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Sample records for metal nitrides phosphides

  1. Microwave-assisted synthesis of transition metal phosphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-12-30

    A method of synthesizing transition metal phosphide. In one embodiment, the method has the steps of preparing a transition metal lignosulfonate, mixing the transition metal lignosulfonate with phosphoric acid to form a mixture, and subjecting the mixture to a microwave radiation for a duration of time effective to obtain a transition metal phosphide.

  2. Process Development of Gallium Nitride Phosphide Core-Shell Nanowire Array Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chen

    Dilute Nitride GaNP is a promising materials for opto-electronic applications due to its band gap tunability. The efficiency of GaNxP1-x /GaNyP1-y core-shell nanowire solar cell (NWSC) is expected to reach as high as 44% by 1% N and 9% N in the core and shell, respectively. By developing such high efficiency NWSCs on silicon substrate, a further reduction of the cost of solar photovoltaic can be further reduced to 61$/MWh, which is competitive to levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of fossil fuels. Therefore, a suitable NWSC structure and fabrication process need to be developed to achieve this promising NWSC. This thesis is devoted to the study on the development of fabrication process of GaNxP 1-x/GaNyP1-y core-shell Nanowire solar cell. The thesis is divided into two major parts. In the first parts, previously grown GaP/GaNyP1-y core-shell nanowire samples are used to develop the fabrication process of Gallium Nitride Phosphide nanowire solar cell. The design for nanowire arrays, passivation layer, polymeric filler spacer, transparent col- lecting layer and metal contact are discussed and fabricated. The property of these NWSCs are also characterized to point out the future development of Gal- lium Nitride Phosphide NWSC. In the second part, a nano-hole template made by nanosphere lithography is studied for selective area growth of nanowires to improve the structure of core-shell NWSC. The fabrication process of nano-hole templates and the results are presented. To have a consistent features of nano-hole tem- plate, the Taguchi Method is used to optimize the fabrication process of nano-hole templates.

  3. Metal Phosphides and Phosphates-based Electrodes for Electrochemical Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Elshahawy, Abdelnaby M; Guan, Cao; Wang, John

    2017-10-01

    Phosphorus compounds, such as metal phosphides and phosphates have shown excellent performances and great potential in electrochemical energy storage, which are demonstrated by research works published in recent years. Some of these metal phosphides and phosphates and their hybrids compare favorably with transition metal oxides/hydroxides, which have been studied extensively as a class of electrode materials for supercapacitor applications, where they have limitations in terms of electrical and ion conductivity and device stability. To be specific, metal phosphides have both metalloid characteristics and good electric conductivity. For metal phosphates, the open-framework structures with large channels and cavities endow them with good ion conductivity and charge storage capacity. In this review, we present the recent progress on metal phosphides and phosphates, by focusing on their advantages/disadvantages and potential applications as a new class of electrode materials in supercapacitors. The synthesis methods to prepare these metal phosphides/phosphates are looked into, together with the scientific insights involved, as they strongly affect the electrochemical energy storage performance. Particular attentions are paid to those hybrid-type materials, where strong synergistic effects exist. In the summary, the future perspectives and challenges for the metal phosphides, phosphates and hybrid-types are proposed and discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  5. Low temperature synthesis of ternary metal phosphides using plasma for asymmetric supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Hanfeng; Xia, Chuan; Jiang, Qiu; Gandi, Appala; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    We report a versatile route for the preparation of metal phosphides using PH plasma for supercapacitor applications. The high reactivity of plasma allows rapid and low temperature conversion of hydroxides into monometallic, bimetallic, or even more

  6. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    2017-12-26

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst support in a fuel cell.

  7. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

  8. Low temperature synthesis of ternary metal phosphides using plasma for asymmetric supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Hanfeng

    2017-04-06

    We report a versatile route for the preparation of metal phosphides using PH plasma for supercapacitor applications. The high reactivity of plasma allows rapid and low temperature conversion of hydroxides into monometallic, bimetallic, or even more complex nanostructured phosphides. These same phosphides are much more difficult to synthesize by conventional methods. Further, we present a general strategy for significantly enhancing the electrochemical performance of monometallic phosphides by substituting extrinsic metal atoms. Using NiCoP as a demonstration, we show that the Co substitution into NiP not only effectively alters the electronic structure and improves the intrinsic reactivity and electrical conductivity, but also stabilizes Ni species when used as supercapacitor electrode materials. As a result, the NiCoP nanosheet electrodes achieve high electrochemical activity and good stability in 1 M KOH electrolyte. More importantly, our assembled NiCoP nanoplates//graphene films asymmetric supercapacitor devices can deliver a high energy density of 32.9 Wh kg at a power density of 1301 W kg, along with outstanding cycling performance (83% capacity retention after 5000 cycles at 20 A g). This activity outperforms most of the NiCo-based materials and renders the NiCoP nanoplates a promising candidate for capacitive storage devices.

  9. A Plasma-Assisted Route to the Rapid Preparation of Transition-Metal Phosphides for Energy Conversion and Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Hanfeng; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    with the method of preparation as the electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties of the metal phosphides strongly depend on their synthesis routes. Commonly practiced processes such as solid-state synthesis and ball milling have proven to be reliable routes

  10. Advancing liquid metal reactor technology with nitride fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.F.; Baker, R.B.; Leggett, R.D.; Matthews, R.B.

    1991-08-01

    A review of the use of nitride fuels in liquid metal fast reactors is presented. Past studies indicate that both uranium nitride and uranium/plutonium nitride possess characteristics that may offer enhanced performance, particularly in the area of passive safety. To further quantify these effects, the analysis of a mixed-nitride fuel system utilizing the geometry and power level of the US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor as a reference is described. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  12. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  13. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik

    2012-01-01

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N 15 gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work

  14. Transition Metal Phosphide Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 as Highly Selective Hydrodeoxygenation Catalysts for the Production of Advanced Biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongxing; Ochoa-Hernández, Cristina; de la Peña O'Shea, Víctor A; Pizarro, Patricia; Coronado, Juan M; Serrano, David P

    2015-09-01

    A series of catalysts constituted by nanoparticles of transition metal (M = Fe, Co, Ni and Mo) phosphides (TMP) dispersed on SBA-15 were synthesized by reduction of the corresponding metal phosphate precursors previously impregnated on the mesostructured support. All the samples contained a metal-loading of 20 wt% and with an initial M/P mole ratio of 1, and they were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 sorption, H2-TPR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Metal phosphide nanocatalysts were tested in a high pressure continuous flow reactor for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of a methyl ester blend containing methyl oleate (C17H33-COO-CH3) as main component (70%). This mixture constitutes a convenient surrogate of triglycerides present in vegetable oils, and following catalytic hydrotreating yields mainly n-alkanes. The results of the catalytic assays indicate that Ni2P/SBA-15 catalyst presents the highest ester conversion, whereas the transformation rate is about 20% lower for MoP/SBA-15. In contrast, catalysts based on Fe and Co phosphides show a rather limited activity. Hydrocarbon distribution in the liquid product suggests that both hydrodeoxygenation and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reactions occur simultaneously over the different catalysts, although MoP/SBA-15 possess a selectivity towards hydrodeoxygenation exceeding 90%. Accordingly, the catalyst based on MoP affords the highest yield of n-octadecane, which is the preferred product in terms of carbon atom economy. Subsequently, in order to conjugate the advantages of both Ni and Mo phosphides, a series of catalysts containing variable proportions of both metals were prepared. The obtained results reveal that the mixed phosphides catalysts present a catalytic behavior intermediate between those of the monometallic phosphides. Accordingly, only marginal enhancement of the yield of n-octadecane is obtained for the catalysts with a Mo/Ni ratio of 3. Nevertheless, owing to this high selectivity

  15. A Plasma-Assisted Route to the Rapid Preparation of Transition-Metal Phosphides for Energy Conversion and Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Hanfeng

    2017-06-06

    Transition-metal phosphides (TMPs) are important materials that have been widely used in catalysis, supercapacitors, batteries, sensors, light-emitting diodes, and magnets. The physical and chemical structure of a metal phosphide varies with the method of preparation as the electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties of the metal phosphides strongly depend on their synthesis routes. Commonly practiced processes such as solid-state synthesis and ball milling have proven to be reliable routes to prepare TMPs but they generally require high temperature and long reaction time. Here, a recently developed plasma-assisted conversion route for the preparation of TMPs is reviewed, along with their applications in energy conversion and storage, including water oxidation electrocatalysis, sodium-ion batteries, and supercapacitors. The plasma-assisted synthetic route should open up a new avenue to prepare TMPs with tailored structure and morphology for various applications. In fact, the process may be further extended to the synthesis of a wide range of transition-metal compounds such as borides and fluorides at low temperature and in a rapid manner.

  16. Synthesis of ruthenium phosphides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernogorenko, V.B.; Lynchak, K.A.; Kulik, L.Ya.; Shkaravskij, Yu.F.; Klochkov, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of ampoule synthesis of ruthenium phosphides, Ru 2 P, RuP, and RuP 2 , with stepwise heating of stoichimetric charges in a single-zone furnace is developed. A method for synthesizing ruthenium diphosphide by phosphidization of a ruthenium powder with phosphine at 1150 deg C is worked out. The optimum conditions of its manufacture are found by planning an extremal experiment. Interaction of PH 3 with ruthenium proceeds by the diffusion mechanism and obeys the parabolic law. An extraction-photometric method for determining phosphorus in phosphides is elaborated. Ruthenium phosphides are extremely corrosion-resistant in acids and alkalis. Ru 2 P and RuP exhibit metallic conductivity

  17. Catalytic Activities of Noble Metal Phosphides for Hydrogenation and Hydrodesulfurization Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuharu Kanda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of a highly active noble metal phosphide (NMXPY-based hydrodesulfurization (HDS catalyst with a high hydrogenating ability for heavy oils was studied. NMXPY catalysts were obtained by reduction of P-added noble metals (NM-P, NM: Rh, Pd, Ru supported on SiO2. The order of activities for the hydrogenation of biphenyl was Rh-P > NiMoS > Pd-P > Ru-P. This order was almost the same as that of the catalytic activities for the HDS of dibenzothiophene. In the HDS of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT, the HDS activity of the Rh-P catalyst increased with increasing reaction temperature, but the maximum HDS activity for the NiMoS catalyst was observed at 270 °C. The Rh-P catalyst yielded fully hydrogenated products with high selectivity compared with the NiMoS catalyst. Furthermore, XRD analysis of the spent Rh-P catalysts revealed that the Rh2P phase possessed high sulfur tolerance and resistance to sintering.

  18. Electrochemical behavior of rare earth metals and their nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Goto, Takuya

    2004-01-01

    Pyrometallurgical recycle process using molten salts is considered to be a high potential in pyro-reprocess technologies for spent nitride fuels, and it is important to understand chemical and electro-chemical behavior of nitrides and metals in molten salts. In this study, cadmium nitrates deposited on the anode Cd plate in motlen salt (LiCl-KCl) with addition of Li 3 N are examined. The cadmium nitrates deposited have various compositions corresponding to polarization potentials and then, the relationship between the deposition potential of nitride Cd and their composition is cleared. Their standard chemical potential of CdN is estimated from electrochemical measurement. And then, potential-pH 3- diagram is drawn by voltametry examination of nitride resolution behavior with using thermochemical data of nitrides. (A. Hishinuma)

  19. Preparation of phosphorus targets using the compound phosphorus nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier-Komor, P.

    1987-01-01

    Commercially available phosphorus nitride (P 3 N 5 ) shows a high oxygen content. Nevertheless, this material is attractive for use as phosphorus targets in experiments where red phosphorus would disappear due to its high vapor pressure and where a metal partner in the phosphide must be excluded due to its high atomic number. Methods are described to produce phosphorus nitride targets by vacuum evaporation condensation. (orig.)

  20. Platinum group metal nitrides and carbides: synthesis, properties and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L

    2009-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical data on new compounds, nitrides and carbides of the platinum group 4d and 5d metals (ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum), published over the past five years are summarized. The extreme mechanical properties of platinoid nitrides and carbides, i.e., their high strength and low compressibility, are noted. The prospects of further studies and the scope of application of these compounds are discussed.

  1. Hot carrier dynamics in plasmonic transition metal nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Adela; Florio, Fred; Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2018-06-01

    Extraction of non-equilibrium hot carriers generated by plasmon decay in metallic nano-structures is an increasingly exciting prospect for utilizing plasmonic losses, but the search for optimum plasmonic materials with long-lived carriers is ongoing. Transition metal nitrides are an exciting class of new plasmonic materials with superior thermal and mechanical properties compared to conventional noble metals, but their suitability for plasmonic hot carrier applications remains unknown. Here, we present fully first principles calculations of the plasmonic response, hot carrier generation and subsequent thermalization of all group IV, V and VI transition metal nitrides, fully accounting for direct and phonon-assisted transitions as well as electron–electron and electron–phonon scattering. We find the largest frequency ranges for plasmonic response in ZrN, HfN and WN, between those of gold and silver, while we predict strongest absorption in the visible spectrum for the VN, NbN and TaN. Hot carrier generation is dominated by direct transitions for most of the relevant energy range in all these nitrides, while phonon-assisted processes dominate only below 1 eV plasmon energies primarily for the group IV nitrides. Finally, we predict the maximum hot carrier lifetimes to be around 10 fs for group IV and VI nitrides, a factor of 3–4 smaller than noble metals, due to strong electron–phonon scattering. However, we find longer carrier lifetimes for group V nitrides, comparable to silver for NbN and TaN, while exceeding 100 fs (twice that of silver) for VN, making them promising candidates for efficient hot carrier extraction.

  2. TXRF analysis of trace metals in thin silicon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vereecke, G.; Arnauts, S.; Verstraeten, K.; Schaekers, M.; Heyrts, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    As critical dimensions of integrated circuits continue to decrease, high dielectric constant materials such as silicon nitride are being considered to replace silicon dioxide in capacitors and transistors. The achievement of low levels of metal contamination in these layers is critical for high performance and reliability. Existing methods of quantitative analysis of trace metals in silicon nitride require high amounts of sample (from about 0.1 to 1 g, compared to a mass of 0.2 mg for a 2 nm thick film on a 8'' silicon wafer), and involve digestion steps not applicable to films on wafers or non-standard techniques such as neutron activation analysis. A novel approach has recently been developed to analyze trace metals in thin films with analytical techniques currently used in the semiconductor industry. Sample preparation consists of three steps: (1) decomposition of the silicon nitride matrix by moist HF condensed at the wafer surface to form ammonium fluosilicate. (2) vaporization of the fluosilicate by a short heat treatment at 300 o C. (3) collection of contaminants by scanning the wafer surface with a solution droplet (VPD-DSC procedure). The determination of trace metals is performed by drying the droplet on the wafer and by analyzing the residue by TXRF, as it offers the advantages of multi-elemental analysis with no dilution of the sample. The lower limits of detection for metals in 2 nm thick films on 8'' silicon wafers range from about 10 to 200 ng/g. The present study will focus on the matrix effects and the possible loss of analyte associated with the evaporation of the fluosilicate salt, in relation with the accuracy and the reproducibility of the method. The benefits of using an internal standard will be assessed. Results will be presented from both model samples (ammonium fluoride contaminated with metallic salts) and real samples (silicon nitride films from a production tool). (author)

  3. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  4. Thermal plasma synthesis of transition metal nitrides and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronsheim, P.; Christensen, A.N.; Mazza, A.

    1981-01-01

    Applications of arc plasma processing to high-temperature chemistry of Group V nitrides and Si and Ge alloys are studied. The transition metal nitrides 4f-VN, 4f-NbN, and 4f-TaN are directly synthesized in a dc argon-nitrogen plasma from powders of the metals. A large excess of N 2 is required to form stoichiometric 4f-VN, while the Nb and Ta can only be synthesized with a substoichiometric N content. In a dc argon plasma the alloys V 3 Si, VSi 2 , NbSi 2 , NbGe 2 , Cr 3 Si, and Mo 3 Si are obtained from powder mixtures of the corresponding elements. The compounds are identified by x-ray diffraction patterns and particle shape and size are studied by electron microscopy

  5. Turbostratic boron nitride coated on high-surface area metal oxide templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Brorson, M.

    2007-01-01

    Boron nitride coatings on high-surface area MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by X-ray powder diffraction. The metal oxide templates were coated with boron nitride using a simple nitridation in a flow of ammonia starting from ammonium...

  6. Chapter 19: Catalysis by Metal Carbides and Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaidle, Joshua A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nash, Connor P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yung, Matthew M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chen, Yuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Carl, Sarah [University of Michigan; Thompson, Levi [University of Michigan

    2017-08-09

    Early transition metal carbides and nitrides (ETMCNs), materials in which carbon or nitrogen occupies interstitial sites within a parent metal lattice, possess unique physical and chemical properties that motivate their use as catalysts. Specifically, these materials possess multiple types of catalytic sites, including metallic, acidic, and basic sites, and as such, exhibit reactivities that differ from their parent metals. Moreover, their surfaces are dynamic under reaction conditions. This chapter reviews recent (since 2010) experimental and computational investigations into the catalytic properties of ETMCN materials for applications including biomass conversion, syngas and CO2 upgrading, petroleum and natural gas refining, and electrocatalytic energy conversion, energy storage, and chemicals production, and attempts to link catalyst performance to active site identity/surface structure in order to elucidate the present level of understanding of structure-function relationships for these materials. The chapter concludes with a perspective on leveraging the unique properties of these materials to design and develop improved catalysts through a dedicated, multidisciplinary effort.

  7. UN{sub 2−x} layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Zhong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Hu, Yin [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Chen, Lin [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Luo, Lizhu [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Liu, Kezhao, E-mail: liukz@hotmail.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Lai, Xinchun, E-mail: lai319@yahoo.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We used a very simple method to prepare nitride layer on uranium metal surface. • This modified layer is nitrogen-rich nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. • TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains. • XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence in the nitride. - Abstract: Glow plasma nitriding is a simple and economical surface treatment method, and this technology was used to prepare nitride layer on the surface of uranium metal with thickness of several microns. The composition and structure of the nitride layer were analyzed by AES and XRD, indicating that this modified layer is nitrogen-rich uranium nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains, with compact structure. And XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence existing in the nitride. After the treated uranium storage in air for a long time, oxygen just entered the surface several nanometers, showing the nitride layer has excellent oxidation resistance. The mechanism of nitride layer formation and low valence uranium appearance is discussed.

  8. UN2−x layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Zhong; Hu, Yin; Chen, Lin; Luo, Lizhu; Liu, Kezhao; Lai, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We used a very simple method to prepare nitride layer on uranium metal surface. • This modified layer is nitrogen-rich nitride, which should be written as UN 2−x . • TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains. • XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence in the nitride. - Abstract: Glow plasma nitriding is a simple and economical surface treatment method, and this technology was used to prepare nitride layer on the surface of uranium metal with thickness of several microns. The composition and structure of the nitride layer were analyzed by AES and XRD, indicating that this modified layer is nitrogen-rich uranium nitride, which should be written as UN 2−x . TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains, with compact structure. And XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence existing in the nitride. After the treated uranium storage in air for a long time, oxygen just entered the surface several nanometers, showing the nitride layer has excellent oxidation resistance. The mechanism of nitride layer formation and low valence uranium appearance is discussed

  9. Spray pyrolysis synthesis of γ-Al_2O_3 supported metal and metal phosphide catalysts and their activity in the hydrodeoxygenation of a bio-oil model compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ly, Hoang Vu; Im, Kyungmin; Go, Youngchae; Galiwango, Emmanuel; Kim, Seung-Soo; Kim, Jinsoo; Choi, Jae Hyung; Woo, Hee Chul

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Spherical γ-Al_2O_3 supported metal and metal phosphide catalysts were synthesized by spray pyrolysis method. • Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of 2-furyl methyl ketone (FMK) was conducted using metal/metal phosphide catalysts. • FMK was converted into 2-allyl furan and methyl cyclohexane. • The highest FMK conversion of 83% was achieved over 10 wt% Ni/γ-Al_2O_3 catalysts at reaction temperature of 400 °C. - Abstract: In this study, spherical γ-Al_2O_3 supported metal and metal phosphide (Ni, Co, Ni_2P and CoP) catalysts were successfully prepared by combining sol-gel and spray pyrolysis methods. First boehmite sol was prepared based on the Yoldas process and then the corresponding metal salts were added to the sol at the desired concentration, followed by spray pyrolysis of the mixed solution. As the well-mixed solution was transformed to spherical γ-Al_2O_3 supported metal and metal phosphide catalysts during spray pyrolysis process, the metal species were uniformly distributed in the mesoporous γ-Al_2O_3 supports. The product catalysts were investigated under different conditions for hydrodeoxygenation of bio-oil model compound, 2-furyl methyl ketone (FMK), which is the main component of the bio-oil product from pyrolysis of Saccharina japonica. Among the investigated catalysts, the 10 wt% Ni/γ-Al_2O_3 catalyst after calcination at 800 °C showed the highest FMK conversion of 83.02% at the reaction temperature of 400 °C. The gas and liquid products were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with TCD/FID detectors and GC–MS, respectively, to determine the product compositions.

  10. Predicted stability, structures, and magnetism of 3d transition metal nitrides: the M4N phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, C.M.; Koster, R.S.; Li, W.F.; van Huis, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The 3d transition metal nitrides M4N (Sc4N, Ti4N, V4N, Cr4N, Mn4N, Fe4N, Co4N, Ni4N, and Cu4N) have unique phase relationships, crystal structures, and electronic and magnetic properties. Here we present a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study on these transition metal nitrides, assessing

  11. Performance analysis of a mixed nitride fuel system for an advanced liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.F.; Baker, R.B.; Leggett, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the conceptual development and analysis of a proposed mixed nitride driver and blanket fuel system for a prototypic advanced liquid metal reactor design is performed. As a first step, an intensive literature survey is completed on the development and testing of nitride fuel systems. Based on the results of this survey, prototypic mixed nitride fuel and blanket pins is designed and analyzed using the SIEX computer code. The analysis predicts that the nitride fuel consistently operated at peak temperatures and cladding strain levels that compared quite favorably with competing fuel designs. These results, along with data available in the literature on nitride fuel performance, indicate that a nitride fuel system should offer enhanced capabilities for advanced liquid metal reactors

  12. Performance analysis of a mixed nitride fuel system for an advanced liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.F.; Baker, R.B.; Leggett, R.D.

    1990-11-01

    The conceptual development and analysis of a proposed mixed nitride driver and blanket fuel system for a prototypic advanced liquid metal reactor design has been performed. As a first step, an intensive literature survey was completed on the development and testing of nitride fuel systems. Based on the results of this survey, prototypic mixed nitride fuel and blanket pins were designed and analyzed using the SIEX computer code. The analysis predicted that the nitride fuel consistently operated at peak temperatures and cladding strain levels that compared quite favorably with competing fuel designs. These results, along with data available in the literature on nitride fuel performance, indicate that a nitride fuel system should offer enhanced capabilities for advanced liquid metal reactors. 13 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  13. New catalysts for coal processing: Metal carbides and nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Ted Oyama; David F. Cox

    1999-12-03

    The subject of this research project was to investigate the catalytic properties of a new class of materials, transition metal carbides and nitrides, for treatment of coal liquid and petroleum feedstocks. The main objectives were: (1) preparation of catalysts in unsupported and supported form; (2) characterization of the materials; (3) evaluation of their catalytic properties in HDS and HDN; (4) measurement of the surface properties; and (5) observation of adsorbed species. All of the objectives were substantially carried out and the results will be described in detail below. The catalysts were transition metal carbides and nitrides spanning Groups 4--6 in the Periodic Table. They were chosen for study because initial work had shown they were promising materials for hydrotreating. The basic strategy was first to prepare the materials in unsupported form to identify the most promising catalyst, and then to synthesize a supported form of the material. Already work had been carried out on the synthesis of the Group VI compounds Mo{sub 2}C, Mo{sub 2}N, and WC, and new methods were developed for the Group V compounds VC and NbC. All the catalysts were then evaluated in a hydrotreating test at realistic conditions. It was found that the most active catalyst was Mo{sub 2}C, and further investigations of the material were carried out in supported form. A new technique was employed for the study of the bulk and surface properties of the catalysts, near edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), that fingerprinted the electronic structure of the materials. Finally, two new research direction were explored. Bimetallic alloys formed between two transition metals were prepared, resulting in catalysts having even higher activity than Mo{sub 2}C. The performance of the catalysts in hydrodechloration was also investigated.

  14. Quasi-two-dimensional metallic hydrogen inside di-phosphide at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyarenko, N N; Mazur, E A

    2016-01-01

    The method of mathematical modelling was used for the calculation of the structural, electronic, phononic, and other characteristics of various normal phases of phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH k . It was shown that the di-phosphine may form 2D lattice of the metallic hydrogen in it, stabilized by phosphorus atoms under high hydrostatic pressure. The resulting structure with the elements of H-P-H has a locally stable (or metastable) phonon spectrum. The properties of di-phosphine were compared with the properties of similar structures such as the sulphur hydrides. (paper)

  15. Metal Immiscibility Route to Synthesis of Ultrathin Carbides, Borides, and Nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zixing; Kochat, Vidya; Pandey, Prafull; Kashyap, Sanjay; Chattopadhyay, Soham; Samanta, Atanu; Sarkar, Suman; Manimunda, Praveena; Zhang, Xiang; Asif, Syed; Singh, Abhisek K; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2017-08-01

    Ultrathin ceramic coatings are of high interest as protective coatings from aviation to biomedical applications. Here, a generic approach of making scalable ultrathin transition metal-carbide/boride/nitride using immiscibility of two metals is demonstrated. Ultrathin tantalum carbide, nitride, and boride are grown using chemical vapor deposition by heating a tantalum-copper bilayer with corresponding precursor (C 2 H 2 , B powder, and NH 3 ). The ultrathin crystals are found on the copper surface (opposite of the metal-metal junction). A detailed microscopy analysis followed by density functional theory based calculation demonstrates the migration mechanism, where Ta atoms prefer to stay in clusters in the Cu matrix. These ultrathin materials have good interface attachment with Cu, improving the scratch resistance and oxidation resistance of Cu. This metal-metal immiscibility system can be extended to other metals to synthesize metal carbide, boride, and nitride coatings. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Novel elastic, lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties of metallic single-layer transition metal phosphides: 2H-M 2P (Mo2P, W2P, Nb2P and Ta2P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiuren; Wu, Bozhao; Wang, Yanggang; Li, Zhimi; Yao, Yuanpeng; Jiang, Yong; Ding, Yanhuai; Xu, Fu; Zhang, Ping

    2018-04-01

    Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the research of two-dimensional (2D) phosphides due to their unique physical properties and wide applications. Transition metal phosphides 2H-M 2Ps (Mo2P, W2P, Nb2P and Ta2P) show considerable catalytic activity and energy storage potential. However, the electronic structure and mechanical properties of 2D 2H-M 2Ps are still unrevealed. Here, first-principles calculations are employed to investigate the lattice dynamics, elasticity and thermodynamic properties of 2H-M 2Ps. Results show that M 2Ps with lower stiffness exhibit remarkable lateral deformation under unidirectional loads. Due to the largest average Grüneisen parameter, single-layer Nb2P has the strongest anharmonic vibrations, resulting in the highest thermal expansion coefficient. The lattice thermal conductivities of Ta2P, W2P and Nb2P contradict classical theory, which would predict a smaller thermal conductivity due to the much heavier atom mass. Moreover, the calculations also demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of Ta2P is the highest as well as the lowest thermal expansion, owing to its weak anharmonic phonon scattering and the lowest average Grüneisen parameter. The insight provided by this study may be useful for future experimental and theoretical studies concerning 2D transition metal phosphide materials.

  17. 2D metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) for energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-01-01

    The family of 2D transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (collectively referred to as MXenes) has expanded rapidly since the discovery of Ti3C2 in 2011. The materials reported so far always have surface terminations, such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine, which impart hydrophilicity to their surfaces. About 20 different MXenes have been synthesized, and the structures and properties of dozens more have been theoretically predicted. The availability of solid solutions, the control of surface terminations and a recent discovery of multi-transition-metal layered MXenes offer the potential for synthesis of many new structures. The versatile chemistry of MXenes allows the tuning of properties for applications including energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, reinforcement for composites, water purification, gas- and biosensors, lubrication, and photo-, electro- and chemical catalysis. Attractive electronic, optical, plasmonic and thermoelectric properties have also been shown. In this Review, we present the synthesis, structure and properties of MXenes, as well as their energy storage and related applications, and an outlook for future research.

  18. 2D metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) for energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak

    2017-01-17

    The family of 2D transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (collectively referred to as MXenes) has expanded rapidly since the discovery of Ti3C2 in 2011. The materials reported so far always have surface terminations, such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine, which impart hydrophilicity to their surfaces. About 20 different MXenes have been synthesized, and the structures and properties of dozens more have been theoretically predicted. The availability of solid solutions, the control of surface terminations and a recent discovery of multi-transition-metal layered MXenes offer the potential for synthesis of many new structures. The versatile chemistry of MXenes allows the tuning of properties for applications including energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, reinforcement for composites, water purification, gas- and biosensors, lubrication, and photo-, electro- and chemical catalysis. Attractive electronic, optical, plasmonic and thermoelectric properties have also been shown. In this Review, we present the synthesis, structure and properties of MXenes, as well as their energy storage and related applications, and an outlook for future research.

  19. Investigation of Ternary Transition-Metal Nitride Systems by Reactive Cosputtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dover, R.B. Van; Hessen, B.; Werder, D.; Chen, C.-H.; Felder, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    A reactive dc cosputtering technique has been used to evaluate compound formation in bimetallic transition-metal nitride systems. A wide range in M-M’ composition can be studied in a single deposition run, and the method is applicable to nonalloying metal combinations. Using this technique, it was

  20. Effect of contact metals on the piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, J.P.; Kabulski, A. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Pagan, V.R. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Famouri, K. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Kasarla, K.R.; Rodak, L.E. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Hensel, J.P.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-07-01

    The converse piezoelectric response of aluminum nitride evaluated using standard metal insulator semiconductor structures has been found to exhibit a linear dependence on the work function of the metal used as the top electrode. The apparent d33 of the 150–1100 nm films also depends on the dc bias applied to the samples.

  1. Effect of contact metals on the piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, J.; Kabulski, A.; Pagán, V. R.; Famouri, P.; Kasarla, K. R.; Rodak, L. E.; Peter Hensel, J.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01

    The converse piezoelectric response of aluminum nitride evaluated using standard metal insulator semiconductor structures has been found to exhibit a linear dependence on the work function of the metal used as the top electrode. The apparent d33 of the 150–1100 nm films also depends on the dc bias applied to the samples.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of group V metal carbide and nitride catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Heock-Hoi

    1998-11-01

    Group V transition metal carbides and nitrides were prepared via the temperature programmed reaction (TPR) of corresponding oxides with NHsb3 or a CHsb4/Hsb2 mixture. Except for the tantalum compounds, phase-pure carbides and nitrides were prepared. The vanadium carbides and nitrides were the most active and selective catalysts. Therefore the principal focus of the research was the preparation, characterization, and evaluation of high surface area vanadium nitride catalysts. A series of vanadium nitrides with surface areas up to 60 msp2/g was prepared. Thermal gravimetric analysis coupled with x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the solid-state reaction proceeded by the sequential reduction of Vsb2Osb5 to VOsb{0.9} and concluded with the topotactic substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in VOsb{0.9}. The transformation of Vsb2Osb5 to VN was pseudomorphic. An experimental design was executed to determine effects of the heating rates and space velocities on the VN microstructures. The heating rates had minor effects on the surface areas and pore size distributions; however, increasing the space velocity significantly increased the surface area. The materials were mostly mesoporous. Oxygen chemisorption on the vanadium nitrides scaled linearly with the surface area. The corresponding O/Vsbsurface ratio was ≈0.6. The vanadium nitrides were active for butane activation and pyridine hydrodenitrogenation. During butane activation, their selectivities towards dehydrogenation products were as high as 98%. The major product in pyridine hydrodenitrogenation was pentane. The reaction rates increased almost linearly with the surface area suggesting that these reactions were structure insensitive. The vanadium nitrides were not active for crotonaldehyde hydrogenation; however, they catalyzed an interesting ring formation reaction that produced methylbenzaldehyde and xylene from crotonaldehyde. A new method was demonstrated for the production of very

  3. A new approach to synthesize supported ruthenium phosphides for hydrodesulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qingfang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Yin, Xiaoqian; Zhou, Linxi; Zhang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We bring out a new method to synthesize noble metal phosphides at low temperature. • Both RuP and Ru_2P were synthesized using triphenylphosphine as phosphorus sources. • Ru_2P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. • RuP/SiO_2 prepared by new method had better HDS activity to that by TPR method. - Abstract: Supported noble metal ruthenium phosphides were synthesized by one-step H_2-thermal treatment method using triphenylphosphine (TPP) as phosphorus sources at low temperatures. Two phosphides RuP and Ru_2P can be prepared by this method via varying the molar ratio of metal salt and TPP. The as-prepared phosphides were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), low-temperature N_2 adsorption, CO chemisorption and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The supported ruthenium phosphides prepared by new method and conventional method together with contradistinctive metallic ruthenium were evaluated in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). The catalytic results showed that metal-rich Ru_2P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. Besides this, ruthenium phosphide catalyst prepared by new method exhibited superior HDS activity to that prepared by conventional method.

  4. A new approach to synthesize supported ruthenium phosphides for hydrodesulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qingfang [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Water Environment and Resources, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wang, Zhiqiang [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Water Environment and Resources, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Yin, Xiaoqian; Zhou, Linxi [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhang, Minghui, E-mail: zhangmh@nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Kashgar University, Kashgar 844006 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We bring out a new method to synthesize noble metal phosphides at low temperature. • Both RuP and Ru{sub 2}P were synthesized using triphenylphosphine as phosphorus sources. • Ru{sub 2}P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. • RuP/SiO{sub 2} prepared by new method had better HDS activity to that by TPR method. - Abstract: Supported noble metal ruthenium phosphides were synthesized by one-step H{sub 2}-thermal treatment method using triphenylphosphine (TPP) as phosphorus sources at low temperatures. Two phosphides RuP and Ru{sub 2}P can be prepared by this method via varying the molar ratio of metal salt and TPP. The as-prepared phosphides were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), low-temperature N{sub 2} adsorption, CO chemisorption and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The supported ruthenium phosphides prepared by new method and conventional method together with contradistinctive metallic ruthenium were evaluated in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). The catalytic results showed that metal-rich Ru{sub 2}P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. Besides this, ruthenium phosphide catalyst prepared by new method exhibited superior HDS activity to that prepared by conventional method.

  5. Photovoltaic cells employing zinc phosphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Allen M.; Catalano, Anthony W.; Dalal, Vikram L.; Masi, James V.; Meakin, John D.; Hall, Robert B.

    1984-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell having a zinc phosphide absorber. The zinc phosphide can be a single or multiple crystal slice or a thin polycrystalline film. The cell can be a Schottky barrier, heterojunction or homojunction device. Methods for synthesizing and crystallizing zinc phosphide are disclosed as well as a method for forming thin films.

  6. Use of cermet thin film resistors with nitride passivated metal insulator field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. A.; Harrap, V.

    1971-01-01

    Film deposition of cermet resistors on same chip with metal nitride oxide silicon field effect transistors permits protection of contamination sensitive active devices from contaminants produced in cermet deposition and definition processes. Additional advantages include lower cost, greater reliability, and space savings.

  7. Binary and ternary carbides and nitrides of the transition metals and their phase relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holleck, H.

    1981-01-01

    The occurrance and the structure of the binary and ternary transition metal carbides and nitrides are described. Phase diagrams are assessed for most of the binary and ternary systems. Many ternary phase diagrams are published in this report for the first time. (orig.) [de

  8. Fatal aluminium phosphide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Mahesh Chand

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide (AlP is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide which is commonly used for grain preservation. AlP has currently aroused interest with a rising number of cases in the past four decades due to increased use for agricultural and non-agricultural purposes. Its easy availability in the markets has increased also its misuse for committing suicide. Phosphine inhibits cellular oxygen utilization and can induce lipid peroxidation. Poisoning with AlP has often occurred in attempts to commit suicide, and that more often in adults than in teenagers. This is a case of suicidal consumption of aluminium phosphide by a 32-year-old young medical anesthetist. Toxicological analyses detected aluminium phosphide. We believe that free access of celphos tablets in grain markets should be prohibited by law.

  9. Empirical study of the metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor device characteristics deduced from a microscopic model of memory traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai, K.L.; Hsia, Y.

    1982-01-01

    A graded-nitride gate dielectric metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) memory transistor exhibiting superior device characteristics is presented and analyzed based on a qualitative microscopic model of the memory traps. The model is further reviewed to interpret some generic properties of the MNOS memory transistors including memory window, erase-write speed, and the retention-endurance characteristic features

  10. Scaling Relations for Adsorption Energies on Doped Molybdenum Phosphide Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, Meredith; Tsai, Charlie; Chen, Leanne D.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens K.; Chan, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Molybdenum phosphide (MoP), a well-documented catalyst for applications ranging from hydrotreating reactions to electrochemical hydrogen evolution, has yet to be mapped from a more fundamental perspective, particularly in the context of transition-metal scaling relations. In this work, we use periodic density functional theory to extend linear scaling arguments to doped MoP surfaces and understand the behavior of the phosphorus active site. The derived linear relationships for hydrogenated C, N, and O species on a variety of doped surfaces suggest that phosphorus experiences a shift in preferred bond order depending on the degree of hydrogen substitution on the adsorbate molecule. This shift in phosphorus hybridization, dependent on the bond order of the adsorbate to the surface, can result in selective bond weakening or strengthening of chemically similar species. As a result, we discuss how this behavior deviates from transition-metal, sulfide, carbide, and nitride scaling relations, and we discuss potential applications in the context of electrochemical reduction reactions.

  11. Characterization of a glass frit free TiCuAg-thick film metallization applied on aluminium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reicher, R.; Smetana, W.; Adlassnig, A.; Schuster, J. C.; Gruber, U.

    1997-01-01

    The metallization of aluminium nitride substrates by glass frit free Ti CuAg-thick film pastes were investigated. Adhesion properties of the conductor paste were tested by measuring tensile strength and compared with commercial Cu-thick film pastes (within glass frit). Also numerical analysis of temperature-distribution and thermal extension of metallized aluminium nitride ceramic, induced by a continuous and a pulsed working electronic device were made with a finite element program. (author)

  12. The Use of Plasma Technique in Nitridation Process of Metal Alloy DIN 42CrMo4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purwanto; Malau, Viktor; Tjipto Sujitno

    2003-01-01

    Nitridation process with plasma technique is one of technique for surface treatment of a material. Research on plasma technique for nitridation process has been carried out to find out the nitridation effect on properties of metal alloy DIN 42CrM04. Nitridation process with plasma technique was conducted in a vacuum tube under following conditions 0.36 torr of pressure, 300 o C of temperature and nitridation times 1, 2, and 3 hours. Nitridation process was followed by hardness test measurement using High Quality Micro Hardness Tester machine, serial number MM-0054, as well as microstructure test using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) EDAX-DX4. The results showed that surface hardness increased after nitridation process. For nitridation processes for 1, 2, and 3 hours, the hardness increased from 291 kg/mm 2 to 303 kg/mm 2 , 324 kg/mm 2 and 403 kg/mm 2 , respectively. The results from micro structure observation showed that new phase of Ferro Nitride (Fe 4 N) has been formed with 4.17% nitrogen weight equivalent to 14.73% nitrogen atom and with the thickness of 5.71 μm, 5.08% nitrogen weight or 17.51% nitrogen atom and 6.78 μm thickness, and 5.69% nitrogen weight or 19.24% nitrogen atom and 8.57 μm thickness. (author)

  13. Silicon dioxide with a silicon interfacial layer as an insulating gate for highly stable indium phosphide metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, V. J.; Shokrani, M.

    1991-01-01

    A novel gate insulator consisting of silicon dioxide (SiO2) with a thin silicon (Si) interfacial layer has been investigated for high-power microwave indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors (MISFETs). The role of the silicon interfacial layer on the chemical nature of the SiO2/Si/InP interface was studied by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the silicon interfacial layer reacted with the native oxide at the InP surface, thus producing silicon dioxide, while reducing the native oxide which has been shown to be responsible for the instabilities in InP MISFETs. While a 1.2-V hysteresis was present in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve of the MIS capacitors with silicon dioxide, less than 0.1 V hysteresis was observed in the C-V curve of the capacitors with the silicon interfacial layer incorporated in the insulator. InP MISFETs fabricated with the silicon dioxide in combination with the silicon interfacial layer exhibited excellent stability with drain current drift of less than 3 percent in 10,000 sec, as compared to 15-18 percent drift in 10,000 sec for devices without the silicon interfacial layer. High-power microwave InP MISFETs with Si/SiO2 gate insulators resulted in an output power density of 1.75 W/mm gate width at 9.7 GHz, with an associated power gain of 2.5 dB and 24 percent power added efficiency.

  14. Pressure induced phase transitions in transition metal nitrides: Ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Anurag; Chauhan, Mamta [Advanced Material Research Lab, Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management, Gwalior 474010 (India); Singh, R.K. [Department of Physics, ITM University, Gurgaon 122017 (India)

    2011-12-15

    We have analyzed the stability of transition metal nitrides (TMNs) XN (X = Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta) in their original rocksalt (B1) and hypothetical CsCl (B2) type phases under high compression. The ground state total energy calculation approach of the system has been used through the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) type parameterization as exchange correlation functional. In the whole series of nitrides taken into consideration, tantalum nitride is found to be the most stable. We have observed that under compression the original B1-type phase of these nitrides transforms to a B2-type phase. We have also discussed the computation of ground state properties, like the lattice constant (a), bulk modulus (B{sub 0}) and first order pressure derivative of the bulk modulus (B'{sub 0}) of the TMNs and their host elements. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Preparation of uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, R.A.; Tennery, V.J.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing actinide-nitrides from massive actinide metal which is suitable for sintering into low density fuel shapes by partially hydriding the massive metal and simultaneously dehydriding and nitriding the dehydrided portion. The process is repeated until all of the massive metal is converted to a nitride

  16. Synthesis of metal free ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride sheet for photocatalytic dye degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shakeelur; Momin, Bilal; Higgins M., W.; Annapure, Uday S.; Jha, Neetu

    2018-04-01

    In recent times, low cost and metal free photocatalyts driven under visible light have attracted a lot of interest. One such photo catalyst researched extensively is bulk graphitic carbon nitride sheets. But the low surface area and weak mobility of photo generated electrons limits its photocatalytic performance in the visible light spectrum. Here we present the facile synthesis of ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride using a cost effective melamine precursor and its application in highly efficient photocatalytic dye degradation of Rhodamine B molecules. Compared to bulk graphitic carbon nitride, the synthesized ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride shows an increase in surface area, a a decrease in optical band gap and effective photogenerated charge separation which facilitates the harvest of visible light irradiation. Due to these optimal properties of ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride, it shows excellent photocatalytic activity with photocatalytic degradation of about 95% rhodamine B molecules in 1 hour.

  17. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment — the formation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Geoffrey C.; Holmes, Nigel R.

    1988-05-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced, however, by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air.

  18. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment - the formation of uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Holmes, N.R.

    1987-08-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced however by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air. (author)

  19. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment - the formation of uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Holmes, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced, however, by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air. (orig.)

  20. Formation of titanium nitride layers on titanium metal: Results of XPS and AES investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.; Pfennig, G.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Sirch, M.; Willin, E.

    1988-09-01

    The reaction of titanium metal with gaseous nitrogen and ammonia at temperatures of 890 0 C leads to the formation of nitridic overlayers on the metallic substrate. The thicknesses of the overlayers increase with increasing reaction time. Under comparable conditions ammonia reacts much slower than nitrogen. XPS and AES depth profile analyses show continuous changes of the in-depth compositions of the overlayers. This can be interpreted in terms of a very irregular thickness of the overlayers, an assumption which is substantiated by local AES analyses and by the observation of a pronounced crystalline structure of the substrate after annealing pretreatment, which can give rise to locally different reaction rates. The depth profile is also influenced by the broad ranges of stability of the titanium nitride phases formed during the reaction. The quantitative analysis of the titanium/nitrogen overlayers by AES is difficult because of the overlap of titanium and nitrogen Auger peaks. In quantitative XPS analysis problems arise due to difficulties in defining Ti 2p peak areas. This work presents practical procedures for the quantitative evaluation by XPS and AES of nitridic overlayers with sufficient accuracy. (orig.) [de

  1. Direct comparison of the electrical properties in metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon and metal/aluminum oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon capacitors with equivalent oxide thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Ho-Myoung; Seo, Yu Jeong; Kim, Hee Dong; Kim, Kyoung Chan; Kim, Jong-Guk [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Won-Ju; Koh, Jung-Hyuk [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Yun Mo [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.k [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-31

    We examine the electrical properties of metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon (MONOS) capacitors with two different blocking oxides, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, under the influence of the same electric field. The thickness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer is set to 150 A, which is electrically equivalent to a thickness of the SiO{sub 2} layer of 65 A, in the MONOS structure for this purpose. The capacitor with the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer shows a larger capacitance-voltage memory window of 8.6 V, lower program voltage of 7 V, faster program/erase speeds of 10 ms/1 {mu}s, lower leakage current of 100 pA and longer data retention than the one with the SiO{sub 2} blocking layer does. These improvements are attributed to the suppression of the carrier transport to the gate electrode afforded by the use of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer physically thicker than the SiO{sub 2} one, as well as the effective charge-trapping by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the deep energy levels in the nitride layer.

  2. III-nitrides, 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, and their heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Pawan

    2017-04-01

    Group III-nitride materials have attracted great attention for applications in high efficiency electronic and optoelectronics devices such as high electron mobility transistors, light emitting diodes, and laser diodes. On the other hand, group VI transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) in the form of MX2 has recently emerged as a novel atomic layered material system with excellent thermoelectric, electronic and optoelectronic properties. Also, the recent investigations reveal that the dissimilar heterojunctions formed by TMDs and III-nitrides provide the route for novel devices in the area of optoelectronic, electronics, and water splitting applications. In addition, integration of III-nitrides and TMDs will enable high density integrated optoelectronic circuits and the development of hybrid integration technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated kinetically controlled growth processes in plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) for the III-nitrides and their engineered heterostructures. Techniques such as Ga irradiation and nitrogen plasma exposure has been utilized to implement bulk GaN, InGaN and their heterostructures in PAMBE. For the growth of III-nitride based heterostructures, the in-situ surface stoichiometry monitoring (i-SSM) technique was developed and used for implementing stepped and compositionally graded InGaN-based multiple quantum wells (MQWs). Their optical and microstrain analysis in conjunction with theoretical studies confirmed improvement in the radiative recombination rate of the graded-MQWs as compared to that of stepped-MQWs, owing to the reduced strain in graded-MQWs. Our achievement also includes the realization of the p-type MoS2 by engineering pristine MoS2 layers in PAMBE. Mainly, Ga and nitrogen plasma irradiation on the pristine MoS2 in PAMBE has resulted in the realization of the p-type MoS2. Also, GaN epitaxial thin layers were deposited on MoS2/c-sapphire, WSe2/c-sapphire substrates by PAMBE to study the band

  3. The influence of metal Mg on micro-morphology and crystallinity of spherical hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The action mechanism of Mg to the synthesis of spherical BN was explored. • The influence of Mg content on the crystallinity of h-BN powders was studied. • Even if not added any template, the spherical h-BN could be prepared. - Abstract: This search used the boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, Mg as metal catalyst, and thus prepared different micro-morphology and crystallinity hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at a nitriding temperature of 750 °C. The effect of Mg content on the crystallinity and micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride powders was studied, and the Mg action mechanism was explored. Without the added surfactant, the graphitization index (GI) was 6.87, and the diameter of the spherical h-BN was bigger. When the added Mg were 0.1 g, 0.3 g, 0.5 g and 0.7 g, the (GI) decreased to 6.04, 5.67, 4.62 and 4.84, respectively. When the Mg content was higher (0.9 g), GI value increased rapidly, and the crystallinity became bad. When the Mg content was 0.5 g, the dispersion of h-BN powders was at its optimum and refinement apparently, and the crystallinity at its highest.

  4. Tribocorrosion studies of metallic biomaterials: The effect of plasma nitriding and DLC surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guo-Hua; Aune, Ragnhild E; Espallargas, Nuria

    2016-10-01

    The medical grade pure titanium, stainless steel and CoCrMo alloy have been utilized as biomaterials for load-bearing orthopedic prosthesis. The conventional surgery metals suffer from a combined effect of wear and corrosion once they are implanted, which may significantly accelerate the material degradation process. In this work, the tribocorrosion performance of the metallic biomaterials with different surface modifications was studied in the simulated body fluid for the purpose of investigating the effect of the surface treatments on the tribocorrosion performance and eventually finding the most suitable implantation materials. The metals were subjected to surface modifications by plasma nitriding in different treatment temperatures or physical vapor deposition (PVD) to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating, respectively. The dry wear and tribocorrosion properties of the samples were evaluated by using a reciprocating ball-on-disc tribometer equipped with an electrochemical cell. Prior to the tribocorrosion tests, their electrochemical behavior was measured by the potentiodynamic polarization in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution at room temperature. Both stainless steel and CoCrMo after low temperature nitriding kept their passive nature by forming an expanded austenite phase. The DLC coated samples presented the low anodic corrosion current due to the chemical inertness of the carbon layer. During the tribocorrosion tests at open circuit potential, the untreated and low temperature nitrided samples exhibited significant potential drop towards the cathodic direction, which was a result of the worn out of the passive film. Galvanic coupling was established between the depassivated (worn) area and the still passive (unworn) area, making the materials suffered from wear-accelerated corrosion. The DLC coating performed as a solid lubricant in both dry wear and tribocorrosion tests, and the resulting wear after the tests was almost negligible. Copyright

  5. Ferromagnetism in Fe-doped transition metal nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Sharma, Yamini

    2018-04-01

    Early transition metal mononitrides ScN and YN are refractory compounds with high hardness and melting points as well semiconducting properties. The presence of nitrogen vacancies in ScN/YN introduces asymmetric peaks in the density of states close to Fermi level, the same effects can be achieved by doping by Mn or Fe-atoms. Due to the substitution of TM atoms at Sc/Y sites, it was found that the p-d hybridization induces small magnetic moments at both Sc/Y and N sites giving rise to magnetic semiconductors (MS). From the calculated temperature dependent transport properties, the power factor and ZT is found to be lowered for doped ScN whereas it increases for doped YN. It is proposed that these materials have promising applications as spintronics and thermoelectric materials.

  6. Synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride with the presence of representative metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budak, Erhan, E-mail: erhan@ibu.edu.t [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu 14280 (Turkey); Bozkurt, Cetin [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu 14280 (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) samples were prepared using the modified O'Connor method with KNO{sub 3} and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} at different temperatures (1050, 1250, and 1450 deg. C). The samples were characterized by FTIR, XRD, and SEM techniques. Usage of representative metals exhibited a positive effect on the crystallization of h-BN and they caused the formation of nano-scale products at relatively low temperature. XRD results indicated that there was an increase in interlayer spacing due to the d-{pi} interaction. The calculated lattice constants were very close to the reported value for h-BN.

  7. Effect of alloying on elastic properties of ZrN based transition metal nitride alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Kanoun, Mohammed; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2014-01-01

    We report the effect of composition and metal sublattice substitutional element on the structural, elastic and electronic properties of ternary transition metal nitrides Zr1-xMxN with M=Al, Ti, Hf, V, Nb, W and Mo. The analysis of the elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio provides insights regarding the mechanical behavior of Zr1-xMxN. We predict that ternary alloys are more ductile compared to their parent binary compounds. The revealed trend in the mechanical behavior might help for experimentalists on the ability of tuning the mechanical properties during the alloying process by varying the concentration of the transition metal. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Effect of alloying on elastic properties of ZrN based transition metal nitride alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Kanoun, Mohammed

    2014-09-01

    We report the effect of composition and metal sublattice substitutional element on the structural, elastic and electronic properties of ternary transition metal nitrides Zr1-xMxN with M=Al, Ti, Hf, V, Nb, W and Mo. The analysis of the elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young\\'s modulus, and Poisson\\'s ratio provides insights regarding the mechanical behavior of Zr1-xMxN. We predict that ternary alloys are more ductile compared to their parent binary compounds. The revealed trend in the mechanical behavior might help for experimentalists on the ability of tuning the mechanical properties during the alloying process by varying the concentration of the transition metal. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Synchrotron radiation studies of local structure and bonding in transition metal aluminides and rare earth transition metal magnetic nitrides. Final report, August 1, 1990--July 14, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnick, J.I.; Pease, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    The following areas of study are reported on: bonding and near neighbor force constants in NiAl, CoAl, FeAl via temperature dependent EXAFS; alloys formed when Fe or Ga is microalloyed into a NiAl matrix; EXAFS studies of nitrided versus non nitrided Y 2 Fe 17 ; and transition metal x-ray spectra as related to magnetic moments

  10. Synthesis of IV-VI Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles Using a Reactive Mesoporous Template for Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial carbides and nitrides of early transition metals in Groups IV-VI exhibit platinum-like behavior which makes them a promising candidate to replace noble metals in a wide variety of reactions. Most synthetic methods used to prepare

  11. One-step synthesis of 2D-layered carbon wrapped transition metal nitrides from transition metal carbides (MXenes) for supercapacitors with ultrahigh cycling stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenyu; Cheng, Laifei; Wu, Heng; Zhang, Yani; Lv, Shilin; Guo, Xiaohui

    2018-03-13

    A novel one-step method to synthesize 2D carbon wrapped TiN (C@TiN) was proposed via using 2D metal carbides (MXenes) as precursors. This study provides a novel approach to synthesize carbon wrapped metal nitrides.

  12. Rocksalt nitride metal/semiconductor superlattices: A new class of artificially structured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bivas; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D.

    2018-06-01

    Artificially structured materials in the form of superlattice heterostructures enable the search for exotic new physics and novel device functionalities, and serve as tools to push the fundamentals of scientific and engineering knowledge. Semiconductor heterostructures are the most celebrated and widely studied artificially structured materials, having led to the development of quantum well lasers, quantum cascade lasers, measurements of the fractional quantum Hall effect, and numerous other scientific concepts and practical device technologies. However, combining metals with semiconductors at the atomic scale to develop metal/semiconductor superlattices and heterostructures has remained a profoundly difficult scientific and engineering challenge. Though the potential applications of metal/semiconductor heterostructures could range from energy conversion to photonic computing to high-temperature electronics, materials challenges primarily had severely limited progress in this pursuit until very recently. In this article, we detail the progress that has taken place over the last decade to overcome the materials engineering challenges to grow high quality epitaxial, nominally single crystalline metal/semiconductor superlattices based on transition metal nitrides (TMN). The epitaxial rocksalt TiN/(Al,Sc)N metamaterials are the first pseudomorphic metal/semiconductor superlattices to the best of our knowledge, and their physical properties promise a new era in superlattice physics and device engineering.

  13. Effect of functionalization of boron nitride flakes by main group metal clusters on their optoelectronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2017-10-01

    The possibility of functionalizing boron nitride flakes (BNFs) with some selected main group metal clusters, viz. OLi4, NLi5, CLi6, BLI7 and Al12Be, has been analyzed with the aid of density functional theory (DFT) based computations. Thermochemical as well as energetic considerations suggest that all the metal clusters interact with the BNF moiety in a favorable fashion. As a result of functionalization, the static (first) hyperpolarizability (β ) values of the metal cluster supported BNF moieties increase quite significantly as compared to that in the case of pristine BNF. Time dependent DFT analysis reveals that the metal clusters can lower the transition energies associated with the dominant electronic transitions quite significantly thereby enabling the metal cluster supported BNF moieties to exhibit significant non-linear optical activity. Moreover, the studied systems demonstrate broad band absorption capability spanning the UV-visible as well as infra-red domains. Energy decomposition analysis reveals that the electrostatic interactions principally stabilize the metal cluster supported BNF moieties.

  14. Metal-free hybrids of graphitic carbon nitride and nanodiamonds for photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Zhang, Huayang; Guo, Xiaochen; Sun, Hongqi; Liu, Shaomin; Tade, Moses O; Wang, Shaobin

    2017-05-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) has been considered as a metal-free, cost-effective, eco-friendly and efficient catalyst for various photoelectrochemical applications. However, compared to conventional metal-based photocatalysts, its photocatalytic activity is still low because of the low mobility of carriers restricted by the polymer nature. Herein, a series of hybrids of g-C 3 N 4 (GCN) and nanodiamonds (NDs) were synthesized using a solvothermal method. The photoelectrochemical performance and photocatalytic efficiency of the GCN/NDs were investigated by means of the generation of photocurrent and photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) solutions under UV-visible light irradiations. In this study, the sample of GCN/ND-33% derived from 0.1g GCN and 0.05g NDs displayed the highest photocatalytic activity and the strongest photocurrent density. The mechanism of enhanced photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic performances was also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Black tungsten nitride as a metallic photocatalyst for overall water splitting operable at up to 765 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu Lei; Li, Yu Hang; Wang, Xue Lu; Chen, Ai Ping; Yang, Hua Gui [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Nie, Ting; Gong, Xue Qing [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Centre for Computational Chemistry and Research Institute of Industrial Catalysis, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Li Rong [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2017-06-19

    Semiconductor photocatalysts are hardly employed for overall water splitting beyond 700 nm, which is due to both thermodynamic aspects and activation barriers. Metallic materials as photocatalysts are known to overcome this limitation through interband transitions for creating electron-hole pairs; however, the application of metallic photocatalysts for overall water splitting has never been fulfilled. Black tungsten nitride is now employed as a metallic photocatalyst for overall water splitting at wavelengths of up to 765 nm. Experimental and theoretical results together confirm that metallic properties play a substantial role in exhibiting photocatalytic activity under red-light irradiation for tungsten nitride. This work represents the first red-light responsive photocatalyst for overall water splitting, and may open a promising venue in searching of metallic materials as efficient photocatalysts for solar energy utilization. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Effects of radiation and temperature on gallium nitride (GaN) metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiamori, Heather C.; Angadi, Chetan; Suria, Ateeq; Shankar, Ashwin; Hou, Minmin; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2014-06-01

    The development of radiation-hardened, temperature-tolerant materials, sensors and electronics will enable lightweight space sub-systems (reduced packaging requirements) with increased operation lifetimes in extreme harsh environments such as those encountered during space exploration. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a ceramic, semiconductor material stable within high-radiation, high-temperature and chemically corrosive environments due to its wide bandgap (3.4 eV). These material properties can be leveraged for ultraviolet (UV) wavelength photodetection. In this paper, current results of GaN metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) UV photodetectors behavior after irradiation up to 50 krad and temperatures of 15°C to 150°C is presented. These initial results indicate that GaN-based sensors can provide robust operation within extreme harsh environments. Future directions for GaN-based photodetector technology for down-hole, automotive and space exploration applications are also discussed.

  17. Aluminum Nitride Micro-Channels Grown via Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy for MEMs Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodak, L.E.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Famouri, P.; Ting, L.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for a number of applications due to its temperature and chemical stability. Furthermore, AlN maintains its piezoelectric properties at higher temperatures than more commonly used materials, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) [1, 2], making AlN attractive for high temperature micro and nanoelectromechanical (MEMs and NEMs) applications including, but not limited to, high temperature sensors and actuators, micro-channels for fuel cell applications, and micromechanical resonators. This work presents a novel AlN micro-channel fabrication technique using Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). AlN easily nucleates on dielectric surfaces due to the large sticking coefficient and short diffusion length of the aluminum species resulting in a high quality polycrystalline growth on typical mask materials, such as silicon dioxide and silicon nitride [3,4]. The fabrication process introduced involves partially masking a substrate with a silicon dioxide striped pattern and then growing AlN via MOVPE simultaneously on the dielectric mask and exposed substrate. A buffered oxide etch is then used to remove the underlying silicon dioxide and leave a free standing AlN micro-channel. The width of the channel has been varied from 5 ìm to 110 ìm and the height of the air gap from 130 nm to 800 nm indicating the stability of the structure. Furthermore, this versatile process has been performed on (111) silicon, c-plane sapphire, and gallium nitride epilayers on sapphire substrates. Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Raman measurements have been taken on channels grown on each substrate and indicate that the substrate is influencing the growth of the AlN micro-channels on the SiO2 sacrificial layer.

  18. Electrochemical properties of lanthanum nitride with calcium nitride additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesunova, R.P.; Fishman, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the electrochemical properties of lanthanum nitride with calcium nitride added. The lanthanum nitride was obtained by nitriding metallic lanthanum at 870 K in an ammonia stream. The product contained Cl, Pr, Nd, Sm, Fe, Ca, Cu, Mo, Mg, Al, Si, and Be. The calcium nitride was obtained by nitriding metallic calcium in a nitrogen stream. The conductivity on the LaN/C 3 N 2 system components are shown as a function of temperature. A table shows the solid solutions to be virtually electronic conductors and the lanthanum nitride a mixed conductor

  19. Half-metallicity and electronic structures for carbon-doped group III-nitrides: Calculated with a modified Becke-Johnson potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuai-wei; Wang, Ri-gao; Xu, Pemg

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structures and magnetism for carbon-doped group III-nitrides are investigated by utilizing the first principle method with the modified Becke-Johnson potential. Calculations show that carbon substituting cations (anions) would induce the group III-nitrides to be paramagnetic metals (half-metallic ferromagnets). Single carbon substituting nitrogen could produce 1.00μB magnetic moment. Electronic structures indicate that the carriers-mediated double-exchange interaction plays a crucial role in forming the ferromagnetism. Based on the mean-field theory, the Curie temperature for carbon-doped group III-nitrides would be above the room temperature. Negative chemical pair interactions imply that carbon dopants tend to form clustering distribution in group III-nitrides. The nitrogen vacancy would make the carbon-doped group III-nitrides lose the half-metallic ferromagnetism.

  20. Extreme conditions synthesis, processing and characterization of metal-nitrides and alloys of mechanical and optoelectronic importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serghiou, G; McGaff, A J; Russell, N; Morniroli, J P; Frost, D J; Odling, N; Boehler, R; Troadec, D; Lathe, C

    2010-01-01

    High density nitrides and group IV alloys are of growing importance for both ceramic and optoelectronic applications. We present here new data and processes in our ongoing preparation of alkaline earth and transition metal nitrides as well as group IV alloys, here, up to 25 GPa and 2300 K. We employ large volume and laser-heated diamond anvil cell techniques for synthesis, processing tools including focused ion beam, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for characterization.

  1. Method of activating an article of passive ferrous or non-ferrous metal prior to carburising, nitriding and /or nitrocarburising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2012111456A A method of activating an article of passive ferrous or non-ferrous metal by heating at least one compound containing nitrogen and carbon, wherein the article is treated with gaseous species derived from the compound. The activated article can be subsequently carburised......, nitrided or nitrocarburised in shorter time at lower temperature and resulting superior mechanical properties compared with non-activated articles and even articles of stainless steel, nickel alloy, cobalt alloy or titanium based material can be carburised, nitrided or nitrocarburised....

  2. Hydrogen Sensors Using Nitride-Based Semiconductor Diodes: The Role of Metal/Semiconductor Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Irokawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I review my recent results in investigating hydrogen sensors using nitride-based semiconductor diodes, focusing on the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with the devices. Firstly, effects of interfacial modification in the devices on hydrogen detection sensitivity are discussed. Surface defects of GaN under Schottky electrodes do not play a critical role in hydrogen sensing characteristics. However, dielectric layers inserted in metal/semiconductor interfaces are found to cause dramatic changes in hydrogen sensing performance, implying that chemical selectivity to hydrogen could be realized. The capacitance-voltage (C-V characteristics reveal that the work function change in the Schottky metal is not responsible mechanism for hydrogen sensitivity. The interface between the metal and the semiconductor plays a critical role in the interaction of hydrogen with semiconductor devises. Secondly, low-frequency C-V characterization is employed to investigate the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with diodes. As a result, it is suggested that the formation of a metal/semiconductor interfacial polarization could be attributed to hydrogen-related dipoles. In addition, using low-frequency C-V characterization leads to clear detection of 100 ppm hydrogen even at room temperature where it is hard to detect hydrogen by using conventional current-voltage (I-V characterization, suggesting that low-frequency C-V method would be effective in detecting very low hydrogen concentrations.

  3. Lattice Dynamics of Gallium Phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarnell, J.L.; Warren, J.L.; Wenzel, R.G.; Dean, P.J.

    1968-01-01

    Dispersion curves for phonons propagating in the [100], [110], and [111] directions in gallium phosphide have been measured using a triple-axis neutron diffraction spectrometer operating in the constant-Q mode. The sample was a pseudo-single crystal which was prepared by gluing together 36 single crystal plates of gallium phosphide 1 to 2.5 cm in diameter and ∼0.07 cm thick. The plates were grown epitaxially on substrates of gallium arsenide or gallium phosphide, and aligned individually by neutron diffraction. Rocking curves for eight reflections symmetrically distributed in the plane of the experiment had full widths at half maximum in the range 0.52° - 0.58° and were approximately Gaussian in shape. Gallium phosphide crystallizes in the zinc blende structure. A group theoretic analysis of the lattice dynamics of this structure and a shell model fit to the measured dispersion curves are presented. Various optical properties of gallium phosphide are discussed in terms of the phonon dispersion curves. In particular, the phonons which assist indirect electronic transitions are identified as those at the zone boundary in the [100] direction (symmetry point X) in agreement with theoretical and experimental indications that the extrema of the conduction and valence bands are at X and Γ (center of the zone), respectively. The LO branches lie above the TO branches throughout the Brillouin zone in contradiction to the predictions of Keyes and Mitra. The shell model fit indicates that the charge on the gallium atom is negative. (author)

  4. Light-matter Interactions in Semiconductors and Metals: From Nitride Optoelectronics to Quantum Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Prineha

    This thesis puts forth a theory-directed approach coupled with spectroscopy aimed at the discovery and understanding of light-matter interactions in semiconductors and metals. The first part of the thesis presents the discovery and development of Zn-IV nitride materials. The commercial prominence in the optoelectronics industry of tunable semiconductor alloy materials based on nitride semiconductor devices, specifically InGaN, motivates the search for earth-abundant alternatives for use in efficient, high-quality optoelectronic devices. II-IV-N2 compounds, which are closely related to the wurtzite-structured III-N semiconductors, have similar electronic and optical properties to InGaN namely direct band gaps, high quantum efficiencies and large optical absorption coefficients. The choice of different group II and group IV elements provides chemical diversity that can be exploited to tune the structural and electronic properties through the series of alloys. The first theoretical and experimental investigation of the ZnSnxGe1--xN2 series as a replacement for III-nitrides is discussed here. The second half of the thesis shows ab-initio calculations for surface plasmons and plasmonic hot carrier dynamics. Surface plasmons, electromagnetic modes confined to the surface of a conductor-dielectric interface, have sparked renewed interest because of their quantum nature and their broad range of applications. The decay of surface plasmons is usually a detriment in the field of plasmonics, but the possibility to capture the energy normally lost to heat would open new opportunities in photon sensors, energy conversion devices and switching. A theoretical understanding of plasmon-driven hot carrier generation and relaxation dynamics in the ultrafast regime is presented here. Additionally calculations for plasmon-mediated upconversion as well as an energy-dependent transport model for these non-equilibrium carriers are shown. Finally, this thesis gives an outlook on the

  5. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage.

  6. Low-temperature CVD of iron, cobalt, and nickel nitride thin films from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R.; Davis, Luke M.; Girolami, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of late transition metal nitrides (where the metal is iron, cobalt, or nickel) are grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia. These metal nitrides are known to have useful mechanical and magnetic properties, but there are few thin film growth techniques to produce them based on a single precursor family. The authors report the deposition of metal nitride thin films below 300 °C from three recently synthesized M[N(t-Bu) 2 ] 2 precursors, where M = Fe, Co, and Ni, with growth onset as low as room temperature. Metal-rich phases are obtained with constant nitrogen content from growth onset to 200 °C over a range of feedstock partial pressures. Carbon contamination in the films is minimal for iron and cobalt nitride, but similar to the nitrogen concentration for nickel nitride. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the incorporated nitrogen is present as metal nitride, even for films grown at the reaction onset temperature. Deposition rates of up to 18 nm/min are observed. The film morphologies, growth rates, and compositions are consistent with a gas-phase transamination reaction that produces precursor species with high sticking coefficients and low surface mobilities

  7. New routes to nitrogen-rich transition metal nitrides: Synthesis of novel polymorphs of Hf3N4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamat, Ashkan; Hector, A.; Gray, B.; Kimber, S.; Bouvier, P.; McMillan, P.

    2013-06-01

    One of the most obvious features of transition metal nitride chemistry is that the maximum formal oxidation state of the metal is rarely as high as in the corresponding oxides or fluorides. Much of the interest in the high oxidation phases stems from the desire to identify the next generation of photocatalytic materials with tuneable bandgaps. Experiments in the laser heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) between the direct reaction of metals and nitrogen have previously produced a number of important new main group nitride phases. This technique has also demonstrated its potential for formation of new nitrogen-rich transition metal nitride phases. Alternative methods with the development of ``soft'' routes to new phases with high nitrogen content also offer the possibility of obtaining metastable phases through topotactic conversions. Using LHDAC in situ with synchrotron angle dispersive diffraction techniques we have crystallised at high pressures and temperatures two novel polymorphs of Hf3N4. Starting with an amide-derived nanocrystalline Hf3N4 sample we have identified a novel tetragonal (I4/ m) polymorph at 15 GPa and 1500K and a second high pressure orthorhombic (Pnma) polymorph at 30 GPa and 2000 K. This study demonstrates that the combination of precursor-based synthesis and high-pressure crystallization could be very productive in synthesis of such nitrogen-rich phases.

  8. Lattice dynamics and electron/phonon interactions in epitaxial transition-metal nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Antonio Rodolph Bighetti

    Transition metal (TM) nitrides, due to their unique combination of remarkable physical properties and simple NaCl structure, are presently utilized in a broad range of applications and as model systems in the investigation of complex phenomena. Group-IVB nitrides TiN, ZrN, and HfN have transport properties which include superconductivity and high electrical conductivity; consequentially, they have become technologically important as electrodes and contacts in the semiconducting and superconducting industries. The Group-VB nitride VN, which exhibits enhanced ductility, is a fundamental component in superhard and tough nanostructured hard coatings. In this thesis, I investigate the lattice dynamics responsible for controlling superconductivity and electrical conductivities in Group-IVB nitrides and elasticity and structural stability of the NaCl-structure Group-VB nitride VN. Our group has already synthesized high-quality epitaxial TiN, HfN, and CeN layers on MgO(001) substrates. By irradiating the growth surface with high ion fluxes at energies below the bulk lattice-atom displacement threshold, dense epitaxial single crystal TM nitride films with extremely smooth surfaces have been grown using ultra-high vacuum magnetically-unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Using this approach, I completed the Group-IVB nitride series by growing epitaxial ZrN/MgO(001) films and then grew Group-VB nitride VN films epitaxially on MgO(001), MgO(011), and MgO(111). The combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) reciprocal lattice maps (RLMs), high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR-XTEM), and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) show that single-crystal stoichiometric ZrN films grown at 450 °C are epitaxially oriented cube-on-cube with respect to their MgO(001) substrates, (001) ZrN||(001)MgO and [100]ZrN||[100]MgO. The layers are essentially fully relaxed with a lattice parameter of 0.4575 nm. X-ray reflectivity results reveal that

  9. Surface Preparation and Deposited Gate Oxides for Gallium Nitride Based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. McIntyre

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The literature on polar Gallium Nitride (GaN surfaces, surface treatments and gate dielectrics relevant to metal oxide semiconductor devices is reviewed. The significance of the GaN growth technique and growth parameters on the properties of GaN epilayers, the ability to modify GaN surface properties using in situ and ex situ processes and progress on the understanding and performance of GaN metal oxide semiconductor (MOS devices are presented and discussed. Although a reasonably consistent picture is emerging from focused studies on issues covered in each of these topics, future research can achieve a better understanding of the critical oxide-semiconductor interface by probing the connections between these topics. The challenges in analyzing defect concentrations and energies in GaN MOS gate stacks are discussed. Promising gate dielectric deposition techniques such as atomic layer deposition, which is already accepted by the semiconductor industry for silicon CMOS device fabrication, coupled with more advanced physical and electrical characterization methods will likely accelerate the pace of learning required to develop future GaN-based MOS technology.

  10. Short-range order studies in nonstoichiometric transition metal carbides and nitrides by neutron diffuse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priem, Thierry

    1988-01-01

    Short-range order in non-stoichiometric transition metal carbides and nitrides (TiN 0.82 , TiC 0.64 , TiC 0.76 , NbC 0.73 and NbC 0.83 ) was investigated by thermal neutron diffuse scattering on G4-4 (L.L.B - Saclay) and D10 (I.L.L. Grenoble) spectrometers. From experimental measurements, we have found that metalloid vacancies (carbon or nitrogen) prefer the f.c.c. third neighbour positions. Ordering interaction energies were calculated within the Ising model framework by three approximations: mean field (Clapp and Moss formula), Monte-Carlo simulation, Cluster variation Method. The energies obtained by the two latter methods are very close, and in qualitative agreement with theoretical values calculated from the band structure. Theoretical phase diagrams were calculated from these ordering energies for TiN x and TiC x ; three ordered structures were predicted, corresponding to compositions Ti 6 N 5 Ti 2 C and Ti 3 C 2 . On the other hand, atomic displacements are induced by vacancies. The metal first neighbours were found to move away from a vacancy, whereas the second neighbours move close to it. Near neighbour atomic displacements were theoretically determined by the lattice statics formalism with results in good agreement with experiment. (author) [fr

  11. Bone response to a titanium aluminium nitride coating on metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, C O; Brook, I M

    2006-05-01

    The design, surface characteristics and strength of metallic implants are dependant on their intended use and clinical application. Surface modifications of materials may enable reduction of the time taken for osseointegration and improve the biological response of bio-mechanically favourable metals and alloys. The influence of a titanium aluminium nitride (TAN) coating on the response of bone to commercially pure titanium and austenitic 18/8 stainless steel wire is reported. TAN coated and plain rods of stainless steel and commercially pure titanium were implanted into the mid-shaft of the femur of Wistar rats. The femurs were harvested at four weeks and processed for scanning electron and light microscopy. All implants exhibited a favourable response in bone with no evidence of fibrous encapsulation. There was no significant difference in the amount of new bone formed around the different rods (osseoconduction), however, there was a greater degree of shrinkage separation of bone from the coated rods than from the plain rods (p = 0.017 stainless steel and p = 0.0085 titanium). TAN coating may result in reduced osseointegration between bone and implant.

  12. Nanostructured and nanolayer coatings based on nitrides of the metals structure study and structure and composition standard samples set development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Chabina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches by methods of analytical microscopy and the x-ray analysis have allowed to develop a set of standard samples of composition and structure of the strengthening nanostructured and nanolayer coatings for control of the strengthening nanostructured and nanolayer coatings based on nitrides of the metals used to protect critical parts of the compressor of the gas turbine engine from dust erosion, corrosion and oxidation.

  13. Electrical transport and capacitance characteristics of metal-insulator-metal structures using hexagonal and cubic boron nitride films as dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teii, Kungen; Kawamoto, Shinsuke; Fukui, Shingo; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2018-04-01

    Metal-insulator-metal capacitor structures using thick hexagonal and cubic boron nitride (hBN and cBN) films as dielectrics are produced by plasma jet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and their electrical transport and capacitance characteristics are studied in a temperature range of 298 to 473 K. The resistivity of the cBN film is of the order of 107 Ω cm at 298 K, which is lower than that of the hBN film by two orders of magnitude, while it becomes the same order as the hBN film above ˜423 K. The dominant current transport mechanism at high fields (≥1 × 104 V cm-1) is described by the Frenkel-Poole emission and thermionic emission models for the hBN and cBN films, respectively. The capacitance of the hBN film remains stable for a change in alternating-current frequency and temperature, while that of the cBN film has variations of at most 18%. The dissipation factor as a measure of energy loss is satisfactorily low (≤5%) for both films. The origin of leakage current and capacitance variation is attributed to a high defect density in the film and a transition interlayer between the substrate and the film, respectively. This suggests that cBN films with higher crystallinity, stoichiometry, and phase purity are potentially applicable for dielectrics like hBN films.

  14. Amorphous Metal Tungsten Nitride and its Application for Micro and Nanoelectromechanical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Mayet, Abdulilah M.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this doctoral thesis is to develop, engineer and investigate an amorphous metal tungsten nitride (aWNx) and to study its functionality for applications focused on electromechanical system at the nano-scale. Charge transport based solid state device oriented complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics have reached a level where they are scaled down to nearly their fundamental limits regarding switching speed, off state power consumption and the on state power consumption due to the fundamental limitation of sub-threshold slope (SS) remains at 60 mV/dec. NEM switch theoretically and practically offers the steepest sub-threshold slope and practically has shown zero static power consumption due to their physical isolation originated from the nature of their mechanical operation. Fundamental challenges remain with NEM switches in context of their performance and reliability: (i) necessity of lower pull-in voltage comparable to CMOS technology; (ii) operation in ambient/air; (iii) increased ON current and decreased ON resistance; (iv) scaling of devices and improved mechanical and electrical contacts; and (v) high endurance. The “perfect” NEM switch should overcome all the above-mentioned challenges. Here, we show such a NEM switch fabricated with aWNx to show (i) sub-0.3-volt operation; (ii) operation in air and vacuum; (iii) ON current as high as 0.5 mA and ON resistance lower than 5 kΩ; (iv) improved mechanical contact; and the most importantly (v) continuous switching of 8 trillion cycles for more than 10 days with the highest switching speed is 30 nanosecond without hysteresis. In addition, tungsten nitride could be the modern life vine by fulfilling the demand of biodegradable material for sustainable life regime. Transient electronics is a form of biodegradable electronics as it is physically disappearing totally or partially after performing the required function. The fabricated aWNx suites this category very well, despite not

  15. Nitride stabilized core/shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian Abraham; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2018-01-30

    Nitride stabilized metal nanoparticles and methods for their manufacture are disclosed. In one embodiment the metal nanoparticles have a continuous and nonporous noble metal shell with a nitride-stabilized non-noble metal core. The nitride-stabilized core provides a stabilizing effect under high oxidizing conditions suppressing the noble metal dissolution during potential cycling. The nitride stabilized nanoparticles may be fabricated by a process in which a core is coated with a shell layer that encapsulates the entire core. Introduction of nitrogen into the core by annealing produces metal nitride(s) that are less susceptible to dissolution during potential cycling under high oxidizing conditions.

  16. Layered lithium transition metal nitrides as novel anodes for lithium secondary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yu; Horikawa, Kumi; Fujiyosi, Minako; Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Hirano, Atsushi; Takeda, Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    We report the approach to overcome the deterrents of the hexagonal Li 2.6 Co 0.4 N as potential insertion anode for lithium ion batteries: the rapid capacity fading upon long cycles and the fully Li-rich state before cycling. Research reveals that the appropriate amount of Co substituted by Cu can greatly improve the cycling performance of Li 2.6 Co 0.4 N. It is attributed to the enhanced electrochemical stability and interfacial comparability. However, doped Cu leads to a slightly decreased capacity. High energy mechanical milling (HEMM) was found to effectively improve the reversible capacity associated with the electrochemical kinetics by modifying the active hosts' morphology characteristics. Moreover, the composite based on mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) and Li 2.6 Co 0.4 N was developed under HEMM. The composite demonstrates a high first cycle efficiency at 100% and a large reversible capacity of ca. 450 mAh g -1 , as well as a stable cycling performance. This work may contribute to a development of the lithium transition metal nitrides as novel anodes for lithium ion batteries

  17. Experimental and computational study on the phase stability of Al-containing cubic transition metal nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovere, Florian; Mayrhofer, Paul H; Music, Denis; Ershov, Sergey; Baben, Moritz to; Schneider, Jochen M; Fuss, Hans-Gerd

    2010-01-01

    The phase stability of Al-containing cubic transition metal (TM) nitrides, where Al substitutes for TM (i.e. TM 1-x Al x N), is studied as a function of the TM valence electron concentration (VEC). X-ray diffraction and thermal analyses data of magnetron sputtered Ti 1-x Al x N, V 1-x Al x N and Cr 1-x Al x N films indicate increasing phase stability of cubic TM 1-x Al x N at larger Al contents and higher temperatures with increasing TM VEC. These experimental findings can be understood based on first principle investigations of ternary cubic TM 1-x Al x N with TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Y, Zr and Nb where the TM VEC and the lattice strain are systematically varied. However, our experimental data indicate that, in addition to the decomposition energetics (cubic TM 1-x Al x N → cubic TMN + hexagonal AlN), future stability models have to include nitrogen release as one of the mechanisms that critically determine the overall phase stability of TM 1-x Al x N.

  18. From melamine sponge towards 3D sulfur-doping carbon nitride as metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing; Li, Bin; Li, Songmei; Liu, Jianhua

    2017-07-01

    Development of new and efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for replacing Pt to improve the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of great importance to emerging renewable energy technologies such as metal-air batteries and polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Herein, 3D sulfur-doping carbon nitride (S-CN) as a novel metal-free ORR electrocatalyst was synthesized by exploiting commercial melamine sponge as raw material. The sulfur atoms were doping on CN networks uniformly through numerous S-C bonds which can provide additional active sites. And it was found that the S-CN exhibited high catalytic activity for ORR in term of more positive onset potential, higher electron transfer number and higher cathodic density. This work provides a novel choice of metal-free ORR electrocatalysts and highlights the importance of sulfur-doping CN in metal-free ORR electrocatalysts.

  19. Large scale 2D/3D hybrids based on gallium nitride and transition metal dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kehao; Jariwala, Bhakti; Li, Jun; Briggs, Natalie C; Wang, Baoming; Ruzmetov, Dmitry; Burke, Robert A; Lerach, Jordan O; Ivanov, Tony G; Haque, Md; Feenstra, Randall M; Robinson, Joshua A

    2017-12-21

    Two and three-dimensional (2D/3D) hybrid materials have the potential to advance communication and sensing technologies by enabling new or improved device functionality. To date, most 2D/3D hybrid devices utilize mechanical exfoliation or post-synthesis transfer, which can be fundamentally different from directly synthesized layers that are compatible with large scale industrial needs. Therefore, understanding the process/property relationship of synthetic heterostructures is priority for industrially relevant material architectures. Here we demonstrate the scalable synthesis of molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) and tungsten diselenide (WSe 2 ) via metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on gallium nitride (GaN), and elucidate the structure, chemistry, and vertical transport properties of the 2D/3D hybrid. We find that the 2D layer thickness and transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) choice plays an important role in the transport properties of the hybrid structure, where monolayer TMDs exhibit direct tunneling through the layer, while transport in few layer TMDs on GaN is dominated by p-n diode behavior and varies with the 2D/3D hybrid structure. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal a strong intrinsic dipole and charge transfer between n-MoS 2 and p-GaN, leading to a degraded interface and high p-type leakage current. Finally, we demonstrate integration of heterogeneous 2D layer stacks of MoS 2 /WSe 2 on GaN with atomically sharp interface. Monolayer MoS 2 /WSe 2 /n-GaN stacks lead to near Ohmic transport due to the tunneling and non-degenerated doping, while few layer stacking is Schottky barrier dominated.

  20. Solar selective performance of metal nitride/oxynitride based magnetron sputtered thin film coatings: a comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Khalil; Taha, Hatem; Mahbubur Rahman, M.; Kabir, Humayun; Jiang, Zhong-Tao

    2018-03-01

    Since solar-thermal collectors are considered to be the most direct way of converting solar energy into usable forms, in the last few years growing attention has been paid to the development of transition metal nitride and metal oxynitride based thin film selective surfaces for solar-thermal collectors, in order to harvest more solar energy. A solar-thermal energy system, generally, shows very high solar absorption of incident solar radiation from the solar-thermal collectors in the visible range (0.3 to 2.5 μm) and extremely low thermal losses through emission (or high reflection) in the infrared region (≥2.5 μm). The efficiency of a solar-thermal energy conversion system can be improved by the use of solar selective surfaces consisting of novel metallic nanoparticles embedded in metal nitride/oxynitride systems. In order to enhance the effectiveness of solar-thermal devices, solar selective surfaces with high thermal stability are a prerequisite. Over the years, substantial efforts have been made in the field of solar selective surfaces to attain higher solar absorptance and lower thermal emittance in high temperature (above 400 °C) applications. In this article, we review the present state-of-the-art transition metal nitride and/or oxynitride based vacuum sputtered nanostructured thin film coatings, with respect to their optical and solar selective surface applications. We have also summarized the solar selectivity data from recently published investigations, including discussion on some potential applications for these materials.

  1. Investigation into the use of molecular hydrogen on the growth of gallium nitride via metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billingsley, Daniel; Pritchett, David; Henderson, Walter; Carver, Alexander G.; Burnham, Shawn D.; Doolittle, W.A. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 777 Atlantic Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) has been investigated as a means to improve ammonia nitridation efficiency and attempts to reduce carbon contamination in ammonia-based metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE). A 30% improvement in crystalline quality, inferred from XRD, as well as an increase in subsequent GaN bulk growth rate was observed when bare sapphire was subject to H{sub 2} annealing before nitridation. However, the use of H{sub 2} during GaN homoepitaxy on GaN templates resulted in increased carbon contamination and decreased growth rate of GaN. The results demonstrate promise and proper uses of H{sub 2} during GaN growth under certain conditions. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Synthesis of Binary Transition Metal Nitrides, Carbides and Borides from the Elements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell and Their Structure-Property Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lkhamsuren Bayarjargal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides have a high potential for industrial applications as they not only have a high melting point but are generally harder and less compressible than the pure metals. Here we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of binary transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides focusing on the reaction of the elements at extreme conditions generated within the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The current knowledge of their structures and high-pressure properties like high-(p; T stability, compressibility and hardness is described as obtained from experiments.

  3. Synthesis of Binary Transition Metal Nitrides, Carbides and Borides from the Elements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell and Their Structure-Property Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Alexandra; Winkler, Björn; Juarez-Arellano, Erick A.; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides have a high potential for industrial applications as they not only have a high melting point but are generally harder and less compressible than the pure metals. Here we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of binary transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides focusing on the reaction of the elements at extreme conditions generated within the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The current knowledge of their structures and high-pressure properties like high-(p,T) stability, compressibility and hardness is described as obtained from experiments. PMID:28824101

  4. III-nitrides, 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, and their heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Pawan

    2017-01-01

    Group III-nitride materials have attracted great attention for applications in high efficiency electronic and optoelectronics devices such as high electron mobility transistors, light emitting diodes, and laser diodes. On the other hand, group VI

  5. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.; Pynn, R.

    1997-01-01

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  6. Ion beam modification of sputtered metal nitride thin films: A study of the induced microstructural changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosavljevic, M.; Perusko, D.; Popovic, M.; Novakovic, M.

    2008-01-01

    Single CrN and TiN and multilayered AlN/TiN and Al/Ti thin film structures (t = 240-280 nm) deposited on Si were irradiated with 120-200 keV Ar + ions to the fluences ranging from 1 x 10 11 5 to 4 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . The metallic Al/Ti multilayered structure was also irradiated with high fluence (1- 2 x 10 17 /cm 2 ) nitrogen ions at 200 keV, in order to study interface mixing and formation of nitrides. Single component CrN and TiN thin films were found to grow in the form of a very fine polycrystalline columnar structures. Individual crystal grains were of the order of a few tens of nm in diameter, stretching from the substrate to the surface. After ion irradiation, the layers retain their polycrystalline structure, although the columns become disconnected, the resulting structures consisting of larger grains and nano-particles of the same phase. The implanted samples displayed higher electrical resistivity, presumably due to a higher concentration of point defects and the presence of nano-particles. In Al/Ti and AlN/TiN multilayers irradiated with Ar ions, the as-deposited structures exhibit well-defined, isolated polycrystalline Al and Ti, or AlN and TiN layers, with sharp interfaces. In the metallic system ion irradiation induced interface mixing which progressed with increasing the ion fluence. Mixing was most pronounced at the interfaces that are located around the projected ion range. The multilayered structure was essentially preserved, but the implanted samples exhibit much larger crystal grains. Also, the formation of lamellar columns stretching over a number of individual layers was observed. The AlN/TiN multilayered structures exhibited no measurable interface mixing on Ar irradiation, attributable to the nature of interatomic bonding and to mutual immiscibility of AlN and TiN. High fluence nitrogen ion irradiation of Al/Ti multilayers results in both the introduction of nitrogen into the structures as well as a high level of their intermixing. A

  7. Phonon properties of americium phosphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arya, B. S., E-mail: bsarya13@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Govt. Narmada P G College, Hoshangabad -461001 (India); Aynyas, Mahendra [Department of Physics, C. S. A. Govt. P. G. College Sehore-46601 (India); Sanyal, S. P. [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal-462026 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Phonon properties of AmP have been studied by using breathing shell models (BSM) which includes breathing motion of electrons of the Am atoms due to f-d hybridization. The phonon dispersion curves, specific heat calculated from present model. The calculated phonon dispersion curves of AmP are presented follow the same trend as observed in uranium phosphide. We discuss the significance of this approach in predicting the phonon dispersion curves of these compounds and examine the role of electron-phonon interaction.

  8. Catalytic properties of lanthanide amide, imide and nitride formed by thermal degradation of liquid ammonia solutions of Eu and Yb metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, H.; Mizuno, K.; Ohishi, K.; Suda, E.; Kanda, K.; Sakata, Y.; Tsuchiya, S.

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic properties of lanthanide amide, imide and nitride prepared by the use of liquid ammonia solutions of lanthanide metals (Ln=Eu and Yb) were studied for catalytic hydrogenation. The reaction of Eu or Yb metal solutions in liquid ammonia with silica yielded SiO 2 -grafted lanthanide amide in the divalent state. The divalent amide showed catalytic activity for the selective hydrogenation of dienes and benzene. It was found that partial hydrogenation of benzene occurred with a very high selectivity for cyclohexene. Amides of calcium, strontium and barium were examined similarly in connection with catalytic studies on divalent amides. Imide and nitride, into which the lanthanide (Ln/AC) deposited by impregnation of active carbon (AC) with liquid ammonia solutions of lanthanide metals were converted thermally, were studied catalytically. It was concluded that imide or imide-like species generated during the thermal degradation of lanthanide amide to nitride were very active in the hydrogenation of ethene. Lanthanide nitride was virtually inactive, but the nitride highly dispersed on active carbon was activated when subjected to evacuation treatment above about 1000 K. (orig.)

  9. Polymeric carbon nitride nanomesh as an efficient and durable metal-free catalyst for oxidative desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lijuan; Lei, Ganchang; Fang, Yuanxing; Cao, Yanning; Wang, Xinchen; Jiang, Lilong

    2018-03-06

    We report the first use of polymeric carbon nitride (CN) for the catalytic selective oxidation of H 2 S. The as-prepared CN with unique ultrathin "nanomeshes" structure exhibits excellent H 2 S conversion and high S selectivity. In particular, the CN nanomesh also displays better durability in the desulfurization reaction than traditional catalysts, such as carbon- and iron-based materials.

  10. Synthesis of aluminum nitride films by plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition using hybrid gas-metal cathodic arc gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Liru; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is of interest in the industry because of its excellent electronic, optical, acoustic, thermal, and mechanical properties. In this work, aluminum nitride films are deposited on silicon wafers (100) by metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) using a modified hybrid gas-metal cathodic arc plasma source and with no intentional heating to the substrate. The mixed metal and gaseous plasma is generated by feeding the gas into the arc discharge region. The deposition rate is found to mainly depend on the Al ion flux from the cathodic arc source and is only slightly affected by the N 2 flow rate. The AlN films fabricated by this method exhibit a cubic crystalline microstructure with stable and low internal stress. The surface of the AlN films is quite smooth with the surface roughness on the order of 1/2 nm as determined by atomic force microscopy, homogeneous, and continuous, and the dense granular microstructures give rise to good adhesion with the substrate. The N to Al ratio increases with the bias voltage applied to the substrates. A fairly large amount of O originating from the residual vacuum is found in the samples with low N:Al ratios, but a high bias reduces the oxygen concentration. The compositions, microstructures and crystal states of the deposited films are quite stable and remain unchanged after annealing at 800 deg. C for 1 h. Our hybrid gas-metal source cathodic arc source delivers better AlN thin films than conventional PIIID employing dual plasmas

  11. Systematic study of formation and crystal structure of 3d-transition metal nitrides synthesized in a supercritical nitrogen fluid under 10 GPa and 1800 K using diamond anvil cell and YAG laser heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Masashi; Yagi, Takehiko

    2005-01-01

    Syntheses of 3d-transition metal (Ti-Cu) nitrides have been tried in a supercritical nitrogen fluid at high pressures (about 10 GPa) and high temperatures (about 1800 K) using diamond anvil cell and YAG laser heating system. Nitrides, such as TiN, VN, CrN, Mn 3 N 2 , Fe 2 N, Co 2 N and Ni 3 N have been successfully synthesized easily by a simple direct nitriding reaction between metal and fluid nitrogen in a short time, while any Cu nitrides were not synthesized. These results indicate that the ratio of nitrogen to metal, N/M, of the nitride decreases from 1 to 0 with the sequence from the early transition metal nitrides to the late transition metal ones. The systematic change of the N/M ratio and crystal structure of the 3d-transition metal nitrides is discussed and interpreted on the basis of the electron arrangement of the 3d-transition metal which is relevant to its coordination number

  12. Proton Irradiation-Induced Metal Voids in Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ABBREVIATIONS 2DEG two-dimensional electron gas AlGaN aluminum gallium nitride AlOx aluminum oxide CCD charged coupled device CTE coefficient of...frequency of FETs. Such a device may also be known as a heterojunction field-effect transistor (HFET), modulation-doped field-effect transistor (MODFET...electrons. This charge attracts electrons to the interface, forming the 2DEG channel. The HEMT includes a heterojunction of two semiconducting

  13. Nanometric resolution in glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry depth profiling of metal (Cr, Al) nitride multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Galindo, R.; Gago, R.; Fornies, E.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Climent Font, A.; Albella, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we address the capability of glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) for fast and accurate depth profiling of multilayer nitride coatings down to the nanometer range. This is shown by resolving the particular case of CrN/AlN structures with individual thickness ranging from hundreds to few nanometers. In order to discriminate and identify artefacts in the GDOES depth profile due to the sputtering process, the layered structures were verified by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfaces in the GDOES profiles for CrN/AlN structures are sharper than the ones measured for similar metal multilayers due to the lower sputtering rate of the nitrides. However, as a consequence of the crater shape, there is a linear degradation of the depth resolution with depth (approximately 40 nm/μm), saturating at a value of approximately half the thickness of the thinner layer. This limit is imposed by the simultaneous sputtering of consecutive layers. The ultimate GDOES depth resolution at the near surface region was estimated to be of 4-6 nm

  14. Metal nitride cluster as a template to tune the electronic and magnetic properties of rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang

    2013-10-16

    Rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes have attracted much attention due to the feasibility of encaging metal atom, atoms or cluster inside of carbon cages. By switching the metal atom or cluster entrapped inside of the carbon cage the physical and chemical properties of the fullerene compounds can be tuned. The understanding of magnetic and electrochemical properties of endohedral fullerenes plays an essential role in fundamental scientific researches and potential applications in materials science. In this thesis, synthesizing novel rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerene structures, studying the properties of these isolated endohedral fullerenes and the strategies of tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of endohedral fullerenes were introduced. The DC-arc discharging synthesis of different lanthanide metal-based (Ho, Ce and Pr) mixed metal nitride clusterfullerenes was achieved. Those rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes were isolated by multi-step HPLC. The isolated samples were characterized by spectroscopic techniques included UV-vis-NIR, FTIR, Raman, LDI-TOF mass spectrometry, NMR and electrochemistry. The Ho-based mixed metal nitride clusterfullerenes Ho{sub x}M{sub 3-x}N rate at C{sub 80} (M= Sc, Lu, Y; x=1, 2) were synthesized by ''reactive gas atmosphere'' method or ''selective organic solid'' route. The isolated samples were characterized by LDI-TOF mass spectrometry, UV-vis-NIR, FTIR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. The {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic studies demonstrated exceptional NMR behaviors that resulted from switching the second metal inside of the mixed metal nitride cluster Ho{sub x}M{sub 3-x}N from Sc to Lu and further to Y. The LnSc{sub 2}N rate at C{sub 80} (Ln= Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Lu) MMNCFs were characterized by {sup 13}C and {sup 45}Sc NMR study respectively. According to Bleaney's theory and Reilley method, the separation of δ{sup PC} and δ{sup con

  15. Metal nitride cluster as a template to tune the electronic and magnetic properties of rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes have attracted much attention due to the feasibility of encaging metal atom, atoms or cluster inside of carbon cages. By switching the metal atom or cluster entrapped inside of the carbon cage the physical and chemical properties of the fullerene compounds can be tuned. The understanding of magnetic and electrochemical properties of endohedral fullerenes plays an essential role in fundamental scientific researches and potential applications in materials science. In this thesis, synthesizing novel rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerene structures, studying the properties of these isolated endohedral fullerenes and the strategies of tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of endohedral fullerenes were introduced. The DC-arc discharging synthesis of different lanthanide metal-based (Ho, Ce and Pr) mixed metal nitride clusterfullerenes was achieved. Those rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes were isolated by multi-step HPLC. The isolated samples were characterized by spectroscopic techniques included UV-vis-NIR, FTIR, Raman, LDI-TOF mass spectrometry, NMR and electrochemistry. The Ho-based mixed metal nitride clusterfullerenes Ho x M 3-x N rate at C 80 (M= Sc, Lu, Y; x=1, 2) were synthesized by ''reactive gas atmosphere'' method or ''selective organic solid'' route. The isolated samples were characterized by LDI-TOF mass spectrometry, UV-vis-NIR, FTIR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. The 13 C NMR spectroscopic studies demonstrated exceptional NMR behaviors that resulted from switching the second metal inside of the mixed metal nitride cluster Ho x M 3-x N from Sc to Lu and further to Y. The LnSc 2 N rate at C 80 (Ln= Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Lu) MMNCFs were characterized by 13 C and 45 Sc NMR study respectively. According to Bleaney's theory and Reilley method, the separation of δ PC and δ con from δ para was achieved by the primary 13 C and 45 Sc NMR analysis of LnSc 2 N rate at C 80 (I). The

  16. Feasibility study of using thin aluminum nitride film as a buffer layer for dual metal gate process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Seo; Cho, Byung Jin; Balasubramanian, N.; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of using an ultra thin aluminum nitride (AlN) buffer layer for dual metal gates CMOS process. Since the buffer layer should not affect the thickness of gate dielectric, it should be removed or consumed during subsequent process. In this work, it was shown that a thin AlN dielectric layer would be reacted with initial gate metals and would be consumed during subsequent annealing, resulting in no increase of equivalent oxide thickness (EOT). The reaction of AlN layer with tantalum (Ta) and hafnium (Hf) during subsequent annealing, which was confirmed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, shifted the flat-band voltage of AlN buffered MOS capacitors. No contribution to equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) was also an indication showing the full consumption of AIN, which was confirmed with TEM analysis. The work functions of gate metals were modulated through the reaction, suggesting that the consumption of AlN resulted in new thin metal alloys. Finally, it was found that the barrier heights of the new alloys were consistent with their work functions

  17. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  18. Construction of stable Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} metal/non-metal nitride hybrids with enhanced visible-light photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yinhua, E-mail: yms418@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 2120013,PR China (China); Liu, Peipei; Chen, YeCheng; Zhou, Zhengzhong; Yang, Haijian [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 2120013,PR China (China); Hong, Yuanzhi; Li, Fan; Ni, Liang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 2120013,PR China (China); Yan, Yongsheng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 2120013,PR China (China); Gregory, Duncan H, E-mail: duncan.gregory@glasgow.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} metal/non-metal nitride hybrids were synthesized. • The hybrid nitrides showed enhanced visible-light photocatalytic performance. • The Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} hybrid nitride exhibited excellent photostability. • The hole is the main photoactive specie for the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} metal/non-metal nitride hybrid was successfully synthesized by a facile impregnation method. The photocatalytic activity of Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} hybrid nitrides was evaluated by the degradation of organic dye rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation, and the result indicated that all Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} samples exhibited distinctly enhanced photocatalytic activities for the degradation of RhB than pure g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The optimal Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite sample, with Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} mass ratio of 2%, demonstrated the highest photocatalytic activity, and its degradation rate constant was 2.71 times as high as that of pure g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of this Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} metal/metal-free nitride was predominantly attributed to the synergistic effect which increased visible-light absorption and facilitated the efficient separation of photoinduced electrons and holes. The Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} hybrid nitride exhibited excellent photostability and reusability. The possible mechanism for improved photocatalytic performance was proposed. Overall, this work may provide a facile way to synthesize the highly efficient metal/metal-free hybrid nitride photocatalysts with promising applications in environmental purification and energy conversion.

  19. Tin phosphide-based anodes for sodium-ion batteries: synthesis via solvothermal transformation of Sn metal and phase-dependent Na storage performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Seop; Jung, Kyu-Nam; Jo, Yong Nam; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Hansung; Lee, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    There is a great deal of current interest in the development of rechargeable sodium (Na)-ion batteries (SIBs) for low-cost, large-scale stationary energy storage systems. For the commercial success of this technology, significant progress should be made in developing robust anode (negative electrode) materials with high capacity and long cycle life. Sn-P compounds are considered promising anode materials that have considerable potential to meet the required performance of SIBs, and they have been typically prepared by high-energy mechanical milling. Here, we report Sn-P-based anodes synthesised through solvothermal transformation of Sn metal and their electrochemical Na storage properties. The temperature and time period used for solvothermal treatment play a crucial role in determining the phase, microstructure, and composition of the Sn-P compound and thus its electrochemical performance. The Sn-P compound prepared under an optimised solvothermal condition shows excellent electrochemical performance as an SIB anode, as evidenced by a high reversible capacity of ~560 mAh g−1 at a current density of 100 mA g−1 and cycling stability for 100 cycles. The solvothermal route provides an effective approach to synthesising Sn-P anodes with controlled phases and compositions, thus tailoring their Na storage behaviour. PMID:27189834

  20. Functionalized Graphitic Carbon Nitride for Metal-free, Flexible and Rewritable Nonvolatile Memory Device via Direct Laser-Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Cheng, Huhu; Hu, Yue; Song, Long; Zhang, Zhipan; Jiang, Lan; Qu, Liangti

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet (g-C3N4-NS) has layered structure similar with graphene nanosheet and presents unusual physicochemical properties due to the s-triazine fragments. But their electronic and electrochemical applications are limited by the relatively poor conductivity. The current work provides the first example that atomically thick g-C3N4-NSs are the ideal candidate as the active insulator layer with tunable conductivity for achieving the high performance memory devices with electrical bistability. Unlike in conventional memory diodes, the g-C3N4-NSs based devices combined with graphene layer electrodes are flexible, metal-free and low cost. The functionalized g-C3N4-NSs exhibit desirable dispersibility and dielectricity which support the all-solution fabrication and high performance of the memory diodes. Moreover, the flexible memory diodes are conveniently fabricated through the fast laser writing process on graphene oxide/g-C3N4-NSs/graphene oxide thin film. The obtained devices not only have the nonvolatile electrical bistability with great retention and endurance, but also show the rewritable memory effect with a reliable ON/OFF ratio of up to 105, which is the highest among all the metal-free flexible memory diodes reported so far, and even higher than those of metal-containing devices. PMID:25073687

  1. Functionalized Graphitic Carbon Nitride for Metal-free, Flexible and Rewritable Nonvolatile Memory Device via Direct Laser-Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Cheng, Huhu; Hu, Yue; Song, Long; Zhang, Zhipan; Jiang, Lan; Qu, Liangti

    2014-07-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet (g-C3N4-NS) has layered structure similar with graphene nanosheet and presents unusual physicochemical properties due to the s-triazine fragments. But their electronic and electrochemical applications are limited by the relatively poor conductivity. The current work provides the first example that atomically thick g-C3N4-NSs are the ideal candidate as the active insulator layer with tunable conductivity for achieving the high performance memory devices with electrical bistability. Unlike in conventional memory diodes, the g-C3N4-NSs based devices combined with graphene layer electrodes are flexible, metal-free and low cost. The functionalized g-C3N4-NSs exhibit desirable dispersibility and dielectricity which support the all-solution fabrication and high performance of the memory diodes. Moreover, the flexible memory diodes are conveniently fabricated through the fast laser writing process on graphene oxide/g-C3N4-NSs/graphene oxide thin film. The obtained devices not only have the nonvolatile electrical bistability with great retention and endurance, but also show the rewritable memory effect with a reliable ON/OFF ratio of up to 105, which is the highest among all the metal-free flexible memory diodes reported so far, and even higher than those of metal-containing devices.

  2. Amorphous Metal Tungsten Nitride and its Application for Micro and Nanoelectromechanical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Mayet, Abdulilah M.

    2016-01-01

    In addition, tungsten nitride could be the modern life vine by fulfilling the demand of biodegradable material for sustainable life regime. Transient electronics is a form of biodegradable electronics as it is physically disappearing totally or partially after performing the required function. The fabricated aWNx suites this category very well, despite not being a universal bio-element. It has been found that aWNx dissolves in ground water with a rate of ≈ 20-60 nm h-1. This means that a 100 nm thick aWNx disappears in ground water in less than a day and three days are enough to dissolve completely a 300 nm thickness device.

  3. Study of the stability of ordered phases in non-stoichiometric transition metal carbides and nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landesman, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    After presenting the results of neutron diffraction experiments on the ordered compounds Nb 6 C 5 and Ti 2 N, we propose a classification of the ordered phases encountered in this class of compounds, and, using a tight-binding description of the electronic structure, we calculate the band energy for several ordered configurations and the disordered configuration, for a given metalloid vacancy concentration. We can then, on one hand, predict the relative stability (at O K) of the various ordered phases possible at this concentration - and these predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations, mainly in the case of carbides - and on the other hand calculate the effective pair interactions V 1 and V 2 which appear in the Ising model and reconstruct theoretical stability maps, for any vacancy concentration, which are again in agreement with the phenomenological stability maps (overall agreement in the case of nitrides, more precise agreement in the case of carbides) [fr

  4. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon nitride to metal and silicon carbide to metal for advanced heat engine applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S.; Selverian, J.H.; O`Neil, D.; Kim, H. [GTE Labs., Inc., Waltham, MA (US); Kim, K. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (US). Div. of Engineering

    1993-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Nitride to Metal and Silicon Carbide to Metal for Advanced Heat Engine Applications. A general methodology was developed to optimize the joint geometry and material systems for 650{degrees}C applications. Failure criteria were derived to predict the fracture of the braze and ceramic. Extensive finite element analyses (FEA) were performed to examine various joint geometries and to evaluate the affect of different interlayers on the residual stress state. Also, material systems composed of coating materials, interlayers, and braze alloys were developed for the program based on the chemical stability and strength of the joints during processing, and service. The FEA results were compared with experiments using two methods: (1) an idealized strength relationship of the ceramic, and (2) a probabilistic analysis of the ceramic strength (NASA CARES). The results showed that the measured strength of the joint reached 30--80% of the strength predicted by FEA. Also, potential high-temperature braze alloys were developed and evaluated for the high-temperature application of ceramic-metal joints. 38 tabs, 29 figs, 20 refs.

  5. Novel p-n heterojunction copper phosphide/cuprous oxide photocathode for solar hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chu; Chen, Zhong-Bo; Hsu, Yu-Kuei

    2018-08-01

    A Copper phosphide (Cu 3 P) micro-rod (MR) array, with coverage by an n-Cu 2 O thin layer by electrodeposition as a photocathode, has been directly fabricated on copper foil via simple electro-oxidation and phosphidation for photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen production. The morphology, structure, and composition of the Cu 3 P/Cu 2 O heterostructure are systematically analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectra. The PEC measurements corroborate that the p-Cu 3 P/n-Cu 2 O heterostructural photocathode illustrates efficient charge separation and low charge transfer resistance to achieve the highest photocurrent of 430 μA cm -2 that is greater than other transition metal phosphide materials. In addition, a detailed energy diagram of the p-Cu 3 P/n-Cu 2 O heterostructure was investigated using Mott-Schottky analysis. Our study paves the way to explore phosphide-based materials in a new class for solar energy applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet@metal-organic framework core-shell nanoparticles for photo-chemo combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Zhang, Jinfeng; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xianfeng; Zapien, J. Antonio; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-10-01

    Recently, nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) have started to be developed as a promising platform for bioimaging and drug delivery. On the other hand, combination therapies using multiple approaches are demonstrated to achieve much enhanced efficacy. Herein, we report, for the first time, core-shell nanoparticles consisting of a photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agent and a MOF shell while simultaneously carrying a chemotherapeutic drug for effective combination therapy. In this work, core-shell nanoparticles of zeolitic-imadazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) as shell embedded with graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets as core are fabricated by growing ZIF-8 in the presence of g-C3N4 nanosheets. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) is then loaded into the ZIF-8 shell of the core-shell nanoparticles. The combination of the chemotherapeutic effects of DOX and the PDT effect of g-C3N4 nanosheets can lead to considerably enhanced efficacy. Furthermore, the red fluorescence of DOX and the blue fluorescence of g-C3N4 nanosheets provide the additional function of dual-color imaging for monitoring the drug release process.Recently, nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) have started to be developed as a promising platform for bioimaging and drug delivery. On the other hand, combination therapies using multiple approaches are demonstrated to achieve much enhanced efficacy. Herein, we report, for the first time, core-shell nanoparticles consisting of a photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agent and a MOF shell while simultaneously carrying a chemotherapeutic drug for effective combination therapy. In this work, core-shell nanoparticles of zeolitic-imadazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) as shell embedded with graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets as core are fabricated by growing ZIF-8 in the presence of g-C3N4 nanosheets. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) is then loaded into the ZIF-8 shell of the core-shell nanoparticles. The combination of the chemotherapeutic effects of DOX

  7. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Swanepoel, J.J.; van Vuuren, D.S.; Heydenrych, M.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200°C) chlorination reaction will not react with chlorine. It is therefore necessary to remove as much iron as possible from the nitrided ilmenite. Hydrochloric acid leaching is a possible process route to remove metallic iron from nitrided ilmenite without excessive dissolution o...

  8. Work Function Tuning in Sub-20nm Titanium Nitride (TiN) Metal Gate: Mechanism and Engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, Mehdi

    2011-07-01

    Scaling of transistors (the building blocks of modern information age) provides faster computation at the expense of excessive power dissipation. Thus to address these challenges, high-k/metal gate stack has been introduced in commercially available microprocessors from 2007. Since then titanium nitride (TiN) metal gate’s work function (Wf) tunability with its thickness (thickness increases, work function increases) is a well known phenomenon. Many hypotheses have been made over the years which include but not limited to: trap charge and metal gate nucleation, nitrogen concentration, microstructure agglomeration and global stress, metal oxide formation, and interfacial oxide thickness. However, clear contradictions exist in these assumptions. Also, nearly all these reports skipped a comprehensive approach to explain this complex paradigm. Therefore, in this work we first show a comprehensive physical investigation using transmission electron microcopy/electron energy loss spectroscopy (TEM/EELS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) to show replacement of oxygen by nitrogen in the metal/dielectric interface, formation of TiONx, reduction of Ti/N concentration and grain size increment happen with TiN thickness increment and thus may increase the work function. Then, using these finding, we experimentally show 100meV of work function modulation in 10nm TiN Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor by using low temperature oxygen annealing. A low thermal budget flow (replicating gate-last) shows similar work function boost up. Also, a work function modulation of 250meV has been possible using oxygen annealing and applying no thermal budget. On the other hand, etch-back of TiN layer can decrease the work function. Thus this study quantifies role of various factors in TiN work function tuning; it also reproduces the thickness varied TiN work function modulation in single thickness TiN thus reducing the

  9. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON TRIBOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SILICON NITRIDE REINFORCED ALUMINIUM METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. BHUVANESH

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium alloy (LM25 reinforced with silicon nitride was fabricated by liquid metallurgy route. The fabricated composite was investigated for dry sliding wear behaviour by conducting experiments using pin-on-disc tribometer. Set of experiments were planned using Taguchi’s technique and data analysis was carried out using L27 orthogonal array. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA technique was used to determine the significance of parameter with respect to wear rate. Signal-to-Noise ratio was employed to detect the most and least influential parameter as well as their level of influence. ‘Smaller the wear’ characteristic was chosen for the analysis of dry sliding wear. Results implied that, the load has the primary effect on the wear succeeded by the effect of sliding velocity and sliding distance. Scanning Electronic Microscopic studies were carried out on worn surfaces to understand the wear mechanism.Tribological results indicated that LM25 aluminium alloy could be better utilized as a material for piston, rotor and bearings for long life in low speed applications.

  10. Effect of gas flow on the selective area growth of gallium nitride via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Kasarla, K. R.; Korakakis, D.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of gas flow on the selective area growth (SAG) of gallium nitride (GaN) grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) has been investigated. In this study, the SAG of GaN was carried out on a silicon dioxide striped pattern along the GaN direction. SAG was initiated with the striped pattern oriented parallel and normal to the incoming gas flow in a horizontal reactor. The orientation of the pattern did not impact cross section of the structure after re-growth as both orientations resulted in similar trapezoidal structures bounded by the (0 0 0 1) and {1 1 2¯ n} facets ( n≈1.7-2.2). However, the growth rates were shown to depend on the orientation of the pattern as the normally oriented samples exhibited enhanced vertical and cross-sectional growth rates compared to the parallel oriented samples. All growths occurred under identical conditions and therefore the difference in growth rates must be attributed to a difference in mass transport of species.

  11. Topotactic Transformation of Metal-Organic Frameworks to Graphene-Encapsulated Transition-Metal Nitrides as Efficient Fenton-like Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuning; Ao, Zhimin; Liu, Jiayi; Sun, Hongqi; Rykov, Alexandre I; Wang, Junhu

    2016-12-27

    Innovation in transition-metal nitride (TMN) preparation is highly desired for realization of various functionalities. Herein, series of graphene-encapsulated TMNs (Fe x Mn 6-x Co 4 -N@C) with well-controlled morphology have been synthesized through topotactic transformation of metal-organic frameworks in an N 2 atmosphere. The as-synthesized Fe x Mn 6-x Co 4 -N@C nanodices were systematically characterized and functionalized as Fenton-like catalysts for catalytic bisphenol A (BPA) oxidation by activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS). The catalytic performance of Fe x Mn 6-x Co 4 -N@C was found to be largely enhanced with increasing Mn content. Theoretical calculations illustrated that the dramatically reduced adsorption energy and facilitated electron transfer for PMS activation catalyzed by Mn 4 N are the main factors for the excellent activity. Both sulfate and hydroxyl radicals were identified during the PMS activation, and the BPA degradation pathway mainly through hydroxylation, oxidation, and decarboxylation was investigated. Based on the systematic characterization of the catalyst before and after the reaction, the overall PMS activation mechanism over Fe x Mn 6-x Co 4 -N@C was proposed. This study details the insights into versatile TMNs for sustainable remediation by activation of PMS.

  12. Synthesis of uniform-sized bimetallic iron-nickel phosphide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ki Youl; Jang, Youngjin; Park, Jongnam; Hwang, Yosun; Koo, Bonil; Park, Je-Geun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2008-01-01

    We synthesized uniform-sized nanorods of iron-nickel phosphides from the thermal decomposition of metal-phosphine complexes. Uniform-sized (Fe x Ni 1-x ) 2 P nanorods (0≤x≤1) of various compositions were synthesized by thermal decomposition of Ni-trioctylphosphine (TOP) complex and Fe-TOP complex. By measuring magnetic properties, we found that blocking temperature and coercive field depend on Ni content in the nanorods. Both parameters were more sensitive to doping compared with bulk samples. - Graphical abstract: We synthesized uniform-sized nanorods of iron-nickel phosphides from thermal decomposition of metal-phosphine complexes. The magnetic studies showed that blocking temperature and coercive field depend on Ni content in the nanorods

  13. Chemically linked metal-matrix nanocomposites of boron nitride nanosheets and silver as thermal interface materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagabandi, N.; Yegin, C.; Feng, X.; King, C.; Oh, J. K.; Scholar, E. A.; Narumanchi, S.; Akbulut, M.

    2018-03-01

    Herein, novel hybrid nanocomposite thermal interface materials (TIMs) relying on the chemical linkage of silver, boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs), and organic ligands are reported. These TIMs were prepared using a co-electrodeposition/chemisorption approach where the electrolytic reduction of silver ions into silver nano-/micro-crystals was coupled with the conjugation of ligand-coated nanosheets onto silver crystals. Furthermore, the influence of the bond strength of silver/nanosheet links on the thermal, mechanical, and structural properties is investigated using a combination of techniques including laser flash analysis, phase-sensitive transient thermoreflectance, nanoindentation, and electron microscopy. The internal nanostructure was found to be strongly dependent on the linker chemistry. While the chemical grafting of 4-cyano-benzoyl chloride (CBC) and 2-mercapto-5-benzimidazole carboxylic acid (MBCA) on BNNSs led to the uniform distribution of functionalized-nanosheets in the silver crystal matrix, the physical binding of 4-bromo-benzoyl chloride linkers on nanosheets caused the aggregation and phase separation. The thermal conductivity was 236-258 W m-1 K and 306-321 W m-1 K for physically and chemically conjugated TIMs, respectively, while their hardness varied from 400-495 MPa and from 240 to 360 MPa, respectively. The corresponding ratio of thermal conductivity to hardness, which is a critical parameter controlling the performance of TIMs, was ultrahigh for the chemically conjugated TIMs: 1.3 × 10-6 m2 K-1 s for MBCA-BNNS and 8.5 × 10-7 m2 K-1 s for CBC-BNNS. We anticipate that these materials can satisfy some of the emerging thermal management needs arising from the improved performance and efficiency, miniaturization, and/or high throughput of electronic devices, energy storage devices, energy conversion systems, light-emitting diodes, and telecommunication components.

  14. Synthesis and catalytic activity of the metastable phase of gold phosphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, Deshani; Nigro, Toni A.E.; Dyer, I.D. [Department of Chemistry, 107 Physical Sciences I, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Alia, Shaun M.; Pivovar, Bryan S. [Chemical and Materials Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Vasquez, Yolanda, E-mail: yolanda.vasquez@okstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, 107 Physical Sciences I, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Recently, transition metal phosphides have found new applications as catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction that has generated an impetus to synthesize these materials at the nanoscale. In this work, Au{sub 2}P{sub 3} was synthesized utilizing the high temperature decomposition of tri-n-octylphosphine as a source of elemental phosphorous. Gold nanorods were used as morphological templates with the aim of controlling the shape and size of the resulting gold phosphide particles. We demonstrate that the surface capping ligand of the gold nanoparticle precursors can influence the purity and extent to which the gold phosphide phase will form. Gold nanorods functionalized with 1-dodecanethiol undergo digestive ripening to produce discrete spherical particles that exhibit reduced reactivity towards phosphorous, resulting in low yields of the gold phosphide. In contrast, gold phosphide was obtained as a phase pure product when cetyltrimethylammonium bromide functionalized gold nanorods are used instead. The Au{sub 2}P{sub 3} nanoparticles exhibited higher activity than polycrystalline gold towards the hydrogen evolution reaction. - Graphical abstract: Au{sub 2}P{sub 3} was synthesized utilizing the high temperature decomposition of tri-n-octylphosphine as a source of elemental phosphorous and gold nanoparticles as reactants. We demonstrate that the surface capping ligand of the gold nanoparticle precursors influence the purity and extent to which the Au{sub 2}P{sub 3} phase will form. Gold nanorods functionalized with 1-dodecanethiol undergo digestive ripening to produce discrete spherical particles that exhibit reduced reactivity towards phosphorous, resulting in low yields of the gold phosphide. In contrast, gold phosphide was obtained as a phase pure product when cetyltrimethylammonium bromide functionalized gold nanoparticles are used instead. The Au{sub 2}P{sub 3} nanoparticles exhibited higher activity than polycrystalline gold towards the hydrogen evolution

  15. Safety performance comparation of MOX, nitride and metallic fuel based 25-100 MWe Pb-Bi cooled long life fast reactors without on-site refuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su'ud, Zaki

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the safety performance of 25-100 MWe Pb-Bi cooled long life fast reactors based on three types of fuels: MOX, nitride and metal is compared and discussed. In the fourth generation NPP paradigm, especially for Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors, inherent safety capability is necessary against some standard accidents such as unprotected loss of flow (ULOF), unprotected rod run-out transient over power (UTOP), unprotected loss of heat sink (ULOHS). Selection of fuel type will have important impact on the overall system safety performance. The results of safety analysis of long life Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors without on-site fuelling using nitride, MOX and metal fuel have been performed. The reactors show the inherent safety pattern with enough safety margins during ULOF and UTOP accidents. For MOX fuelled reactors, ULOF accident is more severe than UTOP accident while for nitride fuelled cores UTOP accident may push power much higher than that comparable MOX fuelled cores. (author)

  16. Metal-free spin and spin-gapless semiconducting heterobilayers: monolayer boron carbonitrides on hexagonal boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongzhe; Zhang, Hongyu; Sun, Yuanyuan; Ding, Yingchun; Chen, Jie; Du, Youwei; Tang, Nujiang

    2017-06-07

    The interfaces between monolayer boron carbonitrides and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) play an important role in their practical applications. Herein, we respectively investigate the structural and electronic properties of two metal-free heterobilayers constructed by vertically stacking two-dimensional (2D) spintronic materials (B 4 CN 3 and B 3 CN 4 ) on a h-BN monolayer from the viewpoints of lattice match and lattice mismatch models using density functional calculations. It is found that both B 4 CN 3 and B 3 CN 4 monolayers can be stably adsorbed on the h-BN monolayer due to the van der Waals interactions. Intriguingly, we demonstrate that the bipolar magnetic semiconductor (BMS) behavior of the B 4 CN 3 layer and the spin gapless semiconductor (SGS) property of the B 3 CN 4 layer can be well preserved in the B 4 CN 3 /BN and B 3 CN 4 /BN heterobilayers, respectively. The magnetic moments and spintronic properties of the two systems originate mainly from the 2p z electrons of the carbon atoms in the B 4 CN 3 and B 3 CN 4 layers. Furthermore, the BMS behavior of the B 4 CN 3 /BN bilayer is very robust while the electronic property of the B 3 CN 4 /BN bilayer is sensitive to interlayer couplings. These theoretical results are helpful both in understanding the interlayer coupling between B 4 CN 3 or B 3 CN 4 and h-BN monolayers and in providing a possibility of fabricating 2D composite B 4 CN 3 /BN and B 3 CN 4 /BN metal-free spintronic materials theoretically.

  17. Neutron powder diffraction studies of Hydrogen and Denterium in Palladium Phosphides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The use of the Rietveld-type profile refinements on neutron powder diffraction intensity data for determining crystallographic positions of hydrogen and deuterium in metal hydrides is illustrated by results obtained on some hydrogenated and deuterated palladium phosphides. The structural features of the solid solutions of hydrogen and deuterium in Pd/sb15/P/sb2/ Pd/sb6/P and Pd/sb3/P/sb1-u/ (0< u<0.28) are briefly presented and discussed

  18. Synthesis of IV-VI Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles Using a Reactive Mesoporous Template for Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial carbides and nitrides of early transition metals in Groups IV-VI exhibit platinum-like behavior which makes them a promising candidate to replace noble metals in a wide variety of reactions. Most synthetic methods used to prepare these materials lead to bulk or micron size powder which limits their use in reactions in particular in catalytic applications. Attempts toward the production of transition metal carbide and nitride nanoparticles in a sustainable, simple and cheap manner have been rapidly increasing. In this thesis, a new approach was presented to prepare nano-scale transition metal carbides and nitrides of group IV-VI with a size as small as 3 nm through the reaction of transition metal precursor with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4) that not only provides confined spaces for nanoparticles formation but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reaction with mass spectroscopy (MS), CHN elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of the reaction temperature, the ratio of the transition metal precursor to the reactive template (mpg-C3N4), and the selection of the carrier gas (Ar, N2, and NH3) on the resultant crystal phases and structures were investigated. The results indicated that different tantalum phases with cubic structure, TaN, Ta2CN, and TaC, can be formed under a flow of nitrogen by changing the reaction temperatures. Two forms of tantalum nitride, namely TaN and Ta3N5, were selectively formed under N2 and NH3 flow, respectively. Significantly, the formation of TaC, Ta2CN, and TaN can be controlled by altering the weight ratio of the C3N4 template relative to the Ta precursor at 1573 K under a flow of nitrogen where high C3N4/Ta precursor ratio generally resulted in high carbide

  19. InP (Indium Phosphide): Into the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandhorst, H.W. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Major industry is beginning to be devoted to indium phosphide and its potential applications. Key to these applications are high speed and radiation tolerance; however the high cost of indium phosphide may be an inhibitor to progress. The broad applicability of indium phosphide to many devices will be discussed with an emphasis on photovoltaics. Major attention is devoted to radiation tolerance and means of reducing cost of devices. Some of the approaches applicable to solar cells may also be relevant to other devices. The intent is to display the impact of visionary leadership in the field and enable the directions and broad applicability of indium phosphide

  20. InP (Indium Phosphide): Into the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Major industry is beginning to be devoted to indium phosphide and its potential applications. Key to these applications are high speed and radiation tolerance; however the high cost of indium phosphide may be an inhibitor to progress. The broad applicability of indium phosphide to many devices will be discussed with an emphasis on photovoltaics. Major attention is devoted to radiation tolerance and means of reducing cost of devices. Some of the approaches applicable to solar cells may also be relevant to other devices. The intent is to display the impact of visionary leadership in the field and enable the directions and broad applicability of indium phosphide.

  1. Anomalous Insulator-Metal Transition in Boron Nitride-Graphene Hybrid Atomic Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    Juan de la Cierva” pro- gram (JCI-2010-08156), Spanish MICINN (FIS2010-21282- C02-01 and PIB2010US-00652), ACI-Promociona (ACI2009- 1036), “ Grupos ...percolation through metallic graphene networks and hopping conduction between edge states on randomly distributed insulating h-BN domains. REPORT...Tallahassee, Florida 32310, USA 3Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group and ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Departamento de Fı́sica de Materiales, Centro de Fı́sica

  2. Powder-XRD and (14) N magic angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of some metal nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempgens, Pierre; Britton, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Some metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN, InN, GaN, Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 ) have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (14) N magic angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 , no (14) N NMR signal was observed. Low speed (νr  = 2 kHz for TiN, ZrN, and GaN; νr  = 1 kHz for InN) and 'high speed' (νr  = 15 kHz for TiN; νr  = 5 kHz for ZrN; νr  = 10 kHz for InN and GaN) MAS NMR experiments were performed. For TiN, ZrN, InN, and GaN, powder-XRD was used to identify the phases present in each sample. The number of peaks observed for each sample in their (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectrum matches perfectly well with the number of nitrogen-containing phases identified by powder-XRD. The (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectra are symmetric and dominated by the quadrupolar interaction. The envelopes of the spinning sidebands manifold are Lorentzian, and it is concluded that there is a distribution of the quadrupolar coupling constants Qcc 's arising from structural defects in the compounds studied. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. On melting of boron phosphide under pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Solozhenko, Vladimir; Mukhanov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Melting of cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied at pressures to 9 GPa using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and electrical resistivity measurements. It has been found that above 2.6 GPa BP melts congruently, and the melting curve exhibits negative slope (–60 ± 7 K/GPa), which is indicative of a higher density of the melt as compared to the solid phase.

  4. Mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation on phosphides and sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S Ted; Lee, Yong-Kul

    2005-02-17

    The mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of 2-methylpiperidine was studied over a silica-supported nickel phosphide catalyst (Ni2P/SiO2, Ni/P = 1/2) and a commercial Ni-Mo-S/Al2O3 catalyst in a three-phase trickle-bed reactor operated at 3.1 MPa and 450-600 K. Analysis of the product distribution as a function of contact time indicated that the reaction proceeded in both cases predominantly by a substitution mechanism, with a smaller contribution of an elimination mechanism. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the 2-methylpiperidine indicated that at reaction conditions a piperidinium ion intermediate was formed on both the sulfide and the phosphide. It is concluded that the mechanism of HDN on nickel phosphide is very similar to that on sulfides. The mechanism on the nickel phosphide was also probed by comparing the reactivity of piperidine and several of its derivatives in the presence of 3000 ppm S. The relative elimination rates depended on the structure of the molecules, and followed the sequence: 4-methylpiperidine approximately piperidine > 3-methylpiperidine > 2,6-dimethylpiperidine > 2-methylpiperidine. [Chemical structure: see text] This order of reactivity was not dependent on the number of alpha-H or beta-H atoms in the molecules, ruling out their reaction through a single, simple mechanism. It is likely that the unhindered piperidine molecules reacted by an S(N)2 substitution process and the more hindered 2,6-dimethylpiperidine reacted by an E2 elimination process.

  5. Aluminium phosphide poising: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirani, S.A.A.; Rahman, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the case of a family in which three children were presented at Emergency Room (ER) with poisoning after the use of a pesticide at home. Initially, the cases were managed as routine cases of organophosphorus poisoning; however, the death of two children made the health team members realise that the poison's effects were delayed and devastating. Later, the compound was identified as Aluminium Phosphide (ALP), and the life of the last surviving child in the family was saved. (author)

  6. Bipolar resistive switching in metal-insulator-semiconductor nanostructures based on silicon nitride and silicon oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koryazhkina, M. N.; Tikhov, S. V.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Belov, A. I.; Korolev, D. S.; Antonov, I. N.; Karzanov, V. V.; Gorshkov, O. N.; Tetelbaum, D. I.; Karakolis, P.; Dimitrakis, P.

    2018-03-01

    Bipolar resistive switching in metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor-like structures with an inert Au top electrode and a Si3N4 insulator nanolayer (6 nm thick) has been observed. The effect of a highly doped n +-Si substrate and a SiO2 interlayer (2 nm) is revealed in the changes in the semiconductor space charge region and small-signal parameters of parallel and serial equivalent circuit models measured in the high- and low-resistive capacitor states, as well as under laser illumination. The increase in conductivity of the semiconductor capacitor plate significantly reduces the charging and discharging times of capacitor-like structures.

  7. Electrical and structural properties of group-4 transition-metal nitride (TiN, ZrN, and HfN) contacts on Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Keisuke; Nakashima, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakasima@astec.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Noguchi, Ryutaro; Wang, Dong [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Mitsuhara, Masatoshi; Nishida, Minoru [Department of Engineering Sciences for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Hara, Toru [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    Electrical and structural properties were investigated for group-4 transition-metal nitride contacts on Ge (TiN/Ge, ZrN/Ge, and HfN/Ge), which were prepared by direct sputter depositions using nitride targets. These contacts could alleviate the intrinsic Fermi-level pinning (FLP) position toward the conduction band edge. It was revealed that this phenomenon is induced by an amorphous interlayer (a-IL) containing nitrogen atoms at the nitride/Ge interfaces. The strength of FLP alleviation positively depended on the thickness of a-IL. TiN/Ge and ZrN/Ge contacts with ∼2 nm-thick a-ILs showed strong FLP alleviations with hole barrier heights (Φ{sub BP}) in the range of 0.52–56 eV, and a HfN/Ge contact with an ∼1 nm-thick a-IL showed a weaker one with a Φ{sub BP} of 0.39 eV. However, TaN/Ge contact without a-IL did not show such FLP alleviation. Based on the results of depth distributions for respective elements, we discussed the formation kinetics of a-ILs at TiN/Ge and ZrN/Ge interfaces. Finally, we proposed an interfacial dipole model to explain the FLP alleviation.

  8. Physical and Chemical Properties of TiOxNy Prepared by Low-Temperature Oxidation of Ultrathin Metal Nitride Directly Deposited on SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yue-Ping; HAN Yan

    2009-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of titanium oxynitride (TiOxNy) formed by low-temperature oxidation of titanium nitride (TIN) layer are investigated for advanced metal-oxide--semiconductor (MOS) gate dielectric application.TiOx Ny exhibits polycrystalline properties after the standard thermal process for MOS device fabrication,showing the preferred orientation at [200].Superior electrical properties of TiOxNy can be maintained before and after the annealing,probably due to the nitrogen incorporation in the oxide bulk and at the interface.Naturally formed transition layer between TiOxNy and SiO2 is also confirmed.

  9. Different shape normal metal interlayers between niobium based SIS junctions and niobium titanium nitride leads and their influence on the electron temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selig, S; Westig, M P; Jacobs, K; Honingh, C E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the reduction of heating in a niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junction with aluminum-oxide tunnel barrier embedded in a niobium-titanium-nitride circuit. Nonequilibrium quasiparticles which are created due to the Andreev trap at the interface between the niobium and the niobium-titanium-nitride layers are relaxed by inserting a normal-metal conductor of gold between these two layers. In an earlier work we explained the observed relaxation of nonequilibrium quasiparticles due to the geometrically assisted cooling effect. In this paper we investigate this cooling effect in dependence of the normal-metal layer shape and size. We expect that an adapted normal-metal layer is necessary for implementation in practical terahertz SIS heterodyne mixer circuits. We observe in DC-measurements of a large number of devices a clear relation between the volume of the gold layer and the effective electron temperature in the device. Our central finding is that the shape of the gold layer does not influence the cooling provided that the volume is sufficient.

  10. Relative SHG measurements of metal thin films: Gold, silver, aluminum, cobalt, chromium, germanium, nickel, antimony, titanium, titanium nitride, tungsten, zinc, silicon and indium tin oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Che

    Full Text Available We have experimentally measured the surface second-harmonic generation (SHG of sputtered gold, silver, aluminum, zinc, tungsten, copper, titanium, cobalt, nickel, chromium, germanium, antimony, titanium nitride, silicon and indium tin oxide thin films. The second-harmonic response was measured in reflection using a 150 fs p-polarized laser pulse at 1561 nm. We present a clear comparison of the SHG intensity of these films relative to each other. Our measured relative intensities compare favorably with the relative intensities of metals with published data. We also report for the first time to our knowledge the surface SHG intensity of tungsten and antimony relative to that of well known metallic thin films such as gold and silver. Keywords: Surface second-harmonic generation, Nonlinear optics, Metal thin films

  11. Separation of zirconium--hafnium by nitride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.N.; Parlee, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for the separation of a light reactive metal (e.g., zirconium) from a heavy reactive metal (e.g., hafnium) by forming insoluble nitrides of the metals in a molten metal solvent (e.g., copper) inert to nitrogen and having a suitable density for the light metal nitride to form a separate phase in the upper portion of the solvent and for the heavy metal nitride to form a separate phase in the lower portion of the solvent. Nitriding is performed by maintaining a nitrogen-containing atmosphere over the bath. The light and heavy metals may be an oxide mixture and carbothermically reduced to metal form in the same bath used for nitriding. The nitrides are then separately removed and decomposed to form the desired separate metals. 16 claims, 1 figure

  12. Mechanical properties and electronic structure of anti-ReO3 structured cubic nitrides, M3N, of d block transition metals M: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiuquan; Gall, Daniel; Khare, Sanjay V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We use DFT to model the anti-ReO 3 structured transition metal nitrides M 3 N. • We predict their lattice constants, electronic structures and mechanical properties. • We correlate the metal d and nitrogen 2p orbitals with stability and hardness. • We established a high-throughput database for materials design. - Abstract: We report a systematic study of the anti-ReO 3 structured transition metal nitrides, M 3 N, using ab initio density functional theory computations in the local density approximation. Here M denotes all the 3d, 4d and 5d transition metals. Our calculations indicate that all M 3 N compounds except V 3 N of group 5 and Zn 3 N and Hg 3 N of group 12 are mechanically stable. For the stable M 3 N compounds, we report a database of predictions for their lattice constants, electronic properties and mechanical properties including bulk modulus, Young’s modulus, shear modulus, ductility, hardness and Debye temperature. It is found that most M 3 N compounds exhibit ductility with Vickers hardness between 0.4 GPa and 11.2 GPa. Our computed lattice constant for Cu 3 N, the only M 3 N compound where experiments exist, agrees well with the experimentally reported values. We report ratios of the melting points of all M 3 N compounds to that of Cu 3 N. The local density of states for all M 3 N compounds are obtained, and electronic band gaps are observed only for M of group 11 (Cu, Ag and Au) while the remaining M 3 N compounds are metallic without band gaps. Valence electron density along with the hybridization of the metal d and nitrogen 2p orbitals play an important role in determining the stability and hardness of different compounds. Our high-throughput databases for the cubic anti-ReO 3 structured transition metal nitrides should motivate future experimental work and shorten the time to their discovery

  13. Effect of Silicon Nitride Incorporation on Microstructure and Hardness of Ni-Co Metal Matrix Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ni-Co-Si3N4 nanocomposite coatings were prepared by electrodeposition technique. The deposition was performed at 50 mA cm-2 on copper substrate. The working temperature of electrodepostion was constant at 500C in an acidic environment of pH 4. The effects of silicon in the nickel-cobalt metal matrix composite were investigated. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to determine the composition. The Co content in the coatings is in the range 27-49 at.%. The phase present in the Ni-Co-Si3N4 were examined with an X-ray diffraction analysis. All the reflection patterns indicate that the coatings are having face-centered cubic (fcc structure. The microhardness of the Ni-Co-Si3N4 nanocomposite coating increases with increasing silicon content. The microhardness of the Ni-Co-Si3N4 nanocomposite coating increased from 549 HV for Nickel-cobalt alloy coating to 641 HV for Ni-Co-Si3N4 nanocomposite coating with 5.47 at.% Si.

  14. Joining technique of silicon nitride and silicon carbide in a mixture and/or in contact with high-melting metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Zell, A.

    1980-01-01

    The following work gives a survey on possible joining techniques of silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) and silicon carbide (SiC) in a mixture and/or in contact with high-melting metals and alloys. The problem arose because special ceramic materials such as Si 3 N 4 and SiC are to be used in gas turbines. The special ceramics in use may unavoidably come into contact with metals or the one hand, or form intended composite systems with them on the other hand, like e.g. the joining of a Si 3 N 4 disc with a metallic drive axis or ceramic blades with a metal wheel. The mixed body of X% ceramic (Si 3 N 4 , SiC) and Y% metal powder were prepared depending on the material combination at 1200 0 C-1750 0 C by hot-pressing or at 1200 0 C-2050 0 C by hot-pressing or pressureless sintering. The following possible ways were chosen as interlaminar bonding ceramic/metal/ceramic: on the one hand pressure welding (composite hot pressing) and the solid-state bonding in direct contact and by means of artificially included transition mixed layers, as well as material intermediate layers between metal and ceramic and on the other hand, soldering with active solder with molten phase. (orig./RW) [de

  15. Electrocatalytic activity of cobalt phosphide-modified graphite felt toward VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhijun; Wang, Ling; He, Zhangxing; Li, Yuehua; Jiang, Yingqiao; Meng, Wei; Dai, Lei

    2018-04-01

    A novel strategy for improving the electro-catalytic properties of graphite felt (GF) electrode in vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) is designed by depositing cobalt phosphide (CoP) onto GF surface. The CoP powder is synthesized by direct carbonization of Co-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) followed by phosphidation. Cyclic voltammetry results confirm that the CoP-modified graphite felt (GF-CoP) electrode has excellent reversibility and electro-catalytic activity to the VO2+/VO2+ cathodic reaction compared with the pristine GF electrode. The cell using GF-CoP electrode shows apparently higher discharge capacity over that based on GF electrode. The cell using GF-CoP electrode has the capacity of 67.2 mA h at 100 mA cm-2, 32.7 mA h larger than that using GF electrode. Compared with cell using GF electrode, the voltage efficiency of the cell based on GF-CoP electrode increases by 5.9% and energy efficiency by 5.4% at a current density of 100 mA cm-2. The cell using GF-CoP electrode can reach 94.31% capacity retention after 50 cycles at a current density of 30 mA cm-2. The results show that the CoP can effectively promote the VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction, implying that metal phosphides are a new kind of potential catalytic materials for VRFB.

  16. Determination of Carrier Polarity in Fowler-Nordheim Tunneling and Evidence of Fermi Level Pinning at the Hexagonal Boron Nitride/Metal Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2018-04-11

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an important insulating substrate for two-dimensional (2D) heterostructure devices and possesses high dielectric strength comparable to SiO 2 . Here, we report two clear differences in their physical properties. The first one is the occurrence of Fermi level pinning at the metal/h-BN interface, unlike that at the metal/SiO 2 interface. The second one is that the carrier of Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) tunneling through h-BN is a hole, which is opposite to an electron in the case of SiO 2 . These unique characteristics are verified by I- V measurements in the graphene/h-BN/metal heterostructure device with the aid of a numerical simulation, where the barrier height of graphene can be modulated by a back gate voltage owing to its low density of states. Furthermore, from a systematic investigation using a variety of metals, it is confirmed that the hole F-N tunneling current is a general characteristic because the Fermi levels of metals are pinned in the small energy range around ∼3.5 eV from the top of the conduction band of h-BN, with a pinning factor of 0.30. The accurate energy band alignment at the h-BN/metal interface provides practical knowledge for 2D heterostructure devices.

  17. A first-principles study of half-metallic ferromagnetism in binary alkaline-earth nitrides with rock-salt structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, G.Y.; Yao, K.L.; Liu, Z.L.; Zhang, J.; Min, Y.; Fan, S.W.

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter, using the first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method, we extend the electronic structure and magnetism studies on zinc-blende structure of II-V compounds MX (M=Ca,Sr,Ba; X=N,P,As) [M. Sieberer, J. Redinger, S. Khmelevskyi, P. Mohn, Phys. Rev. B 73 (2006) 024404] to the rock-salt structure. It is found that, in the nine compounds, only alkaline-earth nitrides CaN, SrN and BaN exhibit ferromagnetic half-metallic character with a magnetic moment of 1.00μ B per formula unit. Furthermore, compared with the zinc-blende structure of CaN, SrN and BaN, the rock-salt structure has lower energy, which makes them more promising candidates of possible growth of half-metallic films on suitable substrates

  18. [Cr(N)(acac)2]: A simple chromium nitride complex and its reactivity towards late transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Erik Donovan; Schau-Magnussen, Magnus; Bendix, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    A new simple chromium(V) nitride complex, Cr(N)(acac)2 (1) has been prepared by nitrogen atom transfer. X-ray crystallography shows a short Cr-N bond at 1.5564(11) Å and equatorial Cr-O distances in the range 1.9387(9) – 1.9485(9) Å. 1 reacts as a p-backbonding ligand ......A new simple chromium(V) nitride complex, Cr(N)(acac)2 (1) has been prepared by nitrogen atom transfer. X-ray crystallography shows a short Cr-N bond at 1.5564(11) Å and equatorial Cr-O distances in the range 1.9387(9) – 1.9485(9) Å. 1 reacts as a p-backbonding ligand ...

  19. Influence of post-annealing on the electrical properties of metal/oxide/silicon nitride/oxide/silicon capacitors for flash memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Dong; An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Kyoung Chan; Seo, Yu Jeong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2008-01-01

    We report the effect of post-annealing on the electrical properties of metal/oxide/silicon nitride/oxide/silicon (MONOS) capacitors. Four samples, namely as-deposited and annealed at 750, 850 and 950 °C for 30 s in nitrogen ambient by a rapid thermal process, were prepared and characterized for comparison. The best performance with the largest memory window of 4.4 V and the fastest program speed of 10 ms was observed for the sample annealed at 850 °C. In addition, the highest traps density of 6.84 × 10 18 cm −3 was observed with ideal trap distributions for the same sample by capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurement. These results indicate that the memory traps in the ONO structure can be engineered by post-annealing to improve the electrical properties of the MONOS device

  20. Process for producing ceramic nitrides anc carbonitrides and their precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G.M.; Maya, L.

    1987-02-25

    A process for preparing ceramic nitrides and carbon nitrides in the form of very pure, fine particulate powder. Appropriate precursors is prepared by reaching a transition metal alkylamide with ammonia to produce a mixture of metal amide and metal imide in the form of an easily pyrolyzable precipitate.

  1. Core-level spectra and binding energies of transition metal nitrides by non-destructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy through capping layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greczynski, G.; Primetzhofer, D.; Lu, J.; Hultman, L.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • First non-destructive measurements of XPS core level binding energies for group IVb-VIb transition metal nitrides are presented. • All films are grown under the same conditions and analyzed in the same instrument, providing a useful reference for future XPS studies. • Extracted core level BE values are more reliable than those obtained from sputter-cleaned N-deficient surfaces. • Comparison to Ar+-etched surfaces reveals that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer. • The N/metal concentration ratios from capped samples are found to be 25-90% higher than those from the corresponding ion-etched surfaces. - Abstract: We present the first measurements of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE:s) for the widely-applicable group IVb-VIb polycrystalline transition metal nitrides (TMN’s) TiN, VN, CrN, ZrN, NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, and WN as well as AlN and SiN, which are common components in the TMN-based alloy systems. Nitride thin film samples were grown at 400 °C by reactive dc magnetron sputtering from elemental targets in Ar/N 2 atmosphere. For XPS measurements, layers are either (i) Ar + ion-etched to remove surface oxides resulting from the air exposure during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, or (ii) in situ capped with a few nm thick Cr or W overlayers in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. Film elemental composition and phase content is thoroughly characterized with time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and x-ray diffraction. High energy resolution core level XPS spectra acquired with monochromatic Al Kα radiation on the ISO-calibrated instrument reveal that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer that substantially affects the extracted binding energy values. These

  2. Core-level spectra and binding energies of transition metal nitrides by non-destructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy through capping layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greczynski, G., E-mail: grzgr@ifm.liu.se [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Primetzhofer, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Lu, J.; Hultman, L. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • First non-destructive measurements of XPS core level binding energies for group IVb-VIb transition metal nitrides are presented. • All films are grown under the same conditions and analyzed in the same instrument, providing a useful reference for future XPS studies. • Extracted core level BE values are more reliable than those obtained from sputter-cleaned N-deficient surfaces. • Comparison to Ar+-etched surfaces reveals that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer. • The N/metal concentration ratios from capped samples are found to be 25-90% higher than those from the corresponding ion-etched surfaces. - Abstract: We present the first measurements of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE:s) for the widely-applicable group IVb-VIb polycrystalline transition metal nitrides (TMN’s) TiN, VN, CrN, ZrN, NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, and WN as well as AlN and SiN, which are common components in the TMN-based alloy systems. Nitride thin film samples were grown at 400 °C by reactive dc magnetron sputtering from elemental targets in Ar/N{sub 2} atmosphere. For XPS measurements, layers are either (i) Ar{sup +} ion-etched to remove surface oxides resulting from the air exposure during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, or (ii) in situ capped with a few nm thick Cr or W overlayers in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. Film elemental composition and phase content is thoroughly characterized with time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and x-ray diffraction. High energy resolution core level XPS spectra acquired with monochromatic Al Kα radiation on the ISO-calibrated instrument reveal that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer that substantially affects the extracted binding energy

  3. Novel, high-activity hydroprocessing catalysts: Iron group phosphides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianqin

    A series of iron, cobalt and nickel transition metal phosphides was synthesized by means of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of the corresponding phosphates. The same materials, Fe2P, CoP and NO, were also prepared on a silica (SiO2) support. The phase purity of these catalysts was established by x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the surface properties were determined by N2 BET specific surface area (Sg) measurements and CO chemisorption. The activities of the silica-supported catalysts were tested in a three-phase trickle bed reactor for the simultaneous hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene using a model liquid feed at realistic conditions (30 atm, 370°C). The reactivity studies showed that the nickel phosphide (Ni2P/SiO2) was the most active of the catalysts. Compared with a commercial Ni-Mo-S/gamma-Al 2O3 catalyst at the same conditions, Ni2P/silica had a substantially higher HDS activity (100% vs. 76%) and HDN activity (82% vs. 38%). Because of their good hydrotreating activity, an extensive study of the preparation of silica supported nickel phosphides, Ni2P/SiO 2, was carried out. The parameters investigated were the phosphorus content and the weight loading of the active phase. The most active composition was found to have a starting synthesis Ni/P ratio close to 1/2, and the best loading of this sample on silica was observed to be 18 wt.%. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements were employed to determine the structures of the supported samples. The main phase before and after reaction was found to be Ni2P, but some sulfur was found to be retained after reaction. A comprehensive scrutiny of the HDN reaction mechanism was also made over the Ni2P/SiO2 sample (Ni/P = 1/2) by comparing the HDN activity of a series of piperidine derivatives of different structure. It was found that piperidine adsorption involved an alpha-H activation

  4. Cavity optomechanics in gallium phosphide microdisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Matthew; Barclay, Paul E.; Hryciw, Aaron C.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate gallium phosphide (GaP) microdisk optical cavities with intrinsic quality factors >2.8 × 10 5 and mode volumes 3 , and study their nonlinear and optomechanical properties. For optical intensities up to 8.0 × 10 4 intracavity photons, we observe optical loss in the microcavity to decrease with increasing intensity, indicating that saturable absorption sites are present in the GaP material, and that two-photon absorption is not significant. We observe optomechanical coupling between optical modes of the microdisk around 1.5 μm and several mechanical resonances, and measure an optical spring effect consistent with a theoretically predicted optomechanical coupling rate g 0 /2π∼30 kHz for the fundamental mechanical radial breathing mode at 488 MHz

  5. Simple process to fabricate nitride alloy powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Keon Sik; Rhee, Young Woo; Oh, Jang-Soo; Kim, Jong Hun; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Uranium mono-nitride (UN) is considered as a fuel material [1] for accident-tolerant fuel to compensate for the loss of fissile fuel material caused by adopting a thickened cladding such as SiC composites. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. Among them, a direct nitriding process of metal is more attractive because it has advantages in the mass production of high-purity powders and the reusing of expensive 15 N 2 gas. However, since metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots, it has a drawback in the fabrication of fine powders. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a centrifugal atomisation technique to fabricate uranium and uranium alloy powders. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate nitride fuel powders directly from uranium metal alloy powders. Spherical powder and flake of uranium metal alloys were fabricated using a centrifugal atomisation method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating the metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. The phase and morphology evolutions of powders were investigated during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also part of the present work. KAERI has developed the centrifugal rotating disk atomisation process to fabricate spherical uranium metal alloy powders which are used as advanced fuel materials for research reactors. The rotating disk atomisation system involves the tasks of melting, atomising, and collecting. A nozzle in the bottom of melting crucible introduces melt at the center of a spinning disk. The centrifugal force carries the melt to the edge of the disk and throws the melt off the edge. Size and shape of droplets can be controlled by changing the nozzle size, the disk diameter and disk speed independently or simultaneously. By adjusting the processing parameters of the centrifugal atomiser, a spherical and flake shape

  6. New Routes to Lanthanide and Actinide Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D.P.; Jaques, B.J.; Osterberg, D.D. [Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, Idaho 83725-2075 (United States); Marx, B.M. [Concurrent Technologies Corporation, Johnstown, PA (United States); Callahan, P.G. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hamdy, A.S. [Central Metallurgical R and D Institute, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-06-15

    The future of nuclear energy in the U.S. and its expansion worldwide depends greatly on our ability to reduce the levels of high level waste to minimal levels, while maintaining proliferation resistance. Implicit in the so-called advanced fuel cycle is the need for higher levels of fuel burn-up and consequential use of complex nuclear fuels comprised of fissile materials such as Pu, Am, Np, and Cm. Advanced nitride fuels comprised ternary and quaternary mixtures of uranium and these actinides have been considered for applications in advanced power plants, but there remain many processing challenges as well as necessary qualification testing. In this presentation, the advantages and disadvantages of nitride fuels are discussed. Methods of synthesizing the raw materials and sintering of fuels are described including a discussion of novel, low cost routes to nitrides that have the potential for reducing the cost and footprint of a fuel processing plant. Phase pure nitrides were synthesized via four primary methods; reactive milling metal flakes in nitrogen at room temperature, directly nitriding metal flakes in a pure nitrogen atmosphere, hydriding metal flakes prior to nitridation, and carbo-thermically reducing the metal oxide and carbon mixture prior to nitridation. In the present study, the sintering of UN, DyN, and their solid solutions (U{sub x}, Dy{sub 1-x}) (x = 1 to 0.7) were also studied. (authors)

  7. Structural, mechanical and electronic properties of 3d transition metal nitrides in cubic zincblende, rocksalt and cesium chloride structures: a first-principles investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z T Y; Khare, S V; Zhou, X; Gall, D

    2014-01-01

    We report systematic results from ab initio calculations with density functional theory on three cubic structures, zincblende (zb), rocksalt (rs) and cesium chloride (cc), of the ten 3d transition metal nitrides. We computed lattice constants, elastic constants, their derived moduli and ratios that characterize mechanical properties. Experimental measurements exist in the literature of lattice constants for rs-ScN, rs-TiN and rs-VN and of elastic constants for rs-TiN and rs-VN, all of which are in good agreement with our computational results. Similarly, computed Vickers hardness (H V ) values for rs-TiN and rs-VN are consistent with earlier experimental results. Several trends were observed in our rich data set of 30 compounds. All nitrides, except for zb-CrN, rs-MnN, rs-FeN, cc-ScN, cc-CrN, cc-NiN and cc-ZnN, were found to be mechanically stable. A clear correlation in the atomic density with the bulk modulus (B) was observed with maximum values of B around FeN, MnN and CrN. The shear modulus, Young’s modulus, H V and indicators of brittleness showed similar trends and all showed maxima for cc-VN. The calculated value of H V for cc-VN was about 30 GPa, while the next highest values were for rs-ScN and rs-TiN, about 24 GPa. A relation (H V ∝θ D 2 ) between H V and Debye temperature (θ D ) was investigated and verified for each structure type. A tendency for anti-correlation of the elastic constant C 44 , which strongly influences stability and hardness, with the number of electronic states around the Fermi energy was observed. (paper)

  8. Compressibility measurements and phonon spectra of hexagonal transition-metal nitrides at high pressure: ε-TaN, δ-MoN, and Cr2N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soignard, Emmanuel; Shebanova, Olga; McMillan, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    We report compressibility measurements for three transition metal nitrides (ε-TaN, δ-MoN, Cr 2 N) that have structures based on hexagonal arrangements of the metal atoms. The studies were performed using monochromatic synchrotron x-ray diffraction at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell. The three nitride compounds are well-known high hardness materials, and they are found to be highly incompressible. The bulk modulus values measured for ε-TaN, Cr 2 N, and δ-MoN are K 0 =288(6) GPa, 275(23) GPa, and 345(9) GPa, respectively. The data were analyzed using a linearized plot of reduced pressure (F) vs the Eulerian finite strain variable f within a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state formulation. The K 0 ' values for ε-TaN and δ-MoN were 4.7(0.5) and 3.5(0.3), respectively, close to the value of K 0 ' =4 that is typically assumed in fitting compressibility data in equation of state studies using a Birch-Murnaghan equation. However, Cr 2 N was determined to have a much smaller value, K 0 ' =2.0(2.0), indicating a significantly smaller degree of structural stiffening with increased pressure. We also present Raman data for ε-TaN and δ-MoN at high pressure in order to characterize the phonon behavior in these materials. All of the Raman active modes for ε-TaN were identified using polarized spectroscopy. Peaks at low frequency are due to Ta motions, whereas modes at higher wave number contain a large component of N motion. The high frequency modes associated with Ta-N stretching vibrations are more sensitive to compression than the metal displacements occurring at lower wave number. The mode assignments can be generally extended to δ-MoN, that has a much more complex Raman spectrum. The x-ray and Raman data for ε-TaN show evidence for structural disordering occurring above 20 GPa, whereas no such change is observed for δ-MoN

  9. Stress and piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride thin films deposited onto metal electrodes by pulsed direct current reactive sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, Marc-Alexandre; Muralt, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Polycrystalline aluminum nitride thin films were deposited onto platinum, aluminum, and titanium electrodes by reactive magnetron sputtering in the pulsed direct current mode. The films exhibited all a columnar microstructure and a c-axis texture. The built-in stress and the piezoelectric properties of these films were studied as a function of both the processing conditions and the electrode material. Stress was found to be very much dependent on the growth conditions, and values ranging from strong compression to high tension were observed. The piezoelectric d 33,f coefficient was shown to rely on substrate quality and ionic bombardment: The nucleation surface must be stable with regard to the nitrogen plasma and present a hexagonal symmetry and, on the other hand, enough energy must be delivered to the growing film through ionic bombardment. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  10. A Rare but Potentially Fatal Poisoning; Aluminum Phosphide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkun Tolunay

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphide, a very toxic gas, is used in our country as aluminium phosphide tablets impregnated in clay. It is widely used since it has a very high diffusion capacity, whereby it can eradicate all living creatures in any form of their life cycle and does not leave any remnants in agricultural products. Aluminum phosphide poisoning is among intoxications for which there are still no true antidotes. Mortality rate varies between 30% and 100%. This paper presents a case of aluminum phosphide poisoning caused by the uncompleted suicide attempt. A 14-year-old girl, who swallowed aluminum phosphate tablets, was brought to the emergency department with the complaints of nausea and vomiting. The patient was treated with gastric lavage and activated charcoal. Since the patient ingested a lethal amount of aluminum phosphide, she was referred to the pediatric intensive care unit. The patient was discharged in stable condition after supportive care and monitoring. Specific antidotes are life-saving in poisonings. However, this case was presented to show how general treatment principles and quick access to health services affect the result of treatment. Also, we aimed to highlight the uncontrolled selling of aluminum phosphate, which results in high mortality rates in case of poisoning.

  11. Predictors of Poor Prognosis in Aluminum Phosphide Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhredin Taghaddosi Nejad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aluminum phosphide as a fumigant is extensively used for wheat preservation from rodents and bugs especially in silos worldwide. There is increasing number of acute intoxication with this potentially lethal compound because of its easy availability. We have tried to locate predictors of poor prognosis in patients with aluminum phosphide intoxication in order to find patients who need more strict medical cares. Methods: All cases of aluminum phosphide intoxication that had been referred to our hospital during April 2008 to March 2010 were studied by their medical dossiers. Pertinent data including vital signs, demographic features, clinical and lab findings, and incidence of any complication were collected and analyzed by the relevant statistical methods. Results: Sixty seven cases of aluminum phosphide intoxication were included in the study. 44.8% of them were male. 97% of cases were suicidal. Mean amount of ingestion was 1.23+/- 0.71 tablets. Mortality rate was 41.8%. ECG abnormality and need for mechanical ventilation had negative relation with outcome. Conclusion: Correlation between some findings and complications with outcome in aluminum phosphide intoxication can be used as guidance for risk assessment and treatment planning in the patients.

  12. Synthesis of TiCuAg thick film inks for glass frit free metallization of aluminium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adlassnig, A.; Schuster, J. C.; Smetana, W.; Reicher, R.

    1997-01-01

    A glas frit free screen printing ink for metallization of AIN was developed. Bonding to the substrate is achieved by active metal additives. The metallic component consists of Cu and Ag powder synthesized from inorganic salts by the polyol process, and Cu-Ti powder synthesized by arc melting, milling and ultracentrifugation. This ternary powder mixture was introduced to a specifically developed organic vehicle and screen printed onto AIN. The detailed development process and the results will be presented. (author)

  13. Acute aluminium phosphide poisoning, what is new?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatendra Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide (AlP is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide that is commonly used for grain preservation. AlP has currently generated interest with increasing number of cases in the past four decades because of its increased use for agricultural and nonagricultural purposes, and also its easy availability in the markets has led to its increased misuse to commit suicide. Ingestion is usually suicidal in intent, uncommonly accidental and rarely homicidal. The poison affects all systems, shock, cardiac arrhythmias with varied ECG changes and gastrointestinal features being the most prominent. Diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical suspicion, a positive silver nitrate paper test to phosphine, and gastric aspirate and viscera biochemistry. Treatment includes early gastric lavage with potassium permanganate or a combination of coconut oil and sodium bicarbonate, administration of charcoal and palliative care. Specific therapy includes intravenous magnesium sulphate and oral coconut oil. Unfortunately, the lack of a specific antidote Results in very high mortality and the key to treatment lies in rapid decontamination and institution of resuscitative measures. This article aims to identify the salient features and mechanism of AlP poisoning along with its management strategies and prognostic variables.

  14. Fabrication challenges for indium phosphide microsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwak, N P; Fan, X Z; Ghodssi, R

    2015-01-01

    From the inception of III–V microsystems, monolithically integrated device designs have been the motivating drive for this field, bringing together the utility of single-chip microsystems and conventional fabrication techniques. Indium phosphide (InP) has a particular advantage of having a direct bandgap within the low loss telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm) range, able to support passive waveguiding and optical amplification, detection, and generation depending on the exact alloy of In, P, As, Ga, or Al materials. Utilizing epitaxy, one can envision the growth of a substrate that contains all of the components needed to establish a single-chip optical microsystem, containing detectors, sources, waveguides, and mechanical structures. A monolithic InP MEMS system has, to our knowledge, yet to be realized due to the significant difficulties encountered when fabricating the integrated devices. In this paper we present our own research and consolidate findings from other research groups across the world to give deeper insight into the practical aspects of InP monolithic microsystem development: epitaxial growth of InP-based alloys, etching techniques, common MEMS structures realized in InP, and future applications. We pay special attention to shedding light on considerations that must be taken when designing and fabricating a monolithic InP MEMS device. (topical review)

  15. An update on toxicology of aluminum phosphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moghadamnia Ali

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aluminum phosphide (AlP is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide which is commonly used for grain preservation. In Iran it is known as the “rice tablet”. AlP has currently aroused interest with increasing number of cases in the past four decades due to increased use in agricultural and non-agricultural purposesand also its easy availability in the markets has increased its misuse to commit suicide. Upon contact with moisture in the environment, AlP undergoes a chemical reaction yielding phosphine gas, which is the active pesticidal component. Phosphine inhibits cellular oxygen utilization and can induce lipid peroxidation. It was reported that AlP has a mortality rate more than 50% of intoxication cases. Poisoning with AlP has usually occurred in attempts to suicide. It is a more common case in adults rather than teen agers. In some eastern countries it is a very common agent with rapid action for suicide. Up to date, there is no effective antidote or treatment for its intoxication. Also, some experimental results suggest that magnesium sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, glutathione, vitamin C and E, beta-carotenes, coconut oil and melatonin may play an important role in reducing the oxidative outcomes of phosphine. This article reviews the experimental and clinical features of AlP intoxication and tries to suggest a way to encounter its poisoning.

  16. An Update on Toxicology of Aluminum Phosphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Moghhadamnia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum phosphide (AlP is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide which is commonly used for grain preservation. In Iran it is known as the "rice tablet". AlP has currently aroused interest with increasing number of cases in the past four decades due to increased use in agricultural and non-agricultural purposes and also its easy availability in the markets has increased its misuse to commit suicide. Upon contact with moisture in the environment, AlP undergoes a chemical reaction yielding phosphine gas, which is the active pesticidal component. Phosphine inhibits cellular oxygen utilization and can induce lipid peroxidation. It was reported that AlP has a mortality rate more than 50% of intoxication cases. Poisoning with AlP has usually occurred in attempts to suicide. It is a more common case in adults rather than teen agers. In some eastern countries it is a very common agent with rapid action for suicide. Up to date, there is no effective antidote or treatment for its intoxication. Also, some experimental results suggest that magnesium sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, glutathione, vitamin C and E, beta-carotenes, coconut oil and melatonin may play an important role in reducing the oxidative outcomes of phosphine. This article reviews the experimental and clinical features of AlP intoxication and tries to suggest a way to encounter its poisoning.

  17. [Severity factors of aluminium phosphide poisoning (Phostoxin)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajouji Idrissi, M; Oualili, L; Abidi, K; Abouqal, R; Kerkeb, O; Zeggwagh, A A

    2006-04-01

    To determine characteristics of acute aluminum phosphide poisoning (AAlPP) and to evaluate its severity factors. Retrospective cohort study. Consecutive cases of AAlPP admitted in medical ICU (Hospital Avicenne, Rabat, Morocco) between January 1992 and December 2002 were studied. AAlPP was identified by history, symptoms and toxicological results. Almost 50 parameters have been collected and compared between survivors and non-survivors groups. Data were analyzed using Fisher exact test and Mann-Whitney test. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled: 17 female and 11 male, average age = 24+/-11 years, SAPS II = 24.4+/-14.5. The ingested dose was 3.3+/-1.8 g. The self-poisoning was observed in 27 cases and delay before hospital admission was 11+/-13 hours. Mean Glasgow coma scale was 14+/-2. Shock was found in 22 (79%) cases. Average pH was 7.1+/-0.4 and bicarbonate concentration was 16.3+/-8.8 mmol/l. The ECG abnormalities were noted in 20 (72%) cases. The average mortality rate was 61%. The prognostic factors were SAPS II (p = 0.031), Apache II (p = 0.037), shock (p = 0.022), ECG abnormalities (p = 0.05), use of vasoactive drugs (p = 0.05) and use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.003). AAlPP induced a significantly high mortality and haemodynamic disturbances were a risk factor of poor outcome.

  18. Thermal expansion and volumetric changes during indium phosphide melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazov, V.M.; Davletov, K.; Nashel'skij, A.Ya.; Mamedov, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the measurements of a thermal expansion were summed up at various temperatures as a diagram in coordinates (Δ 1/1) approximately F(t). It was shown that an appreciable deviation of the relationship (Δ1/1) approximately f(t) from the linear law corresponded to a temperature of 500-550 deg C. It was noted that the said deviation was related to an appreciable thermal decomposition of indium phosphide as temperature increased. The strength of the inter-atomic bond of indium phosphide was calculated. Investigated were the volumetric changes of indium phosphide on melting. The resultant data were analyzed with the aid of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation

  19. A Suicide Attempt Using Zinc Phosphide (A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysenur Sumer Coskun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zinc phosphide is a toxin that is added to wheat for use in rodent control and is the active ingredient of rodenticide. A 17 year-old male attempted suicide by drinking pesticide [Zinc PHOSPHIDE (Zn3P2] and was subsequently admitted to the emergency department: the patient’s general condition was poor, he was unconscious and vomiting, the skin had a garlic odor and advanced acidosis was present. The patient was treated symptomatically, followed by mechanical ventilation, and was transferred to a psychiatric clinic on the fifth day.

  20. Topotactic Conversion of Copper(I) Phosphide Nanowires for Sensitive Electrochemical Detection of H2O2 Release from Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenzhen; Xin, Yanmei; Wu, Wenlong; Fu, Baihe; Zhang, Zhonghai

    2016-08-02

    In this work, we clearly demonstrate for the first time the use of transition-metal phosphides to set up a new cathodic analysis platform for sensitive and selective electrochemical nonenzymatic detection of H2O2. With the help of a facile topotactic conversion method, the noble metal-free electrocatalyst of copper(I) phosphide nanowires on three-dimensional porous copper foam (Cu3P NWs/CF) is fabricated with electrochemical anodized Cu(OH)2 NWs as precursor. The Cu3P NWs/CF-based sensor presents excellent electrocatalytic activity for H2O2 reduction with a detection limit of 2 nM, the lowest detection limit achieved by noble-metal free electrocatalyst, which guarantees the possibility of sensitive and reliable detection of H2O2 release from living tumorigenic cells, thus showing the potential application as a sensitive cancer cell detection probe.

  1. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  2. HDO of Methyl Palmitate over Silica-Supported Ni Phosphides: Insight into Ni/P Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Deliy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Two sets of silica-supported nickel phosphide catalysts with a nickel content of about 2.5 and 10 wt % and Ni/P molar ratio 2/1, 1/1 and 1/2 in each set, were prepared by way of a temperature-programmed reduction method using (Ni(CH3COO2 and ((NH42HPO4 as a precursor. The NixPy/SiO2 catalysts were characterized using chemical analysis N2 physisorption, XRD, TEM, 31P MAS NMR. Methyl palmitate hydrodeoxygenation (HDO was performed in a trickle-bed reactor at 3 MPa and 290 °C with LHSV ranging from 0.3 to 16 h−1. The Ni/P ratio was found to affect the nickel phosphide phase composition, POx groups content and catalytic properties in methyl palmitate HDO with the TOF increased along with a decline of Ni/P ratio and a growth of POx groups’ content. Taking into account the possible routes of methyl palmitate conversion (metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis or acid-catalyzed hydrolysis, we proposed that the enhancement of acid POx groups’ content with the Ni/P ratio decrease provides an enhancement of the rate of methyl palmitate conversion through the acceleration of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis.

  3. Demonstration of AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors with silicon-oxy-nitride as the gate insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachander, K.; Arulkumaran, S.; Egawa, T.; Sano, Y.; Baskar, K.

    2005-01-01

    AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors (MOSHEMTs) were fabricated with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon oxy-nitride (SiON) as an insulating layer. The compositions of SiON thin films were confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The fabricated MOSHEMTs exhibited a very high saturation current density of 1.1 A/mm coupled with high positive operational gate voltage up to +7 V. The MOSHEMTs also exhibited four orders of low gate leakage current and high forward-on voltage when compared with the conventional HEMTs. The drain current collapse using gate pulse measurements showed only a negligible difference in the saturation current density revealing the drastic improvement in passivation of the surface states due to the high quality of dielectric thin films deposited. Thus, based on the improved direct-current operation, SiON can be considered to be a potential gate oxide comparable with other dielectric insulators

  4. A Simple, General Synthetic Route toward Nanoscale Transition Metal Borides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothi, Palani R; Yubuta, Kunio; Fokwa, Boniface P T

    2018-04-01

    Most nanomaterials, such as transition metal carbides, phosphides, nitrides, chalcogenides, etc., have been extensively studied for their various properties in recent years. The similarly attractive transition metal borides, on the contrary, have seen little interest from the materials science community, mainly because nanomaterials are notoriously difficult to synthesize. Herein, a simple, general synthetic method toward crystalline transition metal boride nanomaterials is proposed. This new method takes advantage of the redox chemistry of Sn/SnCl 2 , the volatility and recrystallization of SnCl 2 at the synthesis conditions, as well as the immiscibility of tin with boron, to produce crystalline phases of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metal nanoborides with different morphologies (nanorods, nanosheets, nanoprisms, nanoplates, nanoparticles, etc.). Importantly, this method allows flexibility in the choice of the transition metal, as well as the ability to target several compositions within the same binary phase diagram (e.g., Mo 2 B, α-MoB, MoB 2 , Mo 2 B 4 ). The simplicity and wide applicability of the method should enable the fulfillment of the great potential of this understudied class of materials, which show a variety of excellent chemical, electrochemical, and physical properties at the microscale. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Mineralizer-assisted high-pressure high-temperature synthesis and characterization of novel phosphorus nitride imides and luminescent alkaline earth metal (oxo)nitridophosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchuk, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of this thesis were the synthesis, identification and structural characterization of new alkaline earth metal (oxo)nitridophopshates and phosphorus nitrides. Furthermore, luminescence properties of the resulting materials should be investigated and a connection between these properties and the respective structures should be established. For this purpose, a range of synthesis strategies was employed, including conventional solid-state syntheses in silica ampoules and high-pressure high-temperature syntheses using the multianvil technique. The emphasis of the synthetic part of this thesis lies on the development of new synthetic strategies in order to increase crystallinity of alkaline earth metal (oxo)nitridophosphates and thus accelerate their structure determination. This involves the selection of a suitable mineralizer and the investigation of its interaction with the respective starting materials. In addition, the analytical methods applied in this thesis in order to identify and characterize the compounds are just as essential as the synthesis strategies. X-ray diffraction on single crystals and on powders was carried out as the main analytical method while being supported by quantitative and qualitative 1 H and 31 P solid-state NMR measurements, FTIR and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, as well as electron microscopy methods including both imaging and diffraction techniques. Implied by the large number of novel structures investigated, theoretical studies including topological analysis, calculations of lattice energies and bond-valence sums also played a major role in this thesis. Optical analysis methods such as reflectance spectroscopy, luminescence microscopy and photoluminescence measurements helped to determine the luminescence properties of some of the presented compounds.

  6. Polyserositis: An Unusual Complication of Aluminum Phosphide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Bhalla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Aluminum phosphide is the common cause of poisoning in adults in India, with a very high case fatality ratio. We studied five patients of aluminum phosphide poisoning with polyserositis. Methods: We enrolled all patients with aluminum phosphide poisoning presenting to emergency medical department, at a tertiary care hospital in northwestern India from January to July 2006. These patients were managed according to a standard treatment protocol and their complications were recorded. Results: During the study period, total of 35 patients were admitted with 57.5% mortality in the first 12 hours. Among the rest, 5 patients were found to develop polyserositis. All these patients had severe hypotension at presentation and developed respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation after an average stay of 3.8 days post-ingestion. They were managed conservatively and four of them were discharged from the hospital after the average stay of 10 days. Conclusion: In this case series, features of polyserositis (pleural effusion, ascites and pericardial effusion were found in 15% patients of severe aluminum phosphide poisoning. We postulate systemic capillary leak syndrome, secondary to mitochondrial damage in the endothelium, as a possible mechanism.        

  7. Wurtzite gallium phosphide has a direct-band gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assali, S.; Zardo, I.; Plissard, S.; Verheijen, M.A.; Haverkort, J.E.M.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Gallium Phosphide (GaP) with the normal cubic crystal structure has an indirect band gap, which severely limits the emission efficiency. We report the fabrication of GaP nanowires with pure hexagonal crystal structure and demonstrate the direct nature of the band gap. We observe strong

  8. Rational Design of Zinc Phosphide Heterojunction Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Jeffrey Paul

    The prospect of terawatt-scale electricity generation using a photovoltaic (PV) device places strict requirements on the active semiconductor optoelectronic properties and elemental abundance. After reviewing the constraints placed on an ``earth-abundant'' solar absorber, we find zinc phosphide (α-Zn 3P2) to be an ideal candidate. In addition to its near-optimal direct band gap of 1.5 eV, high visible-light absorption coefficient (>10. 4cm-1), and long minority-carrier diffusion length (>5 μm), Zn3P 2 is composed of abundant Zn and P elements and has excellent physical properties for scalable thin-film deposition. However, to date, a Zn 3P2 device of sufficient efficiency for commercial applications has not been demonstrated. Record efficiencies of 6.0% for multicrystalline and 4.3% for thin-film cells have been reported, respectively. Performance has been limited by the intrinsic p-type conductivity of Zn3P 2 which restricts us to Schottky and heterojunction device designs. Due to our poor understanding of Zn3P2 interfaces, an ideal heterojunction partner has not yet been found. The goal of this thesis is to explore the upper limit of solar conversion efficiency achievable with a Zn3P2 absorber through the design of an optimal heterojunction PV device. To do so, we investigate three key aspects of material growth, interface energetics, and device design. First, the growth of Zn3P2 on GaAs(001) is studied using compound-source molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). We successfully demonstrate the pseudomorphic growth of Zn3P2 epilayers of controlled orientation and optoelectronic properties. Next, the energy-band alignments of epitaxial Zn3P2 and II-VI and III-V semiconductor interfaces are measured via high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to determine the most appropriate heterojunction partner. From this work, we identify ZnSe as a nearly ideal n-type emitter for a Zn3P 2 PV device. Finally, various II-VI/Zn3P2 heterojunction solar cells designs are

  9. Metal-doped graphene layers composed with boron nitride-graphene as an insulator: a nano-capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monajjemi, Majid

    2014-11-01

    A model of a nanoscale dielectric capacitor composed of a few dopants has been investigated in this study. This capacitor includes metallic graphene layers which are separated by an insulating medium containing a few h-BN layers. It has been observed that the elements from group IIIA of the periodic table are more suitable as dopants for hetero-structures of the {metallic graphene/hBN/metallic graphene} capacitors compared to those from groups IA or IIA. In this study, we have specifically focused on the dielectric properties of different graphene/h-BN/graphene including their hetero-structure counterparts, i.e., Boron-graphene/h-BN/Boron-graphene, Al-graphene/h-BN/Al-graphene, Mg-graphene/h-BN/Mg-graphene, and Be-graphene/h-BN/Be-graphene stacks for monolayer form of dielectrics. Moreover, we studied the multi dielectric properties of different (h-BN)n/graphene hetero-structures of Boron-graphene/(h-BN)n/Boron-graphene.

  10. Adsorption of 3d transition metal atoms on graphene-like gallium nitride monolayer: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Xiang; Li, Han-Fei; Yang, Xu; Wen, Jun-Qing; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Jian-Min

    2018-03-01

    We study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atoms (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) adsorbed GaN monolayer (GaN-ML) using first-principles calculations. The results show that, for 6 different TM adatoms, the most stable adsorption sites are the same. The adsorption of TM atoms results in significant lattice distortions. A covalent chemical bonding character between TM adatom and GaN-ML is found in TM adsorbed systems. Except for Ni adsorbed system, all TM adsorbed systems show spin polarization implying that the adsorption of TM induces magnetization. The magnetic moments of the adsorbed systems are concentrated on the TM adatoms and the nearest-neighbor N atoms of the adsorption site contributed slightly. Our analysis shows that the GaN-ML properties can be effectively modulated by TM adsorption, and exhibit various electronic and magnetic properties, such as magnetic metals (Fe adsorption), half-metal (Co adsorption), and spin gapless semiconductor (Cu adsorption). These present properties of TM adsorbed GaN-ML may be of value in electronics and spintronics applications.

  11. Semiconducting La2AuP3, the metallic conductor Ce2AuP3, and other rare-earth gold phosphides Ln2AuP3 with two closely related crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschen, M.; Kotzyba, G.; Kuennen, B.; Jeitschko, W.

    2001-01-01

    The compounds Ln 2 AuP 3 were synthesized by reaction of the elemental components in evacuated silica tubes. Their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal diffractometer data. The compounds with Ln = La, Ce, and Pr crystallize with an orthorhombic U 2 NiC 3 type structure (Pnma, Z = 4). The structure refinement for Ce 2 AuP 3 resulted in a = 774.14(6) pm, b = 421.11(4) pm, c = 1612.3(1) pm, R = 0.019 for 1410 structure factors and 38 variable parameters. For Pr 2 AuP 3 a residual of R = 0.024 was obtained. Nd 2 AuP 3 crystallizes with a monoclinic distortion of this structure: P2 1 /c, Z = 4, a = 416.14(4) pm, b = 768.87(6) pm, c = 1647.1(2) pm, β = 104.06(1) , R = 0.022 for 1361 F values and 56 variables. The near-neighbor coordinations of the two structures are nearly the same. In both structures the gold and phosphorus atoms form two-dimensionally infinite nets, where the gold atoms are tetrahedrally coordinated by phosphorus atoms with Au-P distances varying between 245.8 and 284.2 pm. Two thirds of the phosphorus atoms form pairs with single-bond distances varying between 217.7 and 218.9 pm. Thus, using oxidation numbers the structures can be rationalized with the formulas (Ln +3 ) 2 [AuP 3 ] -6 and (Ln +3 ) 2 Au +1 (P 2 ) -4 P -3 . Accordingly, La 2 AuP 3 is a diamagnetic semiconductor. Pr 2 AuP 3 is semi-conducting with an antiferromagnetic ground state, showing metamagnetism with a critical field of B c = 0.5(±0.1) T. In contrast, the cerium compound is a metallic conductor, even though its cell volume indicates that the cerium atoms are essentially trivalent, as is also suggested by the ferro- or ferrimagnetic behavior of the compound. (orig.)

  12. Nitriding behavior of Ni and Ni-based binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonovic, Matej

    2015-01-15

    Gaseous nitriding is a prominent thermochemical surface treatment process which can improve various properties of metallic materials such as mechanical, tribological and/or corrosion properties. This process is predominantly performed by applying NH{sub 3}+H{sub 2} containing gas atmospheres serving as the nitrogen donating medium at temperatures between 673 K and 873 K (400 C and 600 C). NH{sub 3} decomposes at the surface of the metallic specimen and nitrogen diffuses into the surface adjacent region of the specimen whereas hydrogen remains in the gas atmosphere. One of the most important parameters characterizing a gaseous nitriding process is the so-called nitriding potential (r{sub N}) which determines the chemical potential of nitrogen provided by the gas phase. The nitriding potential is defined as r{sub N} = p{sub NH{sub 3}}/p{sub H{sub 2}{sup 3/2}} where p{sub NH{sub 3}} and p{sub H{sub 2}} are the partial pressures of the NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} in the nitriding atmosphere. In contrast with nitriding of α-Fe where the nitriding potential is usually in the range between 0.01 and 1 atm{sup -1/2}, nitriding of Ni and Ni-based alloys requires employing nitriding potentials higher than 100 atm{sup -1/2} and even up to ∞ (nitriding in pure NH{sub 3} atmosphere). This behavior is compatible with decreased thermodynamic stability of the 3d-metal nitrides with increasing atomic number. Depending on the nitriding conditions (temperature, nitriding potential and treatment time), different phases are formed at the surface of the Ni-based alloys. By applying very high nitriding potential, formation of hexagonal Ni{sub 3}N at the surface of the specimen (known as external nitriding) leads to the development of a compound layer, which may improve tribological properties. Underneath the Ni{sub 3}N compound layer, two possibilities exist: (i) alloying element precipitation within the nitrided zone (known as internal nitriding) and/or (ii) development of metastable and

  13. Protonated graphitic carbon nitride coated metal-organic frameworks with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity for contaminants degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Zhang, Xibiao; Song, Haiyan; Chen, Chunxia; Han, Fuqin; Wen, Congcong

    2018-05-01

    Most of the reported composites of g-C3N4/metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were obtained via exfoliation of g-C3N4 and wrapping the nanosheets on MOFs with weak interaction. In this work, chemical protonation of g-C3N4 and dip-coating was adopted as a feasible pathway to achieve the real combination of g-C3N4 derivatives with a familiar MOF material MIL-100(Fe). Structural, chemical and photophysical properties of the novel hybrid photocatalysts were characterized and compared to those of the parent materials. It was verified that the protonated g-C3N4 species of appropriate content were uniformly coated along the frameworks of MIL-100(Fe) with strong interaction. The optimal materials maintained the intact framework structure, surface property and porosity of MIL-100(Fe), as well as the inherent structural units and physicochemical properties of C3N4. In comparison to the parent materials, the protonated g-C3N4 coated MIL-100(Fe) materials exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity in degradation of rhodamine B or methylene blue dye, as well as in oxidative denitrogenation for pyridine by molecular oxygen under visible light. Introduction of protonated g-C3N4 on MOFs improved the adsorption ability for contaminant molecules. Furthermore, coating effect provided a platform for rapid photoexcited electrons transfer and superior separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. Photocatalytic conversion of the three contaminants followed different mechanisms.

  14. Radiation induced traps of zinc phosphate and phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murali, K.R.; Rao, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve (TGC) method has been used to study the traps produced by X-irradiation in Zn 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and Zn 3 P 2 . Prominent TL glow peaks were observed at 100 0 and 360 0 C for zinc phosphate while for zinc phosphide only one glow peak at 245 0 C was observed, and in the latter case the TL output was in general quite low compared to zinc phosphate. The TL spectra for both the glow peaks of zinc phosphate indicated emission band in the region around 560 nm, while for zinc phosphide the emission occurred at 575 nm (in the temperature region 200-270 0 C). The low temperature glow peaks below 270 0 C were less stable compared to those above 300 0 C and were completely destroyed when the irradiated samples were stored in darkness for 24 hr at room temperature. Shining by 470 nm light however produced preferential bleaching of the two TL peaks at 100 and 360 0 C with no effect on the 245 0 C glow peak of zinc phosphide. It is concluded that during heat treatment large numbers of Zn-vacancies are formed due to which complexes like Zn-P are produced by irradiation and the TL traps destroyed in a radiative recombination process are related with these complexes. (author)

  15. A series of inorganic solid nitrogen sources for the synthesis of metal nitride clusterfullerenes: the dependence of production yield on the oxidation state of nitrogen and counter ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fupin; Guan, Jian; Wei, Tao; Wang, Song; Jiao, Mingzhi; Yang, Shangfeng

    2013-04-01

    A series of nitrogen-containing inorganic solid compounds with variable oxidation states of nitrogen and counter ions have been successfully applied as new inorganic solid nitrogen sources toward the synthesis of Sc-based metal nitride clusterfullerenes (Sc-NCFs), including ammonium salts [(NH4)xH(3-x)PO4 (x = 0-2), (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)2CO3, NH4X (X = F, Cl), NH4SCN], thiocyanate (KSCN), nitrates (Cu(NO3)2, NaNO3), and nitrite (NaNO2). Among them, ammonium phosphates ((NH4)xH(3-x)PO4, x = 1-3) and ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) are revealed to behave as better nitrogen sources than others, and the highest yield of Sc-NCFs is achieved when NH4SCN was used as a nitrogen source. The optimum molar ratio of Sc2O3:(NH4)3PO4·3H2O:C and Sc2O3:NH4SCN:C has been determined to be 1:2:15 and 1:3:15, respectively. The thermal decomposition products of these 12 inorganic compounds have been discussed in order to understand their different performances toward the synthesis of Sc-NCFs, and accordingly the dependence of the production yield of Sc-NCFs on the oxidation state of nitrogen and counter ion is interpreted. The yield of Sc3N@C80 (I(h) + D(5h)) per gram Sc2O3 by using the N2-based group of nitrogen sources (thiocyanate, nitrates, and nitrite) is overall much lower than those by using gaseous N2 and NH4SCN, indicating the strong dependence of the yield of Sc-NCFs on the oxidation state of nitrogen, which is attributed to the "in-situ" redox reaction taking place for the N2-based group of nitrogen sources during discharging. For NH3-based group of nitrogen sources (ammonium salts) which exhibits a (-3) oxidation states of nitrogen, their performance as nitrogen sources is found to be sensitively dependent on the anion, and this is understood by considering their difference on the thermal stability and/or decomposition rate. Contrarily, for the N2-based group of nitrogen sources, the formation of Sc-NCFs is independent to both the oxidation state of nitrogen (+3 or +5) and the

  16. Electrochemical Solution Growth of Magnetic Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monson, Todd C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pearce, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic nitrides, if manufactured in bulk form, would provide designers of transformers and inductors with a new class of better performing and affordable soft magnetic materials. According to experimental results from thin films and/or theoretical calculations, magnetic nitrides would have magnetic moments well in excess of current state of the art soft magnets. Furthermore, magnetic nitrides would have higher resistivities than current transformer core materials and therefore not require the use of laminates of inactive material to limit eddy current losses. However, almost all of the magnetic nitrides have been elusive except in difficult to reproduce thin films or as inclusions in another material. Now, through its ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen, the electrochemical solution growth (ESG) technique can bring highly sought after (and previously inaccessible) new magnetic nitrides into existence in bulk form. This method utilizes a molten salt as a solvent to solubilize metal cations and nitrogen ions produced electrochemically and form nitrogen compounds. Unlike other growth methods, the scalable ESG process can sustain high growth rates (~mm/hr) even under reasonable operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and 500 °C). Ultimately, this translates into a high throughput, low cost, manufacturing process. The ESG process has already been used successfully to grow high quality GaN. Below, the experimental results of an exploratory express LDRD project to access the viability of the ESG technique to grow magnetic nitrides will be presented.

  17. Surface-oxidized cobalt phosphide used as high efficient electrocatalyst in activated carbon air-cathode microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Wang, Zhong; Li, Kexun; Liu, Yi; Liu, Di; Wang, Junjie

    2017-09-01

    Herein, we report a simplistic method to fabricate the surface-oxidized cobalt phosphide (CoP) nanocrystals (NCs), which is used as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in microbial fuel cell (MFC) for the first time. The corallite-like CoP NCs are successfully prepared by a hydrothermal reaction following a phosphating treatment in N2 atmosphere. When used as an ORR catalyst, cobalt phosphide shows comparable onset potential, inferior resistance, as well as a small Tafel slope with long-term stability in neutral media. The maximum power density of MFC embellished with 10% CoP reached 1914.4 ± 59.7 mW m-2, which is 108.5% higher than the control. The four-electron pathway, observed by the RDE, plays a crucial role in electrochemical catalytic activity. In addition, material characterizations indicate that the surface oxide layer (CoOx) around the metallic CoP core is important and beneficial for ORR. Accordingly, it can be expected that the as-synthesized CoP will be a promising candidate of the non-precious metal ORR electrocatalysts for electrochemical energy applications.

  18. Indium phosphide space solar cell research: Where we are and where we are going

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1995-01-01

    Indium phosphide is considered to be a strong contender for many photovoltaic space applications because of its radiation resistance and its potential for high efficiency. An overview of recent progress is presented, and possible future research directions for indium phosphide space solar cells are discussed. The topics considered include radiation damage studies and space flight experiments.

  19. Aqueous corrosion of phosphide minerals from iron meteorites: a highly reactive source of prebiotic phosphorus on the surface of the early Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Matthew A; Lauretta, Dante S

    2005-08-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of aqueous corrosion of Fe-phosphide under conditions relevant to the early Earth. The results strongly suggest that iron meteorites were an important source of reactive phosphorus (P), a requirement for the formation of P-based life. We further demonstrate that iron meteorites were an abundant source of phosphide minerals early in Earth history. Phosphide corrosion was studied in five different solutions: deionized water, deionized water buffered with sodium bicarbonate, deionized water with dissolved magnesium and calcium chlorides, deionized water containing ethanol and acetic acid, and deionized water containing the chlorides, ethanol, and acetic acid. Experiments were performed in the presence of both air and pure Ar gas to evaluate the effect of atmospheric chemistry. Phosphide corrosion in deionized water results in a metastable mixture of mixed-valence, P-bearing ions including pyrophosphate and triphosphate, key components for metabolism in modern life. In a pH-buffered solution of NaHCO(3), the condensed and reduced species diphosphonate is an abundant corrosion product. Corrosion in ethanol- and acetic acid-containing solutions yields additional P-bearing organic molecules, including acetyl phosphonate and a cyclic triphosphorus molecule. Phosphonate is a major corrosion product of all experiments and is the only P-bearing molecule that persists in solutions with high concentrations of magnesium and calcium chlorides, which suggests that phosphonate may have been a primitive oceanic source of P. The stability and reactivity of phosphonate and hypophosphite in solution were investigated to elucidate reaction mechanisms and the role of mineral catalysts on P-solution chemistry. Phosphonate oxidation is rapid in the presence of Fe metal but negligible in the presence of magnetite and in the control sample. The rate of hypophosphite oxidation is independent of reaction substrate.

  20. Exploring electrolyte preference of vanadium nitride supercapacitor electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Zhaohui; Lu, Gang [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China); Wang, Tianhu [School of Electrical Information and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Ge, Yunwang, E-mail: ywgelit@126.com [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Hierarchical VN nanostructures were prepared on graphite foam. • Electrolyte preference of VN supercapacitor electrodes was explored. • VN showed better capacitive property in organic and alkaline electrolytes than LiCl. - Abstract: Vanadium nitride hierarchical nanostructures were prepared through an ammonia annealing procedure utilizing vanadium pentoxide nanostructures grown on graphite foam. The electrochemical properties of hierarchical vanadium nitride was tested in aqueous and organic electrolytes. As a result, the vanadium nitride showed better capacitive energy storage property in organic and alkaline electrolytes. This work provides insight into the charge storage process of vanadium nitride and our findings can shed light on other transition metal nitride-based electrochemical energy storage systems.

  1. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs

  2. Plasma nitriding - an eco friendly surface hardening process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Surface hardening is a process of heating the metal such that the surface gets only hardened. This process is adopted for many components like gears, cams, and crankshafts, which desire high hardness on the outer surface with a softer core to withstand the shocks. So, to attain such properties processes like carburising, nitriding, flame hardening and induction hardening are employed. Amongst these processes nitriding is the most commonly used process by many industries. In nitriding process the steel material is heated to a temperature of around 550 C and then exposed to atomic nitrogen. This atomic nitrogen reacts with iron and other alloying elements and forms nitrides, which are very hard in nature. By this process both wear resistance and hardness of the product can be increased. The atomic nitrogen required for this process can be obtained using ammonia gas (gas nitriding), cyanide based salt bath (liquid nitriding) and plasma medium (plasma nitriding). However, plasma nitriding has recently received considerable industrial interest owing to its characteristic of faster nitrogen penetration, short treatment time, low process temperature, minimal distortion, low energy use and easier control of layer formation compared with conventional techniques such as gas and liquid nitriding. This process can be used for all ferrous materials including stainless steels. Plasma nitriding is carried out using a gas mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen gas at sub atmospheric pressures hence, making it eco-friendly in nature. Plasma nitriding allows modification of the surface layers and hardness profiles by changing the gas mixture and temperature. The wide applicable temperature range enables a multitude of applications, beyond the possibilities of gas or salt bath processes. This has led to numerous applications of this process in industries such as the manufacture of machine parts for plastics and food processing, packaging and tooling as well as pumps and hydraulic, machine

  3. Assembly of phosphide nanocrystals into porous networks: formation of InP gels and aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitihami-Mudiyanselage, Asha; Senevirathne, Keerthi; Brock, Stephanie L

    2013-02-26

    The applicability of sol-gel nanoparticle assembly routes, previously employed for metal chalcogenides, to phosphides is reported for the case of InP. Two different sizes (3.5 and 6.0 nm) of InP nanoparticles were synthesized by solution-phase arrested precipitation, capped with thiolate ligands, and oxidized with H₂O₂ or O₂/light to induce gel formation. The gels were aged, solvent-exchanged, and then supercritically dried to obtain aerogels with both meso- (2-50 nm) and macropores (>50 nm) and accessible surface areas of ∼200 m²/g. Aerogels showed higher band gap values relative to precursor nanoparticles, suggesting that during the process of assembling nanoparticles into 3D architectures, particle size reduction may have taken place. In contrast to metal chalcogenide gelation, InP gels did not form using tetranitromethane, a non-oxygen-transferring oxidant. The requirement of an oxygen-transferring oxidant, combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data showing oxidized phosphorus, suggests gelation is occurring due to condensation of phosphorus oxoanionic moieties generated at the interfaces. The ability to link discrete InP nanoparticles into a 3D porous network while maintaining quantum confinement is expected to facilitate exploitation of nanostructured InP in solid-state devices.

  4. Photoluminescence blue shift of indium phosphide nanowire networks with aluminum oxide coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryauf, David M.; Zhang, Junce; Norris, Kate J.; Diaz Leon, Juan J.; Oye, Michael M.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; Wei, Min

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes our finding that optical properties of semiconductor nanowires were modified by depositing a thin layer of metal oxide. Indium phosphide nanowires were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrates with gold catalyst resulting in three-dimensional nanowire networks, and optical properties were obtained from the collective nanowire networks. The networks were coated with an aluminum oxide thin film deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition. We studied the dependence of the peak wavelength of photoluminescence spectra on the thickness of the oxide coatings. A continuous blue shift in photoluminescence spectra was observed when the thickness of the oxide coating was increased. The observed blue shift is attributed to the Burstein-Moss effect due to increased carrier concentration in the nanowire cores caused by repulsion from intrinsic negative fixed charges located at the inner oxide surface. Samples were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and selective area diffractometry to better understand the physical mechanisms for the blue shift. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Photoluminescence blue shift of indium phosphide nanowire networks with aluminum oxide coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryauf, David M.; Zhang, Junce; Norris, Kate J.; Diaz Leon, Juan J.; Oye, Michael M.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P. [Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR), Advanced Studies Laboratories, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Baskin School of Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Wei, Min [Baskin School of Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); School of Micro-Electronics and Solid-Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China)

    2014-07-15

    This paper describes our finding that optical properties of semiconductor nanowires were modified by depositing a thin layer of metal oxide. Indium phosphide nanowires were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrates with gold catalyst resulting in three-dimensional nanowire networks, and optical properties were obtained from the collective nanowire networks. The networks were coated with an aluminum oxide thin film deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition. We studied the dependence of the peak wavelength of photoluminescence spectra on the thickness of the oxide coatings. A continuous blue shift in photoluminescence spectra was observed when the thickness of the oxide coating was increased. The observed blue shift is attributed to the Burstein-Moss effect due to increased carrier concentration in the nanowire cores caused by repulsion from intrinsic negative fixed charges located at the inner oxide surface. Samples were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and selective area diffractometry to better understand the physical mechanisms for the blue shift. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, W.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds of metals with non-metals such as C, N, and B show different hardness. Wagner's interaction parameter characterizes manner and extent of the interaction between the atoms of the substance dissolved and the additional elements in metallic mixed phases. An attempt has been made to correlate the hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides (data taken from literature) with certain interaction parameters and associated thermodynamic quantities (ΔH, ΔG). For some metals of periods 4, 5, and 6 corresponding relations were found between microhardness, interaction parameters, heat of formation, and atomic number

  7. Ion nitriding in 316=L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Calderon, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    Ion nitriding is a glow discharge process that is used to induce surface modification in metals. It has been applied to 316-L austenitic stainless steel looking for similar benefits already obtained in other steels. An austenitic stainless steel was selected because is not hardenable by heat treatment and is not easy to nitride by gas nitriding. The samples were plastically deformed to 10, 20, 40, 50 AND 70% of their original thickness in order to obtain bulk hardening and to observe nitrogen penetration dependence on it. The results were: an increase of one to two rockwell hardness number (except in 70% deformed sample because of its thickness); an increase of even several hundreds per cent in microhardness knoop number in nitrided surface. The later surely modifies waste resistance which would be worth to quantify in further studies. Microhardness measured in an internal transversal face to nitrided surface had a gradual diminish in its value with depth. Auger microanalysis showed a higher relative concentration rate C N /C F e near the surface giving evidence of nitrogen presence till 250 microns deep. The color metallography etchant used, produced faster corrosion in nitrited regions. Therefore, corrosion studies have to be done before using ion nitrited 316-L under these chemicals. (Author)

  8. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride; Rueckhaltemechanismen fuer Wasserstoff in metallischem Beryllium und Berylliumoxid sowie Eigenschaften von ioneninduziertem Berylliumnitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-09-22

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  9. Synthesis by reactive grinding of molybdenum iron bimetallic nitride; Sintesis por molienda reactiva del nitruro bimetalico Mo-Fe: Mo{sub 3}Fe{sub 3}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldan, M. A.; Ortega, A.; Palencia, I.; Real, C.

    2008-07-01

    The transition metal nitride ternary show similar properties to the binary nitride and some times this behaviour are improved. In the present work, the molybdenum-iron nitride has been prepared by reactive grinding form the two metals under nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 11 bar. The characterization of the compounds is presented and it is also shown a study of the stability of the nitride under several atmospheres. (Author) 42 refs.

  10. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of plasma nitrided ferrous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portolan, E. [Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, 95070-560 Caxias do Sul-RS (Brazil); Baumvol, I.J.R. [Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, 95070-560 Caxias do Sul-RS (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre 91509-970 (Brazil); Figueroa, C.A., E-mail: cafiguer@ucs.br [Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, 95070-560 Caxias do Sul-RS (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    The electronic structures of the near-surface regions of two different nitrided steels (AISI 316 and 4140) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectron groups from all main chemical elements involved were addressed for steel samples with implanted-N concentrations in the range 16-32 at.%. As the implanted-N concentrations were increased, rather contrasting behaviors were observed for the two kinds of steel. The N1s photoelectrons had spectral shifts toward lower (nitrided AISI 316) or higher (nitrided AISI 4140) binding energies, whereas the Fe2p{sub 3/2} photoelectron spectrum remains at a constant binding energy (nitrided AISI 316) or shifts toward higher binding energies (AISI 4140). These trends are discussed in terms of the metallic nitride formation and the overlapping of atomic orbitals. For nitrided AISI 316, a semi-classical approach of charge transfer between Cr and N is used to explain the experimental facts (formation of CrN), while for nitrided AISI 4140 we propose that the interaction between orbitals 4s from Fe and 2p from N promotes electrons to the conduction band increasing the electrical attraction of the N1s and Fe2p electrons in core shells (formation of FeN{sub x}). The increase in hardness of the steel upon N implantation is attributed to the localization of electrons in specific bonds, which diminishes the metallic bond character.

  11. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of plasma nitrided ferrous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolan, E.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Figueroa, C. A.

    2009-04-01

    The electronic structures of the near-surface regions of two different nitrided steels (AISI 316 and 4140) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectron groups from all main chemical elements involved were addressed for steel samples with implanted-N concentrations in the range 16-32 at.%. As the implanted-N concentrations were increased, rather contrasting behaviors were observed for the two kinds of steel. The N1s photoelectrons had spectral shifts toward lower (nitrided AISI 316) or higher (nitrided AISI 4140) binding energies, whereas the Fe2p 3/2 photoelectron spectrum remains at a constant binding energy (nitrided AISI 316) or shifts toward higher binding energies (AISI 4140). These trends are discussed in terms of the metallic nitride formation and the overlapping of atomic orbitals. For nitrided AISI 316, a semi-classical approach of charge transfer between Cr and N is used to explain the experimental facts (formation of CrN), while for nitrided AISI 4140 we propose that the interaction between orbitals 4s from Fe and 2p from N promotes electrons to the conduction band increasing the electrical attraction of the N1s and Fe2p electrons in core shells (formation of FeN x). The increase in hardness of the steel upon N implantation is attributed to the localization of electrons in specific bonds, which diminishes the metallic bond character.

  12. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of plasma nitrided ferrous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portolan, E.; Baumvol, I.J.R.; Figueroa, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structures of the near-surface regions of two different nitrided steels (AISI 316 and 4140) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectron groups from all main chemical elements involved were addressed for steel samples with implanted-N concentrations in the range 16-32 at.%. As the implanted-N concentrations were increased, rather contrasting behaviors were observed for the two kinds of steel. The N1s photoelectrons had spectral shifts toward lower (nitrided AISI 316) or higher (nitrided AISI 4140) binding energies, whereas the Fe2p 3/2 photoelectron spectrum remains at a constant binding energy (nitrided AISI 316) or shifts toward higher binding energies (AISI 4140). These trends are discussed in terms of the metallic nitride formation and the overlapping of atomic orbitals. For nitrided AISI 316, a semi-classical approach of charge transfer between Cr and N is used to explain the experimental facts (formation of CrN), while for nitrided AISI 4140 we propose that the interaction between orbitals 4s from Fe and 2p from N promotes electrons to the conduction band increasing the electrical attraction of the N1s and Fe2p electrons in core shells (formation of FeN x ). The increase in hardness of the steel upon N implantation is attributed to the localization of electrons in specific bonds, which diminishes the metallic bond character.

  13. Ion nitriding of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitz, T.

    2002-09-01

    The present study is devoted to the investigation of the mechanism of aluminium nitriding by a technique that employs implantation of low-energy nitrogen ions and diffusional transport of atoms. The nitriding of aluminium is investigated, because this is a method for surface modification of aluminium and has a potential for application in a broad spectrum of fields such as automobile, marine, aviation, space technologies, etc. However, at present nitriding of aluminium does not find any large scale industrial application, due to problems in the formation of stoichiometric aluminium nitride layers with a sufficient thickness and good quality. For the purposes of this study, ion nitriding is chosen, as an ion beam method with the advantage of good and independent control over the process parameters, which thus can be related uniquely to the physical properties of the resulting layers. Moreover, ion nitriding has a close similarity to plasma nitriding and plasma immersion ion implantation, which are methods with a potential for industrial application. (orig.)

  14. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  15. Plasmonic spectral tunability of conductive ternary nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassavetis, S.; Patsalas, P., E-mail: ppats@physics.auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Bellas, D. V.; Lidorikis, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Abadias, G. [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Université de Poitiers-CNRS-ENSMA, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France)

    2016-06-27

    Conductive binary transition metal nitrides, such as TiN and ZrN, have emerged as a category of promising alternative plasmonic materials. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides such as Ti{sub x}Ta{sub 1−x}N, Ti{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x}N, Ti{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N, and Zr{sub x}Ta{sub 1−x}N share the important plasmonic features with their binary counterparts, while having the additional asset of the exceptional spectral tunability in the entire visible (400–700 nm) and UVA (315–400 nm) spectral ranges depending on their net valence electrons. In particular, we demonstrate that such ternary nitrides can exhibit maximum field enhancement factors comparable with gold in the aforementioned broadband range. We also critically evaluate the structural features that affect the quality factor of the plasmon resonance and we provide rules of thumb for the selection and growth of materials for nitride plasmonics.

  16. Solubility limit and precipitation kinetics of iron-phosphide in ferritic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    The solubility limit of iron-phosphide in ferritic iron was examined with electrical resistivity measurements by using the relationship between resistivity and the amount of dissolved phosphorous. The temperature dependence of the solubility obtained was in good agreement with previous results. The kinetics of precipitation of the phosphide from a supersaturated Fe-3.75 at.% P alloy was also investigated with changes of the resistivity by isochronal and isothermal annealing. The activation energy for the precipitation process of the phosphide was about 2.6 eV. Diffusivities of phosphorus were estimated from the annealing behaviour and the morphology of the precipitates, which were comparable to those obtained with the tracer method previously. This suggests that the precipitation process of phosphide is rate controlled by diffusion of phosphorus in ferritic iron-phosphorus alloys. (orig.) [de

  17. Aluminum Phosphide; the Most Fatal Rodenticide and Fungicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshari, R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Aluminum phosphide (AP) is a fumigate agent, which is also used to control rodents and pests in grain storage facilities. This agent is commonly used in low income and agricultural communities. AP is easily available, cheap and highly toxic. Ingestion of even half a fresh tablet invariably results in death. Its suicidal or accidental poisoning is a medical emergency, while in some low income countries it reaches to more than two third of poisoning deaths. Methods: PubMed was systematically searched (December 2006) for articles related to aluminium phosphide poisoning. 24 articles were finally included. Mechanism of action; AP on exposure to moisture, liberates highly toxic gas, phosphine. In animal and human models AP rapidly inhibits cytochrome-c oxidase leading to inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and inhibits mitochondrial respiration and has cytotoxic action. Clinical Findings: Initial findings of intoxication may be nonspecific and transient. The symptoms may resolve within several hours after removal from exposure. It, however, produces phosphine gas, which is a mitochondrial poison. Its manufacturing and application pose risks of inhalation of phosphine. CNS; GCS is fine at the beginning. Biochemistry; Metabolic acidosis and liver dysfunction are reported. Shock is frequent. Respiratory Tract; Acute dyspnoea, hypotension, bradycardia and other signs of intoxication were also stated. Gastrointestinal; Reported short-segment esophageal strictures in the upper and mid esophagus, successfully managed by endoscopic dilatation. In sub-chronic use, degenerative changes in liver, heart and kidney of rabbits are reported. Cardiovascular; The ECG abnormalities are common and include hypotension, bradycardia, ST-T changes, Supraventricular tachycardia, ventricular ectopics, life threatening ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, atrial flutter/fibrillation, variable degrees of heart block and toxic myocarditis. Haematologic

  18. Changes in Some Hematology Parameters in poisoning with Rice Tablet (Aluminum Phosphide)

    OpenAIRE

    Farshid Fayyaz (PhD)

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Aluminum Phosphide (ALP) is a solid non-organic phosphide with dark gray or dark yellow crystals. It reacts with stomach acid after ingestion and causes phosphine gas to be released. It is thought that phosphine causes toxicity from enzymatic interference and may even lead to cell death. This study aimed to investigate the effects of poisoning with rice tablet on levels of platelets, hemoglobin, white blood cells. Methods: The clinical records of 67 cases of acute...

  19. Preparation and characteristics of various rare earth nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, H.; Imahashi, T.; Zaimi, M.; Sakata, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Active nanocrystalline nitrides of EuN and YbN with high surface areas were successfully prepared by the thermal decomposition of the rare earth amides (Eu(NH 2 ) 2 , Yb(NH 2 ) 2 and Yb(NH 2 ) 3 ). For the preparation of CeN, PrN and NdN, the direct reaction of the rare earth metals with ammonia was extensively studied to determine optimal conditions. In the reaction of rare earth metals with ammonia, hydrides besides the nitrides were competitively formed. The reaction conditions such as temperatures and ratios of ammonia to rare earth metal were crucial in preferential formation of nitride. The nanocrystalline YbN and EuN readily absorbed large amounts of ammonia even at room temperature upon contact with ammonia (13.3 kPa). The absorbed ammonia existed in at least two forms on/in the nitride; the one was surface-adsorbed ammonia and the other ammonia absorbed in the nitride in a decomposed state. The properties of ammonia absorbed by the nitride were further evaluated by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), FT-IR and XRD techniques

  20. V{sub 18}P{sub 9}C{sub 2}. A complex phosphide carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boller, Herbert [Linz Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie; Effenberger, Herta [Wien Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Mineralogie und Kristallographie

    2016-08-01

    V{sub 18}P{sub 9}C{sub 2} crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pmma with the lattice parameters a = 17.044(3), b = 3.2219(7), and c = 13.030(2) Aa, Z = 2. The crystal structure is composed of 19 symmetry-independent atoms. The crystal structure is considered as a network formed by the transition metal atoms exhibiting cubic, trigonal prismatic, and octahedral voids centered by V, P, and C atoms, respectively. Vice versa, the V and P atoms form a three-dimensional network. The two CV{sub 6} octahedra are edge- and corner-connected to chains running parallel to [010]. The five unique P atoms are trigonal prismatically coordinated by V atoms with one to three faces capped again by a V atom. The V atoms have mainly cubic environments formed solely by V or by V and P atoms. V{sub 18}P{sub 9}C{sub 2} exhibits some structural relations to other compounds of the ternary system V-P-C as well as to other intermetallic phases. Despite the low carbon content, V{sub 18}P{sub 9}C{sub 2} is considered as a ternary compound rather than an interstitially stabilized (binary) phosphide in view of its special structural features.

  1. Triamidoamine-uranium(IV)-stabilized terminal parent phosphide and phosphinidene complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Benedict M.; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J.; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Balazs, Gabor; Scheer, Manfred [Institut of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Regensburg (Germany); Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J.L. [School of Chemistry and Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-22

    Reaction of [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(THF)][BPh{sub 4}] (1; Tren{sup TIPS}=N{CH_2CH_2NSi(iPr)_3}{sub 3}) with NaPH{sub 2} afforded the novel f-block terminal parent phosphide complex [U(Tren {sup TIPS})(PH{sub 2})] (2; U-P=2.883(2) Aa). Treatment of 2 with one equivalent of KCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and two equivalents of benzo-15-crown-5 ether (B15C5) afforded the unprecedented metal-stabilized terminal parent phosphinidene complex [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(PH)][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (4; U=P=2.613(2) Aa). DFT calculations reveal a polarized-covalent U=P bond with a Mayer bond order of 1.92. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Electrostatically driven resonance energy transfer in "cationic" biocompatible indium phosphide quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devatha, Gayathri; Roy, Soumendu; Rao, Anish; Mallick, Abhik; Basu, Sudipta; Pillai, Pramod P

    2017-05-01

    Indium Phosphide Quantum Dots (InP QDs) have emerged as an alternative to toxic metal ion based QDs in nanobiotechnology. The ability to generate cationic surface charge, without compromising stability and biocompatibility, is essential in realizing the full potential of InP QDs in biological applications. We have addressed this challenge by developing a place exchange protocol for the preparation of cationic InP/ZnS QDs. The quaternary ammonium group provides the much required permanent positive charge and stability to InP/ZnS QDs in biofluids. The two important properties of QDs, namely bioimaging and light induced resonance energy transfer, are successfully demonstrated in cationic InP/ZnS QDs. The low cytotoxicity and stable photoluminescence of cationic InP/ZnS QDs inside cells make them ideal candidates as optical probes for cellular imaging. An efficient resonance energy transfer ( E ∼ 60%) is observed, under physiological conditions, between the cationic InP/ZnS QD donor and anionic dye acceptor. A large bimolecular quenching constant along with a linear Stern-Volmer plot confirms the formation of a strong ground state complex between the cationic InP/ZnS QDs and the anionic dye. Control experiments prove the role of electrostatic attraction in driving the light induced interactions, which can rightfully form the basis for future nano-bio studies between cationic InP/ZnS QDs and anionic biomolecules.

  3. Solar cells with gallium phosphide/silicon heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnon, Maxime; Varache, Renaud; Descazeaux, Médéric; Quinci, Thomas; Martin, Mickaël; Baron, Thierry; Muñoz, Delfina

    2015-09-01

    One of the limitations of current amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells is electrical and optical losses in the front transparent conductive oxide and amorphous silicon layers that limit the short circuit current. We propose to grow a thin (5 to 20 nm) crystalline Gallium Phosphide (GaP) by epitaxy on silicon to form a more transparent and more conducting emitter in place of the front amorphous silicon layers. We show that a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) is still necessary to laterally collect the current with thin GaP emitter. Larger contact resistance of GaP/TCO increases the series resistance compared to amorphous silicon. With the current process, losses in the IR region associated with silicon degradation during the surface preparation preceding GaP deposition counterbalance the gain from the UV region. A first cell efficiency of 9% has been obtained on ˜5×5 cm2 polished samples.

  4. Optical properties of indium phosphide nanowire ensembles at various temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohn, Andrew J; Onishi, Takehiro; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P [Baskin School of Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR), Advanced Studies Laboratories, University of California Santa Cruz-NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Ensembles that contain two types (zincblende and wurtzite) of indium phosphide nanowires grown on non-single crystalline surfaces were studied by micro-photoluminescence and micro-Raman spectroscopy at various low temperatures. The obtained spectra are discussed with the emphasis on the effects of differing lattice types, geometries, and crystallographic orientations present within an ensemble of nanowires grown on non-single crystalline surfaces. In the photoluminescence spectra, a typical Varshni dependence of band gap energy on temperature was observed for emissions from zincblende nanowires and in the high temperature regime energy transfer from excitonic transitions and band-edge transitions was identified. In contrast, the photoluminescence emissions associated with wurtzite nanowires were rather insensitive to temperature. Raman spectra were collected simultaneously from zincblende and wurtzite nanowires coexisting in an ensemble. Raman peaks of the wurtzite nanowires are interpreted as those related to the zincblende nanowires by a folding of the phonon dispersion.

  5. AC surface photovoltage of indium phosphide nanowire networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohn, Andrew J.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P. [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Baskin School of Engineering; California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (US). Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR); NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States). Advanced Studies Laboratories

    2012-06-15

    Surface photovoltage is used to study the dynamics of photogenerated carriers which are transported through a highly interconnected three-dimensional network of indium phosphide nanowires. Through the nanowire network charge transport is possible over distances far in excess of the nanowire lengths. Surface photovoltage was measured within a region 10.5-14.5 mm from the focus of the illumination, which was chopped at a range of frequencies from 15 Hz to 30 kHz. Carrier dynamics were modeled by approximating the nanowire network as a thin film, then fitted to experiment suggesting diffusion of electrons and holes at approximately 75% of the bulk value in InP but with significantly reduced built-in fields, presumably due to screening by nanowire surfaces. (orig.)

  6. Optical properties of indium phosphide nanowire ensembles at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohn, Andrew J; Onishi, Takehiro; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P

    2010-01-01

    Ensembles that contain two types (zincblende and wurtzite) of indium phosphide nanowires grown on non-single crystalline surfaces were studied by micro-photoluminescence and micro-Raman spectroscopy at various low temperatures. The obtained spectra are discussed with the emphasis on the effects of differing lattice types, geometries, and crystallographic orientations present within an ensemble of nanowires grown on non-single crystalline surfaces. In the photoluminescence spectra, a typical Varshni dependence of band gap energy on temperature was observed for emissions from zincblende nanowires and in the high temperature regime energy transfer from excitonic transitions and band-edge transitions was identified. In contrast, the photoluminescence emissions associated with wurtzite nanowires were rather insensitive to temperature. Raman spectra were collected simultaneously from zincblende and wurtzite nanowires coexisting in an ensemble. Raman peaks of the wurtzite nanowires are interpreted as those related to the zincblende nanowires by a folding of the phonon dispersion.

  7. Thermoelectric properties of boron and boron phosphide CVD wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumashiro, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Sato, A.; Ando, Y. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Electrical and thermal conductivities and thermoelectric power of p-type boron and n-type boron phosphide wafers with amorphous and polycrystalline structures were measured up to high temperatures. The electrical conductivity of amorphous boron wafers is compatible to that of polycrystals at high temperatures and obeys Mott`s T{sup -{1/4}} rule. The thermoelectric power of polycrystalline boron decreases with increasing temperature, while that of amorphous boron is almost constant in a wide temperature range. The weak temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of BP polycrystalline wafers reflects phonon scattering by grain boundaries. Thermal conductivity of an amorphous boron wafer is almost constant in a wide temperature range, showing a characteristic of a glass. The figure of merit of polycrystalline BP wafers is 10{sup -7}/K at high temperatures while that of amorphous boron is 10{sup -5}/K.

  8. Phosphorus Dimerization in Gallium Phosphide at High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavina, Barbara [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, United States; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, United States; Kim, Eunja [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, United States; Cynn, Hyunchae [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, United States; Weck, Philippe F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185, United States; Seaborg, Kelly [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, United States; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, United States; Siska, Emily [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, United States; Meng, Yue [HPCAT, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Evans, William [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, United States

    2018-02-09

    Using combined experimental and computational approaches, we show that at 43 GPa and 1300 K gallium phosphide adopts the super-Cmcm structure, here indicated with its Pearson notation oS24. First-principles enthalpy calculations demonstrate that this structure is more thermodynamically stable above ~20 GPa than previously proposed polymorphs. Here, in contrast to other polymorphs, the oS24 phase shows a strong bonding differentiation and distorted fivefold coordination geometries of both P atoms. The shortest bond of the phase is a single covalent P–P bond measuring 2.171(11) Å at synthesis pressure. Phosphorus dimerization in GaP sheds light on the nature of the super-Cmcm phase and provides critical new insights into the high-pressure polymorphism of octet semiconductors. Bond directionality and anisotropy explain the relatively low symmetry of this high-pressure phase.

  9. Characterization of plasma nitrided layers produced on sintered iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alves Fontes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nitriding is a thermo-physical-chemical treatment process, which promotes surface hardening, caused by interstitial diffusion of atomic nitrogen into metallic alloys. In this work, this process was employed in the surface modification of a sintered ferrous alloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses, and wear and microhardness tests were performed on the samples submitted to ferrox treatment and plasma nitriding carried out under different conditions of time and temperature. The results showed that the nitride layer thickness is higher for all nitrided samples than for ferrox treated samples, and this layer thickness increases with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature is a more significant variable. The XRD analysis showed that the nitrided layer, for all samples, near the surface consists in a mixture of γ′-Fe4N and ɛ-Fe3N phases. Both wear resistance and microhardness increase with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature influences both the characteristics the most.

  10. Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Krishna, Katla; Pavan Kumar, B. V. V. S.; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2011-07-01

    Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride have been prepared using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane as a template. The amine groups present on the surface of these nanopillars were exploited for functionalization with oleic acid in order to stabilize the nanostructure at the aqueous-organic interface and also for the immobilization of metal nanoparticles and protein. These immobilised nanoparticles were found to have good catalytic activity.

  11. Preparation and study of the nitrides and mixed carbide-nitrides of uranium and of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselin, F.

    1966-06-01

    A detailed description is given of a simple method for preparing uranium and plutonium nitrides by the direct action of nitrogen under pressure at moderate temperatures (about 400 C) on the partially hydrogenated bulk metal. It is shown that there is complete miscibility between the UN and PuN phases. The variations in the reticular parameters of the samples as a function of temperature and in the presence of oxide have been used to detect and evaluate the solubility of oxygen in the different phases. A study has been made of the sintering of these nitrides as a function of the preparation conditions with or without sintering additives. A favorable but non-reproducible, effect has been found for traces of oxide. The best results were obtained for pure UN at 1600 C (96 per cent theoretical density) on condition that a well defined powder, was used. The criterion used is the integral width of the X-ray diffraction lines. The compounds UN and PuN are completely miscible with the corresponding carbides. This makes it possible to prepare carbide-nitrides of the general formula (U,Pu) (C,N) by solid-phase diffusion, at around 1400 C. The sintering of these carbide-nitrides is similar to that of the carbides if the nitrogen content is low; in particular, nickel is an efficient sintering agent. For high contents, the sintering is similar to that of pure nitrides. (author) [fr

  12. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Masahide; Itoh, Akinori; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  13. Thermionic field emission in gold nitride Schottky nanodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, N.; Sarantopoulou, E.; Kollia, Z.; Samardžija, Z.; Kobe, S.; Cefalas, A. C.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the thermionic field emission and charge transport properties of gold nitride nanodomains grown by pulsed laser deposition with a molecular fluorine laser at 157 nm. The nanodomains are sandwiched between the metallic tip of a conductive atomic force microscope and a thin gold layer forming thus a metal-semiconductor-metal junction. Although the limited existing data in the literature indicate that gold nitride was synthesized previously with low efficiency, poor stability, and metallic character; in this work, it is shown that gold nitride nanodomains exhibit semiconducting behavior and the metal-semiconductor-metal contact can be modeled with the back-to-back Schottky barrier model. From the experimental I-V curves, the main charge carrier transport process is found to be thermionic field emission via electron tunneling. The rectifying, near symmetric and asymmetric current response of nanocontacts is related to the effective contact area of the gold nitride nanodomains with the metals. A lower limit for the majority charge carriers concentration at the boundaries of nanodomains is also established using the full depletion approximation, as nanodomains with thickness as low as 6 nm were found to be conductive. Current rectification and charge memory effects are also observed in "quite small" conductive nanodomains (6-10 nm) due to stored charges. Indeed, charges near the surface are identified as inversion domains in the phase shift mapping performed with electrostatic force microscopy and are attributed to charge trapping at the boundaries of the nanodomains.

  14. Preparation of high-pressure phase boron nitride films by physical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, P W; Zhao, Y N; Li, D M; Liu, H W; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure phases boron nitride films together with cubic, wurtzic, and explosive high-pressure phases, were successfully deposited on the metal alloy substrates by tuned substrate radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The percentage of cubic boron nitride phase in the film was about 50% as calculated by Fourier transform infrared measurements. Infrared peak position of cubic boron nitride at 1006.3 cm sup - sup 1 , which is close to the stressless state, indicates that the film has very low internal stress. Transition electron microscope micrograph shows that pure cubic boron nitride phase exits on the surface of the film. The growth mechanism of the BN films was also discussed.

  15. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  16. Gallium Phosphide Integrated with Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaomin

    It has been a long-standing goal to epitaxially integrate III-V alloys with Si substrates which can enable low-cost microelectronic and optoelectronic systems. Among the III-V alloys, gallium phosphide (GaP) is a strong candidate, especially for solar cells applications. Gallium phosphide with small lattice mismatch ( 0.4%) to Si enables coherent/pseudomorphic epitaxial growth with little crystalline defect creation. The band offset between Si and GaP suggests that GaP can function as an electron-selective contact, and it has been theoretically shown that GaP/Si integrated solar cells have the potential to overcome the limitations of common a-Si based heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. Despite the promising potential of GaP/Si heterojunction solar cells, there are two main obstacles to realize high performance photovoltaic devices from this structure. First, the growth of the polar material (GaP) on the non-polar material (Si) is a challenge in how to suppress the formation of structural defects, such as anti-phase domains (APD). Further, it is widely observed that the minority-carrier lifetime of the Si substrates is significantly decreased during epitaxially growth of GaP on Si. In this dissertation, two different GaP growth methods were compared and analyzed, including migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) and traditional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). High quality GaP can be realized on precisely oriented (001) Si substrates by MBE growth, and the investigation of structural defect creation in the GaP/Si epitaxial structures was conducted using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The mechanisms responsible for lifetime degradation were further investigated, and it was found that external fast diffusors are the origin for the degradation. Two practical approaches including the use of both a SiNx diffusion barrier layer and P-diffused layers, to suppress the Si minority-carrier lifetime degradation

  17. Optical and Electrical Characterization of Melt-Grown Bulk Indium Gallium Arsenide and Indium Arsenic Phosphide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    spectrum, photoluminescence (PL), and refractive index measurements. Other methods such as infrared imagery and micro probe wavelength dispersing ...States. AFIT/DS/ENP/11-M02 OPTICAL AND ELECTRICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MELT- GROWN BULK INDIUM GALLIUM ARSENIDE AND INDIUM ARSENIC PHOSPHIDE ...CHARACTERIZATION OF MELT-GROWN BULK INDIUM GALLIUM ARSENIDE AND INDIUM ARSENIC PHOSPHIDE ALLOYS Jean Wei, BS, MS Approved

  18. Phosphidation of Li4Ti5O12 nanoparticles and their electrochemical and biocompatible superiority for lithium rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Mi Ru; Nam, Ki Min; Lee, Youngmin; Song, Kyeongse; Park, Joon T; Kang, Yong-Mook

    2011-11-07

    Phosphidated-Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) shows high capacity with a significantly enhanced kinetics opening new possibilities for ultra-fast charge/discharge of lithium rechargeable batteries. The in vitro cytotoxicity test proves its fabulous cell viability, indicating that the toxicity problem of nanoparticles can be also solved by phosphidation. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  19. Synthesis, reactivity, and electronic structure of molecular uranium nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Cleaves, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The study of metal-ligand multiple bonding offers insight into the electronic structure and bond of metal systems. Until recently, for uranium, such systems were limited to uranyl, and terminal chalcogenide, imide and carbene complexes. In 2012, this was extended to nitrides with the first preparation of a uranium–nitride (U≡N) species isolable under standard conditions, namely [U(TrenTIPS)(N)][Na(12C4)2] (52), which is prepared by the two-electron reduction of sodium azide with a trivalent u...

  20. Optical Properties of Strained Wurtzite Gallium Phosphide Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Greil, J.

    2016-06-08

    Wurtzite gallium phosphide (WZ GaP) has been predicted to exhibit a direct bandgap in the green spectral range. Optical transitions, however, are only weakly allowed by the symmetry of the bands. While efficient luminescence has been experimentally shown, the nature of the transitions is not yet clear. Here we apply tensile strain up to 6% and investigate the evolution of the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of WZ GaP nanowires (NWs). The pressure and polarization dependence of the emission together with a theoretical analysis of strain effects is employed to establish the nature and symmetry of the transitions. We identify the emission lines to be related to localized states with significant admixture of Γ7c symmetry and not exclusively related to the Γ8c conduction band minimum (CBM). The results emphasize the importance of strongly bound state-related emission in the pseudodirect semiconductor WZ GaP and contribute significantly to the understanding of the optoelectronic properties of this novel material.

  1. Silicon nitride nanosieve membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tong, D.H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gadgil, V.J.; Bostan, C.G.; Berenschot, Johan W.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    An array of very uniform cylindrical nanopores with a pore diameter as small as 25 nm has been fabricated in an ultrathin micromachined silicon nitride membrane using focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The pore size of this nanosieve membrane was further reduced to below 10 nm by coating it with

  2. Iron-based alloy and nitridation treatment for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Yang, Bing [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-09

    A corrosion resistant electrically conductive component that can be used as a bipolar plate in a PEM fuel cell application is composed of an alloy substrate which has 10-30 wt. % Cr, 0.5 to 7 wt. % V, and base metal being Fe, and a continuous surface layer of chromium nitride and vanadium nitride essentially free of base metal. A oxide layer of chromium vanadium oxide can be disposed between the alloy substrate and the continuous surface nitride layer. A method to prepare the corrosion resistant electrically conductive component involves a two-step nitridization sequence by exposing the alloy to a oxygen containing gas at an elevated temperature, and subsequently exposing the alloy to an oxygen free nitrogen containing gas at an elevated temperature to yield a component where a continuous chromium nitride layer free of iron has formed at the surface.

  3. Thermal Properties and Phonon Spectral Characterization of Synthetic Boron Phosphide for High Thermal Conductivity Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joon Sang; Wu, Huan; Hu, Yongjie

    2017-12-13

    Heat dissipation is an increasingly critical technological challenge in modern electronics and photonics as devices continue to shrink to the nanoscale. To address this challenge, high thermal conductivity materials that can efficiently dissipate heat from hot spots and improve device performance are urgently needed. Boron phosphide is a unique high thermal conductivity and refractory material with exceptional chemical inertness, hardness, and high thermal stability, which holds high promises for many practical applications. So far, however, challenges with boron phosphide synthesis and characterization have hampered the understanding of its fundamental properties and potential applications. Here, we describe a systematic thermal transport study based on a synergistic synthesis-experimental-modeling approach: we have chemically synthesized high-quality boron phosphide single crystals and measured their thermal conductivity as a record-high 460 W/mK at room temperature. Through nanoscale ballistic transport, we have, for the first time, mapped the phonon spectra of boron phosphide and experimentally measured its phonon mean free-path spectra with consideration of both natural and isotope-pure abundances. We have also measured the temperature- and size-dependent thermal conductivity and performed corresponding calculations by solving the three-dimensional and spectral-dependent phonon Boltzmann transport equation using the variance-reduced Monte Carlo method. The experimental results are in good agreement with that predicted by multiscale simulations and density functional theory, which together quantify the heat conduction through the phonon mode dependent scattering process. Our finding underscores the promise of boron phosphide as a high thermal conductivity material for a wide range of applications, including thermal management and energy regulation, and provides a detailed, microscopic-level understanding of the phonon spectra and thermal transport mechanisms of

  4. First-principles study of the structural and electronic properties of III-phosphides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Rashid [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan)], E-mail: rasofi@hotmail.com; Fazal-e-Aleem [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan); Hashemifar, S. Javad; Akbarzadeh, Hadi [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-05-01

    We use density functional theory and different forms of the exchange-correlation approximation to calculate the structural and electronic properties of tetrahedrally coordinated III-phosphide semiconductors. The computed results for structural properties using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) agree well with the experimental data. For reliable description of energy band gap values, another form of GGA developed by Engel and Vosko has been applied. As anticipated, boron phosphide was found to be the hardest compound due to the strong B-P covalent bonding.

  5. A CASE REPORT ON ZINC PHOSPHIDE POISONING AND ITS RARE EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naga Raghunandan Thota

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Zinc phosphide is widely in use as a rodenticide. After ingestion, it gets converted to phosphine gas, which is subsequently absorbed into the bloodstream through the stomach and the intestines and gets captured by the liver and the lungs. The toxic effects of zinc phosphide poisoning is through the phosphine gas that produces various metabolic and non-metabolic intermediate compounds. Patients develop features of shock, myocarditis, pericarditis, acute pulmonary oedema and congestive heart failure. In this case report, we present a common complication of the poison that manifested earlier than it is depicted in the current literature.

  6. First principles calculations of interstitial and lamellar rhenium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, G., E-mail: gerardo@cnyn.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico); Tiznado, H.; Reyes, A.; Cruz, W. de la [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The possible structures of rhenium nitride as a function of composition are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloying energy is favorable for rhenium nitride in lamellar arrangements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures produced by magnetron sputtering are metastable variations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures produced by high-pressure high-temperature are stable configurations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lamellar structures are a new category of interstitial dissolutions. - Abstract: We report here a systematic first principles study of two classes of variable-composition rhenium nitride: i, interstitial rhenium nitride as a solid solution and ii, rhenium nitride in lamellar structures. The compounds in class i are cubic and hexagonal close-packed rhenium phases, with nitrogen in the octahedral and tetrahedral interstices of the metal, and they are formed without changes to the structure, except for slight distortions of the unit cells. In the compounds in class ii, by contrast, the nitrogen inclusion provokes stacking faults in the parent metal structure. These faults create trigonal-prismatic sites where the nitrogen residence is energetically favored. This second class of compounds produces lamellar structures, where the nitrogen lamellas are inserted among multiple rhenium layers. The Re{sub 3}N and Re{sub 2}N phases produced recently by high-temperature and high-pressure synthesis belong to this class. The ratio of the nitrogen layers to the rhenium layers is given by the composition. While the first principle calculations point to higher stability for the lamellar structures as opposed to the interstitial phases, the experimental evidence presented here demonstrates that the interstitial classes are synthesizable by plasma methods. We conclude that rhenium nitrides possess polymorphism and that the two-dimensional lamellar structures might represent an emerging class of materials

  7. First principles calculations of interstitial and lamellar rhenium nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, G.; Tiznado, H.; Reyes, A.; Cruz, W. de la

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The possible structures of rhenium nitride as a function of composition are analyzed. ► The alloying energy is favorable for rhenium nitride in lamellar arrangements. ► The structures produced by magnetron sputtering are metastable variations. ► The structures produced by high-pressure high-temperature are stable configurations. ► The lamellar structures are a new category of interstitial dissolutions. - Abstract: We report here a systematic first principles study of two classes of variable-composition rhenium nitride: i, interstitial rhenium nitride as a solid solution and ii, rhenium nitride in lamellar structures. The compounds in class i are cubic and hexagonal close-packed rhenium phases, with nitrogen in the octahedral and tetrahedral interstices of the metal, and they are formed without changes to the structure, except for slight distortions of the unit cells. In the compounds in class ii, by contrast, the nitrogen inclusion provokes stacking faults in the parent metal structure. These faults create trigonal-prismatic sites where the nitrogen residence is energetically favored. This second class of compounds produces lamellar structures, where the nitrogen lamellas are inserted among multiple rhenium layers. The Re 3 N and Re 2 N phases produced recently by high-temperature and high-pressure synthesis belong to this class. The ratio of the nitrogen layers to the rhenium layers is given by the composition. While the first principle calculations point to higher stability for the lamellar structures as opposed to the interstitial phases, the experimental evidence presented here demonstrates that the interstitial classes are synthesizable by plasma methods. We conclude that rhenium nitrides possess polymorphism and that the two-dimensional lamellar structures might represent an emerging class of materials within binary nitride chemistry.

  8. Hierarchical cobalt poly-phosphide hollow spheres as highly active and stable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution over a wide pH range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianli; Pi, Mingyu; Wang, Xiaodeng; Guo, Weimeng; Zhang, Dingke; Chen, Shijian

    2018-01-01

    Exploring highly-efficient and low-cost non-noble metal electrocatalyst toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is highly desired for renewable energy system but remains challenging. In this work, three dimensional hierarchical porous cobalt poly-phosphide hollow spheres (CoP3 HSs) were prepared by topotactic phosphidation of the cobalt-based precursor via vacuum encapsulation technique. As a porous HER cathode, the CoP3 HSs delivers remarkable electrocatalytic performance over the wide pH range. It needs overpotentials of -69 mV and -118 mV with a small Tafel slope of 51 mV dec-1 to obtain current densities of 10 mA cm-2 and 50 mA cm-2, respectively, and maintains its electrocatalytic performance over 30 h in acidic solution. In addition, CoP3 also exhibit superior electrocatalytic performance and stability under neutral and alkaline conditions for the HER. Both experimental measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to explore the mechanism behind the excellent HER performance. The results of our study make the porous CoP3 HSs as a promising electrocatalyst for practical applications toward energy conversion system and present a new way for designing and fabricating HER electrodes through high degree of phosphorization and nano-porous architecture.

  9. Acute aluminium phosphide poisoning: Can we predict mortality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Mathai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, acute aluminium phosphide poisoning (AAlPP is a serious health care problem. This study aimed to determine the characteristics of AAlPP and the predictors of mortality at the time of patients′ admission. We studied consecutive admissions of patients with AAlPP admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU between November 2004 and October 2006. We noted 38 parameters at admission to the hospital and the ICU and compared survivor and non-survivor groups. A total of 27 patients were enrolled comprising5 females and 22 males and the mean ingested dose of poison was 0.75 ± 0.745 grams. Hypotension was noted in 24 patients (89% at admission and electrocardiogram abnormalities were noted in 13 patients (48.1%. The mean pH on admission was 7.20 ± 0.14 and the mean bicarbonate concentration was 12.32 ± 5.45 mmol/ L. The mortality from AAlPP was 59.3%. We found the following factors to be associated with an increased risk of mortality: a serum creatinine concentration of more than 1.0 mg % (P = 0.01, pH value less than 7.2 (P = 0.014, serum bicarbonate value less than 15 mmol/L (P = 0.048, need for mechanical ventilation (P = 0.045, need for vasoactive drugs like dobutamine (P = 0.027 and nor adrenaline (P = 0.048 and a low APACHE II score at admission (P = 0.019. AAlPP causes high mortality primarily due to early haemodynamic failure and multi-organ dysfunction

  10. Frequency of Cardiac Arrhythmias in Patients with Aluminum Phosphide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umair Aziz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac failure is the major lethal consequence of aluminum phosphide (AlP poisoning. This study was designed to determine the frequency of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with AlP poisoning. Methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study, patients with definitive history of AlP poisoning treated at emergency department of Allied Hospital Faisalabad, Faisalabad, Pakistan, from July 2013 to November 2014 were included. On admission, twelve-lead electrocardiogram (ECG was performed for all patients. During admission, all patients underwent continuous cardiac monitoring using a cardiac monitor. If an arrhythmia was suspected on the cardiac monitor, another ECG was obtained immediately.  Results: During the study period, 100 patients with AlP poisoning (63% men were treated at Allied Hospital Faisalabad. Mean age of the patients was 26.7 ± 7.9 years ranging from 16 to 54 years. Tachycardia was detected in 68 patients and bradycardia in 12 patients. Hypotension was observed in 75 patients. Eighty patients developed cardiac arrhythmia. The most frequent arrhythmia was atrial fibrillation (31% of patients followed by ventricular fibrillation (20%, ventricular tachycardia (17%, 3rd degree AV block (7% and 2nd degree AV block (5%. In total, 78 patients died, depicting a 78% mortality rate following wheat pill poisoning. Among those who died, seventy-one patients had cardiac arrhythmia. Comparison of death rate between patients with and without cardiac arrhythmia showed a significant difference (71/80 (88.8% vs. 7/20 (35%; P < 0.001.  Conclusion: Wheat pill poisoning causes a very high mortality, and circulatory collapse is the major cause of death among these patients. Most of the patients with AlP poisoning develop cardiac arrhythmias which are invariably life threatening. Early detection of cardiac disorders and proper management of arrhythmias may reduce mortalities.

  11. Crystallo-chemistry of actinide nitrides (U1-yPuy)N and effect of impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Coulon-Picard, E.; Pelletier, M.

    2004-01-01

    Investigations on actinide nitrides has been done in our Laboratories for Fast Breeder Reactors since the seventies and some properties are reported to show the interest for these fuels. Today, the actinide nitrides are reconsidered as possible fuels for the future fission reactors (GFR and LMFR selected by the international forum Generation IV). The results of new investigations on crystal structure of mixed mono-nitrides (U,Pu)N, and the effects of oxygen and carbon contaminations on this structure are presented. The cubic 'NaCl-fcc' type structure of actinide nitrides AnN with space group O5/h-Fm3m does not respect the 'Vegard law' model for the mixed nitrides (U 1-y Pu y )N. These nitrides are usually considered with strong metallic character associated with partial ionic bonding, but the ionic contribution in the An-N bonding determined in this work is very important and near 41.6% for UN and PuN. From results published on resistivity of mixed nitrides, the data on bonding must be also modified for partial covalence. This is in good agreement with the experimental lattice parameters which are not compatible with dominant metallic bonding. The numbers of bonding electrons in the nitrides (U 1-y Pu y )N are reevaluated and the low values proposed comparatively with those previously published confirm the strong ionic character with high concentration of An 3+ ions. The solubility of oxygen and carbon in actinide nitrides (U 1-y Pu y )N are discussed from measurements on volume concentration of actinide oxide phase, total oxygen and carbon contents, and lattice parameter of nitrides. The oxygen solubility limit in UN is near 1000 ppm, with a lightly higher value of 1200 ppm for the mixed nitride (U 0.8 Pu 0.2 )N. The effects of oxygen or carbon atoms in the lattice of (U 1-y Pu y )N are analysed

  12. Nitriding of high speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, E.D.; Pagon, A.M.; Hubbard, P.; Dowey, S.J.; Pilkington, A.; McCulloch, D.G.; Latham, K.; DuPlessis, J.

    2010-01-01

    Current practice when nitriding HSS cutting tools is to avoid embrittlement of the cutting edge by limiting the depth of the diffusion zone. This is accomplished by reducing the nitriding time and temperature and eliminating any compound layer formation. However, in many applications there is an argument for generating a compound layer with beneficial tribological properties. In this investigation results are presented of a metallographic, XRD and XPS analysis of nitrided surface layers generated using active screen plasma nitriding and reactive vapour deposition using cathodic arc. These results are discussed in the context of built up edge formation observed while machining inside a scanning electron microscope. (author)

  13. Defects in dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.M.; Buyanova, I.A.; Tu, C.W.; Yonezu, H.

    2005-01-01

    We provide a brief review our recent results from optically detected magnetic resonance studies of grown-in non-radiative defects in dilute nitrides, i.e. Ga(In)NAs and Ga(Al,In)NP. Defect complexes involving intrinsic defects such as As Ga antisites and Ga i self interstitials were positively identified.Effects of growth conditions, chemical compositions and post-growth treatments on formation of the defects are closely examined. These grown-in defects are shown to play an important role in non-radiative carrier recombination and thus in degrading optical quality of the alloys, harmful to performance of potential optoelectronic and photonic devices based on these dilute nitrides. (author)

  14. Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning: Two Pediatric Patients and Two Different Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Ekinci

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide is an insecticide that turns into a quite toxic gas called phosphine when contacts with gastric fluids. Aluminium phosphide poisoning causes severe metabolic acidosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure with cardiogenic shock. Our first case was an-18-year-old girl admitted to our emergency department two hours after ingestion of one tablet containing 500 mg aluminium phosphide in a suicide attempt. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was started one hour after initiation of inotropic agents. Despite improvement in hemodynamic status, she developed refractory arrhythmias at the12th hour and she died 22 hours after admission. The second case was a two-year-old girl who was admitted to our emergency department because of observing a piece of aluminum phosphide 500 mg tablet broken in her mouth. Her vital signs were stable in the follow-up. The patient who had no problems in the follow-up was discharged at 48 hours.

  15. Peculiarities of electrooptical characteristics of gallium phosphide light-emitting diodes in high injection level conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Hontaruk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electroluminescence of green N-doped gallium phosphide light-emitting diodes was studied. The negative differential resistance region in the current-voltage characteristics was found at low temperature (Т ≤ 90 К. Possible reason of this phenomenon is the redistribution of recombinational flows between annihilation channels on isolated nitrogen atoms and annihilation channel on the NN1 pairs.

  16. Effect of aluminium phosphide on some metabolites of the liver and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminium phosphide induced changes in some metabolic parameters in Parophiocephalus obscurus were assessed. Parophiocephalus obscurus (mean length, 18.00±0.09cm and mean weight, 65.03±0.03g) were acclimatized to laboratory condition for 10 days and then exposed to varying sublethal concentrations of ...

  17. First-principles calculation of the structural and elastic properties of ternary metal nitrides TaxMo1-xN and TaxW1-xN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouamama, Kh.; Djemia, P.; Benhamida, M.

    2015-09-01

    First-principles pseudo-potentials calculations of the mixing enthalpy, of the lattice constants a0 and of the single-crystal elastic constants cij for ternary metal nitrides TaxMe1-xN (Me=Mo or W) alloys considering the cubic B1-rocksalt structure is carried out. For disordered ternary alloys, we employ the virtual crystal approximation VCA in which the alloy pseudopotentials are constructed within a first-principles VCA scheme. The supercell method SC is also used for ordered structures in order to evaluate clustering effects. We find that the mixing enthalpy still remains negative for TaxMe1-xN alloys in the whole composition range which implies these cubic TaxMo1-xN and TaxW1-xN ordered solid solutions are stable. We investigate the effect of Mo and W alloying on the trend of the mechanical properties of TaN. The effective shear elastic constant c44, the Cauchy pressure (c12-c44), and the shear to bulk modulus G/B ratio are used to discuss, respectively, the mechanical stability of the ternary structure and the brittle/ductile behavior in reference to TaN, MeN alloys. We determine the onset transition from the unstable structure to the stable one B1-rocksalt from the elastic stability criteria when alloying MeN with Ta. In a second stage, in the frame of anisotropic elasticity, we estimate by one homogenization method the averaged constants of the polycrystalline TaxMe1-xN alloys considering the special case of an isotropic medium with no crystallographic texture.

  18. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energy...

  19. Uranium sesqui nitride synthesis and its use as catalyst for the thermo decomposition of ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Soraya Maria Rizzo da

    1996-01-01

    The preoccupation to have a secure destination for metallic uranium scraps and wastes and to search new non-nuclear uses for the huge amount of depleted metal uranium accumulated at the nuclear industry encouraged the study of the uranium sesqui nitride synthesis and its use. The use of uranium sesqui nitride as a catalyst for the thermo decomposition of ammonia for the hydrogen production has enormous significance. One of the most important nuclear cycle step is the reduction of the higher uranium oxides for the production of uranium dioxide and its conversion to uranium tetrafluoride. The reduction of the UO 3 and U 3 O 8 oxides is accomplished by the gas-solid reaction with elementary hydrogen. For economical purposes and for the safety concern the nuclear industry prefers to manufacture the hydrogen gas at the local and at the moment of use, exploring the catalytic decomposition of ammonia vapor. Using metallic uranium scraps as the raw material the obtention of its nitride was achieved by the reaction with ammonia. The results of the chemical and physical characterization of the prepared uranium sesqui nitride and its behavior as a catalyst for the cracking of ammonia are commented. A lower ammonia cracking temperature (550 deg C) using the uranium sesqui nitride compared with recommended industrial catalysts iron nitride (650 deg C) and manganese nitride (700 deg C) sounds reliable and economically advantageous. (author)

  20. Zinc phosphide toxicity with a trial of tranexamic acid in its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Rahman M. El Naggar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Zinc phosphide is a highly effective rodenticide used widely to protect grain in stores and domestically to kill rodents. Acute poisoning may be direct by ingestion or indirect through accidental inhalation of phosphine gas generated during its use. This study aims to identify the patterns of intoxication with zinc phosphide among Egyptian patients admitted to the National Egyptian Center of Clinical and Environmental Toxicological Research (NECTR; to study the role of antifibrinolytics in management of zinc phosphide toxicity; and to publish the results of the study, which include recommendations for action towards planning prevention and education programs. The study provides descriptive data and analysis of 188 cases admitted to the NECTR with acute zinc phosphide poisoning over a period of 22 months. Results show that poisoning is more common among females (60.6% of cases than males (39.4%; the mean age is nearly 21 years old. The most common cause of poisoning is suicidal attempts (83.6% followed by accidental exposure (16.4%. The most common causative factors that lead to self-poisoning are marital disharmony, economic hardship, social problems and scolding from other family members. Signs and symptoms of toxicity include gastrointestinal disturbances, respiratory compromise and changes in mental status. Other features include disseminated intravascular coagulation, hepatic and renal impairment. Metabolic disturbances had been reported. Death can result immediately due to pulmonary edema or delayed due to cardiotoxicity. Patients must be admitted to hospital and observed for at least 3 days. Symptomatic and supportive care is the mainstay of therapy. Zinc phosphide poisoning requires gastric lavage with excessive sodium bicarbonate solution. Tranexamic acid – an antifibrinolytic agent – was found to be of help in some cases. Psychosocial counseling in cases of intentional poisoning is an important aspect of overall management of the

  1. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition......, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride...... precipitates were formed firstly close to the surface and later throughout the sample with austenitic structure. Chromium-rich nitride precipitates with a rod or strip-like morphology was developed by a discontinuous cellular precipitation mechanism. STEM-EDS analysis demonstrated partitioning of metallic...

  2. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  3. Quantum dot infrared photodetectors based on indium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhard, T.

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this work is a systematic study of quantum dot infrared photodetectors based on indium-phosphide substrate by means of various spectroscopic and electronic measurement methods in order to understand the physical and technological processes. This enables a concise definition of strategies in order to realize next generation devices in this material system and to gain overall progress in the research field of quantum dot infrared photodetectors. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by analytical and numerical simulations. The samples, grown by collaboration partners, were characterized using differential transmission and fast Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on the latter one. Therefore, samples both in wedged waveguide geometry and samples with gold coated mesa structures have been processed. A large part of the discussion is dedicated to the current voltage characteristic of the devices, due to its large importance for device optimization, i.e. the reduction of the dark current plays a crucial role in the research field of high temperature infrared photon-detection. Further, results of photoluminescence measurements, performed by collaboration partners, have been used in order to attain a more complete picture of the samples' electronic band structure and in order to obtain complementary information with respect to other measurement methods applied within the experimental work and the simulation of the structures. In agreement to the simulations, a photocurrent response was observed at 6 and at 12 μm up to a temperature of 80 K, depending on the samples' design. The principle of parameter scaling was applied to the samples, in order to assign physical effects either to details in the samples' design or to technological quality aspects, i.e. the doping level and the thickness of the capping layer was varied. In addition to that a quantum well was introduced within a series of samples in order to

  4. Oxide-nitride-oxide dielectric stacks with Si nanoparticles obtained by low-energy ion beam synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannou-Sougleridis, V; Dimitrakis, P; Vamvakas, V Em; Normand, P; Bonafos, C; Schamm, S; Mouti, A; Assayag, G Ben; Paillard, V

    2007-01-01

    Formation of a thin band of silicon nanoparticles within silicon nitride films by low-energy (1 keV) silicon ion implantation and subsequent thermal annealing is demonstrated. Electrical characterization of metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors reveals that oxide/Si-nanoparticles-nitride/oxide dielectric stacks exhibit enhanced charge transfer characteristics between the substrate and the silicon nitride layer compared to dielectric stacks using unimplanted silicon nitride. Attractive results are obtained in terms of write/erase memory characteristics and data retention, indicating the large potential of the low-energy ion-beam-synthesis technique in SONOS memory technology

  5. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  6. Origin of interfacial charging in irradiated silicon nitride capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Many experiments show that when metal-silicon nitride-silicon dioxide-silicon (MNOS) devices are irradiated in short circuit, a large interfacial charge builds up near the nitride-SiO 2 -Si interface. This effect cannot be explained by simple models of radiation-induced conductivity of the nitride, but it is reported here that inclusion of carrier diffusion and recombination in the photoconductivity equations can predict the observed behavior. Numerical solutions on a computer are required, however, when these complications are added. The simulations account for the magnitude and radiation dose dependence of the results, as well as the occurrence of a steady state during the irradiation. The location of the excess trapped charge near the interface is also predicted, along with the large number of new traps which must be introduced to influence the steady-state charge distribution

  7. Electrostatically driven resonance energy transfer in ?cationic? biocompatible indium phosphide quantum dots? ?Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental methods, the synthesis and characterization of QDs, bioimaging, stability studies, control experiments, and the calculation of various parameters involved in the resonance energy transfer process etc. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00592j Click here for additional data file.

    OpenAIRE

    Devatha, Gayathri; Roy, Soumendu; Rao, Anish; Mallick, Abhik; Basu, Sudipta; Pillai, Pramod P.

    2017-01-01

    Indium Phosphide Quantum Dots (InP QDs) have emerged as an alternative to toxic metal ion based QDs in nanobiotechnology. The ability to generate cationic surface charge, without compromising stability and biocompatibility, is essential in realizing the full potential of InP QDs in biological applications. We have addressed this challenge by developing a place exchange protocol for the preparation of cationic InP/ZnS QDs. The quaternary ammonium group provides the much required permanent posi...

  8. Short period strain balanced gallium arsenide nitride/indium arsenide nitride superlattice lattice matched to indium phosphide for mid-infrared photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhusal, Lekhnath

    Dilute nitrogen-containing III-V-N alloys have been intensively studied for their unusual electronic and optical behavior in the presence of a small amount of nitrogen. Those behaviors can further be manipulated, with a careful consideration of the strain and strain balancing, for example, in the context of a strain-balanced superlattice (SL) based on those alloys. In this work, the k.p approximation and the band anti-crossing model modified for the strain have been used to describe the electronic states of the strained bulk-like GaAs1-xNx and InAs 1-yNy ternaries in the vicinity of the center of the Brillouin zone (Gamma-point). Band-offsets between the conduction and valence bands of GaAs1-xNx and InAs1-yN y have also been evaluated, before implementing them into the SL structure. By minimizing the total mechanical energy of the stack of the alternating layers of GaAs1-xNx and InAs1-yNy in the SL, the ratio of the thicknesses of the epilayers is determined to make the structure lattice-matching on the InP(001), through the strain-balancing. Mini-band energies of the strain-balanced GaAs1-xNx/InAs 1-yNy short-period SL on InP(001) is then investigated using the transfer matrix formalism. This enabled identifying the evolution of the band edge transition energies of the superlattice structure for different nitrogen compositions. Results show the potential of the new proposed design to exceed the existing limits of bulk-like InGaAsN alloys and offer the applications for photon absorption/emission energies in the range of ~0.65-0.35eV at 300K for a typical nitrogen composition of ≤5%. The optical absorption coefficient of such a SL is then estimated under the anisotropic medium approximation, where the optical absorption of the bulk structure is modified according to the anisotropy imposed by the periodic potential in the growth direction. As an application, the developed SL structure is used to investigate the performance of double, triple and quadruple junction thermophotovoltaic devices. Integration of the SL structure, which is lattice matched to InP, in the i region of the p(InGaAs)- i(SL) n(InGaAs) diode allowed the possibility of more than two junction thermophotovoltiac device with the enhanced performance in comparison to the conventional p(InGaAs)n(InGaAs) diode.

  9. Hot pressing of uranium nitride and mixed uranium plutonium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.Y.

    1975-01-01

    The hot pressing characteristics of uranium nitride and mixed uranium plutonium nitride were studied. The utilization of computer programs together with the experimental technique developed in the present study may serve as a useful purpose of prediction and fabrication of advanced reactor fuel and other high temperature ceramic materials for the future. The densification of nitrides follow closely with a plastic flow theory expressed as: d rho/ dt = A/T(t) (1-rho) [1/1-(1-rho)/sup 2/3/ + B1n (1-rho)] The coefficients, A and B, were obtained from experiment and computer curve fitting. (8 figures) (U.S.)

  10. Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-09-22

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  11. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  12. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH 3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  13. Fabrication of aluminum nitride crucibles for molten salt and plutonium compatibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to fabricate a calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride crucible and determine the compatibility of this crucible with molten chloride salts and plutonium metal in the DOR process. Calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride was preferred over yttrium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride because of (1) the presence of calcium chloride, calcium oxide, and calcium metal in the molten salts utilized in the DOR process, and (2) the higher volatility of the secondary phases formed compared with phases resulting from the addition of yttrium oxide during the aluminum nitride sintering process. The calcium oxide system may yield a higher purity crystal structure with fewer secondary phases present than in the yttrium oxide system. The secondary phases that are present in the grain boundaries may be unreactive with the calcium chloride salt due to the presence of calcium in the secondary phases

  14. Molybdenum Nitride Films: Crystal Structures, Synthesis, Mechanical, Electrical and Some Other Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jauberteau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Among transition metal nitrides, molybdenum nitrides have been much less studied even though their mechanical properties as well as their electrical and catalytic properties make them very attractive for many applications. The δ-MoN phase of hexagonal structure is a potential candidate for an ultra-incompressible and hard material and can be compared with c-BN and diamond. The predicted superconducting temperature of the metastable MoN phase of NaCl-B1-type cubic structure is the highest of all refractory carbides and nitrides. The composition of molybdenum nitride films as well as the structures and properties depend on the parameters of the process used to deposit the films. They are also strongly correlated to the electronic structure and chemical bonding. An unusual mixture of metallic, covalent and ionic bonding is found in the stoichiometric compounds.

  15. Study on the nitride fuel fabrication for FBR cycle (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinkai, Yasuo; Ono, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Kenya

    2002-07-01

    In the phase-II of JNC's 'Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fuel Reactor Cycle System (the F/S)', the nitride fuels are selected as candidate for fuels for heavy metal cooled reactor, gas cooled reactor, and small scale reactor. In particular, the coated fuel particles are a promising concept for gas cooled reactor. In addition, it is necessary to study in detail the application possibility of pellet nitride fuel and vibration compaction nitride fuel for heavy metal cooled reactor and small scale reactor in the phase-II. In 2001, we studied more about additional equipments for the nitride fuel fabrication in processes from gelation to carbothermic reduction in the vibration compaction method. The result of reevaluation of off-gas mass flow around carbothermic reduction equipment in the palletizing method, showed that quantity of off-gas flow reduced and its reduction led the operation cost to decrease. We studied the possibility of fabrication of large size particles in the coated fuel particles for helium gas cooled reactor and we made basic technical issues clear. (author)

  16. Electronic properties of Mn-decorated silicene on hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Jones, Burton; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Singh, Nirpendra

    2013-01-01

    We study silicene on hexagonal boron nitride, using first-principles calculations. Since hexagonal boron nitride is semiconducting, the interaction with silicene is weaker than for metallic substrates. It therefore is possible to open a 50 meV band gap in the silicene. We further address the effect of Mn decoration by determining the onsite Hubbard interaction parameter, which turns out to differ significantly for decoration at the top and hollow sites. The induced magnetism in the system is analyzed in detail.

  17. Electronic properties of Mn-decorated silicene on hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-12-17

    We study silicene on hexagonal boron nitride, using first-principles calculations. Since hexagonal boron nitride is semiconducting, the interaction with silicene is weaker than for metallic substrates. It therefore is possible to open a 50 meV band gap in the silicene. We further address the effect of Mn decoration by determining the onsite Hubbard interaction parameter, which turns out to differ significantly for decoration at the top and hollow sites. The induced magnetism in the system is analyzed in detail.

  18. Explosion of lithium-thionyl-chloride battery due to presence of lithium nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Hennesø, E.; Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2015-01-01

    An explosion of a lithium–thionyl-chloride (Li–SOCl2) battery during production (assembly) leads to serious worker injury. The accident cell batch had been in a dry-air intermediate storage room for months before being readied with thionyl chloride electrolyte. Metallic lithium can react with atmospheric nitrogen to produce lithium nitride. Nodules of lithium nitride were found to be present on the lithium foil in other cells of the accident batch. The investigation attributed the explosion t...

  19. Scaling-resistance of ruthenium- and ruthenium phosphides powders in argon and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernogorebko, V.B.; Semenov-Kobzar', A.A.; Kulik, L.Ya.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal stability of ruthenium phosphides in air diminishes as the content of phosphorus in the compound increases. The temperatures at which active oxidation of the powders starts are as follows: Ru-600, Ru 2 P-590, RuP-390, and RuP 2 -270 0 C. The oxidation of phosphorus in the phosphides proceeds in steps. The atoms of phosphorus which are most accessible to oxygen are first oxidated. Phosphorus atoms in the octahedral spaces are oxidated less easily, simultaneously with the oxidation of the ruthenium atoms. When heated in argon, Ru 2 P and RuP fuse congruently at 1,500 and 1,555 0 C respectively, while RuP 2 dissociates at 950 0 C. (author)

  20. Compton scattering studies of the electron momentum distribution in indium phosphide

    CERN Document Server

    Deb, A; Guin, R; Chatterjee, A K

    1999-01-01

    The electron momentum anisotropy of indium phosphide has been studied by measuring the directional Compton profiles of indium phosphide single crystals with the use of radiation from an sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am gamma source. Three different samples, cut along the [100], [110] and [111] planes, were used. The experimental anisotropy has been compared with the results based on the linear combination of Gaussian orbitals (LCGO) method. The agreement is very good with our theoretical results. It is found that the extrema appearing in the dependences on q of the anisotropies have an intimate connection with the bonding properties of the semiconductor. A self-consistent, all-electron, local density calculation for the partial density of states, total density of states and the charge analysis is also presented here.

  1. Method for producing polycrystalline boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeevskii, V.P.; Bochko, A.V.; Dzhamarov, S.S.; Karpinos, D.M.; Karyuk, G.G.; Kolomiets, I.P.; Kurdyumov, A.V.; Pivovarov, M.S.; Frantsevich, I.N.; Yarosh, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    A mixture containing less than 50 percent of graphite-like boron nitride treated by a shock wave and highly defective wurtzite-like boron nitride obtained by a shock-wave method is compressed and heated at pressure and temperature values corresponding to the region of the phase diagram for boron nitride defined by the graphite-like compact modifications of boron nitride equilibrium line and the cubic wurtzite-like boron nitride equilibrium line. The resulting crystals of boron nitride exhibit a structure of wurtzite-like boron nitride or of both wurtzite-like and cubic boron nitride. The resulting material exhibits higher plasticity as compared with polycrystalline cubic boron nitride. Tools made of this compact polycrystalline material have a longer service life under impact loads in machining hardened steel and chilled iron. (U.S.)

  2. Properties of epitaxial films of indium phosphides alloyed with erbium in strong electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, V.I.; Dvoryankin, V.F.; Korobkin, V.A.; Kudryashov, A.A.; Lopatin, V.V.; Lyubchenko, V.E.; Telegin, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature dependences of specific resistance and free charge-carrier mobility at low temperatures for indium phosphide films grown by liquid-phase epitaxial method with erbium additions (0.01-0.1 mass%). The main mechanisms of scattering for different temperature regions: scattering on ionized impurities in the rage from 20 to 40 K and lattice scattering at the temperature above 90 K are determined. The current density dependences on applied electric field strength are presented

  3. Acetaminophen and zinc phosphide for lethal management of invasive lizards Ctenosaura similis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. AVERY, John D. EISEMANN, Kandy L. KEACHER,Peter J. SAVARIE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Reducing populations of invasive lizards through trapping and shooting is feasible in many cases but effective integrated management relies on a variety of tools, including toxicants. In Florida, using wild-caught non-native black spiny-tailed iguanas Ctenosaura similis, we screened acetaminophen and zinc phosphide to determine their suitability for effective population management of this prolific invasive species. Of the animals that received acetaminophen, none died except at the highest test dose, 240 mg per lizard, which is not practical for field use. Zinc phosphide produced 100% mortality at dose levels as little as 25 mg per lizard, equivalent to about 0.5% in bait which is lower than currently used in commercial baits for commensal rodent control. We conclude that zinc phosphide has potential as a useful tool for reducing populations of invasive lizards such as the black spiny-tailed iguana provided target-selective delivery methods are developed [Current Zoology 57 (5: 625–629, 2011].

  4. Ingestion of gallium phosphide nanowires has no adverse effect on Drosophila tissue function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolfsson, Karl; Hammarin, Greger; Prinz, Christelle N; Schneider, Martina; Häcker, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles have been under increasing scrutiny in recent years. High aspect ratio nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires have raised safety concerns due to their geometrical similarity to asbestos fibers. III–V epitaxial semiconductor nanowires are expected to be utilized in devices such as LEDs and solar cells and will thus be available to the public. In addition, clean-room staff fabricating and characterizing the nanowires are at risk of exposure, emphasizing the importance of investigating their possible toxicity. Here we investigated the effects of gallium phosphide nanowires on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila larvae and/or adults were exposed to gallium phosphide nanowires by ingestion with food. The toxicity and tissue interaction of the nanowires was evaluated by investigating tissue distribution, activation of immune response, genome-wide gene expression, life span, fecundity and somatic mutation rates. Our results show that gallium phosphide nanowires applied through the diet are not taken up into Drosophila tissues, do not elicit a measurable immune response or changes in genome-wide gene expression and do not significantly affect life span or somatic mutation rate. (paper)

  5. Plain abdominal radiography: A powerful tool to prognosticate outcome in patients with zinc phosphide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanian-Moghaddam, H.; Shahnazi, Makhtoom; Zamani, N.; Rahimi, M.; Bahrami-Motlagh, H.; Amiri, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical features of zinc phosphide poisoning and to investigate whether outcome could be prognosticated based on abdominal radiography on presentation. Materials and methods: All zinc phosphide-poisoned patients who were referred to Loghman-Hakim Hospital between March 2011 and September 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Data regarding patients' demographic characteristics, characteristics of the poisoning, abdominal radiography results, and patients' outcome were recorded. Results: In 102 patients, the most common presenting signs/symptoms were nausea and vomiting (60%). Four patients died and another seven had developed complications during their hospitalization (metabolic acidosis, liver abnormalities, or acute renal failure). Nineteen patients had radio-opaque abdominal radiographs, nine of whom had died or developed complications (p = 0.001). Plain abdominal radiography had a sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 89% in predicting the patients' death or further development of complications. The positive and negative predictive values were 47% and 97%, respectively. Conclusion: Plain abdominal radiography is a very good tool for prognostication in patients with zinc phosphide poisoning. Immediate abdominal radiography can help stratify patients into high- or low-risk groups and determine treatment strategies. - Highlights: • ZP poisoning may cause severe symptoms or death although less frequent compared to ALP. • ZP-poisoned patients may deteriorate within the first 72 hours post-ingestion. • Abdominal radiography is a good tool to predict death/complications in these patients

  6. Orientation of Zn3P2 films via phosphidation of Zn precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsube, Ryoji; Nose, Yoshitaro

    2017-02-01

    Orientation of solar absorber is an important factor to achieve high efficiency of thin film solar cells. In the case of Zn3P2 which is a promising absorber of low-cost and high-efficiency solar cells, (110)/(001) orientation was only reported in previous studies. We have successfully prepared (101)-oriented Zn3P2 films by phosphidation of (0001)-oriented Zn films at 350 °C. The phosphidation mechanism of Zn is discussed through STEM observations on the partially-reacted sample and the consideration of the relationship between the crystal structures of Zn and Zn3P2 . We revealed that (0001)-oriented Zn led to nucleation of (101)-oriented Zn3P2 due to the similarity in atomic arrangement between Zn and Zn3P2 . The electrical resistivity of the (101)-oriented Zn3P2 film was lower than those of (110)/(001)-oriented films, which is an advantage of the phosphidation technique to the growth processes in previous works. The results in this study demonstrated that well-conductive Zn3P2 films could be obtained by controlling orientations of crystal grains, and provide a guiding principle for microstructure control in absorber materials.

  7. Zirconium nitride hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Daiane; Amorim, Cintia Lugnani Gomes de; Soares, Gabriel Vieira; Figueroa, Carlos Alejandro; Baumvol, Israel Jacob Rabin; Basso, Rodrigo Leonardo de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) nanometric films were deposited onto different substrates, in order to study the surface crystalline microstructure and also to investigate the electrochemical behavior to obtain a better composition that minimizes corrosion reactions. The coatings were produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The influence of the nitrogen partial pressure, deposition time and temperature over the surface properties was studied. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and corrosion experiments were performed to characterize the ZrN hard coatings. The ZrN films properties and microstructure changes according to the deposition parameters. The corrosion resistance increases with temperature used in the films deposition. Corrosion tests show that ZrN coating deposited by PVD onto titanium substrate can improve the corrosion resistance. (author)

  8. Pyrochemical reprocessing of nitride fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazono, Yoshihisa; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    Electrochemical behavior of actinide nitrides in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt was investigated in order to apply pyrochemical process to nitride fuel cycle. The electrode reaction of UN and (U, Nd)N was examined by cyclic voltammetry. The observed rest potential of (U, Nd)N depended on the equilibrium of U 3+ /UN and was not affected by the addition of NdN of 8 wt.%. (author)

  9. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  10. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming B.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-10-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe-22.7Cr-2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride precipitates were formed firstly close to the surface and later throughout the sample with austenitic structure. Chromium-rich nitride precipitates with a rod or strip-like morphology was developed by a discontinuous cellular precipitation mechanism. STEM-EDS analysis demonstrated partitioning of metallic elements between austenite and nitrides, with chromium contents of about 80 wt.% in the precipitates. XRD analysis indicated that the Chromium-rich nitride precipitates are hexagonal (Cr, Mo)2N. Based on the TEM studies, (Cr, Mo)2N precipitates presented a (1 1 1)γ//(0 0 2)(Cr, Mo)2N, ?γ//?(Cr, Mo)2N orientation relationship with respect to the austenite matrix. EBSD studies revealed that the austenite in the regions that have transformed into austenite and (Cr, Mo)2N have no orientation relation to the untransformed austenite.

  11. Metallurgical response of an AISI 4140 steel to different plasma nitriding gas mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adão Felipe Oliveira Skonieski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nitriding is a surface modification process that uses glow discharge to diffuse nitrogen atoms into the metallic matrix of different materials. Among the many possible parameters of the process, the gas mixture composition plays an important role, as it impacts directly the formed layer's microstructure. In this work an AISI 4140 steel was plasma nitrided under five different gas compositions. The plasma nitriding samples were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, microhardness test, X-ray diffraction and GDOES. The results showed that there are significant microstructural and morphological differences on the formed layers depending on the quantity of nitrogen and methane added to the plasma nitriding atmosphere. Thicknesses of 10, 5 and 2.5 µm were obtained when the nitrogen content of the gas mixtures were varied. The possibility to obtain a compound layer formed mainly by γ'-Fe4N nitrides was also shown. For all studied plasma nitriding conditions, the presence of a compound layer was recognized as being the responsible to hinder the decarburization on the steel surface. The highest value of surface hardness - 1277HV - were measured in the sample which were nitrided with 3vol.% of CH4.

  12. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swanepoel, JJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200 °C) chlorination reaction...

  13. Aluminum nitride insulating films for MOSFET devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Maserjian, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of aluminum nitrides as electrical insulator for electric capacitors is discussed. Electrical properties of aluminum nitrides are analyzed and specific use with field effect transistors is defined. Operational limits of field effect transistors are developed.

  14. Formation of zirconium nitride via mechanochemical decomposition of zircon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puclin, T.; Kaczmarek, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we report some results of the mechanochemical reduction of zircon, and for the first time subsequent reaction with nitrogen to form zirconium nitride (ZrN). This process can be described by the equation: 3ZrSiO 4 + 8Al + 1.5N 2 = 4Al 2 O 3 + 3ZrN + 3Si. Milling was carried out in three steps: 1) low speed grinding of Al+ZrSiO 4 in vacuum, 2) high speed milling to effect the reduction, and 3) continued milling after the addition of nitrogen. Powders produced were examined by X-ray diffraction. The first step showed no reaction occurred during low speed grinding. The second step proved to be a slow reaction without the 'ignition' often seen in other mechanochemical reduction works. The final step was also gradual, and did not always go to full nitridation over the duration of the experiment, giving a product of composition ZrN 0.6 to ZrN l.0 . This is quite acceptable as transition metal nitrides are often non-stoichiometric. These results show that the formation of a useful hard material such as ZrN can be formed from a raw mineral by two stage mechanochemical processing. Further investigations are currently being undertaken to eliminate Fe contamination and produce pure ceramic oxide-nitride composites

  15. Theoretical assessment of the electro-optical features of the group III nitrides (B{sub 12}N{sub 12}, Al{sub 12}N{sub 12} and Ga{sub 12}N{sub 12}) and group IV carbides (C{sub 24}, Si{sub 12}C{sub 12} and Ge{sub 12}C{sub 12}) nanoclusters encapsulated with alkali metals (Li, Na and K)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahmasebi, Elham [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Lorestan University, Khorram Abad, Lorestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakerzadeh, Ehsan, E-mail: e.shakerzadeh@scu.ac.ir [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biglari, Zeinab [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Lorestan University, Khorram Abad, Lorestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Encapsulation of Li, Na and K narrow the HOMO–LUMO gaps of the clusters. • The group III nitrides nanoclusters strongly interacted with the alkali metals. • First hyperpolarizabilities remarkably enhance for B{sub 12}N{sub 12} encapsulated with Na/K. - Abstract: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to study the influence of alkali metals (Li, Na and K) encapsulation within the group III nitrides (B{sub 12}N{sub 12}, Al{sub 12}N{sub 12} and Ga{sub 12}N{sub 12}) and the group IV carbides (C{sub 24}, Si{sub 12}C{sub 12}and Ge{sub 12}C{sub 12}) nanoclusters. The encapsulation of Li, Na and K atoms is found to narrow the HOMO–LUMO gaps of the considered clusters. The electronic properties of these clusters, especially the group III nitrides nanoclusters, are strongly sensitive to interaction with the alkali metals. Moreover it is observed that the encapsulation of alkali metals enhances the first hyperpolarizabilities of B{sub 12}N{sub 12} nanocluster. Surprisingly, due to the alkali metals encapsulation within B{sub 12}N{sub 12} nanocluster, the first hyperpolarizability values are remarkably increased to 8505.49 and 122,503.76 a.u. for Na@B{sub 12}N{sub 12} and K@B{sub 12}N{sub 12}, respectively. Also the TD-DFT calculations at both CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and PBE0/6-311+G(d) levels of theory are also performed to investigate the origin of first hyperpolarizabilities.

  16. Estimation of sensing characteristics for refractory nitrides based gain assisted core-shell plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Manmohan Singh; Pathania, Pankaj

    2018-04-01

    Refractory transition metal nitrides such as zirconium nitride (ZrN), hafnium nitride (HfN) and titanium nitride (TiN) have emerged as viable alternatives to coinage metals based plasmonic materials, e.g., gold (Au) and silver (Ag). The present work assesses the suitability of gain assisted ZrN-, HfN- and TiN-based conventional core-shell nanoparticles (CCSNPs) and multilayered core-shell nanoparticles (MCSNPs) for refractive index sensing. We report that the optical gain incorporation in the dielectric layer leads to multifold enhancement of the scattering efficiency (Qsca), substantial reduction of the spectral full width at half maximum, and a higher figure of merit (FOM). In comparison with CCSNPs, the MCSNP system exhibits superior sensing characteristics such as higher FOM, ˜ 45% reduction in the critical optical gain, response shift towards the biological window, and higher degree of tunability. Inherent biocompatibility, growth compatibility, chemical stability and flexible spectral tuning of refractory nitrides augmented by superior sensing properties in the present work may pave the way for refractory nitrides based low cost sensing.

  17. Fabrication of vanadium nitride by carbothermal nitridation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xitang; Wang Zhuofu; Zhang Baoguo; Deng Chengji

    2005-01-01

    Vanadium nitride is produced from V 2 O 5 by carbon-thermal reduction and nitridation. When the sintered temperature is above 1273 K, VN can be formed, and the nitrogen content of the products increased with the firing temperature raised, and then is the largest when the sintered temperature is 1573 K. The C/V 2 O 5 mass ratio of the green samples is the other key factor affecting on the nitrogen contents of the products. The nitrogen content of the products reaches the most when the C/V 2 O 5 mass ratio is 0.33, which is the theoretical ratio of the carbothermal nitridation of V 2 O 5 . (orig.)

  18. Explosion of lithium-thionyl-chloride battery due to presence of lithium nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennesø, E.; Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2015-01-01

    An explosion of a lithium–thionyl-chloride (Li–SOCl2) battery during production (assembly) leads to serious worker injury. The accident cell batch had been in a dry-air intermediate storage room for months before being readied with thionyl chloride electrolyte. Metallic lithium can react...... with atmospheric nitrogen to produce lithium nitride. Nodules of lithium nitride were found to be present on the lithium foil in other cells of the accident batch. The investigation attributed the explosion to the formation of porous lithium nitride during intermediate storage and a violent exothermal...... decomposition with the SOCl2–LiAlCl4 electrolyte triggered by welding. The literature is silent on hazards of explosion of Li–SOCl2 cells associated with the presence of lithium nitride. The silence is intriguing. Possible causes may be that such explosions are very rare, that explosions go unpublished...

  19. A study of nitride formation during the oxidation of titanium-tantalum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Lu, Y.C.; Kung, H.; Butt, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    The oxidation rates of Ti rich titanium-tantalum alloys are significantly lower in air than in oxygen. This nitrogen effect has been shown to be associated with the formation of a nitride layer at or near the scale-metal interface. In the present work the authors used transmission electron microscopy and microdiffraction to identify the nitrides formed on Ti5Ta and Ti40Ta (5 and 40 weight percent Ta alloys) during identical exposures. In both alloys the nitride develops in contact with the oxygen stabilized α-phase in the substrate. In Ti5Ta a continuous layer of TiN forms, while in Ti40Ta a discontinuous layer of Ti 2 N interspersed with Ta 2 O 5 (formed from the Ta rich β-phase) is formed. The nitride layer acts as an oxygen diffusion barrier, reducing the dissolution of oxygen in the substrate

  20. Effect of ion nitridation process on hardness and the corrosion resistance of biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirjoadi; Lely Susita; Bambang Siswanto; Sudjatmoko

    2012-01-01

    Ion nitriding process has been performed on metal biomaterials to improve their mechanical properties of materials, particularly to increase hardness and corrosion resistance. This metallic biomaterials used for artificial bone or a prosthetic graft and used as devices of orthopedic biomaterials are usually of 316L SS metal-type and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The purpose of this study is to research the development and utilization of ion nitridation method in order to get iron and titanium nitride thin films on the metallic biomaterials for artificial bone that has wear resistance and corrosion resistance is better. Microhardness of the samples was measured using a microhardness tester, optimum hardness of SS 316L samples are about 582 VHN, this was obtained at the nitriding temperature of 500 °C, the nitriding time of 3 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.6 mbar, while optimum hardness of Ti-6Al-4V alloy is 764 VHN, this was obtained at the nitriding temperature of 500 °C, the nitriding time of 4 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.6 mbar. The hardness value of SS 316L sample and Ti-6Al-4V alloy increase to 143% and 153%, if compared with standard samples. The optimum corrosion resistance at temperature of 350 °C for SS 316L and Ti-6Al-4V are 260,12 and 110,49 μA/cm 2 or corrosion rate are 29,866 and 15,189 mpy, respectively. (author)

  1. Deposition of single-layer and graded aluminum nitride coatings on vanadium substrates using ion-beam assisted reactive evaporation (ITER task no. ETA-EC-BLR26)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamarani, F.; Lang, R.; Owles, R.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the project has been to develop a reactive evaporation process for the fabrication of aluminum nitride coatings on pure vanadium substrates. The aluminum nitride coatings are to be used as electrical insulators on the surfaces of structural materials in contact with liquid metal coolants. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  2. Effect of post-deposition implantation and annealing on the properties of PECVD deposited silicon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shams, Q.A.

    1988-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that memory-quality silicon nitride can be deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Nitrogen implantation and post-deposition annealing resulted in improved memory properties of MNOS devices. The primary objective of the work described here is the continuation of the above work. Silicon nitride films were deposited using argon as the carrier gas and evaluated in terms of memory performance as the charge-trapping layer in the metal-nitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) capacitor structure. The bonding structure of PECVD silicon nitride was modified by annealing in different ambients at temperatures higher than the deposition temperature. Post-deposition ion implantation was used to introduce argon into the films in an attempt to influence the transfer, trapping, and emission of charge during write/erase exercising of the MNOS devices. Results show that the memory performance of PECVD silicon nitride is sensitive to the deposition parameters and post-deposition processing

  3. Semiconducting La{sub 2}AuP{sub 3}, the metallic conductor Ce{sub 2}AuP{sub 3}, and other rare-earth gold phosphides Ln{sub 2}AuP{sub 3} with two closely related crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschen, M.; Kotzyba, G.; Kuennen, B.; Jeitschko, W. [Anorganisch-Chemisches Inst. der Westfaelischen Wilhelms-Univ., Muenster (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The compounds Ln{sub 2}AuP{sub 3} were synthesized by reaction of the elemental components in evacuated silica tubes. Their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal diffractometer data. The compounds with Ln = La, Ce, and Pr crystallize with an orthorhombic U{sub 2}NiC{sub 3} type structure (Pnma, Z = 4). The structure refinement for Ce{sub 2}AuP{sub 3} resulted in a = 774.14(6) pm, b = 421.11(4) pm, c = 1612.3(1) pm, R = 0.019 for 1410 structure factors and 38 variable parameters. For Pr{sub 2}AuP{sub 3} a residual of R = 0.024 was obtained. Nd{sub 2}AuP{sub 3} crystallizes with a monoclinic distortion of this structure: P2{sub 1}/c, Z = 4, a = 416.14(4) pm, b = 768.87(6) pm, c = 1647.1(2) pm, {beta} = 104.06(1) , R = 0.022 for 1361 F values and 56 variables. The near-neighbor coordinations of the two structures are nearly the same. In both structures the gold and phosphorus atoms form two-dimensionally infinite nets, where the gold atoms are tetrahedrally coordinated by phosphorus atoms with Au-P distances varying between 245.8 and 284.2 pm. Two thirds of the phosphorus atoms form pairs with single-bond distances varying between 217.7 and 218.9 pm. Thus, using oxidation numbers the structures can be rationalized with the formulas (Ln{sup +3}){sub 2}[AuP{sub 3}]{sup -6} and (Ln{sup +3}){sub 2}Au{sup +1}(P{sub 2}){sup -4}P{sup -3}. Accordingly, La{sub 2}AuP{sub 3} is a diamagnetic semiconductor. Pr{sub 2}AuP{sub 3} is semi-conducting with an antiferromagnetic ground state, showing metamagnetism with a critical field of B{sub c} = 0.5({+-}0.1) T. In contrast, the cerium compound is a metallic conductor, even though its cell volume indicates that the cerium atoms are essentially trivalent, as is also suggested by the ferro- or ferrimagnetic behavior of the compound. (orig.)

  4. Simulation of the Nitriding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukovich, M. G.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of the nitriding process makes it possible to solve many practical problems of process control, prediction of results, and development of new treatment modes and treated materials. The presented classification systematizes nitriding processes and processes based on nitriding, enables consideration of the theory and practice of an individual process in interrelation with other phenomena, outlines ways for intensification of various process variants, and gives grounds for development of recommendations for controlling the structure and properties of the obtained layers. The general rules for conducting the process and formation of phases in the layer and properties of the treated surfaces are used to create a prediction computational model based on analytical, numerical, and empirical approaches.

  5. Engineering absorption and blackbody radiation in the far-infrared with surface phonon polaritons on gallium phosphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streyer, W.; Law, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Wasserman, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Roberts, C.; Podolskiy, V. A. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Hoffman, A. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    We demonstrate excitation of surface phonon polaritons on patterned gallium phosphide surfaces. Control over the light-polariton coupling frequencies is demonstrated by changing the pattern periodicity and used to experimentally determine the gallium phosphide surface phonon polariton dispersion curve. Selective emission via out-coupling of thermally excited surface phonon polaritons is experimentally demonstrated. Samples are characterized experimentally by Fourier transform infrared reflection and emission spectroscopy, and modeled using finite element techniques and rigorous coupled wave analysis. The use of phonon resonances for control of emissivity and excitation of bound surface waves offers a potential tool for the exploration of long-wavelength Reststrahlen band frequencies.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, and chemical bonding analysis of the lithium alkaline-earth metal gallide nitrides Li{sub 2}(Ca{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] and Li{sub 2}(Sr{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Manisha; Bobnar, Matej; Ormeci, Alim; Hoehn, Peter [Chemische Metallkunde, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Stoiber, Dominik; Niewa, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Ovchinnikov, Alexander [Chemische Metallkunde, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2017-11-17

    Large single crystals of Li{sub 2}(Ca{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] and Li{sub 2}(Sr{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] up to several mm in size were grown from mixtures of the respective elements and binary alkaline-earth metal nitrides in reactive lithium melts employing a modified high-temperature centrifugation-aided filtration (HTCAF) technique. The main structural features of these isotypic phases are stella quadrangula building units [Ga{sub 4}]Li{sub 4/2} and octahedra (Nae{sub 6/2}), which form two independent interpenetrating networks. The phases crystallize in the η-carbide structure and represent diamagnetic small bandgap semiconductors. Real-space chemical bonding analysis indicates predominantly ionic bonding. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Essential elucidation for preparation of supported nickel phosphide upon nickel phosphate precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Baoquan

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of supported nickel phosphide (Ni 2 P) depends on nickel phosphate precursor, generally related to its chemical composition and supports. Study of this dependence is essential and meaningful for the preparation of supported Ni 2 P with excellent catalytic activity. The chemical nature of nickel phosphate precursor is revealed by Raman and UV–vis spectra. It is found that initial P/Ni mole ratio ≥0.8 prohibits the Ni-O-Ni bridge bonding (i.e., nickel oxide). This chemical bonding will not result in Ni 2 P structure, verified by XRD characterization results. The alumina (namely, γ-Al 2 O 3 , θ-Al 2 O 3 , or α-Al 2 O 3 ) with distinct physiochemical properties also results in diverse chemical nature of nickel phosphate, and then different nickel phosphides. The influence of alumina support on producing Ni 2 P was explained by the theory of surface energy heterogeneity, calculated by the NLDFT method based on N 2 -sorption isotherm. The uniform surface energy of α-Al 2 O 3 results only in the nickel phosphosate precursor and thus the Ni 2 P phase. - Graphical abstract: Surface energy heterogeneity in alumina (namely α-Al 2 O 3 , θ-Al 2 O 3 , and γ-Al 2 O 3 ) supported multi-oxidic precursors with different reducibilities and thus diverse nickel phosphides (i.e., Ni 3 P, Ni 12 P 5 , Ni 2 P). - Highlights: • Preparing pure Ni 2 P. • Elucidating nickel phosphate precursor. • Associating with surface energy

  8. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect...... for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling...

  9. Enhancing the Hardness of Sintered SS 17-4PH Using Nitriding Process for Bracket Orthodontic Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharno, B.; Supriadi, S.; Ayuningtyas, S. T.; Widjaya, T.; Baek, E. R.

    2018-01-01

    Brackets orthodontic create teeth movement by applying force from wire to bracket then transferred to teeth. However, emergence of friction between brackets and wires reduces load for teeth movement towards desired area. In order to overcome these problem, surface treatment like nitriding chosen as a process which could escalate efficiency of transferred force by improving material hardness since hard materials have low friction levels. This work investigated nitriding treatment to form nitride layer which affecting hardness of sintered SS 17-4PH. The nitride layers produced after nitriding process at various temperature i.e. 470°C, 500°C, 530°C with 8hr holding time under 50% NH3 atmosphere. Optical metallography was conducted to compare microstructure of base and surface metal while the increasing of surface hardness then observed using vickers microhardness tester. Hardened surface layer was obtained after gaseous nitriding process because of nitride layer that contains Fe4N, CrN and Fe-αN formed. Hardness layers can achieved value 1051 HV associated with varies thickness from 53 to 119 μm. The presence of a precipitation process occurring in conjunction with nitriding process can lead to a decrease in hardness due to nitrogen content diminishing in solid solution phase. This problem causes weakening of nitrogen expansion in martensite lattice.

  10. Magnetic properties of Sm-based filled skutterudite phosphides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, R.; Sekine, C.; Shimaya, Y.; Shirotani, I.; Matsuhira, K.; Doi, Y.; Hinatsu, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Amitsuka, H

    2003-05-01

    Filled skutterudites SmFe{sub 4}P{sub 12} and SmOs{sub 4}P{sub 12} have been prepared at high temperature and high pressure. The temperature dependence of electrical resistivity in both compounds shows metallic behavior. The magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements indicate that SmFe{sub 4}P{sub 12} shows a ferromagnetic ordering at 1.5 K, whereas SmOs{sub 4}P{sub 12} is an antiferromagnet with a T{sub N} of 4.6 K.

  11. Efficient telecom to visible wavelength conversion in doubly resonant gallium phosphide microdisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, David P.; Mitchell, Matthew; Jayakumar, Harishankar; dos Santos, Laís Fujii; Curic, Davor; Barclay, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant second harmonic generation between 1550 nm and 775 nm with normalized outside efficiency > 3.8 × 10 - 4 mW - 1 is demonstrated in a gallium phosphide microdisk supporting high-Q modes at visible ( Q ˜ 10 4 ) and infrared ( Q ˜ 10 5 ) wavelengths. The double resonance condition is satisfied for a specific pump power through intracavity photothermal temperature tuning using ˜ 360 μ W of 1550 nm light input to a fiber taper and coupled to a microdisk resonance. Power dependent efficiency consistent with a simple model for thermal tuning of the double resonance condition is observed.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David M.; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J. L.; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J.; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2013-06-01

    The nature and extent of covalency in uranium bonding is still unclear compared with that of transition metals, and there is great interest in studying uranium-ligand multiple bonds. Although U=O and U=NR double bonds (where R is an alkyl group) are well-known analogues to transition-metal oxo and imido complexes, the uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond has long remained a synthetic target in actinide chemistry. Here, we report the preparation of a uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond. We highlight the importance of (1) ancillary ligand design, (2) employing mild redox reactions instead of harsh photochemical methods that decompose transiently formed uranium(VI) nitrides, (3) an electrostatically stabilizing sodium ion during nitride installation, (4) selecting the right sodium sequestering reagent, (5) inner versus outer sphere oxidation and (6) stability with respect to the uranium oxidation state. Computational analyses suggest covalent contributions to U≡N triple bonds that are surprisingly comparable to those of their group 6 transition-metal nitride counterparts.

  13. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  14. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; ChangZeng

    2007-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.……

  15. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.

  16. Neutron detection using boron gallium nitride semiconductor material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Atsumi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a new neutron-detection device using a boron gallium nitride (BGaN semiconductor in which the B atom acts as a neutron converter. BGaN and gallium nitride (GaN samples were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, and their radiation detection properties were evaluated. GaN exhibited good sensitivity to α-rays but poor sensitivity to γ-rays. Moreover, we confirmed that electrons were generated in the depletion layer under neutron irradiation. This resulted in a neutron-detection signal after α-rays were generated by the capture of neutrons by the B atoms. These results prove that BGaN is useful as a neutron-detecting semiconductor material.

  17. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porz, F.

    1982-10-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 1500 0 C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE) [de

  18. Graphitic carbon nitride based nanocomposites: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zaiwang; Sun, Yanjuan; Dong, Fan

    2014-11-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), as an intriguing earth-abundant visible light photocatalyst, possesses a unique two-dimensional structure, excellent chemical stability and tunable electronic structure. Pure g-C3N4 suffers from rapid recombination of photo-generated electron-hole pairs resulting in low photocatalytic activity. Because of the unique electronic structure, the g-C3N4 could act as an eminent candidate for coupling with various functional materials to enhance the performance. According to the discrepancies in the photocatalytic mechanism and process, six primary systems of g-C3N4-based nanocomposites can be classified and summarized: namely, the g-C3N4 based metal-free heterojunction, the g-C3N4/single metal oxide (metal sulfide) heterojunction, g-C3N4/composite oxide, the g-C3N4/halide heterojunction, g-C3N4/noble metal heterostructures, and the g-C3N4 based complex system. Apart from the depiction of the fabrication methods, heterojunction structure and multifunctional application of the g-C3N4-based nanocomposites, we emphasize and elaborate on the underlying mechanisms in the photocatalytic activity enhancement of g-C3N4-based nanocomposites. The unique functions of the p-n junction (semiconductor/semiconductor heterostructures), the Schottky junction (metal/semiconductor heterostructures), the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect, photosensitization, superconductivity, etc. are utilized in the photocatalytic processes. Furthermore, the enhanced performance of g-C3N4-based nanocomposites has been widely employed in environmental and energetic applications such as photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, photocatalytic hydrogen generation, carbon dioxide reduction, disinfection, and supercapacitors. This critical review ends with a summary and some perspectives on the challenges and new directions in exploring g-C3N4-based advanced nanomaterials.

  19. Three-dimensional interconnected nickel phosphide networks with hollow microstructures and desulfurization performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shuna; Zhang, Shujuan; Song, Limin; Wu, Xiaoqing; Fang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three-dimensional interconnected nickel phosphide networks with hollow microstructures and desulfurization performance. - Highlights: • Three-dimensional Ni 2 P has been prepared using foam nickel as a template. • The microstructures interconnected and formed sponge-like porous networks. • Three-dimensional Ni 2 P shows superior hydrodesulfurization activity. - Abstract: Three-dimensional microstructured nickel phosphide (Ni 2 P) was fabricated by the reaction between foam nickel (Ni) and phosphorus red. The as-prepared Ni 2 P samples, as interconnected networks, maintained the original mesh structure of foamed nickel. The crystal structure and morphology of the as-synthesized Ni 2 P were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, automatic mercury porosimetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SEM study showed adjacent hollow branches were mutually interconnected to form sponge-like networks. The investigation on pore structure provided detailed information for the hollow microstructures. The growth mechanism for the three-dimensionally structured Ni 2 P was postulated and discussed in detail. To investigate its catalytic properties, SiO 2 supported three-dimensional Ni 2 P was prepared successfully and evaluated for the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). DBT molecules were mostly hydrogenated and then desulfurized by Ni 2 P/SiO 2

  20. GXRD study of 100 MeV Fe9+ ion irradiated indium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, R.L.; Dubey, S.K.; Kachhap, N.K.; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-01-01

    Swift heavy ions with MeV to GeV kinetic energy offer unique possibilities of modifying material properties. Each projectile passing through the target material causes loss of its energy by ion-electrons and ion-atoms interaction with the target material. The consequence of formal one is to change in surface properties and latter to produces damage deep in the target material near the projected range of projectile. In the present work, indium phosphide samples were irradiated at 100 MeV 56 Fe 9+ ions with different fluences varying from 1x10 12 to 1x10 14 ions cm -2 using the 15UD Pelletron facilities at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. Grazing angle X-ray diffraction technique was used to investigate the structural properties of irradiated indium phosphide at different depths. The GXRD spectra of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were recorded at different grazing angle i.e 1°, 2°, 3°, 4° and 5° to get the structural information over the projected range. The detailed result will be presented and discussed in the conference. (author)

  1. Moringa oleifera extract (Lam) attenuates Aluminium phosphide-induced acute cardiac toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Ahmed S; El-Nabarawy, Nagla A; Ibrahim, Samah F

    2018-01-01

    Moringa oleifera extract (Lam) has many antioxidant and protective properties. Objective: to investigate the antioxidant activities of Lam in counteracting the high oxidative stress caused by acute sub-lethal aluminium phosphide (AlP) intoxication in rat heart. These activities will be detected by histopathological examination and some oxidative stress biomarkers. a single sub-lethal dose of Alp (2 mg/kg body weight) was administered orally, and Lam was given orally at a dose (100 mg/kg body weight) one hour after receiving AlP to rats. aluminium phosphide caused significant cardiac histopathological changes with a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA); lipid peroxidation marker; and a significant depletion of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and glutathione reductase). However, treatment with Lam protected efficiently the cardiac tissue of intoxicated rats by increasing antioxidants levels with slight decreasing in MDA production compared to untreated group. This study suggested that Moringa oleifera extract could possibly restore the altered cardiac histopathology and some antioxidant power in AlP intoxicated rats, and it could even be used as adjuvant therapy against AlP-induced cardiotoxicity.

  2. Proceedings of the first international conference on indium phosphide and related materials for advanced electronic and optical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.; Messick, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first international conference on indium phosphide and related materials for advanced electronic and optical devices. Topics covered include: Growth and characterization of bulk and epitaxial films, Passivation technology, Processing technology, High speed optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Solar cells

  3. Surface modification of austenitic steel by various glow-discharge nitriding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Borowski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen intensive research on modifying glow-discharge nitriding processes. One of the most commonly used glow-discharge methods includes cathodic potential nitriding (conventional method, and active screen plasma nitriding. Each of these methods has a number of advantages. One very important, common feature of these techniques is full control of the microstructure, chemical and phase composition, thickness and the surface topography of the layers formed. Another advantage includes the possibility of nitriding such materials as: austenitic steels or nickel alloys, i.e. metallic materials which do not diffuse nitrogen as effectively as ferritic or martensitic steels. However, these methods have some disadvantages as well. In the case of conventional plasma nitriding, engineers have to deal with the edge effect, which makes it difficult to use this method for complexly shaped components. In turn, in the case of active screen plasma nitriding, the problem disappears. A uniform, smooth layer forms, but is thinner, softer and is not as resistant to friction compared to layers formed using the conventional method. Research is also underway to combine these methods, i.e. use an active screen in conventional plasma nitriding at cathodic potential. However, there is a lack of comprehensive data presenting a comparison between these three nitriding processes and the impact of pulsating current on the formation of the microstructure and functional properties of austenitic steel surfaces. The article presents a characterisation of nitrided layers produced on austenitic X2CrNiMo17-12-2 (AISI 316L stainless steel in the course of glow-discharge nitriding at cathodic potential, at plasma potential and at cathodic potential incorporating an active screen. All processes were carried out at 440 °C under DC glow-discharge conditions and in 100 kHz frequency pulsating current. The layers were examined in terms of their microstructure, phase and

  4. Bimetallic Cobalt-Based Phosphide Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework: CoP x Phase-Dependent Electrical Conductivity and Hydrogen Atom Adsorption Energy for Efficient Overall Water Splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Junhua [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Xu, Bo Z. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Ye, Ranfeng [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Beckman, Scott P. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-10-25

    Cobalt-based bimetallic phosphide encapsulated in carbonized zeolitic imadazolate frameworks has been successfully synthesized and showed excellent activities toward both hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Density functional theory calculation and electrochemical measurements reveal that the electrical conductivity and electrochemical activity are closely associated with the Co2P/CoP mixed phase behaviors upon Cu metal doping. This relationship is found to be the decisive factor for enhanced electrocatalytic performance. Moreover, the precise control of Cu content in Co-host lattice effectively alters the Gibbs free energy for H* adsorption, which is favorable for facilitating reaction kinetics. Impressively, an optimized performance has been achieved with mild Cu doping in Cu0.3Co2.7P/nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) which exhibits an ultralow overpotential of 0.19 V at 10 mA cm–2 and satisfying stability for OER. Cu0.3Co2.7P/NC also shows excellent HER activity, affording a current density of 10 mA cm–2 at a low overpotential of 0.22 V. In addition, a homemade electrolyzer with Cu0.3Co2.7P/NC paired electrodes shows 60% larger current density than Pt/ RuO2 couple at 1.74 V, along with negligible catalytic deactivation after 50 h operation. The manipulation of electronic structure by controlled incorporation of second metal sheds light on understanding and synthesizing bimetallic transition metal phosphides for electrolysis-based energy conversion.

  5. Ion nitridation - physical and technological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbern, A.W.

    1980-01-01

    Ion nitridation, is a technique which allows the formation of a controlled thickness of nitrides in the surface of the material, using this material as the cathode in a low pressure glow discharge, which presents many advantages over the conventional method. A brief review of the ion nitriding technique, the physical fenomena involved, and we discuss technological aspects of this method, are presented. (Author) [pt

  6. Silicon nitride-fabrication, forming and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yehezkel, O.

    1983-01-01

    This article, which is a literature survey of the recent years, includes description of several methods for the formation of silicone nitride, and five methods of forming: Reaction-bonded silicon nitride, sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing and chemical vapour deposition. Herein are also included data about mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride and the relationship between the forming method and the properties. (author)

  7. Topotactic synthesis of vanadium nitride solid foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, S.T.; Kapoor, R.; Oyama, H.T.; Hofmann, D.J.; Matijevic, E.

    1993-01-01

    Vanadium nitride has been synthesized with a surface area of 120 m 2 g -1 by temperature programmed nitridation of a foam-like vanadium oxide (35 m 2 g -1 ), precipitated from vanadate solutions. The nitridation reaction was established to be topotactic and pseudomorphous by x-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The crystallographic relationship between the nitride and oxide was {200}//{001}. The effect of precursor geometry on the product size and shape was investigated by employing vanadium oxide solids of different morphologies

  8. Microhardness and microplasticity of zirconium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshpor, V.S.; Eron'yan, M.A.; Petrov, A.N.; Kravchik, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    To experimentally check the concentration dependence of microhardness of 4 group nitrides, microhardness of zirconium nitride compact samples was measured. The samples were obtained either by bulk saturation of zirconium iodide plates or by chemical precipitation from gas. As nitrogen content decreased within the limits of homogeneity of zirconium nitride samples where the concentration of admixed oxygen was low, the microhardness grew from 1500+-100 kg/mm 2 for ZrNsub(1.0) to 27000+-100 kg/mm 2 for ZrNsub(0.78). Microplasticity of zirconium nitride (resistance to fracture) decreased, as the concentration of nitrogen vacancies was growing

  9. XPS study of the ultrathin a-C:H films deposited onto ion beam nitrided AISI 316 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskinis, S.; Andrulevicius, M.; Kopustinskas, V.; Tamulevicius, S.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of the steel surface treatment by nitrogen ion beam and subsequent deposition of the diamond-like carbon (hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) and nitrogen doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-CN x :H)) films were investigated by means of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Experimental results show that nitrogen ion beam treatment of the AISI 316 steel surface even at room temperature results in the formation of the Cr and Fe nitrides. Replacement of the respective metal oxides by the nitrides takes place. Formation of the C-N bonds was observed for both ultrathin a-C:H and ultrathin a-CN x :H layers deposited onto the nitrided steel. Some Fe and/or Cr nitrides still were presented at the interface after the film deposition, too. Increased adhesion between the steel substrate and hydrogenated amorphous carbon layer after the ion beam nitridation was explained by three main factors. The first two is steel surface deoxidisation/passivation by nitrogen as a result of the ion beam treatment. The third one is carbon nitride formation at the nitrided steel-hydrogenated amorphous carbon (or a-CN x :H) film interface

  10. Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Doan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (˜ 6.4 eV, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700 °K. The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of μ ∝ (T/T0−α with α = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ħω = 192 meV (or 1546 cm-1, which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

  11. Nitride alloy layer formation of duplex stainless steel using nitriding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleque, M. A.; Lailatul, P. H.; Fathaen, A. A.; Norinsan, K.; Haider, J.

    2018-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) shows a good corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties. However, DSS performance decrease as it works under aggressive environment and at high temperature. At the mentioned environment, the DSS become susceptible to wear failure. Surface modification is the favourable technique to widen the application of duplex stainless steel and improve the wear resistance and its hardness properties. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to nitride alloy layer on the surface of duplex stainless steel by the nitriding process temperature of 400°C and 450°C at different time and ammonia composition using a horizontal tube furnace. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyzer are used to analyse the morphology, composition and the nitrided alloy layer for treated DSS. The micro hardnesss Vickers tester was used to measure hardness on cross-sectional area of nitrided DSS. After nitriding, it was observed that the hardness performance increased until 1100 Hv0.5kgf compared to substrate material of 250 Hv0.5kgf. The thickness layer of nitride alloy also increased from 5μm until 100μm due to diffusion of nitrogen on the surface of DSS. The x-ray diffraction results showed that the nitride layer consists of iron nitride, expanded austenite and chromium nitride. It can be concluded that nitride alloy layer can be produced via nitriding process using tube furnace with significant improvement of microstructural and hardness properties.

  12. Instability of Yb3+ and Pr3+ low-symmetry luminescence centers in gallium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasatkin, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    The stability of γb 3+ and Pr 3+ low-symmetry luminescence centers formed in gallium phosphide during quenching were studied in the process of durable storage and annealing. Observation of the Yb 3+ and Pr 3+ centrer states was accomplished by the photoluminescence spectra at 18 K. It has been established that annealing in the dark under normal conditions results in a reduced integral luminescence intensity of all low-symmetry Yb 3+ and Pr 3+ centers. Annealing of quenched GaP and GaP saples at 400 K results in complete disappearance of intracenter luminescence of Pr 3+ and low-symmetry Yb 3+ centers. Decomposition during storage and low anealing temperature point to the instability of low-symmetry centers of Pr 3+ and Yb 3+ luminescence

  13. Treatment of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning with a Combination of Intravenous Glucagon, Digoxin and Antioxidant Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Oghabian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide (AlP is used to protect stored grains from rodents. It produces phosphine gas (PH3, a mitochondrial poison thought to cause toxicity by blocking the cytochrome c oxidase enzyme and inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation, which results in cell death. AlP poisoning has a high mortality rate among humans due to the rapid onset of cardiogenic shock and metabolic acidosis, despite aggressive treatment. We report a 21-yearold male who was referred to the Afzalipour Hospital, Kerman, Iran, in 2015 after having intentionally ingested a 3 g AlP tablet. He was successfully treated with crystalloid fluids, vasopressors, sodium bicarbonate, digoxin, glucagon and antioxidant agents and was discharged from the hospital six days after admission in good clinical condition. For the treatment of AlP poisoning, the combination of glucagon and digoxin with antioxidant agents should be considered. However, evaluation of further cases is necessary to optimise treatment protocols.

  14. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-11-14

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  15. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2011-01-01

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  16. Kinetics of the nitridation of dysprosium during mechanochemical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanko, Gordon A.; Osterberg, Daniel D.; Jaques, Brian J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Hurley, Michael F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Boulevard, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: darrylbutt@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Boulevard, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • DyN was mechanochemically synthesized by milling pure metal under nitrogen. • Temperature and pressure were monitored to investigate reaction progress. • The effects of metal adhered to media on the impact energetics was measured. • The reactive milling kinetics are described in terms of reactive surface formation. - Abstract: Dysprosium nitride was synthesized by the reactive milling of the rare earth metal under 400 kPa nitrogen gas in a planetary ball mill. The nitrogen consumption rate was calculated from in situ temperature and pressure measurements to find the reaction extent as a function of milling time at milling speeds from 350 to 650 rpm. The results are analyzed in terms of a fundamental milling dynamics model in which the input milling energy is the primary driving force for reaction and the rate limiting step of the nitridation kinetics is the formation of chemically active surfaces. The model differs from traditional gas–solid reactions which are often limited by diffusion of a species through a surface layer or by dissociation of the gas molecule. These results give fresh insight into reactive gas–solid milling kinetics.

  17. Magnetic behavior study of samarium nitride using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Narayan N.; Mankad, Venu H.; Dabhi, Shweta D.; Patel, Anjali; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, the state-of-art density functional theory is employed to study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of samarium nitride (SmN). We have performed calculation for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states in rock-salt phase. The calculated results of optimized lattice parameter and magnetic moment agree well with the available experimental and theoretical values. From energy band diagram and electronic density of states, we observe a half-metallic behaviour in FM phase of rock salt SmN in while metallicity in AFM I and AFM III phases. We present and discuss our current understanding of the possible half-metallicity together with the magnetic ordering in SmN. The calculated phonon dispersion curves shows dynamical stability of the considered structures. The phonon density of states and Eliashberg functional have also been analysed to understand the superconductivity in SmN.

  18. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed

  19. Waste conversion into high-value ceramics: Carbothermal nitridation synthesis of titanium nitride nanoparticles using automotive shredder waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayyas, Mohannad; Pahlevani, Farshid; Maroufi, Samane; Liu, Zhao; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2017-03-01

    Environmental concern about automotive shredder residue (ASR) has increased in recent years due to its harmful content of heavy metals. Although several approaches of ASR management have been suggested, these approaches remain commercially unproven. This study presents an alternative approach for ASR management where advanced materials can be generated as a by-product. In this approach, titanium nitride (TiN) has been thermally synthesized by nitriding pressed mixture of automotive shredder residue (ASR) and titanium oxide (TiO 2 ). Interactions between TiO 2 and ASR at non-isothermal conditions were primarily investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry. Results indicated that TiO 2 influences and catalyses degradation reactions of ASR, and the temperature, at which reduction starts, was determined around 980 °C. The interaction between TiO 2 and ASR at isothermal conditions in the temperature range between 1200 and 1550 °C was also studied. The pressed mixture of both materials resulted in titanium nitride (TiN) ceramic at all given temperatures. Formation kinetics were extracted using several models for product layer diffusion-controlled solid-solid and solid-fluid reactions. The effect of reactants ratio and temperature on the degree of conversion and morphology was investigated. The effect of reactants ratio was found to have considerable effect on the morphology of the resulting material, while temperature had a lesser impact. Several unique structures of TiN (porous nanostructured, polycrystalline, micro-spherical and nano-sized structures) were obtained by simply tuning the ratio of TiO 2 to ASR, and a product with appreciable TiN content of around 85% was achieved after only one hour nitridation at 1550 °C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Syntheses, Characterization and Kinetics of Nickel-Tungsten Nitride Catalysts for Hydrotreating of Gas Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchwey, Christian

    This thesis summarizes the methods and major findings of Ni-W(P)/gamma-Al 2O3 nitride catalyst synthesis, characterization, hydrotreating activity, kinetic analysis and correlation of the catalysts' activities to their synthesis parameters and properties. The range of parameters for catalyst synthesis were W (15-40 wt%), Ni (0-8 wt%), P (0-5 wt%) and nitriding temperature (TN) (500-900 °C). Characterization techniques used included: N2 sorption studies, chemisorption, elemental analysis, temperature programmed studies, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure. Hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA) were performed at: temperature (340-380 °C), pressure (6.2-9.0 MPa), liquid hourly space velocity (1-3 h-1) and hydrogen to oil ratio (600 ml/ml, STP). The predominant species on the catalyst surface were Ni3N, W2N and bimetallic Ni2W3N. The bimetallic Ni-W nitride species was more active than the individual activities of the Ni3N and W2N. P increased weak acid sites while nitriding temperature decreased amount of strong acid sites. Low nitriding temperature enhanced dispersion of metal particles. P interacted with Al 2O3 which increased the dispersion of metal nitrides on the catalyst surface. HDN activity increased with Ni and P loading but decreased with increase in nitriding temperature (optimum conversion; 60 wt%). HDS and HDA activities went through a maximum with increase in the synthesis parameters (optimum conversions; 88. wt% for HDS and 47 wt% for HDA). Increase in W loading led to increase in catalyst activity. The catalysts were stable to deactivation and had the nitride structure conserved during hydrotreating in the presence of hydrogen sulfide. The results showed good correlation between hydrotreating activities (HDS and HDN) and the catalyst nitrogen content, number of exposed

  1. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  2. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one...

  3. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bu...

  4. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...

  5. Alloy Effects on the Gas Nitriding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Sisson, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Alloy elements, such as Al, Cr, V, and Mo, have been used to improve the nitriding performance of steels. In the present work, plain carbon steel AISI 1045 and alloy steel AISI 4140 were selected to compare the nitriding effects of the alloying elements in AISI 4140. Fundamental analysis is carried out by using the "Lehrer-like" diagrams (alloy specific Lehrer diagram and nitriding potential versus nitrogen concentration diagram) and the compound layer growth model to simulate the gas nitriding process. With this method, the fundamental understanding for the alloy effect based on the thermodynamics and kinetics becomes possible. This new method paves the way for the development of new alloy for nitriding.

  6. Preparation and electrical properties of boron and boron phosphide films obtained by gas source molecular beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumashiro, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Fujita, T. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Boron and boron phosphide films were prepared by gas source molecular beam deposition on sapphire crystal at various substrate temperatures up to 800{degrees}C using cracked B{sub 2}H{sub 6} (2% in H{sub 2}) at 300{degrees}C and cracked PH{sub 3} (20% in H{sub 2}) at 900{degrees}C. The substrate temperatures and gas flow rates of the reactant gases determined the film growth. The boron films with amorphous structure are p type. Increasing growth times lead to increasing mobilities and decreasing carrier concentrations. Boron phosphide film with maximum P/B ratio is obtained at a substrate temperature of 600{degrees}C, below and above which they become phosphorous deficient due to insufficient supply of phosphorus and thermal desorption of the phosphorus as P{sub 2}, respectively, but they are all n type conductors due to phosphorus vacancies.

  7. Influence of the ion nitriding temperature in the wear resistance of AISI H13 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, Stenio Cristaldo; Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Pereira, Ricardo Gomes; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos; Totten, George Edward

    2010-01-01

    The AISI H13 tool steel for hot work is the most used in its category. This steel was developed for injection molds and extrusion of hot metals as well as for conformation in hot presses and hammers. Plasma nitriding can improve significantly the surface properties of these steels, but the treatments conditions, such as temperature, must be optimized. In this work the influence of nitriding treatment temperature on the wear behavior of this steel is investigated. Samples of AISI H13 steel were quenched and tempered and then ion nitrided in the temperatures of 450, 550 and 650 deg C, at 4mbar pressure, during 5 hours. Samples of the treated material were characterized by optical microscopy, Vickers microhardness, x-ray analysis and wear tests. Plasma nitriding formed hard diffusion zones in all the treated samples. White layers were formed in samples treated at 550 deg C and 650 deg C. The treatment temperature of 450 deg C produced the highest hardness. Treatment temperature showed great influence in the diffusion layer thickness. X-ray analysis indicated the formation of the Fe_3N, Fe_4N and CrN phases for all temperatures, but with different concentrations. Nitriding increased significantly the AISI H13 wear resistance. (author)

  8. Multilayer-Forming Behavior of Cr Nitrides and Carbides for Thermoreactive Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeongmo Park

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a nitride layer on the forming behavior of CrN and (Cr, Fe7C3 multilayers for thermoreactive deposition (TRD was investigated. Plasma nitriding followed by TRD (PN-TRD produced a larger coating thickness than the case of direct TRD with no plasma nitriding. For PN-TRD, an Fe2-3N layer of 10 μm in thickness was produced on AISI 52100 steels using plasma nitriding, followed by TRD using a mixed powder composed of 30 wt % Cr, 2 wt % NH4Cl, and 68 wt % Al2O3. During TRD at 800 °C, a CrN layer of 2 μm in thickness was formed along with a thin layer of mixed carbide (Cr7C3 and nitride (CrN on top. As the deposition temperature was increased to 950 °C, a new layer of Cr7C3 was formed underneath the outermost layer composed of mixed Cr7C3 and CrN. At 950 °C, a Cr-rich zone indicated a thickness of ~7 μm. As the deposition time increased to 3 h at 950 °C, a new layer of (Cr, Fe7C3 was produced at the interface between the CrN formed at 800 °C and the base metal. This layer formed because of the abundant resources of Cr and C provided from the TRD powder and base metal, respectively. The multilayer and interface were concretely filled without the formation of voids as the TRD time increased to 6 h at 950 °C. The TRD process on a pre-nitrided layer was successfully applied to produce multilayers of CrN and Cr7C3.

  9. Solvothermal synthesis: a new route for preparing nitrides

    CERN Document Server

    Demazeau, G; Denis, A; Largeteau, A

    2002-01-01

    Solvothermal synthesis appears to be an interesting route for preparing nitrides such as gallium nitride and aluminium nitride, using ammonia as solvent. A nitriding additive is used to perform the reaction and, in the case of gallium nitride, is encapsulated by melt gallium. The syntheses are performed in the temperature range 400-800 deg. C and in the pressure range 100-200 MPa. The synthesized powders are characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Finely divided gallium nitride GaN and aluminium nitride AlN, both with wurtzite-type structure, can be obtained by this route.

  10. Cathodoluminescence of cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Shipilo, V.B.; Zajtsev, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three optically active defects are detected in mono- and polycrystal cubic boron nitride (β-BN). Analysis of intensity of temperature dependences, halfwidth and energy shift of 1.76 eV narrow phononless line (center GC-1) makes it possible to interprete the observed cathodoluminescence spectra an optical analog of the Moessbaner effect. Comparison of the obtained results with the known data for diamond monocrystals makes it possible to suggest that the detected center GC-1 is a nitrogen vacancy . The conclusion, concerning the Moessbauer optical spectra application, is made to analyze structural perfection of β-BN crystal lattice

  11. Surface analysis in steel nitrides by using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, R.S. de.

    1991-07-01

    The formation of iron nitride layer at low temperatures, 600-700 K, by Moessbauer spectroscopy is studied. These layers were obtained basically through two different processes: ion nitriding and ammonia gas nitriding. A preliminary study about post-discharge nitriding was made using discharge in hollow cathode as well as microwave excitation. The assembly of these chambers is also described. The analysis of the nitrided samples was done by CEMS and CXMS, aided by optical microscopy, and the CEMS and CXMS detectors were constructed by ourselves. We also made a brief study about these detectors, testing as acetone as the mixture 80% He+10% C H 4 as detection gases for the use of CEMS. The surface analysis of the samples showed that in the ammonia gas process nitriding the nitrided layer starts by the superficial formation of an iron nitride rich nitrogen. By thermal evolution this nitride promotes the diffusion of nitrogen and the formation of other more stable nitrides. (author)

  12. Effect of explosion hardening on the properties of the near-surface layer of glow-discharged nitrided 33H3MF steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnicki, J.; Fleszar, A.; Wierzchon, T.; Maranda, A.; Nowaczewski, J.

    1999-01-01

    The study was concerned with the effect of explosion hardening of 33H3MF steel, realized by the impact of the detonation products of a metallic plate driven by the detonation of an explosive plastic material, upon the microhardness and thickness of the nitrided layers forming during the glow discharge assisted nitridation process. Nitrided layers containing a compound zone, diffusion layers and layers with braunite content were formed on explosion-hardened steel surfaces. The corrosion resistance of the nitrided layers thus obtained was compared with that of the layers formed on non-hardened surfaces and on non-hardened and nitrided surfaces. The layers examined have a higher corrosion resistance than the starting material, but lower than the nitrided layers formed without the explosive load. The impact strength of the steel samples was examined before and after the explosion hardening and also after glow discharge assisted nitriding. It has been found that the explosion hardening followed by nitriding increases the impact strength, which is an advantageous effect. This also gives evidence that the changes in the hardness and structure of the samples examined, which are only observed in the layers whose thickness falls between 0.1 and 1.5 mm do not affect the notch present on the sample surface and thus have no influence upon the character of the sample fracture. (author)

  13. Ensembles of indium phosphide nanowires: physical properties and functional devices integrated on non-single crystal platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; Lohn, Andrew; Onishi, Takehiro [University of California, Santa Cruz (United States). Baskin School of Engineering; NASA Ames Research Center, Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR), Advanced Studies Laboratories, Univ. of California Santa Cruz, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Mathai, Sagi; Li, Xuema; Straznicky, Joseph; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Williams, R.S. [Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Information and Quantum Systems Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Logeeswaran, V.J.; Islam, M.S. [University of California Davis, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Davis, CA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    A new route to grow an ensemble of indium phosphide single-crystal semiconductor nanowires is described. Unlike conventional epitaxial growth of single-crystal semiconductor films, the proposed route for growing semiconductor nanowires does not require a single-crystal semiconductor substrate. In the proposed route, instead of using single-crystal semiconductor substrates that are characterized by their long-range atomic ordering, a template layer that possesses short-range atomic ordering prepared on a non-single-crystal substrate is employed. On the template layer, epitaxial information associated with its short-range atomic ordering is available within an area that is comparable to that of a nanowire root. Thus the template layer locally provides epitaxial information required for the growth of semiconductor nanowires. In the particular demonstration described in this paper, hydrogenated silicon was used as a template layer for epitaxial growth of indium phosphide nanowires. The indium phosphide nanowires grown on the hydrogenerated silicon template layer were found to be single crystal and optically active. Simple photoconductors and pin-diodes were fabricated and tested with the view towards various optoelectronic device applications where group III-V compound semiconductors are functionally integrated onto non-single-crystal platforms. (orig.)

  14. Ensembles of indium phosphide nanowires: physical properties and functional devices integrated on non-single crystal platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; Lohn, Andrew; Onishi, Takehiro; Mathai, Sagi; Li, Xuema; Straznicky, Joseph; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Williams, R.S.; Logeeswaran, V.J.; Islam, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    A new route to grow an ensemble of indium phosphide single-crystal semiconductor nanowires is described. Unlike conventional epitaxial growth of single-crystal semiconductor films, the proposed route for growing semiconductor nanowires does not require a single-crystal semiconductor substrate. In the proposed route, instead of using single-crystal semiconductor substrates that are characterized by their long-range atomic ordering, a template layer that possesses short-range atomic ordering prepared on a non-single-crystal substrate is employed. On the template layer, epitaxial information associated with its short-range atomic ordering is available within an area that is comparable to that of a nanowire root. Thus the template layer locally provides epitaxial information required for the growth of semiconductor nanowires. In the particular demonstration described in this paper, hydrogenated silicon was used as a template layer for epitaxial growth of indium phosphide nanowires. The indium phosphide nanowires grown on the hydrogenerated silicon template layer were found to be single crystal and optically active. Simple photoconductors and pin-diodes were fabricated and tested with the view towards various optoelectronic device applications where group III-V compound semiconductors are functionally integrated onto non-single-crystal platforms. (orig.)

  15. Rodenticide Comparative Effect of Klerat® and Zinc Phosphide for Controlling Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad VEYSI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL is a neglected disease with public health importance that is common in many rural areas of Iran. In recent years, behavioral resistance and/or bait shyness against the common rodenticide among reservoir hosts of ZCL have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Klerat® and zinc phosphide against natural reservoir of ZCL.Methods: This survey was carried out in four villages located 45 to 95 km far from Esfahan City Esfahan province, central Iran from April to November 2011. The rodent burrows were counted destroyed and reopened holes baited around all villages. Effect of rodent control operation on the main vector density and incidence of ZCL were evaluated.Results: The reduction rate of rodent burrows after intervention calculated to be at 62.8% in Klerat® and 58.15% in zinc phosphide treated areas. Statistical analysis showed no difference between the densities of the vector in indoors and outdoors in intervention and control areas. The incidence of the disease between treated and control areas after intervention was statistically different (P< 0.05.Conclusion: Klerat® could be a suitable alternative for zinc phosphide in a specific condition such as behavior resistance or occurrence of bait shyness.

  16. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...... of the sample surface. The development of epsilon nitride, expanded austenite and expanded martensite resulted from the low temperature nitriding treatments. The microstructural features, hardness and phase composition are discussed with emphasis on the influence of nitriding duration and nitriding potential....

  17. Cr-doped III-V nitrides: Potential candidates for spintronics

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Bin

    2011-02-19

    Studies of Cr-doped III-V nitrides, dilute magnetic alloys in the zincblende crystal structure, are presented. The objective of the work is to investigate half-metallicity in Al 0.75Cr 0.25N, Ga 0.75Cr 0.25N, and In 0.75Cr 0.25N for their possible application in spin-based electronic devices. The calculated spin-polarized band structures, electronic properties, and magnetic properties of these compounds reveal that Al 0.75Cr 0.25N and Ga 0.75Cr 0.25N are half-metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors while In 0.75Cr 0.25N is metallic in nature. The present theoretical predictions provide evidence that some Cr-doped III-V nitrides can be used in spintronics devices. © 2011 TMS.

  18. Cr-doped III-V nitrides: Potential candidates for spintronics

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Bin; Arif, Suneela K.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Maqbool, Muhammad; Ahmad, Roshan; Goumri-Said, Souraya; Prisbrey, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of Cr-doped III-V nitrides, dilute magnetic alloys in the zincblende crystal structure, are presented. The objective of the work is to investigate half-metallicity in Al 0.75Cr 0.25N, Ga 0.75Cr 0.25N, and In 0.75Cr 0.25N for their possible application in spin-based electronic devices. The calculated spin-polarized band structures, electronic properties, and magnetic properties of these compounds reveal that Al 0.75Cr 0.25N and Ga 0.75Cr 0.25N are half-metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors while In 0.75Cr 0.25N is metallic in nature. The present theoretical predictions provide evidence that some Cr-doped III-V nitrides can be used in spintronics devices. © 2011 TMS.

  19. Highly aligned vertical GaN nanowires using submonolayer metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George T [Albuquerque, NM; Li, Qiming [Albuquerque, NM; Creighton, J Randall [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-06-29

    A method for forming vertically oriented, crystallographically aligned nanowires (nanocolumns) using monolayer or submonolayer quantities of metal atoms to form uniformly sized metal islands that serve as catalysts for MOCVD growth of Group III nitride nanowires.

  20. Preparation of aluminum nitride-silicon carbide nanocomposite powder by the nitridation of aluminum silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itatani, K.; Tsukamoto, R.; Delsing, A.C.A.; Hintzen, H.T.J.M.; Okada, I.

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)-silicon carbide (SiC) nanocomposite powders were prepared by the nitridation of aluminum-silicon carbide (Al4SiC4) with the specific surface area of 15.5 m2·g-1. The powders nitrided at and above 1400°C for 3 h contained the 2H-phases which consisted of AlN-rich and SiC-rich

  1. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer......, developing at the surfce and consisting of iron-based (carbo)nitrides, and the diffusion zone underneath, consisting of iron and alloying element nitrides dispersed in af ferritic matrix. Microstructural features are related directly to the origins of stress buildup and stres relief....

  2. Comparative sodium void effects for different advanced liquid metal reactor fuel and core designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbin, K.D.; Kessler, S.F.; Nelson, J.V.; Gedeon, S.R.; Omberg, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of metal-, oxide-, and nitride-fueled advanced liquid metal reactor cores was performed to investigate the calculated differences in sodium void reactivity, and to determine the relationship between sodium void reactivity and burnup reactivity swing using the three fuel types. The results of this analysis indicate that nitride fuel has the least positive sodium void reactivity for any given burnup reactivity swing. Thus, it appears that a good design compromise between transient overpower and loss of flow response is obtained using nitride fuel. Additional studies were made to understand these and other nitride advantages. (author)

  3. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Silvan; Guillermo Villanueva, Luis; Amato, Bartolo; Boisen, Anja [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil; Sørensen, Anders S.; Usami, Koji; Polzik, Eugene S. [QUANTOP, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Taylor, Jacob M. [Joint Quantum Institute/NIST, College Park, Maryland 20899 (United States); Herring, Patrick K.; Cassidy, Maja C. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Charles M. [Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Cheol Shin, Yong; Kong, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene.

  4. Fundamental characterization of the effect of nitride sidewall spacer process on boron dose loss in ultra-shallow junction formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, P. [Silicon Technology Development, Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX 75243 (United States) and Microelectronics Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78758 (United States)]. E-mail: puneet.kohli@sematech.org; Chakravarthi, S. [Silicon Technology Development, Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX 75243 (United States); Jain, Amitabh [Silicon Technology Development, Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX 75243 (United States); Bu, H. [Silicon Technology Development, Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX 75243 (United States); Mehrotra, M. [Silicon Technology Development, Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX 75243 (United States); Dunham, S.T. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Banerjee, S.K. [Microelectronics Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78758 (United States)

    2004-12-15

    A nitride spacer with an underlying deposited tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) oxide that behaves as a convenient etch stop layer is a popular choice for sidewall spacer in modern complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process flows. In this work, we have investigated the effect of the silicon nitride spacer process chemistry on the boron profile in silicon and the related dose loss of B from Si into silicon dioxide. This is reflected as a dramatic change in the junction depth, junction abruptness and junction peak concentration for the different nitride chemistries. We conclude that the silicon nitride influences the concentration of hydrogen in the silicon dioxide and different nitride chemistries result in different concentrations of hydrogen in the silicon dioxide during the final source/drain anneal. The presence of H enhances the diffusivity of B in the silicon dioxide and thereby results in a significant dose loss from the Si into the silicon dioxide. In this work, we show that this dose loss can be minimized and the junction profile engineered by choosing a desirable nitride chemistry.

  5. Surface modification of titanium by plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapczinski Myriam Pereira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation was undertaken on commercially pure titanium submitted to plasma nitriding. Thirteen different sets of operational parameters (nitriding time, sample temperature and plasma atmosphere were used. Surface analyses were performed using X-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction and scanning electron microscopy. Wear tests were done with stainless steel Gracey scaler, sonic apparatus and pin-on-disc machine. The obtained results indicate that the tribological performance can be improved for samples treated with the following conditions: nitriding time of 3 h; plasma atmosphere consisting of 80%N2+20%H2 or 20%N2+80%H2; sample temperature during nitriding of 600 or 800 degreesC.

  6. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    As a prerequisite for predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron-based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present (even) the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... of pure iron-nitrogen phases has not been achieved fully. It has been shown that taking into account ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron-nitride phases, leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although thermodynamics indicate the state the system strives for......, the nitriding result is determined largely by the kinetics of the process. The nitriding kinetics have been shown to be characterised by the occurring local near-equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data have...

  7. Compressive creep of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.R.M. da; Melo, F.C.L. de; Cairo, C.A.; Piorino Neto, F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon nitride samples were formed by pressureless sintering process, using neodymium oxide and a mixture of neodymium oxide and yttrio oxide as sintering aids. The short term compressive creep behaviour was evaluated over a stress range of 50-300 MPa and temperature range 1200 - 1350 0 C. Post-sintering heat treatments in nitrogen with a stepwise decremental variation of temperature were performed in some samples and microstructural analysis by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the secondary crystalline phase which form from the remnant glass are dependent upon composition and percentage of aditives. Stress exponent values near to unity were obtained for materials with low glass content suggesting grain boundary diffusion accommodation processes. Cavitation will thereby become prevalent with increase in stress, temperature and decrease in the degree of crystallization of the grain boundary phase. (author) [pt

  8. Cathodoluminescence of cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Shipilo, V.B.; Zaitsev, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three types of optically active defect were observed in single-crystal and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (β-BN). An analysis of the temperature dependences of the intensity, half-width, and energy shift of a narrow zero-phonon line at 1.76 eV (GC-1 center) made it possible to interpret the observed cathodoluminescence spectra as an optical analog of the Moessbauer effect. A comparison of the results obtained in the present study with the available data on diamond single crystals made it possible to identify the observed GC-1 center as a nitrogen vacancy. It was concluded that optical Moessbauer-type spectra can be used to analyze structure defects in the crystal lattice of β-BN

  9. Ellipsometric analysis and optical absorption characterization of gallium phosphide nanoparticulate thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qi-Xian; Ruan Fang-Ping; Wei Wen-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) nanoparticulate thin films were easily fabricated by colloidal suspension deposition via GaP nanoparticles dispersed in N,N-dimethylformamide. The microstructure of the film was performed by x-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The film was further investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry. After the model GaP+void|SiO 2 was built and an effective medium approximation was adopted, the values of the refractive index n and the extinction coefficient k were calculated for the energy range of 0.75 eV–4.0 eV using the dispersion formula in DeltaPsi2 software. The absorption coefficient of the film was calculated from its k and its energy gaps were further estimated according to the Tauc equation, which were further verified by its fluorescence spectrum measurement. The structure and optical absorption properties of the nanoparticulate films are promising for their potential applications in hybrid solar cells. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  10. Ellipsometric analysis and optical absorption characterization of gallium phosphide nanoparticulate thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Xian; Wei, Wen-Sheng; Ruan, Fang-Ping

    2011-04-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) nanoparticulate thin films were easily fabricated by colloidal suspension deposition via GaP nanoparticles dispersed in N,N-dimethylformamide. The microstructure of the film was performed by x-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The film was further investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry. After the model GaP+void|SiO2 was built and an effective medium approximation was adopted, the values of the refractive index n and the extinction coefficient k were calculated for the energy range of 0.75 eV-4.0 eV using the dispersion formula in DeltaPsi2 software. The absorption coefficient of the film was calculated from its k and its energy gaps were further estimated according to the Tauc equation, which were further verified by its fluorescence spectrum measurement. The structure and optical absorption properties of the nanoparticulate films are promising for their potential applications in hybrid solar cells.

  11. Heterogeneous Bimetallic Phosphide/Sulfide Nanocomposite for Efficient Solar-Energy-Driven Overall Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yanmei; Kan, Xiang; Gan, Li-Yong; Zhang, Zhonghai

    2017-10-24

    Solar-driven overall water splitting is highly desirable for hydrogen generation with sustainable energy sources, which need efficient, earth-abundant, robust, and bifunctional electrocatalysts for both oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Herein, we propose a heterogeneous bimetallic phosphide/sulfide nanocomposite electrocatalyst of NiFeSP on nickel foam (NiFeSP/NF), which shows superior electrocatalytic activity of low overpotentials of 91 mV at -10 mA cm -2 for HER and of 240 mV at 50 mA cm -2 for OER in 1 M KOH solution. In addition, the NiFeSP/NF presents excellent overall water splitting performance with a cell voltage as low as 1.58 V at a current density of 10 mA cm -2 . Combining with a photovoltaic device of a Si solar cell or integrating into photoelectrochemical (PEC) systems, the bifunctional NiFeSP/NF electrocatalyst implements unassisted solar-driven water splitting with a solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of ∼9.2% and significantly enhanced PEC performance, respectively.

  12. Preparation and study of the properties of indium phosphide thin films impregnated with cadmium and zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutinho, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Indium phosphide thin films were deposited by vacuum evaporation of indium and phosphorous, using the three-temperature method. The effects of the introduction of cadmium and zinc, group II impurities, on the properties of these films were studied. The introduction of cadmium was achieved by coevaporation of this element during the film deposition. The introduction of zinc was done by diffusion of this element in intrinsic films. Analyses of these films were carried out by the study of the composition, morphology, structure, optical properties and electrical properties. The introduction of cadmium led to the reduction of grain size and increase in the bandgap and in certain cases, even change in morphology. Phases of CdP2 and β-CdP2 were detected and the resistivity increased by some orders of magnitude. The introduction of zinc did not change the morphology, crystalline structure and bandgap. However, a new energy level corresponding to the zinc acceptor level was found and the resistivity increased by some orders of magnitude. (Author) [pt

  13. High pressure study of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound in two different phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Electronic and structural properties of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound are calculated at hydrostatic pressure using the full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method in both cubic and tetragonal phases. The exchange-correlation potential is treated by the generalized gradient approximation within the scheme of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof, GGA96 (1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 3865). Also, the Engel and Vosko GGA formalism, EV-GGA (Engel and Vosko 1993 Phys. Rev. B 47 13164), is used to improve the band-gap results. Internal parameters are optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The lattice constants, internal parameters, bulk modulus, cohesive energy and band structures have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. The structural calculations predict that the stable phase is tetragonal. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band-gap, valence bandwidths and internal gaps (the energy gap between different parts of the valence bands) are studied using both GGA96 and EV-GGA.

  14. Density functional study of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Ali [Simulation Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shahrekord University, PB 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mokhtari@sci.sku.ac.ir

    2008-04-02

    The full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method, as implemented in the suite of software WIEN2k, has been used to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds M{sub 3}P{sub 2} (M = Be, Mg and Ca). The exchange-correlation functional was approximated as a generalized gradient functional introduced by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA96) and Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA). Internal parameters were optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The structural parameters, bulk modules, cohesive energy, band structures and density of states have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. These compounds are predicted to be semiconductors with the direct band gap of about 1.60, 2.55 and 2.62 eV for Be{sub 3}P{sub 2}, Mg{sub 3}P{sub 2} and Ca{sub 3}P{sub 2}, respectively. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band gap, valence bandwidths and anti-symmetric gap (the energy gap between two parts of the valence bands) are investigated using both GGA96 and EV-GGA. The contribution of s, p and d orbitals of different atoms to the density of states is discussed in detail.

  15. Density functional study of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method, as implemented in the suite of software WIEN2k, has been used to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds M 3 P 2 (M = Be, Mg and Ca). The exchange-correlation functional was approximated as a generalized gradient functional introduced by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA96) and Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA). Internal parameters were optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The structural parameters, bulk modules, cohesive energy, band structures and density of states have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. These compounds are predicted to be semiconductors with the direct band gap of about 1.60, 2.55 and 2.62 eV for Be 3 P 2 , Mg 3 P 2 and Ca 3 P 2 , respectively. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band gap, valence bandwidths and anti-symmetric gap (the energy gap between two parts of the valence bands) are investigated using both GGA96 and EV-GGA. The contribution of s, p and d orbitals of different atoms to the density of states is discussed in detail

  16. High pressure study of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound in two different phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Ali [Simulation Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shahrekord University, PB 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mokhtari@sci.sku.ac.ir

    2009-07-08

    Electronic and structural properties of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound are calculated at hydrostatic pressure using the full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method in both cubic and tetragonal phases. The exchange-correlation potential is treated by the generalized gradient approximation within the scheme of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof, GGA96 (1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 3865). Also, the Engel and Vosko GGA formalism, EV-GGA (Engel and Vosko 1993 Phys. Rev. B 47 13164), is used to improve the band-gap results. Internal parameters are optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The lattice constants, internal parameters, bulk modulus, cohesive energy and band structures have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. The structural calculations predict that the stable phase is tetragonal. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band-gap, valence bandwidths and internal gaps (the energy gap between different parts of the valence bands) are studied using both GGA96 and EV-GGA.

  17. Observation of three-component fermions in the topological semimetal molybdenum phosphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, B. Q.; Feng, Z.-L.; Xu, Q.-N.; Gao, X.; Ma, J.-Z.; Kong, L.-Y.; Richard, P.; Huang, Y.-B.; Strocov, V. N.; Fang, C.; Weng, H.-M.; Shi, Y.-G.; Qian, T.; Ding, H.

    2017-06-01

    In quantum field theory, Lorentz invariance leads to three types of fermion—Dirac, Weyl and Majorana. Although the existence of Weyl and Majorana fermions as elementary particles in high-energy physics is debated, all three types of fermion have been proposed to exist as low-energy, long-wavelength quasiparticle excitations in condensed-matter systems. The existence of Dirac and Weyl fermions in condensed-matter systems has been confirmed experimentally, and that of Majorana fermions is supported by various experiments. However, in condensed-matter systems, fermions in crystals are constrained by the symmetries of the 230 crystal space groups rather than by Lorentz invariance, giving rise to the possibility of finding other types of fermionic excitation that have no counterparts in high-energy physics. Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to demonstrate the existence of a triply degenerate point in the electronic structure of crystalline molybdenum phosphide. Quasiparticle excitations near a triply degenerate point are three-component fermions, beyond the conventional Dirac-Weyl-Majorana classification, which attributes Dirac and Weyl fermions to four- and two-fold degenerate points, respectively. We also observe pairs of Weyl points in the bulk electronic structure of the crystal that coexist with the three-component fermions. This material thus represents a platform for studying the interplay between different types of fermions. Our experimental discovery opens up a way of exploring the new physics of unconventional fermions in condensed-matter systems.

  18. Nitride fuels irradiation performance data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brozak, D.E.; Thomas, J.K.; Peddicord, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    An irradiation performance data base for nitride fuels has been developed from an extensive literature search and review that emphasized uranium nitride, but also included performance data for mixed nitrides [(U,Pu)N] and carbonitrides [(U,Pu)C,N] to increase the quantity and depth of pin data available. This work represents a very extensive effort to systematically collect and organize irradiation data for nitride-based fuels. The data base has many potential applications. First, it can facilitate parametric studies of nitride-based fuels to be performed using a wide range of pin designs and operating conditions. This should aid in the identification of important parameters and design requirements for multimegawatt and SP-100 fuel systems. Secondly, the data base can be used to evaluate fuel performance models. For detailed studies, it can serve as a guide to selecting a small group of pin specimens for extensive characterization. Finally, the data base will serve as an easily accessible and expandable source of irradiation performance information for nitride fuels

  19. Methods for and products of processing nanostructure nitride, carbonitride and oxycarbonitride electrode power materials by utilizing sol gel technology for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhong; Wei, Oiang; Chu, Chung-tse; Zheng, Haixing

    2001-01-01

    Metal nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder with high surface area (up to 150 m.sup.2 /g) is prepared by using sol-gel process. The metal organic precursor, alkoxides or amides, is synthesized firstly. The metal organic precursor is modified by using unhydrolyzable organic ligands or templates. A wet gel is formed then by hydrolysis and condensation process. The solvent in the wet gel is then be removed supercritically to form porous amorphous hydroxide. This porous hydroxide materials is sintered to 725.degree. C. under the ammonia flow and porous nitride powder is formed. The other way to obtain high surface area nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder is to pyrolyze polymerized templated metal amides aerogel in an inert atmosphere. The electrochemical capacitors are prepared by using sol-gel prepared nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder. Two methods are used to assemble the capacitors. Electrode is formed either by pressing the mixture of nitride powder and binder to a foil, or by depositing electrode coating onto metal current collector. The binder or coating is converted into a continuous network of electrode material after thermal treatment to provide enhanced energy and power density. Liquid electrolyte is soaked into porous electrode. The electrochemical capacitor assembly further has a porous separator layer between two electrodes/electrolyte and forming a unit cell.

  20. Effect of dislocations on the open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current and efficiency of heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Raj K.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Excellent radiation resistance of indium phosphide solar cells makes them a promising candidate for space power applications, but the present high cost of starting substrates may inhibit their large scale use. Thin film indium phosphide cells grown on Si or GaAs substrates have exhibited low efficiencies, because of the generation and propagation of large number of dislocations. Dislocation densities were calculated and its influence on the open circuit voltage, short circuit current, and efficiency of heteroepitaxial indium phosphide cells was studied using the PC-1D. Dislocations act as predominant recombination centers and are required to be controlled by proper transition layers and improved growth techniques. It is shown that heteroepitaxial grown cells could achieve efficiencies in excess of 18 percent AMO by controlling the number of dislocations. The effect of emitter thickness and surface recombination velocity on the cell performance parameters vs. dislocation density is also studied.

  1. Phase equilibria in the Mo-Fe-P system at 800 °C and structure of ternary phosphide (Mo(1-x)Fe(x))3P (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.15).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliynyk, Anton O; Lomnytska, Yaroslava F; Dzevenko, Mariya V; Stoyko, Stanislav S; Mar, Arthur

    2013-01-18

    Construction of the isothermal section in the metal-rich portion (ternary phases: (Mo(1-x)Fe(x))(2)P (x = 0.30-0.82) and (Mo(1-x)Fe(x))(3)P (x = 0.10-0.15). The occurrence of a Co(2)Si-type ternary phase (Mo(1-x)Fe(x))(2)P, which straddles the equiatomic composition MoFeP, is common to other ternary transition-metal phosphide systems. However, the ternary phase (Mo(1-x)Fe(x))(3)P is unusual because it is distinct from the binary phase Mo(3)P, notwithstanding their similar compositions and structures. The relationship has been clarified through single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies on Mo(3)P (α-V(3)S-type, space group I42m, a = 9.7925(11) Å, c = 4.8246(6) Å) and (Mo(0.85)Fe(0.15))(3)P (Ni(3)P-type, space group I4, a = 9.6982(8) Å, c = 4.7590(4) Å) at -100 °C. Representation in terms of nets containing fused triangles provides a pathway to transform these closely related structures through twisting. Band structure calculations support the adoption of these structure types and the site preference of Fe atoms. Electrical resistivity measurements on (Mo(0.85)Fe(0.15))(3)P reveal metallic behavior but no superconducting transition.

  2. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically...

  3. Microstructural characterization of an AISI-SAE 4140 steel without nitridation and nitrided

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina F, A.; Naquid G, C.

    2000-01-01

    It was micro structurally characterized an AISI-SAE 4140 steel before and after of nitridation through the nitridation process by plasma post-unloading microwaves through Optical microscopy (OM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) by means of secondary electrons and retrodispersed, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersion spectra (EDS) and mapping of elements. (Author)

  4. Synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium nitride (Mg3N2) powder using thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Tae-Hee; Park, Hyun-Woo; Park, Dong-Wha

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystalline magnesium nitride (Mg 3 N 2 ) powder was synthesized from bulk magnesium by thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure. Magnesium vapor was generated through heating the bulk magnesium by DC plasma jet and reacted with ammonia gas. Injecting position and flow rates of ammonia gas were controlled to investigate an ideal condition for Mg 3 N 2 synthesis. The synthesized Mg 3 N 2 was cooled and collected on the chamber wall. Characteristics of the synthesized powders for each experimental condition were analyzed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravity analysis (TGA). In absence of NH 3 , magnesium metal powder was formed. The synthesis with NH 3 injection in low temperature region resulted in a formation of crystalline magnesium nitride with trigonal morphology, whereas the mixture of magnesium metal and amorphous Mg 3 N 2 was formed when NH 3 was injected in high temperature region. Also, vaporization process of magnesium was discussed.

  5. The mechanical design of hybrid graphene/boron nitride nanotransistors: Geometry and interface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einalipour Eshkalak, Kasra; Sadeghzadeh, Sadegh; Jalaly, Maisam

    2018-02-01

    From electronic point of view, graphene resembles a metal or semi-metal and boron nitride is a dielectric material (band gap = 5.9 eV). Hybridization of these two materials opens band gap of the graphene which has expansive applications in field-effect graphene transistors. In this paper, the effect of the interface structure on the mechanical properties of a hybrid graphene/boron nitride was studied. Young's modulus, fracture strain and tensile strength of the models were simulated. Three likely types (hexagonal, octagonal and decagonal) were found for the interface of hybrid sheet after relaxation. Although Csbnd B bonds at the interface were indicated to result in more promising electrical properties, nitrogen atoms are better choice for bonding to carbon for mechanical applications.

  6. Superconducting nitride halides MNX (M = Ti, Zr, Hf; X = Cl, Br, I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schurz, Christian M.; Shlyk, Larysa; Schleid, Thomas; Niewa, Rainer [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    2011-07-01

    Two different polymorphs of the metal nitride halides MNX (M = Ti, Zr, Hf; X = Cl, Br, I) are known to crystallize in layered structures. The two crystal structures differ in the way {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}{l_brace}X[M{sub 2}N{sub 2}]X{r_brace} slabs are stacked along the c-axes. Metal atoms and/or organic molecules can be intercalated into the van-der-Waals gap between these layers. After such an electron-doping via intercalation the prototypic band insulators change into superconductors with moderate high critical temperatures T{sub c} up to 25.5 K. This review gathers information on synthesis routes, structural characteristics and properties of the prototypic nitride halides and the derivatives after electron-doping with a focus on superconductivity. (orig.)

  7. Chemical vapor deposition of refractory ternary nitrides for advanced diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custer, Jonathan S.; Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth; Smith, Paul Martin

    1998-09-22

    Refractory ternary nitride films for diffusion barriers in microelectronics have been grown using chemical vapor deposition. Thin films of titanium-silicon-nitride, tungsten-boron-nitride, and tungsten-silicon-nitride of various compositions have been deposited on 150 mm Si wafers. The microstructure of the films are either fully amorphous for the tungsten based films, or nauocrystalline TiN in an amorphous matrix for titanium-silicon-nitride. All films exhibit step coverages suitable for use in future microelectronics generations. Selected films have been tested as diffusion barriers between copper and silicon, and generally perform extremely weH. These fiIms are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barriers for microelectronics applications. The manufacturing of silicon wafers into integrated circuits uses many different process and materials. The manufacturing process is usually divided into two parts: the front end of line (FEOL) and the back end of line (BEOL). In the FEOL the individual transistors that are the heart of an integrated circuit are made on the silicon wafer. The responsibility of the BEOL is to wire all the transistors together to make a complete circuit. The transistors are fabricated in the silicon itself. The wiring is made out of metal, currently aluminum and tungsten, insulated by silicon dioxide, see Figure 1. Unfortunately, silicon will diffuse into aluminum, causing aluminum spiking of junctions, killing transistors. Similarly, during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten from ~fj, the reactivity of the fluorine can cause "worn-holes" in the silicon, also destroying transistors. The solution to these problems is a so-called diffusion barrier, which will allow current to pass from the transistors to the wiring, but will prevent reactions between silicon and the metal.

  8. Toward Edge-Defined Holey Boron Nitride Nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Liao, Yunlong; Chen, Zhongfan; Connell, John W.

    2015-01-01

    "Holey" two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets with well-defined holy morphology and edge chemistry are highly desirable for applications such as energy storage, catalysis, sensing, transistors, and molecular transport/separation. For example, holey grapheme is currently under extensive investigation for energy storage applications because of the improvement in ion transport due to through the thickness pathways provided by the holes. Without the holes, the 2D materials have significant limitations for such applications in which efficient ion transport is important. As part of an effort to apply this approach to other 2D nanomaterials, a method to etch geometrically defined pits or holes on the basal plane surface of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets has been developed. The etching, conducted via heating in ambient air using metal nanoparticles as catalysts, was facile, controllable, and scalable. Starting h-BN layered crystals were etched and subsequently exfoliated into boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs). The as-etched and exfoliated h-BN nanosheets possessed defined pit and hole shapes that were comprised of regulated nanostructures at the edges. The current finding are the first step toward the bulk preparation of holey BNNSs with defined holes and edges.

  9. The encapsulation of trimetallic nitride clusters in fullerene cages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, H.C.; Stevenson, S.; Craft, J.; Cromer, F.; Duchamp, J.; Rice, G.; Glass, T.; Harich, K.; Fowler, P.W.; Heine, T.; Hajdu, E.; Bible, R.; Olmstead, M.M.; Maitra, K.; Fisher, A.J.; Balch, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Kratschmer-Huffman electric-arc generator typically produces endohedral metallofullerenes in low yields with a wide array of different products, but the introduction of nitrogen leads to a new family of encapsulates. A family of endohedral metallofullerenes A n B 3-n N at C 2n (n=0-3, x=34, 39, and 40) where A and B are Group III and rare-earth metals is formed by a trimetallic nitride template (TNT) process in relatively high yields. The archetypal representative of this new class is the stable endohedral metallofullerene, Sc 3 N at C 80 containing a triscandium nitride cluster encapsulated in an icosahedron (I h ), C 80 cage. The Sc 3 N at C 80 is formed in yields even exceeding empty-cage C 84 . Other prominent scandium TNT members are Sc 3 N at C 68 and Sc 3 N at C 78 . The former Sc 3 N at C 68 molecule represents an exception to the well known isolated pentagon rule (IPR). These new molecules were purified by chromatography with corresponding characterization by various spectroscopic approaches. In this paper we focus on the characterization and properties of this fascinating new class of materials

  10. A nano-engineered graphene/carbon nitride hybrid for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Li; Yao Zheng; Anthony F.Masters; Thomas Maschmeyer

    2016-01-01

    A metal-free photocatalytic hydrogen evolution system was successfully fabricated using heteroatom doped graphene materials as electron-transfer co-catalysts and carbon nitride as a semiconductor.The catalytic role of graphene is significantly dependent on the heteroatom dopant of the graphene,such as O,S,B,N doped/undoped graphene co-catalysts,and N-graphene shows the best catalytic hydrogen evolution rate.

  11. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average ...

  12. Preparing microspheres of actinide nitrides from carbon containing oxide sols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triggiani, L.V.

    1975-01-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium nitride, uranium oxynitride, and uranium carboxynitride microspheres and the microspheres as compositions of matter. The microspheres are prepared from carbide sols by reduction and nitriding steps. (Official Gazette)

  13. Selectivity control of photosensitive structures based on gallium arsenide phosphide solid solutions by changing the rate of surface recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, S A; Andreev, M Y; Lamkin, I A; Solomonov, A V

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the effect of surface recombination on spectral sensitivity of structures based on gallium arsenide phosphide solid solutions. Simulation of the effect for structures based on a p-n junction and a Schottky barrier was carried out. Photodetectors with different rates of surface recombination were fabricated by using different methods of preliminary treatment of the semiconductor surface. We experimentally demonstrated the possibility to control photodetector selectivity by altering the rate of surface recombination. The full width at half maximum was reduced by almost 4 times, while a relatively small decrease in sensitivity at the maximum was observed. (paper)

  14. Studies of the pressure dependence of the charge density distribution in cerium phosphide by the maximum-entropy method

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimatsu, N; Takata, M; Nishibori, E; Sakata, M; Hayashi, J; Shirotani, I; Shimomura, O

    2002-01-01

    The physical properties relating to 4f electrons in cerium phosphide, especially the temperature dependence and the isomorphous transition that occurs at around 10 GPa, were studied by means of x-ray powder diffraction and charge density distribution maps derived by the maximum-entropy method. The compressibility of CeP was exactly determined using a helium pressure medium and the anomaly that indicated the isomorphous transition was observed in the compressibility. We also discuss the anisotropic charge density distribution of Ce ions and its temperature dependence.

  15. Diffusion length variation in 0.5- and 3-MeV-proton-irradiated, heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide (GaAs) and silicon (Si) solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of light weight, mechanically strong, and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5- and 3-MeV proton irradiations have been explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence was calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient, K(sub L), was also plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  16. A Difference in Using Atomic Layer Deposition or Physical Vapour Deposition TiN as Electrode Material in Metal-Insulator-Metal and Metal-Insulator-Silicon Capacitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenland, A.W.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    In this work, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and metal-insulator-silicon (MIS) capacitors are studied using titanium nitride (TiN) as the electrode material. The effect of structural defects on the electrical properties on MIS and MIM capacitors is studied for various electrode configurations. In the

  17. Niobium Nitride Nb4N5 as a New High‐Performance Electrode Material for Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Houlei; Zhu, Guilian; Liu, Xiangye; Liu, Fengxin; Xie, Yian; Yang, Chongyin; Lin, Tianquan; Gu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Supercapacitors suffer either from low capacitance for carbon or derivate electrodes or from poor electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability for metal oxide or conducting polymer electrodes. Transition metal nitrides possess fair electrical conductivity but superior chemical stability, which may be desirable candidates for supercapacitors. Herein, niobium nitride, Nb4N5, is explored to be an excellent capacitive material for the first time. An areal capacitance of 225.8 mF cm−2, with a reasonable rate capability (60.8% retention from 0.5 to 10 mA cm−2) and cycling stability (70.9% retention after 2000 cycles), is achieved in Nb4N5 nanochannels electrode with prominent electrical conductivity and electrochemical activity. Faradaic pseudocapacitance is confirmed by the mechanistic studies, deriving from the proton incorporation/chemisorption reaction owing to the copious +5 valence Nb ions in Nb4N5. Moreover, this Nb4N5 nanochannels electrode with an ultrathin carbon coating exhibits nearly 100% capacitance retention after 2000 CV cycles, which is an excellent cycling stability for metal nitride materials. Thus, the Nb4N5 nanochannels are qualified for a candidate for supercapacitors and other energy storage applications. PMID:27980920

  18. Niobium Nitride Nb4N5 as a New High-Performance Electrode Material for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Houlei; Zhu, Guilian; Liu, Xiangye; Liu, Fengxin; Xie, Yian; Yang, Chongyin; Lin, Tianquan; Gu, Hui; Huang, Fuqiang

    2015-12-01

    Supercapacitors suffer either from low capacitance for carbon or derivate electrodes or from poor electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability for metal oxide or conducting polymer electrodes. Transition metal nitrides possess fair electrical conductivity but superior chemical stability, which may be desirable candidates for supercapacitors. Herein, niobium nitride, Nb 4 N 5 , is explored to be an excellent capacitive material for the first time. An areal capacitance of 225.8 mF cm -2 , with a reasonable rate capability (60.8% retention from 0.5 to 10 mA cm -2 ) and cycling stability (70.9% retention after 2000 cycles), is achieved in Nb 4 N 5 nanochannels electrode with prominent electrical conductivity and electrochemical activity. Faradaic pseudocapacitance is confirmed by the mechanistic studies, deriving from the proton incorporation/chemisorption reaction owing to the copious +5 valence Nb ions in Nb 4 N 5 . Moreover, this Nb 4 N 5 nanochannels electrode with an ultrathin carbon coating exhibits nearly 100% capacitance retention after 2000 CV cycles, which is an excellent cycling stability for metal nitride materials. Thus, the Nb 4 N 5 nanochannels are qualified for a candidate for supercapacitors and other energy storage applications.

  19. Corrosion-resistant titanium nitride coatings formed on stainless steel by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium films 70nm thick were deposited on austenitic type 316L stainless steel substrates, and these specimens were irradiated with titanium ions of energy 70kV at a fluence of 1x10 17 ioncm -2 , using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) IV metallic ion source at room temperature. After irradiation, titanium nitride (TiN) films were deposited by titanium evaporation and simultaneous irradiation by a nitrogen ion beam, with transport ratios of Ti to N atoms from 0.5 to 10.0 and an ion acceleration voltage of 2kV. The preferred orientation of the TiN films varied from left angle 200 right angle to left angle 111 right angle normal to the surface when the transport ratio was increased. With the help of Auger electron spectroscopy, interfacial mixing was verified. Nitrogen atoms were present in the state of titanium nitride for all transport ratios from 0.5 up to 10.0. However, the chemical bonding state of titanium changed from titanium nitride to the metallic state with increasing transport ratio Ti/N. The corrosion behavior was evaluated in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid saturated with oxygen, using multisweep cyclic voltammetry measurements. Thin film deposition of pure titanium and titanium implantation prior to TiN deposition have beneficial effects on the suppression of transpassive chromium dissolution. ((orig.))

  20. Toward an Aqueous Solar Battery: Direct Electrochemical Storage of Solar Energy in Carbon Nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podjaski, Filip; Kröger, Julia; Lotsch, Bettina V

    2018-03-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides have emerged as an earth-abundant family of polymeric materials for solar energy conversion. Herein, a 2D cyanamide-functionalized polyheptazine imide (NCN-PHI) is reported, which for the first time enables the synergistic coupling of two key functions of energy conversion within one single material: light harvesting and electrical energy storage. Photo-electrochemical measurements in aqueous electrolytes reveal the underlying mechanism of this "solar battery" material: the charge storage in NCN-PHI is based on the photoreduction of the carbon nitride backbone and charge compensation is realized by adsorption of alkali metal ions within the NCN-PHI layers and at the solution interface. The photoreduced carbon nitride can thus be described as a battery anode operating as a pseudocapacitor, which can store light-induced charge in the form of long-lived, "trapped" electrons for hours. Importantly, the potential window of this process is not limited by the water reduction reaction due to the high intrinsic overpotential of carbon nitrides for hydrogen evolution, potentially enabling new applications for aqueous batteries. Thus, the feasibility of light-induced electrical energy storage and release on demand by a one-component light-charged battery anode is demonstrated, which provides a sustainable solution to overcome the intermittency of solar radiation. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Thermal expansion of TRU nitride solid solutions as fuel materials for transmutation of minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Masahide; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Minato, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    The lattice thermal expansion of the transuranium nitride solid solutions was measured to investigate the composition dependence. The single-phase solid solution samples of (Np 0.55 Am 0.45 )N, (Pu 0.59 Am 0.41 )N, (Np 0.21 Pu 0.52 Am 0.22 Cm 0.05 )N and (Pu 0.21 Am 0.18 Zr 0.61 )N were prepared by carbothermic nitridation of the respective transuranium dioxides and nitridation of Zr metal through hydride. The lattice parameters were measured by the high temperature X-ray diffraction method from room temperature up to 1478 K. The linear thermal expansion of each sample was determined as a function of temperature. The average thermal expansion coefficients over the temperature range of 293-1273 K for the solid solution samples were 10.1, 11.5, 10.8 and 8.8 x 10 -6 K -1 , respectively. Comparison of these values with those for the constituent nitrides showed that the average thermal expansion coefficients of the solid solution samples could be approximated by the linear mixture rule within the error of 2-3%.

  2. Facile synthesis of phosphorus doped graphitic carbon nitride polymers with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ligang; Chen, Xiufang; Guan, Jing; Jiang, Yijun; Hou, Tonggang; Mu, Xindong

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • P-doped g-C 3 N 4 has been prepared by a one-pot green synthetic approach. • The incorporation of P resulted in favorable textural and electronic properties. • Doping with P enhanced the visible-light photocatalytic activity of g-C 3 N 4 . • A postannealing treatment further enhanced the activity of P-doped g-C 3 N 4 . • Photogenerated holes were the main species responsible for the activity. - Abstract: Phosphorus-doped carbon nitride materials were prepared by a one-pot green synthetic approach using dicyandiamide monomer and a phosphorus containing ionic liquid as precursors. The as-prepared materials were subjected to several characterizations and investigated as metal-free photocatalysts for the degradation of organic pollutants (dyes like Rhodamine B, Methyl orange) in aqueous solution under visible light. Results revealed that phosphorus-doped carbon nitride have a higher photocatalytic activity for decomposing Rhodamine B and Methyl orange in aqueous solution than undoped g-C 3 N 4 , which was attributed to the favorable textural, optical and electronic properties caused by doping with phosphorus heteroatoms into carbon nitride host. A facile postannealing treatment further improved the activity of the photocatalytic system, due to the higher surface area and smaller structural size in the postcalcined catalysts. The phosphorus-doped carbon nitride showed high visible-light photocatalytic activity, making them promising materials for a wide range of potential applications in photochemistry

  3. Plasma assisted nitriding for micro-texturing onto martensitic stainless steels*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoh Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-texturing method has grown up to be one of the most promising procedures to form micro-lines, micro-dots and micro-grooves onto the mold-die materials and to duplicate these micro-patterns onto metallic or polymer sheets via stamping or injection molding. This related application requires for large-area, fine micro-texturing onto the martensitic stainless steel mold-die materials. A new method other than laser-machining, micro-milling or micro-EDM is awaited for further advancement of this micro-texturing. In the present paper, a new micro-texturing method is developed on the basis of the plasma assisted nitriding to transform the two-dimensionally designed micro-patterns to the three dimensional micro-textures in the martensitic stainless steels. First, original patterns are printed onto the surface of stainless steel molds by using the dispenser or the ink-jet printer. Then, the masked mold is subjected to high density plasma nitriding; the un-masked surfaces are nitrided to have higher hardness, 1400 Hv than the matrix hardness, 200 Hv of stainless steels. This nitrided mold is further treated by sand-blasting to selectively remove the soft, masked surfaces. Finally, the micro-patterned martensitic stainless steel mold is fabricated as a tool to duplicate these micro-patterns onto the plastic materials by the injection molding.

  4. Plasma Nitriding of AISI 304 Stainless Steel in Cathodic and Floating Electric Potential: Influence on Morphology, Chemical Characteristics and Tribological Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; He, Yongyong; Wang, Wei; Mao, Junyuan; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Yijie; Ye, Qianwen

    2018-03-01

    In direct current plasma nitriding (DCPN), the treated components are subjected to a high cathodic potential, which brings several inherent shortcomings, e.g., damage by arcing and the edging effect. In active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes, the cathodic potential is applied to a metal screen that surrounds the workload, and the component to be treated is placed in a floating potential. Such an electrical configuration allows plasma to be formed on the metal screen surface rather than on the component surface; thus, the shortcomings of the DCPN are eliminated. In this work, the nitrided experiments were performed using a plasma nitriding unit. Two groups of samples were placed on the table in the cathodic and the floating potential, corresponding to the DCPN and ASPN, respectively. The floating samples and table were surrounded by a steel screen. The DCPN and ASPN of the AISI 304 stainless steels are investigated as a function of the electric potential. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscope. Dry sliding ball-on-disk wear tests were conducted on the untreated substrate, DCPN and ASPN samples. The results reveal that all nitrided samples successfully produced similar nitrogen-supersaturated S phase layers on their surfaces. This finding also shows the strong impact of the electric potential of the nitriding process on the morphology, chemical characteristics, hardness and tribological behavior of the DCPN and ASPN samples.

  5. Corrosion resistant surface for vanadium nitride and hafnium nitride layers as function of grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, C. A.; Caicedo, J. C.; Aperador, W.

    2014-01-01

    In this research it was studied vanadium nitride (VN) and hafnium nitride (HfN) film, which were deposited onto silicon (Si (100)) and AISI 4140 steel substrates via r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in Ar/N2 atmosphere with purity at 99.99% for both V and Hf metallic targets. Both films were approximately 1.2±0.1 μm thick. The crystallography structures that were evaluated via X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) showed preferential orientations in the Bragg planes VN (200) and HfN (111). The chemical compositions for both films were characterized by EDX. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology; the results reveal grain sizes of 78±2 nm for VN and 58±2 nm for HfN and roughness values of 4.2±0.1 nm for VN and 1.5±0.1 nm for HfN films. The electrochemical performance in VN and HfN films deposited onto steel 4140 were studied by Tafel polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy methods (EIS) under contact with sodium chloride at 3.5 wt% solution, therefore, it was found that the corrosion rate decreased about 95% in VN and 99% for HfN films in relation to uncoated 4140 steel, thus demonstrating, the protecting effect of VN and HfN films under a corrosive environment as function of morphological characteristics (grain size). VN(grain size)=78±2.0 nm, VN(roughness)=4.2±0.1 nm, VN(corrosion rate)=40.87 μmy. HfN(grain size)=58±2.0 nm, HfN(roughness)=1.5±0.1 nm, HfN(corrosion rate)=0.205 μmy. It was possible to analyze that films with larger grain size, can be observed smaller grain boundary thus generating a higher corrosion rate, therefore, in this work it was found that the HfN layer has better corrosion resistance (low corrosion rate) in relation to VN film which presents a larger grain size, indicating that the low grain boundary in (VN films) does not restrict movement of the Cl- ion and in this way the corrosion rate increases dramatically.

  6. Byproduct-free mass production of compound semiconductor nanowires: zinc phosphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yixi; Polinnaya, Rakesh; Vaddiraju, Sreeram

    2018-05-01

    A method for the mass production of compound semiconductor nanowires that involves the direct reaction of component elements in a chemical vapor deposition chamber (CVD) is presented. This method results in nanowires, without the associated production of any other byproducts such as nanoparticles or three-dimensional (3D) bulk crystals. Furthermore, no unreacted reactants remain mixed with the nanowire product in this method. This byproduct-free nanowire production thus circumvents the need to tediously purify and collect nanowires from a mixture of products/reactants after their synthesis. Demonstration made using zinc phosphide (Zn3P2) material system as an example indicated that the direct reaction of zinc microparticles with phosphorus supplied via the vapor phase results in the production of gram quantities of nanowires. To enhance thermal transport and achieve the complete reaction of zinc microparticles, while simultaneously ensuring that the microparticles do not agglomerate into macroscale zinc particles and partly remain unreacted (owing to diffusion limitations), pellets composed of mixtures of zinc and a sacrificial salt, NH4Cl, were employed as the starting material. The sublimation by decomposition of NH4Cl in the early stages of the reaction leaves a highly porous pellet of zinc composed of only zinc microparticles, which allows for inward diffusion of phosphorus/outward diffusion of zinc and the complete conversion of zinc into Zn3P2 nanowires. NH4Cl also aids in removal of any native oxide layer present on the zinc microparticles that may prevent their reaction with phosphorus. This method may be used to mass produce many other nanowires in a byproduct-free manner, besides Zn3P2.

  7. Pushing indium phosphide quantum dot emission deeper into the near infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeboe, A. M.; Kays, J.; Mahler, A. H.; Dennis, A. M.

    2018-02-01

    Cadmium-free near infrared (NIR) emitting quantum dots (QDs) have significant potential for multiplexed tissue-depth imaging applications in the first optical tissue window (i.e., 650 - 900 nm). Indium phosphide (InP) chemistry provides one of the more promising cadmium-free options for biomedical imaging, but the full tunability of this material has not yet been achieved. Specifically, InP QD emission has been tuned from 480 - 730 nm in previous literature reports, but examples of samples emitting from 730 nm to the InP bulk bandgap limit of 925 nm are lacking. We hypothesize that by generating inverted structures comprising ZnSe/InP/ZnS in a core/shell/shell heterostructure, optical emission from the InP shell can be tuned by changing the InP shell thickness, including pushing deeper into the NIR than current InP QDs. Colloidal synthesis methods including hot injection precipitation of the ZnSe core and a modified successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method for stepwise shell deposition were used to promote growth of core/shell/shell materials with varying thicknesses of the InP shell. By controlling the number of injections of indium and phosphorous precursor material, the emission peak was tuned from 515 nm to 845 nm (2.41 - 1.47 eV) with consistent full width half maximum (FWHM) values of the emission peak 0.32 eV. To confer water solubility, the nanoparticles were encapsulated in PEGylated phospholipid micelles, and multiplexing of NIR-emitting InP QDs was demonstrated using an IVIS imaging system. These materials show potential for multiplexed imaging of targeted QD contrast agents in the first optical tissue window.

  8. Study of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in indium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaban, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    This research is focused on (1) conducting detailed theoretical and experimental study of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in liquid encapsulated Czohralski (LEC) grown, Zn-doped P-type indium phosphide (InP), (2) identifying the physical origin of the defects detected using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) method, and (3) and developing a second-order model to interpret the presence of nonexponential capacitance transients in DLTS method. Analysis of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in P-type InP is undertaken. The main research results are summarized as follows: (1) DLTS analysis of grown-in defects in liquid LEC-grown, Zn-doped, P-type InP is made in this study. A single-hole trap of E/sub v/ + 0.52 eV is detected with a trap density of 1.8 x 10 15 cm -3 . The physical origin of this hole trap is attributed to a phosphorus vacancy or phosphorus interstitial-related defect. (2) One-MeV electron-irradiated P-type InP introduced two new hole traps, namely E/sub v/ + 0.34 and E/sub v/ + 0.58 eV with introduction rates (dN/sub T/d phi) of 0.4 and 1.2 per electron-cm, respectively. (3) A theoretical model is developed to interpret nonexponential capacitance transients in a deep-level transient spectroscopy method when the capture process competes with the dominant thermal-emission process

  9. Atomistic investigations on the mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms of indium phosphide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pial, Turash Haque; Rakib, Tawfiqur; Mojumder, Satyajit; Motalab, Mohammad; Akanda, M A Salam

    2018-03-28

    The mechanical properties of indium phosphide (InP) nanowires are an emerging issue due to the promising applications of these nanowires in nanoelectromechanical and microelectromechanical devices. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) crystal structured InP nanowires (NWs) are presented under uniaxial tension at varying sizes and temperatures. It is observed that the tensile strengths of both types of NWs show inverse relationships with temperature, but are independent of the size of the nanowires. Moreover, applied load causes brittle fracture by nucleating cleavage on ZB and WZ NWs. When the tensile load is applied along the [001] direction, the direction of the cleavage planes of ZB NWs changes with temperature. It is found that the {111} planes are the cleavage planes at lower temperatures; on the other hand, the {110} cleavage planes are activated at elevated temperatures. In the case of WZ NWs, fracture of the material is observed to occur by cleaving along the (0001) plane irrespective of temperature when the tensile load is applied along the [0001] direction. Furthermore, the WZ NWs of InP show considerably higher strength than their ZB counterparts. Finally, the impact of strain rate on the failure behavior of InP NWs is also studied, and higher fracture strengths and strains at higher strain rates are found. With increasing strain rate, the number of cleavages also increases in the NWs. This paper also provides in-depth understanding of the failure behavior of InP NWs, which will aid the design of efficient InP NWs-based devices.

  10. Plasma nitridation optimization for sub-15 A gate dielectrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cubaynes, F.N; Schmitz, Jurriaan; van der Marel, C.; Snijders, J.H.M.; Veloso, A.; Rothschild, A.; Olsen, C.; Date, L.

    The work investigates the impact of plasma nitridation process parameters upon the physical properties and upon the electrical performance of sub-15 A plasma nitrided gate dielectrics. The nitrogen distribution and chemical bonding of ultra-thin plasma nitrided films have been investigated using

  11. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  12. Indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride quantum wells grown on polar and nonpolar gallium nitride substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kun-Yu

    Nonpolar (m-plane or a-plane) gallium nitride (GaN) is predicted to be a potential substrate material to improve luminous efficiencies of nitride-based quantum wells (QWs). Numerical calculations indicated that the spontaneous emission rate in a single In0.15Ga0.85N/GaN QW could be improved by ˜2.2 times if the polarization-induced internal field was avoided by epitaxial deposition on nonpolar substrates. A challenge for nonpolar GaN is the limited size (less than 10x10 mm2) of substrates, which was addressed by expansion during the regrowth by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE). Subsurface damage in GaN substrates were reduced by annealing with NH3 and N2 at 950°C for 60 minutes. It was additionally found that the variation of m-plane QWs' emission properties was significantly increased when the substrate miscut toward a-axis was increased from 0° to 0.1°. InGaN/GaN QWs were grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane and m-plane GaN substrates. The QWs were studied by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with different incident electron beam probe currents (0.1 nA ˜ 1000 nA). Lower emission intensities and longer peak wavelengths from c-plane QWs were attributed to the Quantum-confined Stark Effect (QCSE). The emission intensity ratios of m-plane QWs to c-plane QWs decreased from 3.04 at 1 nA to 1.53 at 1000 nA. This was identified as the stronger screening effects of QCSE at higher current densities in c-plane QWs. To further investigate these effects in a fabricated structure, biased photoluminescence measurements were performed on m-plane InGaN/GaN QWs. The purpose was to detect the possible internal fields induced by the dot-like structure in the InGaN layer through the response of these internal fields under externally applied fields. No energy shifts of the QWs were observed, which was attributed to strong surface leakage currents.

  13. Elaboration of titanium nitride coatings by activated reactive evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, Jean

    1978-01-01

    As titanium nitride is a very interesting and promising material for the protection against wear and corrosion of metals and alloys with a low fusion point, and notably steels, this research thesis reports the study of the elaboration of a TiN coating by activated reactive evaporation. In a first part, the author describes deposition processes based on evaporation and their characteristics. He explains the choice of the studied process. He discusses published data and results related to the titanium-nitrogen system. He describes the apparatus and reports the operation mode adjustment, and reports the study of the influence of operating conditions (substrate temperature, nitrogen pressure, evaporation rate, possible use of a discharge) on growth kinetics and on coating properties. A reaction mechanism is then proposed to describe and explain the obtained results [fr

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

    2006-01-01

    The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy and Environment (E and E) and Chemistry and Material Sciences (C and MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E and E and C and MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US

  15. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... of pure Fe-N phases has not been fully achieved. It is shown that taking into account the ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron nitride phases leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although consideration of thermodynamics indicates the state the system strives for...... for process control of gaseous nitriding by monitoring the partial pressure of oxygen in the furnace using a solid state electrolyte is provided. At the time the work was carried out the authors were in the Laboratory of Materials Science, Delft University of Technology, Rotterdamseweg 137, 2628 AL Delft...

  16. Theoretical prediction of sandwiched two-dimensional phosphide binary compound sheets with tunable bandgaps and anisotropic physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. Y.; Yu, M.

    2018-03-01

    Atomic layers of GaP and InP binary compounds with unique anisotropic structural, electronic and mechanical properties have been predicted from first-principle molecular dynamics simulations. These new members of the phosphide binary compound family stabilize to a sandwiched two-dimensional (2D) crystalline structure with orthorhombic lattice symmetry and high buckling of 2.14 Å-2.46 Å. Their vibration modes are similar to those of phosphorene with six Raman active modes ranging from ˜80 cm-1 to 400 cm-1. The speeds of sound in their phonon dispersions reflect anisotropy in their elastic constants, which was further confirmed by their strong directional dependence of Young’s moduli and effective nonlinear elastic moduli. They show wide bandgap semiconductor behavior with fundamental bandgaps of 2.89 eV for GaP and 2.59 eV for InP, respectively, even wider than their bulk counterparts. Such bandgaps were found to be tunable under strain. In particular, a direct-indirect bandgap transition was found under certain strains along zigzag or biaxial orientations, reflecting their promising applications in strain-induced bandgap engineering in nanoelectronics and photovoltaics. Feasible pathways to realize these novel 2D phosphide compounds are also proposed.

  17. Study of laboratory profile in patients with aluminium phosphide poisoning in the southwest of Iran from 2010 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhonde Jamshidi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Aluminium phosphide or rice tablet is one of the most common pesticides around the world. The substance releases phosphine gas in the presence of water, steam or stomach acid which can lead to poisoning. Phosphine poisoning is more about suicide the number of which is increasing day by day. Two-thirds of patients lose their lives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the data on the clinical epidemiology and laboratory changes in patients poisoned with rice tablets. Material and methods : A total of 23 patients poisoned by aluminium phosphide who referred to Ahvaz Razi hospital within the period of 2010–2015 were studied. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests. Results : The mean age of the patients was 27.2 ±7.3 years and 60.9% of the patients were male. 8.7% of the patients had hyponatremia and 21.7% of the patients had hypokalemia. In the majority of cases the amount of sodium and potassium was normal. 91% of patients had acidosis and serum bicarbonate was reduced in the majority of cases. The average interval between poisoning and admission was 1.48 ±0.76 hours. Conclusions : The pattern to change the electrolytes and other laboratory factors could be a good marker of the severity of the poisoning and the clinical conditions of the patient, which requires more specific research to prove the process.

  18. Sulfur-Doped Carbon Nitride Polymers for Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Pollutant and Reduction of Cr(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yun; Yu, Zihao; Lin, Feng; Guo, Fangsong; Alamry, Khalid A; Taib, Layla A; Asiri, Abdullah M; Wang, Xinchen

    2017-04-01

    As a promising conjugated polymer, binary carbon nitride has attracted extensive attention as a metal-free and visible-light-responsive photocatalyst in the area of photon-involving purification of water and air. Herein, we report sulfur-doped polymeric carbon nitride microrods that are synthesized through thermal polymerization based on trithiocyanuric acid and melamine (TM) supramolecular aggregates. By tuning the polymerization temperature, a series of sulfur-doped carbon nitride microrods are prepared. The degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and the reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) are selected as probe reactions to evaluate the photocatalytic activities. Results show that increasing pyrolysis temperature leads to a large specific surface area, strong visible-light absorption, and accelerated electron-hole separation. Compared to bulk carbon nitride, the highly porous sulfur-doped carbon nitride microrods fabricated at 650 °C exhibit remarkably higher photocatalytic activity for degradation of RhB and reduction of Cr(VI). This work highlights the importance of self-assembly approach and temperature-control strategy in the synthesis of photoactive materials for environmental remediation.

  19. Ternary nitrides for hydrogen storage: Li-B-N, Li-Al-N and Li-Ga-N systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langmi, Henrietta W.; McGrady, G. Sean

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports an investigation of hydrogen storage performance of ternary nitrides based on lithium and the Group 13 elements boron, aluminum and gallium. These were prepared by ball milling Li 3 N together with the appropriate Group 13 nitride-BN, AlN or GaN. Powder X-ray diffraction of the products revealed that the ternary nitrides obtained are not the known Li 3 BN 2 , Li 3 AlN 2 and Li 3 GaN 2 phases. At 260 deg. C and 30 bar hydrogen pressure, the Li-Al-N ternary system initially absorbed 3.7 wt.% hydrogen, although this is not fully reversible. We observed, for the first time, hydrogen uptake by a pristine ternary nitride of Li and Al synthesized from the binary nitrides of the metals. While the Li-Ga-N ternary system also stored a significant amount of hydrogen, the storage capacity for the Li-B-N system was near zero. The hydrogenation reaction is believed to be similar to that of Li 3 N, and the enthalpies of hydrogen absorption for Li-Al-N and Li-Ga-N provide evidence that AlN and GaN, as well as the ball milling process, play a significant role in altering the thermodynamics of Li 3 N

  20. A micro-spectroscopy study on the influence of chemical residues from nanofabrication on the nitridation chemistry of Al nanopatterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, B., E-mail: bing@raunvis.hi.is [Physics Department, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3,107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Olafsson, S. [Physics Department, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3,107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Zakharov, A.A. [MAX-lab, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Agnarsson, B. [Physics Department, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3,107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Gislason, H.P. [Physics Department, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3,107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Goethelid, M. [Materialfysik, MAP, ICT, KTH, ELECTRUM 229, 16440 Kista (Sweden)

    2012-03-01

    We applied spatially resolved photoelectron spectroscopy implemented with an X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) using soft X-ray synchrotron radiation to identify the compositional and morphological inhomogeneities of a SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate surface nanopatterned with Al before and after nitridation. The nanofabrication was conducted by a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based e-beam lithography and a fluorine-based reactive ion etching (RIE), followed by Al metalization and acetone lift-off. Three types of chemical residues were identified before nitridation: (1) fluorocarbons produced and accumulated mainly during RIE process on the sidewalls of the nanopatterns; (2) a thick Al-bearing PMMA layer and/or (3) a thin PMMA residue layer owing to unsuccessful or partial lift-off of the e-beam unexposed PMMA between the nanopatterns. The fluorocarbons actively influenced the surface chemical composition of the nanopatterns by forming Al-F compounds. After nitridation, in the PMMA residue-free area, the Al-F compounds on the sidewalls were decomposed and transformed to AlN. The PMMA residues between the nanopatterns had no obvious influence on the surface chemical composition and nitridation properties of the Al nanopatterns. They were only partially decomposed by the nitridation. The regional surface morphology of the nanopatterns revealed by the secondary electron XPEEM was consistent with the scanning electron microscopy results.

  1. Nitrides and carbides of molybdenum and tungsten with high specific-surface area: their synthesis, structure, and catalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, L.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reactions between trioxides of molybdenum or tungsten and ammonia provide a new method to synthesize dimolybdenum and ditungsten nitrides with specific surface areas to two-hundred-and-twenty and ninety-one square meters per gram, respectively. These are the highest values on record for any unsupported metallic powders. They correspond to three-four nonometer particles. The reaction of molybdenum trioxide with ammonia is topotactic in the sense that one-zero-zero planes of dimolybdenum nitride are parallel to zero-one-zero planes of molybdenum trioxide. As the trioxide transforms, it passes through an oxynitride intermediate with changing bulk structure and increasing surface area and extent of reduction. The nitride product consists of platelets, pseudomorphous with the original trioxide, which can be regarded as highly porous defect single crystals. By treating small particles of dimolybdenum or ditungsten nitride with methane-dihydrogen mixtures it is possible to replace interstitial nitrogen atoms by carbon atoms, without sintering, and thus to prepare carbides of molybdenum and tungsten with very high specific surface areas. Molybdenum nitride powders catalyze ammonia synthesis. A pronounced increase in the catalytic activity with increasing particle size confirms the structure-sensitive character of this reaction

  2. Molecular dynamics studies of actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) calculation was performed for actinide nitrides (UN, NpN, and PuN) in the temperature range from 300 to 2800 K to evaluate the physical properties viz., the lattice parameter, thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and heat capacity. The Morse-type potential function added to the Busing-Ida type potential was employed for the ionic interactions. The interatomic potential parameters were determined by fitting to the experimental data of the lattice parameter. The usefulness and applicability of the MD method to evaluate the physical properties of actinide nitrides were studied. (author)

  3. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  4. Additive-assisted synthesis of boride, carbide, and nitride micro/nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Lishan; Heng, Hua; Chen, Jingzhong; Zhang, Linfei; Xu, Liqiang; Qian, Yitai; Yang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    General and simple methods for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides are highly desirable, since those materials have unique physical properties and promising applications. Here, a series of boride (TiB 2 , ZrB 2 , NbB 2 , CeB 6 , PrB 6 , SmB 6 , EuB 6 , LaB 6 ), carbide (SiC, TiC, NbC, WC) and nitride (TiN, BN, AlN, MgSiN 2 , VN) micro/nanocrystals were prepared from related oxides and amorphous boron/active carbon/NaN 3 with the assistance of metallic Na and elemental S. In-situ temperature monitoring showed that the reaction temperature could increase quickly to ∼850 °C, once the autoclave was heated to 100 °C. Such a rapid temperature increase was attributed to the intense exothermic reaction between Na and S, which assisted the formation of borides, carbides and nitrides. The as-obtained products were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and HRTEM techniques. Results in this report will greatly benefit the future extension of this approach to other compounds. - Graphical abstract: An additive-assisted approach is successfully developed for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides micro/nanocrystals with the assistance of the exothermic reaction between Na and S. Highlights: ► An additive-assisted synthesis strategy is developed for a number of borides, carbides and nitrides. ► The reaction mechanism is demonstrated by the case of SiC nanowires. ► The formation of SiC nanowires is initiated by the exothermic reaction of Na and S.

  5. Optical properties of nitride nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantarero, A.; Cros, A.; Garro, N.; Gomez-Gomez, M.I.; Garcia, A.; Lima, M.M. de [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, PO Box 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Daudin, B. [Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, SPMM, CEA/Grenoble, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Rizzi, A.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J. [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg August Universitaet Goettingen, 37073 Goettingen (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    In this paper we review some recent results on the optical properties of nitride nanostructures, in particular on GaN quantum dots (QDs) and InN nanocolumns (NCs). First, we will give a brief introduction on the particularities of vibrational modes of wurtzite. The GaN QDs, embedded in AlN, were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in the Stransky-Krastanov mode on c- and a-plane 6H-SiC. We have studied the optical properties by means of photoluminescence (PL) and performed Raman scattering measurements to analyze the strain relaxation in the dots and the barrier, the effect of the internal electric fields, and the influence of specific growth parameters, like the influence of capping or the spacer on the relaxation of the QDs. A theoretical model, based on continuous elastic theory, were developed to interpret the Raman scattering results. On the other hand, InN NCs have been grown by MBE in the vapor-liquid-solid mode using Au as a catalyst. The nanocolumns have different morphology depending on the growth conditions. The optical properties can be correlated to the morphology of the samples and the best growth conditions can be selected. We observe, from the analysis of the Raman data in InN NCs, the existence of two space regions contributing to the scattering: the surface and the inner region. From the inner region, uncoupled phonon modes are clearly observed, showing the high crystal quality and the complete relaxation of the NCs (no strain). The observation of a LO-phonon-plasmon couple in the same spectra is a fingerprint of the accumulation layer predicted at the surface of the nanocolumns. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Metal phosphonate coordination networks and frameworks as precursors of electrocatalysts for the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; El-Refaei, Sayed M.; Russo, Patrícia A.; Pinna, Nicola

    2018-05-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) play key roles in the conversion of energy derived from renewable energy sources into chemical energy. Efficient, robust, and inexpensive electrocatalysts are necessary for driving these reactions at high rates at low overpotentials and minimize energetic losses. Recently, electrocatalysts derived from hybrid metal phosphonate compounds have shown high activity for the HER or OER. We review here the utilization of metal phosphonate coordination networks and metal-organic frameworks as precursors/templates for transition-metal phosphides, phosphates, or oxyhydroxides generated in situ in alkaline solutions, and their electrocatalytic performance in HER or OER.

  7. Two-Dimensional Modeling of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holmes, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMT's) are microwave power devices that have the performance characteristics to improve the capabilities of current and future Navy radar and communication systems...

  8. Surface modification of 17-4PH stainless steel by DC plasma nitriding and titanium nitride film duplex treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, F.; Leng, Y.X.; Huang, N.; Bai, B.; Zhang, P.Ch.

    2007-01-01

    17-4PH stainless steel was modified by direct current (DC) plasma nitriding and titanium nitride film duplex treatment in this study. The microstructure, wear resistance and corrosion resistance were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), pin-on-disk tribological test and polarization experiment. The results revealed that the DC plasma nitriding pretreatment was in favor of improving properties of titanium nitride film. The corrosion resistance and wear resistance of duplex treatment specimen was more superior to that of only coated titanium nitride film

  9. Progress in efficient doping of high aluminum-containing group III-nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y.-H.; Towe, E.

    2018-03-01

    The group III-nitride (InN, GaN, and AlN) class of semiconductors has become one of two that are critical to a number of technologies in modern life—the other being silicon. Light-emitting diodes made from (In,Ga)N, for example, dominate recent innovations in general illumination and signaling. Even though the (In,Ga)N materials system is fairly well established and widely used in advanced devices, challenges continue to impede development of devices that include aluminum-containing nitride films such as (Al,Ga)N. The main difficulty is efficient doping of films with aluminum-rich compositions; the problem is particularly severe for p-type doping, which is essential for Ohmic contacts to bipolar device structures. This review briefly summarizes the fundamental issues related to p-type doping, and then discusses a number of approaches that are being pursued to resolve the doping problem or for circumventing the need for p-type doping. Finally, we discuss an approach to doping under liquid-metal-enabled growth by molecular beam epitaxy. Recent results from a number of groups appear to indicate that p-type doping of nitride films under liquid-metal-enabled growth conditions might offer a solution to the doping problem—at least for materials grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of silicon nitride structural ceramics of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohaecker, T.R.; Nobrega, M.C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of direct evaluation technic of tenacity for fracturing by hardness impact in silicon nitride ceramics is described. The microstructure were analysied, by Scanning Electron Microscopy, equiped with a microanalysis acessory by X ray energy dispersion. The difference between the values of K IC measure for two silicon nitride ceramics is discussed, in function of the microstructures and the fracture surfaces of the samples studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  11. Chemical trends of Schottky barrier behavior on monolayer hexagonal B, Al, and Ga nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haichang; Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2016-08-01

    The Schottky Barrier Heights (SBH) of metal layers on top of monolayer hexagonal X-nitrides (X = B, Al, Ga, and h-XN) are calculated using supercells and density functional theory so as to understand the chemical trends of contact formation on graphene and the 2D layered semiconductors such as the transition metal dichalcogenides. The Fermi level pinning factor S of SBHs on h-BN is calculated to be nearly 1, indicating no pinning. For h-AlN and h-GaN, the calculated pinning factor is about 0.63, less than for h-BN. We attribute this to the formation of stronger, chemisorptive bonds between the nitrides and the contact metal layer. Generally, the h-BN layer remains in a planar sp2 geometry and has weak physisorptive bonds to the metals, whereas h-AlN and h-GaN buckle out of their planar geometry which enables them to form the chemisorptive bonds to the metals.

  12. Optical characterisation of III-V nitride-based multiphase and diluted magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegscheider, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present work is devoted to the investigation of the optical properties of transition metal doped Gallium nitride. The Gallium nitride layers are epitaxially grown in a full metalorganic chemical vapour deposition process whereas the transition metals iron or manganese as well as the n and p-type dopants silicon and magnesium are incorporated simultaneously. Background and driving force of the realization of such material systems is basically the evocation of ferromagnetic spin alignment where free carriers ensure the correspondence between the localized spin state provided by the metal ions. The production of completely new devices for semiconductor industries based on the possibility to switch on or off the ferrimagnetic alignment by changing the free carrier concentration can be expected in the near future. In this context photoluminescence studies in the ultraviolet and mid infrared spectral range at temperatures between the liquid helium point and room temperature at atmospheric pressure were made. These measurements basically provide information on optical transitions between the conduction and valence band and deep defects as well as on crystal field forced transitions within the d-orbitals of the metal ion involved. In this context valuable knowledge could have been gained on doping concentrations, growth fashions and parameters, formation of secondary phases as well as on the doping efficiency and incorporation sites of the metal atoms. (author) [de

  13. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride photonic crystals for improved-performance surface electromagnetic wave biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinibaldi, Alberto; Descrovi, Emiliano; Giorgis, Fabrizio; Dominici, Lorenzo; Ballarini, Mirko; Mandracci, Pietro; Danz, Norbert; Michelotti, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    We exploit the properties of surface electromagnetic waves propagating at the surface of finite one dimensional photonic crystals to improve the performance of optical biosensors with respect to the standard surface plasmon resonance approach. We demonstrate that the hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride technology is a versatile platform for fabricating one dimensional photonic crystals with any desirable design and operating in a wide wavelength range, from the visible to the near infrared. We prepared sensors based on photonic crystals sustaining either guided modes or surface electromagnetic waves, also known as Bloch surface waves. We carried out for the first time a direct experimental comparison of their sensitivity and figure of merit with surface plasmon polaritons on metal layers, by making use of a commercial surface plasmon resonance instrument that was slightly adapted for the experiments. Our measurements demonstrate that the Bloch surface waves on silicon nitride photonic crystals outperform surface plasmon polaritons by a factor 1.3 in terms of figure of merit.

  14. Effects of plasma-deposited silicon nitride passivation on the radiation hardness of CMOS integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of plasma-deposited silicon nitride as a final passivation over metal-gate CMOS integrated circuits degrades the radiation hardness of these devices. The hardness degradation is manifested by increased radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts caused principally by the charging of new interface states and, to a lesser extent, by the trapping of holes created upon exposure to ionizing radiation. The threshold voltage shifts are a strong function of the deposition temperature, and show very little dependence on thickness for films deposited at 300 0 C. There is some correlation between the threshold voltage shifts and the hydrogen content of the PECVD silicon nitride films used as the final passivation layer as a function of deposition temperature. The mechanism by which the hydrogen contained in these films may react with the Si/SiO 2 interface is not clear at this point

  15. Growth, morphology, and structural properties of group-III-nitride nanocolumns and nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleja, E.; Ristic, J.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Grandal, J.; Cerutti, L.; Trampert, A.; Jahn, U.; Sanchez, G.; Griol, A.; Sanchez, B.

    2007-01-01

    The growth conditions to achieve group-III-nitride nanocolumns and nanocolumnar heterostructures by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The evolution of the nanocolumnar morphology with the growth conditions is determined for (Ga,Al)N and (In,Ga)N nanocolumns. The mechanisms behind the nanocolumnar growth under high N-rich conditions are clarified in the sense that no seeding or catalysts are required, as it is the case in the vapour-liquid-solid model that applies to most nanocolumns grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition, either with group-III nitrides, II-VI or III-V compounds. Some examples of nanocolumnar heterostructures are given, like quantum disks and cylindrical nanocavities. Preliminary results on the growth of arrays of ordered GaN nanocolumns are reported. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Low Working-Temperature Acetone Vapor Sensor Based on Zinc Nitride and Oxide Hybrid Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Fengdong; Yuan, Yao; Guarecuco, Rohiverth; Yang, Minghui

    2016-06-01

    Transition-metal nitride and oxide composites are a significant class of emerging materials that have attracted great interest for their potential in combining the advantages of nitrides and oxides. Here, a novel class of gas sensing materials based on hybrid Zn3 N2 and ZnO composites is presented. The Zn3 N2 /ZnO (ZnNO) composites-based sensor exhibits selectivity and high sensitivity toward acetone vapor, and the sensitivity is dependent on the nitrogen content of the composites. The ZnNO-11.7 described herein possesses a low working temperature of 200 °C. The detection limit (0.07 ppm) is below the diabetes diagnosis threshold (1.8 ppm). In addition, the sensor shows high reproducibility and long-term stability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Boron nitride nanosheets reinforced glass matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saggar, Richa; Porwal, H.; Tatarko, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, SEP (2015), S26-S32 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK155 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Boron nitride nanosheets * Borosilicate glass * Mechanical properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2015

  18. Alkaline fuel cell with nitride membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shen-Huei; Pilaski, Moritz; Wartmann, Jens; Letzkus, Florian; Funke, Benedikt; Dura, Georg; Heinzel, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work is to fabricate patterned nitride membranes with Si-MEMS-technology as a platform to build up new membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEA) for alkaline fuel cell applications. Two 6-inch wafer processes based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were developed for the fabrication of separated nitride membranes with a nitride thickness up to 1 μm. The mechanical stability of the perforated nitride membrane has been adjusted in both processes either by embedding of subsequent ion implantation step or by optimizing the deposition process parameters. A nearly 100% yield of separated membranes of each deposition process was achieved with layer thickness from 150 nm to 1 μm and micro-channel pattern width of 1μm at a pitch of 3 μm. The process for membrane coating with electrolyte materials could be verified to build up MEA. Uniform membrane coating with channel filling was achieved after the optimization of speed controlled dip-coating method and the selection of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as electrolyte solvent. Finally, silver as conductive material was defined for printing a conductive layer onto the MEA by Ink-Technology. With the established IR-thermography setup, characterizations of MEAs in terms of catalytic conversion were performed successfully. The results of this work show promise for build up a platform on wafer-level for high throughput experiments.

  19. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang, E-mail: gaodq@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z. Y.; Xue, Desheng, E-mail: gaodq@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, Yushen [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and College of Physics and Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Deng, Xiaohui [Department of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Hengyang Normal University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Zhang, G. P. [Department of Physics, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Indiana 47809 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  20. Covalent biofunctionalization of silicon nitride surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, A.; Giesbers, M.; Rosso, M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; White, R.G.; Li Yang,; Linford, M.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2007-01-01

    Covalently attached organic monolayers on etched silicon nitride (SixN4; x 3) surfaces were prepared by reaction of SixN4-coated wafers with neat or solutions of 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes in refluxing mesitylene. The surface modification was monitored by measurement of the static water contact angle,

  1. Bandgap engineered graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article a double-barrier resonant tunnelling diode (DBRTD) has been modelled by taking advantage of single-layer hexagonal lattice of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The DBRTD performance and operation are explored by means of a self-consistent solution inside the non-equilibrium Green's ...

  2. Ion beam induces nitridation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1998-01-01

    High dose ion bombardment of silicon with reactive species, such as oxygen and nitrogen, has attracted considerable interest due to possible applications of beam-induced chemical compounds with silicon. For example, high energy oxygen bombardment of Si is now routinely used to form buried oxide layers for device purposes, the so called SIMOX structures. On the other hand, Si nitrides, formed by low energy ( 100 keV) nitrogen beam bombardment of Si, are attractive as oxidation barriers or gate insulators, primarily due to the low diffusivity of many species in Si nitrides. However, little data exists on silicon nitride formation during bombardment and its angle dependence, in particular for N 2 + bombardment in the 10 keV range, which is of interest for analytical techniques such as SIMS. In SIMS, low energy oxygen ions are more commonly used as bombarding species, as oxygen provides stable ion yields and enhances the positive secondary ion yield. Therefore, a large body of data can be found in the literature on oxide formation during low energy oxygen bombardment. Nitrogen bombardment of Si may cause similar effects to oxygen bombardment, as nitrogen and oxygen have similar masses and ranges in Si, show similar sputtering effects and both have the ability to form chemical compounds with Si. In this work we explore this possibility in some detail. We compare oxide and nitride formation during oxygen and nitrogen ion bombardment of Si under similar conditions. Despite the expected similar behaviour, some large differences in compound formation were found. These differences are explained in terms of different atomic diffusivities in oxides and nitrides, film structural differences and thermodynamic properties. (author)

  3. Nitrogen reduction and functionalization by a multimetallic uranium nitride complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marta; Chatelain, Lucile; Scopelliti, Rosario; Živković, Ivica; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2017-07-01

    Molecular nitrogen (N2) is cheap and widely available, but its unreactive nature is a challenge when attempting to functionalize it under mild conditions with other widely available substrates (such as carbon monoxide, CO) to produce value-added compounds. Biological N2 fixation can do this, but the industrial Haber-Bosch process for ammonia production operates under harsh conditions (450 degrees Celsius and 300 bar), even though both processes are thought to involve multimetallic catalytic sites. And although molecular complexes capable of binding and even reducing N2 under mild conditions are known, with co-operativity between metal centres considered crucial for the N2 reduction step, the multimetallic species involved are usually not well defined, and further transformation of N2-binding complexes to achieve N-H or N-C bond formation is rare. Haber noted, before an iron-based catalyst was adopted for the industrial Haber-Bosch process, that uranium and uranium nitride materials are very effective heterogeneous catalysts for ammonia production from N2. However, few examples of uranium complexes binding N2 are known, and soluble uranium complexes capable of transforming N2 into ammonia or organonitrogen compounds have not yet been identified. Here we report the four-electron reduction of N2 under ambient conditions by a fully characterized complex with two UIII ions and three K+ centres held together by a nitride group and a flexible metalloligand framework. The addition of H2 and/or protons, or CO to the resulting complex results in the complete cleavage of N2 with concomitant N2 functionalization through N-H or N-C bond-forming reactions. These observations establish that a molecular uranium complex can promote the stoichiometric transformation of N2 into NH3 or cyanate, and that a flexible, electron-rich, multimetallic, nitride-bridged core unit is a promising starting point for the design of molecular complexes capable of cleaving and functionalizing N2 under

  4. Molecular Nickel Phosphide Carbonyl Nanoclusters: Synthesis, Structure, and Electrochemistry of [Ni11P(CO)18]3- and [H6-nNi31P4(CO)39]n- (n = 4 and 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacci, Chiara; Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Funaioli, Tiziana; Zacchini, Stefano; Zanotti, Valerio

    2018-02-05

    The reaction of [NEt 4 ] 2 [Ni 6 (CO) 12 ] in thf with 0.5 equiv of PCl 3 affords the monophosphide [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 3- that in turn further reacts with PCl 3 resulting in the tetra-phosphide carbonyl cluster [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- . Alternatively, the latter can be obtained from the reaction of [NEt 4 ] 2 [Ni 6 (CO) 12 ] in thf with 0.8-0.9 equiv of PCl 3 . The [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- penta-anion is reversibly protonated by strong acids leading to the [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- tetra-anion, whereas deprotonation affords the [Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 6- hexa-anion. The latter is reduced with Na/naphthalene yielding the [Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 7- hepta-anion. In order to shed light on the polyhydride nature and redox behavior of these clusters, electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies were carried out on [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 3- , [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- , and [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- . The reversible formation of the stable [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 4- tetra-anion is demonstrated through the spectroelectrochemical investigation of [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 3- . The redox changes of [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- show features of chemical reversibility and the vibrational spectra in the ν CO region of the nine redox states of the cluster [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] n- (n = 3-11) are reported. The spectroelectrochemical investigation of [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- revealed the presence of three chemically reversible reduction processes, and the IR spectra of [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] n- (n = 4-7) have been recorded. The different spectroelectrochemical behavior of [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- and [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- support their formulations as polyhydrides. Unfortunately, all the attempts to directly confirm their poly hydrido nature by 1 H NMR spectroscopy failed, as previously found for related large metal carbonyl clusters. Thus, the presence and number of hydride ligands have been based on the observed protonation/deprotonation reactions and the spectroelectrochemical

  5. P and Si functionalized MXenes for metal-ion battery applications

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2017-01-01

    MXenes are a family of two-dimensional materials, composed of early transition metal carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides, with great potential in energy storage systems, in particular in electrodes for Li, Na, K-ion batteries. However, so far

  6. Comparative studies on mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes of Sitophilus zeamais treated with allyl isothiocyanate and calcium phosphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Hua; Zhao, Yuan; Ma, Zhiqing; Zhang, Xing

    2016-01-01

    With Sitophilus zeamais as the target organism, the present study for the first time attempted to elucidate the comparative effects between allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and calcium phosphide (Ca3P2), exposure on mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC.) complex I & IV and their downstream effects on enzymes relevant to reactive oxygen species (ROS). In vivo, both AITC and Ca3P2 inhibited complex I and IV with similar downstream effects. In contrast with Ca3P2, the inhibition of complex I caused by AITC was dependent on time and dose. In vitro, AITC inhibited complex IV more significantly than complex I. These results indicate that mitochondrial complex IV is the primary target of AITC, and that complex I is another potential target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. ZrCu2P2 and HfCu2P2 phosphides and their crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomnitskaya, Ya.F.

    1986-01-01

    Isostructural ZrCu 2 P 2 and HfCu 2 P 2 compounds are prepared for the first time. X-ray diffraction analysis (of powder, DRON-2.0 diffractometer, FeKsub(α) radiation) was used to study crystal structure of HfCu 2 P 2 phosphide belonging to the CaAl 2 Si 2 structural type (sp. group P anti 3 m 1, R=0.095). Lattice parameters the compounds are as follows: for ZrCu 2 P 2 a=0.3810(1), c=0.6184(5); for HfCu 2 P 2 a=0.3799(1), c=0.6160(2) (nm). Atomic parameters in the HfCu 2 P 2 structure and interatomic distances are determined

  8. Effects of P/Ni ratio and Ni content on performance of γ-Al_2O_3-supported nickel phosphides for deoxygenation of methyl laurate to hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhena; Tang, Mingxiao; Chen, Jixiang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The formation of AlPO_4 was unfavorable for that of nickel phosphides. • The phase compositions of nickel phosphide depended on the amount of reduced P. • Catalytic activity was determined by surface Ni site density and catalyst acidity. • HDO pathway was promoted by increasing P/Ni ratio and Ni content. • Nickel phosphide gave much higher carbon yield and lower H_2 consumption than Ni. - Abstract: γ-Al_2O_3-supported nickel phosphides (mNi-Pn) were prepared by the TPR method and tested for the deoxygenation of methyl laurate to hydrocarbons. The effects of the P/Ni ratio (n = 1.0–2.5) and Ni content (m = 5–15 wt.%) in the precursors on their structure and performance were investigated. Ni/γ-Al_2O_3 was also studied for comparison. It was found that the formation of AlPO_4 in the precursor inhibited the reduction of phosphate and so the formation of nickel phosphides. With increasing the P/Ni ratio and Ni content, the Ni, Ni_3P, Ni_1_2P_5 and Ni_2P phases orderly formed, accompanying with the increases of their particle size and the amount of weak acid sites (mainly due to P-OH group), while the CO uptake and the amount of medium strong acid sites (mainly related to Ni sites) reached maximum on 10%Ni-P1.5. In the deoxygenation reaction, compared with Ni/γ-Al_2O_3, the mNi-Pn catalysts showed much lower activities for decarbonylation, C−C hydrogenolysis and methanation due to the ligand and ensemble effects of P. The conversion and the selectivity to n-C11 and n-C12 hydrocarbons achieved maximum on 10%Ni-P 2.0 for the 10%Ni-Pn catalysts and on 8%Ni-P2.0 for the mNi-P2.0 catalysts, while the turnover frequency (TOF) of methyl laurate mainly increased with the P/Ni ratio and Ni content. We propose that TOF was influenced by the nickel phosphide phases, the catalyst acidity and the particle size as well as the synergetic effect between the Ni site and acid site. Again, the hydrodeoxygenation pathway of methyl

  9. Enhanced activity and durability of platinum anode catalyst by the modification of cobalt phosphide for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Liu, Ziwu; Wang, Haihui; Peng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel Pt/CoP/CNTs electrocatalyst with has been designed and prepared, which exhibits high activity and stability for methanol oxidation reaction. - Highlights: • Pt-cobalt phosphide catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes (Pt/CoP/CNTs) is designed. • Pt/CoP/CNTs exhibit high activity and stability for methanol oxidation reaction(MOR). • The effect of CoP content on electrocatalytic performances for MOR is studied. • CoP decreases the Pt particle size and increases the electrochemical surface areas. • The interaction between Pt and CoP is evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. - Abstract: In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported Pt-cobalt phosphide (CoP) electrocatalyst (Pt/CoP/CNTs) is designed and prepared for methanol oxidation (MOR) for the first time. The modification of CoP decreases the Pt particle size significantly and increases the electrochemical surface areas due to the interaction between Pt and CoP, which is evidenced by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Among all these catalysts, Pt/4%CoP/CNTs catalyst exhibits the best MOR activity of 1600 mA mg −1 Pt , which is six times that of Pt/CNTs. Moreover, this catalyst also exhibits the higher onset current density and steady current density than the other Pt-based catalysts. The work provides a promising method to develop the highly active and stable Pt-based catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

  10. Phase formation, thermal stability and magnetic moment of cobalt nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Gupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt nitride (Co-N thin films prepared using a reactive magnetron sputtering process are studied in this work. During the thin film deposition process, the relative nitrogen gas flow (RN2 was varied. As RN2 increases, Co(N, Co4N, Co3N and CoN phases are formed. An incremental increase in RN2, after emergence of Co4N phase at RN2 = 10%, results in a linear increase of the lattice constant (a of Co4N. For RN2 = 30%, a maximizes and becomes comparable to its theoretical value. An expansion in a of Co4N, results in an enhancement of the magnetic moment, to the extent that it becomes even larger than pure Co. Such larger than pure metal magnetic moment for tetra-metal nitrides (M4N have been theoretically predicted. Incorporation of N atoms in M4N configuration results in an expansion of a (relative to pure metal and enhances the itinerary of conduction band electrons leading to larger than pure metal magnetic moment for M4N compounds. Though a higher (than pure Fe magnetic moment for Fe4N thin films has been evidenced experimentally, higher (than pure Co magnetic moment is evidenced in this work.

  11. An assessment of the thermodynamic properties of uranium nitride, plutonium nitride and uranium-plutonium mixed nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, T.; Ohse, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties such as vapour pressures, heat capacities and enthalpies of formation for UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s) are critically evaluated. The equations of the vapour pressures and the heat capacities for the three nitrides are assessed. Thermal functions, and thermodynamic functions for the formation of UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s), are calculated

  12. Ag doped silicon nitride nanocomposites for embedded plasmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayle, M.; Bonafos, C., E-mail: bonafos@cemes.fr; Benzo, P.; Benassayag, G.; Pécassou, B.; Carles, R. [CEMES-CNRS and Université de Toulouse, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse, Cedex 04 (France); Khomenkova, L.; Gourbilleau, F. [CIMAP, CNRS/CEA/ENSICAEN/UCBN, 6 Boulevard Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen, Cedex 4 (France)

    2015-09-07

    The localized surface plasmon-polariton resonance (LSPR) of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is widely exploited for enhanced optical spectroscopies of molecules, nonlinear optics, photothermal therapy, photovoltaics, or more recently in plasmoelectronics and photocatalysis. The LSPR frequency depends not only of the noble metal NP material, shape, and size but also of its environment, i.e., of the embedding matrix. In this paper, Ag-NPs have been fabricated by low energy ion beam synthesis in silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) matrices. By coupling the high refractive index of SiN{sub x} to the relevant choice of dielectric thickness in a SiN{sub x}/Si bilayer for an optimum antireflective effect, a very sharp plasmonic optical interference is obtained in mid-range of the visible spectrum (2.6 eV). The diffusion barrier property of the host SiN{sub x} matrix allows for the introduction of a high amount of Ag and the formation of a high density of Ag-NPs that nucleate during the implantation process. Under specific implantation conditions, in-plane self-organization effects are obtained in this matrix that could be the result of a metastable coarsening regime.

  13. The oxidation of titanium nitride- and silicon nitride-coated stainless steel in carbon dioxide environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.R.G.; Stott, F.H.

    1992-01-01

    A study has been undertaken into the effects of thin titanium nitride and silicon nitride coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition and chemical vapour deposition processes, on the oxidation resistance of 321 stainless steel in a simulated advanced gas-cooled reactor carbon dioxide environment for long periods at 550 o C and 700 o C under thermal-cycling conditions. The uncoated steel contains sufficient chromium to develop a slow-growing chromium-rich oxide layer at these temperatures, particularly if the surfaces have been machine-abraded. Failure of this layer in service allows formation of less protective iron oxide-rich scales. The presence of a thin (3-4 μm) titanium nitride coating is not very effective in increasing the oxidation resistance since the ensuing titanium oxide scale is not a good barrier to diffusion. Even at 550 o C, iron oxide-rich nodules are able to develop following relatively rapid oxidation and breakdown of the coating. At 700 o C, the coated specimens oxidize at relatively similar rates to the uncoated steel. A thin silicon nitride coating gives improved oxidation resistance, with both the coating and its slow-growing oxide being relatively electrically insulating. The particular silicon nitride coating studied here was susceptible to spallation on thermal cycling, due to an inherently weak coating/substrate interface. (Author)

  14. Intragranular Chromium Nitride Precipitates in Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Torunn Hjulstad

    2012-01-01

    Intragranular chromium nitrides is a phenomenon with detrimental effects on material properties in superduplex stainless steels which have not received much attention. Precipitation of nitrides occurs when the ferritic phase becomes supersaturated with nitrogen and there is insufficient time during cooling for diffusion of nitrogen into austenite. Heat treatment was carried out at between 1060◦C and 1160◦C to study the materials susceptibility to nitride precipitation with...

  15. Corrosion stability of cermets on the base of titanium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdash, O.N.; Marinich, M.A.; Kuzenkova, M.A.; Manzheleev, I.V.

    1991-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of titanium nitride and its cermets in 5% of HCl, 7% of HNO 3 , 10% of H 2 SO 4 is studied. It is established that alloys TiN-Ni-Mo alloyed with chromium (from 10 to 15%) possess the highest corrosion resistance. Cermet TiN-Cr has the higher stability than titanium nitride due to formation of binary nitride (Ti, Cr)N

  16. Thermal conductivity of nitride films of Ti, Cr, and W deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannadham, Kasichainula

    2015-01-01

    Nitride films of Ti, Cr, and W were deposited using reactive magnetron sputtering from metal targets in argon and nitrogen plasma. TiN films with (200) orientation were achieved on silicon (100) at the substrate temperature of 500 and 600 °C. The films were polycrystalline at lower temperature. An amorphous interface layer was observed between the TiN film and Si wafer deposited at 600 °C. TiN film deposited at 600 °C showed the nitrogen to Ti ratio to be near unity, but films deposited at lower temperature were nitrogen deficient. CrN film with (200) orientation and good stoichiometry was achieved at 600 °C on Si(111) wafer but the film deposited at 500 °C showed cubic CrN and hexagonal Cr 2 N phases with smaller grain size and amorphous back ground in the x-ray diffraction pattern. An amorphous interface layer was not observed in the cubic CrN film on Si(111) deposited at 600 °C. Nitride film of tungsten deposited at 600 °C on Si(100) wafer was nitrogen deficient, contained both cubic W 2 N and hexagonal WN phases with smaller grain size. Nitride films of tungsten deposited at 500 °C were nonstoichiometric and contained cubic W 2 N and unreacted W phases. There was no amorphous phase formed along the interface for the tungsten nitride film deposited at 600 °C on the Si wafer. Thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance of all the nitride films of Ti, Cr, and W were determined by transient thermoreflectance technique. The thermal conductivity of the films as function of deposition temperature, microstructure, nitrogen stoichiometry and amorphous interaction layer at the interface was determined. Tungsten nitride film containing both cubic and hexagonal phases was found to exhibit much higher thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance. The amorphous interface layer was found to reduce effective thermal conductivity of TiN and CrN films

  17. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  18. Research and development of nitride fuel cycle technology in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Arai, Yasuo; Akabori, Mitsuo; Tamaki, Yoshihisa; Itoh, Kunihiro

    2004-01-01

    The research on the nitride fuel was started for an advanced fuel, (U, Pn)N, for fast reactors, and the research activities have been expanded to minor actinide bearing nitride fuels. The fuel fabrication, property measurements, irradiation tests and pyrochemical process experiments have been made. In 2002 a five-year-program named PROMINENT was started for the development of nitride fuel cycle technology within the framework of the Development of Innovative Nuclear Technologies by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. In the research program PROMINENT, property measurements, pyrochemical process and irradiation experiments needed for nitride fuel cycle technology are being made. (author)

  19. Development of pseudocapacitive molybdenum oxide–nitride for electrochemical capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, Yen-Jui Bernie [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Wu, Haoran [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Kherani, Nazir P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Lian, Keryn, E-mail: keryn.lian@utoronto.ca [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    A thin film Mo oxide–nitride pseudocapacitive electrode was synthesized by electrodeposition of Mo oxide on Ti and a subsequent low-temperature (400 °C) thermal nitridation. Two nitridation environments, N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}, were used and the results were compared. Surface analyses of these nitrided films showed partial conversion of Mo oxide to nitrides, with a lower conversion percentage being the film produced in N{sub 2}. However, the electrochemical analyses showed that the surface of the N{sub 2}-treated film had better pseudocapacitive behaviors and outperformed that nitrided in NH{sub 3}. Cycle life of the resultant N{sub 2}-treated Mo oxide–nitride was also much improved over Mo oxide. A two-electrode cell using Mo oxide–nitride electrodes was demonstrated and showed high rate performance. - Highlights: • Mo(O,N){sub x} was developed by electrodeposition and nitridation in N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}. • N{sub 2} treated Mo(O,N){sub x} showed a capacitive performance superior to that treated by NH{sub 3}. • The promising electrochemical performance was due to the formation of γ-Mo{sub 2}N.

  20. Modeling the Gas Nitriding Process of Low Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Zimmerman, C.; Donahue, D.; Sisson, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    The effort to simulate the nitriding process has been ongoing for the last 20 years. Most of the work has been done to simulate the nitriding process of pure iron. In the present work a series of experiments have been done to understand the effects of the nitriding process parameters such as the nitriding potential, temperature, and time as well as surface condition on the gas nitriding process for the steels. The compound layer growth model has been developed to simulate the nitriding process of AISI 4140 steel. In this paper the fundamentals of the model are presented and discussed including the kinetics of compound layer growth and the determination of the nitrogen diffusivity in the diffusion zone. The excellent agreements have been achieved for both as-washed and pre-oxided nitrided AISI 4140 between the experimental data and simulation results. The nitrogen diffusivity in the diffusion zone is determined to be constant and only depends on the nitriding temperature, which is ~5 × 10-9 cm2/s at 548 °C. It proves the concept of utilizing the compound layer growth model in other steels. The nitriding process of various steels can thus be modeled and predicted in the future.

  1. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  2. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Lawton, L. M.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Nash, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devices and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.

  3. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Lawton, L. M.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Nash, G. R., E-mail: g.r.nash@exeter.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-28

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devices and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.

  4. Nitridation of vanadium by ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Kinomura, Atsushi; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    1994-01-01

    The nitridation of vanadium by ion beam irradiation is studied by the ion implantation method and the dynamic mixing method. The nitrogen ion implantation was carried out into deposited V(110) films. Using both methods, three phases are formed, i.e. α-V, β-V 2 N, and δ-VN. Which phases are formed is related to the implantation dose or the arrival ratio. The orientation of the VN films produced by the dynamic ion beam mixing method is (100) and that of the VN films produced by the ion implantation method is (111). The nitridation of vanadium is also discussed in comparison with that of titanium and chromium. ((orig.))

  5. Boric acid solubility in the presence of alkali metal nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skvortsov, V G; Tsekhanskij, R S; Molodkin, A K; Sadetdinov, Sh V [Chuvashskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Cheboksary (USSR); Universitet Druzhby Narodov, Moscow (USSR))

    1983-01-01

    Methods of solubility and refractometry at 25 deg C have been applied to state that systems boric acid-lithium (sodium, potassium) nitrite-water are simple eutonic type systems. Nitrites salt in the acid and their lyotropic effect increases from lithium salt to potassium salt. The disclosed succession in change of the effect is determined by the character of cation hydration in the medium the acidic reaction of which is conditioned by boric acid polymerization and partial oxidation of nitrite ion into nitrate ion. Boric acid is salted out from solutions containing lithium and sodium cations with increase of nitrate ion.

  6. Boric acid solubility in the presence of alkali metal nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortsov, V.G.; Tsekhanskij, R.S.; Molodkin, A.K.; Sadetdinov, Sh.V.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of solubility and refractometry at 25 deg C have been applied to state that systems boric acid-lithium (sodiUm, potassium) nitrite-water are simple eutonic type systems. Nitrites salt in the acid and their lyotropic effect increases from lithium salt to potassium salt. The disclosed succession in change of the effect is determined by the character of cation hydration in the medium the acidic reaction of which is conditioned by boric acid polymerization and partial oxidation of nitrite ion into nitrate ion Boric acid is salted out form solutions containing lithium and sodium cations with increase of nitrate ion

  7. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Silicon Nitride Antireflection Coatings for Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; Wydeven, T.; Donohoe, K.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical-vapor deposition adapted to yield graded index of refraction. Silicon nitride deposited in layers, refractive index of which decreases with distance away from cell/coating interface. Changing index of refraction allows adjustment of spectral transmittance for wavelengths which cell is most effective at converting light to electric current. Average conversion efficiency of solar cells increased from 8.84 percent to 12.63 percent.

  9. In situ X-ray absorption fine structure studies on the structure of nickel phosphide catalyst supported on K-USY

    CERN Document Server

    Kawai, T; Suzuki, S

    2003-01-01

    Local structure around Ni in a nickel phosphide catalyst supported on K-USY was investigated by an situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) method during the reduction process of the catalyst and the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reaction of thiophene. In the passivated sample, Ni phosphide was partially oxidized but after the reduction, 1.1 nm diameter Ni sub 2 P particles were formed with Ni-P and Ni-Ni distances at 0.218 and 0.261 nm, respectively, corresponding to those of bulk Ni sub 2 P. In situ XAFS cleary revealed that the Ni sub 2 P structure was stable under reaction conditions and was an active structure for the HDS process.

  10. Tribological Characteristic of Titanium Alloy Surface Layers Produced by Diode Laser Gas Nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the tribological properties of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V composite surface layers Ti/TiN were produced during laser surface gas nitriding by means of a novel high power direct diode laser with unique characteristics of the laser beam and a rectangular beam spot. Microstructure, surface topography and microhardness distribution across the surface layers were analyzed. Ball-on-disk tests were performed to evaluate and compare the wear and friction characteristics of surface layers nitrided at different process parameters, base metal of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and also the commercially pure titanium. Results showed that under dry sliding condition the commercially pure titanium samples have the highest coefficient of friction about 0.45, compared to 0.36 of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and 0.1-0.13 in a case of the laser gas nitrided surface layers. The volume loss of Ti6Al4V samples under such conditions is twice lower than in a case of pure titanium. On the other hand the composite surface layer characterized by the highest wear resistance showed almost 21 times lower volume loss during the ball-on-disk test, compared to Ti6Al4V samples.

  11. Bonding silicon nitride using glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobedoe, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon nitride has been successfully bonded to itself using magnesium-aluminosilicate glass and glass-ceramic. For some samples, bonding was achieved using a diffusion bonder, but in other instances, following an initial degassing hold, higher temperatures were used in a nitrogen atmosphere with no applied load. For diffusion bonding, a small applied pressure at a temperature below which crystallisation occurs resulted in intimate contact. At slightly higher temperatures, the extent of the reaction at the interface and the microstructure of the glass-ceramic joint was highly sensitive to the bonding temperature. Bonding in a nitrogen atmosphere resulted in a solution-reprecipitation reaction. A thin layer of glass produced a ''dry'', glass-free joint, whilst a thicker layer resulted in a continuous glassy join across the interface. The chromium silicide impurities within the silicon nitride react with the nucleating agent in the glass ceramic, which may lead to difficulty in producing a fine glass-ceramic microstructure. Slightly lower temperatures in nitrogen resulted in a polycrystalline join but the interfacial contact was poor. It is hoped that one of the bonds produced may be developed to eventually form part of a graded joint between silicon nitride and a high temperature nickel alloy. (orig.)

  12. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  13. Thermodynamics of silicon nitridation - Effect of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N. J.; Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Equilibrium compositions for the nitridization of Si were calculated to detect the effectiveness of H2 in removal of the oxide film and in increasing the concentration of SiO and reducing the proportions of O2. Gibbs free energy for the formation of SiN2O was computed above 1685 K, and at lower temperatures. The thermodynamic properties of SiN2O2 were then considered from 1000-3000 K, taking into account the known thermodynamic data for 39 molecular combinations of the Si, Ni, and O. The gases formed were assumed ideal mixtures with pure phase condensed species. The mole fractions were obtained for a system of SiO2 with each Si particle covered with a thin layer of SiO2 before nitridation, and a system in which the nitriding atmosphere had access to the Si. The presence of H2 was determined to enhance the removal of NiO2 in the first system, decrease the partial pressure of O2, increase the partial pressures of SiO, Si, H2O, NH3, and SiH4, while its effects were negligible in the Si system.

  14. Phosphorization boosts the capacitance of mixed metal nanosheet arrays for high performance supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yingying; Zhao, Hongyang; Zong, Yan; Li, Xinghua; Sun, Yong; Feng, Juan; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xinliang; Du, Yaping

    2018-05-01

    Binary transition metal phosphides hold immense potential as innovative electrode materials for constructing high-performance energy storage devices. Herein, porous binary nickel-cobalt phosphide (NiCoP) nanosheet arrays anchored on nickel foam (NF) were rationally designed as self-supported binder-free electrodes with high supercapacitance performance. Taking the combined advantages of compositional features and array architectures, the nickel foam supported NiCoP nanosheet array (NiCoP@NF) electrode possesses superior electrochemical performance in comparison with Ni-Co LDH@NF and NiCoO2@NF electrodes. The NiCoP@NF electrode shows an ultrahigh specific capacitance of 2143 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 and retained 1615 F g-1 even at 20 A g-1, showing excellent rate performance. Furthermore, a binder-free all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor device is designed, which exhibits a high energy density of 27 W h kg-1 at a power density of 647 W kg-1. The hierarchical binary nickel-cobalt phosphide nanosheet arrays hold great promise as advanced electrode materials for supercapacitors with high electrochemical performance.

  15. Ab initio calculations of non-stoichiometric copper nitride, pure and with palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Armenta, Maria G.; Soto, Gerardo; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The most stable arrangement corresponds to the Cu 3 N-anti ReO 3 structure. → Formation energy of Cu 32 Vac 0 N 8 and Cu 24 Pd 8 Vac 0 N 8 are very similar. → The biggest volume in the compound is Cu 31 Pd 1 Vac 0 N 8/ . → Small amount introduction of extra metal atoms in copper nitride is possible. - Abstract: We present first principles calculations of copper nitride by using periodic density functional theory within a plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential scheme. The insertions of extra Cu and/or Pd atoms in the empty sites, vacancy reorganization, and substitution of Cu by Pd atoms were studied. We have used an equivalent reduced-symmetry 2 x 2 x 2 Cu 3 N-like cubic super-cell. Small Cu and/or Pd concentrations and vacancy rearrangements in the copper sub-lattice were conveniently calculated in these low-symmetry cells. We cover probable situations like: the occupation of the initially empty copper sites by (1) copper atoms, and by (2) palladium; (3) the relocation of vacancies in the copper sub-lattice; and (4) the substitution of small quantities of copper by palladium atoms in the copper sub-lattice. The equilibrium volumes and energies after relaxing the atomic positions are compared to those of intrinsic copper nitride. We found that the most stable arrangement corresponds to the ideal stoichiometric Cu 3 N. We also found that any deviation from this ideal configuration shift the semiconductor state to a metallic or semi-metallic one.

  16. Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel surfaces nitrided by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schibicheski, Bruna Corina Emanuely; Souza, Gelson Biscaia de; Oliveira, Willian Rafael de; Serbena, Francisco Carlos, E-mail: bruna_schibicheski@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil); Marino, Cláudia E.B. [Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The supermartensitic stainless steel UNS S41426 is employed in marine oil and gas extraction ducts, where it is subjected to severe conditions of temperature, pressure and exposure to corrosive agents (as the H{sub 2}S). In such environments, pitting corrosion is a major cause of degradation of metallic alloys [1]. This work investigated the effectiveness of the nitrogen inlet, attained here by the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique, in improving the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the material surface. Samples were initially austenitized at 1100°C with a subsequent room temperature oil quenching in order to obtain a fully martensitic structure. The nitriding was carried out under 10 kV implantation energy and 30 ms pulse width. The temperatures ranged from 300 °C to 400°C, achieved by controlling the pulse repetition rates. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, instrumented indentation, scanning electron microscopy, potentiodynamic anodic polarization tests (in NaCl solution), and cathodic hydrogenation tests (in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution). The PIII nitriding produced stratified layers up to 30 mm thick containing nitrogen expanded martensite and iron nitride phases (γ’-Fe{sub 4}N, ε- Fe{sub 2+x}N), depending on the treatment temperature. Consequently, the surface hardness increased from ∼3GPa (reference) up to ∼13GPa (400°C). Regarding the corrosion resistance, the nitrided surfaces presented a significant improvement as compared with the pristine surface, evidenced by the increase of the corrosion potential, which was also correlated to the hydrogen embrittlement reduction and the subsequent suppression of morphological changes. References: [1] M.G. Fontana, Corrosion Engineering, Singapore: McGraw-Hill, 1987. [2] B.C.E.S. Kurelo et al., Applied Surface Science 349 (2015) 403-414. (author)

  17. RF plasma nitriding of severely deformed iron-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferkel, H.; Glatzer, M.; Estrin, Y.; Valiev, R.Z.; Blawert, C.; Mordike, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of severe plastic deformation by cold high pressure torsion (HPT) on radio frequency (RF) plasma nitriding of pure iron, as well as St2K50 and X5CrNi1810 steels was investigated. Nitriding was carried out for 3 h in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 10 -5 bar and temperatures of 350 and 400 deg. C. Nitrided specimens were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and micro hardness measurements. It was found that HPT enhances the effect of nitriding leading almost to doubling of the thickness of the nitrided layer for pure iron and the high alloyed steel. The largest increase in hardness was observed when HPT was combined with RF plasma nitriding at 350 deg. C. In the case of pure iron, the X-ray diffraction spectra showed the formation of ε and γ' nitrides in the compound layer, with a preferential formation of γ' at the expense of the α-phase at the higher nitriding temperature. The corresponding surface hardness was up to 950 HV0.01. While the HPT-processed St2K50 exhibits both nitride phases after nitriding at 350 deg. C, only the γ'-phase was observed after nitriding at 400 deg. C. A surface hardness of up to 1050 HV0.01 was measured for this steel. The high alloyed steel X5CrNi1810 exhibited the highest increase in surface hardness when HPT was combined with nitriding at 350 deg. C. The surface hardness of this steel was greater than 1400 HV0.025. The XRD analyses indicate the formation of the expanded austenite (S-phase) in the surface layer as a result of RF plasma nitriding. Furthermore, after HPT X5CrNi1810 was transformed completely into deformation martensite which did not transform back to austenite under thermochemical treatment. However, in the case of nitriding of the HPT-processed high alloyed steel at 400 deg. C, the formation of the S-phase was less pronounced. In view of the observed XRD peak broadening, the formation of nitrides, such as e.g. CrN, cannot be ruled out

  18. A cubic boron nitride film-based fluorescent sensor for detecting Hg2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. M.; Zhao, W. W.; Zhang, H. Y.; Wang, P. F.; Chong, Y. M.; Ye, Q.; Zou, Y. S.; Zhang, W. J.; Zapien, J. A.; Bello, I.; Lee, S. T.

    2009-05-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) film-based sensors for detecting Hg2+ ions were developed by surface functionalization with dansyl chloride. To immobilize dansyl chloride, 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane was modified on hydroxylated cBN surfaces to form an amino-group-terminated self-assembled monolayer. The covalent attachment of the amino groups was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The selectivity and sensitivity of the sensors to detect diverse metal cations in ethanol solutions were studied by using fluorescence spectroscopy, revealing a great selectivity to Hg2+ ions. Significantly, the dansyl-chloride-functionalized cBN film sensors were recyclable after the sensing test.

  19. Hydrogen-Mediated Nitrogen Clustering in Dilute III-V Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Limpijumnong, Sukit; Zhang, S. B.

    2006-08-01

    First-principles calculation reveals multi-N clusters to be the ground states for hydrogenated N in dilute III-V nitrides. While hydrogenation of a single N, forming H2*(N), can relax the large strain induced by the size-mismatched N, formation of the clusters will relax the strain even more effectively. This suppresses the formation of H2*(N), the existence of which has recently been debated. More importantly, postgrowth dehydrogenation of the N-H clusters provides an explanation to the observed metastable bare N clusters in GaAsN grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy or metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  20. Strain- and electric field-induced band gap modulation in nitride nanomembranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Rodrigo G; Zhong Xiaoliang; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Pandey, Ravindra; Rocha, Alexandre R; Karna, Shashi P

    2013-01-01

    The hexagonal nanomembranes of the group III-nitrides are a subject of interest due to their novel technological applications. In this paper, we investigate the strain- and electric field-induced modulation of their band gaps in the framework of density functional theory. For AlN, the field-dependent modulation of the bandgap is found to be significant whereas the strain-induced semiconductor-metal transition is predicted for GaN. A relatively flat conduction band in AlN and GaN nanomembranes leads to an enhancement of their electronic mobility compared to that of their bulk counterparts. (paper)

  1. Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.; Shell, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500.degree. C. in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850.degree. to 950.degree. C. in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

  2. Structure-chemical and metallurgical investigations in boride- and boron nitride systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic phase equilibria in the systems (Ti, Zv, Hf)-B-N were determined in an isothermal cut at 1500 O C and 1 atm. The phase field separation is dominated by the high stability of the metal mononitrides and metal diborides. No ternery compounds were found. There are varying solubilities of B and N in the nitrides and borides. The system Cr-B-N was investigated at 1000 O C under 1 atm argon and vacuum, and at 1400 O C at 1 atm argon and 1 atm nitrogen. For the system Mn-B-N the phase field separation was determined at 900 O C under 1 atm Ar and under vacuum. The properties of hard metals with various binding phases and TiBr as hard constituents were investigated. 6 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs. (qui)

  3. 77 FR 51825 - Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... Nitrided Vanadium From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five... order on ferrovanadium and nitrided vanadium from Russia would not be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in the United States within a reasonably foreseeable time. \\1...

  4. Fabrication of functional structures on thin silicon nitride membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkels, P.; Tjerkstra, R.W.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Brugger, J.P.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    A process to fabricate functional polysilicon structures above large (4×4 mm2) thin (200 nm), very flat LPCVD silicon rich nitride membranes was developed. Key features of this fabrication process are the use of low-stress LPCVD silicon nitride, sacrificial layer etching, and minimization of

  5. Low Temperature Gaseous Nitriding of a Stainless Steel Containing Strong Nitride Formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    Low temperature thermochemical surface hardening of the precipitation hardening austenitic stainless steel A286 in solution treated state was investigated. A286 contains, besides high amounts of Cr, also substantial amounts of strong nitride formers as Ti, Al and V. It is shown that simultaneous...

  6. Problems and possibilities of development of boron nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanova, L.N.; Romashin, A.G.; Kulikova, G.I.; Golubeva, O.P.

    1988-01-01

    The modern state of developments in the field of technology of ceramics produced from boron nitride is analyzed. Substantial difficulties in production of pure ceramics from hexagonal and wurtzite-like boron nitride are stated as related to the structure peculiarities and inhomogeneity of chemical bonds in elementary crystal cells of various modifications. Advantages and disadvantages of familiar technological procedures in production of boron nitride ceramics are compared. A new technology is suggested, which is based on the use of electroorganic compounds for hardening and protection of porous high-purity boron-nitride die from oxidation, and as high-efficient sintered elements for treatment of powders of various structures and further pyrolisis. The method is called thermal molecular lacing (TML). Properties of ceramics produced by the TML method are compared with characteristics of well-known brands of boron nitride ceramics

  7. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2017-05-12

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to an azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.

  8. The Effect of Polymer Char on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Rickmond C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of polymer char on nitridation kinetics of attrition milled silicon powder have been investigated from 1200 to 1350 C. Results indicate that at and above 1250 C, the silicon compacts containing 3.5 wt percent polymer char were fully converted to Si3N4 after 24 hr exposure in nitrogen. In contrast, the silicon compacts without polymer char could not be fully converted to Si3N4 at 1350 C under similar exposure conditions. At 1250 and 1350 C, the silicon compacts with polymer char showed faster nitridation kinetics than those without the polymer char. As the polymer char content is increased, the amount of SiC in the nitrided material is also increased. By adding small amounts (approx. 2.5 wt percent) of NiO, the silicon compacts containing polymer char can be completely nitrided at 1200 C. The probable mechanism for the accelerated nitridation of silicon containing polymer char is discussed.

  9. 15 N utilization in nitride nuclear fuels for advanced nuclear power reactors and accelerator - driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, D.

    2005-01-01

    15 N utilization for nitride nuclear fuels production for nuclear power reactors and accelerator - driven systems is presented. Nitride nuclear fuel is the obvious choice for advanced nuclear reactors and ADS because of its favorable properties: a high melting point, excellent thermal conductivity, high fissile density, lower fission gas release and good radiation tolerance. The application of nitride fuels in nuclear reactors and ADS requires use of 15 N enriched nitrogen to suppress 14 C production due to (n,p) reaction on 14 N. Accelerator - driven system is a recent development merging of accelerator and fission reactor technologies to generate electricity and transmute long - lived radioactive wastes as minor actinides: Np, Am, Cm. A high-energy proton beam hitting a heavy metal target produces neutrons by spallation. The neutrons cause fission in the fuel, but unlike in conventional reactors, the fuel is sub-critical and fission ceases when the accelerator is turned off. Nitride fuel is a promising candidate for transmutation in ADS of minor actinides, which are converted into nitrides with 15 N for that purpose. Tacking into account that the world wide market is about 20 to 40 Kg 15 N annually, the supply of that isotope for nitride fuel production for nuclear power reactors and ADS would therefore demand an increase in production capacity by a factor of 1000. For an industrial plant producing 100 t/y 15 N, using present technology of isotopic exchange in NITROX system, the first separation stage of the cascade would be fed with 10M HNO 3 solution of 600 mc/h flow - rate. If conversion of HNO 3 into NO, NO 2 , at the enriching end of the columns, would be done with gaseous SO 2 , for a production plant of 100 t/y 15 N a consumption of 4 million t SO 2 /y and a production of 70 % H 2 SO 4 waste solution of 4.5 million mc/y are estimated. The reconversion of H 2 SO 4 into SO 2 in order to recycle of SO 2 is a problem to be solved to compensate the cost of SO 2

  10. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouanis, F.Z.; Bentiss, F.; Bellayer, S.; Vogt, J.B.; Jama, C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. → RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. → The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. → Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of Fe x N. → The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N 2 gas. Surface characterizations before and after N 2 plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 μm for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV 0.005 at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  11. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouanis, F.Z. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Bentiss, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination et d' Analytique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, B.P. 20, M-24000 El Jadida (Morocco); Bellayer, S.; Vogt, J.B. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Jama, C., E-mail: charafeddine.jama@ensc-lille.fr [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-05-16

    Highlights: {yields} C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. {yields} RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. {yields} The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. {yields} Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of Fe{sub x}N. {yields} The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N{sub 2} gas. Surface characterizations before and after N{sub 2} plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 {mu}m for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV{sub 0.005} at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  12. Nano-particulate Aluminium Nitride/Al: An Efficient and Versatile Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Synthesis of Biginelli Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekale, S. U.; Tekale, A. B.; Kanhe, N. S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Pawar, R. P.

    2011-12-01

    Nano-particulate aluminium nitride/Al (7:1) is reported as a new heterogeneous solid acid catalyst for the synthesis of 3, 4-dihydroxypyrimidi-2-(1H)-ones and their sulphur analogues using the Biginelli reaction. This method involves short reaction time, easy separation, high yields and purity of products.

  13. Nitridation of U and Pu recovered in liquid Cd cathode by molten salt electrorefining of (U,Pu)N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Takumi; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Solid solutions of actinide mono-nitrides have been proposed as a candidate fuel of the accelerator-driven system (ADS) and Gen.IV-type fast reactors because the thermal conductivity and metal density are higher than those of actinide oxides and also they have high melting temperature. Pyrochemical process has several advantages over conventional wet process in treating of spent nitride fuel. One of the key technologies of the pyrochemical reprocessing of nitride fuel is the formation of the nitrides from actinides in the liquid Cd cathode. The nitridation-distillation combined method was developed and has been adopted to convert the actinides to the nitrides. In this method, the nitridation of actinides and the distillation of Cd occurred simultaneously by heating the actinide-Cd alloys in N{sub 2} gas stream. In the present study, the nitride formation behavior of U and Pu recovered in Cd cathode by molten salt electrorefining of (U,Pu)N was experimentally investigated. In addition, the nitride pellet was prepared form the powder obtained by the nitridation of U and Pu recovered in Cd cathode. (U,Pu)N (PuN = 80 mol %) was used as the starting material in the experiment. Molten salt electrorefining of (U,Pu)N pellet was carried out in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt with 1.2 wt% PuCl{sub 3} and 0.3 wt% UCl{sub 3} of about 110 g at the constant anodic potential of -0.60 to -0.55 V vs. Ag/AgCl for about 9 hours at 773 K. After the electrorefining, about 42 % of U and Pu in the starting (U,Pu)N pellet was dissolved at the anode and recovered into the liquid Cd cathode. The recovered U-Pu-Cd alloy was heated in an alumina crucible at 973 K for 10 hours under N{sub 2} gas (99.999 %) stream (0.015 L/min). Fine black powder was recovered after heating the U-Pu-Cd alloy. The powder was identified as the single phase solid solution of (U,Pu)N by the XRD analysis. After milling in the agate mortar for 1 hour, the powder was compacted into green pellet under a pressure of about

  14. One-step route to a hybrid TiO2/TixW1−xN nanocomposite by in situ selective carbothermal nitridation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë Schnepp, Martin J Hollamby, Masahiko Tanaka, Yoshitaka Matsushita, Yoshio Katsuya and Yoshio Sakka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide/nitride nanocomposites have many existing and potential applications, e.g. in energy conversion or ammonia synthesis. Here, a hybrid oxide/nitride nanocomposite (anatase/TixW1−xN was synthesized by an ammonia-free sol–gel route. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction, complemented with electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, was used to study the structure, composition and mechanism of formation of the nanocomposite. The nanocomposite contained nanoparticles (<5 nm diameter of two highly intermixed phases. This was found to arise from controlled nucleation and growth of a single oxide intermediate from the gel precursor, followed by phase separation and in situ selective carbothermal nitridation. Depending on the preparation conditions, the composition varied from anatase/TixW1−xN at low W content to an isostructural mixture of Ti-rich and W-rich TixW1−xN at high W content. In situ selective carbothermal nitridation offers a facile route to the synthesis of nitride-oxide nanocomposites. This conceptually new approach is a significant advance from previous methods, which generally require ammonolysis of a pre-synthesized oxide.

  15. Electrochemical capacitance performance of titanium nitride nanoarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Suzhou Research Institute of Southeast University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Yong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Du, Hongxiu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Suzhou Research Institute of Southeast University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Highlights: • TiN nanoarray is formed by a nitridation process of TiO{sub 2} in ammonia atmosphere. • TiN nanoarray exhibits much higher EDLC capacitance than TiO{sub 2} nanoarray. • The specific capacitance of TiN nanoarray achieves a high level of 99.7 mF cm{sup −2}. • A flexible solid-state supercapacitor is constructed by TiN nanoarray and PVA gel. -- Abstract: In this study, titanium nitride (TiN) nanoarrays with a short nanotube and long nanopore structure have been prepared by an anodization process of ultra thin titanium foil in ethylene glycol (EG) solution containing ammonium fluoride, subsequent calcination process in an air atmosphere, and final nitridation process in an ammonia atmosphere. The morphology and microstructure characterization has been conducted using field emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical properties have been investigated through cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectrum measurements. The electrochemical capacitance performance has been investigated by galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements in the acidic, neural and alkali electrolyte solution. Well-defined TiN nanoarrays contribute a much higher capacitance performance than titania (TiO{sub 2}) in the supercapacitor application due to the extraordinarily improved electrical conductivity. Such an electrochemical capacitance can be further enhanced by increasing aspect ratio of TiN nanoarray from short nanotubes to long nanopores. A flexible supercapacitor has been constructed using two symmetrical TiN nanoarray electrodes and a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gel electrolyte with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–KCl–H{sub 2}O–EG. Such a supercapacitor has a highly improved potential window and still keeps good electrochemical energy storage. TiN nanoarray with a high aspect ratio can act well as an ultra thin film electrode material of flexible supercapacitor to contribute a superior capacitance performance.

  16. Inelastic light scattering spectroscopy of semiconductor nitride nanocolumns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, J.M.; Lazic, S.; Sanchez-Paramo, J. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Agullo-Rueda, F. [Materials Science Institute of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cerutti, L.; Ristic, J.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Grandal, J.; Calleja, E. [ISOM and Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, ETSIT, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Trampert, A.; Jahn, U. [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    A review of inelastic light scattering measurements on group III-nitride nanocolumns grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented. The nanocolumns are hexagonal, high quality single crystals with diameters in the range of 20 to 100 nm, with no traces of extended defects. GaN nanocolumns grown on bare Si substrates with both (111) and (100) orientation display narrow phonon peaks, indicating the absence of strain inhomogeneities. This opens the possibility of efficient integration of the nanocolumns as optoelectronic devices with the complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Measurements of the E{sub 2} phonon frequency on AlGaN nanocolumns indicate a linear dependence of the Al concentration on the Al relative flux, up to 60%. The E{sub 2} peak width increases with Al content due to phonon damping by alloy scattering. Inelastic light scattering measurements in InN nanocolumns display a coupled LO phonon-plasmon mode together with uncoupled phonons. The coupled mode is not observed in a reference compact sample. The origin of the coupled mode is attributed to spontaneous accumulation of electrons at the lateral surfaces of the nanocolumns. The presence of free electrons in the nanocolumns is confirmed by infrared reflectance measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Inelastic light scattering spectroscopy of semiconductor nitride nanocolumns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleja, J.M.; Lazic, S.; Sanchez-Paramo, J.; Agullo-Rueda, F.; Cerutti, L.; Ristic, J.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Grandal, J.; Calleja, E.; Trampert, A.; Jahn, U.

    2007-01-01

    A review of inelastic light scattering measurements on group III-nitride nanocolumns grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented. The nanocolumns are hexagonal, high quality single crystals with diameters in the range of 20 to 100 nm, with no traces of extended defects. GaN nanocolumns grown on bare Si substrates with both (111) and (100) orientation display narrow phonon peaks, indicating the absence of strain inhomogeneities. This opens the possibility of efficient integration of the nanocolumns as optoelectronic devices with the complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Measurements of the E 2 phonon frequency on AlGaN nanocolumns indicate a linear dependence of the Al concentration on the Al relative flux, up to 60%. The E 2 peak width increases with Al content due to phonon damping by alloy scattering. Inelastic light scattering measurements in InN nanocolumns display a coupled LO phonon-plasmon mode together with uncoupled phonons. The coupled mode is not observed in a reference compact sample. The origin of the coupled mode is attributed to spontaneous accumulation of electrons at the lateral surfaces of the nanocolumns. The presence of free electrons in the nanocolumns is confirmed by infrared reflectance measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Ammonium-tungstate-promoted growth of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Songfeng; Li, Chaowei; Li, Taotao; Geng, Renjie; Li, Qiulong; Lu, Weibang; Yao, Yagang

    2018-05-01

    Ammonium tungstate ((NH4)10W12O41 · xH2O) is a kind of oxygen-containing ammonium salt. The following study proves that it can be successfully used as a metal oxide alternative to produce boron oxide (B2O2) by oxidizing boron (B) in a traditional boron oxide chemical vapor deposition (BOCVD) process. This special oxidant promotes the simplistic fabrication of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in a conventional horizontal tube furnace, an outcome which may have resulted from its strong oxidizability. The experimental results demonstrate that the mole ratio of B and (NH4)10W12O41 · xH2O is a key parameter in determining the formation, quality and quantity of BNNTs when stainless steel is employed as a catalyst. We also found that Mg(NO3)2 and MgO nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as catalysts to grow BNNTs with the same precursor. The BNNTs obtained from the Mg(NO3)2 catalyst were straighter than those obtained from the MgO NP catalyst. This could have been due to the different physical forms of the catalysts that were used.

  19. Dilute Nitrides For 4-And 6- Junction Space Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, S.; Stammler, E.; Ronsch, S.; Oliva, E.; Schachtner, M.; Siefer, G.; Bett, A. W.; Dimroth, F.

    2011-10-01

    According to simulations the efficiency of conventional, lattice-matched GaInP/GaInAs/Ge triple-junction space solar cells can be strongly increased by the incorporation of additional junctions. In this way the existing excess current of the Germanium bottom cell can be reduced and the voltage of the stack can be increased. In particular, the use of 1.0 eV materials like GaInNAs opens the door for solar cells with significantly improved conversion efficiency. We have investigated the material properties of GaInNAs grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and its impact on the quantum efficiency of solar cells. Furthermore we have developed a GaInNAs subcell with a bandgap energy of 1.0 eV and integrated it into a GaInP/GaInAs/GaInNAs/Ge 4-junction and a AlGaInP/GaInP/AlGaInAs/GaInAs/GaInNAs/Ge 6- junction space solar cell. The material quality of the dilute nitride junction limits the current density of these devices to 9.3 mA/cm2 (AM0). This is not sufficient for a 4-junction cell but may lead to current matched 6- junction devices in the future.

  20. Transport properties of ultrathin black phosphorus on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doganov, Rostislav A.; Özyilmaz, Barbaros [Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 6 Science Drive 2, 117546 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, 117456 Singapore (Singapore); Koenig, Steven P.; Yeo, Yuting [Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 6 Science Drive 2, 117546 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-02-23

    Ultrathin black phosphorus, or phosphorene, is a two-dimensional material that allows both high carrier mobility and large on/off ratios. Similar to other atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is expected to be affected by the underlying substrate. The properties of black phosphorus have so far been studied on the widely utilized SiO{sub 2} substrate. Here, we characterize few-layer black phosphorus field effect transistors on hexagonal boron nitride—an atomically smooth and charge trap-free substrate. We measure the temperature dependence of the field effect mobility for both holes and electrons and explain the observed behavior in terms of charged impurity limited transport. We find that in-situ vacuum annealing at 400 K removes the p-doping of few-layer black phosphorus on both boron nitride and SiO{sub 2} substrates and reduces the hysteresis at room temperature.