising of cAMP that triggers the activation of neutral trehalase. This suggests that toxin specifically binding to cells, is internalized and active the protein phosphorylation cascade. Our objective is labeling the cholera toxin to verify the presence of binding sites on yeast cell surfaces for the cholera toxin. Cholera toxin was radiolabelled with Na 125 I by a chloramine-T method modified from Cuatrecasas and Griffiths et alii. The 125 I-Cholera toxin showed a specific radioactivity at about 1000 cpm/fmol toxin. Biological activity of labeled cholera toxin measured by trehalase activation was similar to the native toxin. (author)

  18. Radiolabelling of cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, R.G.; Neves, Nicoli M.J. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Abdalla, L.F.; Brandao, R.L.; Etchehebehere, L. [Ouro Preto Univ., MG (Brazil). Escola de Farmacia. Lab. de Fisiologia e Bioquimica de Microorganismos; Lima, M.E. de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Nicoli, J.R. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Microbiologia

    1999-11-01

    Binding of cholera toxin to ganglioside receptors of enterocyte microvilli catalyzes the activation of adenylate cyclase causing a rise in cAMP which final result is a copious diarrhea. Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast has been used to prevent diarrhea. Although the antidiarrheic properties of S. boulardii are widely recognized, this yeast has been used on empirical basis, and the mechanism of this protective effect is unknown. The addition of cholera toxin to S. boulardii induces the raising of cAMP that triggers the activation of neutral trehalase. This suggests that toxin specifically binding to cells, is internalized and active the protein phosphorylation cascade. Our objective is labeling the cholera toxin to verify the presence of binding sites on yeast cell surfaces for the cholera toxin. Cholera toxin was radiolabelled with Na {sup 125} I by a chloramine-T method modified from Cuatrecasas and Griffiths et alii. The {sup 125} I-Cholera toxin showed a specific radioactivity at about 1000 cpm/fmol toxin. Biological activity of labeled cholera toxin measured by trehalase activation was similar to the native toxin. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs.; e-mail: nevesmj at urano.cdtn.br

  19. High-pressure in situ 129Xe NMR spectroscopy and computer simulations of breathing transitions in the metal-organic framework Ni2(2,6-ndc)2(dabco) (DUT-8(Ni)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Herbert C; Assfour, Bassem; Epperlein, Fanny; Klein, Nicole; Paasch, Silvia; Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan; Seifert, Gotthard; Brunner, Eike

    2011-06-08

    Recently, we have described the metal-organic framework Ni(2)(2,6-ndc)(2)(dabco), denoted as DUT-8(Ni) (1) (DUT = Dresden University of Technology, 2,6-ndc = 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate, dabco = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane). Upon adsorption of molecules such as nitrogen and xenon, this material exhibits a pronounced gate-pressure effect which is accompanied by a large change of the specific volume. Here, we describe the use of high-pressure in situ (129)Xe NMR spectroscopy, i.e., the NMR spectroscopic measurements of xenon adsorption/desorption isotherms and isobars, to characterize this effect. It appears that the pore system of DUT-8(Ni) takes up xenon until a liquid-like state is reached. Deeper insight into the interactions between the host DUT-8(Ni) and the guest atom xenon is gained from ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. van der Waals interactions are included for the first time in these calculations on a metal-organic framework compound. MD simulations allow the identification of preferred adsorption sites for xenon as well as insight into the breathing effect at a molecular scale. Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations have been performed in order to simulate adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, the favorable influence of a sample pretreatment using solvent exchange and drying with supercritical CO(2) as well as the influence of repeated pore opening/closure processes, i.e., the "aging behavior" of the compound, can be visualized by (129)Xe NMR spectroscopy.

  20. Effect of alkali metal ions on the pyrrole and pyridine π-electron systems in pyrrole-2-carboxylate and pyridine-2-carboxylate molecules: FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and theoretical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świderski, G.; Wojtulewski, S.; Kalinowska, M.; Świsłocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2011-05-01

    The FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (PCA) and lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium pyrrole-2-carboxylates were recorded, assigned and compared in the Li → Na → K → Rb → Cs salt series. The effect of alkali metal ions on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. The obtained results were compared with previously reported ones for pyridine-2-carboxylic acid and alkali metal pyridine-2-carboxylates. Calculations for pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid and Li, Na, K pyrrole-2-carboxylates in B3LYP/6-311++G ** level and Møller-Plesset method in MP2/6-311++G ** level were made. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments as well as aromaticity indices (HOMA, EN, GEO, I 6) for the optimized structures of pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (PCA) and lithium, sodium, potassium pyrrole-2-carboxylates were also calculated. The degree of perturbation of the aromatic system of ligand under the influence of metals in the Li → Cs series was investigated with the use of statistical methods (linear correlation), calculated aromaticity indices and Mulliken, NBO and ChelpG population analysis method. Additionally, the Bader theory (AIM) was applied to setting the characteristic of the bond critical points what confirmed the influence of alkali metals on the pyrrole ring.

  1. Graphical programming for pulse automated NMR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmonte, S.B. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, I.S.; Guimaraes, A.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1999-01-01

    We describe a software program designed to control a broadband pulse Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer used in zero-field NMR studies of magnetic metals. The software is written in the graphical language LabVIEW. This type of programming allows modifications and the inclusion of new routines to be easily made by the non-specialist, without changing the basic structure of the program. The program corrects for differences in the gain of the two acquisition channels [U (phase) and V (quadrature)], and automatic baseline subtraction. We present examples of measurements of NMR spectra, spin-echo decay (T{sub 2}), and quadrupolar oscillations, performed in magnetic intermetallic compounds. (author)

  2. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  3. Microalgal toxin(s): characteristics and importance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prokaryotic and eukaryotic microalgae produce a wide array of compounds with biological activities. These include antibiotics, algicides, toxins, pharmaceutically active compounds and plant growth regulators. Toxic microalgae, in this sense, are common only among the cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. The microalgal ...

  4. The use of deuterium n.m.r. spectroscopy in mechanistic studies of exchange reactions of ethers on supported metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Kemball, Charles; McDougall, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    Exchange reactions of diethyl ether (DEE) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) with deuterium have been studied over supported nickel, palladium, platinum, and rhodium catalysts. Products from most of the systems were analysed by deuterium n.m.r. spectroscopy (55.28 MHz) which gave quantitative results about the distribution of deuterium in the exchanged ethers. The results confirm earlier conclusions about the mechanism of the exchange of DEE and provide new evidence about the reactions of THF. Some hydrogenolysis occurred simultaneously with exchange of THF over both nickel and platinum. (author)

  5. Determination of the pKa value of the hydroxyl group in the alpha-hydroxycarboxylates citrate, malate and lactate by 13C NMR: implications for metal coordination in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andre M N; Kong, XiaoLe; Hider, Robert C

    2009-10-01

    Citric acid is an important metal chelator of biological relevance. Citric acid helps solubilizing metals, increasing their bioavailability for plants and microbes and it is also thought to be a constituent of both the extracellular and cytoplasmic low molecular iron pools occurring in plants and vertebrates. Metal coordination by citric acid involves coordination both by the carboxylate and hydroxyl groups, of particular interest is its alpha-hydroxycarboxylate function. This structural feature is highly conserved in siderophores produced by evolutionarily distant species and seems to confer specificity toward Fe(III) binding. In order to understand the mechanism of metal coordination by alpha-hydroxycarboxylates and correctly evaluate the respective complex stability constants, it is essential to improve the knowledge about the ionisation of the alcohol group in these compounds. We have evaluated the hydroxyl pKa value of citric, malic and lactic acids with the objective of understanding the influence of alpha-carbon substitution. Studies at high pH values, utilizing (13)C NMR, permitted estimation of the pKa values for the three acids. The pKa (alcohol) values (14.4 for citric acid, 14.5 for malic acid, and 15.1 for lactic acid) are considerably higher than the previously reported value for citric acid (11.6) but still lower than the value of 15.5 for methanol. A comparative analysis of the three compounds indicates that different substitutions on the alpha-carbon introduce changes to the inductive effect experienced by the hydroxyl group thereby modulating its ionisation behaviour. Comparison with the siderophore rhizoferrin, which pKa (alcohol) values were confirmed to be 10 and 11.3, suggests that intra-molecular hydrogen bonding may also aid in the hydroxyl ionisation by stabilizing the resulting anion. Studies of metal coordination by alpha-hydroxycarboxylates should take these factors into account.

  6. NMR of lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  7. A strategy for acquisition and analysis of complex natural abundance 33S solid-state NMR spectra of a disordered tetrathio transition-metal anion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Hans J.; Bildsøe, Henrik; Skibsted, Jørgen; Brorson, Michael; Gor'kov, Peter; Gan, Zhehong

    2010-02-01

    A strategy, involving (i) sensitivity enhancement for the central transition (CT) by population transfer (PT) employing WURST inversion pulses to the satellite transitions (STs) in natural abundance 33S MAS NMR for two different MAS frequencies ( νr = 5.0 and 10.0 kHz) at 14.1 T and (ii) a 33S static QCPMG experiment at 19.6 T, has allowed acquisition and analysis of very complex solid-state 33S CT NMR spectra for the disordered tetrathioperrhenate anion ReS4- in [(C 2H 5) 4N][ReS 4]. This strategy of different NMR experiments combined with spectral analysis/simulations has allowed determination of precise values for two sets of quadrupole coupling parameters ( CQ and ηQ) assigned to the two different S sites for the four sulfur atoms in the ReS4- anion in the ratio S1:S2 = 1:3. These sets of CQ, ηQ values for the S1 and S2 site are quite similar and the magnitudes of the quadrupole coupling constants ( CQ = 2.2-2.5 MHz) are a factor of about three larger than observed for other tetrathiometalates A 2MS 4 (A = NH 4, Cs, Rb and M = W, Mo). In addition, the spectral analysis also leads to a determination of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters ( δσ and ησ) for the S1 and S2 site, however, with much lower precisions (about 20% error margins) compared to those for CQ, ηQ, because the magnitudes of the two CSAs (i.e., δσ = 60-90 ppm) are about a factor of six smaller than observed for the other tetrathiometalates mentioned above. This large difference in the magnitudes of the anisotropic parameters CQ and δσ for the ReS4- anion, compared to those for the WS42- and MoS42- anions determined previously under identical experimental conditions, accounts for the increased complexity of the PT-enhanced 33S MAS spectra observed for the ReS4- anion in this study. This difference in CQ also contributes significantly to the intensity distortions observed in the outer wings of the CTs when employing PT from the STs under conditions of slow-speed MAS.

  8. A strategy for acquisition and analysis of complex natural abundance (33)S solid-state NMR spectra of a disordered tetrathio transition-metal anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Hans J; Bildsøe, Henrik; Skibsted, Jørgen; Brorson, Michael; Gor'kov, Peter; Gan, Zhehong

    2010-02-01

    A strategy, involving (i) sensitivity enhancement for the central transition (CT) by population transfer (PT) employing WURST inversion pulses to the satellite transitions (STs) in natural abundance (33)S MAS NMR for two different MAS frequencies (nu(r)=5.0 and 10.0kHz) at 14.1T and (ii) a (33)S static QCPMG experiment at 19.6T, has allowed acquisition and analysis of very complex solid-state (33)S CT NMR spectra for the disordered tetrathioperrhenate anion ReS(4)(-) in [(C(2)H(5))(4)N][ReS(4)]. This strategy of different NMR experiments combined with spectral analysis/simulations has allowed determination of precise values for two sets of quadrupole coupling parameters (C(Q) and eta(Q)) assigned to the two different S sites for the four sulfur atoms in the ReS(4)(-) anion in the ratio S1:S2=1:3. These sets of C(Q), eta(Q) values for the S1 and S2 site are quite similar and the magnitudes of the quadrupole coupling constants (C(Q)=2.2-2.5MHz) are a factor of about three larger than observed for other tetrathiometalates A(2)MS(4) (A=NH(4), Cs, Rb and M=W, Mo). In addition, the spectral analysis also leads to a determination of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters (delta(sigma) and eta(sigma)) for the S1 and S2 site, however, with much lower precisions (about 20% error margins) compared to those for C(Q), eta(Q), because the magnitudes of the two CSAs (i.e., delta(sigma)=60-90ppm) are about a factor of six smaller than observed for the other tetrathiometalates mentioned above. This large difference in the magnitudes of the anisotropic parameters C(Q) and delta(sigma) for the ReS(4)(-) anion, compared to those for the WS(4)(2-) and MoS(4)(2-) anions determined previously under identical experimental conditions, accounts for the increased complexity of the PT-enhanced (33)S MAS spectra observed for the ReS(4)(-) anion in this study. This difference in C(Q) also contributes significantly to the intensity distortions observed in the outer wings of the CTs when

  9. Short Toxin-like Proteins Abound in Cnidaria Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Linial

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cnidaria is a rich phylum that includes thousands of marine species. In this study, we focused on Anthozoa and Hydrozoa that are represented by the Nematostella vectensis (Sea anemone and Hydra magnipapillata genomes. We present a method for ranking the toxin-like candidates from complete proteomes of Cnidaria. Toxin-like functions were revealed using ClanTox, a statistical machine-learning predictor trained on ion channel inhibitors from venomous animals. Fundamental features that were emphasized in training ClanTox include cysteines and their spacing along the sequences. Among the 83,000 proteins derived from Cnidaria representatives, we found 170 candidates that fulfill the properties of toxin-like-proteins, the vast majority of which were previously unrecognized as toxins. An additional 394 short proteins exhibit characteristics of toxin-like proteins at a moderate degree of confidence. Remarkably, only 11% of the predicted toxin-like proteins were previously classified as toxins. Based on our prediction methodology and manual annotation, we inferred functions for over 400 of these proteins. Such functions include protease inhibitors, membrane pore formation, ion channel blockers and metal binding proteins. Many of the proteins belong to small families of paralogs. We conclude that the evolutionary expansion of toxin-like proteins in Cnidaria contributes to their fitness in the complex environment of the aquatic ecosystem.

  10. Short toxin-like proteins abound in Cnidaria genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh, Yitshak; Linial, Itai; Askenazi, Manor; Linial, Michal

    2012-11-16

    Cnidaria is a rich phylum that includes thousands of marine species. In this study, we focused on Anthozoa and Hydrozoa that are represented by the Nematostella vectensis (Sea anemone) and Hydra magnipapillata genomes. We present a method for ranking the toxin-like candidates from complete proteomes of Cnidaria. Toxin-like functions were revealed using ClanTox, a statistical machine-learning predictor trained on ion channel inhibitors from venomous animals. Fundamental features that were emphasized in training ClanTox include cysteines and their spacing along the sequences. Among the 83,000 proteins derived from Cnidaria representatives, we found 170 candidates that fulfill the properties of toxin-like-proteins, the vast majority of which were previously unrecognized as toxins. An additional 394 short proteins exhibit characteristics of toxin-like proteins at a moderate degree of confidence. Remarkably, only 11% of the predicted toxin-like proteins were previously classified as toxins. Based on our prediction methodology and manual annotation, we inferred functions for over 400 of these proteins. Such functions include protease inhibitors, membrane pore formation, ion channel blockers and metal binding proteins. Many of the proteins belong to small families of paralogs. We conclude that the evolutionary expansion of toxin-like proteins in Cnidaria contributes to their fitness in the complex environment of the aquatic ecosystem.

  11. Selective photochemistry at stereogenic metal and ligand centers of cis-[Ru(diphosphine)2(H)2]: preparative, NMR, solid state, and laser flash studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmpian, Marius V; Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara; Thatcher, Robert J; Torres, Olga; Whitwood, Adrian C

    2012-02-22

    Three ruthenium complexes Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-BPE)(2)(H)(2)] Λ-R,R-Ru1H(2), Δ-[cis-Ru((S,S)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(H)(2)] Δ-S,S-Ru2H(2), and Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(H)(2)] Λ-R,R-Ru2H(2) (1 = (Me-BPE)(2), 2 = (Me-DuPHOS)(2)) were characterized by multinuclear NMR and CD spectroscopy in solution and by X-ray crystallography. The chiral ligands allow the full control of stereochemistry and enable mechanistic studies not otherwise available. Oxidative addition of E-H bonds (E = H, B, Si, C) was studied by steady state and laser flash photolysis in the presence of substrates. Steady state photolysis shows formation of single products with one stereoisomer. Solid state structures and circular dichroism spectra reveal a change in configuration at ruthenium for some Δ-S,S-Ru2H(2)/Λ-R,R-Ru2H(2) photoproducts from Λ to Δ (or vice versa) while the configuration for Λ-R,R-Ru1H(2) products remains unchanged as Λ. The X-ray structure of silyl hydride photoproducts suggests a residual H(1)···Si(1) interaction for Δ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(Et(2)SiH)(H)] and Δ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(PhSiH(2))(H)] but not for their Ru(R,R-BPE)(2) analogues. Molecular structures were also determined for Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-BPE)(2)(Bpin)(H)], Λ-[Ru((S,S)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(η(2)-C(2)H(4))], Δ-[Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(η(2)-C(2)H(4))], and trans-[Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(C(6)F(5))(H)]. In situ laser photolysis in the presence of p-H(2) generates hyperpolarized NMR spectra because of magnetically inequivalent hydrides; these experiments and low temperature photolysis with D(2) reveal that the loss of hydride ligands is concerted. The reaction intermediates [Ru(DuPHOS)(2)] and [Ru(BPE)(2)] were detected by laser flash photolysis and have spectra consistent with approximate square-planar Ru(0) structures. The rates of their reactions with H(2), D(2), HBpin, and PhSiH(3) were measured by transient kinetics. Rate constants are significantly faster for [Ru(BPE)(2)] than for [Ru(DuPHOS)(2

  12. β-NMR of a thin Pt film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, I.; Chow, K. H.; Parolin, T. J.; Egilmez, M.; Hossain, M. D.; Jung, J.; Keeler, T. A.; Kiefl, R. F.; Kreitzman, S. R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Ma, R.; Morris, G. D.; Pearson, M. R.; Saadaoui, H.; Salman, Z.; Smadella, M.; Song, Q.; Wang, D.; Xu, M.; MacFarlane, W. A.

    2009-04-01

    We report beta-detected NMR ( β-NMR) measurements on a 50 nm thick platinum (Pt) film grown on a magnesium oxide (MgO) substrate. The frequency of the β-NMR resonance in Pt was compared to the MgO reference frequency to estimate the Knight shift at various temperatures (100-300 K). The Knight shift was found to be negative and strongly temperature dependent. The implications are discussed and compared to other transition metals that have been studied via β-NMR previously.

  13. beta-NMR of a thin Pt film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, I., E-mail: ifan@phys.ualberta.c [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Chow, K.H. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Parolin, T.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Egilmez, M. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Hossain, M.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Jung, J. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Keeler, T.A.; Kiefl, R.F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kreitzman, S.R.; Levy, C.D.P. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Ma, R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Morris, G.D.; Pearson, M.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Saadaoui, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Salman, Z. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, UK OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Smadella, M.; Song, Q.; Wang, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Xu, M. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); MacFarlane, W.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    We report beta-detected NMR (beta-NMR) measurements on a 50 nm thick platinum (Pt) film grown on a magnesium oxide (MgO) substrate. The frequency of the beta-NMR resonance in Pt was compared to the MgO reference frequency to estimate the Knight shift at various temperatures (100-300 K). The Knight shift was found to be negative and strongly temperature dependent. The implications are discussed and compared to other transition metals that have been studied via beta-NMR previously.

  14. NMR-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundin, A.G.; Fedin, Eh.I.

    1986-01-01

    Physical foundations are given and the most important areas of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) application in physics, chemistry, biology are described. A detailed review of the investigations conducted and the NMR applications in different science and technology fields is presented. The method basic experimental variants, including such new ones as high resolution in a solid body; rare isotope resonance; two-dimensional and multi-quantum fourier-spectroscopy; large molecule NMR; NMR tomography and NMR intrascopy etc. are considered. The instruments are briefly described. NMR is characterized as one of the most important investigation methods of the material composition, its molecular and crystal structure, visualization of the living organism and nonmetallic object inner structure

  15. New binding site on common molecular scaffold provides HERG channel specificity of scorpion toxin BeKm-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korolkova, Yuliya V; Bocharov, Eduard V; Angelo, Kamilla

    2002-01-01

    The scorpion toxin BeKm-1 is unique among a variety of known short scorpion toxins affecting potassium channels in its selective action on ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG)-type channels. BeKm-1 shares the common molecular scaffold with other short scorpion toxins. The toxin spatial structure...... resolved by NMR consists of a short alpha-helix and a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. By toxin mutagenesis study we identified the residues that are important for the binding of BeKm-1 to the human ERG K+ (HERG) channel. The most critical residues (Tyr-11, Lys-18, Arg-20, Lys-23) are located...... in the alpha-helix and following loop whereas the "traditional" functional site of other short scorpion toxins is formed by residues from the beta-sheet. Thus the unique location of the binding site of BeKm-1 provides its specificity toward the HERG channel....

  16. Botulinum Toxin for Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Cengiz; Ismi, Onur

    2016-08-01

    Rhinitis is a common clinical entity. Besides nasal obstruction, itching, and sneezing, one of the most important symptoms of rhinitis is nasal hypersecretion produced by nasal glands and exudate from the nasal vascular bed. Allergic rhinitis is an IgE-mediated inflammatory reaction of nasal mucosa after exposure to environmental allergens. Idiopathic rhinitis describes rhinitis symptoms that occur after non-allergic, noninfectious irritants. Specific allergen avoidance, topical nasal decongestants, nasal corticosteroids, immunotherapy, and sinonasal surgery are the main treatment options. Because the current treatment modalities are not enough for reducing rhinorrhea in some patients, novel treatment options are required to solve this problem. Botulinum toxin is an exotoxin generated by Clostridium botulinum. It disturbs the signal transmission at the neuromuscular and neuroglandular junction by inhibiting the acetylcholine release from the presynaptic nerve terminal. It has been widely used in neuromuscular, hypersecretory, and autonomic nerve system disorders. There have been a lot of published articles concerning the effect of this toxin on rhinitis symptoms. Based on the results of these reports, intranasal botulinum toxin A administration appears to be a safe and effective treatment method for decreasing rhinitis symptoms in rhinitis patients with a long-lasting effect. Botulinum toxin type A will be a good treatment option for the chronic rhinitis patients who are resistant to other treatment methods.

  17. 1H NMR study of effects of synergistic anion and metal ion binding on pH titration of the histidinyl side-chain residues of the half-molecules of ovotransferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodworth, R.C.; Butcher, N.D.; Brown, S.A.; Brown-Mason, A.

    1987-01-01

    Separation of ovotransferrin into C-terminal (OTf/2C) and N-terminal (OTf/2N) half-molecules has made possible the resolution of all expected histidinyl C(2)H resonances by proton nuclear magnetic resonance at 250 MHz. The chemical shift of many of the resonances decreases with increasing pH, allowing construction of titration curves, whereas a few resonances fail to titrate. On formation of the Ga/sup III/OTf/2(C 2 O 4 ) ternary complexes, two of the low-field C(2)H resonances in each half-molecule fail to titrate. This behavior implicates the imidazole groups giving rise to these resonances as ligands to the bound metal ion. A third C(2)H resonance in each half-molecule undergoes a marked reduction in pK'/sub a/ on formation of the ternary complex. The imidazole group displaying this resonance is implicated in a proton-relay scheme involved in binding the synergistic anion, oxalate, and a water of hydration on the bound metal ion. The titration curves for the various imidazole resonances have been fit to a four-parameter equation involving estimation of the pK'/sub a/, the limiting chemical shift values, and a Hill constant n. Hill constants of 1, which suggests positive cooperativity in the titration of this residue. The basis for this behavior cannot be rationalized at this time. 13 C NMR studies of [zeta- 13 C]Arg-OTf suggest the Arg side chains may not be intimately involved in formation of the ternary complex

  18. Carbohydrate inhibitors of cholera toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vajinder; Turnbull, W Bruce

    2018-01-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease caused by a protein toxin released by Vibrio cholera in the host's intestine. The toxin enters intestinal epithelial cells after binding to specific carbohydrates on the cell surface. Over recent years, considerable effort has been invested in developing inhibitors of toxin adhesion that mimic the carbohydrate ligand, with particular emphasis on exploiting the multivalency of the toxin to enhance activity. In this review we introduce the structural features of the toxin that have guided the design of diverse inhibitors and summarise recent developments in the field.

  19. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6, which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  20. Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2–Dependent Lethal Toxin Killing In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scobie, Heather M; Wigelsworth, Darran J; Marlett, John M; Thomas, Diane; Rainey, G. Jonah A; Lacy, D. Borden; Manchester, Marianne; Collier, R. John; Young, John A. T

    2006-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptors 1 and 2 (ANTXR1 and ANTXR2) have a related integrin-like inserted (I) domain which interacts with a metal cation that is coordinated by residue D683 of the protective antigen (PA) subunit of anthrax toxin. The receptor-bound metal ion and PA residue D683 are critical for ANTXR1-PA binding. Since PA can bind to ANTXR2 with reduced affinity in the absence of metal ions, we reasoned that D683 mutant forms of PA might specifically interact with ANTXR2. We show here that this is the case. The differential ability of ANTXR1 and ANTXR2 to bind D683 mutant PA proteins was mapped to nonconserved receptor residues at the binding interface with PA domain 2. Moreover, a D683K mutant form of PA that bound specifically to human and rat ANTXR2 mediated killing of rats by anthrax lethal toxin, providing strong evidence for the physiological importance of ANTXR2 in anthrax disease pathogenesis. PMID:17054395

  1. Functional studies using NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCready, V.R.; Leach, M.O.; Sutton; Ell, P.

    1986-01-01

    The object of this book is to discuss and evaluate an area of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance which to date has been less emphasized than it might be, namely the use of NMR for functional studies. The book commences with a discussion of the areas in which the NMR techniques might be needed due to deficiencies in other techniques. The physics of NMR especially relating to functional measurement are then explained. Technical factors in producing functional images are discussed and the use of paramagnetic substances for carrying out flow studies are detailed. Particular attention is paid to specific studies in the various organs. The book ends with a survey of imaging in each organ and the relation of NMR images to other techniques such as ultrasound, nuclear medicine and X-rays

  2. Functional studies using NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCready, V.R.; Leach, M.; Ell, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is based on a series of lectures delivered at a one-day teaching symposium on functional and metabolic aspects of NMR measurements held at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School on 1st September 1985 as a part of the European Nuclear Medicine Society Congress. Currently the major emphasis in medical NMR in vivo is on its potential to image and display abnormalities in conventional radiological images, providing increased contrast between normal and abnormal tissue, improved definition of vasculature, and possibly an increased potential for differential diagnosis. Although these areas are undeniably of major importance, it is probable that NMR will continue to complement conventional measurement methods. The major potential benefits to be derived from in vivo NMR measurements are likely to arise from its use as an instrument for functional and metabolic studies in both clinical research and in the everyday management of patients. It is to this area that this volume is directed

  3. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh; Finley, Natosha L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R h ) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken together

  4. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh [Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Finley, Natosha L., E-mail: finleynl@miamioh.edu [Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Cell, Molecular, and Structural Biology Program, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R{sub h}) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken

  5. A 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopic investigation of the structure of the iminium ion with a dipolar form in metal complexes of 2-N-substituted N-confused porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Pin; Lin, Wen-Chain; Chen, Jyh-Horung; Wang, Shin-Shin; Tung, Jo-Yu

    2012-11-21

    The crystal structures of chloro(2-aza-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-carbaporphyrinato-N,N′N′′) zinc(II) [Zn(2-NCH2COOC2H5NCTPP)Cl; 4], (2-aza-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-carbaporphyrinato-N,N′N′′) palladium(II) [Pd(2-NCH2COOC2H5NCTPP); 5], bromo(2-aza-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-carbaporphyrinato-N,N′N′′) manganese(III) [Mn(2-NCH2COOC2H5NCTPP)Br; 6], [2-aza-(3′-phenoxypropyl)-5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-carbaporphyrinato-N,N′N′′] nickel(II) [Ni(2-NCH2CH2CH2OC6H5NCTPP); 7] and chloro(2-aza-2-methoxycarbonylmethyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-carbaporphyrinato-N,N′N′′) zinc(II) [Zn(2-NCH2COOCH3NCTPP)Cl; 8] have been established. The g value of 9.54, which was measured from the parallel polarization of the X-band EPR spectra in CHCl3 at 4 K, is consistent with the high spin mononuclear manganese(III) centre (S = 2) in 6. The magnitude of the axial (D) zero-field splitting (ZFS) for the mononuclear Mn(III) centre in 6 was determined approximately to be 1.63 cm(−1) by paramagnetic susceptibility measurements. The NMR spectroscopic investigation of the iminium ion with a dipolar canonical contribution to the metal complexes 5–7, Pd(2-NCH2C6H5NCTPP) (10) and Ni(2-NCH2C6H5NCTPP) (11) in CDCl3 is reported. A resonance between the dipolar canonical form II and covalent canonical form I exists for complexes 5–7, 10 and 11 in CDCl3. To develop the correlations between δ13C [C(3)], δ1H [H(3)] and the canonical form II in 5–7, 10 and 11, this work thoroughly examines the 13C and 1H NMR of N+=CH(Ar) fragment on seven metal complexes of 2-N substituted N-confused porphyrin. According to these results, the 13C [C(3)] and 1H [H(3)] chemical shifts of the N+=CH(Ar) fragment at 20 °C in CDCl3 are separately located at 152.6 ± 0.5 and 8.30 ± 0.15 ppm respectively for the iminium ion. This exists as a dipolar canonical form II for complexes 5–7, 10 and 11, and the N–CH(Ar) group

  6. UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition For the UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition proposal, a new 400 MHz and an upgraded 500 MHz NMR...valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. University of California - Merced 5200 North Lake Road Merced , CA 95343...UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition Report Title For the UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition proposal, a new 400 MHz and an upgraded 500

  7. {beta}-nmr of Palladium foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parolin, T.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Salman, Z. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Chakhalian, J. [Max-Plank Institute for Solid State Research, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Wang, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Keeler, T.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Hossain, Md. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kiefl, R.F. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (Canada); Chow, K.H. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2J1 (Canada); Morris, G.D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Miller, R.I. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); MacFarlane, W.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)]. E-mail: wam@chem.ubc.ca

    2006-03-31

    Beta-detected NMR ({beta}-nmr) of low-energy implanted {sup 8}Li{sup +} was studied in metallic palladium. The resonance was found to have a large negative shift with respect to the reference signal in the cubic insulator MgO. This shift exhibited significant temperature dependence on cooling below room temperature, approximately proportionate to the temperature-dependent spin susceptibility of pure Pd. Thus it is tentatively attributed to a Knight shift (K) caused by a large negative hyperfine coupling; a phenomenon common in transition metal ions, but not in alkalis. However, the spin-lattice relaxation of {sup 8}Li is much slower than expected from the Korringa law for such a large K. We compare results from samples of very different thicknesses: 12.5{mu}m foil and a 100nm thin film.

  8. Resonance assignments of a VapC family toxin from Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Xuan, Jinsong; Cui, Qiu; Feng, Yingang

    2016-10-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems widely exist in bacterial plasmids, phages, and chromosomes and play important roles in growth persistence and host-pathogen interaction. Virulence associated protein BC (VapBC) family TAs are the most abundant TAs in bacteria and many pathogens contain a large number of vapBC loci in the genome which have been extensively studied. Clostridium thermocellum, a cellulolytic anaerobic gram-positive bacterium with promising applications in biofuel production, also contains a VapBC TA in the genome. Despite the structures of several VapBC family TAs have been determined, the toxin and anti-toxin components of C. thermocellum VapBC have very low sequence identity to the proteins in PDB. Therefore, the structure and functional mechanism of this TA is largely unknown. Here we reported the NMR resonance assignments of the VapC toxin from C. thermocellum as a basis for further structural and functional studies.

  9. Neurotoxicity of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caito, Samuel; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metals are frequently used in industry and represent a major source of toxin exposure for workers. For this reason governmental agencies regulate the amount of metal exposure permissible for worker safety. While essential metals serve physiologic roles, metals pose significant health risks upon acute and chronic exposure to high levels. The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to metals. The brain readily accumulates metals, which under physiologic conditions are incorporated into essential metalloproteins required for neuronal health and energy homeostasis. Severe consequences can arise from circumstances of excess essential metals or exposure to toxic nonessential metal. Herein, we discuss sources of occupational metal exposure, metal homeostasis in the human body, susceptibility of the nervous system to metals, detoxification, detection of metals in biologic samples, and chelation therapeutic strategies. The neurologic pathology and physiology following aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, mercury, and trimethyltin exposures are highlighted as classic examples of metal-induced neurotoxicity. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Teaching NMR Using Online Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Hornak

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy has almost become an essential analytical tool for the chemist. High-resolution one- and multi-dimensional NMR, timedomain NMR, and NMR microscopy are but a few of the NMR techniques at a chemist's disposal to determine chemical structure and dynamics. Consequently, even small chemistry departments are finding it necessary to provide students with NMR training and experience in at least some of these techniques. The hands-on experience is readily provided with access to state-of-the-art commercial spectrometers. Instruction in the principles of NMR is more difficult to achieve as most instructors try to teach NMR using single organic or analytical chemistry book chapters with static figures. This paper describes an online textbook on NMR spectroscopy called The Basics of NMR (http://www.cis.rit.edu/htbooks/nmr/ suitable for use in teaching the principles of NMR spectroscopy. The book utilizes hypertext and animations to present the principles of NMR spectroscopy. The book can be used as a textbook associated with a lecture or as a stand-alone teaching tool. Conference participants are encouraged to review the textbook and evaluate its suitability for us in teaching NMR spectroscopy to undergraduate chemistry majors.

  11. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C.G.; Armstrong, G.D. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes.

  12. Microprocessorized NMR measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    An MC68000 CAMAC microprocessor system for fast and accurate NMR signal measurement will be presented. A stand-alone CAMAC microprocessor system (MC68000 STAC) with a special purpose interface sweeps a digital frequency synthesizer and digitizes the NMR signal with a 16-bit ADC of 17 μs conversion time. It averages the NMR signal data over many sweeps and then transfers it through CAMAC to a computer for calculation of the signal parameters. The computer has full software control over the timing and sweep settings of this signal averager, and thus allows optimization of noise suppression. Several of these processor systems can be installed in the same crate for parallel processing, and the flexibility of the STAC also allows easy adaptation to other applications such as transient recording or phase-sensitive detection. (orig.)

  13. Structural NMR assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procter, J.B.; Torda, A.E.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: General automated NMR assignment approaches are aimed at full heteronuclear assignment, which is needed for structure determination. Usually, full assignment requires at least as much spectral information as is used for structure generation. For large proteins, obtaining sufficient spectral information may require a number of sample preparations and many spectra, resulting in a significant overhead for the use of NMR in biochemical investigation. For a protein of biochemical interest one may already have an x-ray crystal structure, but spectral assignment is still needed to use NMR as a structural probe for ligand binding studies. In this situation it may be possible to use much less spectral information to make an assignment based purely on the correspondence of structural data to the measurements contained in a few simple spectra. We introduce a framework to accomplish this 'structural assignment', and give some observations on the practical requirements for a structural assignment to succeed

  14. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site

  15. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L. (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.

  16. International symposium on NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication consists of 32 papers and presentations from the field of NMR spectroscopy applications submitted to the International Symposium on NMR Spectroscopy held at Smolenice between 29 Sep and 3 Oct, 1980. (B.S.)

  17. Autonomous driving in NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The automatic analysis of NMR data has been a much-desired endeavour for the last six decades, as it is the case with any other analytical technique. This need for automation has only grown as advances in hardware; pulse sequences and automation have opened new research areas to NMR and increased the throughput of data. Full automatic analysis is a worthy, albeit hard, challenge, but in a world of artificial intelligence, instant communication and big data, it seems that this particular fight is happening with only one technique at a time (let this be NMR, MS, IR, UV or any other), when the reality of most laboratories is that there are several types of analytical instrumentation present. Data aggregation, verification and elucidation by using complementary techniques (e.g. MS and NMR) is a desirable outcome to pursue, although a time-consuming one if performed manually; hence, the use of automation to perform the heavy lifting for users is required to make the approach attractive for scientists. Many of the decisions and workflows that could be implemented under automation will depend on the two-way communication with databases that understand analytical data, because it is desirable not only to query these databases but also to grow them in as much of an automatic manner as possible. How these databases are designed, set up and the data inside classified will determine what workflows can be implemented. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. NMR, water and plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.

    1982-01-01

    This Thesis describes the application of a non-destructive pulsed proton NMR method mainly to measure water transport in the xylem vessels of plant stems and in some model systems. The results are equally well applicable to liquid flow in other biological objects than plants, e.g. flow of blood and

  19. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... out' response to environmental changes with structural complexity ... of 3D structure at atomic resolution of folded proteins ...... 5.14 HIV-1 protease. NMR identification of local structural preferences in. HIV-1 protease in the 'unfolded state' at 6 M gua- nidine hydrochloride has been reported.49 Analyses.

  20. Single-sided NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Single-Sided NMR describes the design of the first functioning single-sided tomograph, the related measurement methods, and a number of applications. One of the key advantages to this method is the speed at which the images are obtained.

  1. NMR for chemists and biologists

    CERN Document Server

    Carbajo, Rodrigo J

    2013-01-01

    This book offers a concise introduction to the field of nuclear magnetic resonance or NMR. It presents the basic foundations of NMR in a non-mathematical way and provides an overview of both recent and important biological applications of NMR.

  2. Food toxin detection with atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Externally introduced toxins or internal spoilage correlated pathogens and their metabolites are all potential sources of food toxins. To prevent and protect unsafe food, many food toxin detection techniques have been developed to detect various toxins for quality control. Although several routine m...

  3. Hydrolysis Studies and Quantitative Determination of Aluminum Ions Using [superscript 27]Al NMR: An Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Maria A.; Ingalls, Laura R.; Campbell, Andrew; James-Pederson, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a novel experiment focused on metal ion hydrolysis and the equilibria related to metal ions in aqueous systems. Using [superscript 27]Al NMR, the students become familiar with NMR spectroscopy as a quantitative analytical tool for the determination of aluminum by preparing a standard calibration curve using standard aluminum…

  4. Toxins: State of Journal Report, 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon L. Tesh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the “Message from the Editor-in-Chief” posted on the Toxins website (see www.mdpi.com/journal/toxins/toxins-flyer.pdf, we wrote: “The editorial board and staff of Toxins are dedicated to providing a timely, peer-reviewed outlet for exciting, innovative primary research articles and concise, informative reviews from investigators in the myriad of disciplines contributing to our knowledge on toxins. [...

  5. Bio Warfare and Terrorism: Toxins and Other Mid-Spectrum Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Madsen, James M

    2005-01-01

    ... counterparts are still by definition toxins. Related terms include phycotoxins (toxins from algae), mycotoxins (fungal toxins), phytotoxins (plant toxins), and venoms (toxins from animals, especially vertebrates...

  6. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  7. NMR, water and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As, H. van.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes the application of a non-destructive pulsed proton NMR method mainly to measure water transport in the xylem vessels of plant stems and in some model systems. The results are equally well applicable to liquid flow in other biological objects than plants, e.g. flow of blood and other body fluids in human and animals. The method is based on a pulse sequence of equidistant π pulses in combination with a linear magnetic field gradient. (Auth.)

  8. NMR spectroscopic study and DFT calculations of GIAO NMR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1H, proton coupled and decoupled 13C, DEPT, HETCOR NMR spectra, the magnitude of one bond 1JCH coupling constants and 13C NMR spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of 1,9-diaminononane (danon, C9H22N2) have been reported for the first time. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts and 1JCH coupling constants of danon ...

  9. Phospholipase D toxins of brown spider venom convert lysophosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin to cyclic phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, Daniel M; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A; Kumirov, Vlad K; Bandarian, Vahe; Binford, Greta J; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2013-01-01

    Venoms of brown spiders in the genus Loxosceles contain phospholipase D enzyme toxins that can cause severe dermonecrosis and even death in humans. These toxins cleave the substrates sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine in mammalian tissues, releasing the choline head group. The other products of substrate cleavage have previously been reported to be monoester phospholipids, which would result from substrate hydrolysis. Using (31)P NMR and mass spectrometry we demonstrate that recombinant toxins, as well as whole venoms from diverse Loxosceles species, exclusively catalyze transphosphatidylation rather than hydrolysis, forming cyclic phosphate products from both major substrates. Cyclic phosphates have vastly different biological properties from their monoester counterparts, and they may be relevant to the pathology of brown spider envenomation.

  10. NMR imaging of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.S. (Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH); Kaufman, B.; El Yousef, S.J.; Benson, J.E.; Bonstelle, C.T.; Alfidi, R.J.; Haaga, J.R.; Yeung, H.; Huss, R.G.

    1983-12-01

    The usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images in the evaluation of spinal disorders below the craniocervical junction was studied. Six normal subjects and 41 patients with various spinal abnormalities were examined. NMR proved capable of demonstrating important normal and pathologic anatomic structures; it was useful in the evaluation of syringohydromyelia and cystic spinal cord tumors, and the bright signal intensity of lipoma was quite impressive. In the evaluation of herniated disk, NMR images offered a new perspective by visualizing abnormal degradation of the signal intensity of the nucleus pulposus itself. NMR images were least valuable in the evaluation of spondylosis and spinal stenosis. Although NMR imaging of the spine is still in a very early developmental stage, the absence of both ionizing radiation and risks associated with contrast material makes it especially attractive as a new diagnostic method. This limited experience with currently available equipment suggests that, with technical refinement, the efficacy of NMR of the spine will increase.

  11. Processing DOSY NMR Data by Chemometric Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huo, R.

    2006-01-01

    DOSY NMR can be used as a non-invasive separation method for complex mixtures. It is more and more attractive for industrial laboratories, for the main advantage DOSY NMR over routine separation methods such as LC-NMR is easy and economical implementation. With NMR instruments, DOSY NMR data can be

  12. nmr spectroscopic study and dft calculations of giao nmr shieldings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    NMR is a sensitive and versatile probe of molecular-scale structure and dynamics in solids and liquids. It has been widely used in chemistry, materials and geochemistry [21-23] and it enables one to get faster and easier structural information. The standard 1D and 2D hetero and homonuclear NMR experiments are enough ...

  13. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000590.htm Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins is a lack ...

  14. (AJST) DETECTION AND QUANTIFICATION OF TOXINS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -, hepato- and neuro-toxins ..... risk assessment of cyanobacterial toxins. In: Hester,. R.E. and Harrison, R.M. (Eds.) Agricultural chemicals and the environment. Issues in Environmental. Science and Technology 5. The Royal Society of.

  15. Toxin synergism in snake venoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    Synergism between venom toxins exists for a range of snake species. Synergism can be derived from both intermolecular interactions and supramolecular interactions between venom components, and can be the result of toxins targeting the same protein, biochemical pathway or physiological process. Few...... simple systematic tools and methods for determining the presence of synergism exist, but include co-administration of venom components and assessment of Accumulated Toxicity Scores. A better understanding of how to investigate synergism in snake venoms may help unravel strategies for developing novel...

  16. Inhibition of cholera toxin and other AB toxins by polyphenolic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    All AB-type protein toxins have intracellular targets despite an initial extracellular location. These toxins use different methods to reach the cytosol and have different effects on the target cell. Broad-spectrum inhibitors against AB toxins are therefore hard to develop because the toxins use dif...

  17. Toxin yet not toxic: Botulinum toxin in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana M.S.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Paracelsus contrasted poisons from nonpoisons, stating that “All things are poisons, and there is nothing that is harmless; the dose alone decides that something is a poison”. Living organisms, such as plants, animals, and microorganisms, constitute a huge source of pharmaceutically useful medicines and toxins. Depending on their source, toxins can be categorized as phytotoxins, mycotoxins, or zootoxins, which include venoms and bacterial toxins. Any toxin can be harmful or beneficial. Within the last 100 years, the perception of botulinum neurotoxin (BTX has evolved from that of a poison to a versatile clinical agent with various uses. BTX plays a key role in the management of many orofacial and dental disorders. Its indications are rapidly expanding, with ongoing trials for further applications. However, despite its clinical use, what BTX specifically does in each condition is still not clear. The main aim of this review is to describe some of the unclear aspects of this potentially useful agent, with a focus on the current research in dentistry.

  18. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology.

  19. NMR imaging studies of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Z.R.; Zhang, P.Z.; Ding, G.L.; Li, L.Y.; Ye, C.H. [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-06-01

    The permeation transportation and swelling behavior of solvents into coal are investigated by NMR imaging using pyridine-d{sub 5} and acetone-d{sub 6}. Images of coal swollen with deuterated solvents illuminate proton distributions of mobile phases within the coal macromolecular networks. More information about the chemical and physical structure of coal can be obtained using NMR imaging techniques.

  20. NMR imaging of osteoarticular pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frocrain, L.; Duvauferrier, R.; Gagey, N. and others

    1987-01-01

    NMR imaging is assuming an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of osteo-articular disorders. Semiological descriptions of the mean pathological disorders of the locomotor system are presented. Some investigation strategies are proposed to compare NMR imaging with other imaging techniques in various pathological states.

  1. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Quantum Information Processing by NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. NMR; quantum information processing; quantum computing; qubits; pseudopure states; quantum; pseudopure states; quantum gates; quantum simulations; decoherence. ... T S Mahesh1. Department of Physics and NMR Research Center, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune 411 008, India ...

  3. Resistive NMR of intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.; Levine, R.S.; Lynch, R.; Goldberg, H.I.; Samuel, L.; Edelstein, W.; Bottomley, P.; Redington, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison between computed tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in 17 patients with intracranial hematomas indicate a distinct role for NMR in evaluating the stable patient with hematoma. NMR is useful for delineating the extent of the hematoma, the relationship of the hematoma to brain anatomy, and the presence of hematoma at a time when the hematoma is isodense on CT.

  4. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  5. Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Quincy

    2005-01-01

    This textbook begins with an overview of NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

  6. Chemical synthesis, 3D structure, and ASIC binding site of the toxin mambalgin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Christina I; Rash, Lachlan D; Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Rosengren, K Johan; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F; Alewood, Paul F; Craik, David J; Durek, Thomas

    2014-01-20

    Mambalgins are a novel class of snake venom components that exert potent analgesic effects mediated through the inhibition of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). The 57-residue polypeptide mambalgin-2 (Ma-2) was synthesized by using a combination of solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. The structure of the synthetic toxin, determined using homonuclear NMR, revealed an unusual three-finger toxin fold reminiscent of functionally unrelated snake toxins. Electrophysiological analysis of Ma-2 on wild-type and mutant ASIC1a receptors allowed us to identify α-helix 5, which borders on the functionally critical acidic pocket of the channel, as a major part of the Ma-2 binding site. This region is also crucial for the interaction of ASIC1a with the spider toxin PcTx1, thus suggesting that the binding sites for these toxins substantially overlap. This work lays the foundation for structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies and further development of this promising analgesic peptide. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Shigella Sonnei and Shiga Toxin

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-07-28

    Katherine Lamba, an infectious disease epidemiologist with the California Department of Public Health, discusses Shiga Toxin producing Shigella sonnei.  Created: 7/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/28/2016.

  8. Risk Assessment of Shellfish Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Munday

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex secondary metabolites, some of which are highly toxic to mammals, are produced by many marine organisms. Some of these organisms are important food sources for marine animals and, when ingested, the toxins that they produce may be absorbed and stored in the tissues of the predators, which then become toxic to animals higher up the food chain. This is a particular problem with shellfish, and many cases of poisoning are reported in shellfish consumers each year. At present, there is no practicable means of preventing uptake of the toxins by shellfish or of removing them after harvesting. Assessment of the risk posed by such toxins is therefore required in order to determine levels that are unlikely to cause adverse effects in humans and to permit the establishment of regulatory limits in shellfish for human consumption. In the present review, the basic principles of risk assessment are described, and the progress made toward robust risk assessment of seafood toxins is discussed. While good progress has been made, it is clear that further toxicological studies are required before this goal is fully achieved.

  9. Inactivation of allergens and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandini, Piero

    2010-11-30

    Plants are replete with thousands of proteins and small molecules, many of which are species-specific, poisonous or dangerous. Over time humans have learned to avoid dangerous plants or inactivate many toxic components in food plants, but there is still room for ameliorating food crops (and plants in general) in terms of their allergens and toxins content, especially in their edible parts. Inactivation at the genetic rather than physical or chemical level has many advantages and classical genetic approaches have resulted in significant reduction of toxin content. The capacity, offered by genetic engineering, of turning off (inactivating) specific genes has opened up the possibility of altering the plant content in a far more precise manner than previously available. Different levels of intervention (genes coding for toxins/allergens or for enzymes, transporters or regulators involved in their metabolism) are possible and there are several tools for inactivating genes, both direct (using chemical and physical mutagens, insertion of transposons and other genetic elements) and indirect (antisense RNA, RNA interference, microRNA, eventually leading to gene silencing). Each level/strategy has specific advantages and disadvantages (speed, costs, selectivity, stability, reversibility, frequency of desired genotype and regulatory regime). Paradigmatic examples from classical and transgenic approaches are discussed to emphasize the need to revise the present regulatory process. Reducing the content of natural toxins is a trade-off process: the lesser the content of natural toxins, the higher the susceptibility of a plant to pests and therefore the stronger the need to protect plants. As a consequence, more specific pesticides like Bt are needed to substitute for general pesticides. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanism of Shiga Toxin Clustering on Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Gao, Haifei; Arumugam, Senthil

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial Shiga toxin interacts with its cellular receptor, the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 or CD77), as a first step to entering target cells. Previous studies have shown that toxin molecules cluster on the plasma membrane, despite the apparent lack of direct interactions...... toxin molecules. By contrast, in coarse-grained computer simulations, a correlation was found between clustering and toxin nanoparticle-driven suppression of membrane fluctuations, and experimentally we observed that clustering required the toxin molecules to be tightly bound to the membrane surface....... The most likely interpretation of these findings is that a membrane fluctuation-induced force generates an effective attraction between toxin molecules. Such force would be of similar strength to the electrostatic force at separations around 1 nm, remain strong at distances up to the size of toxin...

  11. Structural and functional diversity of acidic scorpion potassium channel toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-Yun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the basic scorpion K(+ channel toxins (KTxs are well-known pharmacological tools and potential drug candidates, characterization the acidic KTxs still has the great significance for their potential selectivity towards different K(+ channel subtypes. Unfortunately, research on the acidic KTxs has been ignored for several years and progressed slowly. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe the identification of nine new acidic KTxs by cDNA cloning and bioinformatic analyses. Seven of these toxins belong to three new α-KTx subfamilies (α-KTx28, α-KTx29, and α-KTx30, and two are new members of the known κ-KTx2 subfamily. ImKTx104 containing three disulfide bridges, the first member of the α-KTx28 subfamily, has a low sequence homology with other known KTxs, and its NMR structure suggests ImKTx104 adopts a modified cystine-stabilized α-helix-loop-β-sheet (CS-α/β fold motif that has no apparent α-helixs and β-sheets, but still stabilized by three disulfide bridges. These newly described acidic KTxs exhibit differential pharmacological effects on potassium channels. Acidic scorpion toxin ImKTx104 was the first peptide inhibitor found to affect KCNQ1 channel, which is insensitive to the basic KTxs and is strongly associated with human cardiac abnormalities. ImKTx104 selectively inhibited KCNQ1 channel with a K(d of 11.69 µM, but was less effective against the basic KTxs-sensitive potassium channels. In addition to the ImKTx104 toxin, HeTx204 peptide, containing a cystine-stabilized α-helix-loop-helix (CS-α/α fold scaffold motif, blocked both Kv1.3 and KCNQ1 channels. StKTx23 toxin, with a cystine-stabilized α-helix-loop-β-sheet (CS-α/β fold motif, could inhibit Kv1.3 channel, but not the KCNQ1 channel. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings characterize the structural and functional diversity of acidic KTxs, and could accelerate the development and clinical use of acidic KTxs as pharmacological tools and

  12. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  13. The Kagomé topology of the gallium and indium metal-organic framework types with a MIL-68 structure: synthesis, XRD, solid-state NMR characterizations, and hydrogen adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkringer, Christophe; Meddouri, Mohamed; Loiseau, Thierry; Guillou, Nathalie; Marrot, Jérôme; Férey, Gérard; Haouas, Mohamed; Taulelle, Francis; Audebrand, Nathalie; Latroche, Michel

    2008-12-15

    The vanadium-based terephthalate analogs of MIL-68 have been obtained with gallium and indium (network composition: M(OH)(O(2)C-C(6)H(4)-CO(2)), M = Ga or In) by using a solvothermal synthesis technique using N,N-dimethylformamide as a solvent (10 and 48 h, for Ga and In, respectively, at 100 degrees C). They have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis; vibrational spectroscopy; and solid-state (1)H and (1)H-(1)H radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR), (1)H-(1)H double quantum correlation (DQ), and (13)C{(1)H} cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy. The three-dimensional network with a Kagomé-like lattice is built up from the connection of infinite trans-connected chains of octahedral units MO(4)(OH)(2) (M = Ga or In), linked to each other through the terephthalate ligands in order to generate triangular and hexagonal one-dimensional channels. The presence of DMF molecules with strong interactions within the channels as well as their departure upon calcination (150 degrees C under a primary vacuum) of the materials has been confirmed by subjecting MIL-68 (Ga) to solid-state (1)H MAS NMR. The (1)H-(1)H RFDR and (1)H-(1)H DQ spectra revealed important information on the spatial arrangement of the guest species with respect to the hybrid organic-inorganic network. (13)C{(1)H} CPMAS NMR of activated samples provided crystallographically independent sites in agreement with X-ray diffraction structure determination. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas are 1117(24) and 746(31) m(2) g(-1) for MIL-98 (Ga) and MIL-68 (In), respectively. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms have been measured at 77 K, and the storage capacities are found to be 2.46 and 1.98 wt % under a saturated pressure of 4 MPa for MIL-68 (Ga) and MIL-68 (In), respectively. For comparison, the hydrogen uptake for the aluminum trimesate MIL-110, which has an open framework with 16 A channels, is 3 wt % under 4 MPa.

  14. NMR Studies of Polymer Nanocomposites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenbaum, Steve

    2001-01-01

    .... The primary tool is pulsed field gradient NMR. A static field gradient method was developed which makes possible variable pressure diffusion measurement, and the application to the important fuel cell membrane NAFION constitute the first results...

  15. β-NMR sample optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Zakoucka, Eva

    2013-01-01

    During my summer student programme I was working on sample optimization for a new β-NMR project at the ISOLDE facility. The β-NMR technique is well-established in solid-state physics and just recently it is being introduced for applications in biochemistry and life sciences. The β-NMR collaboration will be applying for beam time to the INTC committee in September for three nuclei: Cu, Zn and Mg. Sample optimization for Mg was already performed last year during the summer student programme. Therefore sample optimization for Cu and Zn had to be completed as well for the project proposal. My part in the project was to perform thorough literature research on techniques studying Cu and Zn complexes in native conditions, search for relevant binding candidates for Cu and Zn applicable for ß-NMR and eventually evaluate selected binding candidates using UV-VIS spectrometry.

  16. Interpretations of NMR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J.Z.; McFarland, W.D.; Chen, S.S.; Sadhu, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Two color display schemes are generally considered in medical images: pseudo-color and color composite. Psuedo-color technique maps the intensity means of a single monochrome image into a three dimensional color space, the gray level is thus replaced by the assigned color. Such a psuedo-color assignment is somewhat arbitrary but may be advantageous if the monochrome image is composed of simple intensity patterns. A good example of psuedo-color application is in nuclear medicine: The change of gray levels can be simply determined and the isocounts from two regions with different surroundings can be readily recognized. However, the use of psuedo-color in CT or MR imaging is controversial because it does not give additional information and may exaggerate insignificant gray scale differences. The color composite technique maps three parametric image data into a three dimensional color space, and thus three monochrome images are merged to form a single color image. The color composite technique increases the number of ways information can be displayed and provides both quantitative and qualitative data about the object or event represented. This paper describes the application of color composite in NMR images

  17. Exfoliative Toxins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Bukowski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and livestock. It causes a diverse array of diseases, ranging from relatively harmless localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic conditions. Among multiple virulence factors, staphylococci secrete several exotoxins directly associated with particular disease symptoms. These include toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1, enterotoxins, and exfoliative toxins (ETs. The latter are particularly interesting as the sole agents responsible for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS, a disease predominantly affecting infants and characterized by the loss of superficial skin layers, dehydration, and secondary infections. The molecular basis of the clinical symptoms of SSSS is well understood. ETs are serine proteases with high substrate specificity, which selectively recognize and hydrolyze desmosomal proteins in the skin. The fascinating road leading to the discovery of ETs as the agents responsible for SSSS and the characterization of the molecular mechanism of their action, including recent advances in the field, are reviewed in this article.

  18. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129 Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131 Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen

  19. Shiga Toxin Therapeutics: Beyond Neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Hall

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribotoxic Shiga toxins are the primary cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS in patients infected with Shiga toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (STEC, a pathogen class responsible for epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal disease around the globe. HUS is a leading cause of pediatric renal failure in otherwise healthy children, resulting in a mortality rate of 10% and a chronic morbidity rate near 25%. There are currently no available therapeutics to prevent or treat HUS in STEC patients despite decades of work elucidating the mechanisms of Shiga toxicity in sensitive cells. The preclinical development of toxin-targeted HUS therapies has been hindered by the sporadic, geographically dispersed nature of STEC outbreaks with HUS cases and the limited financial incentive for the commercial development of therapies for an acute disease with an inconsistent patient population. The following review considers potential therapeutic targeting of the downstream cellular impacts of Shiga toxicity, which include the unfolded protein response (UPR and the ribotoxic stress response (RSR. Outcomes of the UPR and RSR are relevant to other diseases with large global incidence and prevalence rates, thus reducing barriers to the development of commercial drugs that could improve STEC and HUS patient outcomes.

  20. NMR imaging in theory and in practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.G.; Inamdar, R.; Bushell, M.-C.

    1988-01-01

    This review, completed in 1988, covers basic theory, NMR imaging (selective excitation, image acquisition and reconstruction, spatial localisation of NMR parameters, factors affecting accuracy of NMR parameters, image quality considerations), and NMR imaging in clinical practice. The authors conclude that current NMR technology enables one to image the human body with a clarity matching x-ray CT, in terms of contrast differentiation in soft tissues being superior. (U.K.)

  1. Toxin production in Dinophysis and the fate of these toxins in marine mussels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Tor

    Diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) poses a considerable threat to food safety and to the economy of shellfish fishers and farmers in many parts of the world. Thousands of DSP intoxications have been reported, and bivalve harvesting can sometimes be closed down several months in a row. The toxins....... acuta. I grew the two species in laboratory cultures at different irradiances (7-130 μmol photons m-2 s-1) and with different food availability. The results showed that irradiance had no effects on toxin profiles, and only limited effects of the cellular toxin contents. Rather, toxin production rates...... followed growth rates, thus giving stable toxin contents. Food availability also did not change the toxin profiles of either species, but starvation did increase the cellular contents of each of the toxins present. The observation that toxin production continued for several weeks after the ciliate food...

  2. Computational Studies of Snake Venom Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Paola G. Ojeda; David Ramírez; Jans Alzate-Morales; Julio Caballero; Quentin Kaas; Wendy González

    2017-01-01

    Most snake venom toxins are proteins, and participate to envenomation through a diverse array of bioactivities, such as bleeding, inflammation, and pain, cytotoxic, cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects. The venom of a single snake species contains hundreds of toxins, and the venoms of the 725 species of venomous snakes represent a large pool of potentially bioactive proteins. Despite considerable discovery efforts, most of the snake venom toxins are still uncharacterized. Modern bioinformatics t...

  3. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs

  4. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Ammonia Vapor Removal by Cu3(BTC)2 and Its Characterization by MAS NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Gregory W.; Wagner, George W.; Balboa, Alex; Mahle, John; Sewell, Tara; Karwacki, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption equilibria and NMR experiments were performed to study the adsorption and interactions of ammonia with metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1, or Cu3(BTC)2 (BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate). Ammonia capacities determined from chemical breakthrough measurements show significantly higher uptake capacities than from adsorption alone, suggesting a stronger interaction involving a potential reaction with the Cu3(BTC)2 framework. Indeed, 1H MAS NMR reveals that a major disruption of the...

  6. Solid-State NMR Study of New Copolymers as Solid Polymer Electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Daigle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the analysis of comb-like polymers by solid-state NMR. The polymers were previously evaluated as solid-polymer-electrolytes (SPE for lithium-polymer-metal batteries that have suitable ionic conductivity at 60 °C. We propose to develop a correlation between 13C solid-state NMR measurements and phase segregation. 13C solid-state NMR is a perfect tool for differentiating polymer phases with fast or slow motions. 7Li was used to monitor the motion of lithium ions in the polymer, and activation energies were calculated.

  7. NMR-based milk metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundekilde, Ulrik; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Bertram, Hanne Christine S.

    2013-01-01

    and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking...... the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive...... compounds. Furthermore, metabolomics applications elucidating how the differential regulated genes affects milk composition are also reported. This review will highlight the recent advances in NMR-based metabolomics on milk, as well as give a brief summary of when NMR spectroscopy can be useful for gaining...

  8. Further development of deuterium NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-azzawi, N.A.Y.

    1983-01-01

    In this work dichlorotris (triphenylphosphine) ruthenium (11) (RuCl 2 (PPh 3 ) 3 ) coupled with the deuterium source D 2 O was used as a catalyst for the study of the isotopic exchange reaction in alcohols and amines deuterium labelling of several primary and secondary alcohols have been made, and the position of labelling in the molecule was established by comparison of the 1 H NMR and 2 H NMR spectra while the relative distribution of deuterium was obtained from 2 H NMR spectrum. An oxidation-reduction mechanism was proposed for the hydrogen-deuterium exchange process, since in case of secondary alcohol the anticipated intermediate product (Ketone) was separated and identified. The relative distribution of deuterium was found to be time-dependent. Moreover the labelling in the B. Position was found to increase up on the addition of sodium hydroxide to the reaction mixture. 80 tabs.; 290 figs.; 124 refs

  9. Flow NMR of complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheler, U.; Bagusat, F. [Leibniz-Inst. fuer Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Dresden (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    A combination of NMR imaging and pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR is applied to investigate flow. NMR longitudinal relaxation is used to generate contrast in a binary system of oil and water. The spatial distribution of each component and its flow pattern are measured separately. As a model a Couette cell with an additional area of high shear is used as model geometry. While a flat smooth interface is found at rest, the interface become bent under rotation, finally emulgation starts because of the velocity differences between the components. Flow from a submillimeter tube into a wide box and out of the box is investigated as well to understand shear-induced mixing and demixing. (orig.)

  10. Synthesis and biology of cyclic imine toxins, an emerging class of potent, globally distributed marine toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivala, Craig E; Benoit, Evelyne; Aráoz, Rómulo; Servent, Denis; Novikov, Alexei; Molgó, Jordi; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-03-01

    From a small group of exotic compounds isolated only two decades ago, Cyclic Imine (CI) toxins have become a major class of marine toxins with global distribution. Their distinct chemical structure, biological mechanism of action, and intricate chemistry ensures that CI toxins will continue to be the subject of fascinating fundamental studies in the broad fields of chemistry, chemical biology, and toxicology. The worldwide occurrence of potent CI toxins in marine environments, their accumulation in shellfish, and chemical stability are important considerations in assessing risk factors for human health. This review article aims to provide an account of chemistry, biology, and toxicology of CI toxins from their discovery to the present day.

  11. NMR spectroscopic study and DFT calculations of GIAO NMR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts and 1JCH coupling constants of danon have been calculated by means of B3LYP density functional method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Comparison between the experimental and the theoretical results indicates that density functional B3LYP method is able to provide satisfactory results for ...

  12. Vth Pan American Symposium on Animal, Plant and Microbial Toxins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ownby, Charlotte

    1996-01-01

    ..., cardiotoxins, and antihemorrhagic factors. Presentations on plant and microbial toxins include work done on ricin, Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin, cone snail peptides, sea anemone toxins, proteinase inhibitors and maitotoxin...

  13. A Quantitative Electrochemiluminescence Assay for Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merrill, Gerald A; Rivera, Victor R; Neal, Dwayne D; Young, Charles; Poli, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    .... Biotinylated antibodies to C. perfringens alpha toxin bound to streptavidin paramagnetic beads specifically immunoadsorbed soluble sample alpha toxin which subsequently selectively immunoadsorbed ruthenium (Ru...

  14. Plant insecticidal toxins in ecological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Sébastien; Gallet, Christiane; Després, Laurence

    2012-04-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play a key role in plant-insect interactions, whether constitutive or induced, C- or N-based. Anti-herbivore defences against insects can act as repellents, deterrents, growth inhibitors or cause direct mortality. In turn, insects have evolved a variety of strategies to act against plant toxins, e.g., avoidance, excretion, sequestration and degradation of the toxin, eventually leading to a co-evolutionary arms race between insects and plants and to co-diversification. Anti-herbivore defences also negatively impact mutualistic partners, possibly leading to an ecological cost of toxin production. However, in other cases toxins can also be used by plants involved in mutualistic interactions to exclude inadequate partners and to modify the cost/benefit ratio of mutualism to their advantage. When considering the whole community, toxins have an effect at many trophic levels. Aposematic insects sequester toxins to defend themselves against predators. Depending on the ecological context, toxins can either increase insects' vulnerability to parasitoids and entomopathogens or protect them, eventually leading to self-medication. We conclude that studying the community-level impacts of plant toxins can provide new insights into the synthesis between community and evolutionary ecology.

  15. Plant Insecticidal Toxins in Ecological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ibanez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary metabolites play a key role in plant-insect interactions, whether constitutive or induced, C- or N-based. Anti-herbivore defences against insects can act as repellents, deterrents, growth inhibitors or cause direct mortality. In turn, insects have evolved a variety of strategies to act against plant toxins, e.g., avoidance, excretion, sequestration and degradation of the toxin, eventually leading to a co-evolutionary arms race between insects and plants and to co-diversification. Anti-herbivore defences also negatively impact mutualistic partners, possibly leading to an ecological cost of toxin production. However, in other cases toxins can also be used by plants involved in mutualistic interactions to exclude inadequate partners and to modify the cost/benefit ratio of mutualism to their advantage. When considering the whole community, toxins have an effect at many trophic levels. Aposematic insects sequester toxins to defend themselves against predators. Depending on the ecological context, toxins can either increase insects’ vulnerability to parasitoids and entomopathogens or protect them, eventually leading to self-medication. We conclude that studying the community-level impacts of plant toxins can provide new insights into the synthesis between community and evolutionary ecology.

  16. Toxin-Antitoxin Battle in Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cataudella, Ilaria

    This PhD thesis consists of three research projects revolving around the common thread of investigation of the properties and biological functions of Toxin-Antitoxin loci. Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) loci are transcriptionally regulated via an auto-inhibition mechanism called conditional cooperativity, ...

  17. Botulinum toxin — therapeutic effect in cosmetology

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison A.V.; Bocharova Y.M.; Morrison V.V.

    2016-01-01

    This review presents the data from published literatures and the research works conducted by the authors about mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin and its use in the practical medicine (particularly in dermatology and cosmetology). Indications and contraindications of botulinum toxin use in cosmetology are also considered in this work.

  18. Stealth and mimicry by deadly bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yates, S.P.; Jørgensen, Rene; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2006-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin and exotoxin A are well-characterized members of the ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin family that serve as virulence factors in the pathogenic bacteria, Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.  New high-resolution structural data of the Michaelis complex...

  19. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates...

  20. Botulinum toxin for masseter hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowicz, Zbys; van Zuuren, Esther J; Schoones, Jan

    2013-09-09

    Benign masseter muscle hypertrophy is an uncommon clinical phenomenon of uncertain aetiology which is characterised by a soft swelling near the angle of the mandible. The swelling may on occasion be associated with facial pain and can be prominent enough to be considered cosmetically disfiguring. Varying degrees of success have been reported for some of the treatment options for masseter hypertrophy, which range from simple pharmacotherapy to more invasive surgical reduction. Injection of botulinum toxin type A into the masseter muscle is generally considered a less invasive modality and has been advocated for cosmetic sculpting of the lower face. Botulinum toxin type A is a powerful neurotoxin which is produced by the anaerobic organism Clostridium botulinum and when injected into a muscle causes interference with the neurotransmitter mechanism producing selective paralysis and subsequent atrophy of the muscle.This review is an update of a previously published Cochrane review. To assess the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A compared to placebo or no treatment, for the management of benign bilateral masseter hypertrophy. We searched the following databases from inception to April 2013: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE (via PubMed); EMBASE (via embase.com); Web of Science; CINAHL; Academic Search Premier (via EBSCOhost); ScienceDirect; LILACS (via BIREME); PubMed Central and Google Scholar (from 1700 to 19 April 2013). We searched two bibliographic databases of regional journals (IndMED and Iranmedex) which were expected to contain relevant trials. We also searched reference lists of relevant articles and contacted investigators to identify additional published and unpublished studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing intra-masseteric injections of botulinum toxin versus placebo administered for cosmetic facial sculpting in individuals of any age with bilateral benign

  1. Brown spider dermonecrotic toxin directly induces nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaim, Olga Meiri; Sade, Youssef Bacila; Bertoni da Silveira, Rafael; Toma, Leny; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Chavez-Olortegui, Carlos; Mangili, Oldemir Carlos; Gremski, Waldemiro; Dietrich, Carl Peter von; Nader, Helena B.; Sanches Veiga, Silvio

    2006-01-01

    Brown spider (Loxosceles genus) venom can induce dermonecrotic lesions at the bite site and systemic manifestations including fever, vomiting, convulsions, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hemolytic anemia and acute renal failure. The venom is composed of a mixture of proteins with several molecules biochemically and biologically well characterized. The mechanism by which the venom induces renal damage is unknown. By using mice exposed to Loxosceles intermedia recombinant dermonecrotic toxin (LiRecDT), we showed direct induction of renal injuries. Microscopic analysis of renal biopsies from dermonecrotic toxin-treated mice showed histological alterations including glomerular edema and tubular necrosis. Hyalinization of tubules with deposition of proteinaceous material in the tubule lumen, tubule epithelial cell vacuoles, tubular edema and epithelial cell lysis was also observed. Leukocytic infiltration was neither observed in the glomerulus nor the tubules. Renal vessels showed no sign of inflammatory response. Additionally, biochemical analyses showed such toxin-induced changes in renal function as urine alkalinization, hematuria and azotemia with elevation of blood urea nitrogen levels. Immunofluorescence with dermonecrotic toxin antibodies and confocal microscopy analysis showed deposition and direct binding of this toxin to renal intrinsic structures. By immunoblotting with a hyperimmune dermonecrotic toxin antiserum on renal lysates from toxin-treated mice, we detected a positive signal at the region of 33-35 kDa, which strengthens the idea that renal failure is directly induced by dermonecrotic toxin. Immunofluorescence reaction with dermonecrotic toxin antibodies revealed deposition and binding of this toxin directly in MDCK epithelial cells in culture. Similarly, dermonecrotic toxin treatment caused morphological alterations of MDCK cells including cytoplasmic vacuoles, blebs, evoked impaired spreading and detached cells from each other and from

  2. Interplay between toxin transport and flotillin localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pust, Sascha; Dyve, Anne Berit; Torgersen, Maria L

    2010-01-01

    The flotillin proteins are localized in lipid domains at the plasma membrane as well as in intracellular compartments. In the present study, we examined the importance of flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 for the uptake and transport of the bacterial Shiga toxin (Stx) and the plant toxin ricin and we...... for flotillin-1 or -2. However, the Golgi-dependent sulfation of both toxins was significantly reduced in flotillin knockdown cells. Interestingly, when the transport of ricin to the ER was investigated, we obtained an increased mannosylation of ricin in flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 knockdown cells. The toxicity...... of both toxins was twofold increased in flotillin-depleted cells. Since BFA (Brefeldin A) inhibits the toxicity even in flotillin knockdown cells, the retrograde toxin transport is apparently still Golgi-dependent. Thus, flotillin proteins regulate and facilitate the retrograde transport of Stx and ricin....

  3. Pore-forming toxins in Cnidaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-12-01

    The ancient phylum of Cnidaria contains many aquatic species with peculiar lifestyle. In order to survive, these organisms have evolved attack and defense mechanisms that are enabled by specialized cells and highly developed venoms. Pore-forming toxins are an important part of their venomous arsenal. Along some other types, the most representative are examples of four protein families that are commonly found in other kingdoms of life: actinoporins, Cry-like proteins, aerolysin-like toxins and MACPF/CDC toxins. Some of the homologues of pore-forming toxins may serve other functions, such as in food digestion, development and response against pathogenic organisms. Due to their interesting physico-chemical properties, the cnidarian pore-forming toxins may also serve as tools in medical research and nanobiotechnological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Studies of muscarinic neurotransmission with antimuscarinic toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Lincoln T; Flynn, Donna D; Liang, Jing-Sheng; McCollum, Mark H

    2004-01-01

    M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors are the most prevalent receptors for acetylcholine in the brain, and m1-toxin1 and m4-toxin are the most specific ligands yet found for their extracellular faces. Both toxins are antagonists. These toxins and their derivatives with biotin, radioiodine and fluorophores are useful for studying M1- and M4-linked neurotransmission. We have used the rat striatum for many studies because this tissue express exceptionally high concentrations of both receptors, the striatum regulates movement, and movement is altered by antimuscarinic agents, M1-knockout and M4-knockout. These toxins and their derivatives may also be used for studies of M1 and M4 receptors in the hippocampus and cortex.

  5. Crystallization of isoelectrically homogeneous cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, B.D.; Westbrook, E.M. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA))

    1989-02-07

    Past difficulty in growing good crystals of cholera toxin has prevented the study of the crystal structure of this important protein. The authors have determined that failure of cholera toxin to crystallize well has been due to its heterogeneity. They have now succeeded in overcoming the problem by isolating a single isoelectric variant of this oligomeric protein (one A subunit and five B subunits). Cholera toxin purified by their procedure readily forms large single crystals. The crystal form has been described previously. They have recorded data from native crystals of cholera toxin to 3.0-{angstrom} resolution with our electronic area detectors. With these data, they have found the orientation of a 5-fold symmetry axis within these crystals, perpendicular to the screw dyad of the crystal. They are now determining the crystal structure of cholera toxin by a combination of multiple heavy-atom isomorphous replacement and density modification techniques, making use of rotational 5-fold averaging of the B subunits.

  6. Crystallization of isoelectrically homogeneous cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangler, B.D.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Past difficulty in growing good crystals of cholera toxin has prevented the study of the crystal structure of this important protein. The authors have determined that failure of cholera toxin to crystallize well has been due to its heterogeneity. They have now succeeded in overcoming the problem by isolating a single isoelectric variant of this oligomeric protein (one A subunit and five B subunits). Cholera toxin purified by their procedure readily forms large single crystals. The crystal form has been described previously. They have recorded data from native crystals of cholera toxin to 3.0-angstrom resolution with our electronic area detectors. With these data, they have found the orientation of a 5-fold symmetry axis within these crystals, perpendicular to the screw dyad of the crystal. They are now determining the crystal structure of cholera toxin by a combination of multiple heavy-atom isomorphous replacement and density modification techniques, making use of rotational 5-fold averaging of the B subunits

  7. Immunotoxins: The Role of the Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David FitzGerald

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin bifunctional molecules that rely on intracellular toxin action to kill target cells. Target specificity is determined via the binding attributes of the chosen antibody. Mostly, but not exclusively, immunotoxins are purpose-built to kill cancer cells as part of novel treatment approaches. Other applications for immunotoxins include immune regulation and the treatment of viral or parasitic diseases. Here we discuss the utility of protein toxins, of both bacterial and plant origin, joined to antibodies for targeting cancer cells. Finally, while clinical goals are focused on the development of novel cancer treatments, much has been learned about toxin action and intracellular pathways. Thus toxins are considered both medicines for treating human disease and probes of cellular function.

  8. 103Rh NMR spectroscopy and its application to rhodium chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernsting, Jan Meine; Gaemers, Sander; Elsevier, Cornelis J

    2004-09-01

    Rhodium is used for a number of large processes that rely on homogeneous rhodium-catalyzed reactions, for instance rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of alkenes, carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid and hydrodesulfurization of thiophene derivatives (in crude oil). Many laboratory applications in organometallic chemistry and catalysis involve organorhodium chemistry and a wealth of rhodium coordination compounds is known. For these and other areas, 103Rh NMR spectroscopy appears to be a very useful analytical tool. In this review, most of the literature concerning 103Rh NMR spectroscopy published from 1989 up to and including 2003 has been covered. After an introduction to several experimental methods for the detection of the insensitive 103Rh nucleus, a discussion of factors affecting the transition metal chemical shift is given. Computational aspects and calculations of chemical shifts are also briefly addressed. Next, the application of 103Rh NMR in coordination and organometallic chemistry is elaborated in more detail by highlighting recent developments in measurement and interpretation of 103Rh NMR data, in relation to rhodium-assisted reactions and homogeneous catalysis. The dependence of the 103Rh chemical shift on the ligands at rhodium in the first coordination sphere, on the complex geometry, oxidation state, temperature, solvent and concentration is treated. Several classes of compounds and special cases such as chiral rhodium compounds are reviewed. Finally, a section on scalar coupling to rhodium is provided. 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  10. Developments in Solid-State NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reso/020/11/1040-1052. Keywords. NMR; solid state; anisotropy; magic angle spinning dipolar coupling; quadrupolar coupling; chemical shift. Author Affiliations. K V Ramanathan1. NMR Research Center, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru ...

  11. Understanding NMR: self-learning manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastler, B.

    2000-01-01

    This initiation to the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging allows to understand the essential basic physical principles for the realization and the interpretation of an NMR examination. (J.S.)

  12. Fourier transform n.m.r. spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, D.

    1976-01-01

    This book is orientated to techniques rather than applications. The basic theory of n.m.r. is dealt with in a unified approach to the Fourier theory. The middle section of the book concentrates on the practical aspects of Fourier n.m.r., both instrumental and experimental. The final chapters briefly cover general application of n.m.r., but concentrate strongly on those areas where Fourier n.m.r. can give information which is not available by conventional techniques

  13. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1969-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications focuses on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as chemical shifts, lattices, and couplings. The book first offers information on the theory of NMR, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, spin lattice relaxation, line widths, saturation, quantum mechanical description of NMR, and ringing. The text then ponders on instrumentation and techniques and chemical shifts. Discussions focus on the origin of chemical shifts, reference compounds, empirical correlations of chemical shifts, modulation and phase detection,

  14. Structures of Biomolecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    solution makes NMR more suitable for studying the dynamic behavior of macromolecules. The first high resolution protein structure by NMR spectroscopy was carried out in mid-1980s [3]. Before the beginning of this millennium, NMR spectroscopy was limited to solving 3D struc- tures of proteins with molecular masses less ...

  15. Development of Two-Dimensional NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The development of Fourier transform NMR in the mid. 1960's, did parallel processing of the collection of NMR data, increased the signal/noise ratio by two orders of magnitude and made it possible to record the proton NMR spectra of small proteins which contain hundreds of resonances. The assignment of these ...

  16. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  17. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinastepe, Neslihan; Küçük, Burcu Bal; Oral, Koray

    2015-10-01

    Botulinum toxin, the most potent biological toxin, has been shown to be effective for a variety of disorders in several medical conditions, when used both therapeutically and cosmetically. In recent years, there has been a rising trend in the use of this pharmacological agent to control bruxing activity, despite its reported adverse effects. The aim of this review was to provide a brief overview to clarify the underlying essential ideas for the use of botulinum toxin in bruxism based on available scientific papers. An electronic literature search was performed to identify publications related to botulinum toxin and its use for bruxism in PubMed. Hand searching of relevant articles was also made to identify additional studies. Of the eleven identified studies, only two were randomized controlled trials, compared with the effectiveness of botulinum toxins on the reduction in the frequency of bruxism events and myofascial pain after injection. The authors of these studies concluded that botulinum toxin could be used as an effective treatment for reducing nocturnal bruxism and myofascial pain in patients with bruxism. Evidence-based research was limited on this topic. More randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm that botulinum toxin is safe and reliable for routine clinical use in bruxism.

  18. Computational Studies of Snake Venom Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Paola G; Ramírez, David; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Caballero, Julio; Kaas, Quentin; González, Wendy

    2017-12-22

    Most snake venom toxins are proteins, and participate to envenomation through a diverse array of bioactivities, such as bleeding, inflammation, and pain, cytotoxic, cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects. The venom of a single snake species contains hundreds of toxins, and the venoms of the 725 species of venomous snakes represent a large pool of potentially bioactive proteins. Despite considerable discovery efforts, most of the snake venom toxins are still uncharacterized. Modern bioinformatics tools have been recently developed to mine snake venoms, helping focus experimental research on the most potentially interesting toxins. Some computational techniques predict toxin molecular targets, and the binding mode to these targets. This review gives an overview of current knowledge on the ~2200 sequences, and more than 400 three-dimensional structures of snake toxins deposited in public repositories, as well as of molecular modeling studies of the interaction between these toxins and their molecular targets. We also describe how modern bioinformatics have been used to study the snake venom protein phospholipase A2, the small basic myotoxin Crotamine, and the three-finger peptide Mambalgin.

  19. Computational Studies of Snake Venom Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola G. Ojeda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most snake venom toxins are proteins, and participate to envenomation through a diverse array of bioactivities, such as bleeding, inflammation, and pain, cytotoxic, cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects. The venom of a single snake species contains hundreds of toxins, and the venoms of the 725 species of venomous snakes represent a large pool of potentially bioactive proteins. Despite considerable discovery efforts, most of the snake venom toxins are still uncharacterized. Modern bioinformatics tools have been recently developed to mine snake venoms, helping focus experimental research on the most potentially interesting toxins. Some computational techniques predict toxin molecular targets, and the binding mode to these targets. This review gives an overview of current knowledge on the ~2200 sequences, and more than 400 three-dimensional structures of snake toxins deposited in public repositories, as well as of molecular modeling studies of the interaction between these toxins and their molecular targets. We also describe how modern bioinformatics have been used to study the snake venom protein phospholipase A2, the small basic myotoxin Crotamine, and the three-finger peptide Mambalgin.

  20. Engineering toxins for 21st century therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddock, John A; Acharya, K Ravi

    2011-04-01

    'Engineering Toxins for 21st Century Therapies' (9-10 September 2010) was part of the Royal Society International Seminar series held at the Kavli International Centre, UK. Participants were assembled from a range of disciplines (academic, industry, regulatory, public health) to discuss the future potential of toxin-based therapies. The meeting explored how the current structural and mechanistic knowledge of toxins could be used to engineer future toxin-based therapies. To date, significant progress has been made in the design of novel recombinant biologics based on domains of natural toxins, engineered to exhibit advantageous properties. The meeting concluded, firstly that future product development vitally required the appropriate combination of creativity and innovation that can come from the academic, biotechnology and pharma sectors. Second, that continued investigation into understanding the basic science of the toxins and their targets was essential in order to develop new opportunities for the existing products and to create new products with enhanced properties. Finally, it was concluded that the clinical potential for development of novel biologics based on toxin domains was evident. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  1. The first successful observation of in-cell NMR signals of DNA and RNA in living human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoki, Yudai; Kiyoishi, Ayaka; Miyake, Masayuki; Kano, Fumi; Murata, Masayuki; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2018-01-31

    In order to understand intracellular biological events, information on the structure, dynamics and interaction of proteins and nucleic acids in living cells is of crucial importance. In-cell NMR is a promising method to obtain this information. Although NMR signals of proteins in human cells have been reported, those of nucleic acids were reported only in Xenopus laevis oocytes, i.e., not in human cells. Here, DNA and RNA were introduced into human cells by means of pore formation by bacterial toxin streptolysin O and subsequent resealing. Then, NMR signals of DNA and RNA were successfully observed for the first time in living human cells. The observed signals directly suggested the formation of DNA and RNA hairpin structures in living human cells.

  2. Polymers under mechanical stress- an NMR investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich [Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden (Germany); Xu, Bo; Leisen, Johannes; Beckham, Haskell W. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Low-field NMR using permanent magnets in Halbach arrangements permit NMR investigation without the limits present in high-field NMR. The lower field in conjunction with confined stray field permit the application of NMR, in particular relaxation NMR in a stretching apparatus and a rheometer. Crystalline and amorphous fraction of semi-crystalline polymers are distinguished by their transverse relaxation times. Upon mechanical load the relaxation times of the amorphous fraction changes as seen in in-situ measurements on polypropylene rods. During the formation of a neck the crystalline fraction becomes more prominent.

  3. A High-Throughput, Precipitating Colorimetric Sandwich ELISA Microarray for Shiga Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gehring

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx1 and Stx2 from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC bacteria were simultaneously detected with a newly developed, high-throughput antibody microarray platform. The proteinaceous toxins were immobilized and sandwiched between biorecognition elements (monoclonal antibodies and pooled horseradish peroxidase (HRP-conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Following the reaction of HRP with the precipitating chromogenic substrate (metal enhanced 3,3-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride or DAB, the formation of a colored product was quantitatively measured with an inexpensive flatbed page scanner. The colorimetric ELISA microarray was demonstrated to detect Stx1 and Stx2 at levels as low as ~4.5 ng/mL within ~2 h of total assay time with a narrow linear dynamic range of ~1–2 orders of magnitude and saturation levels well above background. Stx1 and/or Stx2 produced by various strains of STEC were also detected following the treatment of cultured cells with mitomycin C (a toxin-inducing antibiotic and/or B-PER (a cell-disrupting, protein extraction reagent. Semi-quantitative detection of Shiga toxins was demonstrated to be sporadic among various STEC strains following incubation with mitomycin C; however, further reaction with B-PER generally resulted in the detection of or increased detection of Stx1, relative to Stx2, produced by STECs inoculated into either axenic broth culture or culture broth containing ground beef.

  4. A structural homologue of colipase in black mamba venom revealed by NMR floating disulphide bridge analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisbouvier, J; Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M; Jaquinod, M; Schweitz, H; Lazdunski, M; Marion, D

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of mamba intestinal toxin 1 (MIT1), isolated from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom, has been determined. This molecule is a cysteine-rich polypeptide exhibiting no recognised family membership. Resistance to MIT1 to classical specific endoproteases produced contradictory NMR and biochemical information concerning disulphide-bridge topology. We have used distance restraints allowing ambiguous partners between S atoms in combination with NMR-derived structural information, to correctly determine the disulphide-bridge topology. The resultant solution structure of MIT1, determined to a resolution of 0.5 A, reveals an unexpectedly similar global fold with respect to colipase, a protein involved in fatty acid digestion. Colipase exhibits an analogous resistance to endoprotease activity, indicating for the first time the possible topological origins of this biochemical property. The biochemical and structural homology permitted us to propose a mechanically related digestive function for MIT1 and provides novel information concerning snake venom protein evolution. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  5. High-resolution /sup 1/H NMR study of the solution structure of delta-hemolysin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tappin, M.J.; Pastore, A.; Norton, R.S.; Freer, J.H.; Campbell, I.D.

    1988-03-08

    The 26-residue toxin from Staphylococcus aureus delta-hemolysin, is thought to act by traversing the plasma membrane. The structure of this peptide, in methanol solution, has been investigated by using high-resolution NMR in combination with molecular dynamics calculations. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum has been completely assigned, and it is shown that residues 2-20 form a relatively stable helix while the residues at the C-terminal end appear to be more flexible. The structures were calculated only from nuclear Overhauser effect data and standard bond lengths. It is shown that the results are consistent with /sup 3/J/sub NH-..cap alpha..CH/ coupling constants and amide hydrogen exchange rates.

  6. NMR resonance assignments of NarE, a putative ADP-ribosylating toxin from Neisseria meningitidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlier, L.P.A.; Köhler, Christian; Veggi, D.; Pizza, M.; Soriani, M.; Boelens, R.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    NarE is a 16 kDa protein identified from Neisseria meningitidis, one of the bacterial pathogens responsible for meningitis. NarE belongs to the ADP-ribosyltransferase family and catalyses the transfer of ADP-ribose moieties to arginine residues in target protein acceptors. Many pathogenic bacteria

  7. NMR imaging of human atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of atherosclerosis can no longer be evaluated with morphological parameters only. A description of atherosclerotic plaque composition is necessary to study the mechanisms of plaque rupture, which depends on collagenous cap and lipid core thicknesses. NMR, as a biochemical imaging technique, allows visualization of these components using T1 contrast (mobile lipids), T2 contrast (cap vs. core), spin density (calcifications), diffusion imaging, 1H and 13C spectroscopy. Today, these imaging sequences allow to study in vitro the effects of interventional techniques such as angioplasty or atherectomy. Clinical investigations begin, which will attempt to develop in vivo microscopy and test the ability of NMR to predict plaque rupture. (author). 13 refs., 7 figs

  8. PVT Degradation Studies: NMR Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Under certain environmental conditions, polyvinyl toluene (PVT) plastic scintillator has been observed to undergo internal fogging. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to elucidate the state of water inside the PVT. The deuterium NMR results show that water absorbed by PVT under warm, humid conditions enters several distinct environments, and when the PVT is transferred from incubation to ambient temperature and humidity the water is lost on a time scale of a few hours from these samples. Most of the deuterium NMR peaks can be assigned to bulk liquid water, but almost 35% of the detected signal intensity is contained in a resonance that resembles spectra of water contained in nanometer-scale pores in mesoporous carbon.

  9. Botulinum A toxin utilizations in obstetric palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Aydin

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that with the help of botulinum A toxin and physyotherapy, obstetrical palsy patient with cocontractions can significantly improve movements and may have less surgery. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(3.000: 89-94

  10. Bacterial toxins as pathogen weapons against phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana edo Vale

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxins are virulence factors that manipulate host cell functions and take over the control of vital processes of living organisms to favour microbial infection. Some toxins directly target innate immune cells, thereby annihilating a major branch of the host immune response. In this review we will focus on bacterial toxins that act from the extracellular milieu and hinder the function of macrophages and neutrophils. In particular, we will concentrate on toxins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that manipulate cell signalling or induce cell death by either imposing direct damage to the host cells cytoplasmic membrane or enzymatically modifying key eukaryotic targets. Outcomes regarding pathogen dissemination, host damage and disease progression will be discussed.

  11. NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis - 2015. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  12. NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  13. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of metallocene derivatives of bi-and trivalent rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulejmanov, G.Z.; Bogachev, Yu.S.; Petrovskij, P.V.; Kazimirchuk, E.I.; Zhuravleva, I.L.; Mekhdiev, R.Yu.; Agdamskij, T.A.; Kolobova, N.E.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    Using 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy of metallocene lanthanide-containg derivatives of iron, manganese, rhenium and molybdenum, the interaction character of cyclopentadienyl ligand, central metal atom (Re,Mo) with lanthanide atom is studied. The introduction of bivalent ytterbium-containing substituent both over cyclopentadienyl ring and transition metal atom is realized according to σ-type

  14. Updates on tetanus toxin: a fundamental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ahaduzzaman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium tetani is an anaerobic bacterium that produces second most poisonous protein toxins than any other bacteria. Tetanus in animals is sporadic in nature but difficult to combat even by using antibiotics and antiserum. It is crucial to understand the fundamental mechanisms and signals that control toxin production for advance research and medicinal uses. This review was intended for better understanding the basic patho-physiology of tetanus and neurotoxins (TeNT among the audience of related field.

  15. Toxicological Perspective on Climate Change: Aquatic Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botana, Luis M

    2016-04-18

    In recent years, our group and several others have been describing the presence of new, not previously reported, toxins of high toxicity in vectors that may reach the human food chain. These include tetrodotoxin in gastropods in the South of Europe, ciguatoxin in fish in the South of Spain, palytoxin in mussels in the Mediterranean Sea, pinnatoxin all over Europe, and okadaic acid in the south of the U.S. There seem to be new marine toxins appearing in areas that are heavy producers of seafood, and this is a cause of concern as most of these new toxins are not included in current legislation and monitoring programs. Along with the new toxins, new chemical analogues are being reported. The same phenomenom is being recorded in freshwater toxins, such as the wide appearance of cylindrospermopsin and the large worldwide increase of microcystin. The problem that this phenomenon, which may be linked to climate warming, poses for toxicologists is very important not only because there is a lack of chronic studies and an incomplete comprehension of the mechanism driving the production of these toxins but also because the lack of a legal framework for them allows many of these toxins to reach the market. In some cases, it is very difficult to control these toxins because there are not enough standards available, they are not always certified, and there is an insufficient understanding of the toxic equivalency factors of the different analogues in each group. All of these factors have been revealed and grouped through the massive increase in the use of LC-MS as a monitoring tool, legally demanded, creating more toxicological problems.

  16. Dinoflagellate Toxins Responsible for Ciguatera Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-30

    Virgin Gorda Prorocu’nt~um lirna 885 Little Lameshur Bay, St. John Prorocentrum lima 838 Unknown (cold water form) Prorocontrum lima 62, 105, 142... Prorocentrum concavum, Conference on Natural Toxins from Aquatic and Marine Environments. 4. Tindall, D.R. and Miller, D.M., (1987) Two potent tox-is fiom...NO. NO. N. ACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (iclude Security Classification) DINOFLAGELLATE TOXINS RESPONSIBLE FOR CIGUATERA POISONING 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S

  17. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    Nanoscience is an emerging field that can provide potential routes towards addressing critical issues such as clean and sustainable energy, environmental remediation and human health. Specifically, porous nanomaterials, such as zeolites and mesoporous silica, are found in a wide range of applications including catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, environmental protection, and sensing. The characterization of the physical and chemical properties of nanocrystalline materials is essential to the realization of these innovative applications. The great advantage of porous nanocrystals is their increased external surface area that can control their biological, chemical and catalytic activities. Specific functional groups synthesized on the surface of nanoparticles are able to absorb heavy metals from the solution or target disease cells, such as cancer cells. In these studies, three main issues related to functionalized nanomaterials will be addressed through the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques including: 1) surface composition and structure of functionalized nanocrystalline particles; 2) chemical properties of the guest molecules on the surface of nanomaterials, and 3) adsorption and reactivity of surface bound functional groups. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the major spectroscopic techniques available for the characterization of molecular structure and conformational dynamics with atomic level detail. This thesis deals with the application of 1H solution state NMR to porous nanomaterial in an aqueous environment. Understanding the aqueous phase behavior of functionalized nanomaterials is a key factor in the design and development of safe nanomaterials because their interactions with living systems are always mediated through the aqueous phase. This is often due to a lack of fundamental knowledge in interfacial chemical and physical phenomena that occur on the surface of nanoparticles. The use of solution NMR spectroscopy results

  18. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J; Noonan, Carmel P

    2017-03-02

    The use of botulinum toxin as an investigative and treatment modality for strabismus is well reported in the medical literature. However, it is unclear how effective it is in comparison to other treatment options for strabismus. The primary objective was to examine the efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in the treatment of strabismus compared with alternative conservative or surgical treatment options. This review sought to ascertain those types of strabismus that particularly benefit from the use of botulinum toxin as a treatment option (such as small angle strabismus or strabismus with binocular potential, i.e. the potential to use both eyes together as a pair). The secondary objectives were to investigate the dose effect and complication rates associated with botulinum toxin. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2016), Embase (January 1980 to July 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2016), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 11 July 2016. We handsearched the British and Irish Orthoptic Journal, Australian Orthoptic Journal, proceedings of the European Strabismological Association (ESA), International Strabismological Association (ISA) and International Orthoptic Association (IOA) (www.liv.ac.uk/orthoptics/research/search.htm) and American Academy of Paediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus meetings (AAPOS). We contacted researchers who are active in this field for information about further

  19. Solid-state NMR of inorganic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesinowski, James P

    2012-01-01

    Studies of inorganic semiconductors by solid-state NMR vary widely in terms of the nature of the samples investigated, the techniques employed to observe the NMR signal, and the types of information obtained. Compared with the NMR of diamagnetic non-semiconducting substances, important differences often result from the presence of electron or hole carriers that are the hallmark of semiconductors, and whose theoretical interpretation can be involved. This review aims to provide a broad perspective on the topic for the non-expert by providing: (1) a basic introduction to semiconductor physical concepts relevant to NMR, including common crystal structures and the various methods of making samples; (2) discussions of the NMR spin Hamiltonian, details of some of the NMR techniques and strategies used to make measurements and theoretically predict NMR parameters, and examples of how each of the terms in the Hamiltonian has provided useful information in bulk semiconductors; (3) a discussion of the additional considerations needed to interpret the NMR of nanoscale semiconductors, with selected examples. The area of semiconductor NMR is being revitalized by this interest in nanoscale semiconductors, the great improvements in NMR detection sensitivity and resolution that have occurred, and the current interest in optical pumping and spintronics-related studies. Promising directions for future research will be noted throughout.

  20. [Botulinum toxin therapy for spasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masakado, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) administered as an adjunct to other interventions for spasticity can act as a useful and effective therapeutic tool for treating patients disabled by spasticity. Presence of other non-reflex motor disorders (muscle stiffness, shortness, and contracture) can complicate the clinical course and disturb rehabilitative process of patients with spasticity. Treatment of spasticity using BTX can improve paralysis by correcting muscular imbalance that follows these diseases. In patients with chronic severe spasticity, we also have to address unique and difficult-to-treat clinical conditions such as abnormal posture and movement disorders. The effectiveness of BTX in treating some of these conditions is discussed. Because patients with neurological disabilities can show complex dysfunctions, specific functional limitations, goals, and expected outcomes of treatment should be evaluated and discussed with the patient, family members, and caregivers, prior to initiating BTX therapy. BTX therapy might improve not only care, passive function, but also motor functions in these patients by supplementing intensive rehabilitation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct-current stimulation, peripheral electrical stimulation, muscle stretching, and other rehabilitation strategies.

  1. Affinity chromatography of tetanus toxin, tetanus toxoid, and botulinum A toxin on synaptosomes, and differentiation of their acceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habermann, E.

    1976-01-01

    125 I-labelled tetanus toxin and 125 I-labelled botulinum A neurotoxin are known to be specifically bound to brain synaptosomes. In order to discriminate between active toxin and inactive admixtures present in the starting material or arising during iodination, synaptosome columns were prepared using bromacetylcellulose and/or kieselgur (Celite) as carriers. Both types of columns adsorb the toxins from low ionic strength medium and release them if the pH and ionic strength are raised. Botulinum toxin was eluted with lower ionic strength than tetanus toxin, and could be freed from nontoxic admixtures. Analysis by affinity chromatography disclosed partially toxoided tetanus toxin in both labelled and unlabelled toxin samples. High concentrations of formaldehyde (0.5%) destroyed both toxicity and affinity to the synaptosomes of tetanus toxin. Low concentrations of formaldehyde (0.05%) yielded a derivative of low toxicity which was still, however less firmly, bound to synaptosomes. Tetanus and botulinum toxin differ by their acceptors. Whereas unlabelled botulinum toxin is unable to compete with labelled tetanus toxin, unlabelled tetanus toxin slightly competes with botulinum toxin. Both labelled toxins display anomalous binding behaviour in that they cannot be displaced completely even with a large excess of unlabelled toxin. (orig.) [de

  2. 113Cd NMR as a Probe of the Active Sites of Metalloenzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armitage, Ian M.; Schoot Uiterkamp, Antonius J.M.; Chlebowski, Jan F.; Coleman, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    113Cd NMR has been used to study the active site metal ion(s) of the 113Cd(II) derivatives of four Zn(II) metalloenzymes, carboxypeptidase A, carbonic anhydrases, alkaline phosphatase, and superoxide dismutase. The resonances of the enzyme-bound 113Cd(II) ions are extremely sensitive to ligand

  3. Solid state 13 C NMR quantitative study of wood tar pitches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prauchner, Marcos Juliano; Pasa, Vanya Marcia Duarte; Menezes, Sonia Maria Cabral de

    1999-01-01

    In this work, solid-state 13 C NMR is used with other techniques to characterize Eucalyptus tar pitches and to follow their polymerization reactions. The pitches are the residues of distillation (about 50% m;m) of the tar generated in Eucalyptus slow pyrolysis for charcoal production in metal industry

  4. Tritium and deuterium NMR studies of zeolite catalyzed isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, J.L.; Long, M.A.; Williams, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The use of 3 H and 2 H nmr spectroscopy in studies of hydrogen isotope exchange over zeolites and metal loaded zeolites is important for both development of new catalytic methods of producing labelled compounds and for investigation of the mechanisms of catalysis over zeolites, as selected examples illustrate. 9 refs.; 1 figure; 2 tabs

  5. Hg-II/Ag-I-mediated base pairs and their NMR spectroscopic studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dairaku, T.; Furuita, K.; Sato, H.; Šebera, Jakub; Nakashima, K.; Ono, A.; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Kojima, C.; Tanaka, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 452, Oct 1 (2016), s. 34-42 ISSN 0020-1693 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0228 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR * Hg * Ag * metal-DNA Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.002, year: 2016

  6. Pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin: when and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzi, Rosamaria; Di Martino, Vincenzo; Inzirillo, Antonio; D'Avenia, Eugenio; Inzirillo, Maurizio; Cattaneo, Fabio; Cattaneo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin:when and why? The endoscopic treatment options of achalasia include botulinum toxin (BT) injection and pneumatic dilation (PD) of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). BT can reduce the LES pressure by blocking the release of acetylcoline from presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals in the myenteric plexus. Although the procedure is safe and good initial response is reported, there is a wide variability in the duration of the response and the effect tends to decrease over time. BT is usually recommended for elderly patients or patients with comorbid illnesses, who are poor candidates for more invasive procedures. PD aims at tearing the muscle fibers of the LES and is considered the most effective nonsurgical treatment for achalasia. Technical details of the procedure vary in different institutions and in many clinical settings the choice between PD or minimally invasive surgical myotomy depends upon local expertise in the procedures. Further endoscopic treatment options such as submucosal esophageal myotomy or self-expanding metallic stents are being studied.

  7. Toxin- and cadmium-induced cell death events in tomato suspension cells resemble features of hypersensitive response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Woltering, E.J.; Yordanova, Z.P.

    2007-01-01

    Elicitors of different origin (fumonisin B1, fungal toxin), camptothecin (alkaloid from Camptotheca acuminata), mastoparan (wasp venom) and the heavy metal (cadmium) were tested for their ability to induce programmed cell death (PCD) in a model system of tomato cell culture, line MsK8. By employing

  8. Dynamic pulsed-field-gradient NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Sørland, Geir Humborstad

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with the basics, theory and applications of dynamic pulsed-field-gradient NMR NMR (PFG NMR), this book describes the essential theory behind diffusion in heterogeneous media that can be combined with NMR measurements to extract important information of the system being investigated. This information could be the surface to volume ratio, droplet size distribution in emulsions, brine profiles, fat content in food stuff, permeability/connectivity in porous materials and medical applications currently being developed. Besides theory and applications it will provide the readers with background knowledge on the experimental set-ups, and most important, deal with the pitfalls that are numerously present in work with PFG-NMR. How to analyze the NMR data and some important basic knowledge on the hardware will be explained, too.

  9. Proton NMR relaxation in hydrous melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, J.; Bacarella, A.L.; Benjamin, B.M.; Brown, L.L.; Girard, C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse and continuous wave NMR measurements are reported for protons in hydrous melts of calcium nitrate at temperatures between -4 and 120 0 C. Although measured in different temperature ranges, spin-lattice (T 1 ) and spin-spin (T 2 ) relaxation times appear to be nearly equal to each other and proportional to the self-diffusion coefficients of solute metal cations such as Cd 2+ . At temperatures near 50 0 C, mean Arrhenius coefficients Δ H/sub T 1 / (kcal/mol) are 7.9, 7.3, and 4.8, respectively, for melts containing 2.8, 4.0, and 8.0 moles of water per mole of calcium nitrate, compared to 4.6 kcal/mol for pure water. Temperature dependence of T 1 and T 2 in Ca(NO 3 ) 2 -2.8 H 2 O between -4 and 120 0 C are non-Arrhenius and can be represented by a Fulcher-type equation with a ''zero mobility temperature'' (T 0 ) of 225 0 K, close to the value of T 0 for solute diffusion, electrical conductance and viscosity. Resolution of the relaxation rates into correlation times for intramolecular (rotational) and intermolecular (translational) diffusional motion is discussed in terms of the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound and more recent models for dipolar relaxation

  10. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this article will enable instructors to use inversion recovery as a laboratory activity in applied NMR classes and provide research students with a conveni...

  11. Metal complexes of phosphinic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, P.N.M.; Kuchen, W.; Keck, H.; Haegele, G.

    1977-01-01

    Pr(III), Nd(III) and Eu(III) complexes of dimethyldithiophosphinic acid have been prepared. Their properties and structures have been studied using elemental analysis, molecular weight determination, IR, UV, mass, NMR, magnetic studies, etc. It is found that these metals form neutral complexes of the type ML 3 where L is a deprotonated bidentate dimethyldithiophosphinic acid molecule. The coordination number exhibited by these metals in this case is six. Octahedral structures have been assigned to these complexes. (author)

  12. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination. Part II: Pulse NMR and NMR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Uses simple pulse NMR experiments to discuss Fourier transforms. Studies the generation of spin echoes used in the imaging procedure. Shows that pulse NMR experiments give signals that are additions of sinusoids of differing amplitudes, frequencies, and phases. (MVL)

  13. Solution NMR structure determination of proteins revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billeter, Martin; Wagner, Gerhard; Wuethrich, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    This 'Perspective' bears on the present state of protein structure determination by NMR in solution. The focus is on a comparison of the infrastructure available for NMR structure determination when compared to protein crystal structure determination by X-ray diffraction. The main conclusion emerges that the unique potential of NMR to generate high resolution data also on dynamics, interactions and conformational equilibria has contributed to a lack of standard procedures for structure determination which would be readily amenable to improved efficiency by automation. To spark renewed discussion on the topic of NMR structure determination of proteins, procedural steps with high potential for improvement are identified

  14. NMR spectroscopy using liquid crystal solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Emsley, JW

    2013-01-01

    NMR Spectroscopy using Liquid Crystal Solvents covers the importance of using a liquid crystal solvent in NMR to derive nuclear dipolar spin-spin coupling constants. This book is composed of ten chapters, and begins with a brief description of the features and benefits of liquid crystal in NMR spectroscopic analysis. The succeeding chapters deal with the mode of operation of nuclear spin Hamiltonian for partially oriented molecules and the analysis of NMR spectra of partially oriented molecules, as well as the determination of rigid molecule structure. These topics are followed by discussions

  15. NMR in structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Marta G; Ab, Eiso; Theisgen, Stephan; Siegal, Gregg

    2017-11-08

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can provide valuable structural information for drug discovery endeavors. Here, we discuss the strengths (and limitations) of NMR applications to structure-based drug discovery, highlighting the different levels of resolution and throughput obtainable. Additionally, the emerging field of paramagnetic NMR in drug discovery and recent developments in approaches to speed up and automate protein-observed NMR data collection and analysis are discussed. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. NMR characterization of pituitary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osbakken, M.; Gonzales, J.; Page, R.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve patients (5 male, 7 female, mean age 37.9 +- 20) with pituitary tumors were extensively evaluated with NMR imaging using a 1.5K gauss resistive magnet. Saturation recovery (SR), inversion recovery (IR) and spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used for qualitative characterization of the lesions. T/sub 1/ calculations were also performed for brain and pituitary. Tumor histology and endocrine status were correlated with NMR data. All tumors were large with suprasellar extension (6 with prolactin secretion, 6 without). Pituitary T/sub 1/'s ranged from .2 to .64, the mean T/sub 1/ being longer than that of brain (Brain = .4 +- .04; Pit = .48 +- .14). 3 patients with histological evidence of homogeneous adenomas had long T/sub 1/'s (0.58 +- .05). 3 patients with evidence of recent or old hemorhage into the pituitary had much shorter T/sub 1/'s (0.29 +- .12). There was no relationship between prolactin secretion and T/sub 1/. Qualitative T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ information can be obtained by using a combination of SR, IR, and SE images. Using this method in the patients, homogeneous adenomas had similar T/sub 1/'s and longer T/sub 2/'s compared to the brain, while patients with bleeds had shorter T/sub 1/'s and T/sub 2/'s. Image T/sub 1/ characteristics correlated well with the calculated T/sub 1/ values. The range of T/sub 1/ (and potentially T/sub 2/) values which occur in apparently similar lesions are most likely due to anatomical and pathophysiological variations in these lesions. It may be ultimately possible to separate different types of pathological processes based on NMR image T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ characteristics after careful comparative studies of NMR and histological data are completed. The combination of calculated T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ with image T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ information may also be useful in further characterization of lesions

  17. Animal Toxins: How is Complexity Represented in Databases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungo, Florence; Estreicher, Anne; Bairoch, Amos; Bougueleret, Lydie; Xenarios, Ioannis

    2010-02-01

    Peptide toxins synthesized by venomous animals have been extensively studied in the last decades. To be useful to the scientific community, this knowledge has been stored, annotated and made easy to retrieve by several databases. The aim of this article is to present what type of information users can access from each database. ArachnoServer and ConoServer focus on spider toxins and cone snail toxins, respectively. UniProtKB, a generalist protein knowledgebase, has an animal toxin-dedicated annotation program that includes toxins from all venomous animals. Finally, the ATDB metadatabase compiles data and annotations from other databases and provides toxin ontology.

  18. Performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Schot, Gijs; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    We present here the performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR, the critical assessment of automated structure determination by NMR. The CS-Rosetta server uses only chemical shifts for structure prediction, in combination, when available, with a post-scoring procedure based on

  19. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which…

  20. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  1. Array biosensor for detection of toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligler, Frances S.; Taitt, Chris Rowe; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Sapsford, Kim E.; Shubin, Yura; Golden, Joel P.

    2003-01-01

    The array biosensor is capable of detecting multiple targets rapidly and simultaneously on the surface of a single waveguide. Sandwich and competitive fluoroimmunoassays have been developed to detect high and low molecular weight toxins, respectively, in complex samples. Recognition molecules (usually antibodies) were first immobilized in specific locations on the waveguide and the resultant patterned array was used to interrogate up to 12 different samples for the presence of multiple different analytes. Upon binding of a fluorescent analyte or fluorescent immunocomplex, the pattern of fluorescent spots was detected using a CCD camera. Automated image analysis was used to determine a mean fluorescence value for each assay spot and to subtract the local background signal. The location of the spot and its mean fluorescence value were used to determine the toxin identity and concentration. Toxins were measured in clinical fluids, environmental samples and foods, with minimal sample preparation. Results are shown for rapid analyses of staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, cholera toxin, botulinum toxoids, trinitrotoluene, and the mycotoxin fumonisin. Toxins were detected at levels as low as 0.5 ng mL(-1).

  2. Cyanobacterial Toxin Degrading Bacteria: Who Are They?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Ar. Kormas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in nature and are both beneficial and detrimental to humans. Benefits include being food supplements and producing bioactive compounds, like antimicrobial and anticancer substances, while their detrimental effects are evident by toxin production, causing major ecological problems at the ecosystem level. To date, there are several ways to degrade or transform these toxins by chemical methods, while the biodegradation of these compounds is understudied. In this paper, we present a meta-analysis of the currently available 16S rRNA and mlrA (microcystinase genes diversity of isolates known to degrade cyanobacterial toxins. The available data revealed that these bacteria belong primarily to the Proteobacteria, with several strains from the sphingomonads, and one from each of the Methylobacillus and Paucibacter genera. Other strains belonged to the genera Arthrobacter, Bacillus, and Lactobacillus. By combining the ecological knowledge on the distribution, abundance, and ecophysiology of the bacteria that cooccur with toxic cyanobacterial blooms and newly developed molecular approaches, it is possible not only to discover more strains with cyanobacterial toxin degradation abilities, but also to reveal the genes associated with the degradation of these toxins.

  3. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  4. New techniques in NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, C.E.

    1998-10-01

    In 1989, Soerensen introduced a method, the unitary bound, for calculating the maximum efficiencies of coherence transfer processes in NMR. This thesis applies this method to quadrupolar nuclei, an area not investigated by Soerensen. In doing so, several questions are raised, and answered, as to the implications of the unitary bound for coherence transfer processes in all areas of NMR. These include discussions of when such processes can be reversed without loss of signal and when sequential coherence transfer steps can be carried out with both steps having the maximum efficiency. One area of NMR of quadrupolar nuclei which has attracted some interest over the past few years has been the selective excitation of 23 Na nuclei in ordered environments. This was hinted at by Jaccard et al. in 1986 and demonstrated in biological systems by Eliav et al. in 1992, who achieved the selective excitation using a double-quantum filtration (DQF) experiment. The following year, Kemp-Harper and Wimperis demonstrated that the Jeener-Broekaert experiment could be used to achieve the same selectivity through excitation of quadrupolar order. The unitary bound shows that neither of these experiments achieve the maximum coherence transfer efficiency. This thesis sets out to improve upon the efficiency of these two experiments. Two multiple-pulse experiments are investigated. One seeks to improve upon the efficiency of the Jeener-Broekaert experiment for spin I = 3/2 nuclei by 33% to achieve the unitary bound efficiency. The other seeks to improve the efficiency of the selective DQF experiment by 41% to achieve the bound for spin I= 3/2 nuclei. 23 Na NMR spectra of cartilage and a lyotropic liquid crystal are presented which show that, although the new version of the Jeener-Broekaert experiment achieves no greater efficiency in practical application than the original, the new DQF experiment produces up to half of the expected improvement in efficiency. Alternative techniques to the

  5. Studies of helium distribution in metal tritides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, R.C. Jr.; Attalla, A.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of helium ( 3 He) in LiT, TiT 2 , and UT 3 , which are regarded as representative metal tritides, was investigated using pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Analyses of the NMR lineshapes and nuclear relaxation times indicate the 3 He atoms are trapped in microscopic gas bubbles for each tritide. The effects of concentration and temperature on the 3 He distributions were investigated as well

  6. Helicobacter pylori Vacuolating Toxin and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Mark S.; Beckett, Amber C.; Cover, Timothy L.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori VacA is a channel-forming toxin unrelated to other known bacterial toxins. Most H. pylori strains contain a vacA gene, but there is marked variation among strains in VacA toxin activity. This variation is attributable to strain-specific variations in VacA amino acid sequences, as well as variations in the levels of VacA transcription and secretion. In this review, we discuss epidemiologic studies showing an association between specific vacA allelic types and gastric cancer, as well as studies that have used animal models to investigate VacA activities relevant to gastric cancer. We also discuss the mechanisms by which VacA-induced cellular alterations may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. PMID:29023421

  7. NMR Analysis of Some Pentacycloundecanedione Derivatives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    was used to assist with the elucidation of the asymmetric ketal structure. KEYWORDS. NMR elucidation, pentacycloundecane, 2D NMR. 1. Introduction. The chemistry ... intermediate for the diol 413,14 which is used in the synthesis of various crown ethers13,15–17 and macrocycles.11,18. 2. Experimental. The four products ...

  8. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  9. Synthesis and NMR Elucidation of Novel Pentacycloundecane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herein we report the synthesis and NMR elucidation of five novel pentacycloundecane (PCU)-derived short peptides as potential HIV protease inhibitors. 1H and 13C spectral analysis show major overlapping of methine resonance of the PCU 'cage' thereby making it extremely difficult to assign the NMR signals. Attachment ...

  10. Early history of NMR at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has developed into an important research tool in chemistry. More recently, NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy promise to produce a revolution in medicine and biochemistry. Early experiments at Los Alamos led to DOE programs involving stable isotopes of importance to biology and to medicine. These events are briefly recounted. 2 refs

  11. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  12. Clostridium perfringens delta toxin is sequence related to beta toxin, NetB, and Staphylococcus pore-forming toxins, but shows functional differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Manich

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens produces numerous toxins, which are responsible for severe diseases in man and animals. Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysins released by a number of C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. Delta toxin was characterized to be cytotoxic for cells expressing the ganglioside G(M2 in their membrane. Here we report the genetic characterization of Delta toxin and its pore forming activity in lipid bilayers. Delta toxin consists of 318 amino acids, its 28 N-terminal amino acids corresponding to a signal peptide. The secreted Delta toxin (290 amino acids; 32619 Da is a basic protein (pI 9.1 which shows a significant homology with C. perfringens Beta toxin (43% identity, with C. perfringens NetB (40% identity and, to a lesser extent, with Staphylococcus aureus alpha toxin and leukotoxins. Recombinant Delta toxin showed a preference for binding to G(M2, in contrast to Beta toxin, which did not bind to gangliosides. It is hemolytic for sheep red blood cells and cytotoxic for HeLa cells. In artificial diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine membranes, Delta and Beta toxin formed channels. Conductance of the channels formed by Delta toxin, with a value of about 100 pS to more than 1 nS in 1 M KCl and a membrane potential of 20 mV, was higher than those formed by Beta toxin and their distribution was broader. The results of zero-current membrane potential measurements and single channel experiments suggest that Delta toxin forms slightly anion-selective channels, whereas the Beta toxin channels showed a preference for cations under the same conditions. C. perfringens Delta toxin shows a significant sequence homolgy with C. perfringens Beta and NetB toxins, as well as with S. aureus alpha hemolysin and leukotoxins, but exhibits different channel properties in lipid bilayers. In contrast to Beta toxin, Delta toxin recognizes G(M2 as receptor and forms anion-selective channels.

  13. Marine toxins and their toxicological significance: An overview

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    This article presents an overview of various types of marine toxins and their toxicological significance in the context of biotechnological research and development. The characteristics and toxic potentials of different marine toxins highlighted...

  14. Vth Pan American Symposium on Animal, Plant and Microbial Toxins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ownby, Charlotte

    1996-01-01

    .... Presentations on arthropod toxins included work on scorpion neurotoxins, K+ channel-blocking peptides, lice and wasp proteins, stinging insect venom allergens and Australian funnel-web spider toxins...

  15. Regulation of Toxin Production in Clostridium perfringens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Ohtani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens is widely distributed in nature, especially in soil and the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. C. perfringens causes gas gangrene and food poisoning, and it produces extracellular enzymes and toxins that are thought to act synergistically and contribute to its pathogenesis. A complicated regulatory network of toxin genes has been reported that includes a two-component system for regulatory RNA and cell-cell communication. It is necessary to clarify the global regulatory system of these genes in order to understand and treat the virulence of C. perfringens. We summarize the existing knowledge about the regulatory mechanisms here.

  16. Cellular Entry of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Takehara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin are composed of two non-linked proteins, one being the enzymatic component and the other being the binding/translocation component. These latter components recognize specific receptors and oligomerize in plasma membrane lipid-rafts, mediating the uptake of the enzymatic component into the cytosol. Enzymatic components induce actin cytoskeleton disorganization through the ADP-ribosylation of actin and are responsible for cell rounding and death. This review focuses upon the recent advances in cellular internalization of clostridial binary toxins.

  17. Staphylococcus hyicus exfoliative toxin: Purification and demonstration of antigenic diversity among toxins from virulent strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Bille-Hansen, Vivi; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1997-01-01

    The exfoliative toxin produced by Staphylococcus hyicus strain 1289D-88 was purified as a single protein of approximately 30 kDa. Extracellular proteins of S. hyicus grown under small scale fermentation conditions were precipitated with ammonium sulfate. Separation of proteins was performed...... of 0.5 mM CuSO4 to the purified toxin resulted in more intense skin alterations comparable to lesions caused by precipitated culture supernatant diluted 1:10. These results indicated that the activity of the exfoliative toxin was dependent on the presence of Cu2+. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies...

  18. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy of biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Nicolau

    1995-01-01

    This book is intended to provide an in-depth understanding of 13C NMR as a tool in biological research. 13C NMR has provided unique information concerning complex biological systems, from proteins and nucleic acids to animals and humans. The subjects addressed include multidimensional heteronuclear techniques for structural studies of molecules in the liquid and solid states, the investigation of interactions in model membranes, the elucidation of metabolic pathwaysin vitro and in vivo on animals, and noninvasive metabolic studies performed on humans. The book is a unique mix of NMR methods and biological applications which makes it a convenient reference for those interested in research in this interdisciplinary area of physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine.Key Features* An interdisciplinary text with emphasis on both 13C NMR methodology and the relevant biological and biomedical issues* State-of-the-art 13C NMR techniques are described; Whenever possible, their advantages over other approaches are empha...

  19. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of an enzymatically active domain from the catalytic component (CDTa, residues 216-420) of a binary toxin from Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Braden M; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Varney, Kristen M; Rustandi, Richard R; Weber, David J

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterial pathogen and is the most commonly reported source of nosocomial infection in industrialized nations. Symptoms of C. difficile infection (CDI) include antibiotic-associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis and death. Over the last decade, rates and severity of hospital infections in North America and Europe have increased dramatically and correlate with the emergence of a hypervirulent strain of C. difficile characterized by the presence of a binary toxin, CDT (C. difficile toxin). The binary toxin consists of an enzymatic component (CDTa) and a cellular binding component (CDTb) that together form the active binary toxin complex. CDTa harbors a pair of structurally similar but functionally distinct domains, an N-terminal domain (residues 1-215; (1-215)CDTa) that interacts with CDTb and a C-terminal domain (residues 216-420; (216-420)CDTa) that harbors the intact ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) active site. Reported here are the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the 23 kDa, 205 amino acid C-terminal enzymatic domain of CDTa, termed (216-420)CDTa. These NMR resonance assignments for (216-420)CDTa represent the first for a family of ART binary toxins and provide the framework for detailed characterization of the solution-state protein structure determination, dynamic studies of this domain, as well as NMR-based drug discovery efforts.

  20. 1HN, 13C, and 15N Resonance Assignments of the CDTb-Interacting Domain (CDTaBID) from the Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin Catalytic Component (CDTa, residues 1–221)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Braden M.; Varney, Kristen M.; Rustandi, Richard R.; Weber, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Once considered a relatively harmless bacterium, Clostridium difficile has become a major concern for healthcare facilities, now the most commonly reported hospital-acquired pathogen. C. difficile infection (CDI) is usually contracted when the normal gut microbiome is compromised by antibiotic therapy, allowing the opportunistic pathogen to grow and produce its toxins. The severity of infection ranges from watery diarrhea and abdominal cramping to pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis, or death. The past decade has seen a marked increase in the frequency and severity of CDI among industrialized nations owing directly to the emergence of a highly virulent C. difficile strain, NAP1. Along with the large Clostridial toxins expressed by non-epidemic strains, C. difficile NAP1 produces a binary toxin, CDT (C. difficile transferase). As the name suggests, CDT is a two-component toxin comprised of an ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) component (CDTa) and a cell-binding/translocation component (CDTb) that function to destabilize the host cytoskeleton by covalent modification of actin monomers. Central to the mechanism of binary toxin-induced pathogenicity is the formation of CDTa/CDTb complexes at the cell surface. From the perspective of CDTa, this interaction is mediated by the N-terminal domain (residues 1–215) and is spatially and functionally independent of ART activity, which is located in the C-terminal domain (residues 216–420). Here we report the 1HN, 13C, and 15N backbone resonance assignments of a 212 amino acid, ~23 kDa N-terminal CDTb-interacting domain (CDTaBID) construct by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. These NMR assignments represent the first component coordination domain for a family of Clostridium or Bacillus species harboring ART activity. Our assignments lay the foundation for detailed solution state characterization of structure-function relationships, toxin complex formation, and NMR-based drug discovery efforts. PMID:27351891

  1. Characterisation of cholera toxin by liquid chromatography - Electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Wils, E.R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Cholera toxin, one of the toxins that may be generated by various strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, can be considered as a substance possibly used in biological warfare. The possibilities of characterising the toxin by liquid chromatography electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ES-MS) were

  2. 77 FR 9888 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service... toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145). This new date..., that are contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26, O45, O103, O111, O121...

  3. EFFECTS OF MARINE ALGAL TOXINS ON THERMOREGULATION IN MICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypothermia is often seen in mice and rats exposed acutely to marine algal toxins, but the mechanism of action of these toxins on thermoregulation is not well understood. Our laboratory has assessed the thermoregulatory mechanisms of two marine algal toxins, maitotoxin and brevet...

  4. Regulations for marine microalgal toxins: Towards harmonization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, there are disparities in current regulations regarding methods and applied limits for toxin control. Inconsistencies are especially evident for Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) toxins. Epidemiological and toxicological data are necessary to assess risk, and to establish safe limits for the different groups of toxins.

  5. Uses of 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy in studies of phenylenedioxydiacetamides complexation with the cations of calcium and potassium in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.Q.; Souza, M.C.B.V. de; Alt, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    The complexation abilities and the coordination sites of 12 derivatives using infrared, 1 HNMR and 13 C NMR spectroscopy are analyzed. The spectroscopic results indicate that only the 1,2-phenylenedioxydiacetamides are suitable ligands; the 1,3 derivatives did not react. These ionophors 1-8 represent fourdentale chelating ligands where all four oxygen atmos are involved in bonds to the metal. Independent from its charge one cations is coordinate by two ionophors. (M.J.C.) [pt

  6. Bioengineered kidney tubules efficiently excrete uremic toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Jitske; Fedecostante, M.; Wilmer, M.; Peters, J.G.; Kreuser, U.M.; Broek, P.H.; Mensink, R.A.; Boltje, T.J.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wetzels, J.F.; van der Heuvel, L.P.; Hoenderop, J.G.; Masereeuw, R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a biotechnological platform for the removal of waste products (e.g. uremic toxins), often bound to proteins in plasma, is a prerequisite to improve current treatment modalities for patients suffering from end stage renal disease (ESRD). Here, we present a newly designed

  7. Botulinum Toxin in Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Levi D'Ancona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin on urodynamic parameters and quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Thirty four adult patients with spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity were selected. The patients received 300 units of botulinum toxin type A. The endpoints evaluated with the episodes of urinary incontinence and measured the maximum cystometric capacity, maximum amplitude of detrusor pressure and bladder compliance at the beginning and end of the study (24 weeks and evaluated the quality of life by applying the Qualiveen questionnaire. Results A significant decrease in the episodes of urinary incontinence was observed. All urodynamic parameters presented a significant improvement. The same was observed in the quality of life index and the specific impact of urinary problems scores from the Qualiveen questionnaire. Six patients did not complete the study, two due to incomplete follow-up, and four violated protocol and were excluded from the analyses. No systemic adverse events of botulinum toxin type A were reported. Conclusions A botulinum toxin type A showed a significantly improved response in urodynamics parameters and specific and general quality of life.

  8. Surgery and botulinum toxin in congenital esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Miguel F; Alvarez, María T; Sánchez-Garrido, Carmen M; Hernáez, José M; Rodríguez, José M

    2004-10-01

    In a previous study we investigated the advantages and drawbacks of early and delayed injection of botulinum toxin as primary treatment of infantile esotropia with nystagmus in abduction (IENA). We carried out a further study to investigate the role and efficacy of surgery in this condition and to determine the possible effect of previous injection of both medial recti with botulinum toxin in patients requiring a final horizontal surgical correction. Review of the records of 44 patients (24 girls and 20 boys) with IENA seen between 1979 and 1998 who had undergone at least one horizontal surgical procedure. The outcomes in the 16 patients who had previously received botulinum toxin were compared with those in the 28 patients for whom surgery was the primary treatment. There was a negative correlation between the pretreatment esotropic angle and age (Pearson's r = -0.45, p IENA with delayed diagnosis and in cases associated with unsteadiness of binocular vision or with nonhorizontal deviations. Initial treatment with botulinum toxin, injected into both medial recti, is effective, reducing the amount of further horizontal surgery and favouring postoperative stability, except in children under 18 months, in whom injection of 5 units induces unbalanced dissociated vertical deviation.

  9. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Micha; Nielsen, Marc Trunjer Kusk; Möller, Sören

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes diarrhoeal disease, bloody diarrhoea and haemolytic uraemic syndrome. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of STEC and the clinical features of STEC patients from a well-defined Danish population in which all fecal...

  10. Immunogenicity of toxins during Staphylococcus aureus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verkaik (Nelianne); O. Dauwalder (Olivier); K. Antri (Kenza); I. Boubekri (Ilhem); C.P. de Vogel (Corné); C. Badiou (Cédric); M. Bes (Michèle); F. Vandenesch (François); M. Tazir (Mohammed); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); J. Etienne (Jerome); G. Lina (Gérard); N. Ramdani-Bouguessa (Nadjia); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAB - BACKGROUND: Toxins are important Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors, but little is known about their immunogenicity during infection. Here, additional insight is generated. METHODS: Serum samples from 206 S. aureus-infected patients and 201 hospital-admitted control subjects

  11. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  12. Okadaic Acid: More than a Diarrheic Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Méndez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Okadaic acid (OA is one of the most frequent and worldwide distributed marine toxins. It is easily accumulated by shellfish, mainly bivalve mollusks and fish, and, subsequently, can be consumed by humans causing alimentary intoxications. OA is the main representative diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP toxin and its ingestion induces gastrointestinal symptoms, although it is not considered lethal. At the molecular level, OA is a specific inhibitor of several types of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and a tumor promoter in animal carcinogenesis experiments. In the last few decades, the potential toxic effects of OA, beyond its role as a DSP toxin, have been investigated in a number of studies. Alterations in DNA and cellular components, as well as effects on immune and nervous system, and even on embryonic development, have been increasingly reported. In this manuscript, results from all these studies are compiled and reviewed to clarify the role of this toxin not only as a DSP inductor but also as cause of alterations at the cellular and molecular levels, and to highlight the relevance of biomonitoring its effects on human health. Despite further investigations are required to elucidate OA mechanisms of action, toxicokinetics, and harmful effects, there are enough evidences illustrating its toxicity, not related to DSP induction, and, consequently, supporting a revision of the current regulation on OA levels in food.

  13. New advances in electrochemical biosensors for the detection of toxins: Nanomaterials, magnetic beads and microfluidics systems. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverté, Laia; Prieto-Simón, Beatriz; Campàs, Mònica

    2016-02-18

    The use of nanotechnology in bioanalytical devices has special advantages in the detection of toxins of interest in food safety and environmental applications. The low levels to be detected and the small size of toxins justify the increasing number of publications dealing with electrochemical biosensors, due to their high sensitivity and design versatility. The incorporation of nanomaterials in their development has been exploited to further increase their sensitivity, providing simple and fast devices, with multiplexed capabilities. This paper gives an overview of the electrochemical biosensors that have incorporated carbon and metal nanomaterials in their configurations for the detection of toxins. Biosensing systems based on magnetic beads or integrated into microfluidics systems have also been considered because of their contribution to the development of compact analytical devices. The roles of these materials, the methods used for their incorporation in the biosensor configurations as well as the advantages they provide to the analyses are summarised. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. NMR spectrometers as "magnetic tongues": prediction of sensory descriptors in canned tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmendal, Anders; Amoresano, Claudia; Trotta, Roberta; Lauri, Ilaria; De Tito, Stefano; Novellino, Ettore; Randazzo, Antonio

    2011-10-26

    The perception of odor and flavor of food is a complicated physiological and psychological process that cannot be explained by simple models. Quantitative descriptive analysis is a technique used to describe sensory features. Nevertheless, the availability of a number of instrumental techniques has opened up the possibility to calibrate the sensory perception. In this frame, we have tested the potentiality of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a predictive tool to measure sensory descriptors. In particular, we have used an NMR metabolomic approach that allowed us to differentiate the analyzed samples based on their chemical composition. We were able to correlate the NMR metabolomic fingerprints recorded for canned tomato samples to the sensory descriptors bitterness, sweetness, sourness, saltiness, tomato and metal taste, redness, and density, suggesting that NMR might be a very useful tool for the characterization of sensory features of tomatoes.

  15. Mutant with diphtheria toxin receptor and acidification function but defective in entry of toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Kenji; Hayes, H.; Mekada, Eisuke; Uchida, Tsuyoshi

    1987-01-01

    A mutant of Chinese hamster ovary cells, GE1, that is highly resistant to diphtheria toxin was isolated. The mutant contains 50% ADP-ribosylatable elongation factor 2, but its protein synthesis was not inhibited by the toxin even at concentrations above 100 μg/ml. 125 I-labeled diphtheria toxin was associated with GE1 cells as well as with the parent cells but did not block protein synthesis of GE1 cells even when the cells were exposed to low pH in the presence or absence of NH 4 Cl. The infections of GE1 cells and the parent cells by vesicular stomatitis virus were similar. GE1 cells were cross-resistant to Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and so were about 1,000 times more resistant to this toxin than the parent cells. Hybrids of GE1 cells and the parent cells or mutant cells lacking a functional receptor were more sensitive to diphtheria toxin than GE1 cells. These results suggest that entry of diphtheria toxin into cells requires a cellular factor(s) in addition to those involved in receptor function and acidification of endosomes and that GE1 cells do not express this cellular factor. This character is recessive in GE1 cells

  16. Characterization of Hemagglutinin Negative Botulinum Progenitor Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC, alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs to cause hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin positive progenitor toxin complex consists of BoNT, nontoxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and three hemagglutinin proteins; HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17. Hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes contain BoNT and NTNH as the minimally functional PTC (M-PTC, but not the three hemagglutinin proteins. Interestingly, the genome of hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes comprises open reading frames (orfs which encode for three proteins, but the existence of these proteins has not yet been extensively demonstrated. In this work, we demonstrate that these three proteins exist and form part of the PTC for hemagglutinin negative complexes. Several hemagglutinin negative strains producing BoNT/A, /E, and /F were found to contain the three open reading frame proteins. Additionally, several BoNT/A-containing bivalent strains were examined, and NAPs from both genes, including the open reading frame proteins, were associated with BoNT/A. The open reading frame encoded proteins are more easily removed from the botulinum complex than the hemagglutinin proteins, but are present in several BoNT/A and /F toxin preparations. These are not easily removed from the BoNT/E complex, however, and are present even in commercially-available purified BoNT/E complex.

  17. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). (authors)

  18. NMR reaction monitoring in flow synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Victoria Gomez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the use of flow chemistry with in-line and on-line analysis by NMR are presented. The use of macro- and microreactors, coupled with standard and custom made NMR probes involving microcoils, incorporated into high resolution and benchtop NMR instruments is reviewed. Some recent selected applications have been collected, including synthetic applications, the determination of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters and reaction optimization, even in single experiments and on the μL scale. Finally, software that allows automatic reaction monitoring and optimization is discussed.

  19. The characterisation of polymers using pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.

    1983-01-01

    Broad line pulsed NMR is applied to obtain information on radiation-induced polymer changes and other aspects of polymer science based on the interpretation of spin-spin relaxation curves. Calculations are made to determine the molecular weight, the crosslink density of simple, low molecular weight, flexible polymers. For higher molecular weight polymers, a conclusion can be drawn on the concentrations of entangled and crosslinked units by means of pulsed NMR. Some typical applications of the technique are illustrated by the examples of polyethylenes, rubbers, filled polymeric systems and aqueous polyethylene oxide solutions. The morphology of polymers can be followed by pulsed NMR. (V.N.)

  20. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  1. Solid-state NMR of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirau, P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as one of the most important methods for the solid-state characterisation of polymers. The popularity of NMR is due to the fact that many molecular level features can be measured from the NMR spectra, including the polymer chain conformation, the morphology and the dynamics. The spectral features and relaxation times are affected by local interactions, so they provide information about the structure of polymers on a length scale (2-200 A) that is difficult to measure by other methods. In favourable cases, the NMR experiments provide a molecular-level explanation for the transitions observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and other methods, and the NMR properties can often be related to the bulk properties. Solid-state NMR has long been of interest in polymer science, and the first solid-state NMR studies of polymers were reported approximately a year after the discovery of nuclear resonance in bulk matter. It was reported in this initial study that the proton line width for natural rubber at room temperature is more like that of a mobile liquid than of a solid, but that the resonance broadens near the glass transition temperature (T g ). This was recognised as being related to a change in chain dynamics above and below the T g . NMR methods developed rapidly after these initial observations, first for polymers in solution and, more recently, for polymers in the solid-state. Solid-state NMR studies of polymers were developed more slowly than their solution-state counterparts because solid-state NMR requires more specialised equipment. Solid-state NMR is now such an important tool that most modern spectrometers are capable of performing these studies. The interest in the NMR of solid polymers is due in part to the fact that most polymers are used in the solid state, and in many cases the NMR properties can be directly related to the macroscopic properties. Polymers have restricted mobility in

  2. Discovery of novel bacterial toxins by genomics and computational biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxey, Andrew C; Mansfield, Michael J; Montecucco, Cesare

    2018-06-01

    Hundreds and hundreds of bacterial protein toxins are presently known. Traditionally, toxin identification begins with pathological studies of bacterial infectious disease. Following identification and cultivation of a bacterial pathogen, the protein toxin is purified from the culture medium and its pathogenic activity is studied using the methods of biochemistry and structural biology, cell biology, tissue and organ biology, and appropriate animal models, supplemented by bioimaging techniques. The ongoing and explosive development of high-throughput DNA sequencing and bioinformatic approaches have set in motion a revolution in many fields of biology, including microbiology. One consequence is that genes encoding novel bacterial toxins can be identified by bioinformatic and computational methods based on previous knowledge accumulated from studies of the biology and pathology of thousands of known bacterial protein toxins. Starting from the paradigmatic cases of diphtheria toxin, tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins, this review discusses traditional experimental approaches as well as bioinformatics and genomics-driven approaches that facilitate the discovery of novel bacterial toxins. We discuss recent work on the identification of novel botulinum-like toxins from genera such as Weissella, Chryseobacterium, and Enteroccocus, and the implications of these computationally identified toxins in the field. Finally, we discuss the promise of metagenomics in the discovery of novel toxins and their ecological niches, and present data suggesting the existence of uncharacterized, botulinum-like toxin genes in insect gut metagenomes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Analysis of trivalent cation complexation to functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Jennifer; Mason, Harris; Bruchet, Anthony; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B; Nitsche, Heino

    2014-11-28

    Functionalized mesoporous silica has applications in separations science, catalysis, and sensors. In this work, we studied the fundamental interactions of trivalent cations with functionalized mesoporous silica. We contacted trivalent cations of varying ionic radii with N-[5-(trimethoxysilyl)-2-aza-1-oxopentyl]caprolactam functionalized mesoporous silica with the aim of probing the binding mechanism of the metal to the surface of the solid. We studied the functionalized silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy before and after contact with the metals of interest. We collected NMR spectra of the various metals, as well as of (29)Si and (13)C to probe the silica substrate and the ligand properties, respectively. The NMR spectra indicate that the metals bind to the functionalized silica via two mechanisms. Aluminum sorbed to both the silica and the ligand, but with different coordination for each. Scandium also sorbed to both the silica and the ligand, and unlike the aluminum, had the same coordination number. Additionally, the functionalized silica was susceptible to acid hydrolysis and two primary mechanisms of degradation were observed: detachment from the silica surface and opening of the seven-membered ring in the ligand. Opening of the seven-membered ring may be beneficial in that it decreases steric hindrance of the molecule for binding.

  4. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement

  5. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement.

  6. Probing the outer mouth structure of the HERG channel with peptide toxin footprinting and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Gea-Ny; Sonawane, Kailas D; Korolkova, Yuliya V; Zhang, Mei; Liu, Jie; Grishin, Eugene V; Guy, H Robert

    2007-05-15

    Previous studies have shown that the unusually long S5-P linker lining human ether a-go-go related gene's (hERG's) outer vestibule is critical for its channel function: point mutations at high-impact positions here can interfere with the inactivation process and, in many cases, also reduce the pore's K+ selectivity. Because no data are available on the equivalent region in the available K channel crystal structures to allow for homology modeling, we used alternative approaches to model its three-dimensional structure. The first part of this article describes mutant cycle analysis used to identify residues on hERG's outer vestibule that interact with specific residues on the interaction surface of BeKm-1, a peptide toxin with known NMR structure and a high binding affinity to hERG. The second part describes molecular modeling of hERG's pore domain. The transmembrane region was modeled after the crystal structure of KvAP pore domain. The S5-P linker was docked to the transmembrane region based on data from previous NMR and mutagenesis experiments, as well as a set of modeling criteria. The models were further restrained by contact points between hERG's outer vestibule and the bound BeKm-1 toxin molecule deduced from the mutant cycle analysis. Based on these analyses, we propose a working model for the open conformation of the outer vestibule of the hERG channel, in which the S5-P linkers interact with the pore loops to influence ion flux through the pore.

  7. Environmental Toxin Screening Using Human-Derived 3D Bioengineered Liver and Cardiac Organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D. Forsythe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionEnvironmental toxins, such as lead and other heavy metals, pesticides, and other compounds, represent a significant health concern within the USA and around the world. Even in the twenty-first century, a plethora of cities and towns in the U.S. have suffered from exposures to lead in drinking water or other heavy metals in food or the earth, while there is a high possibility of further places to suffer such exposures in the near future.MethodsWe employed bioengineered 3D human liver and cardiac organoids to screen a panel of environmental toxins (lead, mercury, thallium, and glyphosate, and charted the response of the organoids to these compounds. Liver and cardiac organoids were exposed to lead (10 µM–10 mM, mercury (200 nM–200 µM, thallium (10 nM–10 µM, or glyphosate (25 µM–25 mM for a duration of 48 h. The impacts of toxin exposure were then assessed by LIVE/DEAD viability and cytotoxicity staining, measuring ATP activity and determining IC50 values, and determining changes in cardiac organoid beating activity.ResultsAs expected, all of the toxins induced toxicity in the organoids. Both ATP and LIVE/DEAD assays showed toxicity in both liver and cardiac organoids. In particular, thallium was the most toxic, with IC50 values of 13.5 and 1.35 µM in liver and cardiac organoids, respectively. Conversely, glyphosate was the least toxic of the four compounds, with IC50 values of 10.53 and 10.85 mM in liver and cardiac organoids, respectively. Additionally, toxins had a negative influence on cardiac organoid beating activity as well. Thallium resulting in the most significant decreases in beating rate, followed by mercury, then glyphosate, and finally, lead. These results suggest that the 3D organoids have significant utility to be deployed in additional toxicity screening applications, and future development of treatments to mitigate exposures.Conclusion3D organoids have significant utility to be

  8. Modelling the acid/base 1H NMR chemical shift limits of metabolites in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredwell, Gregory D; Bundy, Jacob G; De Iorio, Maria; Ebbels, Timothy M D

    2016-01-01

    Despite the use of buffering agents the 1 H NMR spectra of biofluid samples in metabolic profiling investigations typically suffer from extensive peak frequency shifting between spectra. These chemical shift changes are mainly due to differences in pH and divalent metal ion concentrations between the samples. This frequency shifting results in a correspondence problem: it can be hard to register the same peak as belonging to the same molecule across multiple samples. The problem is especially acute for urine, which can have a wide range of ionic concentrations between different samples. To investigate the acid, base and metal ion dependent 1 H NMR chemical shift variations and limits of the main metabolites in a complex biological mixture. Urine samples from five different individuals were collected and pooled, and pre-treated with Chelex-100 ion exchange resin. Urine samples were either treated with either HCl or NaOH, or were supplemented with various concentrations of CaCl 2 , MgCl 2 , NaCl or KCl, and their 1 H NMR spectra were acquired. Nonlinear fitting was used to derive acid dissociation constants and acid and base chemical shift limits for peaks from 33 identified metabolites. Peak pH titration curves for a further 65 unidentified peaks were also obtained for future reference. Furthermore, the peak variations induced by the main metal ions present in urine, Na + , K + , Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ , were also measured. These data will be a valuable resource for 1 H NMR metabolite profiling experiments and for the development of automated metabolite alignment and identification algorithms for 1 H NMR spectra.

  9. General synthesis of β-alanine-containing spider polyamine toxins and discovery of nephila polyamine toxins 1 and 8 as highly potent inhibitors of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Simon; Poulsen, Mette H; Nørager, Niels G

    2012-01-01

    Certain spiders contain large pools of polyamine toxins, which are putative pharmacological tools awaiting further discovery. Here we present a general synthesis strategy for this class of toxins and prepare five structurally varied polyamine toxins. Electrophysiological testing at three ionotrop...

  10. Structural investigations of substituted indolizine derivatives by NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furdui, Bianca; Dinica, Rodica; Demeunynck, Martine; Druta, Ioan

    2008-01-01

    Owing to the increasing importance of indolizine heterocycles in the field of biology and pharmacology we have synthesized and investigated the obtained heterocycles by NMR techniques. In order to investigate the substituent effects on the spectroscopic properties, a series of indolizine derivatives were studied by 1 H-NMR, 13 C-NMR and 2D NMR (GCOSY, GHMBC and GHMQC spectra). (authors)

  11. Simultaneous acquisition of three NMR spectra in a single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reduce the acquisition time of high-dimensional NMR spectra for metabolomics.8 The different fast NMR methods and their combinations developed during the past decade for proteins and nucleic acids such as single-scan NMR spectroscopy (ultrafast NMR),9–13. HADMARD encoding,14 reduced dimensional (RD). 1091 ...

  12. Bayesian Peak Picking for NMR Spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yichen

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method.

  13. Cultural Heritage Studies with Mobile NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehorn, Christian; Blümich, Bernhard

    2018-03-30

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) provides in-situ information about selected isotope densities in samples and objects, while also providing contrast through rotational and translational molecular dynamics. These parameters are probed not only in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging but also in nondestructive materials testing by mobile stray-field NMR whose unique perks are valuable in cultural heritage studies. We present recent progress in the analysis of cultural heritage with mobile 1H NMR stray-field sensors, for which the detection zone is outside of the NMR magnet. Prominent applications include the analysis of stratigraphies in paintings and frescoes, and the assessment of material states changing under the impact of aging, conservation and restoration. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Development of Two-Dimensional NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Development of Two-Dimensional NMR: Strucure Determination of Biomolecules in Solution. Anil Kumar. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 995-1002 ...

  15. NMR study of Albemoschus esculentus characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathista, A.L.B.S; Silva, E.O.; Nogueira, Jose de S.; Tavares, M.I.B.

    2001-01-01

    The investigation of the main compounds presented in the Albemoschus esculentus has been carried out employing nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), using solution and solid state NMR when it one was necessary. The evaluation of NMR data allowed us to characterize the main type of components presented in this kind of sample. It was necessary to use a total information from solid state NMR and also the solution response. From these information we could get that four main components were presented in this sample. One in the shell, that is cellulose, another one between the shell and seeds that is a polysaccharide and in the seed two components were found one is a starch and the second one is an oil, a triacylglycerol. These components are responsible by its physical chemistry properties. (author)

  16. NMR analysis of compositional heterogeneity in polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many copolysaccharides are compositionally heterogeneous, and the composition determined by the usual analytical or spectroscopic methods provides only an average value. For some polysaccharides, the NMR data contain copolymer sequence information, such as diad, triad, and tetrad sequence intensiti...

  17. Bayesian Peak Picking for NMR Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichen Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method.

  18. Relaxation time estimation in surface NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Elliot D.; Walsh, David O.

    2017-03-21

    NMR relaxation time estimation methods and corresponding apparatus generate two or more alternating current transmit pulses with arbitrary amplitudes, time delays, and relative phases; apply a surface NMR acquisition scheme in which initial preparatory pulses, the properties of which may be fixed across a set of multiple acquisition sequence, are transmitted at the start of each acquisition sequence and are followed by one or more depth sensitive pulses, the pulse moments of which are varied across the set of multiple acquisition sequences; and apply processing techniques in which recorded NMR response data are used to estimate NMR properties and the relaxation times T.sub.1 and T.sub.2* as a function of position as well as one-dimensional and two-dimension distributions of T.sub.1 versus T.sub.2* as a function of subsurface position.

  19. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  20. NMR spectroscopy in the characterization of asphalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, P.W.; Desando, M.A.; Raub, M.F.; Hoberg, J.O.; Moats, R.; Stewart, F.F. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman (United States))

    1990-07-01

    NMR spectrometry represents a probe which can provide many details regarding the structure and functionality of asphalts. This is particularly true if it is combined with chromatography and/or chemical modifications. In this project {sup 1}H, {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, {sup 29}Si, {sup 31}P nuclei and a variety of NMR techniques (1D, 2D, DEPT) have been used to describe a few chemical characteristics of the asphalts and chromatographic fractions therefrom.

  1. Photodegradation of the Mycobacterium ulcerans toxin, mycolactones: considerations for handling and storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Marion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycolactones are toxins secreted by M. ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer. These toxins, which are the main virulence factors of the bacilli, are responsible for skin lesions. Considering their specificity for M. ulcerans and their presence in skin lesions even at early stages, mycolactones are promising candidates for the development of a diagnostic tool for M. ulcerans infection. Stability of purified mycolactones towards light and heat has not yet been investigated, despite the importance of such parameters in the selection of strategies for a diagnosis tool development. In this context, the effects of UV, light and temperature on mycolactone stability and biological activity were studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the effect of these physical parameters, mycolactones were exposed to different wavelengths in several solvents and temperatures. Structural changes and biological activity were monitored. Whilst high temperature had no effect on mycolactones, UV irradiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C and sunlight exposure caused a considerable degradation, as revealed by LC-MS and NMR analysis, correlated with a loss of biological activity. Moreover, effect of UVs on mycolactone caused a photodegradation rather than a phototransformation due to the identification of degradation product. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the high sensitivity of mycolactones to UVs as such it defines instructions for storage and handling.

  2. NMRbox: A Resource for Biomolecular NMR Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Mark W; Schuyler, Adam D; Gryk, Michael R; Moraru, Ion I; Romero, Pedro R; Ulrich, Eldon L; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Livny, Miron; Delaglio, Frank; Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2017-04-25

    Advances in computation have been enabling many recent advances in biomolecular applications of NMR. Due to the wide diversity of applications of NMR, the number and variety of software packages for processing and analyzing NMR data is quite large, with labs relying on dozens, if not hundreds of software packages. Discovery, acquisition, installation, and maintenance of all these packages is a burdensome task. Because the majority of software packages originate in academic labs, persistence of the software is compromised when developers graduate, funding ceases, or investigators turn to other projects. To simplify access to and use of biomolecular NMR software, foster persistence, and enhance reproducibility of computational workflows, we have developed NMRbox, a shared resource for NMR software and computation. NMRbox employs virtualization to provide a comprehensive software environment preconfigured with hundreds of software packages, available as a downloadable virtual machine or as a Platform-as-a-Service supported by a dedicated compute cloud. Ongoing development includes a metadata harvester to regularize, annotate, and preserve workflows and facilitate and enhance data depositions to BioMagResBank, and tools for Bayesian inference to enhance the robustness and extensibility of computational analyses. In addition to facilitating use and preservation of the rich and dynamic software environment for biomolecular NMR, NMRbox fosters the development and deployment of a new class of metasoftware packages. NMRbox is freely available to not-for-profit users. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. All rights reserved.

  3. O-17 NMR measurement of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Nobuyuki

    1990-01-01

    Recently, attention has been paid to the various treatment of water and the utilization of water by magnetic treatment, electric field treatment and so on. It has been said that by these treatments, the change in the properties of water arises. The state of this treated water cannot be explained by the properties of water from conventional physical and chemical standpoints. In addition, the method of measurement of whether the change arose or not is not yet determined. It is necessary to establish the method of measurement for the basic state of water. In this study, O-17 NMR which observes the state of water directly at molecular or atomic level was investigated as the method of measuring water. The measurement of O-17 NMR was carried out with a JNR 90Q FT NMR of Fourier transformation type of JEOL Ltd. The experimental method and the results are reported. The result of measurement of the O-17 NMR spectrum for distilled ion exchange water is shown. It is know that it has very wide line width as compared with the NMR spectra of protons and C-13. The relative sensitivity of O-17 observation is about 1/100,000 of that of protons. As to the information on the state of water obtained by O-17 NMR, there are chemical shift and line width. As temperature rose, the line width showed decrease, which seemed to be related to the decrease of hydrogen combination. (K.I.)

  4. Toxins for Transgenic Resistance to Hemipteran Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony C. Bonning

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The sap sucking insects (Hemiptera, which include aphids, whiteflies, plant bugs and stink bugs, have emerged as major agricultural pests. The Hemiptera cause direct damage by feeding on crops, and in some cases indirect damage by transmission of plant viruses. Current management relies almost exclusively on application of classical chemical insecticides. While the development of transgenic crops expressing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt has provided effective plant protection against some insect pests, Bt toxins exhibit little toxicity against sap sucking insects. Indeed, the pest status of some Hemiptera on Bt-transgenic plants has increased in the absence of pesticide application. The increased pest status of numerous hemipteran species, combined with increased prevalence of resistance to chemical insecticides, provides impetus for the development of biologically based, alternative management strategies. Here, we provide an overview of approaches toward transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests.

  5. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  6. Basics of spectroscopic instruments. Hardware of NMR spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    NMR is a powerful tool for structure analysis of small molecules, natural products, biological macromolecules, synthesized polymers, samples from material science and so on. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is applicable to plants and animals Because most of NMR experiments can be done by an automation mode, one can forget hardware of NMR spectrometers. It would be good to understand features and performance of NMR spectrometers. Here I present hardware of a modern NMR spectrometer which is fully equipped with digital technology. (author)

  7. Insecticidal toxins from black widow spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohou, A; Nield, J; Ushkaryov, Y A

    2007-03-15

    The biological effects of Latrodectus spider venom are similar in animals from different phyla, but these symptoms are caused by distinct phylum-specific neurotoxins (collectively called latrotoxins) with molecular masses ranging from 110 to 140 kDa. To date, the venom has been found to contain five insecticidal toxins, termed alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon-latroinsectotoxins (LITs). There is also a vertebrate-specific neurotoxin, alpha-latrotoxin (alpha-LTX), and one toxin affecting crustaceans, alpha-latrocrustatoxin (alpha-LCT). These toxins stimulate massive release of neurotransmitters from nerve terminals and act (1) by binding to specific receptors, some of which mediate an exocytotic signal, and (2) by inserting themselves into the membrane and forming ion-permeable pores. Specific receptors for LITs have yet to be identified, but all three classes of vertebrate receptors known to bind alpha-LTX are also present in insects. All LTXs whose structures have been elucidated (alpha-LIT, delta-LIT, alpha-LTX and alpha-LCT) are highly homologous and have a similar domain architecture, which consists of a unique N-terminal sequence and a large domain composed of 13-22 ankyrin repeats. Three-dimensional (3D) structure analysis, so far done for alpha-LTX only, has revealed its dimeric nature and an ability to form symmetrical tetramers, a feature probably common to all LTXs. Only tetramers have been observed to insert into membranes and form pores. A preliminary 3D reconstruction of a delta-LIT monomer demonstrates the spatial similarity of this toxin to the monomer of alpha-LTX.

  8. Diphtheria toxin translocation across cellular membranes is regulated by sphingolipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spilsberg, Bjorn; Hanada, Kentaro; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is translocated across cellular membranes when receptor-bound toxin is exposed to low pH. To study the role of sphingolipids for toxin translocation, both a mutant cell line lacking the first enzyme in de novo sphingolipid synthesis, serine palmitoyltransferase, and a specific inhibitor of the same enzyme, myriocin, were used. The serine palmitoyltransferase-deficient cell line (LY-B) was found to be 10-15 times more sensitive to diphtheria toxin than the genetically complemented cell line (LY-B/cLCB1) and the wild-type cell line (CHO-K1), both when toxin translocation directly across the plasma membrane was induced by exposing cells with surface-bound toxin to low pH, and when the toxin followed its normal route via acidified endosomes into the cytosol. Toxin binding was similar in these three cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase activity by addition of myriocin sensitized the two control cell lines (LY-B/cLCB1 and CHO-K1) to diphtheria toxin, whereas, as expected, no effect was observed in cells lacking serine palmitoyltransferase (LY-B). In conclusion, diphtheria toxin translocation is facilitated by depletion of membrane sphingolipids

  9. Sea Anemone (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Actiniaria Toxins: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostinho Antunes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Cnidaria phylum includes organisms that are among the most venomous animals. The Anthozoa class includes sea anemones, hard corals, soft corals and sea pens. The composition of cnidarian venoms is not known in detail, but they appear to contain a variety of compounds. Currently around 250 of those compounds have been identified (peptides, proteins, enzymes and proteinase inhibitors and non-proteinaceous substances (purines, quaternary ammonium compounds, biogenic amines and betaines, but very few genes encoding toxins were described and only a few related protein three-dimensional structures are available. Toxins are used for prey acquisition, but also to deter potential predators (with neurotoxicity and cardiotoxicity effects and even to fight territorial disputes. Cnidaria toxins have been identified on the nematocysts located on the tentacles, acrorhagi and acontia, and in the mucous coat that covers the animal body. Sea anemone toxins comprise mainly proteins and peptides that are cytolytic or neurotoxic with its potency varying with the structure and site of action and are efficient in targeting different animals, such as insects, crustaceans and vertebrates. Sea anemones toxins include voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels toxins, acid-sensing ion channel toxins, Cytolysins, toxins with Kunitz-type protease inhibitors activity and toxins with Phospholipase A2 activity. In this review we assessed the phylogentic relationships of sea anemone toxins, characterized such toxins, the genes encoding them and the toxins three-dimensional structures, further providing a state-of-the-art description of the procedures involved in the isolation and purification of bioactive toxins.

  10. Bioengineered kidney tubules efficiently excrete uremic toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, J; Fedecostante, M; Wilmer, M J; Peters, J G; Kreuser, U M; van den Broek, P H; Mensink, R A; Boltje, T J; Stamatialis, D; Wetzels, J F; van den Heuvel, L P; Hoenderop, J G; Masereeuw, R

    2016-05-31

    The development of a biotechnological platform for the removal of waste products (e.g. uremic toxins), often bound to proteins in plasma, is a prerequisite to improve current treatment modalities for patients suffering from end stage renal disease (ESRD). Here, we present a newly designed bioengineered renal tubule capable of active uremic toxin secretion through the concerted action of essential renal transporters, viz. organic anion transporter-1 (OAT1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4). Three-dimensional cell monolayer formation of human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC) on biofunctionalized hollow fibers with maintained barrier function was demonstrated. Using a tailor made flow system, the secretory clearance of human serum albumin-bound uremic toxins, indoxyl sulfate and kynurenic acid, as well as albumin reabsorption across the renal tubule was confirmed. These functional bioengineered renal tubules are promising entities in renal replacement therapies and regenerative medicine, as well as in drug development programs.

  11. The Biology of the Cytolethal Distending Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Lina; Cortes-Bratti, Ximena; Guidi, Riccardo; Frisan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs), produced by a variety of Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, are the first bacterial genotoxins described, since they cause DNA damage in the target cells. CDT is an A-B2 toxin, where the CdtA and CdtC subunits are required to mediate the binding on the surface of the target cells, allowing internalization of the active CdtB subunit, which is functionally homologous to the mammalian deoxyribonuclease I. The nature of the surface receptor is still poorly characterized, however binding of CDT requires intact lipid rafts, and its internalization occurs via dynamin-dependent endocytosis. The toxin is retrograde transported through the Golgi complex and the endoplasmic reticulum, and subsequently translocated into the nuclear compartment, where it exerts the toxic activity. Cellular intoxication induces DNA damage and activation of the DNA damage responses, which results in arrest of the target cells in the G1 and/or G2 phases of the cell cycle and activation of DNA repair mechanisms. Cells that fail to repair the damage will senesce or undergo apoptosis. This review will focus on the well-characterized aspects of the CDT biology and discuss the questions that still remain unanswered. PMID:22069704

  12. 113Cd-NMR investigation of a cadmium-substituted copper, zinc-containing superoxide dismutase from yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Pauli; Bauer, Rogert; Danielsen, Eva

    1991-01-01

    113Cd nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate the metal binding sites of cadmium-substituted copper,zinc-containing superoxide dismutase from baker's yeast. NMR signals were obtained for 113Cd(II) at the Cu site as well as for 113Cd(II) at the Zn site. The two subunits...

  13. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  14. 129 Xe NMR Relaxation-Based Macromolecular Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Muller D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dao, Phuong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jeong, Keunhong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Slack, Clancy C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Vassiliou, Christophoros C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Finbloom, Joel A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Francis, Matthew B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; Pines, Alexander [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-07-29

    A 129Xe NMR relaxation-based sensing approach is reported on that exploits changes in the bulk xenon relaxation rate induced by slowed tumbling of a cryptophane-based sensor upon target binding. The amplification afforded by detection of the bulk dissolved xenon allows sensitive detection of targets. The sensor comprises a xenon-binding cryptophane cage, a target interaction element, and a metal chelating agent. Xenon associated with the target-bound cryptophane cage is rapidly relaxed and then detected after exchange with the bulk. Here we show that large macromolecular targets increase the rotational correlation time of xenon, increasing its relaxation rate. Upon binding of a biotin-containing sensor to avidin at 1.5 μM concentration, the free xenon T2 is reduced by a factor of 4.

  15. NMR study of thermal decomposition of lithium tetrahydroaluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, V.P.; Bakum, S.I.; Kuznetsova, S.F.

    1997-01-01

    Pyrolysis of lithium aluminotetrahydrides and deuterides, LiAlH 4 and LiAlD 4 , was studied by 1 H, 7 Li, 27 Al NMR in 20-700 deg C range. 20-30 time constriction of resonance lines of studied nuclei at 170 deg C testifies to melting of the compounds. It is shown that at LiAlD 4 melting point the first stage of pyrolysis is described by two parallel reactions: LiAlD 4 -> LiD + Al + D 2 , LiAlD 4 + LiD -> Li 3 AlD 6 , which proceed with different rates. It was revealed that reactions of lithium hydride (deuteride) with metallic aluminium at temperatures above 400 deg C resulted to formation of intermetallic compounds of LiAl and LiAl 3 composition. LiAl is characterized by higher thermal stability, than LiAl 3 . 20 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  17. NMR Spectra through the Eyes of a Student: Eye Tracking Applied to NMR Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topczewski, Joseph J.; Topczewski, Anna M.; Tang, Hui; Kendhammer, Lisa K.; Pienta, Norbert J.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) plays a key role in introductory organic chemistry, spanning theory, concepts, and experimentation. Therefore, it is imperative that the instruction methods for NMR are both efficient and effective. By utilizing eye tracking equipment, the researchers were able to monitor how second-semester organic…

  18. Performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schot, Gijs; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-08-01

    We present here the performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR, the critical assessment of automated structure determination by NMR. The CS-Rosetta server uses only chemical shifts for structure prediction, in combination, when available, with a post-scoring procedure based on unassigned NOE lists (Huang et al. in J Am Chem Soc 127:1665-1674, 2005b, doi: 10.1021/ja047109h). We compare the original submissions using a previous version of the server based on Rosetta version 2.6 with recalculated targets using the new R3FP fragment picker for fragment selection and implementing a new annotation of prediction reliability (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR 57:27-35, 2013, doi: 10.1007/s10858-013-9762-6), both implemented in the CS-Rosetta3 WeNMR server. In this second round of CASD-NMR, the WeNMR CS-Rosetta server has demonstrated a much better performance than in the first round since only converged targets were submitted. Further, recalculation of all CASD-NMR targets using the new version of the server demonstrates that our new annotation of prediction quality is giving reliable results. Predictions annotated as weak are often found to provide useful models, but only for a fraction of the sequence, and should therefore only be used with caution.

  19. New methods for the correction of 31P NMR spectra in in vivo NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starcuk, Z.; Bartusek, K.; Starcuk, Z. jr.

    1994-01-01

    The new methods for the correction of 31 P NMR spectra in vivo NMR spectroscopy have been performed. A method for the baseline correction of the spectra which represents a combination of time-domain and frequency-domain has been discussed.The method is very fast and efficient for minimization of base line artifacts of biological tissues impact

  20. [Botulinum toxin: An important complement for facial rejuvenation surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Louarn, C

    2017-10-01

    The improved understanding of the functional anatomy of the face and of the action of the botulinum toxin A leads us to determine a new injection procedure which consequently decreases the risk of eyebrow and eyelid ptosis and increases the toxin's injection possibilities and efficiencies. With less units of toxin, the technique herein described proposes to be more efficient on more muscles: variable toxin injections concentration adapted to each injected muscle are used. Thanks to a new procedure in the upper face, toxin A injection can be quite close to an endoscopic surgical action. In addition, interesting results are achievable to rejuvenate the lateral canthus with injection on the upper lateral tarsus, to rejuvenate the nose with injection at the alar base, the jawline and the neck region. Lastly, a smoothing effect on the skin (meso botox) is obtained by the anticholinergic action of the toxin A on the dermal receptors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Overview of Scorpion Species from China and Their Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijian Cao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Scorpions are one of the most ancient groups of terrestrial animals. They have maintained a steady morphology over more than 400 million years of evolution. Their venom arsenals for capturing prey and defending against predators may play a critical role in their ancient and conservative appearance. In the current review, we present the scorpion fauna of China: 53 species covering five families and 12 genera. We also systematically list toxins or genes from Chinese scorpion species, involving eight species covering four families. Furthermore, we review the diverse functions of typical toxins from Chinese scorpion species, involving Na+ channel modulators, K+ channel blockers, antimicrobial peptides and protease inhibitors. Using scorpion species and their toxins from China as an example, we build the bridge between scorpion species and their toxins, which helps us to understand the molecular and functional diversity of scorpion venom arsenal, the dynamic and functional evolution of scorpion toxins, and the potential relationships of scorpion species and their toxins.

  2. NMR studies of actinide carbide and nitride electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutard, Jean-Louis

    1976-12-01

    N.M.R. studies applied to 13 C and 15 N in the solid solutions ThCsub(1-x)Nsub(x), UCsub(1-x)Nsub(x) and in the compounds ThCsub(1-x) and U 2 C 3 , were undertaken to study carbon and nitrogen contribution to chemical bonds and magnetism. For THORIUM MONOCARBIDE AND CARBONITRIDE: ThCsub(1-x) and ThCsub(1-x)Nsub(x), the very strong orbital contribution to the frequency shift reveals an important covalent character of the valence band 6d metal and 2p metalloid states. The ThCsub(1-x) band structure stoichiometry variation is due to 6dγ metal states appearing at the Fermi level and is in-opposition to a rigid band model. A non-saturated bond mechanism is suggested. For URANIUM CARBONITRIDE: UCsub(1-x)Nsub(x), in the concentration range in which no magnetic order appears at low temperature (x<0.90), the results are in opposition to a localized 5f 2 configuration model, and show that the uranium fundamental state is non-magnetic. Nevertheless two qualitatively different behaviors exist: nitrogen concentration lower than 40%: and nitrogen concentration higher than 40%. A model is proposed to account for those domains: it relies on the 5f-2p hybridization parameter which is maximum on 2p band edge (UC) and almost nul for UN. For URANIUM SESQUICARBIDE: U 2 C 3 : the N.M.R. line observation at 4.2 K indicates a non-magnetic fundamental state although the magnetic susceptibility presents a maximum at 60 K. Spin fluctuations in 5f bands are proposed to describe the electronic properties of this compound. [fr

  3. Differential Requirement for the Translocation of Clostridial Binary Toxins: Iota Toxin Requires a Membrane Potential Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-28

    chlorpromazin (Chp), filipinIII, nigericin (Ni), con- canamycin (Con), ammonium chloride, and nocodazole were from Sig- ma. 2.2. Bacterial strains and toxin...fluid before recording the radioactivity. Results are expressed as a percentage of inhibited protein synthesis rel- ative to control preparations not...5 nM) (D) as measured by inhibition of protein synthesis in Vero cells. Data are means ± S.D. (n = 5). 10-9 10-7 0 20 40 60 80 100 C2 toxin (log M) F

  4. Beneficial effects of botulinum toxin type A in trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Zúñiga,Carlos; Díaz,Sergio; Piedimonte,Fabián; Micheli,Federico

    2008-01-01

    Botulinum toxin has been thoroughly studied as a potential tool in the treatment of several pain syndromes. Therefore, we assessed the clinical effects of botulinum toxin type A injections in 12 patients with otherwise unresponsive idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Patients were infiltrated with 20-50 units of botulinum toxin in trigger zones. Those who presented with mandibular involvement were also infiltrated in the masseter muscle. The patients were assessed on a weekly basis using the Vis...

  5. Staphylococcus aureus α-Toxin: Nearly a Century of Intrigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berube, Bryan J.; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus secretes a number of host-injurious toxins, among the most prominent of which is the small β-barrel pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin. Initially named based on its properties as a red blood cell lytic toxin, early studies suggested a far greater complexity of α-hemolysin action as nucleated cells also exhibited distinct responses to intoxication. The hemolysin, most aptly referred to as α-toxin based on its broad range of cellular specificity, has long been recognized as an important cause of injury in the context of both skin necrosis and lethal infection. The recent identification of ADAM10 as a cellular receptor for α-toxin has provided keen insight on the biology of toxin action during disease pathogenesis, demonstrating the molecular mechanisms by which the toxin causes tissue barrier disruption at host interfaces lined by epithelial or endothelial cells. This review highlights both the historical studies that laid the groundwork for nearly a century of research on α-toxin and key findings on the structural and functional biology of the toxin, in addition to discussing emerging observations that have significantly expanded our understanding of this toxin in S. aureus disease. The identification of ADAM10 as a proteinaceous receptor for the toxin not only provides a greater appreciation of truths uncovered by many historic studies, but now affords the opportunity to more extensively probe and understand the role of α-toxin in modulation of the complex interaction of S. aureus with its human host. PMID:23888516

  6. Staphylococcus aureus α-Toxin: Nearly a Century of Intrigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan J. Berube

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus secretes a number of host-injurious toxins, among the most prominent of which is the small β-barrel pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin. Initially named based on its properties as a red blood cell lytic toxin, early studies suggested a far greater complexity of α-hemolysin action as nucleated cells also exhibited distinct responses to intoxication. The hemolysin, most aptly referred to as α-toxin based on its broad range of cellular specificity, has long been recognized as an important cause of injury in the context of both skin necrosis and lethal infection. The recent identification of ADAM10 as a cellular receptor for α-toxin has provided keen insight on the biology of toxin action during disease pathogenesis, demonstrating the molecular mechanisms by which the toxin causes tissue barrier disruption at host interfaces lined by epithelial or endothelial cells. This review highlights both the historical studies that laid the groundwork for nearly a century of research on α-toxin and key findings on the structural and functional biology of the toxin, in addition to discussing emerging observations that have significantly expanded our understanding of this toxin in S. aureus disease. The identification of ADAM10 as a proteinaceous receptor for the toxin not only provides a greater appreciation of truths uncovered by many historic studies, but now affords the opportunity to more extensively probe and understand the role of α-toxin in modulation of the complex interaction of S. aureus with its human host.

  7. ClanTox: a classifier of short animal toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Naamati, Guy; Askenazi, Manor; Linial, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Toxins are detected in sporadic species along the evolutionary tree of the animal kingdom. Venomous animals include scorpions, snakes, bees, wasps, frogs and numerous animals living in the sea such as the stonefish, snail, jellyfish, hydra and more. Interestingly, proteins that share a common scaffold with animal toxins also exist in non-venomous species. However, due to their short length and primary sequence diversity, these, toxin-like proteins remain undetected by classical search engines...

  8. Military Importance of Natural Toxins and Their Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Pitschmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxin weapon research, development, production and the ban on its uses is an integral part of international law, with particular attention paid to the protection against these weapons. In spite of this, hazards associated with toxins cannot be completely excluded. Some of these hazards are also pointed out in the present review. The article deals with the characteristics and properties of natural toxins and synthetic analogs potentially constituting the basis of toxin weapons. It briefly describes the history of military research and the use of toxins from distant history up to the present age. With respect to effective disarmament conventions, it mentions certain contemporary concepts of possible toxin applications for military purposes and the protection of public order (suppression of riots; it also briefly refers to the question of terrorism. In addition, it deals with certain traditional as well as modern technologies of the research, synthesis, and use of toxins, which can affect the continuing development of toxin weapons. These are, for example, cases of new toxins from natural sources, their chemical synthesis, production of synthetic analogs, the possibility of using methods of genetic engineering and modern biotechnologies or the possible applications of nanotechnology and certain pharmaceutical methods for the effective transfer of toxins into the organism. The authors evaluate the military importance of toxins based on their comparison with traditional chemical warfare agents. They appeal to the ethics of the scientific work as a principal condition for the prevention of toxin abuse in wars, military conflicts, as well as in non-military attacks.

  9. High resolution NMR spectroscopy of synthetic polymers in bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komorski, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of high-resolution NMR of solid polymers; High-resolution NMR of glassy amorphous polymers; Carbon-13 solid-state NMR of semicrystalline polymers; Conformational analysis of polymers of solid-state NMR; High-resolution NMR studies of oriented polymers; High-resolution solid-state NMR of protons in polymers; and Deuterium NMR of solid polymers. This work brings together the various approaches for high-resolution NMR studies of bulk polymers into one volume. Heavy emphasis is, of course, given to 13C NMR studies both above and below Tg. Standard high-power pulse and wide-line techniques are not covered

  10. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy? NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quibilan, E.I.

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  12. Botulinum toxin for treatment of glandular hypersecretory disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, T A

    2012-02-03

    SUMMARY: The use of botulinum toxin to treat disorders of the salivary glands is increasing in popularity in recent years. Recent reports of the use of botulinum toxin in glandular hypersecretion suggest overall favourable results with minimal side-effects. However, few randomised clinical trials means that data are limited with respect to candidate suitability, treatment dosages, frequency and duration of treatment. We report a selection of such cases from our own department managed with botulinum toxin and review the current data on use of the toxin to treat salivary gland disorders such as Frey\\'s syndrome, excessive salivation (sialorrhoea), focal and general hyperhidrosis, excessive lacrimation and chronic rhinitis.

  13. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Genetic toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassaux, Georges; Lemoine, Nick R

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy was initially envisaged as a potential treatment for genetically inherited, monogenic disorders. The applications of gene therapy have now become wider, however, and include cardiovascular diseases, vaccination and cancers in which conventional therapies have failed. With regard to oncology, various gene therapy approaches have been developed. Among them, the use of genetic toxins to kill cancer cells selectively is emerging. Two different types of genetic toxins have been developed so far: the metabolic toxins and the dominant-negative class of toxins. This review describes these two different approaches, and discusses their potential applications in cancer gene therapy

  14. Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanthia Mantzouki

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins. Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light. In summer 2015, we collected samples across Europe to investigate the effect of nutrient and temperature gradients on the variability of toxin production at a continental scale. Direct and indirect effects of temperature were the main drivers of the spatial distribution in the toxins produced by the cyanobacterial community, the toxin concentrations and toxin quota. Generalized linear models showed that a Toxin Diversity Index (TDI increased with latitude, while it decreased with water stability. Increases in TDI were explained through a significant increase in toxin variants such as MC-YR, anatoxin and cylindrospermopsin, accompanied by a decreasing presence of MC-LR. While global warming continues, the direct and indirect effects of increased lake temperatures will drive changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in Europe, potentially promoting selection of a few highly toxic species or strains.

  15. 9 CFR 121.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; Brucella abortus; Brucella melitensis; Brucella suis; Burkholderia mallei; Burkholderia pseudomallei... toxins must be reported within 24 hours by telephone, facsimile, or e-mail: Bacillus anthracis, Brucella...

  16. Nanoparticle-detained toxins for safe and effective vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Che-Ming J.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Luk, Brian T.; Zhang, Liangfang

    2013-12-01

    Toxoid vaccines--vaccines based on inactivated bacterial toxins--are routinely used to promote antitoxin immunity for the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections. Following chemical or heat denaturation, inactivated toxins can be administered to mount toxin-specific immune responses. However, retaining faithful antigenic presentation while removing toxin virulence remains a major challenge and presents a trade-off between efficacy and safety in toxoid development. Here, we show a nanoparticle-based toxin-detainment strategy that safely delivers non-disrupted pore-forming toxins for immune processing. Using erythrocyte membrane-coated nanoparticles and staphylococcal α-haemolysin, we demonstrate effective virulence neutralization via spontaneous particle entrapment. Compared with vaccination with heat-denatured toxin, mice vaccinated with the nanoparticle-detained toxin showed superior protective immunity against toxin-mediated adverse effects. We find that the non-disruptive detoxification approach benefited the immunogenicity and efficacy of toxoid vaccines. We anticipate that this study will open new possibilities in the preparation of antitoxin vaccines against the many virulence factors that threaten public health.

  17. VapC toxins drive cellular dormancy under uranium stress for the extreme thermoacidophile Metallosphaera prunae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arpan; Wheaton, Garrett H; Counts, James A; Ijeomah, Brenda; Desai, Jigar; Kelly, Robert M

    2017-07-01

    When abruptly exposed to toxic levels of hexavalent uranium, the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera prunae, originally isolated from an abandoned uranium mine, ceased to grow, and concomitantly exhibited heightened levels of cytosolic ribonuclease activity that corresponded to substantial degradation of cellular RNA. The M. prunae transcriptome during 'uranium-shock' implicated VapC toxins as possible causative agents of the observed RNA degradation. Identifiable VapC toxins and PIN-domain proteins encoded in the M. prunae genome were produced and characterized, three of which (VapC4, VapC7, VapC8) substantially degraded M. prunae rRNA in vitro. RNA cleavage specificity for these VapCs mapped to motifs within M. prunae rRNA. Furthermore, based on frequency of cleavage sequences, putative target mRNAs for these VapCs were identified; these were closely associated with translation, transcription, and replication. It is interesting to note that Metallosphaera sedula, a member of the same genus and which has a nearly identical genome sequence but not isolated from a uranium-rich biotope, showed no evidence of dormancy when exposed to this metal. M. prunae utilizes VapC toxins for post-transcriptional regulation under uranium stress to enter a cellular dormant state, thereby providing an adaptive response to what would otherwise be a deleterious environmental perturbation. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Aromatic polyetherketones and polyethersulfones containing 6 group metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapov, V.M.; Salazkin, S.N.; Sergeev, V.A.; Komarova, L.I.; Petrovskij, P.V.

    1991-01-01

    Molybdenum- and tungsten-containing polyaryleneetherketones and polyaryleneethersulfones were prepared by the method of chemical modification. Metal content in the polymers constitutes from 0.7 to 12 mass %. The structure of the metal-containing polymers prepared was studied by the methods of 1 H and 13 C NMR and IR spectroscopy. Their properties were analyzed

  19. Entry of diphtheria toxin into cells: possible existence of cellular factor(s) for entry of diphtheria toxin into cells was studied in somatic cell hybrids and hybrid toxins

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites tumor cells were found to be very insensitive to diphtheria toxin. We formed 37 hybrids from Ehrlich tumor cells and diphtheria toxin-sensitive human fibroblasts. The effects of diphtheria toxin on protein synthesis in those hybrids were examined. The hybrids were divided into three groups on the basis of toxin sensitivity. Group A hybrids were as sensitive to diphtheria toxin as human fibroblasts, Group C were as resistant as Ehrlich tumor cells, and Group B had intermediate ...

  20. Half-sandwich pentamethylcyclopentadienyl group 9 metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Group 9 metal complexes of 2-aminopyridyl ligands. 1137. [Cp*M(μ-Cl)Cl]2 (M = Rh and Ir) were prepared according to literature methods.15–17 NMR spectra are recorded on a Bruker Avance II 400 MHz. Infrared spectra were recorded as KBr pellets on a Perkin- Elmer. 983 spectrophotometer. Mass spectra were obtained.

  1. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  2. Remote tuning of NMR probe circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodibagkar, V D; Conradi, M S

    2000-05-01

    There are many circumstances in which the probe tuning adjustments cannot be located near the rf NMR coil. These may occur in high-temperature NMR, low-temperature NMR, and in the use of magnets with small diameter access bores. We address here circuitry for connecting a fixed-tuned probe circuit by a transmission line to a remotely located tuning network. In particular, the bandwidth over which the probe may be remotely tuned while keeping the losses in the transmission line acceptably low is considered. The results show that for all resonant circuit geometries (series, parallel, series-parallel), overcoupling of the line to the tuned circuit is key to obtaining a large tuning bandwidth. At equivalent extents of overcoupling, all resonant circuit geometries have nearly equal remote tuning bandwidths. Particularly for the case of low-loss transmission line, the tuning bandwidth can be many times the tuned circuit's bandwidth, f(o)/Q. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Determination of solid fat content by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawada, Tsukasa; Kato, Chihiro; Suzuki, Kazuaki

    1984-01-01

    To establish a standard method for determing solid fat content, the NMR method was tested at six laboratories and the results were examined for collaboration. Two types of instruments, pulse NMR and wide-line NMR were used. Standard deviation in results at six laboratories was less than 1.5 for the step wise method, but more than 1.5 for the rapid method. The standard deviation in results at a single laboratory was much less than either of these cases. No significant difference could be observed in the values obtained using both instruments. Solid fat content values measured for a mixture of fully hydrogenated rapeseed and rapeseed oil agreed well with the percentage of solid by weight. (author)

  4. Flow NMR of polymers in external fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehme, Ute; Bagusat, Frank; Scheler, Ulrich [Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Pulsed-field gradient NMR is applied to study the motion of polymers in an external electric field and under mechanical shear. The application of an electric field drives motion of charged species. In conjunction with the diffusion coefficient from the electrophoretic mobility the effective charge per molecule is derived. The electric field applicable in the aqueous system is too weak to deform the polymer or even abstract counterions. In a shear flow established in a Couette cell partial orientation of polymer chains is measured via residual dipolar couplings. The entire flow field in a non-symmetric flow cell is monitored by a combination of PFG NMR and NMR imaging exhibiting regions of high shear and locally low shear, where polymers relax.

  5. Muscular pathology: echographic and NMR imaging aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascal-Suisse, P.; Beaurain, P.; Mougniot, C.

    1995-01-01

    A comparison of echographic techniques and NMR imaging has been done for the diagnosis of muscular trauma and tumor pathologies. In traumatic pathology, the echographic analysis allows to determine the complete assessment of recent muscular injuries. NMR imaging can be used in granuloma or fibrous callosity appreciation and for the analysis of deep injury (muscles and muscles-tendon junctions) and of muscular aponeurosis. Echography must be used together with color coding Doppler technique in the diagnosis of tumor pathology and for the study of slow fluxes. The recently available energy Doppler technique seems to be powerful in the study of vascularization of small expansive formations, but their extension to adjacent bone or tissue can only be appreciated using NMR imaging. (J.S.)

  6. Deuterium NMR, induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were studied. Induced cholesteric lyomesophases based on potassium laurate (KL) system, with small amounts of cholesterol added, were studied by deuterium NMR and by polarizing microscopy. Order profiles obtained from deuterium NMR of KL perdenderated chains in both induced cholesteric and normal mesophases were compared. The intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were based on the amphiphile potassium N-lauroyl serinate (KLNS) in the resolved levo form. The study of the type I intrinsic cholesteric mesophase was made by optical microscopy under polarized light and the type II intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophase was characterized by deuterium NMR. The new texture was explained by the use of the theory of disclinations developed for thermotropic liquid crystals, specially for cholesteric type. (M.J.C.) [pt

  7. Prediction of peak overlap in NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefke, Frederik; Schmucki, Roland; Güntert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peak overlap is one of the major factors complicating the analysis of biomolecular NMR spectra. We present a general method for predicting the extent of peak overlap in multidimensional NMR spectra and its validation using both, experimental data sets and Monte Carlo simulation. The method is based on knowledge of the magnetization transfer pathways of the NMR experiments and chemical shift statistics from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Assuming a normal distribution with characteristic mean value and standard deviation for the chemical shift of each observable atom, an analytic expression was derived for the expected overlap probability of the cross peaks. The analytical approach was verified to agree with the average peak overlap in a large number of individual peak lists simulated using the same chemical shift statistics. The method was applied to eight proteins, including an intrinsically disordered one, for which the prediction results could be compared with the actual overlap based on the experimentally measured chemical shifts. The extent of overlap predicted using only statistical chemical shift information was in good agreement with the overlap that was observed when the measured shifts were used in the virtual spectrum, except for the intrinsically disordered protein. Since the spectral complexity of a protein NMR spectrum is a crucial factor for protein structure determination, analytical overlap prediction can be used to identify potentially difficult proteins before conducting NMR experiments. Overlap predictions can be tailored to particular classes of proteins by preparing statistics from corresponding protein databases. The method is also suitable for optimizing recording parameters and labeling schemes for NMR experiments and improving the reliability of automated spectra analysis and protein structure determination.

  8. Emergence of Escherichia coli encoding Shiga toxin 2f in human Shiga toxin-producing E-coli (STEC) infections in the Netherlands, January 2008 to December 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesema, I.; van der Zwaluw, K.; Schuurman, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; Franz, E.; van Duynhoven, Y.; van Pelt, W.

    2014-01-01

    The Shiga toxins of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can be divided into Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) and Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) with several sub-variants. Variant Stx(2f) is one of the latest described, but has been rarely associated with symptomatic human infections. In the enhanced STEC

  9. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Khatkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key conditions for achieving the desirable result during botulinum toxin therapy for muscular dystonia, spasticity, and other diseases accompanied by spasm, pain, and autonomic dysfunction (dystonias, spasticity, etc. is the proper administration of the agent into the muscles directly involved in the pathological process. The exact entry of botulinum toxin into the target muscles is essential for successful and safe treatment because its injection into a normal muscle may cause side effects. The most common errors are the incorrect depth and incorrect direction of a needle on insertion. Therefore, the exact injection of the agent particularly into the shallow and deep muscles is a difficult task even for an experienced specialist and requires the use of controlling methods.The European Consensus on Botulinum Toxin Therapy points out that various injection techniques are needed for the better identification of necessary muscles. However, there are currently no reports on the clear advantage of any technique. In our country, injections using palpation and anatomical landmarks have been widely used in routine practice so far; electromyographic monitoring and electrostimulation have been less frequently applied. In recent years, the new method ultrasound-guided injection has continued to grow more popular. This effective, accessible, and easy-to-use method makes it possible to manage a real-time injection process and to ensure the exact entry of the agent into the muscle. This paper is dedicated to a comparative analysis of different injection methods and to a description of the ultrasound-guided technique and its advantages over others. 

  10. Prevention, control and detection of Fusarial toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nešić Ksenija D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The past couple of decades have provided considerable details on fungi and the toxins that they produce, as well on the mechanism of toxin action, toxicity and effects on animal and human health. But, since they are natural contaminants, their presence is often inevitable. Fusaria are widespread in all cereal-growing territories of the world, but they are especially common in our geographic area. Therefore, special attention is paid to the prevention and control, and also to the improvement of methods for their detection. Although all collected data were critical for understanding this worldwide problem, managing the impact of these toxins on the feed and food safety is still great practical challenge. There are a number of approaches that can be taken to minimize mycotoxin contamination in this chain: prevention of fungal growth and thus mycotoxin formation, strategies to reduce or eliminate mycotoxins from contaminated feedstuffs or diverting the contaminated products to low risk uses. A control program for mycotoxins from field to table should in­volve the criteria of an HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points approach. It requires an understanding of the important aspects of the interactions of the toxigenic fungi with crop plants, the on-farm production and harvest methods for crops, the production of livestock using grains and processed feeds, including diagnostic capabilities for mycotoxicoses, and all the way to the development of processed foods for human consumption, as well as understanding the marketing and trade channels including storage and delivery of foods to the consumer’s table. A good testing protocol for mycotoxins is necessary to manage all of the control points and in order to be able to ensure a food supply free of toxic levels of mycotoxins for the consumer. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46009

  11. Tetanus toxin : primary structure, expression in E. coli, and homology with botulinum toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisel, Ulrich; Jarausch, Wolfgang; Goretzki, Karin; Henschen, Agnes; Engels, Joachim; Weller, Ulrich; Hudel, Martina; Habermann, Ernst; Niemann, Heiner; Rott, R.

    1986-01-01

    A pool of synthetic oligonucleotides was used to identify the gene encoding tetanus toxin on a 75-kbp plasmid from a toxigenic non-sporulating strain of Clostridium tetani. The nucleotide sequence contained a single open reading frame coding for 1315 amino acids corresponding to a polypeptide with a

  12. Staphylococcus hyicus exfoliative toxin: Purification and demonstration of antigenic diversity among toxins from virulent strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Bille-Hansen, Vivi; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1997-01-01

    The exfoliative toxin produced by Staphylococcus hyicus strain 1289D-88 was purified as a single protein of approximately 30 kDa. Extracellular proteins of S. hyicus grown under small scale fermentation conditions were precipitated with ammonium sulfate. Separation of proteins was performed...

  13. Applications of NMR in biological metabolic research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Jiarui; Li Xiuqin; He Chunjian

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance has become a powerful means of studying biological metabolism in non-invasive and non-destructive way. Being used to study the metabolic processes of living system in normal physiological conditions as well as in molecular level, the method is better than other conventional approaches. Using important parameters such as NMR-chemical shifts, longitudinal relaxation time and transverse relaxation time, it is possible to probe the metabolic processes as well as conformation, concentration, transportation and distribution of reacting and resulting substances. The NMR spectroscopy of 1 H, 31 P and 13 C nuclei has already been widely used in metabolic researches

  14. Programmable pulse series generator for NMR relaxometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolbunov, R.N.; Chichikov, S.A.; Lundin, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Paper describes a pulse series generator for NMR relaxometer. The operation mode is set on the basis of the PC program by the PCI bus in the internal memory. The design is based on two Altera Company MAX7000S and Cyclone family microcircuits using the Qartus II 4.0 software. The basic parameters are as follows: pulse minimum length - 50 ns, time resolution - 10 ns, pulse maximum number - 1024, number of controlled output channels - 8. The designed device as a part of the NMR hardware-software system enables to record, to process and to store the experiment results in the form of electronic document [ru

  15. NMR studies of single crystal chromium diboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michioka, C. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: michioka@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Itoh, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yoshimura, K. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Watabe, Y. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8558 (Japan); Kousaka, Y. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8558 (Japan); Ichikawa, H. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8558 (Japan); Akimitsu, J. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8558 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    We report {sup 11}B NMR studies of a single crystal CrB{sub 2}. From the temperature dependence of the Fourier-transformed NMR spectra in the paramagnetic state, the hyperfine coupling constants are estimated to be A{sub Cr-B} = -0.64,-0.74 and -0.71kOe/{mu}{sub B} for H parallel c, H parallel a and H parallel [210], respectively. In the magnetically ordered state, the spectra in H parallel a and H parallel [210] consist of superposition of a broad hump and five peaks, which correspond to the incommensurate and commensurate spin structures.

  16. Binding of diphtheria toxin to phospholipids in liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alving, Carl R.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Urban, Katharine A.; Moss, Joel; Richards, Roberta L.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1980-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin bound to the phosphate portion of some, but not all, phospholipids in liposomes. Liposomes consisting of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol did not bind toxin. Addition of 20 mol% (compared to dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine) of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid, dicetyl phosphate, phosphatidylinositol phosphate, cardiolipin, or phosphatidylserine in the liposomes resulted in substantial binding of toxin. Inclusion of phosphatidylinositol in dimyristol phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol liposomes did not result in toxin binding. The calcium salt of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid was more effective than the sodium salt, and the highest level of binding occurred with liposomes consisting only of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (calcium salt) and cholesterol. Binding of toxin to liposomes was dependent on pH, and the pattern of pH dependence varied with liposomes having different compositions. Incubation of diphtheria toxin with liposomes containing dicetyl phosphate resulted in maximal binding at pH 3.6, whereas binding to liposomes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphate was maximal above pH 7. Toxin did not bind to liposomes containing 20 mol% of a free fatty acid (palmitic acid) or a sulfated lipid (3-sulfogalactosylceramide). Toxin binding to dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidylinositol phosphate was inhibited by UTP, ATP, phosphocholine, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate, but not by uracil. We conclude that (a) diphtheria toxin binds specifically to the phosphate portion of certain phospholipids, (b) binding to phospholipids in liposomes is dependent on pH, but is not due only to electrostatic interaction, and (c) binding may be strongly influenced by the composition of adjacent phospholipids that do not bind toxin. We propose that a minor membrane phospholipid (such as phosphatidylinositol phosphate or phosphatidic acid), or that some other phosphorylated membrane molecule (such as a phosphoprotein) may be important in the initial binding of

  17. Binding of Diphtheria Toxin to Phospholipids in Liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alving, Carl R.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Urban, Katharine A.; Moss, Joel; Richards, Roberta L.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1980-04-01

    Diphtheria toxin bound to the phosphate portion of some, but not all, phospholipids in liposomes. Liposomes consisting of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol did not bind toxin. Addition of 20 mol% (compared to dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine) of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid, dicetyl phosphate, phosphatidylinositol phosphate, cardiolipin, or phosphatidylserine in the liposomes resulted in substantial binding of toxin. Inclusion of phosphatidylinositol in dimyristol phosphatidylcholine / cholesterol liposomes did not result in toxin binding. The calcium salt of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid was more effective than the sodium salt, and the highest level of binding occurred with liposomes consisting only of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (calcium salt) and cholesterol. Binding of toxin to liposomes was dependent on pH, and the pattern of pH dependence varied with liposomes having different compositions. Incubation of diphtheria toxin with liposomes containing dicetyl phosphate resulted in maximal binding at pH 3.6, whereas binding to liposomes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphate was maximal above pH 7. Toxin did not bind to liposomes containing 20 mol% of a free fatty acid (palmitic acid) or a sulfated lipid (3-sulfogalactosylceramide). Toxin binding to dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidylinositol phosphate was inhibited by UTP, ATP, phosphocholine, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate, but not by uracil. We conclude that (a) diphtheria toxin binds specifically to the phosphate portion of certain phospholipids, (b) binding to phospholipids in liposomes is dependent on pH, but is not due only to electrostatic interaction, and (c) binding may be strongly influenced by the composition of adjacent phospholipids that do not bind toxin. We propose that a minor membrane phospholipid (such as phosphatidylinositol phosphate or phosphatidic acid), or that some other phosphorylated membrane molecule (such as a phosphoprotein) may be important in the initial binding of

  18. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin; He, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same intern...

  19. Crystal structures of an intrinsically active cholera toxin mutant yield insight into the toxin activation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Claire J; Amaya, Edward I; Jobling, Michael G; Holmes, Randall K; Hol, Wim G J

    2004-04-06

    Cholera toxin (CT) is a heterohexameric bacterial protein toxin belonging to a larger family of A/B ADP-ribosylating toxins. Each of these toxins undergoes limited proteolysis and/or disulfide bond reduction to form the enzymatically active toxic fragment. Nicking and reduction render both CT and the closely related heat-labile enterotoxin from Escherichia coli (LT) unstable in solution, thus far preventing a full structural understanding of the conformational changes resulting from toxin activation. We present the first structural glimpse of an active CT in structures from three crystal forms of a single-site A-subunit CT variant, Y30S, which requires no activational modifications for full activity. We also redetermined the structure of the wild-type, proenzyme CT from two crystal forms, both of which exhibit (i) better geometry and (ii) a different A2 "tail" conformation than the previously determined structure [Zhang et al. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. 251, 563-573]. Differences between wild-type CT and active CTY30S are observed in A-subunit loop regions that had been previously implicated in activation by analysis of the structure of an LT A-subunit R7K variant [van den Akker et al. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 10996-11004]. The 25-36 activation loop is disordered in CTY30S, while the 47-56 active site loop displays varying degrees of order in the three CTY30S structures, suggesting that disorder in the activation loop predisposes the active site loop to a greater degree of flexibility than that found in unactivated wild-type CT. On the basis of these six new views of the CT holotoxin, we propose a model for how the activational modifications experienced by wild-type CT are communicated to the active site.

  20. 1H NMR spectra dataset and solid-state NMR data of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Silva, Lorena M A; Teofilo, Elizita M; Larsen, Flemming H; de Brito, Edy S

    2017-04-01

    In this article the NMR data from chemical shifts, coupling constants, and structures of all the characterized compounds were provided, beyond a complementary PCA evaluation for the corresponding manuscript (E.G. Alves Filho, L.M.A. Silva, E.M. Teofilo, F.H. Larsen, E.S. de Brito, 2017) [3]. In addition, a complementary assessment from solid-state NMR data was provided. For further chemometric analysis, numerical matrices from the raw 1 H NMR data were made available in Microsoft Excel workbook format (.xls).

  1. NMR structure of bitistatin – a missing piece in the evolutionary pathway of snake venom disintegrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajo, Rodrigo J; Sanz, Libia; Perez, Alicia; Calvete, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Extant disintegrins, as found in the venoms of Viperidae and Crotalidae snakes (vipers and rattlesnakes, represent a family of polypeptides that block the function of β1 and β3 integrin receptors, both potently and with a high degree of selectivity. This toxin family owes its origin to the neofunctionalization of the extracellular region of an ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) molecule recruited into the snake venom gland proteome in the Jurassic. The evolutionary structural diversification of the disintegrin scaffold, from the ancestral long disintegrins to the more recently evolved medium-sized, dimeric and short disintegrins, involved the stepwise loss of pairs of class-specific disulfide linkages and the processing of the N-terminal region. NMR and crystal structures of medium-sized, dimeric and short disintegrins have been solved. However, the structure of a long disintegrin remained unknown. The present study reports the NMR solution structures of two disulfide bond conformers of the long disintegrin bitistatin from the African puff adder Bitis arietans. The findings provide insight into how a structural domain of the extracellular region of an ADAM molecule, recruited into and selectively expressed in the snake venom gland proteome as a PIII metalloprotease in the Jurassic, has subsequently been tranformed into a family of integrin receptor antagonists. © 2014 FEBS.

  2. Study of acute biochemical effects of thallium toxicity in mouse urine by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ritu; Rana, Poonam; Khan, Ahmad Raza; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Devi, M Memita; Chaturvedi, Shubhra; Tripathi, Rajendra P; Khushu, Subash

    2011-10-01

    Thallium (Tl) is a toxic heavy metal and its exposure to the human body causes physiological and biochemical changes due to its interference with potassium-dependent biological reactions. A high-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy based metabonomic approach has been applied for investigating acute biochemical effects caused by thallium sulfate (Tl(2)SO(4)). Male strain A mice were divided in three groups and received three doses of Tl(2)SO(4) (5, 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) b.w., i.p.). Urine samples collected at 3, 24, 72 and 96 h post-dose time points were analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. NMR spectral data were processed and analyzed using principal components analysis to represent biochemical variations induced by Tl(2)SO(4). Results showed Tl-exposed mice urine to have distinct metabonomic phenotypes and revealed dose- and time-dependent clustering of treated groups. The metabolic signature of urine analysis from Tl(2)SO(4)-treated animals exhibited an increase in the levels of creatinine, taurine, hippurate and β-hydroxybutyrate along with a decrease in energy metabolites trimethylamine and choline. These findings revealed Tl-induced disturbed gut flora, membrane metabolite, energy and protein metabolism, representing physiological dysfunction of vital organs. The present study indicates the great potential of NMR-based metabonomics in mapping metabolic response for toxicology, which could ultimately lead to identification of potential markers for Tl toxicity. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo...

  4. Recommendations of the wwPDB NMR Validation Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelione, Gaetano T.; Nilges, Michael; Bax, Ad; Güntert, Peter; Herrmann, Torsten; Richardson, Jane S.; Schwieters, Charles; Vranken, Wim F.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Wishart, David S.; Berman, Helen M.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Markley, John L.

    2013-01-01

    As methods for analysis of biomolecular structure and dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) continue to advance, the resulting 3D structures, chemical shifts, and other NMR data are broadly impacting biology, chemistry, and medicine. Structure model assessment is a critical area of NMR methods development, and is an essential component of the process of making these structures accessible and useful to the wider scientific community. For these reasons, the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) has convened an NMR Validation Task Force (NMR-VTF) to work with the wwPDB partners in developing metrics and policies for biomolecular NMR data harvesting, structure representation, and structure quality assessment. This paper summarizes the recommendations of the NMR-VTF, and lays the groundwork for future work in developing standards and metrics for biomolecular NMR structure quality assessment. PMID:24010715

  5. Current NMR Techniques for Structure-Based Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiki, Toshihiko; Furuita, Kyoko; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2018-01-12

    A variety of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications have been developed for structure-based drug discovery (SBDD). NMR provides many advantages over other methods, such as the ability to directly observe chemical compounds and target biomolecules, and to be used for ligand-based and protein-based approaches. NMR can also provide important information about the interactions in a protein-ligand complex, such as structure, dynamics, and affinity, even when the interaction is too weak to be detected by ELISA or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based high-throughput screening (HTS) or to be crystalized. In this study, we reviewed current NMR techniques. We focused on recent progress in NMR measurement and sample preparation techniques that have expanded the potential of NMR-based SBDD, such as fluorine NMR ( 19 F-NMR) screening, structure modeling of weak complexes, and site-specific isotope labeling of challenging targets.

  6. nmrML: A Community Supported Open Data Standard for the Description, Storage, and Exchange of NMR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Daniel; Jacob, Daniel; Wilson, Michael; Cruz, Joseph A; Marcu, Ana; Grant, Jason R; Moing, Annick; Deborde, Catherine; de Figueiredo, Luis F; Haug, Kenneth; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Easton, John; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Hao, Jie; Ludwig, Christian; Günther, Ulrich L; Rosato, Antonio; Klein, Matthias S; Lewis, Ian A; Luchinat, Claudio; Jones, Andrew R; Grauslys, Arturas; Larralde, Martin; Yokochi, Masashi; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Porzel, Andrea; Griffin, Julian L; Viant, Mark R; Wishart, David S; Steinbeck, Christoph; Salek, Reza M; Neumann, Steffen

    2018-01-02

    NMR is a widely used analytical technique with a growing number of repositories available. As a result, demands for a vendor-agnostic, open data format for long-term archiving of NMR data have emerged with the aim to ease and encourage sharing, comparison, and reuse of NMR data. Here we present nmrML, an open XML-based exchange and storage format for NMR spectral data. The nmrML format is intended to be fully compatible with existing NMR data for chemical, biochemical, and metabolomics experiments. nmrML can capture raw NMR data, spectral data acquisition parameters, and where available spectral metadata, such as chemical structures associated with spectral assignments. The nmrML format is compatible with pure-compound NMR data for reference spectral libraries as well as NMR data from complex biomixtures, i.e., metabolomics experiments. To facilitate format conversions, we provide nmrML converters for Bruker, JEOL and Agilent/Varian vendor formats. In addition, easy-to-use Web-based spectral viewing, processing, and spectral assignment tools that read and write nmrML have been developed. Software libraries and Web services for data validation are available for tool developers and end-users. The nmrML format has already been adopted for capturing and disseminating NMR data for small molecules by several open source data processing tools and metabolomics reference spectral libraries, e.g., serving as storage format for the MetaboLights data repository. The nmrML open access data standard has been endorsed by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative (MSI), and we here encourage user participation and feedback to increase usability and make it a successful standard.

  7. Multiplex detection of protein toxins using MALDI-TOF-TOF tandem mass spectrometry: application in unambiguous toxin detection from bioaerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Kumar, Bhoj; Kamboj, Dev Vrat

    2012-12-04

    Protein toxins, such as botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), shiga toxin (STX), and plant toxin ricin, are involved in a number of diseases and are considered as potential agents for bioterrorism and warfare. From a bioterrorism and warfare perspective, these agents are likely to cause maximum damage to a civilian or military population through an inhalational route of exposure and aerosol is considered the envisaged mode of delivery. Unambiguous detection of toxin from aerosol is of paramount importance, both for bringing mitigation protocols into operation and for implementation of effective medical countermeasures, in case a "biological cloud" is seen over a population. A multiplex, unambiguous, and qualitative detection of protein toxins is reported here using tandem mass spectrometry with MALDI-TOF-TOF. The methodology involving simple sample processing steps was demonstrated to identify toxins (ETX, Clostridium perfringes phospholipase C, and SEB) from blind spiked samples. The novel directed search approach using a list of unique peptides was used to identify toxins from a complex protein mixture. The bioinformatic analysis of seven protein toxins for elucidation of unique peptides with conservation status across all known sequences provides a high confidence for detecting toxins originating from any geographical location and source organism. Use of tandem MS data with peptide sequence information increases the specificity of the method. A prototype for generation of aerosol using a nebulizer and collection using a cyclone collector was used to provide a proof of concept for unambiguous detection of toxin from aerosol using precursor directed tandem mass spectrometry combined with protein database searching. ETX prototoxin could be detected from aerosol at 0.2 ppb concentration in aerosol.

  8. A Fluorescence Based Miniaturized Detection Module for Toxin Producing Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, S. E.; Mistlberger, G.; Troi, L.; Lang, A.; Holly, C.; Klimant, I.

    2016-12-01

    Algal blooms are sensitive to external environmental conditions and may pose a serious threat to marine and human life having an adverse effect on the ecosystem. Harmful algal blooms can produce different toxins, which can lead to massive fish kills or to human disorders. Facing these problems, miniaturized and low-cost instrumentation for an early detection and identification of harmful algae classes has become more important over the last years. 1,2Based on the characteristic pigment pattern of different algae classes, we developed a miniaturized detection module, which is able to detect and identify algae classes after analyzing their spectral behavior. Our device combines features of a flow-cytometer and fluorimeter and is build up as a miniaturized and low-cost device of modular design. Similar to a fluorimeter, it excites cells in the capillary with up to 8 different excitation wavelengths recording the emitted fluorescence at 4 different emission channels. Furthermore, the device operates in a flow-through mode similar to a flow-cytometer, however, using only low-cost elements such as LEDs and photodiodes. Due to its miniaturized design, the sensitivity and selectivity increase, whereas background effects are reduced. With a sampling frequency of 140 Hz, we try to detect and count particular cell events even at a concentration of 2 cells / 7.3 µL illuminated volume. Using a self-learning multivariate algorithm, the data are evaluated autonomously on the device enabling an in-situ analysis. The flexibility in choosing excitation and emission wavelengths as well as the high sampling rate enables laboratory applications such as measuring induction kinetics. However, in its first application, the device is part of an open and modular monitoring system enabling the sensing of chemical compounds such as toxic and essential Hg, Cd, Pb, As and Cu trace metal species, nutrients and species related to the carbon cycle, VOCs and potentially toxic algae classes (FP7

  9. Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Alternaria Toxins in Carrots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solfrizzo, M.; Girolamo, De A.; Vitti, C.; Bulk, van den R.W.

    2004-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method was developed for the determination of Alternaria radicina and A. alternata toxins in carrots. Toxins were extracted from carrot with an acidified mixture of water¿methanol¿acetonitrile. The filtered extract was divided in 2 parts that were purified by

  10. Recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of polyamine toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, K; Andersen, K; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the recent developments in the field of polyamine toxins, with focus on structure activity relationship investigations, including studies of importance of the polyamine moiety for biological activity, photolabeling studies using polyamine toxins as templates, as well as use ...

  11. EFFECT OF MARINE TOXINS ON THERMOREGULATION IN MICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine algal toxins are extremely toxic and can represent a major health problem to humans and animals. Temperature regulation is one of many processes to be affected by exposure to these toxins. Mice and rats become markedly hypothermic when subjected to acute exposure to the ma...

  12. Short inventory of EU legislation on plant toxins in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, de M.; Noordam, M.Y.; Mol, H.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Plant toxins, secondary metabolites that are not essential for the survival of the organism itself but are toxic to human health, are produced by many plants. Plant toxins can be present as inherent metabolites in daily foods such as potatoes, herbs and spices or in herbal preparations. Plant

  13. 76 FR 58157 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... disorders. Shiga toxin is the same toxin as is produced by Shigella, the bacteria that cause dysentery. In... addition, FSIS will conduct a for-cause food safety assessment (FSA) for every positive sample, as it does... conduct sample testing, follow-up testing and for-cause FSAs, the total cost to the Agency is about $454...

  14. Physiological effect of the toxin from Xanthomonas retroflexus on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physiological effect of the toxin from Xanthomonas retroflexus on redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). Z Sun, M Li, J Chen, Y Li. Abstract. A new toxin from Xanthomonas retroflexus could cause a series of physiological responses on seedlings of redroot pigweed. The experimental results revealed that respiratory ratio ...

  15. Nutrients and toxin producing phytoplankton control algal blooms ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    poral dissipative pattern formation in a deterministic and noisy environment, respectively. The overall carrying capacity for the ... fact that the rate of toxin production by toxin producing phytoplankton (TPP) plays an important role for con- trolling oscillations in the .... Examples of these diverse models of impact were given by ...

  16. Physiological effect of the toxin from Xanthomonas retroflexus on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    mitotic indices appeared not to be affected by the toxin. Ultrastructure observation indicated that the thylakoids of chloroplast and cristae of mitochondria swelled, when the leaves were placed in the toxin for 2 h. After treatment with the phototoxin for 3 h, the cell membrane was disrupted, the chloroplasts disintegrated and ...

  17. Cholera toxin stimulation of human mammary epithelial cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, M.R.

    1982-06-01

    Addition of cholera toxin to human mammary epithelial cultures derived from reduction mammoplasties and primary carcinomas greatly stimulated cell growth and increased the number of times the cells could be successfully subcultured. Other agents known to increase intracellular cAMP levels were also growth stimulatory. The increased growth potential conferred by cholera toxin enhances the usefulness of this cell culture system.

  18. Oxidative Stress in Shiga Toxin Production by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Licznerska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Virulence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC strains depends on production of Shiga toxins. These toxins are encoded in genomes of lambdoid bacteriophages (Shiga toxin-converting phages, present in EHEC cells as prophages. The genes coding for Shiga toxins are silent in lysogenic bacteria, and prophage induction is necessary for their efficient expression and toxin production. Under laboratory conditions, treatment with UV light or antibiotics interfering with DNA replication are commonly used to induce lambdoid prophages. Since such conditions are unlikely to occur in human intestine, various research groups searched for other factors or agents that might induce Shiga toxin-converting prophages. Among other conditions, it was reported that treatment with H2O2 caused induction of these prophages, though with efficiency significantly lower relative to UV-irradiation or mitomycin C treatment. A molecular mechanism of this phenomenon has been proposed. It appears that the oxidative stress represents natural conditions provoking induction of Shiga toxin-converting prophages as a consequence of H2O2 excretion by either neutrophils in infected humans or protist predators outside human body. Finally, the recently proposed biological role of Shiga toxin production is described in this paper, and the “bacterial altruism” and “Trojan Horse” hypotheses, which are connected to the oxidative stress, are discussed.

  19. ClanTox: a classifier of short animal toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naamati, Guy; Askenazi, Manor; Linial, Michal

    2009-07-01

    Toxins are detected in sporadic species along the evolutionary tree of the animal kingdom. Venomous animals include scorpions, snakes, bees, wasps, frogs and numerous animals living in the sea such as the stonefish, snail, jellyfish, hydra and more. Interestingly, proteins that share a common scaffold with animal toxins also exist in non-venomous species. However, due to their short length and primary sequence diversity, these, toxin-like proteins remain undetected by classical search engines and genome annotation tools. We construct a toxin classification machine and web server called ClanTox (Classifier of Animal Toxins) that is based on the extraction of sequence-driven features from the primary protein sequence followed by the application of a classification system trained on known animal toxins. For a given input list of sequences, from venomous or non-venomous settings, the ClanTox system predicts whether each sequence is toxin-like. ClanTox provides a ranked list of positively predicted candidates according to statistical confidence. For each protein, additional information is presented including the presence of a signal peptide, the number of cysteine residues and the associated functional annotations. ClanTox is a discovery-prediction tool for a relatively overlooked niche of toxin-like cell modulators, many of which are therapeutic agent candidates. The ClanTox web server is freely accessible at http://www.clantox.cs.huji.ac.il.

  20. Solid-phase synthesis of polyamine toxin analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Hasse; Krikstolaityte, Sonata; Andersen, Anne J

    2002-01-01

    The wasp toxin philanthotoxin-433 (PhTX-433) is a nonselective and noncompetitive antagonist of ionotropic receptors, such as ionotropic glutamate receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Polyamine toxins are extensively used for the characterization of subtypes of ionotropic glutamate re...

  1. Effect of Cryphonectria parasitica toxin on lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to clarify the responses of different chestnut cultivars to Cp-toxin stress, the effect of Cp-toxin from Cryphonectria parasitica (Murr.) Barr on Castanea mollissima Blume, especially on its cell structure, was examined. Chestnut shoots of both resistant (Beiyu No. 2) and susceptible (Hongguang) cultivars were treated ...

  2. Effect of Cryphonectria parasitica toxin on lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... In order to clarify the responses of different chestnut cultivars to Cp-toxin stress, the effect of Cp-toxin from Cryphonectria parasitica (Murr.) Barr on Castanea mollissima Blume, especially on its cell structure, was examined. Chestnut shoots of both resistant (Beiyu No. 2) and susceptible (Hongguang).

  3. Host defenses against bacterial pore-forming toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, F.C.O.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs), the most common bacterial toxins, contribute to infection by perforating host cell membranes. Excessive use and lack of new development of antibiotics are causing increasing numbers of drug-resistant bacteria, like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and

  4. Detection of shiga toxins by lateral flow assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) produce Shiga toxins (Stxs) that can cause human disease and death. The contamination of food products with STEC represents a food safety problem that necessitates rapid and effective detection strategies to mitigate risk. In this manuscript we report ...

  5. Retrograde transport of protein toxins through the Golgi apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvig, Kirsten; Skotland, Tore; van Deurs, Bo

    2013-01-01

    at the cell surface, and they are endocytosed both by clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. Sorting to the Golgi and retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are common to these toxins, but the exact mechanisms turn out to be toxin and cell-type dependent. In the ER...

  6. Recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of polyamine toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, K; Andersen, K; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the recent developments in the field of polyamine toxins, with focus on structure activity relationship investigations, including studies of importance of the polyamine moiety for biological activity, photolabeling studies using polyamine toxins as templates, as well as use...

  7. Lactobacillus bulgaricus mutants decompose uremic toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun-Huan; Jiang, Ya-Fen; Jiang, Yun-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    We aim to obtain a probiotic strain from Lactobacillus bulgaricus by testing its capability to decompose uremic toxins to provide new intestinal bacteria for the treatment of chronic renal failure. Original L. bulgaricus was cultured with the serum of uremic patients and then mutated by physical (ultraviolet) and chemical (diethyl sulfate) methods repeatedly. Using creatinine decomposition rate as an observed index, we selected the best strains which decreased the most concentration of the creatinine. We then tested its ability to decompose urea, uric acid, serum phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and homocysteine and its genetic stability. After inductive and mutagenic treatment, DUC3-17 was selected. Its decomposition rate of creatinine, urea nitrogen, uric acid, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, and homocysteine were 17.23%, 36.02%, 9.84%, 15.73%, 78.26%, and 12.69%, respectively. The degrading capacity was sustained over five generations. After directional induction and compound mutation, L. bulgaricus has greater capacity to decompose uremic toxins, with a stable inheritance.

  8. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Darren L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential.

  9. The Biochemical Toxin Arsenal from Ant Venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Touchard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ants (Formicidae represent a taxonomically diverse group of hymenopterans with over 13,000 extant species, the majority of which inject or spray secretions from a venom gland. The evolutionary success of ants is mostly due to their unique eusociality that has permitted them to develop complex collaborative strategies, partly involving their venom secretions, to defend their nest against predators, microbial pathogens, ant competitors, and to hunt prey. Activities of ant venom include paralytic, cytolytic, haemolytic, allergenic, pro-inflammatory, insecticidal, antimicrobial, and pain-producing pharmacologic activities, while non-toxic functions include roles in chemical communication involving trail and sex pheromones, deterrents, and aggregators. While these diverse activities in ant venoms have until now been largely understudied due to the small venom yield from ants, modern analytical and venomic techniques are beginning to reveal the diversity of toxin structure and function. As such, ant venoms are distinct from other venomous animals, not only rich in linear, dimeric and disulfide-bonded peptides and bioactive proteins, but also other volatile and non-volatile compounds such as alkaloids and hydrocarbons. The present review details the unique structures and pharmacologies of known ant venom proteinaceous and alkaloidal toxins and their potential as a source of novel bioinsecticides and therapeutic agents.

  10. Cardiovascular-Active Venom Toxins: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello Horta, Carolina Campolina; Chatzaki, Maria; Rezende, Bruno Almeida; Magalhães, Bárbara de Freitas; Duarte, Clara Guerra; Felicori, Liza Figueiredo; Ribeiro Oliveira-Mendes, Bárbara Bruna; do Carmo, Anderson Oliveira; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2016-01-01

    Animal venoms are a mixture of bioactive compounds produced as weapons and used primarily to immobilize and kill preys. As a result of the high potency and specificity for various physiological targets, many toxins from animal venoms have emerged as possible drugs for the medication of diverse disorders, including cardiovascular diseases. Captopril, which inhibits the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), was the first successful venom-based drug and a notable example of rational drug design. Since captopril was developed, many studies have discovered novel bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs) with actions on the cardiovascular system. Natriuretic peptides (NPs) have also been found in animal venoms and used as template to design new drugs with applications in cardiovascular diseases. Among the anti-arrhythmic peptides, GsMTx-4 was discovered to be a toxin that selectively inhibits the stretch-activated cation channels (SACs), which are involved in atrial fibrillation. The present review describes the main components isolated from animal venoms that act on the cardiovascular system and presents a brief summary of venomous animals and their venom apparatuses.

  11. The Biochemical Toxin Arsenal from Ant Venoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchard, Axel; Aili, Samira R.; Fox, Eduardo Gonçalves Paterson; Escoubas, Pierre; Orivel, Jérôme; Nicholson, Graham M.; Dejean, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Ants (Formicidae) represent a taxonomically diverse group of hymenopterans with over 13,000 extant species, the majority of which inject or spray secretions from a venom gland. The evolutionary success of ants is mostly due to their unique eusociality that has permitted them to develop complex collaborative strategies, partly involving their venom secretions, to defend their nest against predators, microbial pathogens, ant competitors, and to hunt prey. Activities of ant venom include paralytic, cytolytic, haemolytic, allergenic, pro-inflammatory, insecticidal, antimicrobial, and pain-producing pharmacologic activities, while non-toxic functions include roles in chemical communication involving trail and sex pheromones, deterrents, and aggregators. While these diverse activities in ant venoms have until now been largely understudied due to the small venom yield from ants, modern analytical and venomic techniques are beginning to reveal the diversity of toxin structure and function. As such, ant venoms are distinct from other venomous animals, not only rich in linear, dimeric and disulfide-bonded peptides and bioactive proteins, but also other volatile and non-volatile compounds such as alkaloids and hydrocarbons. The present review details the unique structures and pharmacologies of known ant venom proteinaceous and alkaloidal toxins and their potential as a source of novel bioinsecticides and therapeutic agents. PMID:26805882

  12. Unique opportunities for NMR methods in structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelione, Gaetano T; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Girvin, Mark E; Kennedy, Michael A; Markley, John L; Powers, Robert; Prestegard, James H; Szyperski, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    This Perspective, arising from a workshop held in July 2008 in Buffalo NY, provides an overview of the role NMR has played in the United States Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), and a vision of how NMR will contribute to the forthcoming PSI-Biology program. NMR has contributed in key ways to structure production by the PSI, and new methods have been developed which are impacting the broader protein NMR community.

  13. Some exercises in quantitative NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, C.J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The articles represented in this thesis result from a series of investigations that evaluate the potential of NMR imaging as a quantitative research tool. In the first article the possible use of proton spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 in tissue characterization, tumor recognition and monitoring tissue response to radiotherapy is explored. The next article addresses the question whether water proton spin-lattice relaxation curves of biological tissues are adequately described by a single time constant T 1 , and analyzes the implications of multi-exponentiality for quantitative NMR imaging. In the third article the use of NMR imaging as a quantitative research tool is discussed on the basis of phantom experiments. The fourth article describes a method which enables unambiguous retrieval of sign information in a set of magnetic resonance images of the inversion recovery type. The next article shows how this method can be adapted to allow accurate calculation of T 1 pictures on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The sixth article, finally, describes a simulation procedure which enables a straightforward determination of NMR imaging pulse sequence parameters for optimal tissue contrast. (orig.)

  14. Quantitative evaluation of experimental NMR restraints.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, S.B.; Spronk, C.A.E.M.; Krieger, E.; Maassen, Hans; Vriend, G.; Vuister, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data are an indispensable source of structural information in biomolecular structure determination by NMR spectroscopy. The number and type of experimental restraints used in the structure calculation and the RMS deviation of the restraints are usually reported. We

  15. Quantification of complex mixtures by NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Velzen, van E.; Jacobs, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    NMR has firmly established itself as an analytical tool that can quantify analyte concentrations in complex mixtures in a rapid, cost-effective, accurate and precise manner. Here, the technological advances with respect to instrumentation, sample preparation, data acquisition and data processing

  16. NMR characterization of polymers: Review and update

    Science.gov (United States)

    NMR spectroscopy is a major technique for the characterization and analysis of polymers. A large number of methodologies have been developed in both the liquid and the solid state, and the literature has grown considerably (1-5). The field now covers a broad spectrum of activities, including polym...

  17. Structures of Biomolecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL | ARTICLE integral part of NMR-based structural biology research. A num- ber of computational tools are being developed which utilize such information from BMRB and PDB at various stages of the structure determination process. 2. An Overview of the Structure Determination Process. A flowchart of the different ...

  18. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  19. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  20. Synthesis and NMR Elucidation of Novel Pentacycloundecane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... research in this field, the NMR assignments of five PCU deriva- tives (1–5) ... macology.4,11 We have recently reported a family of PCU lactam .... These assignments are presented in Table 2. RESEARCH ARTICLE. R. Karpoormath, O.K. Onajole, T. Naicker, T. Govender, G.E.M. Maguire and H.G. Kruger.

  1. Hydrate Shell Growth Measured Using NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Agnes; Akhfash, Masoumeh; Loh, Charles K; Aman, Zachary M; Fridjonsson, Einar O; May, Eric F; Johns, Michael L

    2015-08-18

    Benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) and relaxation measurements were used to monitor the clathrate hydrate shell growth occurring in water droplets dispersed in a continuous cyclopentane phase. These techniques allowed the growth of hydrate inside the opaque exterior shell to be monitored and, hence, information about the evolution of the shell's morphology to be deduced. NMR relaxation measurements were primarily used to monitor the hydrate shell growth kinetics, while PFG NMR diffusion experiments were used to determine the nominal droplet size distribution (DSD) of the unconverted water inside the shell core. A comparison of mean droplet sizes obtained directly via PFG NMR and independently deduced from relaxation measurements showed that the assumption of the shell model-a perfect spherical core of unconverted water-for these hydrate droplet systems is correct, but only after approximately 24 h of shell growth. Initially, hydrate growth is faster and heat-transfer-limited, leading to porous shells with surface areas larger than that of spheres with equivalent volumes. Subsequently, the hydrate growth rate becomes mass-transfer-limited, and the shells become thicker, spherical, and less porous.

  2. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  3. NMR imaging of the cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canby, R.C.; Evanochko, W.T.; Pohost, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging permits high-resolution tomographic and three-dimensional images of the human body to be obtained without exposure to ionizing radiation. Such imaging not only yields anatomic resolution comparable to X-ray examinations but also provides a potential means to discriminate between healthy tissue and diseased tissue. This potential is based on certain NMR properties known as relaxation times, which determine, in part, the signal intensity in an image. These properties are related to such factors as the sizes and concentrations of proteins and mobile lipids and the compartmentalization of the protons of water. Although NMR imaging (also called magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) is becoming widely available for clinical use, application to the cardiovascular system, though promising, remains primarily a research tool. Gated proton NMR imaging can generate cardiac images with excellent morphologic detail and contrast; however, its ultimate importance as a cardiovascular diagnostic modality will depend on the development of several unique applications. These applications are discussed in this paper

  4. The bar coil for NMR tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogorodzki, P.; Piatkowski, A.; Wasielewski, J.

    1995-01-01

    The bar coil (bi-planar) for the NMR tomograph, designed for medical diagnostics, has been described. The tests of coil shown that it generates good homogenous magnetic field in a big volume what results in improving of the signal-to-noise ratio

  5. NMR blood vessel imaging method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riederer, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    A high speed method of forming computed images of blood vessels based on measurements of characteristics of a body is described comprising the steps of: subjecting a predetermined body area containing blood vessels of interest to, successively, applications of a short repetition time (TR) NMR pulse sequence during the period of high blood velocity and then to corresponding applications during the period of low blood velocity for successive heart beat cycles; weighting the collected imaging data from each application of the NMR pulse sequence according to whether the data was acquired during the period of high blood velocity or a period of low blood velocity of the corresponding heart beat cycle; accumulating weighted imaging data from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to high blood velocity periods and from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to low blood velocity periods; subtracting the weighted imaging data corresponding to each specific phase encoding acquired during the high blood velocity periods from the weighted imaging data for the same phase encoding corresponding to low blood velocity periods in order to compute blood vessel imaging data; and forming an image of the blood vessels of interest from the blood vessel imaging data

  6. Theoretical molecular structure, vibrational frequencies and NMR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Theoretical results have been successfully compared with available experimental data in the literature. Regarding the calculations, 2mpe-4bb prefers enol-imine form and DFT method is superior to HF approach except for predicting bond lengths. KEY WORDS: Schiff bases, Normal mode frequencies, HF, DFT, NMR. Bull.

  7. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  8. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  9. Milling technological experiments to reduce Fusarium toxin contamination in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véha A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine 4 different DON-toxin-containing (0.74 - 1.15 - 1.19 - 2.14 mg/kg winter wheat samples: they were debranned and undebranned, and we investigated the flour’s and the by-products’ (coarse, fine bran toxin content changes. SATAKE lab-debranner was used for debranning and BRABENDER lab-mill for the milling process. Without debranning, two sample flours were above the DON toxin limit (0.75 mg/kg, which are waste. By minimum debranning (and minimum debranning mass loss; 6-8%, our experience with whole flour is that the multi-stage debranning measurement significantly reduces the content of the flour’s DON toxin, while the milling by-products, only after careful consideration and DON toxin measurements, may be produced for public consumption and for feeding.

  10. Toxin activity assays, devices, methods and systems therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory Jon

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, system and method for conducting toxin activity assay using sedimentation. The toxin activity assay may include generating complexes which bind to a plurality of beads in a fluid sample. The complexes may include a target toxin and a labeling agent, or may be generated due to presence of active target toxin and/or labeling agent designed to be incorporated into complexes responsive to the presence of target active toxin. The plurality of beads including the complexes may be transported through a density media, wherein the density media has a lower density than a density of the beads and higher than a density of the fluid sample, and wherein the transporting occurs, at least in part, by sedimentation. Signal may be detected from the labeling agents of the complexes.

  11. Interaction of Botulinum Toxin with the Epithelial Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukako Fujinaga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT is a protein toxin (~150 kDa, which possesses a metalloprotease activity. Food-borne botulism is manifested when BoNT is absorbed from the digestive tract to the blood stream and enters the peripheral nerves, where the toxin cleaves core proteins of the neuroexocytosis apparatus and elicits the inhibition of neurotransmitter release. The initial obstacle to orally ingested BoNT entering the body is the epithelial barrier of the digestive tract. Recent cell biology and molecular biology studies are beginning to elucidate the mechanism by which this large protein toxin crosses the epithelial barrier. In this review, we provide an overview of the structural features of botulinum toxins (BoNT and BoNT complex and the interaction of these toxins with the epithelial barrier.

  12. Recent Advances in Targeted and Untargeted Metabolomics by NMR and MS/NMR Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingol, Ahmet K.

    2018-04-18

    Metabolomics has made significant progress in multiple fronts in the last 18 months. This minireview aimed to give an overview of these advancements in the light of their contribution to targeted and untargeted metabolomics. New computational approaches have emerged to overcome manual absolute quantitation step of metabolites in 1D 1H NMR spectra. This provides more consistency between inter-laboratory comparisons. Integration of 2D NMR metabolomics databases under a unified web server allowed very accurate identification of the metabolites that have been catalogued in these databases. For the remaining uncatalogued and unknown metabolites, new cheminformatics approaches have been developed by combining NMR and mass spectrometry. These hybrid NMR/MS approaches accelerated the identification of unknowns in untargeted studies, and now they are allowing to profile ever larger number of metabolites in application studies.

  13. Petrophysical properties of greensand as predicted from NMR measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Zakir; Grattoni, Carlos A.; Solymar, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a useful tool in reservoir evaluation. The objective of this study is to predict petrophysical properties from NMR T2 distributions. A series of laboratory experiments including core analysis, capillary pressure measurements, NMR T2 measurements and i...

  14. Performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schot, Gijs van der; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present here the performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR, the critical assessment of automated structure determination by NMR. The CS-Rosetta server uses only chemical shifts for structure prediction, in combination, when available, with a post-scoring procedure based on unassigned NOE lists (Huang et al. in J Am Chem Soc 127:1665–1674, 2005b, doi: 10.1021/ja047109h 10.1021/ja047109h ). We compare the original submissions using a previous version of the server based on Rosetta version 2.6 with recalculated targets using the new R3FP fragment picker for fragment selection and implementing a new annotation of prediction reliability (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR 57:27–35, 2013, doi: 10.1007/s10858-013-9762-6 10.1007/s10858-013-9762-6 ), both implemented in the CS-Rosetta3 WeNMR server. In this second round of CASD-NMR, the WeNMR CS-Rosetta server has demonstrated a much better performance than in the first round since only converged targets were submitted. Further, recalculation of all CASD-NMR targets using the new version of the server demonstrates that our new annotation of prediction quality is giving reliable results. Predictions annotated as weak are often found to provide useful models, but only for a fraction of the sequence, and should therefore only be used with caution

  15. Structural Insights into Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Pore Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Huyet

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysin-like proteins produced by C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. One of the others, NetB, has been shown to be the major cause of Avian Nectrotic Enteritis, which following the reduction in use of antibiotics as growth promoters, has become an emerging disease of industrial poultry. Delta toxin itself is cytotoxic to the wide range of human and animal macrophages and platelets that present GM2 ganglioside on their membranes. It has sequence similarity with Staphylococcus aureus β-pore forming toxins and is expected to heptamerize and form pores in the lipid bilayer of host cell membranes. Nevertheless, its exact mode of action remains undetermined. Here we report the 2.4 Å crystal structure of monomeric Delta toxin. The superposition of this structure with the structure of the phospholipid-bound F component of S. aureus leucocidin (LukF revealed that the glycerol molecules bound to Delta toxin and the phospholipids in LukF are accommodated in the same hydrophobic clefts, corresponding to where the toxin is expected to latch onto the membrane, though the binding sites show significant differences. From structure-based sequence alignment with the known structure of staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a model of the Delta toxin pore form has been built. Using electron microscopy, we have validated our model and characterized the Delta toxin pore on liposomes. These results highlight both similarities and differences in the mechanism of Delta toxin (and by extension NetB cytotoxicity from that of the staphylococcal pore-forming toxins.

  16. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  18. {sup 13}C NMR and EPR spectroscopic evaluation of oil shale mined soil recuperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.V. dos, E-mail: mangrich@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Mangrich, A.S. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia: Energia e Ambiente, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Pereira, B.F. [EMBRAPA Clima Temperado, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Pillon, C.N. [EMBRAPA Clima Temperado, Pelotas, RS (Brazil). Estacao Experimental Cascata; Novotny, E.H. [EMBRAPA Solos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bonagamba, T.J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Abbt-Braun, G.; Frimmel, F.H. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe, TH (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    In this work, native forest soil (NFS) organic matter (SOM) sample and SOM samples from a neighboring forest soil area of an oil shale mine which is being rehabilitated for thirty years (RFS) were analyzed. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to evaluate the soil reclamation of the Brazilian oil shale mining process. Two-dimensional heterospectral correlation studies of the results obtained from EPRand {sup 13}C NMR were used to obtain information about SOM structures and their interactions with residual paramagnetic metal ion. The signal of the residual metallic oxycation, VO{sup 2+} correlated positively with uronic acid-type hydrophilic organic structures, determined from the {sup 13}C NMR spectra, and correlated negatively with the organic free radical (OFR) signal associated with oxygen atoms (g = 2.0042). The hydrophobic aromatic structures correlate positively with the EPR OFR signal associated with carbon atoms (g = 2.0022). The data from the two spectroscopic magnetic techniques show that the used recuperation process is effective. (author)

  19. 13C NMR and EPR spectroscopic evaluation of oil shale mined soil recuperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, J.V. dos; Mangrich, A.S.; Pereira, B.F.; Pillon, C.N.; Bonagamba, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, native forest soil (NFS) organic matter (SOM) sample and SOM samples from a neighboring forest soil area of an oil shale mine which is being rehabilitated for thirty years (RFS) were analyzed. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to evaluate the soil reclamation of the Brazilian oil shale mining process. Two-dimensional heterospectral correlation studies of the results obtained from EPRand 13 C NMR were used to obtain information about SOM structures and their interactions with residual paramagnetic metal ion. The signal of the residual metallic oxycation, VO 2+ correlated positively with uronic acid-type hydrophilic organic structures, determined from the 13 C NMR spectra, and correlated negatively with the organic free radical (OFR) signal associated with oxygen atoms (g = 2.0042). The hydrophobic aromatic structures correlate positively with the EPR OFR signal associated with carbon atoms (g = 2.0022). The data from the two spectroscopic magnetic techniques show that the used recuperation process is effective. (author)

  20. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Cholera toxin but not pertussis toxin inhibits angiotensin II-enhanced contractions in the rat portal vein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.; van Meel, J. C.; Pfaffendorf, M.; van Zwieten, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-enhanced phasic contractions in the rat portal vein were concentration dependently inhibited by cholera toxin (0.1-10 micrograms/ml) and dibutyryl cyclic AMP (0.1-1 mM), but not by pertussis toxin (1 micrograms/ml), which suggests that Gi is not involved in the Ang II signal

  2. Structural investigations on betacyanin pigments by LC NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stintzing, Florian C; Conrad, Jürgen; Klaiber, Iris; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold

    2004-02-01

    Four betacyanin pigments were analysed by LC NMR and subjected to extensive NMR characterisation after isolation. Previously, low pH values were applied for NMR investigations of betalains resulting in rapid degradation of the purified substances thus preventing extensive NMR studies. Consequently, up to now only one single (13)C NMR spectrum of a betalain pigment, namely that of neobetanin (=14,15-dehydrobetanin), was available. Because of its sufficient stability under highly acidic conditions otherwise detrimental for betacyanins, this pigment remained an exemption. Since betalains are most stable in the pH range of 5-7, a new solvent system has been developed allowing improved data acquisition through improved pigment stability at near neutral pH. Thus, not only (1)H, but for the first time also partial (13)C data of betanin, isobetanin, phyllocactin and hylocerenin isolated from red-purple pitaya [Hylocereus polyrhizus (Weber) Britton & Rose, Cactaceae] could be indirectly obtained by gHSQC- and gHMQC-NMR experiments.

  3. OPENCORE NMR: open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments.

  4. Ion counting in supercapacitor electrodes using NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, John M. [Department of Chemistry; University of Cambridge; Cambridge, UK; Forse, Alexander C. [Department of Chemistry; University of Cambridge; Cambridge, UK; Wang, Hao [Department of Chemistry; University of Cambridge; Cambridge, UK; Trease, Nicole M. [Department of Chemistry; Stony Brook University; New York, USA; Taberna, Pierre-Louis [Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse III; CIRIMAT; F-31062 Toulouse, France; Simon, Patrice [Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse III; CIRIMAT; F-31062 Toulouse, France; Grey, Clare P. [Department of Chemistry; University of Cambridge; Cambridge, UK; Department of Chemistry; Stony Brook University

    2014-01-01

    19F NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the local environments of anions in supercapacitor electrodes and to quantify changes in the populations of adsorbed species during charging. In the absence of an applied potential, anionic species adsorbed within carbon micropores (in-pore) are distinguished from those in large mesopores and spaces between particles (ex-pore) by a characteristic nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS). Adsorption experiments and two-dimensional exchange experiments confirm that anions are in dynamic equilibrium between the in- and ex-pore environments with an exchange rate in the order of tens of Hz.19Fin situNMR spectra recorded at different charge states reveal changes in the intensity and NICS of the in-pore resonances, which are interpreted in term of changes in the population and local environments of the adsorbed anions that arise due to the charge-storage process. A comparison of the results obtained for a range of electrolytes reveals that several factors influence the charging mechanism. For a tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, positive polarisation of the electrode is found to proceed by anion adsorption at a low concentration, whereas increased ion exchange plays a more important role for a high concentration electrolyte. In contrast, negative polarization of the electrode proceeds by cation adsorption for both concentrations. For a tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, anion expulsion is observed in the negative charging regime; this is attributed to the reduced mobility and/or access of the larger cations inside the pores, which forces the expulsion of anions in order to build up ionic charge. Significant anion expulsion is also observed in the negative charging regime for alkali metal bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide electrolytes, suggesting that more subtle factors also affect the charging mechanism.

  5. Botulinum toxin injection in laryngeal dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woisard, Virginie; Liu, Xuelai; Bes, Marie Christine Arné; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2017-02-01

    Data, regarding the use of botulinum toxin (BT-A) in laryngeal dyspnea, are scarce, coming from some cases reports in the literature, including Vocal fold paralysis, laryngeal dystonia, vocal cord dysfunction also called paradoxical motion of the vocal fold (PMVF), and post-neuroleptic laryngeal dyskinesia. There is no consensus regarding the muscles and the doses to inject. The aim of this study is to present a retrospective review of patients treated in our ENT Department by BT-A injection in this indication. This study is a retrospective study describing patients who underwent an injection of botulinum toxin for laryngeal dyspnea in the ENT Department from 2005 to 2015 years. The inclusion criteria were a dyspnea associated with a laryngeal dysfunction, confirmed by flexible fiberoptic nasopharyngolaryngoscopy. Information concerning the causes of the dyspnea, the botulinum toxin BT-A injections procedure, post-injection follow-up, and respiratory outcome were collected for all patients included. In the group of 13 patients included, the main cause identified as principal factor linked with the short breath was: a bilateral VF paralysis (Patel et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 130:686-689, 7), laryngeal dystonia (Balkissoon and Kenn, Semin Respir Crit Care Med 33:595-605, 2), Anxiety syndrome associated with unilateral vocal fold paralysis or asthma (Marcinow et al., Laryngoscope 124:1425-1430, 3), and an isolated asthma (Zwirner et al., Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 254:242-245, 1). Nine out of the thirteen patients were improved by the injections. A BT-A-induced stable benefit for four patients led them to stop the injections in the follow-up. Good outcome was observed in five other patients (main cause: bilateral VP paralysis), allowing a progressive lengthening of the delay between BT-A injections. Four patients did not report a positive risk/benefit ratio after BT-A injections; two of them (with bilateral VF paralysis), because of respiratory side effects and

  6. Foodborne toxins of marine origin: ciguatera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juranovic, L R; Park, D L

    1991-01-01

    Ciguatera poisoning has long been recognized as a serious problem in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Due to international and interstate commerce and tourist travel the phenomenon is spreading to other parts of the globe. Various species of fish (surgeonfish, snapper, grouper, barracuda, jack, amberjack among others) have been implicated in this type of poisoning. These fish accumulate toxins in their flesh and viscera through the consumption of smaller fish that have been previously contaminated by feeding on toxic dinoflagellates. The most probable source of ciguatera is thought to be the benthic microorganism, Gambierdiscus toxicus, which produces both CTX and MTX, but other species of dinoflagellates such as Prorocentrum lima may also contribute with secondary toxins associated with the disease. Potentially ciguatoxic dinoflagellates have been isolated, cultured under laboratory conditions and dinoflagellate growth requirements as well as some factors affecting toxin production have been determined. Also, data from their ecological environment have been accumulated in an attempt to reveal a relationship with the epidemiology of ciguatera outbreaks. Several bioassays have been employed to determine the ciguatoxicity of fish. Cats have been used due to their sensitivity, but regurgitation has made dosage information difficult to obtain. Mongooses have also been used but they often carry parasitic and other type of diseases which complicate the bioassay. Mice have been used more commonly; they offer a more reliable model, can be easily housed, readily are dosed in several ways, and manifest diverse symptoms similar to human intoxications; but the amount of toxic extract needed, time consumed, complicated extraction techniques, and instrumentation involved limit the use of this assay commercially. Other bioassays have been explored including the brine shrimp, chicken, mosquito, crayfish nerve cord, guinea pig ileum, guinea pig atrium, and other

  7. SVM-based prediction of propeptide cleavage sites in spider toxins identifies toxin innovation in an Australian tarantula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S W Wong

    Full Text Available Spider neurotoxins are commonly used as pharmacological tools and are a popular source of novel compounds with therapeutic and agrochemical potential. Since venom peptides are inherently toxic, the host spider must employ strategies to avoid adverse effects prior to venom use. It is partly for this reason that most spider toxins encode a protective proregion that upon enzymatic cleavage is excised from the mature peptide. In order to identify the mature toxin sequence directly from toxin transcripts, without resorting to protein sequencing, the propeptide cleavage site in the toxin precursor must be predicted bioinformatically. We evaluated different machine learning strategies (support vector machines, hidden Markov model and decision tree and developed an algorithm (SpiderP for prediction of propeptide cleavage sites in spider toxins. Our strategy uses a support vector machine (SVM framework that combines both local and global sequence information. Our method is superior or comparable to current tools for prediction of propeptide sequences in spider toxins. Evaluation of the SVM method on an independent test set of known toxin sequences yielded 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Furthermore, we sequenced five novel peptides (not used to train the final predictor from the venom of the Australian tarantula Selenotypus plumipes to test the accuracy of the predictor and found 80% sensitivity and 99.6% 8-mer specificity. Finally, we used the predictor together with homology information to predict and characterize seven groups of novel toxins from the deeply sequenced venom gland transcriptome of S. plumipes, which revealed structural complexity and innovations in the evolution of the toxins. The precursor prediction tool (SpiderP is freely available on ArachnoServer (http://www.arachnoserver.org/spiderP.html, a web portal to a comprehensive relational database of spider toxins. All training data, test data, and scripts used are available from

  8. ACTIN-DIRECTED TOXIN. ACD toxin-produced actin oligomers poison formin-controlled actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, David B; Kudryashova, Elena; Grinevich, Dmitry O; Suarez, Cristian; Winkelman, Jonathan D; Birukov, Konstantin G; Kotha, Sainath R; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Kovar, David R; Kudryashov, Dmitri S

    2015-07-31

    The actin cross-linking domain (ACD) is an actin-specific toxin produced by several pathogens, including life-threatening spp. of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. Actin cross-linking by ACD is thought to lead to slow cytoskeleton failure owing to a gradual sequestration of actin in the form of nonfunctional oligomers. Here, we found that ACD converted cytoplasmic actin into highly toxic oligomers that potently "poisoned" the ability of major actin assembly proteins, formins, to sustain actin polymerization. Thus, ACD can target the most abundant cellular protein by using actin oligomers as secondary toxins to efficiently subvert cellular functions of actin while functioning at very low doses. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. An Emulsion Based Microarray Method to Detect the Toxin Genes of Toxin-Producing Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Bai

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Toxins produced by bacteria and fungi are one of the most important factors which may cause food contamination. The study of detection methods with high sensitivity and throughput is significant for the protection of food safety. In the present study, we coupled microarray with emulsion PCR and developed a high throughput detection method. Thirteen different gene sites which encode the common toxins of several bacteria and fungi were assayed in parallel in positive and maize samples. Conventional PCR assays were carried out for comparison. The results showed that the developed microarray method had high specificity and sensitivity. Two zearalenone-related genes were investigated in one of the ten maize samples obtained with this present method. The results indicated that the emulsion based microarray detection method was developed successfully and suggested its potential application in multiple gene site detection.

  10. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo......M hip implant. A Danish surveillance programme has been initiated addressing these problems....

  11. Interactions of hydrogen with alkali promoted Ru/SiO2 catalysts: A proton NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uner, Denis Ozbay [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-05-10

    Role of H spillover to the silica support was studied using chemisorption; a strongly bound component of spilled over H was found in the silica support which interfered with accurate measurements of active metal sites via volumetric strong H chemisorption. The volumetric chemisorption technique was modified so that measurement times were reduced from 12--36 h to 1 h. The active Ru surface was characterized means of changes in proton spin counts and NMR Knight shifts vs alkali loading. Na, K blocked the active surface of Ru metal, but Cs was pushed off by H chemisorption. The alkali promoters restricted H mobility on both metal surface and at the metal support interfaces; this is consistent with effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. 1H NMR was used to study the effect of the active metal and promoter on support hydroxyl groups. The OH group density in the silica support decreased with metal and/or promoter loading, but not on a one-to-one basis; the exchange efficiency of the hydroxyls decreased with atomic size of the alkali metal. An additional downfield proton resonance was detected which was assigned to the alkali hydroxide species in the support.

  12. New advances in electrochemical biosensors for the detection of toxins: Nanomaterials, magnetic beads and microfluidics systems. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reverté, Laia; Prieto-Simón, Beatriz; Campàs, Mònica

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology in bioanalytical devices has special advantages in the detection of toxins of interest in food safety and environmental applications. The low levels to be detected and the small size of toxins justify the increasing number of publications dealing with electrochemical biosensors, due to their high sensitivity and design versatility. The incorporation of nanomaterials in their development has been exploited to further increase their sensitivity, providing simple and fast devices, with multiplexed capabilities. This paper gives an overview of the electrochemical biosensors that have incorporated carbon and metal nanomaterials in their configurations for the detection of toxins. Biosensing systems based on magnetic beads or integrated into microfluidics systems have also been considered because of their contribution to the development of compact analytical devices. The roles of these materials, the methods used for their incorporation in the biosensor configurations as well as the advantages they provide to the analyses are summarised. - Highlights: • Nanomaterials improve the performance of electrochemical biosensors. • Carbon nanomaterials can act as electrocatalysts or label supports in biosensors. • Metal nanomaterials can act as nanostructured supports or labels in biosensors. • Magnetic beads are exploited as immobilisation supports and/or label carriers.

  13. New advances in electrochemical biosensors for the detection of toxins: Nanomaterials, magnetic beads and microfluidics systems. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reverté, Laia [IRTA, Carretera Poble Nou km. 5.5, 43540 Sant Carles de la Ràpita, Tarragona (Spain); Prieto-Simón, Beatriz [ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Campàs, Mònica, E-mail: monica.campas@irta.cat [IRTA, Carretera Poble Nou km. 5.5, 43540 Sant Carles de la Ràpita, Tarragona (Spain)

    2016-02-18

    The use of nanotechnology in bioanalytical devices has special advantages in the detection of toxins of interest in food safety and environmental applications. The low levels to be detected and the small size of toxins justify the increasing number of publications dealing with electrochemical biosensors, due to their high sensitivity and design versatility. The incorporation of nanomaterials in their development has been exploited to further increase their sensitivity, providing simple and fast devices, with multiplexed capabilities. This paper gives an overview of the electrochemical biosensors that have incorporated carbon and metal nanomaterials in their configurations for the detection of toxins. Biosensing systems based on magnetic beads or integrated into microfluidics systems have also been considered because of their contribution to the development of compact analytical devices. The roles of these materials, the methods used for their incorporation in the biosensor configurations as well as the advantages they provide to the analyses are summarised. - Highlights: • Nanomaterials improve the performance of electrochemical biosensors. • Carbon nanomaterials can act as electrocatalysts or label supports in biosensors. • Metal nanomaterials can act as nanostructured supports or labels in biosensors. • Magnetic beads are exploited as immobilisation supports and/or label carriers.

  14. β -detected NMR spin relaxation in a thin film heterostructure of ferromagnetic EuO

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, W. A.; Song, Q.; Ingle, N. J. C.; Chow, K. H.; Egilmez, M.; Fan, I.; Hossain, M. D.; Kiefl, R. F.; Levy, C. D. P.; Morris, G. D.; Parolin, T. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Saadaoui, H.; Salman, Z.; Wang, D.

    2015-08-01

    We present β -detected NMR measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation of +8Li implanted into an epitaxial heterostructure based on a 100 nm thick film of ferromagnetic (FM) EuO as a function of temperature through its FM transition. In the FM state, the spin-lattice relaxation rate follows the same temperature dependence, determined by magnon scattering mechanisms, observed in the bulk by 153Eu NMR, but above 40 K, the signal is wiped out. We also find that +8Li stopped in material adjacent to the magnetic layer exhibits spin relaxation related to the critical slowing of the Eu spins. A particularly strong relaxation in the Au overlayer suggests an unusual strong nonlocal coupling mechanism to 8Li in the metal.

  15. Site-specific labeling of proteins with NMR-active unnatural amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, David H.; Cellitti, Susan E.; Hao Xueshi; Zhang Qiong; Jahnz, Michael; Summerer, Daniel; Schultz, Peter G.; Uno, Tetsuo; Geierstanger, Bernhard H.

    2010-01-01

    A large number of amino acids other than the canonical amino acids can now be easily incorporated in vivo into proteins at genetically encoded positions. The technology requires an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for the unnatural amino acid that is added to the media while a TAG amber or frame shift codon specifies the incorporation site in the protein to be studied. These unnatural amino acids can be isotopically labeled and provide unique opportunities for site-specific labeling of proteins for NMR studies. In this perspective, we discuss these opportunities including new photocaged unnatural amino acids, outline usage of metal chelating and spin-labeled unnatural amino acids and expand the approach to in-cell NMR experiments.

  16. A broadband single-chip transceiver for multi-nuclear NMR probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisi, Marco; Gualco, Gabriele; Boero, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we present an integrated broadband complementary metal-oxide semiconductor single-chip transceiver suitable for the realization of multi-nuclear pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes. The realized single-chip transceiver can be interfaced with on-chip integrated microcoils or external LC resonators operating in the range from 1 MHz to 1 GHz. The dimension of the chip is about 1 mm2. It consists of a radio-frequency (RF) power amplifier, a low-noise RF preamplifier, a frequency mixer, an audio-frequency amplifier, and fully integrated transmit-receive switches. As specific example, we show its use for multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. With an integrated coil of about 150 μm external diameter, a 1H spin sensitivity of about 1.5 × 1013 spins/Hz1/2 is achieved at 7 T.

  17. NMR-based Enantiodifferentiation of Chiral trans-2-Phenylcyclopropane Derivatives Using a Chiral Lanthanide Shift Reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nam Sook; Kim, Hyun Sook; Song, Mi Sook

    2011-01-01

    In contrast with optical methods, there is no need to characterize the pure enantiomers. Instead, the NMR method makes use of chiral reagents that convert a mixture of enantiomers into a mixture of diastereomeric complexes. Integration of the resulting NMR spectra yields a direct measurement of enantiomeric purity as long as there is a sufficiently large difference between the chemical shifts of the two diastereoisomeric complexes to produce baseline-resolved peaks. Absolute enantiomeric configurations can also be determined using this method. Chiral lanthanide shift reagents have been used since the 1970s to form addition complexes with various compounds through interactions with electron donor sites. Lanthanide-induced, pseudo-contact shifts (LIS) are a function of the distance, r, between the nuclei under observation and the lanthanide center, and the angle, θ, between the line connecting the metal ion with the observed nucleus and the line representing the CLSR magnetic axis

  18. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient......'s self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists' and occupational therapists' evaluation of the patients' achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals....... The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals...

  19. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S

    2017-01-01

    's self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists' and occupational therapists' evaluation of the patients' achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals......The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient....... The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals...

  20. Botulinum toxin drugs: brief history and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, D

    2016-03-01

    The global botulinum toxin (BT) market is currently undergoing rapid changes: this may be the time to review the history and the future of BT drug development. Since the early 1990s Botox(®) and Dysport(®) dominated the international BT market. Later, Myobloc(®)/NeuroBloc(®), a liquid BT type B drug, came out, but failed. Xeomin(®) is the latest major BT drug. It features removal of complexing proteins and improved neurotoxin purity. Several new BT drugs are coming out of Korea, China and Russia. Scientific challenges for BT drug development include modification of BT's duration of action, its transdermal transport and the design of BT hybrid drugs for specific target tissues. The increased competition will change the global BT market fundamentally and a re-organisation according to large indication groups, such as therapeutic and cosmetic applications, might occur.

  1. [Botulinum toxin and facial palsy. Our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete Alvaro, María Luisa; Junyent, Josefina; Torrent, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic indication of peripheral facial paralysis depends on the degree of nerve injury. Severe facial palsy (electroneuronographic study less than or equal to 10%) leads to healing with sequelae. The sequelae of facial paralysis are contractures, hemifacial spasm and synkinesis.Our purpose was to demonstrate that these patients could benefit from rehabilitation treatment. We present a study of 48 patients with severe peripheral facial paralysis. They were treated from the beginning of reinnervation with botulinum toxin and facial exercises according to the Wisconsin School. The subjective efficacy of rehabilitation is high. Rehabilitation treatment can inform patients about their chances of recovery, give them control over and quality of facial expression and help to achieve greater facial symmetry. These factors provide better functionality and quality of life. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Chieng Yeo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies.

  3. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Chew Chieng; Abu Bakar, Fauziah; Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-02-19

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies.

  4. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: The NMR-CUFF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windt, Carel W.; Soltner, Helmut; Dusschoten, Dagmar van; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5 mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings.

  5. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: the NMR-CUFF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windt, Carel W; Soltner, Helmut; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarong Hong

    Full Text Available Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods.

  7. Polycystic ovary syndrome and environmental toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra Zofia; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2016-09-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common, heterogeneous, and multifactorial endocrine disorder in premenopausal women. The pathophysiology of this endocrinopathy is still unclear; however, the heterogeneity of its features within ethnic races, geographic location, and families suggests that environment and lifestyle are of prime importance. This work is mainly focused on the possible role of the most common and studied environmental toxins for this syndrome in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Plasticizers, such as bisphenol A (BPA) or phthalates, which belong to the categories of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), affect humans' health in everyday, industrialized life; therefore special attention should be paid to such exposure. Timing of exposure to EDCs is crucial for the intensity of adverse health effects. It is now evident that fetuses, infants, and/or young children are the most susceptible groups, especially in the early development periods. Prenatal exposure to EDCs that mimic endogenous hormones may contribute to the altered fetal programming and in consequence lead to PCOS and other adverse health effects, potentially transgenerationally. Acute or prolonged exposure to EDCs and AGEs through different life cycle stages may result in destabilization of the hormonal homeostasis and lead to disruption of reproductive functions. They may also interfere with metabolic alterations such as obesity, insulin resistance, and compensatory hyperinsulinemia that can exacerbate the PCOS phenotype and contribute to PCOS consequences such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Since wide exposure to environmental toxins and their role in the pathophysiology of PCOS are supported by extensive data derived from diverse scientific models, protective strategies and strong recommendations should be considered to reduce human exposure to protect present and future generations from their adverse health effects. Copyright

  8. Bacterial Toxins: A Hope Towards Angiogenic Ailments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandia, Rekha; Munjal, Ashok; Dhama, Kuldeep; Malik, Yashpal Singh

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential physiological process for growth and maintenance of the body. Especially its role becomes indispendable during the embryonic development stage but lacks in adults with some exceptions like while wound repair and menstrual cycle. It is a tightly regulated process and relies on the cascade of several molecular signaling pathways with the involvement of many effectors like vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF) etc. Related literature/ information were retrieved, analyzed and compiled from the online published resources available in Medline, Pubmed, Pubmed Central, Science Direct and other scientific databases. Excessive angiogenesis leads to disorders like tumor, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetic retinopathy, endometriosis, psoriasis, and adiposity. While, reduced angiogenesis also results in several ailments like cardiac ischemia, low capillary density in brain of Alzheimer's patients and delayed wound healing. Therefore, both angio-proliferative and anti-angiogenic approaches may be of use in developing novel therapeutics. Bacterial toxins are known for modulating the process of angiogenesis by mimicking pro-angiogenic factors and/ or competing with them. Furthermore, they inactivate the receptors or keep them in ON status, hence can be used to treat angiogenic disorders. The ease in handling, cultivation and manipulating the toxins structure has enabled the use of bacteria as an ideal choice for novel therapeutic developments. This review intends to elucidate the molecular mechanisms through which certain bacteria may alter the level of angiogenesis and consequently can work as therapeutics against angiogenic disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Dinophysis Toxins: Causative Organisms, Distribution and Fate in Shellfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Reguera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several Dinophysis species produce diarrhoetic toxins (okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins and pectenotoxins, and cause gastointestinal illness, Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP, even at low cell densities (<103 cells·L−1. They are the main threat, in terms of days of harvesting bans, to aquaculture in Northern Japan, Chile, and Europe. Toxicity and toxin profiles are very variable, more between strains than species. The distribution of DSP events mirrors that of shellfish production areas that have implemented toxin regulations, otherwise misinterpreted as bacterial or viral contamination. Field observations and laboratory experiments have shown that most of the toxins produced by Dinophysis are released into the medium, raising questions about the ecological role of extracelular toxins and their potential uptake by shellfish. Shellfish contamination results from a complex balance between food selection, adsorption, species-specific enzymatic transformations, and allometric processes. Highest risk areas are those combining Dinophysis strains with high cell content of okadaates, aquaculture with predominance of mytilids (good accumulators of toxins, and consumers who frequently include mussels in their diet. Regions including pectenotoxins in their regulated phycotoxins will suffer from much longer harvesting bans and from disloyal competition with production areas where these toxins have been deregulated.

  10. ACTION OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN IN THE GUINEA PIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseman, Joel B.; Pappenheimer, A. M.; Gill, D. M.; Harper, Annabel A.

    1970-01-01

    The blood clearance and distribution in the tissues of 125I after intravenous injection of small doses (1.5–5 MLD or 0.08–0.25 µg) of 125I-labeled diphtheria toxin has been followed in guinea pigs and rabbits and compared with the fate of equivalent amounts of injected 125I-labeled toxoid and bovine serum albumin. Toxoid disappeared most rapidly from the blood stream and label accumulated and was retained in liver, spleen, and especially in kidney. Both toxin and BSA behaved differently. Label was found widely distributed among all the organs except the nervous system and its rate of disappearance from the tissues paralleled its disappearance from the circulation. There was no evidence for any particular affinity of toxin for muscle tissue or for a "target" organ. Previous reports by others that toxin causes specific and selective impairment of protein synthesis in muscle tissue were not confirmed. On the contrary, both in guinea pigs and rabbits, a reduced rate of protein synthesis was observed in all tissues that had taken up the toxin label. In tissues removed from intoxicated animals of both species there was an associated reduction in aminoacyl transferase 2 content. It is concluded that the primary action of diphtheria toxin in the living animal is to effect the inactivation of aminoacyl transferase 2. The resulting inhibition in rate of protein synthesis leads to morphologic damage in all tissues reached by the toxin and ultimately to death of the animal. PMID:5511567

  11. Structural Insights into Bacillus thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and Parasporin Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengchen; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since the first X-ray structure of Cry3Aa was revealed in 1991, numerous structures of B. thuringiensis toxins have been determined and published. In recent years, functional studies on the mode of action and resistance mechanism have been proposed, which notably promoted the developments of biological insecticides and insect-resistant transgenic crops. With the exploration of known pore-forming toxins (PFTs) structures, similarities between PFTs and B. thuringiensis toxins have provided great insights into receptor binding interactions and conformational changes from water-soluble to membrane pore-forming state of B. thuringiensis toxins. This review mainly focuses on the latest discoveries of the toxin working mechanism, with the emphasis on structural related progress. Based on the structural features, B. thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and parasporin toxins could be divided into three categories: three-domain type α-PFTs, Cyt toxin type β-PFTs and aerolysin type β-PFTs. Structures from each group are elucidated and discussed in relation to the latest data, respectively. PMID:25229189

  12. The role of toxins in Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramyavardhanee; Lacy, D Borden

    2017-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterial pathogen that is the leading cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis worldwide. The incidence, severity, mortality and healthcare costs associated with C. difficile infection (CDI) are rising, making C. difficile a major threat to public health. Traditional treatments for CDI involve use of antibiotics such as metronidazole and vancomycin, but disease recurrence occurs in about 30% of patients, highlighting the need for new therapies. The pathogenesis of C. difficile is primarily mediated by the actions of two large clostridial glucosylating toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). Some strains produce a third toxin, the binary toxin C. difficile transferase, which can also contribute to C. difficile virulence and disease. These toxins act on the colonic epithelium and immune cells and induce a complex cascade of cellular events that result in fluid secretion, inflammation and tissue damage, which are the hallmark features of the disease. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the structure and mechanism of action of the C. difficile toxins and their role in disease. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2017.

  13. Synthesis of protein in intestinal cells exposed to cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.W.; Berg, W.D. Jr.; Coppenhaver, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism by which cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), formed by intestinal epithelial cells in response to cholera toxin, ultimately results in alterations in water and electrolyte transport is poorly understood. Several studies have indicated that inhibitors of transcription or translation block much of the transport of ions and water in the intestine and edema formation in tissue elicited by cholera toxin. Data presented in this study confirmed the inhibitory effects of cycloheximide on cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation in the rabbit intestinal loop model. Neither cycloheximide nor actinomycin D altered the amount of cyclic AMP that accumulated in intestinal cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to cholera toxin. An increase in (/sup 3/H) leucine incorporation was readily demonstrable in intestinal epithelial cells from rabbits challenged with Vibrio cholerae. Similarly, intestinal epithelial cells incubated with cholera toxin for 4 hr synthesized substantially more protein than controls as determined by relative incorporation of (/sup 35/S) methionine. Most of the new protein synthesized in response to cholera toxin was membrane associated and of high molecular weight. The possible significance of the toxin-induced protein relative to cholera pathogenesis was discussed.

  14. Structural Insights into Bacillus thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and Parasporin Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengchen Xu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the first X-ray structure of Cry3Aa was revealed in 1991, numerous structures of B. thuringiensis toxins have been determined and published. In recent years, functional studies on the mode of action and resistance mechanism have been proposed, which notably promoted the developments of biological insecticides and insect-resistant transgenic crops. With the exploration of known pore-forming toxins (PFTs structures, similarities between PFTs and B. thuringiensis toxins have provided great insights into receptor binding interactions and conformational changes from water-soluble to membrane pore-forming state of B. thuringiensis toxins. This review mainly focuses on the latest discoveries of the toxin working mechanism, with the emphasis on structural related progress. Based on the structural features, B. thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and parasporin toxins could be divided into three categories: three-domain type α-PFTs, Cyt toxin type β-PFTs and aerolysin type β-PFTs. Structures from each group are elucidated and discussed in relation to the latest data, respectively.

  15. Synthesis of protein in intestinal cells exposed to cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.W.; Berg, W.D. Jr.; Coppenhaver, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), formed by intestinal epithelial cells in response to cholera toxin, ultimately results in alterations in water and electrolyte transport is poorly understood. Several studies have indicated that inhibitors of transcription or translation block much of the transport of ions and water in the intestine and edema formation in tissue elicited by cholera toxin. Data presented in this study confirmed the inhibitory effects of cycloheximide on cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation in the rabbit intestinal loop model. Neither cycloheximide nor actinomycin D altered the amount of cyclic AMP that accumulated in intestinal cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to cholera toxin. An increase in [ 3 H] leucine incorporation was readily demonstrable in intestinal epithelial cells from rabbits challenged with Vibrio cholerae. Similarly, intestinal epithelial cells incubated with cholera toxin for 4 hr synthesized substantially more protein than controls as determined by relative incorporation of [ 35 S] methionine. Most of the new protein synthesized in response to cholera toxin was membrane associated and of high molecular weight. The possible significance of the toxin-induced protein relative to cholera pathogenesis was discussed

  16. Solid-state NMR basic principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Apperley, David C; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has proved to be a uniquely powerful and versatile tool for analyzing and characterizing chemicals and materials of all kinds. This book focuses on the latest developments and applications for "solid-state" NMR, which has found new uses from archaeology to crystallography to biomaterials and pharmaceutical science research. The book will provide materials engineers, analytical chemists, and physicists, in and out of lab, a survey of the techniques and the essential tools of solid-state NMR, together with a practical guide on applications. In this concise introduction to the growing field of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy The reader will find: * Basic NMR concepts for solids, including guidance on the spin-1/2 nuclei concept * Coverage of the quantum mechanics aspects of solid state NMR and an introduction to the concept of quadrupolar nuclei * An understanding relaxation, exchange and quantitation in NMR * An analysis and interpretation of NMR data, with e...

  17. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Structure Determination of Proteins from Pseudocontact Shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jianping

    2013-06-05

    Magic angle spinning solid-state NMR is a unique technique to study atomic-resolution structure of biomacromolecules which resist crystallization or are too large to study by solution NMR techniques. However, difficulties in obtaining sufficient number of long-range distance restraints using dipolar coupling based spectra hamper the process of structure determination of proteins in solid-state NMR. In this study it is shown that high-resolution structure of proteins in solid phase can be determined without the use of traditional dipolar-dipolar coupling based distance restraints by combining the measurements of pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) with Rosetta calculations. The PCSs were generated by chelating exogenous paramagnetic metal ions to a tag 4-mercaptomethyl-dipicolinic acid, which is covalently attached to different residue sites in a 56-residue immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1). The long-range structural restraints with metal-nucleus distance of up to ∼20 Å are quantitatively extracted from experimentally observed PCSs, and these are in good agreement with the distances back-calculated using an X-ray structure model. Moreover, we demonstrate that using several paramagnetic ions with varied paramagnetic susceptibilities as well as the introduction of paramagnetic labels at different sites can dramatically increase the number of long-range restraints and cover different regions of the protein. The structure generated from solid-state NMR PCSs restraints combined with Rosetta calculations has 0.7 Å root-mean-square deviation relative to X-ray structure. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. Coherent evolution of parahydrogen induced polarisation using laser pump, NMR probe spectroscopy: Theoretical framework and experimental observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halse, Meghan E; Procacci, Barbara; Henshaw, Sarah-Louise; Perutz, Robin N; Duckett, Simon B

    2017-05-01

    We recently reported a pump-probe method that uses a single laser pulse to introduce parahydrogen (p-H 2 ) into a metal dihydride complex and then follows the time-evolution of the p-H 2 -derived nuclear spin states by NMR. We present here a theoretical framework to describe the oscillatory behaviour of the resultant hyperpolarised NMR signals using a product operator formalism. We consider the cases where the p-H 2 -derived protons form part of an AX, AXY, AXYZ or AA'XX' spin system in the product molecule. We use this framework to predict the patterns for 2D pump-probe NMR spectra, where the indirect dimension represents the evolution during the pump-probe delay and the positions of the cross-peaks depend on the difference in chemical shift of the p-H 2 -derived protons and the difference in their couplings to other nuclei. The evolution of the NMR signals of the p-H 2 -derived protons, as well as the transfer of hyperpolarisation to other NMR-active nuclei in the product, is described. The theoretical framework is tested experimentally for a set of ruthenium dihydride complexes representing the different spin systems. Theoretical predictions and experimental results agree to within experimental error for all features of the hyperpolarised 1 H and 31 P pump-probe NMR spectra. Thus we establish the laser pump, NMR probe approach as a robust way to directly observe and quantitatively analyse the coherent evolution of p-H 2 -derived spin order over micro-to-millisecond timescales. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coherent evolution of parahydrogen induced polarisation using laser pump, NMR probe spectroscopy: Theoretical framework and experimental observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halse, Meghan E.; Procacci, Barbara; Henshaw, Sarah-Louise; Perutz, Robin N.; Duckett, Simon B.

    2017-05-01

    We recently reported a pump-probe method that uses a single laser pulse to introduce parahydrogen (p-H2) into a metal dihydride complex and then follows the time-evolution of the p-H2-derived nuclear spin states by NMR. We present here a theoretical framework to describe the oscillatory behaviour of the resultant hyperpolarised NMR signals using a product operator formalism. We consider the cases where the p-H2-derived protons form part of an AX, AXY, AXYZ or AA‧XX‧ spin system in the product molecule. We use this framework to predict the patterns for 2D pump-probe NMR spectra, where the indirect dimension represents the evolution during the pump-probe delay and the positions of the cross-peaks depend on the difference in chemical shift of the p-H2-derived protons and the difference in their couplings to other nuclei. The evolution of the NMR signals of the p-H2-derived protons, as well as the transfer of hyperpolarisation to other NMR-active nuclei in the product, is described. The theoretical framework is tested experimentally for a set of ruthenium dihydride complexes representing the different spin systems. Theoretical predictions and experimental results agree to within experimental error for all features of the hyperpolarised 1H and 31P pump-probe NMR spectra. Thus we establish the laser pump, NMR probe approach as a robust way to directly observe and quantitatively analyse the coherent evolution of p-H2-derived spin order over micro-to-millisecond timescales.

  20. NMR Knight shifts and the electronic properties of Rb8Na16Si136 clathrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latturner, Susan; Iversen, Bo B.; Sepa, Jelena; Srdanov, Vojislav; Stucky, Galen

    2001-01-01

    A silicon framework clathrate type-II compound was synthesized with rubidium and sodium atoms in cages. A single crystal of this material was characterized by both conventional and synchrotron x-ray diffraction; the structure belongs to the cubic space group Fd-3m, with a cell edge of 14.738(1) Aa. The alkali metals are ordered in the structure, with the small cages containing sodium, and the large cages containing rubidium. Variable temperature magic-angle-spinning NMR of all three nuclei show large Knight shifts with a strong temperature dependence, unlike conventional metals. The low conductivity (200 S/cm) and high paramagnetic susceptibility (5x10 -6 emu/g) indicate that as the temperature is lowered, the electrons become more localized on the alkali atoms, resulting in properties consistent with a correlated narrow band metal system

  1. Towards the role of metal ions in the structural variability of proteins: CdII speciation of a metal ion binding loop motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jancsó, Attila; Szunyogh, Dániel; Gyurcsik, Béla

    2011-01-01

    A de novo designed dodecapeptide (HS), inspired by the metal binding loops of metal-responsive transcriptional activators, was synthesized. The aim was to create a model system for structurally promiscuous and intrinsically unstructured proteins, and explore the effect of metal ions on their stru...... the peptide is exchanging between a number of structures also in its metal ion bound state(s), as indicated by NMR and PAC data. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  2. Cholera toxin can catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaslow, H.R.; Groppi, V.E.; Abood, M.E.; Bourne, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    Cholera toxin catalyzes transfer of radiolabel from [ 32 P]NAD + to several peptides in particulate preparations of human foreskin fibroblasts. Resolution of these peptides by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis allowed identification of two peptides of M/sub r/ = 42,000 and 52,000 as peptide subunits of a regulatory component of adenylate cyclase. The radiolabeling of another group of peptides (M/sub r/ = 50,000 to 65,000) suggested that cholera toxin could catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins. This suggestion was confirmed by showing that incubation with cholera toxin and [ 32 P]NAD + caused radiolabeling of purified microtubule and intermediate filament proteins

  3. Health Risk Assessment for Cyanobacterial Toxins in Seafood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Humpage

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae are abundant in fresh, brackish and marine waters worldwide. When toxins produced by cyanobacteria are present in the aquatic environment, seafood harvested from these waters may present a health hazard to consumers. Toxicity hazards from seafood have been internationally recognised when the source is from marine algae (dinoflagellates and diatoms, but to date few risk assessments for cyanobacterial toxins in seafood have been presented. This paper estimates risk from seafood contaminated by cyanobacterial toxins, and provides guidelines for safe human consumption.

  4. Secondary metabolite toxins and nutrition of plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Barbara J

    2006-08-01

    Fungal pathogens derive nutrition from the plants they invade. Some fungi can subvert plant defence responses such as programmed cell death to provide nutrition for their growth and colonisation. Secondary metabolite toxins produced by fungi often play a role in triggering these responses. Knowledge of the biosynthesis of these toxins, and the availability of fungal genome sequences and gene disruption techniques, allows the development of tools for experiments aimed at discovering the role of such toxins in triggering plant cell death and plant disease.

  5. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Taly

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted.

  6. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  7. Fully automated system for pulsed NMR measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    A system is described which places many of the complex, tedious operations for pulsed NMR experiments under computer control. It automatically optimizes the experiment parameters of pulse length and phase, and precision, accuracy, and measurement speed are improved. The hardware interface between the computer and the NMR instrument is described. Design features, justification of the choices made between alternative design strategies, and details of the implementation of design goals are presented. Software features common to all the available experiments are discussed. Optimization of pulse lengths and phases is performed via a sequential search technique called Uniplex. Measurements of the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times and of diffusion constants are automatic. Options for expansion of the system are explored along with some of the limitations of the system

  8. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the 14 N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long 14 N longitudinal relaxation times (T 1 ) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between 14 N and 1 H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the 14 N quadrupolar coupling constants (e 2 qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the 14 N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects

  9. DNA oligonucleotide conformations: high resolution NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellema, J.-R.

    1984-01-01

    The present work describes a DNA double-helix model, which is well comparable with the models derived from fibre-diffraction studies. The model has a mononucleotide repeat with torsion angles in accordance with average geometries as derived from 1 H NMR studies. Special attention was paid to reduce the number of short H-H nonbonding contacts, which are abundantly present in the 'classical' fibre-diffraction models. Chapter 3 describes the first complete assignment of a 1 H NMR spectrum of a DNA tetramer, d(TAAT). Preliminary conformational data derived from the spectral parameters recorded at 27 0 C are given. A more detailed analysis employing temperature-dependence studies is given in Chapter 4. (Auth.)

  10. NMR Fingerprints of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Yang-ming

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The 1H NMR fingerprint of Eucommia ulmoides acquired with a CPMG pulse sequence was analyzed with the complete reduction to amplitude-frequency table (CRAFT approach. The signals of target compounds were extracted without chemical separation and purification. Quantitative analysis showed that the average concentration of pinoresinol glucoside (PDG in Eucommia ulmoides got from Guiyang medical plant garden was 0.275 6% with a relative standard deviation (RSD of 1.69%. The results were consistent with those obtained by high performance liquid chromatography (average content of 0.269 6% and RSD of 0.65%. NMR fingerprint and multivariate statistical analysis also revealed that there existed significant differences between Hunan and Guizhou Eucommia ulmoides Oliver.

  11. Exploring the limits to spatially resolved NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaedke, Achim; Nestle, Nikolaus [TU Darmstadt, Institute of Condensed Matter Physics (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Recent advances in MRI have demonstrated resolutions down to 1 {mu}m. Magnetic resonance force microscopy has the potential to reach sensitivity for single nuclear spins. Given these numbers, in vivo imaging of single cells or even biomacromolecules may seem possible. However, for in vivo applications, there are fundamental differences in the contrast mechanisms compared to MRI at macroscopic scales as the length scale of of molecular self-diffusion exceeds that of the spatial resolution on the NMR time scale. Those effects - which are fundamentally different from the echo attenuation in field gradient NMR - even may lead to general limitations on the spatial resolution achievable in aqueous systems with high water content. In our contribution, we explore those effects on a model system in a high-resolution stray-field imaging setup. In addition to experimental results, simulations based on the Bloch-Torrey equation are presented.

  12. Sticholysin II: a pore-forming toxin as a probe to recognize sphingomyelin in artificial and cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Paloma Sanchez; Chieppa, Gabriele; Desideri, Alessandro; Cannata, Stefano; Romano, Elena; Luly, Paolo; Rufini, Stefano

    2012-10-01

    Sphingomyelin is a major component of membrane rafts, and also is a precursor of many bioactive molecules. The sphingomyelin plays important biological roles and alterations of its metabolism are the basis of some genetic disorders such as the Niemann Pick disease. A complete understanding of its biological role is frustrated by the lack of efficient tools for its recognition in the cell. Sticholysin II (StnII) is a 20 kDa protein from the sea-anemone Stichodactyla helianthus which shows a cytotoxic activity by forming oligomeric aqueous pores in the cell plasma membrane. A recent NMR analysis indicates that the sticholysin II binds specifically to sphingomyelin by two domains that recognize respectively the hydrophilic (i.e. phosphorylcholine) and the hydrophobic (i.e. ceramide) moieties of the molecule. Aim of our research has been to verify the possible employ of an antibody against the StnII to investigate the localization and the dynamics of sphingomyelin in cell membranes. For this purpose, we developed a monoclonal antibody (named A10) against the toxin and we tested its ability to bind StnII after binding to sphingomyelin. A10 antibody is able to recognize the sticholysin II both in its native form and after SDS treatment, being the protein still suitable for many analytic techniques such as ELISA, western blotting and immunofluorescence. The high affinity of the toxin for the sphingomyelin in cell membranes has been demonstrated by microscopic immuno-localization and western blot analysis; both methods confirmed that sphingomyelin is the molecular acceptor for StnII also in cell membranes. Finally, we studied the specificity of the toxin for sphingomyelin by a cell membrane-double labelling method, using cholera toxin, specific for the ganglioside GM1, and sticholysin II. The results obtained show that there is no cross-reactivity between the two toxins, confirming that sticholysin II is able to discriminate among membrane domains with sphingomyelin with

  13. Quantitative calibration of radiofrequency NMR Stark effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasek, Matthew R; Kempf, James G

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Stark responses can occur in quadrupolar nuclei for an electric field oscillating at twice the usual NMR frequency (2ω(0)). Calibration of responses to an applied E field is needed to establish nuclear spins as probes of native E fields within material and molecular systems. We present an improved approach and apparatus for accurate measurement of quadrupolar Stark effects. Updated values of C(14) (the response parameter in cubic crystals) were obtained for both (69)Ga and (75)As in GaAs. Keys to improvement include a modified implementation of voltage dividers to assess the 2ω(0) amplitude, |E|, and the stabilization of divider response by reduction of stray couplings in 2ω(0) circuitry. Finally, accuracy was enhanced by filtering sets of |E| through a linear response function that we established for the radiofrequency amplifier. Our approach is verified by two types of spectral results. Steady-state 2ω(0) excitation to presaturate NMR spectra yielded C(14) = (2.59 ± 0.06) × 10(12) m(-1) for (69)Ga at room-temperature and 14.1 T. For (75)As, we obtained (3.1 ± 0.1) × 10(12) m(-1). Both values reconcile with earlier results from 77 K and below 1 T, whereas current experiments are at room temperature and 14.1 T. Finally, we present results where few-microsecond pulses of the 2ω(0) field induced small (tens of Hz) changes in high-resolution NMR line shapes. There too, spectra collected vs |E| agree with the model for response, further establishing the validity of our protocols to specify |E|.

  14. NMR of 1,2-dioxiquinolines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa Villar, Jose Daniel; Santos, N.L. dos

    1993-01-01

    Several derivates of quinoline are known for presenting pharmacological activity as antibiotics and anti-parasites, from which an important group are the antibiotics for the treatment of malaria and infections of the urinary tract. This work presents the structures and the NMR spectra of three new derivates of quinoline. These compounds are being tested as possible antibiotics for the treatment of urinary infections caused by Escherichia coli which are extremely resistant to other types of antibiotics

  15. Nested Surface Coils for Multinuclear NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Magill, Arthur; Gruetter, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the design of surface coils for multinuclear applications. The relative sensitivities of several NMR-visible nuclei of biological interest are considered, and the motivations to operate an RF coil at multiple frequencies, both sequentially and simultaneously, are reviewed. The design of nested surface coils is then developed. Magnetic fields generated by planar loop and butterfly coils are first introduced. The benefits of quadrature design are briefly considered, and ...

  16. NMR dispersion measurement of dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.; Cox, S.F.J.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring dynamic nuclear polarization from the NMR dispersive susceptibility is examined. Two prototype instruments are tested in a polarized proton target using organic target material. The more promising employs a tunnel diode oscillator, inside the target cavity, and should provide a precise polarization measurement working at a frequency far enough from the main resonance for the disturbance of the measured polarization to be negligible. Other existing methods for measuring target polarization are briefly reviewed. (author)

  17. Structure of high-resolution NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Corio, PL

    2012-01-01

    Structure of High-Resolution NMR Spectra provides the principles, theories, and mathematical and physical concepts of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.The book presents the elementary theory of magnetic resonance; the quantum mechanical theory of angular momentum; the general theory of steady state spectra; and multiple quantum transitions, double resonance and spin echo experiments.Physicists, chemists, and researchers will find the book a valuable reference text.

  18. 3D Reconstruction of NMR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Izak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces experiment of 3D reconstruction NMR images scanned from magnetic resonance device. There are described methods which can be used for 3D reconstruction magnetic resonance images in biomedical application. The main idea is based on marching cubes algorithm. For this task was chosen sophistication method by program Vision Assistant, which is a part of program LabVIEW.

  19. observed by high pressure NMR and NQR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Material Science, Himeji Institute of Technology, Kamigori,. Akogun, Hyogo 678-1297, Japan. ∗. Email: kohara@sci.himeji tech.ac.jp. Abstract. NMR and NQR studies on two interesting systems (URu2Si2, CeTIn5) were performed under high pressure. (1) URu2Si2: In the pressure range 3.0 to 8.3 kbar, we ...

  20. NMR methodologies for studying mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Tiago C; Jarak, Ivana; Carvalho, Rui A

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique with an increasing importance in the study of metabolic diseases. Its initial important role in the determination of chemical structures (1, 2) has been considerably overcome by its potential for the in vivo study of metabolism (3-5). The main characteristic that makes this technique so attractive is its noninvasiveness. Only nuclei capable of transitioning between energy states, in the presence of an intense and constant magnetic field, are studied. This includes abundant nuclei such as proton ((1)H) and phosphorous ((31)P), as well as stable isotopes such as deuterium ((2)H) and carbon 13 ((13)C). This allows a wide range of applications that vary from the determination of water distribution in tissues (as obtained in a magnetic resonance imaging scan) to the calculation of metabolic fluxes under ex vivo and in vivo conditions without the need to use radioactive tracers or tissue biopsies (as in a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) scan). In this chapter, some technical aspects of the methodology of an NMR/MRS experiment as well as how it can be used to study mitochondrial bioenergetics are overviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo MRS versus high-resolution NMR using proton high rotation magic angle spinning (HRMAS) of tissue biopsies and tissue extracts are also discussed.

  1. Principles of high resolution NMR in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Mehring, Michael

    1983-01-01

    The field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has developed at a fascinating pace during the last decade. It always has been an extremely valuable tool to the organic chemist by supplying molecular "finger print" spectra at the atomic level. Unfortunately the high resolution achievable in liquid solutions could not be obtained in solids and physicists and physical chemists had to live with unresolved lines open to a wealth of curve fitting procedures and a vast amount of speculations. High resolution NMR in solids seemed to be a paradoxon. Broad structure­ less lines are usually encountered when dealing with NMR in solids. Only with the recent advent of mUltiple pulse, magic angle, cross-polarization, two-dimen­ sional and multiple-quantum spectroscopy and other techniques during the last decade it became possible to resolve finer details of nuclear spin interactions in solids. I have felt that graduate students, researchers and others beginning to get involved with these techniques needed a book which trea...

  2. Solid state NMR study of cumbaru flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Jose S.; Bathista, Andre L.B.S.; Silva, Emerson O.; Priante Filho, Nicolau; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2001-01-01

    The polysaccharide obtained by seed of Dipteryx alata Vog, has been characterised by 13 C solid state, using the basic routine techniques, like MAS and CPMAS and by the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame parameter (T 1 H ρ). Knowing that the chemical structure and molecular dynamic are extremely necessary route to obtain information on the polysaccharides, this work contributes to the classification of the seed containing in the cumbaru fruit to get response on its application. To obtain the initial responses for our purposes some solid state NMR techniques were chosen. The CPMAS 13 C NMR spectrum of the polysaccharide was investigated to know if it has some crystallinity. The MAS 13 C NMR spectrum showed the presence of domains with distinct molecular mobility, because these domains will differ basically in the distribution size and chain packing. The variable contact time experiment was used to analyse the distribution form of 13 C decays, which give us more information about sample heterogeneity. The T 1 H ρHr values were obtained from the variable contact time and by delayed contact time experiment, because these parameter indicate the order of polysaccharides. From the values of this parameter, we found that this polysaccharide is completely non-ordered. (author)

  3. Multispectral dual isotope and NMR image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vannier, M.W.; Beihn, R.M.; Butterfield, R.L.; De Land, F.H.

    1985-05-01

    Dual isotope scintigraphy and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging produce image data that is intrinsically multispectral. That is multiple images of the same anatomic region are generated with different gray scale distribution and morphologic content that is largely redundant. Image processing technology, originally developed by NASA for satellite imaging, is available for multispectral analysis. These methods have been applied to provide tissue characterization. Tissue specific information encoded in the grapy scale data from dual isotope and NMR studies may be extracted using multispectral pattern recognition methods. The authors used table lookup minimum distance, maximum likelihood and cluster analysis techniques with data sets from Ga-67 / Tc-99m, 1-131 labeled antibodies / Tc-99m, Tc-99m perfusion / Xe-133 ventilation, and NMR studies. The results show; tissue characteristic signatures exist in dual isotope and NMR imaging, and these spectral signatures are identifiable using multispectral image analysis and provide tissue classification maps with scatter diagrams that facilitate interpretation and assist in elucidating subtle changes.

  4. Protein NMR structures refined without NOE data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyojung; Kim, Tae-Rae; Ahn, SeonJoo; Ji, Sunyoung; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-01-01

    The refinement of low-quality structures is an important challenge in protein structure prediction. Many studies have been conducted on protein structure refinement; the refinement of structures derived from NMR spectroscopy has been especially intensively studied. In this study, we generated flat-bottom distance potential instead of NOE data because NOE data have ambiguity and uncertainty. The potential was derived from distance information from given structures and prevented structural dislocation during the refinement process. A simulated annealing protocol was used to minimize the potential energy of the structure. The protocol was tested on 134 NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that also have X-ray structures. Among them, 50 structures were used as a training set to find the optimal "width" parameter in the flat-bottom distance potential functions. In the validation set (the other 84 structures), most of the 12 quality assessment scores of the refined structures were significantly improved (total score increased from 1.215 to 2.044). Moreover, the secondary structure similarity of the refined structure was improved over that of the original structure. Finally, we demonstrate that the combination of two energy potentials, statistical torsion angle potential (STAP) and the flat-bottom distance potential, can drive the refinement of NMR structures.

  5. CcpNmr AnalysisAssign: a flexible platform for integrated NMR analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Simon P.; Fogh, Rasmus H. [University of Leicester, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Leicester Institute for Structural- and Chemical Biology (United Kingdom); Boucher, Wayne [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Ragan, Timothy J.; Mureddu, Luca G.; Vuister, Geerten W., E-mail: gv29@le.ac.uk [University of Leicester, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Leicester Institute for Structural- and Chemical Biology (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    NMR spectroscopy is an indispensably powerful technique for the analysis of biomolecules under ambient conditions, both for structural- and functional studies. However, in practice the complexity of the technique has often frustrated its application by non-specialists. In this paper, we present CcpNmr version-3, the latest software release from the Collaborative Computational Project for NMR, for all aspects of NMR data analysis, including liquid- and solid-state NMR data. This software has been designed to be simple, functional and flexible, and aims to ensure that routine tasks can be performed in a straightforward manner. We have designed the software according to modern software engineering principles and leveraged the capabilities of modern graphics libraries to simplify a variety of data analysis tasks. We describe the process of backbone assignment as an example of the flexibility and simplicity of implementing workflows, as well as the toolkit used to create the necessary graphics for this workflow. The package can be downloaded from www.ccpn.ac.uk/v3-software/downloads http://www.ccpn.ac.uk/v3-software/downloads and is freely available to all non-profit organisations.

  6. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2015-01-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD–NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases 15 N– 1 H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD–NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta

  7. Portable microcoil NMR detection coupled to capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Joana; Adams, Kristl L; Klunder, Gregory L; Evans, Lee; Steele, Paul; Vogt, Carla; Herberg, Julie L

    2011-02-15

    High-efficiency separation techniques, such as capillary electrophoresis (CE), coupled to a nondestructive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer offer the ability to separate, chemically identify, and provide structural information on analytes in small sample volumes. Previous CE-NMR coupled systems utilized laboratory-scale NMR magnets and spectrometers, which require very long separation capillaries. New technological developments in electronics have reduced the size of the NMR system, and small 1-2 T permanent magnets provide the possibilities of a truly portable NMR. The microcoils used in portable and laboratory-scale NMR may offer the advantage of improved mass sensitivity because the limit of detection (LOD) is proportional to the coil diameter. In this work, CE is coupled with a portable, briefcase-sized NMR system that incorporates a microcoil probe and a 1.8 T permanent magnet to measure (19)F NMR spectra. Separations of fluorinated molecules are demonstrated with stopped- and continuous-flow NMR detection. The results demonstrate that coupling CE to a portable NMR instrument is feasible and can provide a low-cost method to obtain structural information on microliter samples. An LOD of 31.8 nmol for perfluorotributylamine with a resolution of 4 ppm has been achieved with this system.

  8. 7 CFR 331.3 - PPQ select agents and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Select agents and toxins listed in paragraph (b) of this section that have been genetically modified. (d... variegated chlorosis strain). (c) Genetic elements, recombinant nucleic acids, and recombinant organisms: (1...

  9. 42 CFR 73.3 - HHS select agents and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... have been genetically modified. (d) HHS select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria..., and Recombinant Organisms: (1) Nucleic acids that can produce infectious forms of any of the select...

  10. Occurrence and sequestration of toxins in food chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebs, D

    1998-11-01

    Animals may acquire toxicity by absorbing toxic compounds from their food, e.g. from plants or other animals. Sequestration and accumulation of toxins may provide protection from predators, which learn to avoid this prey because of unpleasant experiences such as bitter taste. This is a common phenomenon in marine as well as in terrestrial ecosystems. Moreover, toxins may enter food chains where they accumulate reaching high, often lethal concentrations. Palytoxin which had been primarily detected in marine zoanthids (Palythoa sp.), occurs also in a wide range of other animals, e.g. in sponges, corals, shellfish, polychaetes and crustaceans, but also in fish, which feed on crustaceans and zoanthids as well. These animals exhibit a high resistance to the toxin's action. The mechanisms which protect the Na+, K+-ATPase of their cell membranes, the primary target of palytoxin, is unknown. Sequestration of the toxin by other animals may cause health problems due to food poisoning.

  11. Conformational Changes in Small Ligands Upon Tetanus Toxin Binding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henderson, Terry J; Gitti, Rossitza K

    2008-01-01

    ... A upon binding to tetanus toxin. C13 T1 measurements suggested that to a first approximation, the conformational behavior of doxorubicin in solution appears to be a composite of a rigid aromatic ring system, ring librations...

  12. Properties of solvated electrons, alkali anions and other species in metal solutions and kinetics of cation and electron exchange reactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of solutions of alkali metals in amine solvents were studied by optical, ETR, NMR and electrochemical methods. Complexation of the alkali cations by crown ethers and cryptands permitted the preparation of concentrated solutions of alkali metals in amine and ether solvents. Extensive alkali metal NMR studies of the exchange of M + with crown-ethers and cryptands and of the alkali metal anion, M - , were made. The first crystalline salt of an alkali metal anion, Na + Cryptand [2.2.2]Na - was synthesized and characterized and led to the preparation of other alkali metal anion salts. This research provided the foundation for continuing studies of crystalline alkalide salts

  13. Alternaria Toxins: Potential Virulence Factors and Genes Related to Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Meena

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Alternaria is an important fungus to study due to their different life style from saprophytes to endophytes and a very successful fungal pathogen that causes diseases to a number of economically important crops. Alternaria species have been well-characterized for the production of different host-specific toxins (HSTs and non-host specific toxins (nHSTs which depend upon their physiological and morphological stages. The pathogenicity of Alternaria species depends on host susceptibility or resistance as well as quantitative production of HSTs and nHSTs. These toxins are chemically low molecular weight secondary metabolites (SMs. The effects of toxins are mainly on different parts of cells like mitochondria, chloroplast, plasma membrane, Golgi complex, nucleus, etc. Alternaria species produce several nHSTs such as brefeldin A, tenuazonic acid, tentoxin, and zinniol. HSTs that act in very low concentrations affect only certain plant varieties or genotype and play a role in determining the host range of specificity of plant pathogens. The commonly known HSTs are AAL-, AK-, AM-, AF-, ACR-, and ACT-toxins which are named by their host specificity and these toxins are classified into different family groups. The HSTs are differentiated on the basis of bio-statistical and other molecular analyses. All these toxins have different mode of action, biochemical reactions and signaling mechanisms to cause diseases. Different species of Alternaria produced toxins which reveal its biochemical and genetic effects on itself as well as on its host cells tissues. The genes responsible for the production of HSTs are found on the conditionally dispensable chromosomes (CDCs which have been well characterized. Different bio-statistical methods like basic local alignment search tool (BLAST data analysis used for the annotation of gene prediction, pathogenicity-related genes may provide surprising knowledge in present and future.

  14. Alternaria Toxins: Potential Virulence Factors and Genes Related to Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Mukesh; Gupta, Sanjay K.; Swapnil, Prashant; Zehra, Andleeb; Dubey, Manish K.; Upadhyay, Ram S.

    2017-01-01

    Alternaria is an important fungus to study due to their different life style from saprophytes to endophytes and a very successful fungal pathogen that causes diseases to a number of economically important crops. Alternaria species have been well-characterized for the production of different host-specific toxins (HSTs) and non-host specific toxins (nHSTs) which depend upon their physiological and morphological stages. The pathogenicity of Alternaria species depends on host susceptibility or resistance as well as quantitative production of HSTs and nHSTs. These toxins are chemically low molecular weight secondary metabolites (SMs). The effects of toxins are mainly on different parts of cells like mitochondria, chloroplast, plasma membrane, Golgi complex, nucleus, etc. Alternaria species produce several nHSTs such as brefeldin A, tenuazonic acid, tentoxin, and zinniol. HSTs that act in very low concentrations affect only certain plant varieties or genotype and play a role in determining the host range of specificity of plant pathogens. The commonly known HSTs are AAL-, AK-, AM-, AF-, ACR-, and ACT-toxins which are named by their host specificity and these toxins are classified into different family groups. The HSTs are differentiated on the basis of bio-statistical and other molecular analyses. All these toxins have different mode of action, biochemical reactions and signaling mechanisms to cause diseases. Different species of Alternaria produced toxins which reveal its biochemical and genetic effects on itself as well as on its host cells tissues. The genes responsible for the production of HSTs are found on the conditionally dispensable chromosomes (CDCs) which have been well characterized. Different bio-statistical methods like basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) data analysis used for the annotation of gene prediction, pathogenicity-related genes may provide surprising knowledge in present and future. PMID:28848500

  15. Short Toxin-like Proteins Abound in Cnidaria Genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Tirosh, Yitshak; Linial, Itai; Askenazi, Manor; Linial, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Cnidaria is a rich phylum that includes thousands of marine species. In this study, we focused on Anthozoa and Hydrozoa that are represented by the Nematostella vectensis (Sea anemone) and Hydra magnipapillata genomes. We present a method for ranking the toxin-like candidates from complete proteomes of Cnidaria. Toxin-like functions were revealed using ClanTox, a statistical machine-learning predictor trained on ion channel inhibitors from venomous animals. Fundamental features that were emph...

  16. Detection of Shiga Toxins by Lateral Flow Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Ching, Kathryn H.; He, Xiaohua; Stanker, Larry H.; Lin, Alice V.; McGarvey, Jeffery A.; Hnasko, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) produce shiga toxins (Stxs) that can cause human disease and death. The contamination of food products with STEC represents a food safety problem that necessitates rapid and effective detection strategies to mitigate risk. In this manuscript, we report the development of a colorimetric lateral flow assay (LFA) for the rapid detection of Stxs in <10 min using a pair of monoclonal antibodies that bind epitopes common to Stx1 and six Stx2 variants...

  17. Knowns and unknowns in metabolomics identified by multidimensional NMR and hybrid MS/NMR methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingol, Kerem; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    Metabolomics continues to make rapid progress through the development of new and better methods and their applications to gain insight into the metabolism of a wide range of different biological systems from a systems biology perspective. Customization of NMR databases and search tools allows the faster and more accurate identification of known metabolites, whereas the identification of unknowns, without a need for extensive purification, requires new strategies to integrate NMR with mass spectrometry, cheminformatics, and computational methods. For some applications, the use of covalent and non-covalent attachments in the form of labeled tags or nanoparticles can significantly reduce the complexity of these tasks.

  18. RELATION BETWEEN NMR PROPERTIES AND ELECTRICAL-RESISTIVITY IN LI-GE, LI-SN AND LI-PB LIQUID ALLOYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    XU, R; VANDERLUGT, W

    1994-01-01

    Recent measurements of the electrical resistivity of liquid Li-Ge alloys enable us to check relations between NMR properties and resistivity in non-metallic alloys derived by Warren in 1971. It is shown that the predicted linear relationships hold, but that the proportionality between the square

  19. Plant toxins that affect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Benedict T; Welch, Kevin D; Panter, Kip E; Lee, Stephen T

    2013-08-19

    Plants produce a wide variety of chemical compounds termed secondary metabolites that are not involved in basic metabolism, photosynthesis, or reproduction. These compounds are used as flavors, fragrances, insecticides, dyes, hallucinogens, nutritional supplements, poisons, and pharmaceutical agents. However, in some cases these secondary metabolites found in poisonous plants perturb biological systems. Ingestion of toxins from poisonous plants by grazing livestock often results in large economic losses to the livestock industry. The chemical structures of these compounds are diverse and range from simple, low molecular weight toxins such as oxalate in halogeton to the highly complex norditerpene alkaloids in larkspurs. While the negative effects of plant toxins on people and the impact of plant toxins on livestock producers have been widely publicized, the diversity of these toxins and their potential as new pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of diseases in people and animals has also received widespread interest. Scientists are actively screening plants from all regions of the world for bioactivity and potential pharmaceuticals for the treatment or prevention of many diseases. In this review, we focus the discussion to those plant toxins extensively studied at the USDA Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory that affect the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors including species of Delphinium (Larkspurs), Lupinus (Lupines), Conium (poison hemlock), and Nicotiana (tobaccos).

  20. Doc toxin is a kinase that inactivates elongation factor Tu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonathan W; Rothenbacher, Francesca P; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Lane, William S; Dunham, Christine M; Woychik, Nancy A

    2014-03-14

    The Doc toxin from bacteriophage P1 (of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system) has served as a model for the family of Doc toxins, many of which are harbored in the genomes of pathogens. We have shown previously that the mode of action of this toxin is distinct from the majority derived from toxin-antitoxin systems: it does not cleave RNA; in fact P1 Doc expression leads to mRNA stabilization. However, the molecular triggers that lead to translation arrest are not understood. The presence of a Fic domain, albeit slightly altered in length and at the catalytic site, provided a clue to the mechanism of P1 Doc action, as most proteins with this conserved domain inactivate GTPases through addition of an adenylyl group (also referred to as AMPylation). We demonstrated that P1 Doc added a single phosphate group to the essential translation elongation factor and GTPase, elongation factor (EF)-Tu. The phosphorylation site was at a highly conserved threonine, Thr-382, which was blocked when EF-Tu was treated with the antibiotic kirromycin. Therefore, we have established that Fic domain proteins can function as kinases. This distinct enzymatic activity exhibited by P1 Doc also solves the mystery of the degenerate Fic motif unique to the Doc family of toxins. Moreover, we have established that all characterized Fic domain proteins, even those that phosphorylate, target pivotal GTPases for inactivation through a post-translational modification at a single functionally critical acceptor site.

  1. Doc Toxin Is a Kinase That Inactivates Elongation Factor Tu*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonathan W.; Rothenbacher, Francesca P.; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Lane, William S.; Dunham, Christine M.; Woychik, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The Doc toxin from bacteriophage P1 (of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system) has served as a model for the family of Doc toxins, many of which are harbored in the genomes of pathogens. We have shown previously that the mode of action of this toxin is distinct from the majority derived from toxin-antitoxin systems: it does not cleave RNA; in fact P1 Doc expression leads to mRNA stabilization. However, the molecular triggers that lead to translation arrest are not understood. The presence of a Fic domain, albeit slightly altered in length and at the catalytic site, provided a clue to the mechanism of P1 Doc action, as most proteins with this conserved domain inactivate GTPases through addition of an adenylyl group (also referred to as AMPylation). We demonstrated that P1 Doc added a single phosphate group to the essential translation elongation factor and GTPase, elongation factor (EF)-Tu. The phosphorylation site was at a highly conserved threonine, Thr-382, which was blocked when EF-Tu was treated with the antibiotic kirromycin. Therefore, we have established that Fic domain proteins can function as kinases. This distinct enzymatic activity exhibited by P1 Doc also solves the mystery of the degenerate Fic motif unique to the Doc family of toxins. Moreover, we have established that all characterized Fic domain proteins, even those that phosphorylate, target pivotal GTPases for inactivation through a post-translational modification at a single functionally critical acceptor site. PMID:24448800

  2. Toxin studies using an integrated biophysical and structural biology approach.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, Julie A.; Schroeder, Anne E.; Slade, Andrea Lynn; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Yip, Christopher M. (University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada); Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-03-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins, such as botulinum and tetanus, are generally thought to invade neural cells through a process of high affinity binding mediated by gangliosides, internalization via endosome formation, and subsequent membrane penetration of the catalytic domain activated by a pH drop in the endosome. This surface recognition and internalization process is still not well understood with regard to what specific membrane features the toxins target, the intermolecular interactions between bound toxins, and the molecular conformational changes that occur as a result of pH lowering. In an effort to elucidate the mechanism of tetanus toxin binding and permeation through the membrane a simple yet representative model was developed that consisted of the ganglioside G{sub tlb} incorporated in a bilayer of cholesterol and DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidyl choline). The bilayers were stable over time yet sensitive towards the binding and activity of whole toxin. A liposome leakage study at constant pH as well as with a pH gradient, to mimic the processes of the endosome, was used to elucidate the effect of pH on the toxin's membrane binding and permeation capability. Topographic imaging of the membrane surface, via in situ tapping mode AFM, provided nanoscale characterization of the toxin's binding location and pore formation activity.

  3. Persistence of Upper Blepharoptosis After Cosmetic Botulinum Toxin Type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsapir, Kenneth D; Groth, Michael J; Boxrud, Cynthia A

    2015-07-01

    Upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin is generally considered short-lived and responsive to apraclonidine ophthalmic drops. The authors present a series with persistent ptosis. To report a series of patients with persistent upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin. A retrospective case review series of 7 patients referred for management after developing visually significant upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin type A treatment. Patients in this series experienced persistent visually significant ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin lasting from 6 weeks to 13 months. Six of the 7 patients were treated with apraclonidine ophthalmic solution. Apraclonidine drops appeared to be clinically effective within 4 to 6 weeks of the resolution of ptosis. Upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin can persist for many months after treatment. Based on this series, the authors propose that apraclonidine drops can be used at the time of initial assessment to predict the relative longevity of ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin treatment (Level 4 evidence recommendation). After a 1-week trial, responders can be advised that ptosis is likely to resolve in 4 to 6 weeks. Nonresponders should be counseled that resolution may take longer than 6 weeks.

  4. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Fan Hsieh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA and European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  5. Pufferfish mortality associated with novel polar marine toxins in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Moeller, Perer D. R.; Beauchesne, Kevin R.; Dagenais, Julie; Breeden, Renee; Rameyer, Robert; Walsh, Willliam A.; Abecassis, Melanie; Kobayashi, Donald R.; Conway, Carla M.; Winton, James

    2017-01-01

    Fish die-offs are important signals in tropical marine ecosystems. In 2010, a mass mortality of pufferfish in Hawaii (USA) was dominated by Arothron hispidus showing aberrant neurological behaviors. Using pathology, toxinology, and field surveys, we implicated a series of novel, polar, marine toxins as a likely cause of this mass mortality. Our findings are striking in that (1) a marine toxin was associated with a kill of a fish species that is itself toxic; (2) we provide a plausible mechanism to explain clinical signs of affected fish; and (3) this epizootic likely depleted puffer populations. Whilst our data are compelling, we did not synthesize the toxin de novo, and we were unable to categorically prove that the polar toxins caused mortality or that they were metabolites of an undefined parent compound. However, our approach does provide a template for marine fish kill investigations associated with marine toxins and inherent limitations of existing methods. Our study also highlights the need for more rapid and cost-effective tools to identify new marine toxins, particularly small, highly polar molecules.

  6. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes.

  7. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  8. Direct Comparison of (19)F qNMR and (1)H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin; He, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR ((1)H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR ((19)F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both (19)F and (1)H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that (19)F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to (1)H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from (19)F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. (19)F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes.

  9. Lipophilic Toxins in WA - Clear and present danger: monitoring and management of lipophilic shellfish toxins in Washington State

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Lipophilic shellfish toxins comprise an extensive suite of compounds including those associated with the human syndromes known as diarrhetic shellfish poisoning...

  10. Toxin production in Dinophysis and the fate of these toxins in marine mussels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Tor

    . The ecological roles of OA/DTX and PTX are currently unknown, but our results accentuate the potential for extracellular functions. I also took advantage of the recent insights into Dinophysis culturing to produce the first study on accumulation of DSP toxins from Dinophysis in a bivalve species. Our results...... in relation to harmful algal blooms, the two species are also of great evolutionary interest due to their ability to sequester and utilize the plastids from their ingested prey. The phenomenon is especially interesting in Dinophysis spp., since the chloroplasts undergo remarkable changes in ultrastructure...

  11. In situ solid state NMR studies of chemical reactions on catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haw, J.F.; Lazo, N.; White, J.; Munson, E.; Richardson, B.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental methods have been developed for the study of chemical reactions in progress on heterogeneous catalysts by high resolution solid state NMR methods. This in situ approach using variable-temperature magic-angle spinning allows the observation of reactive intermediates in some cases. In situ studies have been performed on a variety of catalyst-adsorbate systems including the oligomerization reactions of olefins on acidic zeolites, the reactions of hydrocarbons on selected support-metal catalysts, and cracking reactions are elevated temperature. In situ studies of the highly reactive adsorbate butadiene on zeolites HY and HZSM-5 have provided insight into the mechanisms of catalyst deactivation by coking

  12. Botulinum toxin treatment of lower extremity spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Khat’kova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the current concept of lower extremity spasticity, which is a frequent disabling consequence of stroke. Gait biomechanics, step cycle and main pathologic patterns of lower extremity are described (hip adduction, knee flexion, knee extension, foot plantar flexion, equinovarus foot position, toes flexion, hallux extension, including muscles involved in the pathological process. Additionally the article contains detailed information on pathologic principles of lower extremity spasticity development. Special focus is given to sarcomeregenesis as an essential element of the development of potential conditions for muscle tissue adaptation to a new state and restoration of muscle length and strength. At present Botulinum toxin A (BTA is used in a complex spasticity management programs. The results of clinical studies performed in the last decade supporting the efficacy of Botox® (Onabotulinumtoxin A in the treatment of spasticity are reviewed. Effective BTA doses are proposed. Authors came to the conclusion that BTA as a part of complex rehabilitation in patients with poststroke spasticity of lower extremity promotes treatment efficacy due to a decrease of muscle tone and increase of range of movements in the joints. BTA should be regarded as an essential part of standard rehabilitation programs. Further studies to define optimal muscles for intervention, BTA doses and rehabilitation schemes are still needed. 

  13. Peptide Toxins in Solitary Wasp Venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Konno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Solitary wasps paralyze insects or spiders with stinging venom and feed the paralyzed preys to their larva. Accordingly, the venoms should contain a variety of constituents acting on nervous systems. However, only a few solitary wasp venoms have been chemically studied despite thousands of species inhabiting the planet. We have surveyed bioactive substances in solitary wasp venoms found in Japan and discovered a variety of novel bioactive peptides. Pompilidotoxins (PMTXs, in the venoms of the pompilid wasps Anoplius samariensis and Batozonellus maculifrons, are small peptides consisting of 13 amino acids without a disulfide bond. PMTXs slowed Na+ channel inactivation, in particular against neuronal type Na+ channels, and were rather selective to the Nav1.6 channel. Mastoparan-like cytolytic and antimicrobial peptides are the major components of eumenine wasp venoms. They are rich in hydrophobic and basic amino acids, adopting a α-helical secondary structure, and showing mast cell degranulating, antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. The venom of the spider wasp Cyphononyx fulvognathus contained four bradykinin-related peptides. They are hyperalgesic and, dependent on the structure, differently associated with B1 or B2 receptors. Further survey led to the isolation of leucomyosuppressin-like FMRFamide peptides from the venoms of the digger wasps Sphex argentatus and Isodontia harmandi. These results of peptide toxins in solitary wasp venoms from our studies are summarized.

  14. Why do females use botulinum toxin injections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botulinum toxin (BT use for enhancing the facial features has become a commonly accepted form of aesthetic intervention. This study conducted a self-report survey of female BT users in order to explore the motivating factors in its use (cost-benefit analysis. Settings and Design: This is a cross-sectional exploratory pilot study. Materials and Methods: Self-report questionnaires were administered to 41 consecutive clients attending an independent medical practice for BT injections for cosmetic purposes. All the participants were females and represented a range of age groups from the 20s to above 60s. Items in the nonstandardized questionnaire elicited questions relating to the reasons for and against BT use. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis was used rather than inferential statistics, and involved ranking the responses according to the most likely reasons for using BT and disadvantages of its use. Results: In general, the primary motivating factor for BT use was to improve self-esteem, and the greatest disadvantage involved financial costs associated with the procedure. Conclusions: The main findings of this study suggest that females who use BT for aesthetic purposes are motivated by personal psychological gains (intrapersonal attributes rather than social gains (interpersonal factors. In other words, they do not believe that having BT will equate to being treated any better by other people but would rather provide them with confidence and satisfaction regarding their self-image.

  15. SHELL DISEASES AND TOXINS REGULATED BY LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija Topić Popović

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a long tradition of cultivating shells in Croatia, and the shell industry has a good perspective of further development. Since shells are delicate organisms that require special breeding conditions and climate, they are also subject to many diseases. Bonamiosis, haplospioridiosis, marteiliosis, microcytosis and perkinsosis are stated by the International Bureau for Epizootics as shell diseases that, in keeping with law, must be reported, and iridovirosis as a disease of a potential international importance. The same diseases are regulated by the Veterinary Law from 1997 as infectious diseases prevention of which is of an interest for the Republic of Croatia. Although, according to the law, it does not have to be prevented, in this article the disease Mytilicola is also described. According to the Health Department Statute from 1994, eatable part of shells are being tested for toxins of some marine dinoflagelates that can damage human health, and these are PSP (Paralytic Shellfish Poison, DSP (Diarrhoeic Shellfish Poison and NSP (Neuroparalytic Shellfish Poison.

  16. Rovibrational and temperature effects in theoretical studies of NMR parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Rasmus; Kaminsky, Jakub; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The demand for high precision calculations of NMR shieldings (or their related values, chemical shifts δ) and spin-spin coupling constants facilitating and supporting detailed interpretations of NMR spectra increases hand in hand with the development of computational techniques and hardware...... resources. Highly sophisticated calculations including even relativistic effects are nowadays possible for these properties. However, NMR parameters depend not only on molecular structure and environment but also on molecular flexibility and temperature and the apparent success of theoretical predictions...

  17. Xenon NMR with spectroscopic, spatial, and temporal resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Münnemann, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    129Xe NMR has found many applications in material sciences and medicine because of two useful properties of Xenon atoms for NMR: the sensitivity to their environment due to their highly polarizable electron cloud, which results in a wide range of chemical shifts, and the ability of being hyperpolarized, which overcomes the problem of the low signal-to-noise ratio of thermally polarized Xenon. In this work a variety of different experiments were performed that combine NMR measurements with spe...

  18. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  19. Site I Inactivation Impacts Calmodulin Calcium Binding and Activation of Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Christian W; Finley, Natosha L

    2017-11-30

    Site I inactivation of calmodulin (CaM) was used to examine the importance of aspartic acid 22 at position 3 in CaM calcium binding, protein folding, and activation of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin domain (CyaA-ACD). NMR calcium titration experiments showed that site I in the CaM mutant (D22A) remained largely unperturbed, while sites II, III, and IV exhibited calcium-induced conformational changes similar to wild-type CaM (CaMWt). Circular dichroism analyses revealed that D22A had comparable α -helical content to CaMWt, and only modest differences in α -helical composition were detected between CaMWt-CyaA-ACD and D22A-CyaA-ACD complexes. However, the thermal stability of the D22A-CyaA-ACD complex was reduced, as compared to the CaMWt-CyaA-ACD complex. Moreover, CaM-dependent activity of CyaA-ACD decreased 87% in the presence of D22A. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that D22A engages CyaA-ACD, likely through C -terminal mediated binding, and that site I inactivation exerts functional effects through the modification of stabilizing interactions that occur between N -terminal CaM and CyaA-ACD.

  20. A family of indoles regulate virulence and Shiga toxin production in pathogenic E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Bommarius

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC are intestinal pathogens that cause food and water-borne disease in humans. Using biochemical methods and NMR-based comparative metabolomics in conjunction with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we developed a bioassay to identify secreted small molecules produced by these pathogens. We identified indole, indole-3-carboxaldehyde (ICA, and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, as factors that only in combination are sufficient to kill C. elegans. Importantly, although lethal to C. elegans, these molecules downregulate several bacterial processes important for pathogenesis in mammals. These include motility, biofilm formation and production of Shiga toxins. Some pathogenic E. coli strains are known to contain a Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE, which encodes virulence factors that cause "attaching and effacing" (A/E lesions in mammals, including formation of actin pedestals. We found that these indole derivatives also downregulate production of LEE virulence factors and inhibit pedestal formation on mammalian cells. Finally, upon oral administration, ICA inhibited virulence and promoted survival in a lethal mouse infection model. In summary, the C. elegans model in conjunction with metabolomics has facilitated identification of a family of indole derivatives that broadly regulate physiology in E. coli, and virulence in pathogenic strains. These molecules may enable development of new therapeutics that interfere with bacterial small-molecule signaling.