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Sample records for metal matrix composites

  1. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barczy, P.; Szigeti, F.

    1998-01-01

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  2. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  3. Laser Additive Manufacturing of Metal Matrix Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Mertens, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Current trends in the mechanics and energy industries impose increasing demands on metallic materials, combining elevated service temperatures and severe mechanical solicitations. Metal matrix composite coatings with ceramic reinforcements are good candidates in view of fulfilling the requirements for an improved mechanical durability, and for other complex functions (e.g. self-lubrication, biocompatibility...). First of all, this paper provides an introduction to metal matrix compos...

  4. Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extensive micromechanical modeling effort for woven metal matrix composites. The model is employed to predict the mechanical response of 8-harness (8H) satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites. Experimental mechanical results for this novel high thermal conductivity material were recently reported by Bednarcyk et al. along with preliminary model results. The micromechanics model developed herein is based on an embedded approach. A micromechanics model for the local (micro-scale) behavior of the woven composite, the original method of cells (Aboudi), is embedded in a global (macro-scale) micromechanics model (the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) (Aboudi). This approach allows representation of true repeating unit cells for woven metal matrix composites via GMC-3D, and representation of local effects, such as matrix plasticity, yarn porosity, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding. In addition, the equations of GMC-3D were reformulated to significantly reduce the number of unknown quantities that characterize the deformation fields at the microlevel in order to make possible the analysis of actual microstructures of woven composites. The resulting micromechanical model (WCGMC) provides an intermediate level of geometric representation, versatility, and computational efficiency with respect to previous analytical and numerical models for woven composites, but surpasses all previous modeling work by allowing the mechanical response of a woven metal matrix composite, with an elastoplastic matrix, to be examined for the first time. WCGMC is employed to examine the effects of composite microstructure, porosity, residual stresses, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding on the predicted mechanical response of 8H satin C/Cu. The previously reported experimental results are summarized, and the model predictions are compared to monotonic and cyclic tensile and shear test data. By considering appropriate levels of porosity

  5. Microlevel thermal effects in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakovich, Carl T.

    1990-01-01

    A method for studying the influence of thermal effects on the inelastic response of metal matrix composites is reviewed. A micromechanics approach based upon the method of cells is shown to be quite versatile for studying a variety of materials response phenomena. Yielding and inelastic response of the composite are predicted as functions of thermal stresses, yielding of the matrix, and imperfect fiber/matrix bonding. Results are presented in the form of yield surfaces and nonlinear stress-strain curves for unidirectional and laminated boron/aluminum and silicon-carbide/titanium.

  6. Fracture toughness in metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Ipiña J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of the fracture toughness in metal matrix composites (Duralcan reinforced with 15% of Al(20(3 and SiC are presented in this work. The application of Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics is discussed and the obtained values are compared with the ones obtained by means of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics. Results show that J IC derived K JC values are higher than the corresponding values obtained by direct application of the linear elastic methodology. The effect of a heat treatment on the material fracture toughness was also evaluated in which the analyzed approaches showed, not only different toughness values, but also opposite tendencies. A second comparison of the J IC and K JC values obtained in this work with toughness values reported in the literature is presented and discussed.

  7. Multifunctional Metal Matrix Composite Filament Wound Tank Liners, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials offer tremendous potential for lightweight propellant and pressurant tankage for space applications. Thin MMC liners for COPVs...

  8. Laser Assisted Machining of Metal Matrix Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metal matrix composites (MMC's) are of great interest in aerospace applications where their high specific strength provides a weight saving alternative to standard...

  9. Review on preparation techniques of particle reinforced metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Bin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the investigation status of the techniques for preparation of metal matrix composites and the research outcomes achieved recently. The mechanisms, characteristics, application ranges and levels of development of these preparation techniques are analyzed. The advantages and the disadvantages of each technique are synthetically evaluated. Lastly, the future directions of research and the prospects for the preparation techniques of metal matrix composites are forecasted.

  10. Cavitation instabilities between fibres in a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    induced by bonding to the ceramics that only show elastic deformation. In an MMC the stress state in the metal matrix is highly non-uniform, varying between regions where shear stresses are dominant and regions where hydrostatic tension is strong. An Al–SiC whisker composite with a periodic pattern......Short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are studied here to investigate the possibility that a cavitation instability can develop in the metal matrix. The high stress levels needed for a cavitation instability may occur in metal–ceramic systems due to the constraint on plastic flow...

  11. Fatigue-Testing Apparatus for Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Leonard J.; Petrasek, Donald W.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical load cycling simulated in realistic fatigue tests. Efficient joining of metal matrix composite components to supporting structures is major concern facing users of these materials. Lewis Research Center designed and developed two thermal/mechancical fatigue test facilities, one to test metal matrix composite specimens and another to test compostite/metal attachment bond joints. Thermal/mechanical fatigue facility designed for testing metal matrix composites permits specimen-temperature excursions with controlled heating and loading rates. Second facility designed to test composite/metal attachment bond joints and to permit heating to maximum temperature of 1,400oC (760oC) within 10 min and cooling to 300oF (150oC) within 3 min. Facility has unique capabilities not found in other laboratories.

  12. Drilling of metal matrix composites: cutting forces and chip formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Songmene, V.; Balout, B.; Masounave, J.

    2002-01-01

    Particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs) are known for their low weight and their high wear resistance, but also for the difficulties encountered during their machining. New aluminium MMCs containing with both soft lubricating graphite particles and hard particles (silicon carbide or alumina) with improved machinability were developed. This study investigates the drilling of these composites as compared to non-reinforced aluminium. The microstructure of chip, the cutting forces, the shear angles and the friction at tool-chip interface are used to compare the machinability of these composites. It was found that, during drilling of this new family of composites, the feed rate, and the nature of reinforcing particles govern the cutting forces. The mathematical models established by previous researchers for predicting the cutting forces when drilling metals were validated for these composites. The reinforcing particles within the composite help for chip segmentation, making the composite more brittle and easy to shear during the cutting process. (author)

  13. Metallic-fibre-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevost, F.; Schnedecker, G.; Boncoeur, M.

    1994-01-01

    A refractory metal wire cloth is embedded in an oxide ceramic matrix, using a plasma spraying technology, in order to elaborate composite plates. When mechanically tested, the composite fails with a pseudo-ductile fracture mode whereas the ceramic alone is originally brittle. It exhibits a higher fracture strength, and remains in the form of a single piece even when straining is important. No further heat treatment is needed after the original processing to reach these characteristics. (authors). 2 figs., 2 refs

  14. Proposed framework for thermomechanical life modeling of metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The framework of a mechanics of materials model is proposed for thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction of unidirectional, continuous-fiber metal matrix composites (MMC's). Axially loaded MMC test samples are analyzed as structural components whose fatigue lives are governed by local stress-strain conditions resulting from combined interactions of the matrix, interfacial layer, and fiber constituents. The metallic matrix is identified as the vehicle for tracking fatigue crack initiation and propagation. The proposed framework has three major elements. First, TMF flow and failure characteristics of in situ matrix material are approximated from tests of unreinforced matrix material, and matrix TMF life prediction equations are numerically calibrated. The macrocrack initiation fatigue life of the matrix material is divided into microcrack initiation and microcrack propagation phases. Second, the influencing factors created by the presence of fibers and interfaces are analyzed, characterized, and documented in equation form. Some of the influences act on the microcrack initiation portion of the matrix fatigue life, others on the microcrack propagation life, while some affect both. Influencing factors include coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch strains, residual (mean) stresses, multiaxial stress states, off-axis fibers, internal stress concentrations, multiple initiation sites, nonuniform fiber spacing, fiber debonding, interfacial layers and cracking, fractured fibers, fiber deflections of crack fronts, fiber bridging of matrix cracks, and internal oxidation along internal interfaces. Equations exist for some, but not all, of the currently identified influencing factors. The third element is the inclusion of overriding influences such as maximum tensile strain limits of brittle fibers that could cause local fractures and ensuing catastrophic failure of surrounding matrix material. Some experimental data exist for assessing the plausibility of the proposed

  15. Internal friction in a new kind of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Juan, J.; No, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new kind of metal matrix composites, based on powders of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys (SMAs) surrounded by an indium matrix, specifically designed to exhibit high mechanical damping. The damping properties have been characterized by mechanical spectroscopy as a function of temperature between 150 and 400 K, frequency between 3 x 10 -3 and 3 Hz, and strain amplitude between 5 x 10 -6 and 10 -4 . The material exhibits, in some range of temperature, internal friction as high as 0.54. The extremely high damping is discussed in the light of the microstructure of the material, which has been characterized in parallel

  16. Laser cladding of wear resistant metal matrix composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, A.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2004-01-01

    A number of coatings with wear-resistant properties as well as with a low friction coefficient are produced by laser cladding. The structure of these coatings is determined by required performance and realized as metal matrix composite (MMC), where solid lubricant serves as a ductile matrix (e.g. CuSn), reinforced by appropriate ceramic phase (e.g. WC/Co). One of the engineered coating with functionally graded material (FGM) structure has a dry friction coefficient 0.12. Coatings were produced by coaxial injection of powder blend into the zone of laser beam action. Metallographic and tribological examinations were carried out confirming the advanced performance of engineered coatings

  17. Metallic-glass-matrix composite structures with benchmark mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Joseph P.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.

    2010-12-01

    Metallic-glass-matrix composites demonstrating unusual combination of high strength, high toughness, and excellent processability are utilized to fabricate cellular structures of egg-box topology. Under compressive loading, the egg-box panels are capable of undergoing extensive plastic collapse at very high plateau stresses enabling absorption of large amounts of mechanical energy. In terms of specific mechanical energy absorbed, the present panels far outperform panels of similar topology made of aluminum or fiber-reinforced polymer composites, and even surpass steel structures of highly buckling-resistant topologies, thus emerging among the highest performance structures of any kind.

  18. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-01-01

    One of the key materials challenges for Generation IV reactor technology is to improve the strength and resistance to corrosion and radiation damage in the metal cladding of the fuel pins during high-temperature operation. Various candidate Gen IV designs call for increasing core temperature to improve efficiency and facilitate hydrogen production, operation with molten lead moderator to use fast neutrons. Fuel pin lifetime against swelling and fracture is a significant limit in both respects. The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite. In the context of the mission of the SBIR program, this Phase I grant has been successful. The development of a means to attain interfacial bonding between metal and ceramic has been a pacing challenge in materials science and technology for a century. It entails matching or grading of thermal expansion across the interface and attaining a graded chemical composition so that impurities do not concentrate at the boundary to create a slip layer. To date these challenges have been solved in only a modest number of pairings of compatible materials, e.g. Kovar and glass, titanium and ceramic, and aluminum and ceramic. The latter two cases have given rise to the only presently available MMC materials, developed for aerospace applications. Those materials have been possible because the matrix metal is highly reactive at elevated temperature so that graded composition and intimate bonding happens naturally at the fiber-matrix interface. For metals that are not highly reactive at processing temperature, however, successful bonding is much more difficult. Recent success has been made with copper MMCs for cooling channels in first-wall designs for fusion

  19. Shear testing of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines the elements of a combined experimental/analytical methodology for accurate shear characterization of unidirectional composites in the linear and nonlinear range, with particular attention devoted to metal matrix composites. It is illustrated that consistent results can be obtained for a large class of composites from two commonly employed shear test methods currently in use by composites researchers when the influence of various factors that affect the determination of the actual shear response is properly analyzed. These factors include the effects of material anisotropy, specimen geometry, manner of load introduction, and test fixture design on the stress and deformation fields in the test section of off-axis and Iosipescu specimens. Common errors associated with the measurement of deformation fields and calculation of stress fields are discussed and quantified. Particular problems in the determination of the shear response of unidirectional boron/aluminum using the Iosipescu test are illustrated and discussed.

  20. Ultrafine-grained Aluminm and Boron Carbide Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Rustin

    Cryomilling is a processing technique used to generate homogenously distributed boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforcement within an ultrafine-grained aluminum matrix. The motivation behind characterizing a composite consisting of cryomilled aluminum B4C metal matrix composite is to design and develop a high-strength, lightweight aluminum composite for structural and high strain rate applications. Cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C powders were synthesized into bulk composite by various thermomechanical processing methods to form plate and extruded geometries. The effects of processing method on microstructure and mechanical behavior for the final consolidated composite were investigated. Cryomilling for extended periods of time in liquid nitrogen has shown to increase strength and thermal stability. The effects associated with cryomilling with stearic acid additions (as a process-control agent) on the degassing behavior of Al powders is investigated and results show that the liberation of compounds associated with stearic acid were suppressed in cryomilled Al powders. The effect of thermal expansion mismatch strain on strengthening due to geometrically necessary dislocations resulting from quenching is investigated and found not to occur in bulk cryomilled Al 5083 and B 4C composites. Previous cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C composites have exhibited ultrahigh strength associated with considerable strain-to-failure (>14 pct.) at high strain rates (>103/s) during mechanical testing, but only limited strain-to-failure (˜0.75 pct.) at quasi-static strain rates (10-3/s). The increased strain to failure at high strain rates is attributed to micro-flaw developments, including kinking, extensive axial splitting, and grain growth were observed after high strain rate deformation, and the significance of these mechanisms is considered.

  1. Metal matrix composites synthesis, wear characteristics, machinability study of MMC brake drum

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Nanjappan; Davim, J Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This book is dedicated to composite materials, presenting different synthesis processes, composite properties and their machining behaviour. The book describes also the problems on manufacturing of metal matrix composite components. Among others, it provides procedures for manufacturing of metal matrix composites and case studies.

  2. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  3. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  4. Metal matrix composites for sustainable lotus-effect surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosonovsky, Michael; Hejazi, Vahid; Nyong, Aniedi E; Rohatgi, Pradeep K

    2011-12-06

    The lotus effect involving roughness-induced superhydrophobicity is a way to design nonwetting, self-cleaning, omniphobic, icephobic, and antifouling surfaces. However, such surfaces require micropatterning, which is extremely vulnerable to even small wear rates. This limits the applicability of the lotus effects to situations when wear is practically absent. To design sustainable superhydrophobic surfaces, we suggest using metal matrix composites (MMCs) with hydrophobic reinforcement in the bulk of the material, rather than only at its surface. Such surfaces, if properly designed, provide roughness and heterogeneity needed for superhydrophobicity. In addition, they are sustainable, since when the surface layer is deteriorated and removed due to wear, hydrophobic reinforcement and roughness remains. We present a model and experimental data on wetting of MMCs. We also conducted selected experiments with graphite-reinforced MMCs and showed that the contact angle can be determined from the model. In order to decouple the effects of reinforcement and roughness, the experiments were conducted for initially smooth and etched matrix and composite materials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Machinability study of Al-TiC metal matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa P. N.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites have emerged as an advanced class of structural materials have a combination of different, superior properties compared to an unreinforced matrix, which can result in a number of service benefits such as increased strength, higher elastic moduli, higher service temperature, low CTE, improved wear resistance, high toughness, etc. The excellent mechanical properties of these materials together with weight saving makes them very attractive for a variety of engineering applications in aerospace, automotive, electronic industries, etc. Hence, these materials provide as alternative substitutes for conventional engineering materials when specific mechanical properties necessary for required applications. In this work an attempt is made to study the machining parameters of Al6061/TiC MMC. The composite is developed by reinforcing TiC particles in varying proportions of 3, 6, 9 and 12 % weight fractions to the Al6061 matric alloy through stir casting technique. Cutting forces were measured by varying cutting speed and feed rate with constant depth of cut for different % weight fractions. The results showed that the cutting force increases with the increase of feed rate and decreases with the increase of cutting speed for all the weight fractions. Cutting parameters were optimized using Taguchi technique.

  6. Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Tim W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-01-04

    A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

  7. Leveraging metal matrix composites to reduce costs in space mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Ted; Claridge, Rex; Walker, Jim

    1994-01-01

    Advanced metal matrix composites may be one of the most promising technologies for reducing cost in structural components without compromise to strength or stiffness. A microlight 12.50 N (2.81 lb), two-axis, solar array drive assembly (SADA) was made for the Advanced Materials Applications to Space Structures (AMASS) Program flight experiment. The SADA had both its inner and outer axis housings fabricated from silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumimun. Two versions of the housings were made. The first was machined from a solid billet of material. The second was plaster cast to a near net shape that required minimal finish machining. Both manufacturing methods were compared upon completion. Results showed a cost savings with the cast housing was possible for quantities greater than one and probable for quantities greater than two. For quantities approaching ten, casting resulted in a reduction factor of almost three in the cost per part.

  8. Real-Time Investigation of Solidification of Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu

    1999-01-01

    Casting of metal matrix composites can develop imperfections either as non- uniform distributions of the reinforcement phases or as outright defects such as porosity. The solidification process itself initiates these problems. To identify or rectify the problems, one must be able to detect and to study how they form. Until, recently this was only possible by experiments that employed transparent metal model organic materials with glass beads to simulate the reinforcing phases. Recent results obtained from a Space Shuttle experiment (using transparent materials) will be used to illustrate the fundamental physics that dictates the final distribution of agglomerates in a casting. We have further extended this real time investigation to aluminum alloys using X-ray microscopy. A variety of interface-particle interactions will be discussed and how they alter the final properties of the composite. A demonstration of how a solid-liquid interface is distorted by nearby voids or particles, particle pushing or engulfment by the interface, formations of wormholes, Aggregation of particles, and particle-induced segregation of alloying elements will be presented.

  9. Solid State Non-powder Process for Boron Nitride Nanotube Metal Matrix Composite, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) provide potential for advanced lightweight high stiffness structures that are critical for...

  10. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

    1993-09-14

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

  11. The tensile failure modes of metal-matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M. A.; Wills, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The strengths of individual boron fibers extracted from various as-received and thermally fatigued aluminum alloy matrix materials were measured. The results are described in terms of a Weibull distribution, and strengths of composites fabricated from these fibers are calculated in terms of lower and upper bounds. Tests conducted on composite specimens indicated that strengths approaching the upper bounds can be achieved in composites fabricated by normal diffusion bonding techniques. Cyclic temperature changes effectively reduced the strength values toward the lower bounds. It was concluded that this effect resulted from the degradation of the strength of the fiber-matrix bond.

  12. Milling of Nanoparticles Reinforced Al-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alokesh Pramanik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the face milling of nanoparticles reinforced Al-based metal matrix composites (nano-MMCs using a single insert milling tool. The effects of feed and speed on machined surfaces in terms of surface roughness, surface profile, surface appearance, chip surface, chip ratio, machining forces, and force signals were analyzed. It was found that surface roughness of machined surfaces increased with the increase of feed up to the speed of 60 mm/min. However, at the higher speed (100–140 mm/min, the variation of surface roughness was minor with the increase of feed. The machined surfaces contained the marks of cutting tools, lobes of material flow in layers, pits and craters. The chip ratio increased with the increase of feed at all speeds. The top chip surfaces were full of wrinkles in all cases, though the bottom surfaces carried the evidence of friction, adhesion, and deformed material layers. The effect of feed on machining forces was evident at all speeds. The machining speed was found not to affect machining forces noticeably at a lower feed, but those decreased with the increase of speed for the high feed scenario.

  13. Metal Matrix Composites: Fatigue and Fracture Testing. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and results of testing metal matrix composites for fatigue and fracture. Methods include non-destructive testing techniques, and static and cyclic techniques for assessing compression, tensile, bending, and impact characteristics.

  14. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  15. Experimental study on mechanical behavior of fiber/matrix interface in metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Chiang, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    The technique SIEM(Speckle Interferometry with Electron Microscopy) was employed to quantitatively measure the deformation on the fiber/matrix interface in SCS-6/Ti-6-4 composite at a microscale level. The displacement field within the fiber/matrix interphase zone was determined by in-situ observation with sensitivity of 0.003(microm). The macro-mechanical properties were compared with micro-mechanical behavior. It is shown that the strength in the interphase zone is weaker than the matrix tensile strength. The deformation process can be characterized by the uniform deformation, interface strain concentration and debond, and matrix plastic deformation

  16. Mechanical and corrosion behaviors of developed copper-based metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manvandra Kumar; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv; Ji, Gopal

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates mechanical properties and corrosion resistances of cast copper-tungsten carbide (WC) metal matrix composites (MMCs). Copper matrix composites have been developed by stir casting technique. Different sizes of micro and nano particles of WC particles are utilized as reinforcement to prepare two copper-based composites, however, nano size of WC particles are prepared by high-energy ball milling. XRD (X-rays diffraction) characterize the materials for involvement of different phases. The mechanical behavior of composites has been studied by Vickers hardness test and compression test; while the corrosion behavior of developed composites is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that hardness, compressive strength and corrosion resistance of copper matrix composites are very high in comparison to that of copper matrix, which attributed to the microstructural changes occurred during composite formation. SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) reveals the morphology of the corroded surfaces.

  17. High-Temperature Fatigue of a Hybrid Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. T.; Sanders, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    An aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) brake drum was tested in fatigue at room temperature and extreme service temperatures. At room temperature, the hybrid composite did not fail and exceeded estimated vehicle service times. At higher temperatures (62 and 73 pct of the matrix eutectic), fatigue of a hybrid particle/fiber MMC exhibited failure consistent with matrix overloading. Overaging of the A356 matrix coupled with progressive fracture of the SiC particles combined to create the matrix overload condition. No evidence of macro-fatigue crack initiation or growth was observed, and the matrix-particle interface appeared strong with no debonding, visible matrix phases, or porosity. An effective medium model was constructed to test the hypothesis that matrix overloading was the probable failure mode. The measured particle fracture rate was fit using realistic values of the SiC Weibull strength and modulus, which in turn predicted cycles to failure within the range observed in fatigue testing.

  18. Corrosion Characterization Of ZA-27 Red Mud Metal Matrix Composites In Sodium Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakash

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to evaluate the corrosion characteristics of red mud metal in sodium chloride solution. Metal matrix composites MMC are heterogeneous systems containing matrix and reinforcement. Matrix may be alloy or metal or polymer. Reinforcement may be particulate or fiber or whisker. Their physical and mechanical properties can be tailored according to requirement. They are used in automobile aircraft and marine industries because of their increased corrosion resistance. In this study weight loss corrosion tests and Potestiodynamic polarization studies by using potestiostat are conducted on ZA-27 Red Mud metal matrix composites in different concentrated sodium chloride solutions. Both matrix and reinforcements are commercially available. Composites are prepared by liquid melt metallurgy technique using vortex method. Composites containing 2 4 and 6 percent of preheated but uncoated red mud are prepared. Cylindrical specimens and rectangular specimens are machined. Studies are carried out in 0.035 0.352 and 3.5 solutions of sodium chloride. In all the tests the composites were less prone to corrosion than the matrix. Hence the composites can be used in the marine environment.

  19. Microstructure characterization of laser-deposited titanium carbide and zirconium-based titanium metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ochonogor, OF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available . In this work, the technique is used to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) by using an elementally blended feedstock combining metal and ceramic powders in the melt pool, which melt and solidify to create the required morphology. Ti6Al4V + TiC MMCs were...

  20. Weld microstructure in cast AlSi9/SiC(p metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wysocki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded joint in cast AlSi9/SiC/20(p metal matrix composite by manual TIG arc welding using AlMg5 filler metal has been described inhis paper. Cooling curves have been stated, and the influence in distribution of reinforced particles on crystallization and weldmicrostructure. Welded joint mechanical properties have been determined: hardness and tensile.

  1. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    Macro- and micromechanics analysis were conducted to determine the matrix and fiber behaviors near the notch in a center-notched metal-matrix composite. In this approach, the macrolevel analysis models the entire notched specimen using a 3D finite element program that uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to simulate the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The microlevel behavior is analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model containing one fiber and the surrounding matrix. The viability of this analysis is demonstrated using results for a boron/aluminum monolayer.

  2. Investigations on LM6 Metal Matrix Composite with borosilicate Glass Reinforcement for Aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnaraj, J. David; Sathish, S.

    2017-10-01

    The recycling of glass wastes from the industries and society holds a threat to the environment and leads to the need for new applications. While producing a metal matrix composite production cost is an important factor which decides the suitable application. So, while developing a new material with this low - cost has great importance in this competitive world. In this study, an metal-matrix composite fabricated from an aluminum alloy (LM6) and Borosilicate glass powder particles with % addition of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10% were produced by liquid Processing (stir casting) technique. The variations in the mechanical properties like toughness, compressive strength, hardness, and tensile were examined. The microstructures of the fabricated metal matrix composite have been obtained by using Metallographic microscope. The addition of the borosilicate glass indicated an improved behavior in the hardness and toughness properties. The Rockwell hardness value of fabricated metal matrix composite increases with the increase in % of reinforcement. The compressive and tensile strength of the fabricated MMC increases until reinforcement reaches a maximum of 7.5%. The microstructure of the fabricated MMC shows that the reinforcements were homogeneously distributed in the fabricated metal matrix composite.

  3. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  4. Effects of ductile matrix failure in three dimensional analysis of metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Full three dimensional numerical cell model analyses are carried out for a metal reinforced by short fibers, to study the development of ductile matrix failure. A porous ductile material model is used to describe the effect of the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence. In each case studied...... a rounded vertex on the yield surface. The full three dimensional model is used to study effects of deviations from equal transverse tension in directions perpendicular to the fibers. (C) 1998 Acta Metallurgica Inc....

  5. A planar model study of creep in metal matrix composites with misaligned short fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N.J.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of fibre misalignment on the creep behaviour of metal matrix composites is modelled, including hardening behaviour (stage 1), dynamic recovery and steady state creep (stage 2) of the matrix material, using an internal variable constitutive model for the creep behaviour of the metal...... matrix. Numerical plane strain results in terms of average properties and detailed local deformation behaviour up to large strains are needed to show effects of fibre misalignment on the development of inelastic strains and the resulting over-all creep resistance of the material. The creep resistance...... for the composite is markedly reduced by the fibre misalignment and the time needed to reach an approximate steady state is elongated due to the strain induced rotation of the short fibres in the matrix....

  6. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Luo, Xiangwei [Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Niu, Jitai, E-mail: niujitai@163.com [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe-Ni-Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn-Cd-Ag-Cu) with a melting point of about 400 Degree-Sign C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)-Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al-SiC composite.

  7. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao; Luo, Xiangwei; Niu, Jitai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. ► The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. ► Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. ► Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. ► High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al–SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe–Ni–Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn–Cd–Ag–Cu) with a melting point of about 400 °C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)–Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al–SiC composite.

  8. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: klaira73@gmail.com; Altaf, Khurram, E-mail: khurram.altaf@petronas.com.my; Shirazi, Irfan, E-mail: irfanshirazi@hotmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  9. Finite element implementation and numerical issues of strain gradient plasticity with application to metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksson, Per; Gudmundson, Peter; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2009-01-01

    of quadrilateral type are examined and a few numerical issues are addressed related to these elements as well as to strain gradient plasticity theories in general. Numerical results are presented for an idealized cell model of a metal matrix composite under shear loading. It is shown that strengthening due...

  10. Thermomechanically induced residual strains in Al/SiCp metal-matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T.; Clarke, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Residual lattice strains in the aluminium and SiC phases of F3S.20S extruded A359 20% SiC metal-matrix composite were measured by using neutron diffi action at room and elevated temperatures to monitor the effects of in situ uniaxial plastic deformations. The results are interpreted with referenc...

  11. Sliding wear resistance of metal matrix composite layers prepared by high power laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, Vaclav; Matthews, D; de Hosson, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Two laser surface engineering techniques, Laser Cladding and Laser Melt Injection (LMI), were used to prepare three different metal matrix composite layers with a thickness of about 1 mm and approximately 25-30% volume fraction of ceramic particles. SiC/Al-8Si, WC/Ti-6Al-4V and TiB2/Ti-6Al-4V layers

  12. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  13. Multifunctional Metal Matrix Composite Filament Wound Tank Liners Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are used for storing pressurized gases on board spacecraft when mass saving is a key requirement. All future mass...

  14. Production of Decorative Cast Metal Matrix Composites with a Complex Relief and Nonmetal Reinforcement Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Spasova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is relevant to the research of possibilities for the production of decorative complex relief metal matrix composites (MMCs of the “invitro” type, with unformed and unchanging reinforcement (strengthening phase in the process of creating a composite. The research on the methods of metal matrix composites development in this paper has been brought to the application of different space vacuum schemes for composite synthesisof vacuuming the space for composites synthesis by using the notion of the “capillary forming”. In this method the metal matrix (copper alloy melt was infiltrated in the space between the pellets of reinforcement phase (quartz particles – SiO2, whereas the classical method adopted for the obtaining MMCs “in vitro”, uses a mechanism of forced insertion of the reinforcement phase into the ready for use melt, followed by homogenization of the composite structure. In the particular case, because the obtained composite will have a complex relief three-dimensional surface, the conditions for compacting the building phases in the three directions x, y, z should be virtually equalized. In order to accomplish the task set, a laboratory system is developed. The experiments were conducted with laboratory equipment elaborated on the base of another equipment for "capillary forming" with extra vacuum. The structures of the obtained MMCs were tested by metallographic analysis.

  15. On low cycle fatigue in metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Ø; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    A numerical cell model analysis is used to study the development of fatigue damage in aluminium reinforced by aligned, short SiC fibres. The material is subjected to cyclic loading with either stress control or strain control, and the matrix material is represented by a cyclic plasticity model......, in which continuum damage mechanics is incorporated to model fatigue damage evolution. This material model uses a superposition of kinematic and isotropic hardening, and is able to account for the Bauschinger effect as well as ratchetting, mean stress relaxation, and cyclic hardening or softening. The cell...... model represents a material with transversely staggered fibres. With focus on low cyclic fatigue, the effect of different fibre aspect ratios, different triaxial stress states, and balanced as well as unbalanced cyclic loading is studied....

  16. Microstructural characterisation of electrodeposited coatings of metal matrix composite with alumina nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indyka, P; Beltowska-Lehman, E; Bigos, A

    2012-01-01

    In the present work a nanocrystalline Ni-W metallic matrix was used to fabricate Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 composite coatings. The MMC (metal matrix composite) coatings with inert α-Al 2 O 3 particles (30 - 90 nm) were electrodeposited from aqueous electrolytes under direct current (DC) and controlled hydrodynamic conditions in a system with a rotating disk electrode (RDE). The chemical composition and microstructure of electrodeposited composites mainly control their functional properties; however, the particles must be uniformly dispersed to exhibit the dispersion-hardening effect. In order to increase the alumina particles incorporation as well as to promote the uniform distribution of the ceramic phase in a matrix, outer ultrasonic field was applied during electrodeposition. The influence of embedded alumina nanoparticles on structural characteristics (morphology, phase composition, residual stresses) of the resulting Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 coatings was investigated in order to obtain a nanocomposite with high hardness and relatively low residual stresses. Surface and cross-section morphology and the chemical composition of deposits was examined in the scanning electron microscope, the EDS technique was used. Microstructure and phase composition were determined by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Based on microstructural and micromechanical properties of the coatings, the optimum conditions for obtaining crack-free homogeneous Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 composite coatings have been determined.

  17. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  18. Effect of flyash particles with aluminium melt on the wear of aluminium metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin K. Sharma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the fabrication and tribological testing of an aluminium flyash composite. The metal matrix selected was aluminium and flyash contents in different percentages were reinforced in it to fabricate the required metal matrix composite (MMC. Stir casting method was used to fabricate the MMC with 2–4–6% weight of flyash contents in aluminium. Tribological analysis of the tribo pairs formed between the smooth surfaces of cast iron disc and smooth MMC pin has been considered and friction force and wear of the MMC were investigated by using a Pin-on-disc setup. It was observed that the MMC with 6% weight of flyash content in aluminium matrix results in less wear (0.32 g and 4% weight of flyash content gives the low coefficient of friction (0.12 between the tribopairs of cast iron surface and MMC surface.

  19. Microstructural evolution in WC-Co cermet reinforced - A17075 metal matrix composites by stir casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal Krishna, U. B.; Ranganatha, P.; Auradi, V.; Mahendra Kumar, S.; Vasudeva, B.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composites (AMMCs) are preferred because of their enhanced properties like high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and wear resistance. In the present work, an attempt is made to develop cermet (WC-Co) reinforced with Al7075 metal matrix composite by stir casting technique. WC-Co cermet is reduced to an average size of 10μm through ball milling using Alumina as grinding media. Ball milled WC-Co Cermet in an amount of 6 wt. % is used as reinforcement in Al7075 matrix. Microstructural characterization of the prepared composites is carried out using SEM/EDX and XRD studies. X-ray diffraction studies have revealed the peaks corresponding to α-Al, WC, Co and minor Al5W phases. SEM/EDX characterization revealed the uniform distribution of cermet in Al matrix. Further studies also revealed that, addition of WC-Co cermet to Al7075 matrix has resulted in improvement in hardness and Densities of Al7075 matrix.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of copper–alumina metal matrix composite by conventional and spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, K.; Ray, B.C.; Chaira, D.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The evolution of microstructure, density and hardness of Cu–Al 2 O 3 metal matrix composites with different techniques of sintering has been demonstrated here. The effect of sintering atmosphere has also been discussed. Synthesis of microcomposites was carried out by reinforcing 5, 10 and 15 vol.% of alumina powder particle (average size ∼5.71 μm) in copper matrix via conventional sintering using H 2 and N 2 atmospheres. Nanocomposites of 1, 5, 7 vol.% alumina (average size 2 O 3 metal matrix microcomposites and nanocomposites via conventional route and spark plasma sintering routes are studied and compared. Maximum Vickers hardness of 60 and 80 are obtained when the Cu–15 vol.% Al 2 O 3 is conventionally sintered in N 2 and H 2 atmosphere respectively. However, maximum hardness value of 125 is achieved for the Cu–5 vol.% Al 2 O 3 nanocomposite prepared by spark plasma sintering. It has been observed that Cu–Al 2 O 3 metal matrix composite (MMC) shows poor mechanical properties when it is conventionally sintered in N 2 atmosphere than H 2 atmosphere. Highlights: ► Better matrix–reinforcement interfacial bonding and compatibility in hydrogen atmosphere than nitrogen atmosphere. ► An improvement in density and hardness under hydrogen atmosphere than in nitrogen atmosphere is manifested. ► Spark plasma sintering method results in higher density and hardness values than conventional sintering. - Abstract: The evolution of microstructure, density and hardness of Cu–Al 2 O 3 metal matrix composites with different techniques of sintering have been demonstrated here. The effect of sintering atmosphere on the interfacial compatibility of matrix and reinforcement has also been discussed. Synthesis of microcomposites was carried out by reinforcing 5, 10 and 15 vol.% of alumina powder particles (average size ∼5.71 μm) in copper matrix via conventional sintering using N 2, H 2 and Ar atmospheres. Nanocomposites of 1, 5, 7 vol

  1. Engineering Interfaces in Metal Matrix Composites (Volume 3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-10

    metalographically polished in a Syntron vibratory polisher . These polished surfaces were then coated with SiC of near stoichiometric composition, using a plasma...stresses in annealed coatings on polished (100) silicon wafers cause 0delamination failure if the coating is thick enough to supply the strain energy...20).11(20),.II(20).11(20) Complex*16 BB(20.20). BcB (20,20).cBcB(20,20),cBB(20,20).Cposs Complex*16 X2(20),X21(20).12II(20),ZI Complex*16 Conl,Con2

  2. Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Studies of Fly Ash Reinforced AA-6351 Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uthayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash particles are potentially used in metal matrix composites due to their low cost, low density, and availability in large quantities as waste by-products in thermal power plants. This study describes multifactor-based experiments that were applied to research and investigation on dry sliding wear system of stir-cast aluminum alloy 6351 with 5, 10, and 15 wt.% fly ash reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs. The effects of parameters such as load, sliding speed, and percentage of fly ash on the sliding wear, specific wear rate, and friction coefficient were analyzed using Grey relational analysis on a pin-on-disc machine. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was also employed to investigate which design parameters significantly affect the wear behavior of the composite. The results showed that the applied load exerted the greatest effect on the dry sliding wear followed by the sliding velocity.

  3. Evaluation of mechanical properties of aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaya Ramnath, B.; Elanchezhian, C.; Jaivignesh, M.; Rajesh, S.; Parswajinan, C.; Siddique Ahmed Ghias, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of MMC with aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide is done. • Different proportions of reinforcements are added. • The effects of varying proportions are studied. • Investigation on mechanical properties above composites is performed. • Failure morphology analysis is done using SEM. - Abstract: This paper deals with the fabrication and mechanical investigation of aluminium alloy, alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and boron carbide metal matrix composites. Aluminium is the matrix metal having properties like light weight, high strength and ease of machinability. Alumina which has better wear resistance, high strength, hardness and boron carbide which has excellent hardness and fracture toughness are added as reinforcements. Here, the fabrication is done by stir casting which involves mixing the required quantities of additives into stirred molten aluminium. After solidification, the samples are prepared and tested to find the various mechanical properties like tensile, flexural, impact and hardness. The internal structure of the composite is observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

  4. Non-self-similar cracking in unidirectional metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, G.; Dharani, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental investigations on the fracture behavior of unidirectional Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) show the presence of extensive matrix damage and non-self-similar cracking of fibers near the notch tip. These failures are primarily observed in the interior layers of an MMC, presenting experimental difficulties in studying them. Hence an investigation of the matrix damage and fiber fracture near the notch tip is necessary to determine the stress concentration at the notch tip. The classical shear lag (CLSL) assumption has been used in the present study to investigate longitudinal matrix damage and nonself-similar cracking of fibers at the notch tip of an MMC. It is seen that non-self-similar cracking of fibers reduces the stress concentration at the notch tip considerably and the effect of matrix damage is negligible after a large number of fibers have broken beyond the notch tip in a non-self-similar manner. Finally, an effort has been made to include non-self-similar fiber fracture and matrix damage to model the fracture behavior of a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite for two different matrices viz. a 6061-0 fully annealed aluminum matrix and a heat treated 6061-T6 aluminum matrix. Results have been drawn for several characteristics pertaining to the shear stiffnesses and the shear yield stresses of the two matrices and compared with the available experimental results

  5. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  6. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic and metal matrix composites for NASA's HITEMP and enabling propulsion materials programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1992-01-01

    In a preliminary study, ultrasonic, x-ray opaque, and fluorescent dye penetrants techniques were used to evaluate and characterize ceramic and metal matrix composites. Techniques are highlighted for identifying porosity, fiber alignment, fiber uniformity, matrix cracks, fiber fractures, unbonds or disbonds between laminae, and fiber-to-matrix bond variations. The nondestructive evaluations (NDE) were performed during processing and after thermomechanical testing. Specific examples are given for Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber), FeCrAlY/Al2O3 fibers, Ti-15-3/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) materials, and Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) actively cooled panel components. Results of this study indicate that the choice of the NDE tools to be used can be optimized to yield a faithful and accurate evaluation of advanced composites.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite Processing by the Liquid Route: Literature Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Eric; Arvieu, Corinne; Mantaux, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    One of the technologies used to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs) is liquid route processing. One solution is to inject a liquid metal under pressure or at constant rate through a fibrous preform. This foundry technique overcomes the problem of the wettability of ceramic fibers by liquid metal. The liquid route can also be used to produce semiproducts by coating a filament with a molten metal. These processes involve physical phenomena combined with mass and heat transfer and phase change. The phase change phenomena related to solidification and also to the melting of the metal during the process notably result in modifications to the permeability of porous media, in gaps in impregnation, in the appearance of defects (porosities), and in segregation in the final product. In this article, we provide a state-of-the-art review of numerical models and simulation developed to study these physical phenomena involved in MMC processing by the liquid route.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite Processing by the Liquid Route: Literature Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Eric; Arvieu, Corinne; Mantaux, Olivier

    2018-04-01

    One of the technologies used to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs) is liquid route processing. One solution is to inject a liquid metal under pressure or at constant rate through a fibrous preform. This foundry technique overcomes the problem of the wettability of ceramic fibers by liquid metal. The liquid route can also be used to produce semiproducts by coating a filament with a molten metal. These processes involve physical phenomena combined with mass and heat transfer and phase change. The phase change phenomena related to solidification and also to the melting of the metal during the process notably result in modifications to the permeability of porous media, in gaps in impregnation, in the appearance of defects (porosities), and in segregation in the final product. In this article, we provide a state-of-the-art review of numerical models and simulation developed to study these physical phenomena involved in MMC processing by the liquid route.

  9. Critique of Macro Flow/Damage Surface Representations for Metal Matrix Composites Using Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidance for the formulation of robust, multiaxial, constitutive models for advanced materials is provided by addressing theoretical and experimental issues using micromechanics. The multiaxial response of metal matrix composites, depicted in terms of macro flow/damage surfaces, is predicted at room and elevated temperatures using an analytical micromechanical model that includes viscoplastic matrix response as well as fiber-matrix debonding. Macro flow/damage surfaces (i.e., debonding envelopes, matrix threshold surfaces, macro 'yield' surfaces, surfaces of constant inelastic strain rate, and surfaces of constant dissipation rate) are determined for silicon carbide/titanium in three stress spaces. Residual stresses are shown to offset the centers of the flow/damage surfaces from the origin and their shape is significantly altered by debonding. The results indicate which type of flow/damage surfaces should be characterized and what loadings applied to provide the most meaningful experimental data for guiding theoretical model development and verification.

  10. A possibility of using mechanical alloying for developing metal matrix composites with light-weight reinforcements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, Vladimir A.; Zhizhin, Konstantin Yu.; Malinina, Elena A.; Ketsko, Valery A.; Kuznetsov, Nikolay T.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of metal matrix composite (MMC) with light-weight reinforcements from 10 types of boron-hydrogen compounds was prepared using the method of mechanical alloying. The boron-hydrogen compounds had a decomposition temperature higher than 500 o C and a density of 1.3-2.5 g/cm 3 . The initial size of particles was 50-500 μm. Aluminum and copper were used as the matrix materials. The reinforcements were 20-40 vol. % of the MMC. Mechanical alloying followed by compaction can yield a good-quality bulk material of reduced density

  11. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J.-H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: j.h.you@ipp.mpg.de

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated.

  12. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, J.-H.

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated

  13. An Assessment of Mechanical and Tribological Property of Hybrid Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Santosh Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials has huge requirement in the area of automobile, aerospace, and wear resistant applications. This study presents the synthesis of composite reinforced with SiC and Al2O3 using gravity stir casting. Stir casting is the manufacturing process that is incorporated to produce the composite material because of its extreme bonding capacity with base material. The composition of reinforcement with 6061 aluminium matrix is SiC-7.5% and Al2O3 -2.5% respectively. The average size of reinforcement particle is 30-40 microns. The synthesised composite casting is machined using EDM to prepare specimens for various tests. Microstructure study was carried and the microstructure images prove the existence and dispersion of reinforcement particles in the metal matrix. There is no visible porosity is observed. The hardness of the specimen is tested using Vickers hardness tester and found considerable increase when compare with parent alloy Al 6061. Also mechanical and tribological properties of hybrid Aluminium metal matrix composite were employed. The fortifying material, Silicon Carbide is composed of tetrahedral of carbon and silicon atoms with strong bonds in crystal lattice along with its excellent wear resistance property and alumina have high strength and wear resistance. To avoid enormous material wastage and to achieve absolute accuracy, wire-cut EDM process is capitalised to engrave the specimen as per required dimensions. Three Tensile test specimens were prepared, in order to achieve reliability in results as per ASTM- E8 standard, and the values were tabulated. Impact test was carried out and the readings were tabulated. Wear test was carried out using pin on disc wear test apparatus and the results show considerable increase in wear resistant property when compare with parent alloy Al6061.The above work proves the successful fabrication of composite and evaluation of properties.

  14. Development, characterization and machining of Al and SiCp nano particles metal matrix nano composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Pradyut Kumar; Sahool, Ashok Kumar; Das, Ratnakar; Padhi, Payodhar

    2018-02-01

    The present study has been developed to ensure proper mixing of SiCp nano particle with powder of aluminum metal matrix. Different wt fraction of SiCp 1, 1.5 and 2% samples were prepared for characterization of nano composite material. The paper deals with the influence of different machining parameters at different wt fraction of SiCp in aluminum metal matrix. It was also observed that the cutting forces are affected by dry turning machining operation. As result, high cutting forces were required for machining of high percentage of SiCp nano particles. The study also deals with the dispersion of nano particle and segregation of the particles near the grain boundaries due to grain growth.

  15. Influence of cold rolling and fatigue on the residual stress state of a metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanus, E.; Ericsson, T.; Lu, J.; Decomps, F.

    1993-01-01

    The large difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the matrix alloy and the particle in a metal matrix composite gives rise to residual stresses in the material. In the present work the effect of cold rolling and four-point bending fatigue on the residual stress state of a silicon carbide particle reinforced aluminium alloy (AA 2014) has been investigated. The three dimensional stress state measured in both phases: matrix and reinforcement, has been determined by using an X-ray diffraction technique. It was found that cold rolling induces surface compressive macrostresses of about -250 MPa, with a penetration depth around 2 mm. The absolute values of the pseudomacrostresses in both phases are significantly reduced due to the single track rolling. Stress relaxation occurs during four-point bending fatigue. (orig.)

  16. Interfacial reaction in cast WC particulate reinforced titanium metal matrix composites coating produced by laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dejian; Hu, Peipei; Min, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Laser injection of ceramic particle was conducted to produce particulate reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Cast WC particle (WCp) was used as injection reinforcement to avoid excessive release of carbon atoms into the melt pool. The interfaces and boundaries between WC and Ti matrix were investigated by electron microscopy study. Compared with single crystal WCp, cast WCp was an appropriate solution to control the reaction products (TiC) in the matrix and the total amount of reaction products was significantly reduced. Irregular-shape reaction layers were formed around cast WCp. The reaction layers consist of a W2C layer and a mixed layer of W and TiC. Such reaction layers are effective in load transfer under an external load.

  17. Preparation of Al-based metal matrix composites reinforced by Cu coated SiC particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hailong; Zhang Rui; Xu Hongliang; Lu Hongxia; Guan Shaokang [Coll. of Materials Engineering, Zhengzhou Univ., HEN (China)

    2005-07-01

    In order to improve the interfacial behavior between SiC and Al, a surface layer of Cu was coated on SiC particles. The influence of pH value on the coating process was analyzed. A powder metallurgy method was used to prepare the Al-based metal matrix composites (MMCs). SEM, XRD techniques were used to characterize the sintered compacts. It was found that the optimized pH value during the coating process was 1{proportional_to}2. The specimen showed the maximum density when sintered at 750 C. Inter-metallic compound of Al{sub 3.21}Si{sub 0.47} was detected which contributed to the enhancement at the interface between SiC and Al. The hardness of the composites is improved to 90 MPa. (orig.)

  18. Synthesis of new metal-matrix Al-Al2O3-graphene composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshina, L. A.; Muradymov, R. V.; Kvashnichev, A. G.; Vichuzhanin, D. I.; Molchanova, N. G.; Pankratov, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism of formation of ceramic microparticles (alumina) and graphene in a molten aluminum matrix is studied as a function of the morphology and type of precursor particles, the temperature, and the gas atmosphere. The influence of the composition of an aluminum composite material (as a function of the concentration and size of reinforcing particles) on its mechanical and corrosion properties, melting temperature, and thermal conductivity is investigated. Hybrid metallic Al-Al2O3-graphene composite materials with up to 10 wt % alumina microparticles and 0.2 wt % graphene films, which are uniformly distributed over the metal volume and are fully wetted with aluminum, are synthesized during the chemical interaction of a salt solution containing yttria and boron carbide with molten aluminum in air. Simultaneous introduction of alumina and graphene into an aluminum matrix makes it possible to produce hybrid metallic composite materials having a unique combination of the following properties: their thermal conductivity is higher than that of aluminum, their hardness and strength are increased by two times, their relative elongation during tension is increased threefold, and their corrosion resistance is higher than that of initial aluminum by a factor of 2.5-4. We are the first to synthesize an in situ hybrid Al-Al2O3-graphene composite material having a unique combination of some characteristics. This material can be recommended as a promising material for a wide circle of electrical applications, including ultrathin wires, and as a structural material for the aerospace industry, the car industry, and the shipbuilding industry.

  19. Damage and failure behavior of metal matrix composites under biaxial loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Steven Wayne

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are being considered for increased use in structures that require the ductility and damage tolerance of the metal matrix and the enhanced strength and creep resistance at elevated temperatures of high performance fibers. Particularly promising for advanced aerospace engines and airframes are SiC fiber/titanium matrix composites (TMCs). A large program was undertaken in the Air Force to characterize the deformation and failure behaviors of TMCs and to develop computational models that can be used for component design. The effort reported here focused on a SiC SCS-6/Timetal 21S composite under biaxial loading conditions. Biaxial loading conditions are important because multiaxial stresses have been shown to influence the strength and ductility of engineering materials and, in general, structural components are subjected to multiaxial loads. The TMC material response, including stress-strain curves and failure surfaces, was measured using a combination of off-axis uniaxial tension and compression tests and biaxial cruciform tests. The off-axis tests produce combinations of in-plane tension, compression, and shear stresses, the mix of which are controlled by the relative angle between the fiber and specimen axes. The biaxial cruciform tests allowed independent control over the tensile or compressive loads in the fiber and transverse directions. The results of these characterization tests were used to develop a microstructural constitutive model and failure criteria. The basis of the micromechanical constitutive model is a representative unit volume of the MMC with a periodic array of fibers. The representative unit volume is divided into a fiber and three matrix cells for which the microstructural equilibrium and compatibility equations can be analyzed. The resulting constitutive model and associated failure criteria can be used to predict the material behavior under general loading conditions.

  20. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  1. Experimental research on the penetration of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullet into steel target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. W.; Chen, G.

    2012-08-01

    In the present paper, the penetration experiments of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullets into 45# steel targets are conducted by employing H25 artillery. In which, an experimental technique of sub-caliber penetration is constructed. The quasi static and dynamic behaviours of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are also experimental investigated. The self-sharpening phenomenon of composite material is observed. Integrated with metallographic analysis, the failure modes of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are identified systemically and compared with the quasi-static and dynamic material tests. It includes four failure modes, i.e., shear fracture of tungsten fiber, brittle fracture of tungsten fiber and shear fracture of metallic glass matrix as well as melting of tungsten fiber and metallic glass matrix. Comparatively, three failure mechanisms of tungsten fiber in the bullet nose are also identified, i.e., shear fracture, splitting fracture and bending or/and buckling. Finally, the mechanism of self-sharpening behaviour of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material is discussed.

  2. Experimental research on the penetration of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullet into steel target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen X.W.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the penetration experiments of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullets into 45# steel targets are conducted by employing H25 artillery. In which, an experimental technique of sub-caliber penetration is constructed. The quasi static and dynamic behaviours of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are also experimental investigated. The self-sharpening phenomenon of composite material is observed. Integrated with metallographic analysis, the failure modes of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are identified systemically and compared with the quasi-static and dynamic material tests. It includes four failure modes, i.e., shear fracture of tungsten fiber, brittle fracture of tungsten fiber and shear fracture of metallic glass matrix as well as melting of tungsten fiber and metallic glass matrix. Comparatively, three failure mechanisms of tungsten fiber in the bullet nose are also identified, i.e., shear fracture, splitting fracture and bending or/and buckling. Finally, the mechanism of self-sharpening behaviour of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material is discussed.

  3. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, L Francis; Suresh, Paramasivam

    2016-01-01

    With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate.

  4. Development of new metal matrix composite electrodes for electrical discharge machining through powder metallurgy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mathalai Sundaram

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining (EDM is one of the widely used nontraditional machining methods to produce die cavities by the erosive effect of electrical discharges. This method is popular due to the fact that a relatively soft electrically conductive tool electrode can machine hard work piece. Copper electrode is normally used for machining process. Electrode wear rate is the major drawback for EDM researchers. This research focus on fabrication of metal matrix composite (MMC electrode by mixing copper powder with titanium carbide (TiC and Tungsten carbide (WC powder through powder metallurgy process, Copper powder is the major amount of mixing proportion with TiC and WC. However, this paper focus on the early stage of the project where powder metallurgy route was used to determine suitable mixing time, compaction pressure and sintering and compacting process in producing EDM electrode. The newly prepared composite electrodes in different composition are tested in EDM for OHNS steel.

  5. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Francis Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate.

  6. Micromechanical modeling of tungsten-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hao [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Li Ke [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, TAMU 3123, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)]. E-mail: keli@tamu.edu; Subhash, Ghatu [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Kecskes, Laszlo J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Dowding, Robert J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Micromechanics models are developed for tungsten (W)-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) matrix composites employing the Voronoi tessellation technique and the finite element (FE) method. The simulation results indicate that the computed elastic moduli are close to those measured in the experiments. The predicted stress-strain curves agree well with their experimentally obtained counterparts in the early stage of the plastic deformation. An increase in the W volume fraction leads to a decrease in the yield stress and an increase in the Young's modulus of the composite. In addition, contours of equivalent plastic strain for increasing applied strains provide an explanation why shear bands were observed in the glassy phase, along the W/BMG interface, and in the W phase of failed W/BMG composite specimens.

  7. Evolution of the internal friction in SIC particle reinforced 8090 Al-Li metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Urrutia, I.; Gallego, I.; No, M. L.; San Juan, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The present study has been undertaken to investigate the mechanisms of thermal stress relief at the range of temperatures below room temperature for the metal matrix composite Al-Li 8090/SiC. For this aim the experimental technique of internal friction has been used which has been showed up very effective. Several thermal cycles from 453 K to 100 K were used in order to measures the internal friction as well as the elastic modules of the material concluding that thermal stresses are relaxed by microplastic deformation around the reinforcements. It has been also related the variation in the elastic modules with the different levels of precipitation. (Author) 18 refs

  8. Machining parameters optimization during machining of Al/5 wt% alumina metal matrix composite by fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Arindam; Patil, Pravin

    2017-06-01

    This experimental work presents the study of machining parameters of Ytterbium fiber laser during machining of 5 mm thick Aluminium/5wt%Alumina-MMC (Metal Matrix Composite). Response surface methodology (RSM) is used to achieve the optimization i.e. minimize hole tapering and maximize Material Removal Rate (MRR). A mathematical model has been developed and ANOVA has been done for correlating the interactive and higher-order influences of Ytterbium fiber laser machining parameters (laser power, modulation frequency, gas pressure, wait time, pulse width) on Material Removal Rate (MRR) and hole tapering during machining process.

  9. Investigation of metal-matrix composite containing liquid-phase dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strunz, Pavel; Mukherji, D.; Gilles, R.; Geue, T.; Rösler, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 340, 012098 (2012), s. 1-15 ISSN 1742-6588. [5th European Conference on Neutron Scattering. Praha, 17.07.2011-21.07.2011] R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/378 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) RII3-CT-2003-505925 Program:FP6 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : metal-matrix composite * liquid- phase dispersion * strengthening * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/340/1/012098

  10. Effect of Metallic Additives to Polymer Matrix on Properties of Composite Adhesives Dedicated for Light Metal Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamala A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The most recent and promising trends in development of renewable sources of energy are Combined Heat and Power (CHP systems. The newest solutions from this field are hybrid compact solar panels. The correct operation of both systems, i.e. the photovoltaic panel and the heat exchanger requires an effective connection between the two. The adhesives utilized to interconnect above elements should provide a stable and hermetic joint able to withstand mechanical and thermal impacts of the surrounding environment factors. The paper presents the research results over the impact of the type and the amount of reinforcing phase on the physical and mechanical properties of epoxy resin matrix composites reinforced with particles of non-ferrous metals (Ag, Cu, W, Al, dedicated as adhesives for connections between photovoltaic panels and heat exchangers. Based on the experimental findings the usefulness of classical analytic models for valuation of polymer-metal composites properties was validated.

  11. Fabrication and Tribological Behavior of Stir Cast Mg/B4C Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep; Bala, Niraj

    2017-10-01

    Magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) have emerged as good alternative material to conventional materials due to their promising advanced properties. In the present work, magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) reinforced with B4C particles were successfully fabricated by cost-effective conventional stir casting technique. MMMCs with an average particle size of 63 µm and different weight percent (wt pct) of B4C between 3 and 12 were fabricated. Wear tests were carried out using a pin-on-disk against a steel disk under dry sliding condition at loads that varied between 1 and 5 kg at fixed sliding velocity of 1 m/s. The wear data clearly showed that wear resistance of cast composites is better than that of unreinforced magnesium, which is attributed to dispersion hardening caused by carbide particles. An increase in wt pct of B4C showed the wear resistance and hardness to increase significantly. The wear rate and coefficient of friction increased with an increase in applied load. The SEM and EDS analysis of the worn surfaces delineated the dominant wear mechanisms to be abrasion, adhesion, and oxidation under the different sliding conditions. At lower loads, the wear mechanism transformed from severe abrasive wear in pure magnesium (Mg) to mild abrasion, slight delamination, and oxidation in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composite. At higher loads, severe abrasion, adhesion, delamination, and oxidation were found to be the major wear mechanisms in pure Mg, whereas in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composites the corresponding mechanisms were mild abrasion, mild adhesion, slight delamination, and oxidation.

  12. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beristain, J.; Gonzalo, O.; Sanda, A.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC) with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD) and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD). The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 {mu}m. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE) and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool. (Author)

  13. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beristain, J.; Gonzalo, O.; Sanda, A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC) with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD) and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD). The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 μm. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE) and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool. (Author)

  14. A study of the diffusional behavior of a two-phase metal matrix composite exposed to a high temperature environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The progress of diffusion-controlled filament-matrix interaction in a metal matrix composite where the filaments and matrix comprise a two-phase binary alloy system was studied by mathematically modeling compositional changes resulting from prolonged elevated temperature exposure. The analysis treats a finite, diffusion-controlled, two-phase moving-interface problem by means of a variable-grid finite-difference technique. The Ni-W system was selected as an example system. Modeling was carried out for the 1000 to 1200 C temperature range for unidirectional composites containing from 6 to 40 volume percent tungsten filaments in a Ni matrix. The results are displayed to show both the change in filament diameter and matrix composition as a function of exposure time. Compositional profiles produced between first and second nearest neighbor filaments were calculated by superposition of finite-difference solutions of the diffusion equations.

  15. Investigation of the microcrack evolution in a Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and evolution behavior of the shear-bands and microcracks in a Ti-based metallic-glass–matrix composite (MGMC were investigated by using an in-situ tensile test under transmission electron microscopy (TEM. It was found that the plastic deformation of the Ti-based MGMC related with the generation of the plastic deformation zone in crystalline and shear deformation zone in glass phase near the crack tip. The dendrites can suppress the propagation of the shear band effectively. Before the rapid propagation of cracks, the extending of plastic deformation zone and shear deformation zone ahead of crack tip is the main pattern in the composite.

  16. Method and apparatus for fabricating a composite structure consisting of a filamentary material in a metal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, J.G.; Anderson, R.C.

    1975-10-21

    A method and apparatus are provided for preparing a composite structure consisting of filamentary material within a metal matrix. The method is practiced by the steps of confining the metal for forming the matrix in a first chamber, heating the confined metal to a temperature adequate to effect melting thereof, introducing a stream of inert gas into the chamber for pressurizing the atmosphere in the chamber to a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure, confining the filamentary material in a second chamber, heating the confined filamentary material to a temperature less than the melting temperature of the metal, evacuating the second chamber to provide an atmosphere therein at a pressure, placing the second chamber in registry with the first chamber to provide for the forced flow of the molten metal into the second chamber to effect infiltration of the filamentary material with the molten metal, and thereafter cooling the metal infiltrated-filamentary material to form said composite structure.

  17. Machinability and Tribological Properties of Stir Cast LM6/SiC/GR Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahat Montasser S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis on machining characteristics in turning of LM6/SiC/Gr hybrid metal matrix composites is made of (Al-11.8%Si/SiC/Gr hybrid metal matrix composites. The process performances such as porosity, wear rate of the composites, tool wear, tool life, specific modulus, surface roughness and material removal rate with equal weight fraction of SiC and Gr particulates of 3%, 7%, 10% and 13% reinforcement are investigated. This experimental analysis and test results on the machinability of Al/SiCMMC will provide essential guidelines to the manufacturers. Hybird metal matrix composites reinforced with graphite particles posses better machinability and tribological properties.

  18. Fabrication process optimization for improved mechanical properties of Al 7075/SiCp metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti Kanta Das

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Two sets of nine different silicon carbide particulate (SiCp reinforced Al 7075 Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs were fabricated using liquid metallurgy stir casting process. Mean particle size and weight percentage of the reinforcement were varied according to Taguchi L9 Design of Experiments (DOE. One set of the cast composites were then heat treated to T6 condition. Optical micrographs of the MMCs reveal consistent dispersion of reinforcements in the matrix phase. Mechanical properties were determined for both as-cast and heat treated MMCs for comparison of the experimental results. Linear regression models were developed for mechanical properties of the heat treated MMCs using list square method of regression analysis. The fabrication process parameters were then optimized using Taguchi based grey relational analysis for the multiple mechanical properties of the heat treated MMCs. The largest value of mean grey relational grade was obtained for the composite with mean particle size 6.18 µm and 25 weight % of reinforcement. The optimal combination of process parameters were then verified through confirmation experiments, which resulted 42% of improvement in the grey relational grade. Finally, the percentage of contribution of each process parameter on the multiple performance characteristics was calculated through Analysis of Variance (ANOVA.

  19. Twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) and work hardening in Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Qiao, J W; Wang, Z H; Rao, W; Kang, G Z

    2017-05-12

    The present study demonstrates that Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a normal composition of Ti 43 Zr 32 Ni 6 Ta 5 Be 14 containing ductile dendrites dispersed in the glass matrix has been developed, and deformation mechanisms about the tensile property have been investigated by focusing on twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) effect. The Ti-based MGMC has excellent tensile properties and pronounced tensile work-hardening capacity, with a yield strength of 1100 MPa and homogeneous elongation of 4%. The distinguished strain hardening is ascribed to the formation of deformation twinning within the dendrites. Twinning generated in the dendrites works as an obstacle for the rapid propagation of shear bands, and then, the localized necking is avoided, which ensures the ductility of such kinds of composites. Besides, a finite-element model (FEM) has been established to explain the TWIP effect which brings out a work-hardening behavior in the present MGMC instead of a localized strain concentration. According to the plasticity theory of traditional crystal materials and some new alloys, TWIP effect is mainly controlled by stacking fault energy (SFE), which has been analyzed intensively in the present MGMC.

  20. Cu-TiB metal matrix composites prepared by powder metallurgy route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium boride (TiB is characterized by good conductivity, high strength and high melting point. In this work, TiB was used to make Cu-TiB metal matrix composites (MMCs. Amounts of TiB added into Cu matrix were 2wt.%, 5wt.%, 10 wt.% and 15 wt.%. The samples were pressed at pressures of 500MPa, 600MPa, 700MPa and 800MPa and sintered at 820o and 920o, respectively. The properties of the sintered composites such as hardness and impact toughness were studied. Hardness and impact toughness of samples increased with increasing pressures and decreased with increasing contents of TiB. Composite with good mechanical properties and high conductivity was obtained from the sample containing 2wt.%TiB compacted at 800MPa and sintered at 920o. It was shown that 2wt.% TiB is a suitable content to make Cu-TiB MMCs with good mechanical properties and excellent conductivity.

  1. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  2. Corrosion and Erosion-Corrosion Processes of Metal-Matrix Composites in Slurry Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. F.; Neville, A.; Kapur, N.; Gnanavelu, A.

    2012-03-01

    The corrosion and erosion-corrosion (EC) processes of four metal-matrix composites (MMCs) in a simulated cooling water environment have been assessed in this article. The MMCs consisted of two Ni-base and two Fe-base matrices alloyed with different concentrations of chromium, molybdenum, boron, silicon, and carbon; the matrices were reinforced with tungsten carbide (WC) particles. The corrosion behavior has been investigated using a combination of potentiostatic polarization and post-tests surface analysis. The EC processes were studied by in situ electrochemical techniques measuring the current density and corrosion potential response at different slurry temperatures and sand content. At static conditions it was found that as the temperature increased, there was a transition from a homogeneous corrosion of the matrix to an interfacial corrosion mechanism. The Ni-base MMCs showed a better corrosion resistance and interestingly a highly alloyed matrix did not significantly improved MMC's corrosion resistance. In the in situ EC tests, the Fe-base MMCs showed a constant increase in the current density at all sand contents. Whereas, significant changes were not observed in the Ni-base MMCs below 0.5 g/L. Although sand content had an effect on the monitored current density (the current increased as the sand content increased) this effect was less pronounced above 3 g/L.

  3. Macro-mechanical material model for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    CERN Document Server

    Banks-Sills, L

    1999-01-01

    The stress-strain behavior of a metal matrix composite reinforced with unidirectional, continuous and periodic fibers is investigated. Three-dimensional micro-mechanical analyses of a unit cell by means of the finite element method $9 and homogenization-localization are carried out. These calculations allow the determination of material behavior of the in-plane, as well as the fiber directions. The fibers are assumed to be elastic and the matrix elasto-plastic. $9 The matrix material is governed by a von Mises yield surface, isotropic hardening and an associated flow rule. With the aid of these analyses, the foundation to a macro-mechanical material model is presented which is employed to $9 consider an elementary problem. The model includes an anisotropic yield surface with isotropic hardening and an associated flow rule. A beam in bending containing square fibers under plane strain conditions is analyzed by means of $9 the model. Two cases are considered: one in which the fibers are symmetric with respect t...

  4. The Process of Nanostructuring of Metal (Iron Matrix in Composite Materials for Directional Control of the Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zemtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1 preparation of porous metal matrix; (2 surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3 pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1–50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type “frame in the frame” that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology.

  5. Dry Sliding Wear behaviour of Aluminium-Red mud- Tungsten Carbide Hybrid metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi Chinta, Neelima; Selvaraj, N.; Mahesh, V.

    2016-09-01

    Red mud is an industrial waste obtained during the processing of alumina by Bayer's process. An attempt has been made to utilize the solid waste by using it as the reinforcement material in metal matrix composites. Red mud received from NALCO has been subjected for sieve analysis and milled to 42 nanometers using high energy ball mill. Red mud is used as a reinforcement material in Pure Aluminium matrix composite at 2%, 4%, and 6% weight at 100 microns level as well as 42 nano meters along with 4%Tungsten carbide by weight. Micro and Nano structured red mud powders, Tungsten carbide powder and Aluminium is mixed in a V-Blender, compacted at a pressure of 40 bar and samples are prepared by conventional sintering with vacuum as medium. In this current work, dry sliding wear characteristics at normal and heat treatment conditions are investigated with optimal combination of Aluminium, Tungsten carbide and different weight fractions of micro and nano structured red mud powder.

  6. Improved Mechanical and Tribological Properties of Metal-Matrix Composites Dispersion-Strengthened by Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii Levashov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Co- and Fe-based alloys produced by powder technology are being widely used as a matrix for diamond-containing composites in cutting, drilling, grinding pplications, etc. The severe service conditions demand that the mechanical and tribological properties of these alloys be improved. Development of metal-matrix composites (MMCs and alloys reinforced with nanoparticles is a promising way to resolve this problem. In this work, we have investigated the effect of nano-sized WC, ZrO2, Al2O3, and Si3N4 additives on the properties of sintered dispersion-strengthened Co- and Fe-based MMCs. The results show an increase in the hardness (up to 10 HRB, bending strength (up to 50%, wear resistance (by a factor of 2–10 and a decrease in the friction coefficient (up to 4-fold of the dispersion-strengthened materials. The use of designed alloys as a binder of cutting diamond tools gave a 4-fold increment in the service life, without reduction in their cutting speed.

  7. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. G.; Hubbard, C. R.; Misture, S. T.; Wang, X. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  8. Fabrication of metal matrix composite by semi-solid powder processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yufeng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Various metal matrix composites (MMCs) are widely used in the automotive, aerospace and electrical industries due to their capability and flexibility in improving the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of a component. However, current manufacturing technologies may suffer from insufficient process stability and reliability and inadequate economic efficiency and may not be able to satisfy the increasing demands placed on MMCs. Semi-solid powder processing (SPP), a technology that combines traditional powder metallurgy and semi-solid forming methods, has potential to produce MMCs with low cost and high efficiency. In this work, the analytical study and experimental investigation of SPP on the fabrication of MMCs were explored. An analytical model was developed to understand the deformation mechanism of the powder compact in the semi-solid state. The densification behavior of the Al6061 and SiC powder mixtures was investigated with different liquid fractions and SiC volume fractions. The limits of SPP were analyzed in terms of reinforcement phase loading and its impact on the composite microstructure. To explore adoption of new materials, carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated as a reinforcing material in aluminum matrix using SPP. The process was successfully modeled for the mono-phase powder (Al6061) compaction and the density and density distribution were predicted. The deformation mechanism at low and high liquid fractions was discussed. In addition, the compaction behavior of the ceramic-metal powder mixture was understood, and the SiC loading limit was identified by parametric study. For the fabrication of CNT reinforced Al6061 composite, the mechanical alloying of Al6061-CNT powders was first investigated. A mathematical model was developed to predict the CNT length change during the mechanical alloying process. The effects of mechanical alloying time and processing temperature during SPP were studied on the mechanical, microstructural and

  9. Obtainment, machining and wear of metal matrix composites processed by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Edilson Rosa Barbosa de.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was the obtainment of metal matrix composites (MMC) by the route of powder metallurgy, and the valuation of these materials with relation to their machining and wear characteristics. Firstly, were obtained pure commercial aluminium matrix composites materials, with 5, 10 and 15% volumetric fraction of silicon carbide particles. Was also obtained a material without reinforcement particles in order to verify by comparison, the influence of addition of reinforcement particles. The obtained materials were characterized physics (hydrostatic density), mechanics (hardness and tensile tests) and microstructurally (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). The results showed a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement particles in the composite, and improvement in the mechanical properties, mainly tensile strength (UTS) in comparison to the unreinforced material. After, tests were made to verify the materials behavior during machining and to check the performance of several tool materials (cemented carbide, ceramics and polycrystalline diamond). In these tests, values of the cutting force were measured by instrumented tool-holders. Phenomena such as tool wear, built-up edge formation and mechanism of chip formation were also observed and evaluated. The results from the cemented carbide tool tests, were utilised for the machinability index determination of each material. These results were applied to the Taylor equation and the equation constants for each material and test conditions were determined. The results showed that the inclusion of silicon carbide particles made extremely difficult the machining of the composites, and only with diamond tool, satisfactory results were obtained. At last, wear tests were performed to verify the influence of the reinforcement particles in the characteristics of wear resistance of the materials. The results obtained were utilized in the wear coefficient determination for each material. The

  10. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  11. On the homogenization of metal matrix composites using strain gradient plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2014-01-01

    The homogenized response of metal matrix composites (MMC) is studied using strain gradient plasticity. The material model employed is a rate independent formulation of energetic strain gradient plasticity at the micro scale and conventional rate independent plasticity at the macro scale. Free...... condition. Micro-macro homogenization is performed observing the Hill-Mandel energy condition, and overall loading is considered such that the homogenized higher order terms vanish. The results highlight the intrinsic size-effects as well as the effect of fiber volume fraction on the overall response curves...... energy inside the micro structure is included due to the elastic strains and plastic strain gradients. A unit cell containing a circular elastic fiber is analyzed under macroscopic simple shear in addition to transverse and longitudinal loading. The analyses are carried out under generalized plane strain...

  12. Design, analysis, and testing of a metal matrix composite web/flange intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, S. B.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Moran, S. G.; Olliffe, R.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and analytical program to study the local design details of a typical T-shaped web/flange intersection made from a metal matrix composite is described. Loads creating flange bending were applied to specimens having different designs and boundary conditions. Finite element analyses were conducted on models of the test specimens to predict the structural response. The analyses correctly predict failure load, mode, and location in the fillet material in the intersection region of the web and the flange when specimen quality is good. The test program shows the importance of fabrication quality in the intersection region. The full-scale test program that led to the investigation of this local detail is also described.

  13. Comparison of various tool wear prediction methods during end milling of metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiciak, Martyna; Twardowski, Paweł; Wojciechowski, Szymon

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the problem of tool wear prediction during milling of hard-to-cut metal matrix composite Duralcan™ was presented. The conducted research involved the measurements of acceleration of vibrations during milling with constant cutting conditions, and evaluation of the flank wear. Subsequently, the analysis of vibrations in time and frequency domain, as well as the correlation of the obtained measures with the tool wear values were conducted. The validation of tool wear diagnosis in relation to selected diagnostic measures was carried out with the use of one variable and two variables regression models, as well as with the application of artificial neural networks (ANN). The comparative analysis of the obtained results enable.

  14. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  15. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  16. Creep-fatigue behaviour of aluminum alloy-based metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbera, Daniele; Chen, Haofeng; Liu, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) represents a valuable option as structural material for different type of structures and components. Despite this they struggle to become widely adopted due to expensive manufacturing process and complex microstructural behaviour. When subjected to cyclic load conditions the structural response of MMC is not trivial, and becomes even more difficult when high temperature load is involved. Different failure mechanisms would happen and they are originated by the different material properties between the fibre and surrounding matrix. Among all, the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficient is recognized to be the dominant one. The significantly differing coefficients of thermal expansion between ceramic and metal give rise to micro thermal stresses, which enhance the initiation of matrix micro cracks. Their performance under varying load and high temperature is complex, and hence it is difficult to have a clear understanding of the structural responses, especially when fatigue and creep damages become the main failures of MMCs. To improve current understanding of the relationship between creep fatigue interaction of MMCs, the history of thermal and mechanical loading, and the creep dwell period, a highly accurate but robust direct simulation technique on the basis of the Linear Matching Method (LMM) framework has been proposed in this paper, and been applied to model the fatigue and creep behaviour of MMCs. A homogenised FE model is considered in all analyses, which consist of continuous silicon carbide fibres embedded in a square 2024T3 aluminium alloy matrix array. Various factors that affect creep and fatigue behaviours of composites are analysed and discussed, including effects of the applied load level, dwell period and temperature on the MMC's performance. The effects of reversed plasticity on stress relaxation and creep deformation of MMC are investigated, and the behaviours of cyclically enhanced creep and elastic follow-up are

  17. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT- reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and facture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  18. Investigation of abrasion in Al–MgO metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muharr em Pul; Çalin, Recep; Gül, Ferhat

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of reinforcement volume fractions on abrasive wear behavior were examined in Al–MgO reinforced metal matrix composites of 5%, 10% and 15% reinforcement – volume ratios produced by melt-stirring. Abrasive wear tests were carried out by 60, 80 and 100 mesh sized Al 2 O 3 abrasive papers and pin-on-disc wear test apparatus under 10, 20 and 30 N loads at 0.2 m/s sliding speed. The mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture strength were determined. Subsequent to the wear tests, the microstructures of worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope analyses. While increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite resulted increased hardness, fracture strength was determined to decrease. Additionally, it was found that increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite was accompanied with increased wear loss and porosity as well as reinforcement – volume ratio was identified to be significant determinants of abrasive wear behavior

  19. Hardfacing of aluminium alloys by means of metal matrix composites produced by laser surface alloying

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pityana, SL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available consisted of the hard particles uniformly distributed in the host metal matrix. A strong bond between the particles and matrix was formed in the modified layer. A Rofin Nd: YAG laser was used for injecting the ceramic powder into the substrate...

  20. Improvement of Tribological Properties of Metal Matrix Composites by Means of Slide Burnishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr BEDNARSKI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Burnishing of metal surfaces can affect positively tribological and mechanical properties such as fatigue strength, wear resistance, contact stiffness and bearing capacity. Burnishing affects the entire surface topography, including surface roughness, radii of curvature of peaks and valleys, slope angles and more. We have studied A1Mg1SiCu (6xxx series aluminum matrix composites with a reinforcing phase of Al2O3 which exhibits good workability but poor machinability. The second series studied was based on an AlSi alloy (A-390 reinforced with SiC – this one characterized by poor workability but good machinability. Materials have been prepared by mixing metal powders with the reinforcement, cold pressing, sintering, hot extrusion and heat treatment. We have determined surface roughness with a Hommel tester; the arithmetical mean for A1Mg1SiCu (A6061 + Al2O3 was ~1 µm before burnishing and ~0.15 mm after burnishing. We have also determined the bearing capacity at 50 % with the same tester: before burnishing 2.30 µm and 0.47 µm afterwards for A6061 + Al2O3; before 2.30 µm, afterwards 0.37 µm for A390 + SiC. Vickers microhardness at the surface with respect to the core increases 30 % for the Al2O3 containing composite and 50 % for the SiC containing composite.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.2404

  1. Metal Matrix Superconductor Composites for Flight-Weight Microwave Lightcraft Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, Dan A.; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2008-01-01

    Flight-weight superconducting magnets are designed for a 20-m diameter MicroWave LightCraft (MWLC). The twin coil unit with storage capacity of 900 MJ, is made of structural carbon fiber filaments with a superconducting MgCNi 3 high current density film surface layer, imbedded in a beryllium stabilizer matrix of high electrical and thermal conductivity. These 'bucking' magnets run circumferentially about the lightcraft rim, and provide a 2-Tesla magnetic field necessary for the craft's hypersonic MHD slipstream accelerator. Each magnet is comprised of a single 22 cm diameter, hollow cylindrical cable made from metal matrix composites for superconductors (MMC lowbar Sc) with integral coolant passageways for circulating liquid-helium coolant to prevent the magnets from warming above the superconductive transition temperature. Each is suspended inside a 30-cm diameter toroidal vacuum tube, braced by a radial mesh of high-strength insulating fibers loaded in tension. For a coil separation distance of 1.4 m, each coil has a calculated mass of 1365 kg which is within 2x of the ultimate objective

  2. Effect of nano size 3% wt TaC particles dispersion in two different metallic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, U.U.; Oliveira, L.A.; Souza, C.P.; Menezes, R.C.; Furukava, M.; Torres, Y.

    2009-01-01

    This work studies the characteristics of two different metallic matrixes composites, ferritic and austenitic steels, reinforced with 3% wt nano size tantalum carbide by powder metallurgy. The starting powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of the nano sized carbide dispersion on the matrix microstructures and its consequences on the mechanical properties were identified. The preliminary results showed that the sintering were influenced by morphology and the distribution of carbide and the alloys. (author)

  3. Microstructure Analysis of Neutron Absorber Al/B4C Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of Al/B4C metal matrix composites (MMCs used as neutron absorbers in both dry storage casks and wet storage pools of spent nuclear fuel was analyzed by SEM and TEM. A polishing method of a focused Ga+ ion beam was used to obtain an ideal sample surface with very low roughness, which was used to statistically analyze the distribution characteristics and size factor of B4C particles in the aluminum matrix. The area of B4C particles mainly ranged from 0 to 0.5 μm2, which was the proportion of 64.29%, 86.99% and 76.86% of total statistical results for the Al-15%B4C, Al-25%B4C and Al-30%B4C MMCs, respectively. The average area of B4C particles in the Al-15%B4C, Al-25%B4C and Al-30%B4C MMCs were about 1.396, 0.528 and 1.183 μm2, respectively. The nanoscale precipitates were analyzed by the element mappings in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM mode and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS mode, which included elliptic alloy precipitates with elemental Cu, Cr, Fe and Si, except for Al, and B4C nanoparticles with polygonal shape. The interface characteristics showed that the (021 crystal plane of B4C particle and (111 crystal plane of aluminum matrix grew together. The lattice misfit was about 1.68% for (111Al//(021B4C. The corrosion properties and corresponding mechanism of Al/B4C MMCs were investigated in an aqueous solution with 5000 ppm boric acid at 100 °C and atmospheric pressure, which showed that the mass increment rate was first decreased with increasing corrosion time and then increased.

  4. Wear resistance of WCp/Duplex Stainless Steel metal matrix composite layers prepared by laser melt injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do Nascimento, A. M.; Ocelik, V.; Ierardi, M. C. F.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Melt Injection (LMI) was used to prepare metal matrix composite layers with a thickness of about 0.7 mm and approximately 10% volume fraction of WC particles in three kinds of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels (CDSSs). WC particles were injected into the molten surface layer using Nd:YAG high power

  5. On the homogenization of metal matrix composites using strain gradient plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Reza; Niordson, Christian F.; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2014-04-01

    The homogenized response of metal matrix composites (MMC) is studied using strain gradient plasticity. The material model employed is a rate independent formulation of energetic strain gradient plasticity at the micro scale and conventional rate independent plasticity at the macro scale. Free energy inside the micro structure is included due to the elastic strains and plastic strain gradients. A unit cell containing a circular elastic fiber is analyzed under macroscopic simple shear in addition to transverse and longitudinal loading. The analyses are carried out under generalized plane strain condition. Micro-macro homogenization is performed observing the Hill-Mandel energy condition, and overall loading is considered such that the homogenized higher order terms vanish. The results highlight the intrinsic size-effects as well as the effect of fiber volume fraction on the overall response curves, plastic strain distributions and homogenized yield surfaces under different loading conditions. It is concluded that composites with smaller reinforcement size have larger initial yield surfaces and furthermore, they exhibit more kinematic hardening. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Polymer-Derived In- Situ Metal Matrix Composites Created by Direct Injection of a Liquid Polymer into Molten Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshan; Terauds, Kalvis; Anilchandra, A. R.; Raj, Rishi

    2014-02-01

    We show that a liquid organic precursor can be injected directly into molten magnesium to produce nanoscale ceramic dispersions within the melt. The castings made in this way possess good resistance to tensile deformation at 673 K (400 °C), confirming the non-coarsening nature of these dispersions. Direct liquid injection into molten metals is a significant step toward inserting different chemistries of liquid precursors to generate a variety of polymer-derived metal matrix composites.

  7. Development and fabrication of high strength alloy fibers for use in metal-metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G. W.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Metal fiber reinforced superalloys are being considered for construction of critical components in turbine engines that operate at high temperature. The problems involved in fabricating refractory metal alloys into wire form in such a manner as to maximize their strength properties without developing excessive structural defects are described. The fundamental principles underlying the development of such alloy fibers are also briefly discussed. The progress made to date in developing tungsten, tantalum and columbium base alloys for fiber reinforcement is reported and future prospects for alloy fiber development considered.

  8. Evaluation of metal matrix composite to replace spheroidal graphite iron for a critical component, steering knuckle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayarangan, S.; Rajamanickam, N.; Sivananth, V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A FE model is developed to study the suitability of MMC for steering knuckle. ► Structural analysis of steering knuckle is carried out for 12 load cases. ► The cross section of the critical region is optimized using genetic algorithm. ► The life of the MMC (Al-10 wt.% TiC) knuckle is compared before and after optimization. ► MMC material could replace SG iron for automotive steering knuckle. -- Abstract: Steering knuckle is considered as one of the critical component in automotive suspension system. It is subjected to time varying loads during its service life, leading to fatigue failure. Therefore, its design is an important aspect in the product development cycle. Currently, spheroidal graphite (SG) iron is widely used to manufacture steering knuckle in the commercial automobile sector. It has been observed from the knuckle manufacturers that advanced materials and weight reduction are the real need for the current automobile industry. Due to their high strength to weight ratio, Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have the potential to meet the demanded design requirements of the automotive industry, compared to conventional materials. In this work, an aluminum alloy reinforced with titanium carbide particulate is suggested as an alternate material in place of existing SG iron. Structural analysis of steering knuckle made of alternate material Al-10 wt.% TiC was performed using commercial code ANSYS. The results of steering knuckle made of MMC (Al-10 wt.% TiC) were compared with that of aluminum alloy and SG iron steering knuckles for its performance based on real time load cases. It is found from this analysis, the knuckle strut region has maximum stress and deflection during its life time. The critical strut region cross section area of knuckle was analyzed and geometrically optimized for minimum bending stress and deflection using genetic algorithm available in MatLab. Since, the knuckle experiences time varying loads, fatigue analysis also

  9. Wear of semi-solid rheocast SiCp/Al metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, UA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available compared with the 50% SiC MMC wear rate due to wear of the aluminum matrix. This trend is reversed on diamond abrasives due to pull-out of the irregular shaped composite particles. The 50% SiC MMC suffers from composite particle fracture porosity after high...

  10. Investigation, evaluation and analysis of SiCp nano particle metal matrix nano composite using a hybrid process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Pradyut Kumar; Sahool, Ashok Kumar; Das, Ratnakar; Padhi, Payodhar

    2018-02-01

    The present study was performed on mixing of fine powder of aluminum and silicon carbide nano particles 25nm size each. In this process, aluminum works as matrix and silicon carbide works as reinforcement with volume fraction of 1, 1.5 and 2%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microscopy techniques were used for crystal structure and micro structural characterization of the nano composite material. The objective of study was to achieve uniform distribution of SiCp nano particles in the aluminum matrix. The effect of reinforcement of Silicon carbide nano particle size and its volume fraction with aluminum encouraged investigation of stress strain response, elastic modulus and yield strength of nano composite metal matrix. Nano indentation and compression test were performed to characterize the nano composite material. Yield strength, compressive strength and elastic modulus were obtained from the compression test. Whereas, nano indentation results gave the yield strength, maximum shear stress and elastic modulus. The tensile test was conducted to find out the ultimate tensile strength. FESEM and EDAX techniques were also used to evaluate the different elements and their properties of Aluminum and SiCp nano particle metal matrix nano composite. The study reveals that in the liquid metal nano particle were uniformly dispersed and the segregation of the particles near the grain boundaries is due to pushing of the nano particle during growth of grain.

  11. Investigation on mechanical behavior and material characteristics of various weight composition of SiCp reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichumani, Sivachidambaram; Srinivasan, Raghuraman; Ramamoorthi, Venkatraman

    2018-02-01

    Aluminium – silicon carbide (Al - SiC) metal matrix composite is produced with following wt % of SiC reinforcement (4%, 8% & 12%) using stir casting method. Mechanical testing such as micro hardness, tensile testing and bend testing were performed. Characterizations, namely micro structure, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, inductive coupled plasma – optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, were carried out on Al - SiC composites. The presence of SiC on Al - SiC composite is confirmed through XRD technique and microstructure. The percentage of SiC was confirmed through ICP-OES technique. Increase in weight percentage of SiC tends to increase micro hardness, ultimate strength & yield strength but it reduces the bend strength and elongation (%) of the material. SEM factrography of tensile tested fractured samples of Al - 8% SiC & Al – 12% SiC showed fine dimples on fractured surface & coarse dimples fractured surface respectively. This showed significant fracture differences between Al - 8% SiC & Al - 12% SiC. From the above experiment, Al - 8% SiC had good micro hardness, ultimate strength & yield strength without significant loss in elongation (%) & bend strength.

  12. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peat, Tom, E-mail: tompeat12@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios [Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); McNutt, Philip [TWI Ltd., Granta Park, Cambridge CB21 6AL (United Kingdom); Iqbal, Naveed [TWI Technology Centre, Wallis Way, Catcliff, Rotherham, S60 5TZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • WC-CoCr, Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings were cold spray deposited on AA5083 and friction stir processed. • The SprayStirred WC-CoCr demonstrated a hardness increase of 100% over the cold sprayed coating. • As-deposited and SprayStirred coatings were examined under slurry erosion test conditions. • Mass and volume loss was measured following 20-min exposure to the slurry. • The WC-CoCr and Al2O3 demonstrated a reduction in volume loss of approx. 40% over the cold sprayed coating. - Abstract: This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide – cobalt chromium, chromium carbide – nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the

  13. Analysis of semi-solid processing for metal matrix composite synthesis using factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratus Ranieri

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal in this work is to conduct a quantitative analysis of the mechanical stir casting process for obtaining particulate metal matrix composites. A combined route of stirring at semi-solid state followed by stirring at liquid state is proposed. A fractional factorial design was developed to investigate the influence and interactions of factors as: time, rotation, initial fraction and particle size, on the incorporated fraction. The best incorporations were obtained with all factors at high levels, as well as that very long stirring periods have no strong influence being particle size and rotation the most important factors on the incorporated fraction. Particle wetting occurs during stirring at semi-solid state, highlighting the importance of the interactions between particles and the alloy globularized phase. The role of the alloying element Mg as a wettability-promoting agent is discussed. The shear forces resulting from the stirring system is emphasized and understood as the effect of rotation itself added to the propeller blade geometry.

  14. MOORA-Based Tribological Studies on Red Mud Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of an experimental investigation on the effects of applied load, sliding velocity, wt.% of reinforcement and hardness of the counterface material in dry sliding wear studies performed on red mud-based aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC. The specific wear rate and the coefficient of friction are considered as the output quality characteristics. Taguchi-based L9 orthogonal array has been used to accomplish the objective of the experimental study. Analysis of variance (ANOVA is employed to find the optimal setting and the effect of each parameter on the output performance characteristics. It has been observed that optimal factor setting for each output performance is different. In order to minimize the two responses simultaneously, multiobjective optimization based on ratio analysis (MOORA is adopted. MOORA revealed that the optimal combination of the dry sliding wear parameters for the multiperformance characteristics of the red mud based aluminium is the set normal load at 20 N, sliding velocity 3 m/s, % of reinforcement 20%, and counterface hardness of the material 58 HRC.

  15. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatchurrohman, N; Marini, C D; Suraya, S; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc. (paper)

  16. Micro-strain Evolution and Toughening Mechanisms in a Trimodal Al-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzheng; Topping, Troy D.; Yang, Hanry; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Schoenung, Julie M.; Nutt, Steven R.

    2015-03-01

    A trimodal metal matrix composite (MMC) based on AA (Al alloy) 5083 (Al-4.4Mg-0.7Mn-0.15Cr wt pct) was synthesized by cryomilling powders followed by compaction of blended powders and ceramic particles using two successive dual mode dynamic forgings. The microstructure consisted of 66.5 vol pct ultrafine grain (UFG) region, 30 vol pct coarse grain (CG) region and 3.5 vol pct reinforcing boron carbide particles. The microstructure imparted high-tensile yield strength (581 MPa) compared to a conventional AA 5083 (242 MPa) and enhanced ductility compared to 100 pct UFG Al MMC. The deformation behavior of the heterogeneous structure and the effects of CG regions on crack propagation were investigated using in situ scanning electron microscopy micro-tensile tests. The micro-strain evolution measured using digital image correlation showed early plastic strain localization in CG regions. Micro-voids due to the strain mismatch at CG/UFG interfaces were responsible for crack initiation. CG region toughening was realized by plasticity-induced crack closure and zone shielding of disconnected micro-cracks. However, these toughening mechanisms did not effectively suppress its brittle behavior. Further optimization of the CG distribution (spacing and morphology) is required to achieve toughness levels required for structural applications.

  17. The influence of reinforcement size on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of a nanostructured aluminum-based metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Nathan Adam

    With increased availability and growing commercial applications, aluminum-based metal matrix composites show promise as high specific strength structural materials. Before they can be implemented however, they require thorough characterization and testing. A novel nanostructured aluminum-based metal matrix composite (MMC) was characterized through a combination of microstructural analysis and mechanical testing. Two composites were studied, an aluminum MMC reinforced with 50 nm boron carbide, (B4C) and an aluminum MMC reinforced with 500 nm boron carbide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed an ultra-fine grained matrix with grains on the order of 100--300 nm. The quasi-static and dynamic response of the composites was compared with the behavior of the unreinforced aluminum alloy, and it was found that the reinforcement resulted in a 30% improvement in strength. The decrease in the reinforcement size from 500 to 50 nm activated an additional strengthening mechanism, which further improved the strength of the MMC reinforced with the 50 nm B4C. Dynamic compression tests were performed at elevated temperatures up 400°C on the composites, and it was found that they exhibited impressive strengths considering the thermal softening prevalent in aluminum. The reinforcement size was found to play an important role in the strain softening exhibited at elevated temperature, fracture mechanism, and composite strength. Models to describe the composite behavior are presented.

  18. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods.

  19. Al6061 Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite Reinforced with Alumina and Molybdenum Disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitchayyapillai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Hybrid Reinforcement Technology is a response to the dynamic ever-increasing service requirement of industries such as transportation, aerospace, automobile, and marine, due to its attractive properties like high ductility, highly conductivity, light weight, and high strength to weight ratio. In this evolution, an attempt has been made to investigate the wear rate of Al6061 hybrid metal matrix composite reinforced with the hard ceramic alumina (4, 8, and 12 wt.% of Al2O3 and soft solid lubricant of molybdenum disulphide (2, 4, and 6 wt.% of MoS2 is fabricated by using stir casting method. The unlubricated pins on disc wear tests were conducted to examine the wear behaviour of Al6061/12 wt.% of Al2O3/MoS2 composites. The sliding wear tests were carried out at various loads of 15, 30, and 45 N, sliding velocity (1.25, 2.50, and 3.25 m/sec, and different MoS2 wt.% (2, 4, and 6 wt.%. In addition, the CNC turning experiments were conducted on Al6061/12 wt.% Al2O3/6 wt.% MoS2 using CNMG 120408 uncoated carbide cutting tool under cutting of 100, 150, and 200 m/min, feed of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mm/rev, and depth of cut of 1, 1.5, and 2 mm.

  20. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beristain, Jokin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD. The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 μm. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool.El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de la maquinabilidad del material compuesto de matriz metálica aluminio-carburo de silicio en operaciones de torneado. Las herramientas de corte utilizadas han sido de metal duro con y sin recubrimiento, diferentes grados de diamante policristalino (PCD y diamante monocristalino (MCD. El material mecanizado ha sido AMC225xe, compuesto de la aleación de aluminio AA 2124 con un 25% en peso de partículas de SiC con un tamaño medio de 3 μm. Los experimentos se han realizado con diferentes velocidades de corte en una operación de refrentado, midiendo la rugosidad superficial, las fuerzas y el desgaste de la herramienta. La superficie desgastada de la herramienta ha sido examinada en el microscopio electrónico (SEM. Se ha observado que el filo recrecido y el material adherido son mayores en el caso de las herramientas de MCD que en las de PCD. El filo recrecido actúa como una capa protectora contra la abrasión.

  1. Influence of composition and distribution of the reinforcing particles on fatigue properties of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochreiter, E.; Jeglitsch, F.

    1993-01-01

    Fatigue-life-time behaviour has been examined of extruded 6061 aluminium alloy composites reinforced with 15 vol.% SiC and 10 vol.% Al 2 O 3 particles. The peak particle sizes are at about 4.5 and 6 μm. Within measured S-N curves the fatigue life-time at given stress amplitudes of SiC p /AA6061 is superiour to that of Al 2 O 3p /AA6061 in the low-cycle fatigue region as well as in the high-cycle fatigue region. The discussion of these results has been done by means of theoretical evaluated crack propagation curves. Interfacial bonding has been studied by means of TEM investigations. (orig.)

  2. Residual Stress Induced Mechanical Property Enhancement in Steel Encapsulated Light Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudger, Sean James

    Macro hybridized systems consisting of steel encapsulated light metal matrix composites (MMCs) were produced with the goal of creating a low cost/light weight composite system with enhanced mechanical properties. MMCs are frequently incorporated into advanced material systems due to their tailorable material properties. However, they often have insufficient ductility for many structural applications. The macro hybridized systems take advantage of the high strength, modulus, and damage tolerance of steels and high specific stiffness and low density of MMCs while mitigating the high density of steels and the poor ductility of MMCs. Furthermore, a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch induced residual compressive stress method is utilized as a means of improving the ductility of the MMCs and overall efficiency of the macro hybridized systems. Systems consisting of an A36, 304 stainless steel, or NitronicRTM 50 stainless steel shell filled with an Al-SiC, Al-Al2O3, or Mg-B4C MMC are evaluated in this work. Upon cooling from processing temperatures, residual strains are generated due to a CTE mismatch between each of the phases. The resulting systems offer higher specific properties and a more structurally efficient system can be attained. Mechanical testing was performed and improvements in yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and ductility were observed. However, the combination of these dissimilar materials often results in the formation of intermetallic compounds. In certain loading situations, these typically brittle intermetallic layers can result in degraded performance. X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), and Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) are utilized to characterize the intermetallic layer formation at the interface between the steel and MMC. As the residual stress condition in each phase has a large impact on the mechanical property improvement, accurate quantification of these strains/stresses is

  3. Metal particles constraint in glass matrix composites and its impact on fracture toughness enhancement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotoul, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    387-389 (2004), s. 404-408 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : brittle matrix composites * crack bridging * crack trapping Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  4. Investigations on thermal properties, stress and deformation of Al/SiC metal matrix composite based on finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Ramesh Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AlSiC is a metal matrix composite which comprises of aluminium matrix with silicon carbide particles. It is characterized by high thermal conductivity (180-200 W/m K, and its thermal expansion are attuned to match other important materials that finds enormous demand in industrial sectors. Although its application is very common, the physics behind the Al-SiC formation, functionality and behaviors are intricate owing to the temperature gradient of hundreds of degrees, over the volume, occurring on a time scale of a few seconds, involving multiple phases. In this study, various physical, metallurgical and numerical aspects such as equation of continuum for thermal, stress and deformation using finite element (FE matrix formulation, temperature dependent material properties, are analyzed. Modelling and simulation studies of Al/SiC composites are a preliminary attempt to view this research work from computational point of view.

  5. Evaluation of residual stresses in metal matrix composite materials, by the means of neutron and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceretti, M.; Braham, C.

    1996-01-01

    Thermally- as well as mechanically-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites have been analyzed by the means of two complementary techniques: X-ray diffraction for surface analysis, and neutron diffraction for volume analysis. The residual stress relaxation is examined through in-situ measurements with neutron diffraction. Results from both techniques are well correlated, on condition that the same basic assumptions are used

  6. Numerical Simulations of As-Extruded Mg Matrix Composites Interpenetrated by Metal Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Wang, H.; Wang, S. R.; Yang, X. F.; Li, P.

    2017-12-01

    The interpenetrating magnesium composites reinforced by three-dimensional braided stainless steel wire reinforcement were fabricated and investigated. The extrusion processes of the composites in different conditions were carried out and simulated by finite element method using the DEFORM-3D software. The results show that the matrix and reinforcement of the composites form a good interfacial bonding and the grains were refined by extrusion and the influence of reinforcement, which are in accordance with the enhanced strength and degraded plasticity. The combined quality between the matrix and reinforcement can be strengthened in extrusion chamber where occurred large strain and suffered intense stress, and the effective stress of the material increases continuously with the increase in extrusion ratio and the decrease in extrusion speed until it reaches a stable value.

  7. Internal damping due to dislocation movements induced by thermal expansion mismatch between matrix and particles in metal matrix composites. [Al/SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girand, C.; Lormand, G.; Fougeres, R.; Vincent, A. (GEMPPM, Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-05-01

    In metal matrix composites (MMCs), the mechanical 1 of the reinforcement-matrix interface is an important parameter because it governs the load transfer from matrix to particles, from which the mechanical properties of these materials are derived. Therefore, it would be useful to set out an experimental method able to characterize the interface and the adjacent matrix behaviors. Thus, a study has been undertaken by means of internal damping (I.D.) measurements, which are well known to be very sensitive for studying irreversible displacements at the atomic scale. More especially, this investigation is based on the fact that, during cooling of MMC's, stress concentrations originating from differences in coefficients of thermal expansion (C.T.E.) of matrix and particles should induce dislocation movements in the matrix surrounding the reinforcement; that is, local microplastic strains occur. Therefore, during I.D. measurements vs temperature these movements should contribute to MMCs I.D. in a process similar to those involved around first order phase transitions in solids. The aim of this paper is to present, in the case of Al/SiC particulate composites, new developments of this approach that has previously led to promising results in the case of Al-Si alloys.

  8. Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites for use in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramics and have a very high strength to weight ratio, a property which makes them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Since FSW occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This work characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length of joint) on the wear process. Based on the results of these experiments, a phenomenological model of the wear process was constructed based on the rotating plug model for FSW. The effectiveness of harder tool materials (such as Tungsten Carbide, high speed steel, and tools with diamond coatings) to combat abrasive wear is explored. In-process force, torque, and

  9. Factors influencing creep resistance in discontinuously reinforced magnesium metal matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenička, Václav; Kuchařová, Květa; Kvapilová, Marie; Svoboda, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2015), s. 221-229 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : magnesium alloys * composites * creep properties testing * structure * fibres * interfaces Subject RIV: JG - Metal lurgy Impact factor: 0.365, year: 2015

  10. Electrical properties of composites of hard metal carbides in a polymer matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilčáková, J.; Sáha, P.; Hausnerová, B.; Quadrat, Otakar

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 5 (2002), s. 942-946 ISSN 0272-8397 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/97/0308 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : polymer composites * hard metal carbides * electric conductivity Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.746, year: 2002

  11. Development of scalable methods for the utilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennerberg, Danny Curtis

    traditional fiber-reinforced composites. The latter part of this thesis work explores a new method of producing BP comprised of oriented nanotubes through the use of a modified Taylor-Couette setup capable of simultaneously shearing and filtering an aqueous MWCNT dispersion. BP produced with this setup exhibited anisotropic electrical and mechanical properties as a result of the nanotube alignment. Finally, a new technique for producing MWCNT metal matrix composites was developed using the nanotubes as the heating element and carbon source in a microwave-assisted carbothermic reduction of copper oxide. The extremely rapid heating of MWCNTs upon microwave irradiation allowed Cu-MWCNT composites to be produced in times on the order of a minute. Because this approach requires none of the specialized equipment generally used in metal matrix composite processing, it has promise as a scalable fabrication technique.

  12. The effect of abrasive particle size on the wear behaviour of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Y.; Ozdin, K.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of abrasive particle size on the wear behavior of the SiC particle-reinforced aluminium composites produced by liquid metallurgy was investigated under different sizes of SiC grits at a fixed speed. The results show that the wear loss of composite was considerably lower than that of aluminium alloy. The wear loss increased linearly with sliding distance for both materials, but indicating a considerable difference. It increased with increasing SiC abrasive particles. Moreover, SEM examination indicates that abrasive wear observed for the matrix alloy. The depth of wear grooves decreased with decreasing the abrasive particle size and load. For the composites, wear surfaces were found to be a quite smooth indicating that no abrasive grooves appeared

  13. Mechanical properties of aluminium based metal matrix composites reinforced with graphite nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Syed Nasimul, E-mail: syedn@nitrkl.ac.in; Kumar, Lailesh

    2016-06-14

    In this work Al-matrix composites reinforced by exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) is fabricated by powder metallurgy route and their microstructure, mechanical properties and sliding wear behaviour were investigated. Here, xGnP has been synthesized from the thermally exfoliated graphite produced from a graphite intercalation compound (GIC) through rapid evaporation of the intercalant at an elevated temperature. The xGnP synthesized was characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (DSC/TGA), Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The Al and xGnP powder mixtures were consolidated under a load of 565 MPa followed by sintering at 550 °C for 2 h in an inert atmosphere. Al-1, 2, 3 and 5 wt% xGnP nanocomposites were developed. Results of the wear test show that there was a significant improvement in the wear resistance of the composites up to the addition of 3 wt% of xGnP in the Al matrix. The hardness of the various Al-xGnP composites also shows improvement upto the addition of 1 wt% xGnP beyond which there was a decrease in the hardness of the composites. The tensile strength of the Al-xGnP composites continuously reduced with the addition of xGnP due to the formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} particles at the interface of the Al and xGnP in the composite.

  14. Manufacturing Challenges Associated with the Use of Metal Matrix Composites in Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramic particles or fibers. These materials possess a very high strength to weight ratio, good resistance to impact and wear, and a number of other properties which make them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as NASA's Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and Space Launch System. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials, such as MMCs, which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Since Friction Stir Welding occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This chapter summarizes the challenges encountered when joining MMCs to themselves or to other materials in structures. Specific attention is paid to the influence of process variables in Friction Stir Welding on the wear process characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length

  15. Production of ceramic nanoparticles through self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) and their introduction into a metallic matrix to form metal matrix composites (MMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuechterlein, Jacob

    Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) is a self-sustaining combustion reaction of reactant powders typically in the form of compacted pellets to form a desired product species. The reactants are ignited in one or more locations by several different techniques. After ignition the reaction travels as a wave through the pellet exothermically converting the reactants into products as it propagates. In this case the products are formed as discrete ceramic particles of TiC, Al2O3 and SiC. The goal of this research was to reduce the size of the particles formed by this technique from a diameter of 1-5μm to less than 100nm with the goal of then incorporating these nanoparticles as reinforcements in Al metal matrix composites. To accomplish this, many different SHS principles were studied and their associated variables were changed to reduce the combustion temperature of each reacting system. Several of these systems were investigated and discarded for a number of reasons such as: low ignition or high combustion temperatures, dangerous reaction conditions, or undesirable product densities and morphologies. The systems chosen exhibited low material costs, low combustion temperatures, and a wide range of stabilities when lowering the reaction temperature. The reacting systems pursued were based around the aluminothermic reduction of TiO2 in the presence of carbon to form TiC and Al2O 3. The combustion temperature of this reaction was reduced from 2053ºC to less than 1100ºC, which had a corresponding effect on the particle size of the products, reducing the average diameter of the particles to less than 100nm. This was accomplished by providing high heating rates, controlling the green density and adding diluents to the reaction such as Al, TiC, SiC or Al2O3. Cooling experiments were also investigated, but the cooling rate was found to have no effect on the particle size.

  16. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser; Frank W. Zok; Carlos G. Levi; Jeffrey Hawk

    2004-02-01

    In an effort to realize minimum of a 2x increase in wear life of ground engaging components used on mining machines, two potentially cost effective processes were explored for the production of tailored, highly abrasion resistant materials: (1) hybrid pressure casting of steel composites, and (2) arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings. Steel composites comprised of cermet or oxide hard particles were successfully produced using pressure casting processes, although a cost effective process has not yet been identified for oxide particles. Both composites achieved project wear targets in high stress gouging wear, but the cermet composites did not meet the targets in impact wear, due to poor matrix toughness resulting from particle dissolution. Oxide composites had superior toughness and are expected to meet impact wear goals. Arc lamp processing of thermal spray coatings was successfully demonstrated to produce a metallurgical bond at the coating interface. Functionally graded materials were developed and successfully fused to allow for the accommodation of thermal process stresses in an intermediate layer. Ultimately, three functionally graded materials were identified as having high stress, three-body abrasion resistance sufficient to exceed project goals.

  17. Thermal Shock Resistance of Stabilized Zirconia/Metal Coat on Polymer Matrix Composites by Thermal Spraying Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Huang, Wenzhi; Cheng, Haifeng; Cao, Xueqiang

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized zirconia/metal coating systems were deposited on the polymer matrix composites by a combined thermal spray process. Effects of the thicknesses of metal layers and ceramic layer on thermal shock resistance of the coating systems were investigated. According to the results of thermal shock lifetime, the coating system consisting of 20 μm Zn and 125 μm 8YSZ exhibited the best thermal shock resistance. Based on microstructure evolution, failure modes and failure mechanism of the coating systems were proposed. The main failure modes were the formation of vertical cracks and delamination in the outlayer of substrate, and the appearance of coating spallation. The residual stress, thermal stress and oxidation of substrate near the substrate/metal layer interface were responsible for coating failure, while the oxidation of substrate near the substrate/coating interface was the dominant one.

  18. Near-net-shape manufacturing: Spray-formed metal matrix composites and tooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchugh, Kevin M.

    1994-01-01

    Spray forming is a materials processing technology in which a bulk liquid metal is converted to a spray of fine droplets and deposited onto a substrate or pattern to form a near-net-shape solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing without sacrificing, and oftentimes substantially improving, product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offers property improvements resulting from rapid solidification (e.g. refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is developing a unique spray-forming method, the Controlled Aspiration Process (CAP), to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Results from two spray-accompanying technical and economic benefits. These programs involved spray forming aluminum strip reinforced with SiC particulate, and the production of tooling, such as injection molds and dies, using low-melting-point metals.

  19. Wear and Friction Behavior of Stir Cast Al-TiB2 Metal Matrix Composites with Various Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Al- TiB2 metal matrix composites are fabricated using stir cast method and its tribological characterization is done using three different lubricants. Tribological studies are performed in a multi-tribotester using block-on-roller configuration under 25-75 N loads and 400-600 rpm rotational speeds. Four different weight percentages of TiB2 are considered in this study. Comparison between dry condition and lubricated conditions is gleaned to differentiate wear and friction characteristics and SEM images are taken to fortify them. Lubricated conditions yield large reduction in wear and friction compared to dry condition.

  20. Optimization of the manufacturing process of a titanium aluminide metal matrix composite using a viscoplastic constitutive theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, J.A.; Quimby, H.M. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-04-01

    The thermomechanical behavior of a titanium aluminide metal matrix composite reinforced with silicon carbide fibers is computationally investigated to determine an optimum manufacturing process. The investigations are completed using the Ramaswamy-Stouffer constitutive model and the finite element method. Hold times at a given temperature were used in an effort to allow the residual stresses to relax. However, the subsequent temperature changes erased the benefit of such holds. Thermomechanical cycling was determined to be the optimum method for reducing the residual stress field after cooldown from consolidation.

  1. Effects of interface formation kinetics on the microstructural properties of wear-resistant metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilo, S.; Just, Ch.; Badisch, E.; Wosik, J.; Danninger, H.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: The dissolution reaction kinetics and the formation of intermediate layers of tungsten carbides in Ni-(Cr)-B-Si matrices were studied in liquid-phase sintering with well-defined temperature/time relationship. → The internal intermediate layer formation, close to the original primary tungsten carbide showed diffusion-controlled kinetic (∼t 0.5 ), whereas the outside layer thickness formation, proportional to the processing time (∼t), was formed by the subsequent eutectic reaction of the Ni-(Cr)-B-Si matrix with the WC/W 2 C component. → Cr-addition in the matrix highly influences the inner layer thickness caused probably by increasing the C-diffusion rate, whereas the outer layer thickness was not dependent on the initial Cr-content in the matrix. Generally, the Cr-addition in the Ni-based matrix increased the hardness and elastic modulus of the intermediate phases along the carbide/matrix interface. → The different microstructure gradients are depended mainly on the interface growth kinetics. → The intermediate layers are hard phases (carbides, borides or carbo-borides). → The hardness of the carbide/matrix interface area is significantly lower as the hardness of the original primary tungsten carbides. - Abstract: Hard-particle metal-matrix composites (MMC) are generally used to increase the lifetime of machinery equipment exposed to severe wear conditions. Depending on the manufacturing technology, dissolution reactions of hard phases undergo different temperature/time profiles during processing affecting the microstructure and mechanical properties of the MMCs. Therefore, quantification of the carbide dissolution effects on the microstructure and micro-mechanical properties is the key to success in the development and optimisation of MMCs. Dissolution kinetics of WC/W 2 C in Ni-based matrices were determined in the liquid-sintering with a well-defined temperature/time profile. Microscopic evaluation of the samples showed two

  2. Effects of SiC on Properties of Cu-SiC Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, G. Celebi; Altinsoy, I.; Ipek, M.; Zeytin, S.; Bindal, C.

    2011-12-01

    This paper was focused on the effects of particle size and distribution on some properties of the SiC particle reinforced Cu composites. Copper powder produced by cementation method was reinforced with SiC particles having 1 and 30 μm particle size and sintered at 700 °C. SEM studies showed that SiC particles dispersed in copper matrix homogenously. The presence of Cu and SiC components in composites were verified by XRD analysis technique. The relative densities of Cu-SiC composites determined by Archimedes' principle are ranged from 96.2% to 90.9% for SiC with 1 μm particle size, 97.0 to 95.0 for SiC with 30 μm particle size. Measured hardness of sintered compacts varied from 130 to 155 HVN for SiC having 1 μm particle size, 188 to 229 HVN for SiC having 1 μm particle size. Maximum electrical conductivity of test materials was obtained as 80.0% IACS (International annealed copper standard) for SiC with 1 μm particle size and 83.0% IACS for SiC with 30 μm particle size.

  3. In-situ deformation studies of an aluminum metal-matrix composite in a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Tensile specimens made of a metal-matrix composite (cast and extruded aluminum alloy-based matrix reinforced with Al2O3 particulate) were tested in situ in a scanning electron microscope equipped with a deformation stage, to directly monitor the crack propagation phenomenon. The in situ SEM observations revealed the presence of microcracks both ahead of and near the crack-tip region. The microcracks were primarily associated with cracks in the alumina particles. The results suggest that a region of intense deformation exists ahead of the crack and corresponds to the region of microcracking. As the crack progresses, a region of plastically deformed material and associated microcracks remains in the wake of the crack.

  4. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities.

  5. Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Metal-Matrix Composites Reinforced with Silicon Carbide Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia E. Ares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on the study of the effect of directional heat extraction on the silicon-carbide (SiC distribution in zinc-aluminum matrix composites (MMCs and on the columnar-to-equiaxed (CET position in directionally solidified samples. To this end, a ZA-27 alloy matrix was reinforced with ceramic particles of SiC and vertically directionally solidified. The cooling rates, temperature gradients, and interphase velocities were then measured, and their influence on the solidification microstructure of the MMCs was analyzed. The recalescence detected and measured during the equiaxed transition was of the order of 3.5°C to 1.1°C. The values of the temperature gradients reached a minimum during the CET and were even negative in most cases (between −3.89 K and 0.06 K. The interphase velocities varied between 0.07 mm/s and 0.44 mm/s at the transition. Also, the presence of ceramic particles in ZA-27 alloys affected the thermodynamic local conditions and the kinetics of nucleation, producing a finer microstructure.

  6. Crack and wear behavior of SiC particulate reinforced aluminium based metal matrix composite fabricated by direct metal laser sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Partha

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, crack density and wear performance of SiC particulate (SiCp) reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) fabricated by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process have been studied. Mainly, size and volume fraction of SiCp have been varied to analyze the crack and wear behavior of the composite. The study has suggested that crack density increases significantly after 15 volume percentage (vol.%) of SiCp. The paper has also suggested that when size (mesh) of reinforcement increases, wear resistance of the composite drops. Three hundred mesh of SiCp offers better wear resistance; above 300 mesh the specific wear rate increases significantly. Similarly, there has been no improvement of wear resistance after 20 vol.% of reinforcement. The scanning electron micrographs of the worn surfaces have revealed that during the wear test SiCp fragments into small pieces which act as abrasives to result in abrasive wear in the specimen.

  7. High-energy high-rate processing of high-temperature metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persad, C.; Raghunathan, S.; Lee, B.H.; Bourell, D.L.; Eliezer, Z.; Marcus, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    Advances in kinetic energy storage devices have opened up a new approach to powder processing of high temperature composites. The processing consists of internal heating of a customized powder blend by a fast electrical discharge of homopolar generator. The high-energy high rate IMJ in 1s pulse permits rapid heating of a conducting powder in a cold wall die. This short time at temperature approach offers the opportunity to control phase transformations and the degree of microstructural coarsening not readily possible using standard powder processing approaches. This paper describes the consolidation results of two high temperature composite materials, (W-Ni-Fe)B 4 C and (Ti 3 Al + Nb)/SiC. The focus of this study was the identification of the reaction products formed at the matrix/reinforcement interface as a function of input energy and applied stress. Input energies beyond a threshold value for each system were required to produce detectable reaction products. In the (W-Ni-Fe)/B 4 C system, the reaction products formed at 4000 kj/kg input energy under 420 MPa applied stress were a series of complex carbides and borides including W 2 C,FeWb,Fe 3 C,Fe 6 W 6 C and Ni 4 B 3 . The intermetallic Fe 7 W 6 was also observed. In the (Ti 3 Al + Nb)SiC System, the reaction products observed at 3400 kj/kg and 210 MPa were TiC and TiSi 2

  8. Creep and stress relaxation induced by interface diffusion in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinfeng; Li, Zhonghua

    2013-03-01

    An analytical solution is developed to predict the creep rate induced by interface diffusion in unidirectional fiber-reinforced and particle reinforced composites. The driving force for the interface diffusion is the normal stress acting on the interface, which is obtained from rigorous Eshelby inclusion theory. The closed-form solution is an explicit function of the applied stress, volume fraction and radius of the fiber, as well as the modulus ratio between the fiber and the matrix. It is interesting that the solution is formally similar to that of Coble creep in polycrystalline materials. For the application of the present solution in the realistic composites, the scale effect is taken into account by finite element analysis based on a unit cell. Based on the solution, a closed-form solution is also given as a description of stress relaxation induced by interfacial diffusion under constant strain. In addition, the analytical solution for the interface stress presented in this study gives some insight into the relationship between the interface diffusion and interface slip. This work was supported by the financial support from the Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 10932007), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2010CB631003/5), and the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20100073110006).

  9. A new macroscopically anisotropic pressure dependent yield function for metal matrix composite based on strain gradient plasticity for the microstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza; Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2013-01-01

    in addition to the elastic strain. Hill's classical anisotropic yield criterion is extended to cover the composite such that hydrostatic pressure dependency, Bauschinger stress and size-effects are considered. It is found that depending on the fiber volume fraction, the anisotropic yield surface......Metal matrix composites with long aligned elastic fibers are studied using an energetic rate independent strain gradient plasticity theory with an isotropic pressure independent yield function at the microscale. The material response is homogenized to obtain a conventional macroscopic model...... that exhibits anisotropic yield properties with a pressure dependence. At the microscale free energy includes both elastic strains and plastic strain gradients, and the theory demands higher order boundary conditions in terms of plastic strain or work conjugate higher order tractions. The mechanical response...

  10. Dry sliding wear behavior of heat treated hybrid metal matrix composite using Taguchi techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiran, T.S.; Prasanna Kumar, M.; Basavarajappa, S.; Viswanatha, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ZA-27 alloy is used as matrix material and reinforced with SiC and Gr particles. • Heat treatment was carried out for all specimen. • Dry sliding wear test was done on pin-on-disc apparatus by Taguchi technique. • ZA-27/9SiC–3Gr showed superior wear resistance over the base alloy. • Ceramic mixed mechanical layer on contact surface of composite was formed. - Abstract: Dry sliding wear behavior of zinc based alloy and composite reinforced with SiCp (9 wt%) and Gr (3 wt%) fabricated by stir casting method was investigated. Heat treatment (HT) and aging of the specimen were carried out, followed by water quenching. Wear behavior was evaluated using pin on disc apparatus. Taguchi technique was used to estimate the parameters affecting the wear significantly. The effect of HT was that it reduced the microcracks, residual stresses and improved the distribution of microconstituents. The influence of various parameters like applied load, sliding speed and sliding distance on wear behavior was investigated by means and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Further, correlation between the parameters was determined by multiple linear regression equation for each response. It was observed that the applied load significantly influenced the wear volume loss (WVL), followed by sliding speed implying that increase in either applied load or sliding speed increases the WVL. Whereas for composites, sliding distance showed a negative influence on wear indicating that increase in sliding distance reduces WVL due to the presence of reinforcements. The wear mechanism of the worn out specimen was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The analysis shows that the formation and retention of ceramic mixed mechanical layer (CMML) plays a major role in the dry sliding wear resistance

  11. Hot Extrusion of A356 Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite with Carbon Nanotube/Al2O3 Hybrid Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. H.; Babu, J. S. S.; Kang, C. G.

    2014-05-01

    Over the years, the attention of material scientists and engineers has shifted from conventional composite materials to nanocomposite materials for the development of light weight and high-performance devices. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), many researchers have tried to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) with CNT reinforcements. However, CNTs exhibit low dispersibility in metal melts owing to their poor wettability and large surface-to-volume ratio. The use of an array of short fibers or hybrid reinforcements in a preform could overcome this problem and enhance the dispersion of CNTs in the matrix. In this study, multi-walled CNT/Al2O3 preform-based aluminum hybrid composites were fabricated using the infiltration method. Then, the composites were extruded to evaluate changes in its mechanical properties. In addition, the dispersion of reinforcements was investigated using a hardness test. The required extrusion pressure of hybrid MMCs increased as the Al2O3/CNT fraction increased. The deformation resistance of hybrid material was over two times that of the original A356 aluminum alloy material due to strengthening by the Al2O3/CNTs reinforcements. In addition, an unusual trend was detected; primary transition was induced by the hybrid reinforcements, as can be observed in the pressure-displacement curve. Increasing temperature of the material can help increase formability. In particular, temperatures under 623 K (350 °C) and over-incorporating reinforcements (Al2O3 20 pct, CNTs 3 pct) are not recommended owing to a significant increase in the brittleness of the hybrid material.

  12. Durability and Damage Tolerance of High Temperature Advanced Titanium Metal Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghonem, H

    2000-01-01

    The bridging fatigue crack growth damage mechanisms in a unidirectional SiC/Ti MMC include matrix cracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and sliding along bridging fibers and fracture of these fibers...

  13. Tracer diffusion of .sup.65./sup.Zn, .sup.110m./sup.Ag and .sup.88./sup.Y in QE22 metal matrix composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stloukal, Ivo; Čermák, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 471, 1-2 (2009), s. 83-89 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/05/2115 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : composite materials * metal matrix composite * diffusion Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.135, year: 2009

  14. The erosion performance of particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings produced by co-deposition cold gas dynamic spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on the erosion performance of three particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings, co-deposited with an aluminium binder via cold-gas dynamic spraying. The deposition of ceramic particles is difficult to achieve with typical cold spray techniques due to the absence of particle deformation. This issue has been overcome in the present study by simultaneously spraying the reinforcing particles with a ductile metallic binder which has led to an increased level of ceramic/cermet particles deposited on the substrate with thick (>400 μm) coatings produced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the erosion performance of the co-deposited coatings within a slurry environment. The study also incorporated standard metallographic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of reinforcing particles within the aluminium matrix. All coatings exhibited poorer erosion performance than the uncoated material, both in terms of volume loss and mass loss. The Al2O3 reinforced coating sustained the greatest amount of damage following exposure to the slurry and recorded the greatest volume loss (approx. 2.8 mm3) out of all of the examined coatings. Despite the poor erosion performance, the WC-CoCr reinforced coating demonstrated a considerable hardness increase over the as-received AA5083 (approx. 400%) and also exhibited the smallest free space length between adjacent particles. The findings of this study reveal that the removal of the AA5083 matrix by the impinging silicon carbide particles acts as the primary wear mechanism leading to the degradation of the coating. Analysis of the wear scar has demonstrated that the damage to the soft matrix alloy takes the form of ploughing and scoring which subsequently exposes carbide/oxide particles to the impinging slurry.

  15. An analytical/numerical correlation study of the multiple concentric cylinder model for the thermoplastic response of metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.; Williams, Todd O.

    1993-01-01

    The utility of a recently developed analytical micromechanics model for the response of metal matrix composites under thermal loading is illustrated by comparison with the results generated using the finite-element approach. The model is based on the concentric cylinder assemblage consisting of an arbitrary number of elastic or elastoplastic sublayers with isotropic or orthotropic, temperature-dependent properties. The elastoplastic boundary-value problem of an arbitrarily layered concentric cylinder is solved using the local/global stiffness matrix formulation (originally developed for elastic layered media) and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions. These features of the model facilitate efficient investigation of the effects of various microstructural details, such as functionally graded architectures of interfacial layers, on the evolution of residual stresses during cool down. The available closed-form expressions for the field variables can readily be incorporated into an optimization algorithm in order to efficiently identify optimal configurations of graded interfaces for given applications. Comparison of residual stress distributions after cool down generated using finite-element analysis and the present micromechanics model for four composite systems with substantially different temperature-dependent elastic, plastic, and thermal properties illustrates the efficacy of the developed analytical scheme.

  16. Optimization of mechanical properties of Al-metal matrix composite produced by direct fusion of beverage cans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, C.; Inzunza, G.; Camurri, C.; Rodríguez, C.; Radovic, L.; Soldera, F.; Suarez, S.

    2014-01-01

    The collection of used beverage cans is limited in countries where they are not fabricated; their low value does not justify the extra charge of exporting them for further processing. To address this increasingly serious problem, here we optimize the properties of an aluminum metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) obtained through direct fusion of beverage cans by using the slag generated in the melting process as reinforcement. This method consists of a modified rheocasting process followed by thixoforming. Our main operational variable is the shear rate applied to a semi-solid bath, subsequent to which a suitable heat treatment (T8) is proposed to improve the mechanical properties. The microstructure, the phases obtained and their effect on composite mechanical properties are analyzed. The composite material produced has, under the best conditions, a yield stress of 175 MPa and a tensile strength of 273 MPa. These results demonstrate that the proposed process does indeed transform the used beverage cans into promising composite materials, e.g., for structural applications

  17. Pengaruh Milling Time Terhadap Pembentukan Intermetalik ɣ-TiAl Sebagai Reinforced Dalam Metal Matrix Composite (MMCs Hasil Mechanical Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badrus Soleh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Paduan TiAl mempunyai berbagai keunggulan dalam sifat mekanik serta sifat termal. Senyawa intermetalik γ-TiAl mempunyai sifat mekanik dan sifat termal yang sangat baik sehingga sesuai apabila diaplikasikan sebagai penguat pada metal matrix composite (MMCs. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mensintesis paduan TiAl sehingga terbentuk  fasa intermetalik γ-TiAl yang homogen. Sintesa dilakukan dengan metode mechanical alloying menggunakan modification horizontal ball mill dengan komposisi paduan Ti-36%wt Al dan variasi milling time 0,10,20 jam dengan kecepatan tetap 350rpm. Hasil milling dikompaksi dan di-annealing pada temperatur 9000C selama 30menit.  Fasa intermetalik γ-TiAl terbentuk setelah proses mechanical alloying 20 jam. Hasil pengujian difraksi sinar X menunjukkan ukuran kristal sebesar 198.92Å pada fasa γ-TiAl, memiliki kekerasan 678,1HV.

  18. Tribological Behavior of TiAl Metal Matrix Composite Brake Disk with TiC Reinforcement Under Dry Sliding Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaquat, Hassan; Shi, Xiaoliang; Yang, Kang; Huang, Yuchun; Liu, Xiyao; Wang, Zhihai

    2017-07-01

    In this investigation, the effect of TiC particulate reinforcement and sintering parameters on tribological behavior of TiAl metal matrix composite (TMMC) has been studied and compared with commercially conventional gray cast iron to evaluate the use of TMMC as brake disk material in an automobile. Three sample disks of TMMC containing TiC particulate reinforcement (D1-5 wt.%, D2 and D3-10 wt.%) were produced by the spark plasma sintering process. D3 compared with D2 was sintered at a higher temperature to evaluate the effect of SPS parameters on the wear characteristics of TMMC. All experiments were performed on pin-on-disk tribotester under a dry sliding condition with different loads (10-11.5 N) and sliding velocities (0.2-0.9 m/s). It is found that higher content of TiC increased TMMC hardness and density. XRD technique has been used to analyze the phase composition. Owing to the high sintering temperature, α-2 Ti3Al phase was formed which further enhanced the matrix anti-wear capability. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to capture the wear track and observe wear mechanism. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) has been used to analyze the tribofilm and wear debris. The results showed that the tribofilm for TMMC was mainly composed of metal oxides. Oxidation of Al and Ti due to frictional heat provides wear-resistant protective layer. Under almost all sliding conditions, TMMC, especially disk D3, exhibited minimum wear rate and stable friction coefficient, whereas gray cast iron exhibited lower and unstable friction coefficient as well as higher wear rate. TMMC has shown superior tribological characteristics over gray cast iron in terms of low wear rate along with stable and adequate friction coefficient which is necessary for braking operation and life of brake disk. However, further investigation on full-scale automobile conditions is needed for its practical application.

  19. Fabrication of AZ31/MWCNTs Surface Metal Matrix Composites by Friction Stir Processing: Investigation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Seyed Mohammad; Zebarjad, Seyed Mojtaba; Jahromi, Seyed Ahmad Jenabali

    2017-11-01

    The surface metal matrix composites of AZ31 Mg alloy reinforced with multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been fabricated through the friction stir processing by a conventional and two stepped tools. The microstructure and mechanical properties of fabricated composites were studied by optical and electron microscopy, microhardness and tensile tests, respectively. The processing has developed a fine-grain structure along with good distribution of reinforcements. The hardness and tensile strength of fabricated MWCNT/AZ31 composites are generally higher than as-received and FSPed samples. The accumulative effect of grain refinement and reinforcing nanotubes is assumed to be the reason for increasing the ductility after friction stir processing. The hardness is nearly doubled for FSPed samples and some more for nanocomposites compared with the as-received sample. The elongation of nanocomposites is about two times greater than that of the as-rolled sample. The speed ratio, pass number and CNT amount are three important factors influencing the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. The stepped tools also give a more uniform distribution of reinforcement and higher grain refinement.

  20. EFFECT OF AGING ON MECHANICAL AND WEAR PROPERTIES OF BERYL PARTICULATE REINFORCED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. N. REDDAPPA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the study of effect of aging on mechanical and wear properties of ‘hot rolled’ Al6061-10% wt. of beryl particulate reinforced composites produced by stir casting have been examined. The result shows that hardness and tensile strength of ‘90% hot rolled and aged’ composites were increased by 10.28% and 3.78% as compared to ‘hot rolled’ composites respectively. The ‘hot rolled and aged’ composite shows significant decrease in specific wear rate when compared to that of ‘hot rolled’ composites.

  1. Depth of Cure of Proximal Composite Restorations using a New Perforated Metal Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    DoD  or  the  USUHS.   Chair /Department  Head  Approval**   Name  (Last,  First,  Middle  Initial)    Motyka, Nancy, C...FORCE POSTGRADUATE DENTAL SCHOOL 2450 Pepperrell Street Lackland AFB Texas, 78236-5345 http://www.usuhs.mll "The author hereby certifies that the...buccal and lingual light curing, or a transparent (Composi-Tight 3D Clear matrix, Garrison Dental Solutions, Spring Lake, MI) sectional matrix system

  2. Metal-Matrix Composites and Porous Materials: Constitute Models, Microstructure Evolution and Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Castafieda, P

    2000-01-01

    Constitutive models were developed and implemented numerically to account for the evolution of microstructure and anisotropy in finite-deformation processes involving porous and composite materials...

  3. Debonding of short fibres among particulates in a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2003-01-01

    A numerical analysis is carried out for the development of damage by fibre-matrix debonding in aluminium reinforced by aligned, short SiC fibres. A unit cell-model that has earlier been applied to study materials with arrays of transversely staggered fibres is here extended to contain a number...

  4. Kinetics of the development of a nonchromate conversion coating for magnesium alloys and magnesium-based metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Nunez, M.A.; Skeldon, P.; Thompson, G.E.; Karimzadeh, H.

    1999-12-01

    Kinetics of the development of a conversion coating from a stannate bath on commercial purity magnesium (Mg{sup comm}), magnesium-based alloys ZC71 and WE43, and a metal matrix composite (MMC), comprising a ZC71 alloy matrix and 12 vol% silicon carbide (SiC) particles were studied using linear polarization resistance, potential-time, potentiodynamic polarization, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and microscopic examination. The coating, typically {approximately}3 {micro}m to 5 {micro}m thick, was composed largely of crystalline magnesium tin oxide (MgSnO{sub 3} {center{underscore}dot} 3H{sub 2}O), and developed by a nucleation and growth process through an initial corrosion film on the substrate. Nucleation probably occurred on regions where a critical concentration of magnesium ions was reached for coating crystals to form. Specific sites of nucleation, such as particles of eutectic phase and of reinforcement, were revealed in some cases, but frequently the precise sites of nucleation were not disclosed. A longer treatment time (at least 35 min) was suggested by polarization resistance data for improved coverage of the substrate than the previously recommended time of 20 min. The coating continuity on the substrates, after a particular time of treatment, depends upon ally composition increasing in order: Mg{sup comm}, 12% (SiC)p/ZC71 alloy MMC, ZC71 alloy, and WE43 alloy. Polarization resistance (R{sub p}) changed systematically with coating development, showing a decrease in R{sub p} in the early stages of the coating process, related to the initial corrosion.

  5. Microhardness and wear behaviour of surface modified Ti6Al4V/Zr-TiC metal matrix composite for advanced material

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popoola, API

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was made using a Rofin Sinar 4 kW Nd: YAG laser. A laser multi-track 50% overlapping process was employed to produce Zr and Zr-TiC metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings on Ti6Al4V substrate...

  6. Non-local plasticity effects on the tensile properties of a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2001-01-01

    For a metal reinforced by aligned short fibres the effect of a material length scale characterising the inelastic deformations of the metal is studied. The elastic-plastic constitutive relations used here to represent the nonlocal effects are formulated so that the instantaneous hardening moduli...... depend on the gradient of the effective plastic strain. Numerical cell-model analyses are used to obtain a parametric understanding of the influence of different combinations of the main material parameters. The analyses show a strong dependence on the fibre diameter for given values of all other...

  7. In situ SEM thermal fatigue of Al/graphite metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, G. S.; Rabenberg, L.; Marcus, H. L.

    1990-01-01

    Several thermal fatigue-induced failure mechanisms are deduced for unidirectional graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMCs subjected to in situ thermal cycling. These thermal cycling conditions are representative of MMC service cycles in aerospace environments, where thermal fatigue is primarily associated with changes in the stress states near the interfaces due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between fiber and matrix. This in situ SEM thermal-cycling study clarified such factors affecting MMCs' thermal fatigue as local fiber content and distribution, void volume, fiber stiffness, thermal excursion magnitude, and number of thermal cycles. MMC microfailure modes in thermal fatigue have been deduced.

  8. Influence of graphite particles on surface roughness and chip formation studies in turning metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basavarajappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental investigation on surface roughness and chip formation in turning of Al 2219/15SiCp and Al 2219/15SiCp-3Gr (hybrid composites. Experiments were conducted with different cutting conditions using carbide, coated carbide and polycrystalline diamond (PCD tools. The results reveal that the surface roughness values are less for coated carbide tools compared to carbide and are minimum for PCD tools. The incorporation of graphite in Al 2219/15SiCp composite increases the surface roughness. This is due to smearing and removal of softer and amorphus graphite particles on the surface of the specimen, creates pits on the machined surface which increases the surface roughness values. The graphitic composite produced discontinuous chips leads to easy machining. PCD tool performs better than carbide and coated carbide tools.

  9. Enhanced Contacts for Inverted Metamorphic Multi-Junction Solar Cells Using Carbon Nanotube Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-18

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2017-0125 TR-2017-0125 ENHANCED CONTACTS FOR INVERTED METAMORPHIC MULTI-JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS USING CARBON NANOTUBE METAL...Rochester, NY 14604-5603 18 Jan 2018 Final Report APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED. AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Space...ACCORDANCE WITH ASSIGNED DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. DAVID WILT PAUL HAUSGEN, Ph.D. Program Manager Technical Advisor, Spacecraft Component Technology

  10. Dry sliding wear investigation of Al6082/Gr metal matrix composites by response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of graphite particles on the dry sliding wear behaviour of Al6082 alloy composites produced by conventional stir casting method has been investigated. The percentage of reinforcement was varied from 0% to 12% in a step of 3. The result showed that with the addition of graphite particles micro- and macro-hardness reduced by 11.11% and 10.44%, respectively. The tribological behaviour of composites was investigated by pin on disc apparatus. Percentage reinforcement, load, sliding speed and sliding distance were taken as the process variable. Response surface methodology has been used to plan and analyze the experiment. Results showed that sliding distance is the most influential factor and load is the factor which affects the wear least.

  11. Metal-Matrix Hardmetal/Cermet Reinforced Composite Powders for Thermal Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri GOLJANDIN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of materials is becoming increasingly important as industry response to public demands, that resources must be preserved and environment protected. To produce materials competitive in cost with primary product, secondary producers have to pursue new technologies and other innovations. For these purposes different recycling technologies for composite materials (oxidation, milling, remelting etc are widely used. The current paper studies hardmetal/cermet powders produced by mechanical milling technology. The following composite materials were studied: Cr3C2-Ni cermets and WC-Co hardmetal. Different disintegrator milling systems for production of powders with determined size and shape were used. Chemical composition of produced powders was analysed.  To estimate the properties of recycled hardmetal/cermet powders, sieving analysis, laser granulometry and angularity study were conducted. To describe the angularity of milled powders, spike parameter–quadric fit (SPQ was used and experiments for determination of SPQ sensitivity and precision to characterize particles angularity were performed. Images used for calculating SPQ were taken by SEM processed with Omnimet Image Analyser 22. The graphs of grindability and angularity were composed. Composite powders based on Fe- and Ni-self-fluxing alloys for thermal spray (plasma and HVOF were produced. Technological properties of powders and properties of thermal sprayed coatings from studied powders were investigated. The properties of spray powders reinforced with recycled hardmetal and cermet particles as alternatives for cost-sensitive applications were demonstrated.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.1.1348

  12. Metal-Matrix Hardmetal/Cermet Reinforced Composite Powders for Thermal Spray

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitri GOLJANDIN; Heikki SARJAS; Priit KULU; Helmo KÄERDI; Valdek MIKLI

    2012-01-01

    Recycling of materials is becoming increasingly important as industry response to public demands, that resources must be preserved and environment protected. To produce materials competitive in cost with primary product, secondary producers have to pursue new technologies and other innovations. For these purposes different recycling technologies for composite materials (oxidation, milling, remelting etc) are widely used. The current paper studies hardmetal/cermet powders produced by mechanica...

  13. Magnetic response from a composite of metal-dielectric particles in the visible range: T-matrix simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zhuromskyy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The optical response of a particle composed of a dielectric core surrounded by a densely packed shell of small metal spheres is simulated with the superposition Tmatrix method for realistic material parameters. In order to compute the electric and magnetic particle polarizabilities a single expansion T-matrix is derived from a particle centered T-matrix. Finally the permeability of a medium comprising such particles is found to deviate considerable from unity resulting in a noticeable optical response.

  14. Method of fabricating metal- and ceramic- matrix composites and functionalized textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, James L [Jemez Springs, NM; Chavez, Craig A [Los Alamos, NM; Black, Marcie R [Lincoln, MA

    2012-04-17

    A method of manufacturing an article comprises providing a first sheet, wetting the first sheet with a liquid precursor to provide a first wet sheet, and irradiating the first wet sheet in a pattern corresponding to a first cross section of the article such that the liquid precursor is at least partially converted to a solid in the first cross section. A second sheet is disposed adjacent to the first sheet. The method further comprises wetting the second sheet with the liquid precursor to provide a second wet sheet, and irradiating the second wet sheet in a pattern corresponding to a second cross section of the article such that the liquid precursor is at least partially converted to a solid in the second cross section. In particular the liquid precursor may be converted to a metal, ceramic, semiconductor, semimetal, or a combination of these materials.

  15. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss, E-mail: prathap@iitm.ac.in

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electroless Ni coatings have been performed on CNTs for various deposition times. • The deposition of nickel increased with increase in deposition time. • A deposition time of 60 min has been optimum for uniform coating of Ni on CNTs. • The CNTs with uniform coating of Ni are potential for reinforcements in composites. • Electroless nickel coatings are determined to be super paramagnetic behavior. - Abstract: Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min.

  16. Influence of vegetable based cutting fluids on cutting force and vibration signature during milling of aluminium metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shankar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the environmental and health issues, there is an enormous requirement for developing the novel cutting fluids (CFs. The vegetable based cutting fluid (VBCFs doesn’t affect the environment, diminish the harmful effects to the operator and also enhance the machining performances such as surface roughness, tool life, minimum vibration and cutting forces. In this work, the performances of four different VBCFs like palm, coconut, sunflower, soya bean oils, and a commercial type of CFs were considered to analyze the influence of cutting fluids while measuring the cutting force and vibration signatures during milling of 7075–T6 hybrid aluminium metal matrix composite with carbide insert tool. The experiments were conducted in CNC L-MILL 55 vertical machining center, with milling tool dynamometer to measure the cutting force and a tri-axial accelerometer to measure the vibration signals. The flow rate of the VBCFs were maintained at a constant rate and the results were compared with a commercial cutting fluid. The obtained result shows that palm oil suits better than the other vegetable based cutting fluids in terms of minimum cutting force requirement and minimum vibration. Also, the experimental result shows that the cutting fluid was one of the important parameter needs to be considered which influences the cutting force and vibration signals.

  17. Microstructures induced by excimer laser surface melting of the SiC{sub p}/Al metal matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, D.S., E-mail: Daishu.qian@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Zhong, X.L.; Yan, Y.Z.; Hashimoto, T.; Liu, Z.

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Microstructural analysis of the excimer laser-melted SiC{sub p}/AA2124;. • Analytical, FEM, and SPH simulation of the laser-material interaction;. • Mechanism of the formation of the laser-induced microstructure. - Abstract: Laser surface melting (LSM) was carried out on the SiC{sub p}/Al metal matrix composite (MMC) using a KrF excimer laser with a fluence of 7 J/cm{sup 2}. The re-solidification microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray detector, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. It was found that a 2.5 μm thick melted layer was formed in the near-surface region, in which dissolution of the intermetallics and removal of the SiC particles occurred. The thermal and material response upon laser irradiation was simulated using three models, i.e. analytical model, finite element model (FEM) and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The effect of SiC particles on the LSM process, the mechanism of the SiC removal and the re-solidification microstructures in the melted layer were discussed. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results and contributed to the generic understanding of the re-solidification microstructures induced by ns-pulsed lasers.

  18. Modeling and multi-objective optimization of powder mixed electric discharge machining process of aluminum/alumina metal matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangadharudu Talla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Low material removal rate (MRR and high surface roughness values hinder large-scale application of electro discharge machining (EDM in the fields like automobile, aerospace and medical industry. In recent years, however, EDM has gained more significance in these industries as the usage of difficult-to-machine materials including metal matrix composites (MMCs increased. In the present work, an attempt has been made to fabricate and machine aluminum/alumina MMC using EDM by adding aluminum powder in kerosene dielectric. Results showed an increase in MRR and decrease in surface roughness (Ra compared to those for conventional EDM. Semi empirical models for MRR and Ra based on machining parameters and important thermo physical properties were established using a hybrid approach of dimensional and regression analysis. A multi response optimization was also performed using principal component analysis-based grey technique (Grey-PCA to determine optimum settings of process parameters for maximum MRR and minimum Ra within the experimental range. The recommended setting of process parameters for the proposed process has been found to be powder concentration (Cp = 4 g/l, peak current (Ip = 3 A, pulse on time (Ton = 150 μs and duty cycle (Tau = 85%.

  19. Electroless nickel plating of arc discharge synthesized carbon nanotubes for metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Prathap, Haridoss

    2015-01-01

    Electroless nickel (EN) plating was performed on arc discharge synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for various deposition times. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization techniques are used to identify the presence of nickel deposition on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the degree of graphitization. The results indicate that impurities are less in the purified CNTs as compared to raw carbon soot. Increasing deposition time up to 60 min increases uniform deposition of nickel throughout the length of the CNTs. However, for deposition time longer than 60 min, nickel particles are seen separated from the surface of the CNTs. Uniformly coated nickel CNTs throughout their length are potential candidates for reinforcements in composite materials. Magnetic properties of the nickel coated CNTs, with deposition time of 30 and 60 min were also evaluated. The magnetic saturation of nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 30 min is less compared to nickel coated CNTs with deposition time of 60 min.

  20. Investigation of microstructure-ultrasonic velocity relationship in SiCp-reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guer, C.H.

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-one sets of specimens were fabricated by hot pressing powder mixtures containing various volume and size combinations of pure Al and SiC particles. Neither heat treatment nor secondary deformation processes were applied. The microstructures of the specimens were characterised by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Using a 10 MHz probe, the velocity of ultrasonic longitudinal waves was measured. The results show that in general the ultrasonic velocity increases with an increase in SiC content. However, for larger Al/SiC particle size ratio and higher volume fraction of SiC, ultrasonic velocity decreases owing to microporosity caused by the segregation of SiC particles along the grain boundaries of aluminium. It is concluded that ultrasonic techniques providing fast and non-destructive information are promising for quality assurance of the composites, and may also help to optimise process parameters

  1. Performance Evaluation of PCD Insert 1600 Grade on Turning of Al 6061 Reinforced with 7.5% ZrB2 Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum matrix composite is the innovation of high performance material technology and it has superior interfacial integrity and thermodynamic stability between the matrix and reinforcement. Making the engineering components from this composite material require subsequent machining operations. This paper presents the detailed experimental investigation of the machining behaviour in turning of Al 6061-7.5% ZrB2 Metal Matrix Composite (MMC by using Poly Crystalline Diamond (PCD insert of 1600 grade. The effect of ZrB2 reinforcement particles on machinability behaviour need to be studied. It is concluded that the feed rate has great influence on surface roughness and depth of cut has great influence on cutting force. The confirmation experiment indicates that there is a good agreement between the estimated value and experimental Value. Tool wear study also carried out for time duration of 15 minutes.

  2. Metal matrix composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chawla, Nikhilesh; Chawla, Krishan Kumar

    2006-01-01

    ... have been published in several journal articles, conference proceedings, and multi-authored volumes. It is surprising that only two texts have been published in this area. Taya and Arsenault (1989) published the first book on MMCs, which was followed by that of Clyne and Withers (1993). Thus, it has been a long time since a textbook on ...

  3. Fabrication and Performance Test of Aluminium Alloy-Rice Husk Ash Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite as Industrial and Construction Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rahat Hossain

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium matrix composites (AMCs used extensively in various engineering fields due to their exceptional mechanical properties. In this present study, aluminium matrix composites (AMCs such as aluminium alloy (A356 reinforced with rice husk ash particles (RHA are made to explore the possibilities of reinforcing aluminium alloy. The stir casting method was applied to produce aluminium alloy (A356 reinforced with various amounts of (2%, 4%, and 6% rice husk ash (RHA particles. Physical treatment was carried out before the rice husk ash manufacturing process. The effect of mechanical strength of the fabricated hybrid composite was investigated. Therefore, impact test, tensile stress, compressive stress, and some other tests were carried out to analyse the mechanical properties. From the experimental results, it was found that maximum tensile, and compressive stress were found at 6% rice husk ash (RHA and aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. In future, the optimum percentages of rice husk ash (RHA to fabricate the hybrid composites will be determined. Also, simulation by finite element method (FEM will be applied for further investigation.

  4. Effect of a high temperature cycle on the mechanical properties of silicon carbide/titanium metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, R. A.; Johnson, W. S.; Pollock, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the effects of the SPF/DB cycle on continuous SiC fiber-reinforced Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite's matrix, fiber, and matrix-fiber interface. The fibers in question, designated SCS-6, have a carbon core and thin, carbon-rich surface. The fatigue endurance limit at 50,000 cycles for the SPF/DB specimens was 50 percent lower than for the as-fabricated material. The substantial changes in tensile strength, fatigue life, and fracture-surface appearance due to the SPF-DB cycle are explained by a difference in the failure mechanisms due to SPF/DB-induced changes in the fiber/matrix interface strength.

  5. On the Role of Processing Parameters in Producing Recycled Aluminum AA6061 Based Metal Matrix Composite (MMC-AlR Prepared Using Hot Press Forging (HPF Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlan Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state recycling, which involves the direct recycling of scrap metal into bulk material using severe plastic deformation, has emerged as a potential alternative to the conventional remelting and recycling techniques. Hot press forging has been identified as a sustainable direct recycling technique that has fewer steps and maintains excellent material performance. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore the hardness and density of a recycled aluminum-based metal matrix composite by varying operating temperature and holding time. A mixture of recycled aluminum, AA6061, and aluminum oxide were simultaneously heated to 430, 480, and 530 °C and forged for 60, 90, and 120 min. We found a positive increase in microhardness and density for all composites. The hardness increased approximately 33.85%, while density improved by about 15.25% whenever the temperature or the holding time were increased. Based on qualitative analysis, the composite endures substantial plastic deformation due to the presence of hardness properties due to the aluminum oxide embedded in the aluminum matrix. These increases were significantly affected by the operating temperature; the holding time also had a subordinate role in enhancing the metal matrix composite properties. Furthermore, in an effort to curb the shortage of primary resources, this study reviewed the promising performance of secondary resources produced by using recycled aluminum and aluminum oxide as the base matrix and reinforcement constituent, respectively. This study is an outline for machining practitioners and the manufacturing industry to help increase industry sustainability with the aim of preserving the Earth for our community in the future.

  6. Metal matrix composites: Testing, analysis, and failure modes; Proceedings of the Symposium, Sparks, NV, Apr. 25, 26, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses the tension and compression testing of MMCs, the measurement of advanced composites' thermal expansion, plasticity theory for fiber-reinforced composites, a deformation analysis of boron/aluminum specimens by moire interferometry, strength prediction methods for MMCs, and the analysis of notched MMCs under tensile loading. Also discussed are techniques for the mechanical and thermal testing of Ti3Al/SCS-6 MMCs, damage initiation and growth in fiber-reinforced MMCs, the shear testing of MMCs, the crack growth and fracture of continuous fiber-reinforced MMCs in view of analytical and experimental results, and MMC fiber-matrix interface failures.

  7. Development of TiN particulates reinforced SS316 based metal matrix composite by direct metal laser sintering technique and its characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Manowar; Mandal, Vijay; Kumar, Vikas; Das, A. K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    The present study describes the fabrication of TiN particulates reinforced SS316 based Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) in nitrogen and argon atmosphere. The influence of sintering process parameters on microstructure, density, porosity, wear rate and microhardness of the fabricated samples has been analyzed. The input variable process parameters, such as, laser power density (range: 4.13-5.57 W/cm2 (× 104)), scanning speed (range: 3500-4500 mm/min) and the constant parameters, such as, laser beam diameter (0.4 mm), hatching distance (0.2 mm) and layer thickness (0.4 mm) have been considered in the process. It has been observed from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) analysis that TiN and SS316 powder mixture can be sintered in which chromium acts as a binder. Fine gaps are not found at the interface between TiN and SS316 when the mixture is sintered in nitrogen atmosphere. With an increase in the percentage of TiN, the density and wear rate decreases. However, when the reinforcement is taken beyond 18% by weight, the wear rate starts increasing. The microhardness also increases with an increase in the percentage of TiN. The microstructure, elemental compositions and phase characterization of the developed sintered MMCs have been examined by FESEM, EDX (Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) and XRD (X-ray diffractometer) analysis, respectively. The results have demonstrated the suitability of the TiN reinforced SS316 MMCs for industrial applications.

  8. Influence of Ni-P Coated SiC and Laser Scan Speed on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of IN625 Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sateesh, N. H.; Kumar, G. C. Mohan; Krishna, Prasad

    2015-12-01

    Nickel based Inconel-625 (IN625) metal matrix composites (MMCs) were prepared using pre-heated nickel phosphide (Ni-P) coated silicon carbide (SiC) reinforcement particles by Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing process under inert nitrogen atmosphere to obtain interface influences on MMCs. The distribution of SiC particles and microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron micrographs, and the mechanical behaviours were thoroughly examined. The results clearly reveal that the interface integrity between the SiC particles and the IN625 matrix, the mixed powders flowability, the SiC ceramic particles and laser beam interaction, and the hardness, and tensile characteristics of the DMLS processed MMCs were improved effectively by the use of Ni-P coated SiC particles.

  9. Development of Intelligent Processing Methodology for Intermetallic Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... Intermetallic matrix composites (IMCs), reinforced with a dispersed ceramic phase, will be incorporated into metallic matrices to serve as reinforcing entities within the resulting multi-lithic reinforced composite (MRC...

  10. Influence of the localized initial plastic deformation on the effective thermomechanical response of metal-matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roatta, A.; Turner, P.A.; Bertinetti, M.A.; Bolmaro, R.E.

    1999-11-01

    A generalized Eshelby model, allowing interaction among reinforcing particles under a Mori-Tanaka-like scheme, is presented. Different inclusion aspect ratios are studied in the elastic and incipient elastoplastic regime for a model SiC-Al composite. The solution of the field equations is obtained via an explicit algorithm that yields the interaction field in terms of the stress and strain variables. The particles and fibers are taken as purely elastic, and the matrix is regarded as elastic-perfectly plastic. Coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) are calculated both under the assumption of purely elastic response and at the onset of plastic localized deformation. The simulated stress-strain curves show the influence of interaction stresses on macroscopic yield stress for different inclusion aspect ratios, with no consideration of matrix hardening. The model allows a good simulation of the thermomechanical behavior of composite materials and contributes to the understanding of the elastoplastic transition in stress-strain curves. It can also simply explain some of the most distinctive features of the mechanical behavior of composites. The model presents the possibility of controlling many input variables and geometries and simultaneously considering three-dimensional deformation of interacting inclusion-reinforced materials with low computational effort. Comparisons to experimental CTE and residual stresses are provided.

  11. Equal channel angular pressing of powder processed Al6061/SiC nano metal matrix composites and study of its wear properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongale, Arunkumar M.; Kumar, Satish

    2018-03-01

    Nano Metal Matrix Composites were fabricated by a novel approach by combining powder metallurgy and equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using aluminium alloy 6061 (Al6061) as matrix phase and 2, 4 and 6 wt% of silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiCnp) as reinforcements. Alloying elements of Al6061 in their elemental form are blended together using high energy planetary ball mill and calculated wt% of SiCnp were mixed with it. Thus formed composite powder mixture is compacted in a uniaxial compaction die and then subjected to ECAP up to three passes. Density and porosity of samples were estimated using Archimedes’ principle. Pin on disc setup is used to evaluate the wear properties of the composites under different speed and loading conditions. Tests revealed that increase in wt% of SiCnp reduces the wear rate of the composites whereas increasing the load and speed increases wear rate of the composite samples. SEM micrographs of worn surfaces indicated different types of wear mechanism responsible for wear of the specimens under different testing conditions. Also, wt% of SiCnp and the number of passes through ECAP were found to increase the hardness value of the composite material.

  12. Radiation resistant ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Steiner, D.; Heinisch, H.L.; Newsome, G.A.; Kerch, H.M.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are of interest for nuclear applications because of their high-temperature properties, corrosion resistance, fracture toughness relative to monolithic ceramics, and low neutron activation and after heat. Evaluations of the radiation resistance of commercially available SiC/SiC composites have revealed their promise for this application, but also the need for further development to achieve the desired performance. This paper summarizes the results of a workshop cosponsored by the Offices of Fusion Energy and Basic Energy Sciences of the US Department of Energy and Lockheed-Martin Corporation with forty attendees from national laboratories, universities and industry. A number of promising routes for optimizing the radiation stability of ceramic matrix composites were identified at this workshop. These routes included the newer, more stoichiometric fibers and alternate fiber/matrix interfaces and matrix processing routes. (orig.)

  13. Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcement from aluminum metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcements from pure Al–SiCp composite scrap by salt flux addi- tion has been theoretically predicted .... zero and the salt fluxes have only little solubility in the matrix metal, separation of the matrix ... aluminum melt with SiC at this temperature did not exceed. 30 min. In order to change the ...

  14. A Theoretical Study on Quantitative Prediction and Evaluation of Thermal Residual Stresses in Metal Matrix Composite (Case 1 : Two-Dimensional In-Plane Fiber Distribution)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Son, Bong Jin

    1997-01-01

    Although discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composite(MMC) is one of the most promising materials for applications of aerospace, automotive industries, the thermal residual stresses developed in the MMC due to the mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion between the matrix and the fiber under a temperature change has been pointed out as one of the serious problem in practical applications. There are very limited nondestructive techniques to measure the residual stress of composite materials. However, many difficulties have been reported in their applications. Therefore it is important to establish analytical model to evaluate the thermal residual stress of MMC for practical engineering application. In this study, an elastic model is developed to predict the average thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber of a misoriented short fiber composite. The thermal residual stresses are induced by the mismatch in the coefficient of the thermal expansion of the matrix and fiber when the composite is subjected to a uniform temperature change. The model considers two-dimensional in-plane fiber misorientation. The analytical formulation of the model is based on Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and is unique in that it is able to account for interactions among fibers. This model is more general than past models to investigate the effect of parameters which might influence thermal residual stress in composites. The present model is to investigate the effects of fiber volume fraction, distribution type, distribution cut-off angle, and aspect ratio on thermal residual stress for in-plane fiber misorientation. Fiber volume fraction, aspect ratio, and distribution cut-off angle are shown to have more significant effects on the magnitude of the thermal residual stresses than fiber distribution type for in-plane misorientation

  15. 2D micromechanical analysis of SiC/Al metal matrix composites under tensile, shear and combined tensile/shear loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai

    2013-01-01

    The influence of interface strength and loading conditions on the mechanical behavior of the metal-matrix composites is investigated in this paper. A program is developed to generate automatically 2D micromechanical Finite element (FE) models including interface, in which both the locations....../shear loads. 2D cohesive element is applied to describe the fracture and failure process of interphase, while the damage models based on maximum principal stress criterion and the stress triaxial indicator are developed within Abaqus/Standard Subroutine USDFLD to simulate the failure process of SiC particles...

  16. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  17. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Cu/SiC metal matrix composite fabricated via friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akramifard, H.R.; Shamanian, M.; Sabbaghian, M.; Esmailzadeh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Designing a net hole was effective to achieve uniform distribution SiC particles and prevent agglomeration of them. • SZ has fine and equiaxed grains and distribution of SiC particles in the matrix is almost uniform. • No intermetallic compound was formed after FSP. • In comparison to pure Cu, Cu/SiC composite shows higher hardness and better wear behavior. - Abstract: In the present investigation, pure Cu sheets were reinforced with 25 μm SiC particles to fabricate a composite surface layer by friction stir processing (FSP). In order to improve distribution of reinforcing SiC particles, a net of holes were designed by drill on the surface of pure Cu sheet. For evaluation of microstructure, Optical Microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were used. Microstructural observation confirmed fine and equiaxed grains in the stir zone (SZ) and showed that SiC particles act as heterogeneous nucleation sites in the dynamic recrystallization of Cu grains. Moreover, agglomeration of particles was not observed and fine particles had a good distribution in SZ. In the SEM micrographs, porosities were detected as microstructure defects. Microhardness measurements showed that surface hardness was two times as high as that of substrate. The rotational wear tests demonstrated that use of SiC particles enhanced wear resistance and increased average friction coefficient of pure Cu. No intermetallic compound was found in Cu/SiC composite as revealed by XRD analysis

  18. Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcement from aluminum metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    . The application of metal matrix composites (MMCs) in many engineering components has increased over the last few years, particularly in the automobile industry as drive shafts, engine and brake components (Chawla and Chawla. 2006).

  19. Effect of shock pressure on the structure and superconducting properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O in explosively fabricated bulk metal-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L. E.; Niou, C. S.; Pradhan-Advani, M.

    1991-01-01

    While it is now well established that copper-oxide-based power, or virtually any other ceramic superconductor powder, can be consolidated and encapsulated within a metal matrix by explosive consolidation, the erratic superconductivity following fabrication has posed a major problem for bulk applications. The nature of this behavior was found to arise from microstructural damage created in the shock wave front, and the residual degradation in superconductivity was demonstrated to be directly related to the peak shock pressure. The explosively fabricated or shock loaded YBa2Cu3Ox examples exhibit drastically altered rho (or R) - T curves. The deterioration in superconductivity is even more noticeable in the measurement of ac magnetic susceptibility and flux exclusion or shielding fraction which is also reduced in proportion to increasing peak shock pressure. The high frequency surface resistance (in the GHz range) is also correspondingly compromised in explosively fabricated, bulk metal-matrix composites based on YBa2Cu3O7. Transmission electron microscopy (including lattice imaging techniques) is being applied in an effort to elucidate the fundamental (microstructural) nature of the shock-induced degradation of superconductivity and normal state conductivity. One focus of TEM observations has assumed that oxygen displaced from b-chains rather than oxygen-vacancy disorder in the basal plane of oxygen deficient YBa2Cu3Ox may be a prime mechanism. Shock-wave displaced oxygen may also be locked into new positions or interstitial clusters or chemically bound to displaced metal (possibly copper) atoms to form precipitates, or such displacements may cause the equivalent of local lattice cell changes as a result of stoichiometric changes. While the shock-induced suppression of T(sub c) is not desirable in the explosive fabrication of bulk metal-matrix superconductors, it may be turned into an advantage if the atomic-scale distortion can be understood and controlled as local

  20. A Simulation of Low and High Cycle Fatigue Failure Effects for Metal Matrix Composites Based on Innovative J₂-Flow Elastoplasticity Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoling; Xiao, Heng

    2017-09-24

    New elastoplastic J 2 -flow constitutive equations at finite deformations are proposed for the purpose of simulating the fatigue failure behavior for metal matrix composites. A new, direct approach is established in a two-fold sense of unification. Namely, both low and high cycle fatigue failure effects of metal matrix composites may be simultaneously simulated for various cases of the weight percentage of reinforcing particles. Novel results are presented in four respects. First, both the yield condition and the loading-unloading conditions in a usual sense need not be involved but may be automatically incorporated into inherent features of the proposed constitutive equations; second, low-to-high cycle fatigue failure effects may be directly represented by a simple condition for asymptotic loss of the material strength, without involving any additional damage-like variables; third, both high and low cycle fatigue failure effects need not be separately treated but may be automatically derived as model predictions with a unified criterion for critical failure states, without assuming any ad hoc failure criteria; and, finally, explicit expressions for each incorporated model parameter changing with the weight percentage of reinforcing particles may be obtainable directly from appropriate test data. Numerical examples are presented for medium-to-high cycle fatigue failure effects and for complicated duplex effects from low to high cycle fatigue failure effects. Simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Advance on Al2O3 Particulates Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (Al-MMCs Manufactured by the Power Metallurgy(PM Methods- Improved PM Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Lina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs with Al2O3 particulates as reinforcement fabricated by the power metallurgy (PM methods have gained much attention due to their unique characteristics of the wide range of Al2O3 particles addition, easy-operating process and effectiveness. The improved PM techniques, such as the high energy ball milling, powder extruder and high pressure torsion were applied to further strengthening the properties or/and diminishing the agglomeration of strength particles. The formation of liquid phase assisted densification of compacts to promote the sintering of composites. Complex design of Al2O3 particles with other particles was another efficient method to tailor the properties of Al-MMCs.

  2. A review of the electrodeposition of metal matrix composite coatings by inclusion of particles in a metal layer: an established and diversifying technology

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, F.C.; Ponce de Leon, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Following a brief overview of their history, which dates back to the 1920s with marked developments during the 1960s and 1970s, the principles of composite coatings, achieved by including particles dispersed in a bath into a growing electrodeposited metal layer, are considered. The principles and role of electroplating compared to other techniques for realising such coatings, are considered. A good quality particle dispersion (often aided by a suitable type and concentration of surfactants) a...

  3. Mechanical tests imaging on metallic matrix composites. Experimental contribution to homogenization methods validation and identification of phase-related mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quoc-Thang Vo

    2013-01-01

    This work is focused on a matrix/inclusion metal composite. A simple method is proposed to evaluate the elastic properties of one phase while the properties of the other phase are assumed to be known. The method is based on both an inverse homogenization scheme and mechanical field's measurements by 2D digital image correlation. The originality of the approach rests on the scale studied, i.e. the microstructure scale of material: the characteristic size of the inclusions is about few tens of microns. The evaluation is performed on standard uniaxial tensile tests associated with a long-distance microscope. It allows observation of the surface of a specimen on the microstructure scale during the mechanical stress. First, the accuracy of the method is estimated on 'perfect' mechanical fields coming from numerical simulations for four microstructures: elastic or porous single inclusions having either spherical or cylindrical shape. Second, this accuracy is estimated on real mechanical field for two simple microstructures: an elasto-plastic metallic matrix containing a single cylindrical micro void or four cylindrical micro voids arranged in a square pattern. Third, the method is used to evaluate elastic properties of αZr inclusions with arbitrary shape in an oxidized Zircaloy-4 sample of the fuel cladding of a pressurized water reactor after an accident loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In all this study, the phases are assumed to have isotropic properties. (author) [fr

  4. Obtainment, machining and wear of metal matrix composites processed by powder metallurgy; Obtencao, usinagem e desgaste de materiais compositos de matriz metalica processados via metalurgia do po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Edilson Rosa Barbosa de. E-mail: erbjesus@usp.br

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was the obtainment of metal matrix composites (MMC) by the route of powder metallurgy, and the valuation of these materials with relation to their machining and wear characteristics. Firstly, were obtained pure commercial aluminium matrix composites materials, with 5, 10 and 15% volumetric fraction of silicon carbide particles. Was also obtained a material without reinforcement particles in order to verify by comparison, the influence of addition of reinforcement particles. The obtained materials were characterized physics (hydrostatic density), mechanics (hardness and tensile tests) and microstructurally (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). The results showed a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement particles in the composite, and improvement in the mechanical properties, mainly tensile strength (UTS) in comparison to the unreinforced material. After, tests were made to verify the materials behavior during machining and to check the performance of several tool materials (cemented carbide, ceramics and polycrystalline diamond). In these tests, values of the cutting force were measured by instrumented tool-holders. Phenomena such as tool wear, built-up edge formation and mechanism of chip formation were also observed and evaluated. The results from the cemented carbide tool tests, were utilised for the machinability index determination of each material. These results were applied to the Taylor equation and the equation constants for each material and test conditions were determined. The results showed that the inclusion of silicon carbide particles made extremely difficult the machining of the composites, and only with diamond tool, satisfactory results were obtained. At last, wear tests were performed to verify the influence of the reinforcement particles in the characteristics of wear resistance of the materials. The results obtained were utilized in the wear coefficient determination for each material. The

  5. Comparison of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of A356/SiC Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Two Different Melting Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Prakash Dwivedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A356/SiC metal matrix composites with different weight percent of SiC particles were fabricated by two different techniques such as mechanical stir casting and electromagnetic stir casting. The results of macrostructure, microstructure, and XRD study revealed uniform distribution, grain refinement, and low porosity in electromagnetic stir casing samples. The mechanical results showed that the addition of SiC particles led to the improvement in tensile strength, hardness, toughness, and fatigue life. It indicates that type of fabrication process and percentage of reinforcement are the effective factors influencing the mechanical properties. It is observed that when percentage of reinforcement increases in electromagnetic stir casting, best mechanical properties are obtained.

  6. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Elevated Temperature Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) Alloy and Its Processing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, David C. [Eck Industreis, Inc.; Gegal, Gerald A.

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300°C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300°C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloys and aluminum alloy castings.

  7. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  8. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  9. Cold spraying SiC/Al metal matrix composites: effects of SiC contents and heat treatment on microstructure, thermophysical and flexural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyansah, L.; Tariq, N. H.; Tang, J. R.; Qiu, X.; Feng, B.; Huang, J.; Du, H.; Wang, J. Q.; Xiong, T. Y.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, cold spray was used as an additive manufacturing method to fabricate 5 mm thick SiC/Al metal matrix composites with various SiC contents. The effects of SiC contents and heat treatment on the microstructure, thermophysical and flexural properties were investigated. Additionally, the composites were characterized for retention of SiC particulates, splat size, surface roughness and the progressive understanding of strengthening, toughening and cracking mechanisms. Mechanical properties were investigated via three-point bending test, thermophysical analysis, and hardness test. In the as-sprayed state, flexural strength increased from 95.3 MPa to 133.5 MPa, an appreciation of 40% as the SiC contents increased, and the main toughening and strengthening mechanisms were zigzag crack propagation and high retention of SiC particulates respectively. In the heat treatment conditions, flexural strength appreciated significantly compared to the as-sprayed condition and this was as a result of coarsening of pure Al splat. Crack branching, crack deflection and interface delamination were considered as the main toughening mechanisms at the heat treatment conditions. Experimental results were consistent with the measured CTE, hardness, porosity and flexural modulus.

  10. In-situ scanning electron microscope studies of crack growth in an aluminum metal-matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    Edge-notched specimens of a cast and extruded Al alloy-based, alumina particulate-reinforced composite in the annealed condition were tested in situ in a SEM apparatus equipped with a deformation stage permitting the direct observation of crack growth phenomena. Fracture in this composite is seen to proceed by initiation of microcracks ahead of the macrocrack; as deformation proceeds, the microcracks lengthen, and crack propagation occurs when the region of intense plastic straining becomes comparable to the macrocrack-microcrack distance. The sequence is then repeated.

  11. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to at least 1093 C (2000F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work is to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite's potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests are conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests are performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating test specimens up to 1093 C (2000 F). Tensile stress-strain data are obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  12. Nuclear waste storage container with metal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a storage container for high-level waste having a metal matrix for the high-level waste, thereby providing greater impact strength for the waste container and increasing heat transfer properties.

  13. Nuclear waste storage container with metal matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sump, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a storage container for high-level waste having a metal matrix for the high-level waste, thereby providing greater impact strength for the waste container and increasing heat transfer properties

  14. Nanoporous metal-carbon composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Satcher, Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Colvin, Jeffrey; Felter, Thomas; Kim, Sangil; Merrill, Matthew; Orme, Christine

    2017-12-19

    Described here is a metal-carbon composite, comprising (a) a porous three-dimensional scaffold comprising one or more of carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide, and (b) metal nanoparticles disposed on said porous scaffold, wherein the metal-carbon composite has a density of 1 g/cm.sup.3 or less, and wherein the metal nanoparticles account for 1 wt. % or more of the metal-carbon composite. Also described are methods for making the metal-carbon composite.

  15. Studies on mechanical properties of aluminium 6061 reinforced with titanium and E glass fibre metal matrix hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. N. Ravi; Vidyasagar, H. N.; Shivanand, H. K.

    2018-04-01

    2Development of the mmc with fibers and filler materials as a replacement material for some engineering purpose such as automobiles, aerospace are indispensable. Therefore, the studies related to hybrid mmc's of Al6061 were noted in this paper. In this work, Al6061 reinforced with E glass fibers and micro Titanium particles. Hybrid composites was prepared by very feasible and commercially used technique Stir casting and by varying composition of Al6061, Titanium and E-glass fibre. Experiments were done by varying weight fraction of Titanium (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%) and E glass fibre (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%). Wire EDM were used to prepare the specimens required for tensile and hardness according to standards and tests conducted. The proportion of elements which are present the mmc's are identified by EDAX. Optical microscopy were conducted by SU3500 machine Scanning Electron Microscope and Microstructure shows the distribution of reinforced Ti particles and E glass fibres. The characterization of Al6061 hybrid mmc's is having significant impact on the mechanical properties.

  16. Rutherford cable made of internal magnesium diffusion MgB2 wires sheathed with Al-Al2O3 particulate metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováč, P.; Kopera, L.; Kováč, J.; Hain, M.; Melišek, T.; Kulich, M.; Hušek, I.

    2018-01-01

    Rutherford MgB2 cable has been made from 12 single-core wires prepared via the internal magnesium diffusion process with a light outer sheath of Al-Al2O3 particulate metal matrix composite. Initially, critical currents of single-core wires with different diameters (between 1 mm and 0.465 mm) were measured. X-ray tomography was applied for the analysis of the uniformity of a Rutherford cable assembled of 0.465 mm strands. The obtained engineering current density at 4.2 K and 6. 5 T for the present cable (with only 9.6% of MgB2) is ∼3.6 times higher in comparison with a similar cable fabricated via the powder-in-tube in situ process with 19.8% of MgB2 phase. The strain tolerance of the cable by bending has shown a critical diameter of 70 mm. AC losses measured via the calibration-free method have shown apparently lower coupling losses for the cabled conductor. The obtained results are promising for future lightweight, mechanically flexible and low AC loss MgB2 superconductors suitable especially for motors or generators.

  17. A Computational Study on the Use of an Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite and Aramid as Alternative Brake Disc and Brake Pad Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosa Idusuyi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational model for the heat generation and dissipation in a disk brake during braking and the following release period has been formulated. The model simulates the braking action by investigating the thermal behaviour occurring on the disc and pad surfaces during this period. A comparative study was made between grey cast iron (GCI, asbestos, Aluminium metal matrix composite (AMC, and aramid as brake pad and disc materials. The braking process and following release period were simulated for four material combinations, GCI disc and Asbestos pad, GCI disc and Aramid pad, AMC disc and Asbestos pad, AMC disc and Aramid pad using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The results show similarity in thermal behaviour at the contact surface for the asbestos and aramid brake pad materials with a temperature difference of 1.8 K after 10 seconds. For the brake disc materials, the thermal behaviour was close, with the highest temperature difference being 9.6 K. The GCI had a peak temperature of 489 K at 1.2 seconds and AMC was 465.5 K but cooling to 406.4 K at 10 seconds, while the GCI was 394.7 K.

  18. Tensile behaviour at room and high temperatures of novel metal matrix composites based on hyper eutectic Al-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valer, J.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Urcola, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    This work shows the improvement obtained on tensile stress at room and high temperatures of hyper eutectic Al-Si alloys. These alloys are produced by a combination of spray-forming, extrusion and thixoforming process, in comparison with conventional casting alloys.Al-25% Si-5%Cu. Al-25%Si-5%Cu-2%Mg and Al-30%Si-5%Cu alloys have been studied relating their microstructural parameters with tensile stress obtained and comparing them with conventional Al-20%Si. Al-36%Si and Al-50%Si alloys. Al-25%Si-5%Cu alloy-was tested before and after semi-solid forming, in order to distinguish the different behaviour of this alloy due to the different microstructure. The properties obtained with these alloys were also related to Al-SiC composites formed by similar processes. (Author) 20 refs

  19. Investigation of microstructure-ultrasonic velocity relationship in SiC{sub p}-reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guer, C.H

    2003-11-25

    Twenty-one sets of specimens were fabricated by hot pressing powder mixtures containing various volume and size combinations of pure Al and SiC particles. Neither heat treatment nor secondary deformation processes were applied. The microstructures of the specimens were characterised by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Using a 10 MHz probe, the velocity of ultrasonic longitudinal waves was measured. The results show that in general the ultrasonic velocity increases with an increase in SiC content. However, for larger Al/SiC particle size ratio and higher volume fraction of SiC, ultrasonic velocity decreases owing to microporosity caused by the segregation of SiC particles along the grain boundaries of aluminium. It is concluded that ultrasonic techniques providing fast and non-destructive information are promising for quality assurance of the composites, and may also help to optimise process parameters.

  20. Structure, thermal and mechanical properties of in situ Al-based metal matrix composite reinforced with Al2O3 and TiC submicron particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Peng; Mei Zhi; Tjong, S.C.

    2005-01-01

    We report herein the structure and characterization of in situ Al-based metal matrix composites (MMCs) prepared from the Al-10 wt.% TiO 2 and Al-10 wt.% TiO 2 -1.5 wt.% C systems via hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1000 deg C and 100 MPa. The structure, morphology and thermal behavior of HIPed samples were studied by means of the X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicated that fined Al 2 O 3 particles and large intermetallic Al 3 Ti plates were in situ formed in the Al-10 wt.% TiO 2 sample during HIPing. However, the introduction of C to the Al-TiO 2 system was beneficial to eliminate large intermetallic Al 3 Ti plates. In this case, Al 2 O 3 and TiC submicron particles were in situ formed in the Al-10 wt.% TiO 2 -1.5 wt.% C sample. Three-point-bending test showed that the strength and the strain-at-break of the HIPed Al-10 wt.% TiO 2 -1.5 wt.% C sample were significantly higher than those of its Al-10 wt.% TiO 2 counterpart. The improvement was derived from the elimination of bulk Al 3 Ti intermetallic plates and from the formation of TiC submicron particles. DSC measurements and thermodynamic analyses were carried out to reveal the reaction formation mechanisms of in situ reinforcing phases. The DSC results generally correlated well with the theoretical predictions. Finally, the correlation between the structure-property relationships of in situ composites is discussed

  1. The transverse creep deformation and failure characteristics of SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V metal matrix composites at 482 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleston, M.R.; Ritter, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    While continuous fiber, unidirectional composites are primarily evaluated for their longitudinal properties, the behavior transverse to the fibers often limits their application. In this study, the tensile and creep behaviors of SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V composites in the transverse direction at 482 C were evaluated. Creep tests were performed in air and argon environments over the stress range of 103 to 276 MPa. The composite was less creep resistant than the matrix when tested at stress values larger than 150 MPa. Below 150 MPa, the composite was ore creep resistant than the unreinforced matrix. Failure of the composite occurred by the ductile propagation of racks emanating from separated fiber interfaces. The environment in which the test was performed affected the creep behavior. At 103 MPa, the creep rate in argon was 4 times slower than the creep rate in air. The SCS-6 silicon-carbide fiber's graphite coating oxidized in the air environment and encouraged the separation of the fiber-matrix interface. However, at high stress levels, the difference in behavior between air- and argon-tested specimens was small. At these stresses, separation of the interface occurred during the initial loading of the composite and the subsequent degradation of the interface did not affect the creep behavior. Finally, the enrichment of the composite's surface by molybdenum during fabrication resulted in an alloyed surface layer that failed in a brittle fashion during specimen elongation. Although this embrittled layer did not appear to degrade the properties of the composite, the existence of a similar layer on a composite with a more brittle matrix might be very detrimental

  2. Nondestructive Characterization of Two-Phase Metal-Matrix Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    to a time standard. The alloys 1100. 3003. 5052 , 6061. and 2024. Aluminium specific technique may utilise a standin,-wave pat- alloys that contain...obtained for rolled ferritic steel sheets, rolled ferritic steel plates and for extruded metal-matrix composites of the aluminium alloys Al-8091, Al-7064...and Salama Table 1. Chemical composition of aluminium alloyvs and volhme percentage of SiC reinforcement of the MNIC-specimens Alloying Elements Alloy

  3. Magnesium Matrix Composite Foams—Density, Mechanical Properties, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Cho

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Potential of widespread industrial applications of magnesium has been realized in recent years. A variety of magnesium alloy matrix composites are now being studied for mechanical properties. Since magnesium is the lightest structural metal, it can replace aluminum in existing applications for further weight savings. This review presents an overview of hollow particle filled magnesium matrix syntactic composite foams. Fly ash cenospheres are the most commonly used hollow particles for such applications. Fly ash cenospheres primarily have alumino-silicate composition and contain a large number of trace elements, which makes it challenging to study the interfacial reactions and microstructure in these composites. Microstructures of commonly studied AZ and ZC series magnesium alloys and their syntactic foams are discussed. Although only a few studies are available on these materials because of the nascent stage of this field, a comparison with similar aluminum matrix syntactic foams has provided insight into the properties and weight saving potential of magnesium matrix composites. Analysis shows that the magnesium matrix syntactic foams have higher yield strength at the same level of density compared to most other metal matrix syntactic foams. The comparison can guide future work and set goals that need to be achieved through materials selection and processing method development.

  4. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    based bulk metallic glass (BMG) and its in situ BMG matrix composites with diameter of 3 mm were fabricated by conventional Cu-mould casting method and ... The composites showed lower friction coefficient and wear rate than the pure BMG.

  5. Fabrication of aluminum-alumina metal matrix composites via cold gas dynamic spraying at low pressure followed by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodder, K.J.; Izadi, H. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, 7th Floor, Electrical and Computer Engineering Research Facility, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2V4 (Canada); McDonald, A.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, 4-9 Mechanical Engineering Building, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G8 (Canada); Gerlich, A.P., E-mail: agerlich@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2012-10-30

    Cold gas dynamic spraying at low pressure (1 MPa gage or 150 psig) was used to fabricate Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings onto 6061 Al alloy. The powder contained Al powder admixed with -10 {mu}m Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in fractions up to 90 wt.%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Vickers microhardness testing, and image analysis were conducted to determine the microstructure, properties, and volume fraction of reinforcing particles in the coatings. The coatings were then friction-stir processed (FSP) at tool rotation speeds of 894 or 1723 RPM using a flat cylindrical tool. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and hardness of the final MMC coatings increased with increasing fractions of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in the feedstock powder, resulting in a maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of 48 wt.% and a hardness of 85 HV of the as-sprayed coating when 90 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used in the feed powder blend. After FSP, the hardness of the MMC increased to a maximum of 137 HV. The as-sprayed coatings contained Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles that were segregated between the Al particles, and FSP was effective in dispersing these Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles and decreasing their mean free path. It was suggested that this re-distribution and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle size refinement during FSP improved the hardness of the MMC coatings.

  6. Effect of Cutting Parameters on Thrust Force and Surface Roughness in Drilling of Al-2219/B4C/Gr Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, V. M.; Basavarajappa, G. S. Shiva Shankar S.; Suresh, R.

    2016-09-01

    In aluminium matrix composites, reinforcement of hard ceramic particle present inside the matrix which causes tool wear, high cutting forces and poor surface finish during machining. This paper focuses on effect of cutting parameters on thrust force, surface roughness and burr height during drilling of MMCs. In the present work, discuss the influence of spindle speed and feed rate on drilling the pure base alloy (Al-2219), mono composite (Al- 2219+8% B4C) and hybrid composite (Al-2219+8%B4C+3%Gr). The composites were fabricated using liquid metallurgy route. The drilling experiments were conducted by CNC machine with TiN coated HSS tool, M42 (Cobalt grade) and carbide tools at various spindle speeds and feed rates. The thrust force, surface roughness and burr height of the drilled hole were investigated in mono composite and hybrid composite containing graphite particles, the experimental results show that the feed rate has more influence on thrust force and surface roughness. Lesser thrust force and discontinuous chips were produced during machining of hybrid composites when compared with mono and base alloy during drilling process. It is due to solid lubricant property of graphite which reduces the lesser thrust force, burr height and lower surface roughness. When machining with Carbide tool at low feed and high speeds good surface finish was obtained compared to other two types of cutting tool materials.

  7. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Li, Wenguang; Bailey, James A.; Gao, Yuan

    2010-08-31

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  8. Microwave Processed Multifunctional Polymer Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has identified polymer matrix composites (PMCs) as a critical need for launch and in-space vehicles, but the significant costs of such materials limits their...

  9. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  10. Silver Matrix Composites - Structure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase compositions of composite materials determine their performance as well as physical and mechanical properties. Depending on the type of applied matrix and the kind, amount and morphology of the matrix reinforcement, it is possible to shape the material properties so that they meet specific operational requirements. In the paper, results of investigations on silver alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles are presented. The investigations enabled evaluation of hardness, tribological and mechanical properties as well as the structure of produced materials. The matrix of composite material was an alloy of silver and aluminium, magnesium and silicon. As the reinforcing phase, 20-60 μm ceramic particles (SiC, SiO2, Al2O3 and Cs were applied. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phase in the composites was 10%. The composites were produced using the liquid phase (casting technology, followed by plastic work (the KOBO method. The mechanical and tribological properties were analysed for plastic work-subjected composites. The mechanical properties were assessed based on a static tensile and hardness tests. The tribological properties were investigated under dry sliding conditions. The analysis of results led to determination of effects of the composite production technology on their performance. Moreover, a relationship between the type of reinforcing phase and the mechanical and tribological properties was established.

  11. COMPOSITION OF FOWLPOX VIRUS AND INCLUSION MATRIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RANDALL, C C; GAFFORD, L G; DARLINGTON, R W; HYDE, J

    1964-04-01

    Randall, Charles C. (University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson), Lanelle G. Gafford, Robert W. Darlington, and James M. Hyde. Composition of fowlpox virus and inclusion matrix. J. Bacteriol. 87:939-944. 1964.-Inclusion bodies of fowlpox virus infection are especially favorable starting material for the isolation of virus and inclusion matrix. Electron micrographs of viral particles and matrix indicated a high degree of purification. Density-gradient centrifugation of virus in cesium chloride and potassium tartrate was unsatisfactory because of inactivation, and clumping or disintegration. Chemical analyses of virus and matrix revealed significant amounts of lipid, protein, and deoxyribonucleic acid, but no ribonucleic acid or carbohydrate. Approximately 47% of the weight of the virus and 83% of the matrix were extractable in chloroform-methanol. The lipid partitions of the petroleum ether extracts were similar, except that the phospholipid content of the matrix was 2.2 times that of the virus. Viral particles were sensitive to diethyl ether and chloroform.

  12. CARBON-CONTAINING COMPOSITES BASED ON METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VAGANOV V. E.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement Among the developed technologies metal-composites production,a special place takes powder metallurgy, having fundamental differences from conventionally used foundry technologies. The main advantages of this technology are: the possibility of sensitive control, the structure and phase composition of the starting components, and ultimately the possibility of obtaining of bulk material in nanostructured state with a minimum of processing steps. The potential reinforcers metals include micro and nano-sized oxides, carbides, nitrides, whiskers. The special position is occupied with carbon nanostructures (CNS: С60 fullerenes, single-layer and multi-layer nanotubes, onions (spherical "bulbs", nano-diamonds and graphite,their properties are being intensively studied in recent years. These objects have a high thermal and electrical conductivity values, superelasticity, and have a strength approximate to the theoretical value, which can provide an obtaining composite nanomaterial with a unique set of physical and mechanical properties. In creation of a metal matrix composite nanomaterials (CM, reinforced by various CNS, a special attention should be given to mechanical activation processes (MA already at the stage of preparation of the starting components affecting the structure, phase composition and properties of aluminum-matrix composites. Purpose. To investigate the influence of mechanical activation on the structure and phase composition of aluminum-matrix composites. Conclusion. The results of the study of the structure and phase composition of the initial and mechanically activated powders and bulk-modified metal-composites are shown, depending on the type and concentration of modifying varieties CNS, regimes of MA and parameters of compaction. The study is conducted of tribological properties of Al-CNS OF nanostructured materials.

  13. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  14. Development of an in-situ synthesized multi-component reinforced Al–4.5%Cu–TiC metal matrix composite by FAS technique – Optimization of process parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Das

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, an in-situ multi-component reinforced aluminium copper alloy based metal matrix composite was fabricated by the flux assisted synthesis (FAS technique. It was found from the optical microscopy analysis that TiC particles are formed in the composite. Further the present research investigates the feasibility and dry machining characteristics of Al–4.5%Cu/5TiC metal matrix composite in CNC milling machine using uncoated solid carbide end mill cutter. The effect of the machining parameters such as feed, cutting speed, depth of cut on the response parameters such as cutting force and COM is determined by using analysis of variance (ANOVA. From the analysis it was found that cutting speed and depth of cut played a major role in affecting cutting force. Multi output optimization of the process was carried out by the application of the Taguchi method with fuzzy logic, and the confirmatory test has revealed the accuracy of the developed model. For predicting the response parameters, regression equations were developed and verified with a number of test cases and it was observed that the percentage error for both responses is less than ±3%, which indicates there is a close agreement between the predicted and the measured results.

  15. Evolution of the internal friction in SIC particle reinforced 8090 Al-Li metal matrix composite; Evolucion de la friccion interna del material compuesto de matriz Al-Li 8090 reforzado con particulas de SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez-Urrutia, I.; Gallego, I.; No, M. L.; San Juan, J. M.

    2001-07-01

    The present study has been undertaken to investigate the mechanisms of thermal stress relief at the range of temperatures below room temperature for the metal matrix composite Al-Li 8090/SiC. For this aim the experimental technique of internal friction has been used which has been showed up very effective. Several thermal cycles from 453 K to 100 K were used in order to measures the internal friction as well as the elastic modules of the material concluding that thermal stresses are relaxed by microplastic deformation around the reinforcements. It has been also related the variation in the elastic modules with the different levels of precipitation. (Author) 18 refs.

  16. Drilling of polymer-matrix composites

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaraj, Vijayan; Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric composites are recognised as good candidates for structural components due to their inherent properties. However, they present several kinds of damages while creating holes for assembly. Delamination is considered the most serious damage since it reduces service life of the component. Thrust and delamination can be controlled by proper drill point geometry. Drilling at high speed is also a current requirement of the aerospace industry. This book focus on drilling of polymer matrix composites for aerospace and defence applications. The book presents introduction to machining of polymer composites and discusses drilling as a processing of composites.

  17. Wear and impact resistance of HVOF sprayedceramic matrix composites coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawara, B.; Martides, E.; Priyono, B.; Ardy, H.; Rikardo, N.

    2016-02-01

    Ceramic coating has the mechanical properties of high hardness and it is well known for application on wear resistance, but on the other hand the resistance to impact load is low. Therefore its use is limited to applications that have no impact loading. The aim of this research was to obtain ceramic-metallic composite coating which has improved impact resistance compared to conventional ceramic coating. The high impact resistance of ceramic-metallic composite coating is obtained from dispersed metallic alloy phase in ceramic matrix. Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) powder with chrome carbide (Cr3C2) base and ceramic-metal NiAl-Al2O3 with various particle sizes as reinforced particle was deposited on mild steel substrate with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating. Repeated impact test showed that reinforced metallic phase size influenced impact resistance of CMC coating. The ability of CMC coating to absorb impact energy has improved eight times and ten times compared with original Cr3C2 and hard chrome plating respectively. On the other hand the high temperature corrosion resistance of CMC coating showed up to 31 cycles of heating at 800°C and water quenching cooling.

  18. Silver matrix composites reinforced with galvanically silvered particles

    OpenAIRE

    J. Śleziona; J. Wieczorek,

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper presents the possibility of the application of metalic layers drifted with the use of the galvanic methods on the ceramic particles surface. The application of the layers was aimed at obtaining the rewetting of the reinforcing particles with the liquid silver in the course of the producing of silver matrix composites with the use of mechanical stirring method. To enable introducing of the iron powder and glass carbon powder to liquid silver the solution of covering the powd...

  19. Ceramic matrix composites by microwave assisted CVI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) processes for producing continuously reinforced ceramic composites are reviewed. Potential advantages of microwave assisted CVI are noted and numerical studies of microwave assisted CVI are reviewed. The models predict inverted thermal gradients in fibrous ceramic preforms subjected to microwave radiation and suggest processing strategies for achieving uniformly dense composites. Comparisons are made to experimental results on silicon-based composite systems. The role played by the relative ability of fiber and matrix to dissipate microwave energy is noted. Results suggest that microwave induced inverted gradients can be exploited to promote inside-out densification. 10 refs., 2 figs

  20. CMH-17 Volume 5 Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulonis, Rachael; Kiser, J. Douglas; David, Kaia E.; Davies, Curtis; Ashforth, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of issues must be addressed during the process of certifying CMC (ceramic matrix composite) components for use in commercial aircraft. The Composite Materials Handbook-17, Volume 5, Revision A on ceramic matrix composites has just been revised to help support FAA certification of CMCs for elevated temperature applications. The handbook supports the development and use of CMCs through publishing and maintaining proven, reliable engineering information and standards that have been thoroughly reviewed. Volume 5 contains detailed sections describing CMC materials processing, design analysis guidelines, testing procedures, and data analysis and acceptance. A review of the content of this latest revision will be presented along with a description of how CMH-17, Volume 5 could be used by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and others in the future.

  1. Metallic glass-strengthened thermoplastic elastomer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Liu, Hao; Wang, Dong; Wang, Enpeng; Liu, Wenjian; Yao, Kefu; Chen, Na

    2017-06-01

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) and metallic glasses (MGs), both lack of long-range ordering structure, have different physical and mechanical properties. To combine unique viscoelasticity of elastomers and excellent wear resistance of MGs, we propose to introduce a Pd40Ni40Si4P16 MG into a commercial styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) TPE to form MG/TPE composites. Serving as a hard and strong second phase dispersed in the SBS matrix, the micrometer-sized MG particles can effectively improve the wear resistance of the matrix due to a strengthening effect. In particular, the MG/TPE composite with an addition of 60 wt% MG shows significantly enhanced wear resistance up to about three times that of the SBS matrix. The present results provide a new way to enhance the wear resistance of the widely used TPEs, which may generate immense economic value by extending their service life.

  2. Aluminum matrix composites reinforced with alumina nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the latest efforts to develop aluminum nanocomposites with enhanced damping and mechanical properties and good workability. The nanocomposites exhibited high strength, improved damping behavior and good ductility, making them suitable for use as wires. Since the production of metal matrix nanocomposites by conventional melting processes is considered extremely problematic (because of the poor wettability of the nanoparticles), different powder metallurgy routes were investigated, including high-energy ball milling and unconventional compaction methods. Special attention was paid to the structural characterization at the micro- and nanoscale, as uniform nanoparticle dispersion in metal matrix is of prime importance. The aluminum nanocomposites displayed an ultrafine microstructure reinforced with alumina nanoparticles produced in situ or added ex situ. The physical, mechanical and functional characteristics of the materials produced were evaluated using different mechanical tests and micros...

  3. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslain, R.

    2011-10-01

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  4. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naslain, R, E-mail: naslain@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [University of Bordeaux 3, Allee de La Boetie, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2011-10-29

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  5. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naslain, R

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  6. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  7. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) Sic fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  8. Polypropylene matrix composites reinforced with coconut fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virginia Gelfuso

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene matrix composites reinforced with treated coconut fibers were produced. Fibers chemically treated (alkalization-CCUV samples or mechanically treated (ultrasonic shockwave-CMUV samples were dried using UV radiation. The goal was to combine low cost and eco-friendly treatments to improve fiber-matrix adhesion. Composite samples containing up to 20 vol. (% of untreated and treated coconut fibers were taken from boxes fabricated by injection molding. Water absorption and mechanical properties were investigated according to ASTM D570-98 and ASTM D638-03, respectively. Electrical characterizations were carried out to identify applications of these composites in the electrical sector. NBR 10296-Electrical Tracking Standard (specific to industry applications and conductivity measurements were obtained applying 5 kV DC to the samples. CMUV samples containing 5 vol. (% fiber presented superior tensile strength values (σ~28 MPa compared to the untreated fibers composite (σ~22 MPa or alkali treatment (σ~24 MPa. However, CMUV composites containing 10 vol. (% fiber presented best results for the electrical tracking test and electrical resistivity (3 × 10(7 Ω.m. The results suggest that composites reinforced with mechanically treated coconut fibers are suitable for electrical applications.

  9. The Study of Corrosion and Wear Resistance of Copper Composite Coatings with Inclusions of Carbon Nanomaterials in the Copper Metal Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktorija MEDELIENĖ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the peculiarities of the behaviour of copper nanocomposite coatings with CNMs inclusions under the free corrosion conditions in the acidic medium. The parameters of corrosion current density (jcorr, anodic dissolution current density (ia and polarization resistance (Rp have been determined. In the acidic medium a stronger oxidation of nanostructured copper nanocomposites occurred. With longer immersion periods more corrosion products are formed, resulting in a increase in the polarization resistance (Rp of corrosion. Corrosion products cover the whole surface of the coatings and the corrosion rate (jcorr tends towards a steady value of 1.7×10-3 ¸ 2.1×10-3 A·cm-2 for all copper coatings studied: 1.7×10-3 A·cm-2 for both Cu and Cu-CNM1, 1.9×10-3 A·cm-2 - for Cu-CNM2 and 2.1×10-3 A·cm-2 - for Cu-CNM3 composite coatings. It has been established that nanocomposites possess a higher wear resistance as compared to that of pure copper. The damage of metal characterized as a depth scar (đ is lower. The roughness of the composites studied was found to be the essential factor affecting their wear resistance. Therefore, the wear resistance of nanocomposites is impaired when they are deposited on a hard steel substrate.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.2.481

  10. Metallized Nanotube Polymer Composite (MNPC) and Methods for Making Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Nazem, Negin (Inventor); Taylor, Larry (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A novel method to develop highly conductive functional materials which can effectively shield various electromagnetic effects (EMEs) and harmful radiations. Metallized nanotube polymer composites (MNPC) are composed of a lightweight polymer matrix, superstrong nanotubes (NT), and functional nanoparticle inclusions. MNPC is prepared by supercritical fluid infusion of various metal precursors (Au, Pt, Fe, and Ni salts), incorporated simultaneously or sequentially, into a solid NT-polymer composite followed by thermal reduction. The infused metal precursor tends to diffuse toward the nanotube surface preferentially as well as the surfaces of the NT-polymer matrix, and is reduced to form nanometer-scale metal particles or metal coatings. The conductivity of the MNPC increases with the metallization, which provides better shielding capabilities against various EMEs and radiations by reflecting and absorbing EM waves more efficiently. Furthermore, the supercritical fluid infusion process aids to improve the toughness of the composite films significantly regardless of the existence of metal.

  11. LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-04-21

    Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

  12. Fatigue Behavior of a Functionally-Graded Titanium Matrix Composite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Scott R

    2005-01-01

    Functionally-graded Titanium Matrix Composites are an attempt to utilize the high-strength properties of a titanium matrix composite with a monolithic alloy having the more practical machining qualities...

  13. Immobilization of krypton in a metal matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmell, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The report presents the work carried out on the immobilization of krypton in a metallic matrix by combined ion implantation and sputtering. The process has been successfully tested using 100 curies of fully active krypton in order to demonstrate that the process operates in the radiation levels which will be obtained with active gas at a reprocessing plant. A design study for a plant for fuel reprocessing has shown that the process can be simply operated, without requiring shielded cells. These results, which complete the development programme, indicate that the process is ideal for the containment of kripton arising from the processing of nuclear fuel and that the product will retain the gas under normal storage conditions and also during simulated accident conditions

  14. The Role of the Interface in Refractory Metal Alloy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobstein, Toni; Yun, Hee M.

    1991-01-01

    Creep-rupture and tensile tests have been used to evaluate thoriated W-wire reinforced Nb-1 percent Zr alloy matrix composites fabricated via arc-spray monotape technique. A significant creep strength enhancement was observed over the unreinforced matrix alloy while matrix integrity was maintained; the fiber/matrix interface phase is noted to be a strong and ductile W/Nb alloy, which is formed due to the mutual solubility of the constituent metals. High strength, toughness, and thermal stability are demonstrated by this material system, which is also resistant to liquid alkali metal corrosion.

  15. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Morrow, S. Marvin; Rexford, Donald

    1999-01-01

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  16. The Effect of Nodular Cast Iron Metal Matrix on the Wear Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    G. Gumienny

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies on the effect of the nodular cast iron metal matrix composition on the abrasive and adhesive wear resistance. Nodular cast iron with different metal matrix obtained in the rough state and ADI were tested. To research of abrasive and adhesive wear the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides and without this component were chosen. The influence of the carbides amount for cast iron wear resistance was examined. It was found, that the highest abrasive ...

  17. Properties of Extruded Disintegrable Metal Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Bobby; Xu, Zhiyue; Welch, John

    Recently, a lightweight, disintegrable material with high strength and high ductility has been successfully used in oilfield tool applications to save well operation time and cost. The material is a powder metallurgy composite consisting of a metal matrix and mechanical/chemical reinforcements. Warm extrusion was used to produce rods and tubes of the material from cold pressed green preform. Disintegration rates of the extruded materials with different compositions range from 0 - 300 mg/cm2/hr in 3% KCl at 93.3 °C with a strength of > 60 ksi (414 MPa) and ductility of 7 - 15%. This paper presents the micro structure, disintegration, and mechanical properties of the extruded composite. The results prove that disintegration properties can be controlled by altering the chemical composition of the reinforcements while maintaining good strength and ductility.

  18. Fracture behaviour of brittle (glass) matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 482, - (2005), s. 115-122 ISSN 0255-5476. [International Conference on Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture /4./. Brno, 23.06.2004-25.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041003; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Ceramic matrix composite s * fracture toughness * toughening effects Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2005

  19. Aluminum/alkaline earth metal composites and method for producing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Alan M; Anderson, Iver E; Kim, Hyong J; Freichs, Andrew E

    2014-02-11

    A composite is provided having an electrically conducting Al matrix and elongated filaments comprising Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba disposed in the matrix and extending along a longitudinal axis of the composite. The filaments initially comprise Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba metal or allow and then may be reacted with the Al matrix to form a strengthening intermetallic compound comprising Al and Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba. The composite is useful as a long-distance, high voltage power transmission conductor.

  20. Characterization of Hybrid CNT Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Kinney, Megan C.; Pressley, James; Sauti, Godfrey; Czabaj, Michael W.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied extensively since their discovery and demonstrated at the nanoscale superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties in comparison to micro and macro scale properties of conventional engineering materials. This combination of properties suggests their potential to enhance multi-functionality of composites in regions of primary structures on aerospace vehicles where lightweight materials with improved thermal and electrical conductivity are desirable. In this study, hybrid multifunctional polymer matrix composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets into Hexcel® IM7/8552 prepreg, a well-characterized toughened epoxy carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite. The resin content of these interleaved CNT sheets, as well as ply stacking location were varied to determine the effects on the electrical, thermal, and mechanical performance of the composites. The direct-current electrical conductivity of the hybrid CNT composites was characterized by in-line and Montgomery four-probe methods. For [0](sub 20) laminates containing a single layer of CNT sheet between each ply of IM7/8552, in-plane electrical conductivity of the hybrid laminate increased significantly, while in-plane thermal conductivity increased only slightly in comparison to the control IM7/8552 laminates. Photo-microscopy and short beam shear (SBS) strength tests were used to characterize the consolidation quality of the fabricated laminates. Hybrid panels fabricated without any pretreatment of the CNT sheets resulted in a SBS strength reduction of 70 percent. Aligning the tubes and pre-infusing the CNT sheets with resin significantly improved the SBS strength of the hybrid composite To determine the cause of this performance reduction, Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness of the CNT sheet to CFRP interface was characterized by double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notch flexure (ENF) testing, respectively. Results are compared to the

  1. EH3 matrix mineralogy with major and trace element composition compared to chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, S. W.; McDonough, W. F.; NéMeth, P.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the matrix mineralogy in primitive EH3 chondrites Sahara 97072, ALH 84170, and LAR 06252 with transmission electron microscopy; measured the trace and major element compositions of Sahara 97072 matrix and ferromagnesian chondrules with laser-ablation, inductively coupled, plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS); and analyzed the bulk composition of Sahara 97072 with LA-ICPMS, solution ICPMS, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The fine-grained matrix of EH3 chondrites is unlike that in other chondrite groups, consisting primarily of enstatite, cristobalite, troilite, and kamacite with a notable absence of olivine. Matrix and pyroxene-rich chondrule compositions differ from one another and are distinct from the bulk meteorite. Refractory lithophile elements are enriched by a factor of 1.5-3 in chondrules relative to matrix, whereas the matrix is enriched in moderately volatile elements. The compositional relation between the chondrules and matrix is reminiscent of the difference between EH3 pyroxene-rich chondrules and EH3 Si-rich, highly sulfidized chondrules. Similar refractory element ratios between the matrix and the pyroxene-rich chondrules suggest the fine-grained material primarily consists of the shattered, sulfidized remains of the formerly pyroxene-rich chondrules with the minor addition of metal clasts. The matrix, chondrule, and metal-sulfide nodule compositions are probably complementary, suggesting all the components of the EH3 chondrites came from the same nebular reservoir.

  2. Surface modification by metal ion implantation forming metallic nanoparticles in an insulating matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, M.C.; Teixeira, F.S.; Sgubin, L.G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I.G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal nanoparticles can be produced through metallic ion implantation in insulating substrate, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. • The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile, that can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN. • Nanocomposites, obtained by this way, can be produced in different insulator materials. More specifically we have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. • The nanocomposites were characterized by measuring the resistivity of the composite layer as function of the dose implanted, reaching the percolation threshold. • Excellent agreement was found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. - Abstract: There is special interest in the incorporation of metallic nanoparticles in a surrounding dielectric matrix for obtaining composites with desirable characteristics such as for surface plasmon resonance, which can be used in photonics and sensing, and controlled surface electrical conductivity. We have investigated nanocomposites produced by metal ion implantation into insulating substrates, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile (projected range), which can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN code. TRIDYN is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface. Our study show that the nanoparticles form a bidimentional array buried a few nanometers below the substrate surface. We have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples show that metallic nanoparticles form in

  3. Economical Fabrication of Thick-Section Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Jason; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian; Benander, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for producing thick-section [>2 in. (approx.5 cm)], continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Ultramet-modified fiber interface coating and melt infiltration processing, developed previously for thin-section components, were used for the fabrication of CMCs that were an order of magnitude greater in thickness [up to 2.5 in. (approx.6.4 cm)]. Melt processing first involves infiltration of a fiber preform with the desired interface coating, and then with carbon to partially densify the preform. A molten refractory metal is then infiltrated and reacts with the excess carbon to form the carbide matrix without damaging the fiber reinforcement. Infiltration occurs from the inside out as the molten metal fills virtually all the available void space. Densification to coatings to the fiber preform was also required to accommodate the high preform thickness. The thick-section CMC processing developed in this work proved to be invaluable for component development, fabrication, and testing in two complementary efforts. In a project for the Army, involving SiC/SiC blisk development, nominally 0.8 in. thick x 8 in. diameter (approx. 2 cm thick x 20 cm diameter) components were successfully infiltrated. Blisk hubs were machined using diamond-embedded cutting tools and successfully spin-tested. Good ply uniformity and extremely low residual porosity (matrix composites fabricated via CVI or PIP. The pyrolytic carbon/zirconium nitride interface coating optimized in this work for use on carbon fibers was incorporated in the SiC/SiC composites and yielded a >41 ksi (approx. 283 MPa) flexural strength.

  4. Synthesis, microstructural and mechanical properties of ex situ zircon particles (ZrSiO4 reinforced Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar Thandalam

    2015-07-01

    This review article details the current development on the synthesis, microstructure and mechanical properties of zircon reinforced MMCs, with specific attention on the abrasive wear behavior of the composites. This review also summarizes the work done by various research groups on zircon reinforced MMCs in achieving higher hardness and wear resistance in these composites.

  5. Alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites formed by centrifugal slip casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Zygmuntowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the possibility of fabricating the alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites with gradient concentration of metal particles. Centrifugal slip casting method was chosen for the composite fabrication. This method allows fabrication of the graded distribution of nickel particles in the hollow cylinder composites. The horizontal rotation axis was applied. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM and quantitative description of the microstructure. The macroscopic as well as SEM observations of the prepared composites confirmed the gradient concentration of Ni particles in the composite materials. The application of the centrifugal slip casting method allows for the graded distribution of metal particles in the samples.

  6. Improving Turbine Performance with Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Under the new NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program, efforts are on-going within the Supersonics Project aimed at the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composites into hot section components of future gas turbine engines. Due to recent NASA advancements in SiC-based fibers and matrices, these composites are lighter and capable of much higher service temperatures than current metallic superalloys, which in turn will allow the engines to operate at higher efficiencies and reduced emissions. This presentation briefly reviews studies within Task 6.3.3 that are primarily aimed at developing physics-based concepts, tools, and process/property models for micro- and macro-structural design, fabrication, and lifing of SiC/SiC turbine components in general and airfoils in particular. Particular emphasis is currently being placed on understanding and modeling (1) creep effects on residual stress development within the component, (2) fiber architecture effects on key composite properties such as design strength, and (3) preform formation processes so that the optimum architectures can be implemented into complex-shaped components, such as turbine vanes and blades.

  7. The thermo-mechanical behaviour of W-Cu metal matrix composites for fusion heat sink applications: The influence of the Cu content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejado, E.; Müller, A. v.; You, J.-H.; Pastor, J. Y.

    2018-01-01

    Copper and its alloys are used as heat sink materials for next generation fusion devices and will be joined to tungsten as an armour material. However, the joint of W and Cu experiences high thermal stresses when exposed to high heat loads so an interlayer material could effectively ensure the lifetime of the component by reducing the thermal mismatch. Many researchers have published results on the production of W-Cu composites aiming attention at its thermal conductivity; nevertheless, the mechanical performance of these composites remains poor. This paper reports the characterization of the thermo-mechanical behaviour of W-Cu composites produced via a liquid Cu melt infiltration of porous W preform. This technique was applied to produce composites with 15, 30 and 40 wt% Cu. The microstructure, thermal properties, and mechanical performance were investigated and measured from RT to 800 °C. The results demonstrated that high densification and superior mechanical properties can indeed be achieved via this manufacturing route. The mechanical properties (elastic modulus, fracture toughness, and strength) of the composites show a certain dependency on the Cu content; fracture mode shifts from the dominantly brittle fracture of W particles with constrained deformation of the Cu phase at low Cu content to the predominance of the ductile fracture of Cu when its ratio is higher. Though strong degradation is observed at 800 °C, the mechanical properties at operational temperatures, i.e. below 350 °C, remain rather high-even better than W/Cu materials reported previously. In addition, we demonstrated that the elastic modulus, and therefore the coefficient of thermal expansion, can be tailored via control of the W skeleton's porosity. As a result, the W-Cu composites presented here would successfully drive away heat produced in the fusion chamber avoiding the mismatch between materials while contributing to the structural support of the system.

  8. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  9. Synthesis of Disintegrable Metal Composite for Oilfield Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihui; Salinas, Bobby; Newman, Caleb; Xu, Zhiyue

    Lightweight metal composites were traditionally developed for weight-critical applications. Recently, significant efforts have been made to improve the corrosion performance. In this study we report the synthesis of a novel type of high-strength metal composites with enhanced corrosion rate for use in self-disintegratable tools in oil and gas wells. The composites were fabricated through a powder metallurgy procedure by consolidating reactive metal powders that were coated with nanoscale metallic and/or ceramic coatings. The interaction between the metal matrix and coating was studied using X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and electron microscopy. The composites exhibit simultaneous high strength (up to 460 MPa) and two orders of magnitude increase in the corrosion rate (i.e., 250 mg/cm2/hr) under saline water. The corrosion behavior and associated field applications are described.

  10. THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS PARAMETERS ON DRY SLIDING WEAR BEHAVIOR AND SUBSURFACE OF AGED HYBRID METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES USING TAGUCHI TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. Viswanatha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of applied load, sliding speed and sliding distance on the dry sliding wear behavior of aged Al-SiCp-Gr composites were investigated. The specimen were fabricated by stir-casting technique. The pin-on-disc wear testing machine was used to investigate the wear rate by design of experiments based on L27 using Taguchi technique. Sliding distance was the most important variable that influenced the wear rate followed by sliding speed and applied load. The worn out surfaces were analyzed by SEM and EDS to study the subsurface mechanism of wear. The addition of reinforcements showed improved tribological behavior of the composite than base alloy.

  11. Composite pipe to metal joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, James C.; Leslie, II, James C.; Heard, James; Truong, Liem V.; Josephson, Marvin

    2017-06-27

    A method for making a metal to composite tube joint including selecting an elongated interior fitting constructed with an exterior barrel, reduced in exterior diameter to form a distally facing annular shoulder and then projecting still further distally to form an interior sleeve having a radially outwardly facing bonding surface. Selecting an elongated metal outer sleeve formed proximally with a collar constructed for receipt over the barrel and increased in interior diameter and projecting distally to form an exterior sleeve having a radially inwardly facing bonding surface cooperating with the first bonding surface to form an annulus receiving an extremity of a composite tube and a bond bonding the extremity of the tube to the bonding surfaces.

  12. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Al-TiC Metal Matrix Composite Prepared by Conventional, Microwave and Spark Plasma Sintering Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Ghasali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the mechanical properties and microstructure of Al-15 wt % TiC composite samples prepared by spark plasma, microwave, and conventional sintering were investigated. The sintering process was performed by the speak plasma sintering (SPS technique, microwave and conventional furnaces at 400 °C, 600 °C, and 700 °C, respectively. The results showed that sintered samples by SPS have the highest relative density (99% of theoretical density, bending strength (291 ± 12 MPa, and hardness (253 ± 23 HV. The X-ray diffraction (XRD investigations showed the formation of TiO2 from the surface layer decomposition of TiC particles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM micrographs demonstrated uniform distribution of reinforcement particles in all sintered samples. The SEM/EDS analysis revealed the formation of TiO2 around the porous TiC particles.

  13. Fiber-Matrix Interphase Development in Carbon/Carbon Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rellick, G

    1998-01-01

    In carbon/carbon (C/C) composites-i.e., a composite in which a carbon matrix is reinforced with carbon fiber when the matrix is derived from a thermosetting resin, we always observe a distinct, highly graphitizable, and well-oriented...

  14. Thermal conductivity of microPCMs-filled epoxy matrix composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, J.F.; Wang, X.Y; Huang, Z.; Zhao, Y.H.; Yuan, X.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The thermal conductivity of these microPCMs/matrix composites is an important property need to be considered. In this study, a series of

  15. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) and its in situ BMG matrix composites with diameter of 3 mm were fabricated by conventional .... with no evidence of any crystalline Bragg peaks, indicating that the as-cast sample is fully ..... Acknowledgements. Funding by education fund item of Liaoning Province under grant no.

  16. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Manjula; Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased by 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries

  17. Niobium Carbide-Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by High-Energy Ball Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travessa, Dilermando Nagle; Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Kátia Regina

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are key materials for the transportation industry as they contribute to the development of lightweight structures. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix can lead to a substantial strengthening effect, resulting in composite materials exhibiting interesting mechanical properties and inspiring their technological use in sectors like the automotive and aerospace industries. Powder metallurgy techniques are attractive to design metal matrix composites, achieving a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement into the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. Its use as a reinforcing phase in metal matrix composites has not been deeply explored. Composite powders produced after different milling times, with 10 and 20 vol pct of NbC were produced by high-energy ball milling and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction to establish a relationship between the milling time and size, morphology, and distribution of the particles in the composite powder. Subsequently, an Al/10 pct NbC composite powder was hot extruded into cylindrical bars. The strength of the obtained composite bars is comparable to the commercial high-strength, aeronautical-grade aluminum alloys.

  18. Advanced ceramic matrix composites for high energy x-ray generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2011-01-01

    High energy x-ray targets are the anodes used in high performance tubes, designed to work for long operating times and at high power. Such tubes are used in computed tomography (CT) scan machines. Usually the tubes used in CT scanners have to continuously work at high temperatures and for longer scan durations in order to get maximum information during a single scan. These anodes are composed of a refractory substrate which supports a refractory metallic coating. The present work is a review of the development of a ceramic metal composite based on aluminium nitride (AlN) and molybdenum for potential application as the substrate. This composite is surface engineered by coating with tungsten, the most popular material for high energy x-ray targets. To spray metallic coatings on the surface of ceramic matrix composites dc blown arc plasma is employed. The objective is to increase the performance and the life of an x-ray tube. Aluminium nitride-molybdenum ceramic matrix composites were produced by uniaxial hotpressing mixtures of AlN and Mo powders. These composites were characterized for their mechanical, thermal, electrical and micro-structural properties. An optimized composition was selected which contained 25 vol.% of metallic phase dispersed in the AlN matrix. These composites were produced in the actual size of an anode and coated with tungsten through dc blown arc plasma spraying. The results have shown that sintering of large size anodes is possible through uniaxial pressing, using a modified sintering cycle

  19. Modeling the Stress Strain Behavior of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2006-01-01

    Woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites represent one of the most mature composite systems to date. Future components fabricated out of these woven ceramic matrix composites are expected to vary in shape, curvature, architecture, and thickness. The design of future components using woven ceramic matrix composites necessitates a modeling approach that can account for these variations which are physically controlled by local constituent contents and architecture. Research over the years supported primarily by NASA Glenn Research Center has led to the development of simple mechanistic-based models that can describe the entire stress-strain curve for composite systems fabricated with chemical vapor infiltrated matrices and melt-infiltrated matrices for a wide range of constituent content and architecture. Several examples will be presented that demonstrate the approach to modeling which incorporates a thorough understanding of the stress-dependent matrix cracking properties of the composite system.

  20. Thermal conductivity of microPCMs-filled epoxy matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Su, J.F.; Wang, X.Y; Huang, Z.; Zhao, Y.H.; Yuan, X.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The thermal conductivity of these microPCMs/matrix composites is an important property need to be considered. In this study, a series of microPCMs have been fabricated using the in situ polymerization with various core/shell ratio and average diameter; the thermal conductivity of microPCMs/epoxy composites were investigated in detai...

  1. Influence of Heat Treatment on Abrasive Wear Resistance of Silumin Matrix Composite Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors attempted at examining the effect of heat treatment on abrasive wear resistance of metal composite castings. Metal matrix composites were made by infiltrating preforms created from unordered short fibers (graphite or silumin with liquid aluminium alloy AlSi12(b. Thus prepared composites were subject to solution heat treatment at a temperature of 520°C for four hours, then aging at a temperature of 220°C for four hours. Abrasion resistance of the material was tested before and after thermal treatment.

  2. Functionally Graded Metal-Metal Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Craig A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods and devices are disclosed for creating a multiple alloy composite structure by forming a three-dimensional arrangement of a first alloy composition in which the three-dimensional arrangement has a substantially open and continuous porosity. The three-dimensional arrangement of the first alloy composition is infused with at least a second alloy composition, where the second alloy composition comprises a shape memory alloy. The three-dimensional arrangement is consolidated into a fully dense solid structure, and the original shape of the second alloy composition is set for reversible transformation. Strain is applied to the fully dense solid structure, which is treated with heat so that the shape memory alloy composition becomes memory activated to recover the original shape. An interwoven composite of the first alloy composition and the memory-activated second alloy composition is thereby formed in the multiple alloy composite structure.

  3. Properties of porous FeAlOy/FeAlx ceramic matrix composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Porous ceramic matrix composites FeAlOy/FeAlx with incorporated metal inclusions (cermets) were synthesized by pressureless method, which includes hydrothermal treatment of mechanically alloyed FeAl powder followed by calcination. Their main structural, textural and mechanical features are described.

  4. Metal Matrix Composites for Liquid Rocket Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shelley, J

    2001-01-01

    ...) technologies being developed for application to Liquid Rocket Engines (LIRE). Developments in LRE technology for the US Air Force are being tracked and planned through the Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technologies Program (IHPRPT...

  5. Material parameter identification on metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Rensburg, GJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available of the material, compression tests were only performed to about 2% uniaxial strain as measured by the displacement of the hydraulic cylinder. In room temperature tests, three strain gauges are secured evenly around the centre of the test section. The results from...

  6. Corrosion Behavior of Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    described below. Considering the anodic reaction in chloride media Cu + CI-= CuC1- + e- (1) CuCI - + C1- = CuC1- 2 (2) the corrosion process involves...step. At the lower applied potentials of region 1, the rate of formation of the CuCI is slow in comparison to the transport rate to the interface of...the CP- and the rate of CuCI dissolution, equation (2). In this region, the CuCl is dissolved during the corrosion process and the corrosion behavior

  7. Ultra-Low Expansion Metal Matrix Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    1 percent), porosity, dislocation density and grain boundary area have virtually no effect on a. On the other hand, oriented grains, second phases (in...pp. 235-239. 57. Gatehouse , B.M. and Wadsley, A.D., "The Crystal Structure of the High Temperature Form of Niobium Pentoxide," Acta Crystallo- graphica

  8. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  9. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produce several biofilm matrix molecules, including polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Accessory matrix components shown to aid biofilm formation and adaptability under varying conditions are also produced by pseudomonads. Adaptation facilitated by biofilm formation allows for selection of genetic variants with unique and distinguishable colony morphology. Examples include rugose small-colony variants and wrinkly spreaders (WS), which over produce Psl/Pel or cellulose, respectively, and mucoid bacteria that over produce alginate. The well-documented emergence of these variants suggests that pseudomonads take advantage of matrix-building subpopulations conferring specific benefits for the entire population. This review will focus on various polysaccharides as well as additional Pseudomonas biofilm matrix components. Discussions will center on structure–function relationships, regulation, and the role of individual matrix molecules in niche biology. PMID:22212072

  10. Improved Joining of Metal Components to Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmes, Edmund

    2009-01-01

    Systems requirements for complex spacecraft drive design requirements that lead to structures, components, and/or enclosures of a multi-material and multifunctional design. The varying physical properties of aluminum, tungsten, Invar, or other high-grade aerospace metals when utilized in conjunction with lightweight composites multiply system level solutions. These multi-material designs are largely dependent upon effective joining techAn improved method of joining metal components to matrix/fiber composite material structures has been invented. The method is particularly applicable to equipping such thin-wall polymer-matrix composite (PMC) structures as tanks with flanges, ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liners for high heat engine nozzles, and other metallic-to-composite attachments. The method is oriented toward new architectures and distributing mechanical loads as widely as possible in the vicinities of attachment locations to prevent excessive concentrations of stresses that could give rise to delaminations, debonds, leaks, and other failures. The method in its most basic form can be summarized as follows: A metal component is to be joined to a designated attachment area on a composite-material structure. In preparation for joining, the metal component is fabricated to include multiple studs projecting from the aforementioned face. Also in preparation for joining, holes just wide enough to accept the studs are molded into, drilled, or otherwise formed in the corresponding locations in the designated attachment area of the uncured ("wet') composite structure. The metal component is brought together with the uncured composite structure so that the studs become firmly seated in the holes, thereby causing the composite material to become intertwined with the metal component in the joining area. Alternately, it is proposed to utilize other mechanical attachment schemes whereby the uncured composite and metallic parts are joined with "z-direction" fasteners. The

  11. Ceramic Matrix Composite Environmental Barrier Coating Durability Model, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  12. Ceramic Matrix Composite Environmental Barrier Coating Durability Model, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  13. Fiber composite materials: A survey of fiber matrix interface mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Report is described which discusses mechanism of load transfer from matrix to fiber through interface and effects of interface on composite structural integrity. Theoretical considerations are supplemented with experimental data. General trends and significant points are illustrated graphically.

  14. Modern Nondestructive Test Methods for Army Ceramic Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strand, Douglas J

    2008-01-01

    .... Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are potentially good high-temperature structural materials because of their low density, high elastic moduli, high strength, and for those with weak interfaces, surprisingly good damage tolerance...

  15. MICRO-CRACK BEHAVIOUR IN POLYMER MATRIX OF PARTICULATE COMPOSITE: INFLUENCE OF NON-LINEAR MATRIX

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majer, Z.; Náhlík, Luboš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 106, SUPPL. 3 (2012), S472-S473 ISSN 0009-2770 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : polymer matrix composite * fracture behaviour * non-linear matrix * micro-crack Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 0.453, year: 2012

  16. Modification of natural matrix lac-bagasse for matrix composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhayati, Nanik Dwi; Widjaya, Karna; Triyono

    2016-02-01

    Material technology continues to be developed in order to a material that is more efficient with composite technology is a combination of two or more materials to obtain the desired material properties. The objective of this research was to modification and characterize the natural matrix lac-bagasse as composite films. The first step, natural matrix lac was changed from solid to liquid using an ethanol as a solvent so the matrix homogenly. Natural matrix lac was modified by adding citric acid with concentration variation. Secondly, the bagasse delignification using acid hydrolysis method. The composite films natural matrix lac-bagasse were prepared with optimum modified the addition citric acid 5% (v/v) and delignification bagasse optimum at 1,5% (v/v) in hot press at 80°C 6 Kg/cm-1. Thirdly, composite films without and with modification were characterized functional group analysis using FTIR spectrophotometer and mechanical properties using Universal Testing Machine. The result of research showed natural matrix lac can be modified by reaction with citric acid. FTIR spectra showed without and with modification had functional groups wide absorption 3448 cm-1 group -OH, C=O ester strong on 1712 cm-1 and the methylene group -CH2 on absorption 1465 cm-1. The mechanical properties showed tensile strength 0,55 MPa and elongation at break of 0,95 %. So that composite films natural matrix lac can be made with reinforcement bagasse for material application.

  17. Wear mechanisms in powder metallurgy high speed steels matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordo, E.; Martinez, M. A.; Torralba, J. M.; Jimenez, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The development of metal matrix composites has a major interest for automotive and cutting tools industries since they possess better mechanical properties and wear resistance than corresponding base materials. One of the manufacturing methods for these materials includes processing by powder metallurgy techniques. in this case, blending of both, base material and reinforcement powders constitute the most important process in order to achieve a homogeneous distribution of second phase particles. in the present work, composite materials of M3/2 tool steel reinforced with 2.5,5 and 8 vol% of niobium carbide have been prepared. In order to ensure a homogeneous mix, powders of both materials were mixed by dry high-energy mechanical milling at 200 r.p.m. for 40 h. After a recovering annealing, two routes for consolidate were followed die pressing and vacuum sintering, and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Pin-on-disc tests were carried out to evaluate wear behaviour in all the materials. Results show that ceramic particles additions improve wear resistance of base material. (Author) 9 refs

  18. Cast composites with Al-matrix reinforced with intermetallic carbide phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholewa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work authors presented collected results from studies concerning the manufacturing of metal matrix composites with reinforcement of intermetallic phases, mainly carbides, with use of different casting techniques. For composite matrix different Al-Si alloys were used. Presented results include microstructural studies, quantitative analysis, phases description and their chemical composition. In this part of the work authors characterized the transition zone between the reinforcing particles and metal matrix, showing the possibilities of controlling the properties of the transition zone and type of occurring transition phases.During the studies two casting methods were used: permanent mould casting and lost wax casting. Authors indicated restrictions and possibilities of these methods in dispersive composite elements reinforced with metallic particles. The characteristic feature of such particles is their physical and chemical reactivity, which deteriorates the rheological properties of the liquid dispersion. Selection of technological parameters for manufacturing and casting was aimed on proper filling of the mould with liquid dispersion.Both methods of casting were used for manufacturing of elements which technical application requires special tribological properties, eg. brake discs. Operating properties of all obtained composites were studied and analyzed. Authors showed the analysis of tribological studies connected with the composite structure and type and quantity of the reinforcement used.

  19. Light weight polymer matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kenneth J. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix is layed up, cured, and thermally aged at about 750.degree. F. in the presence of an inert gas. The heat treatment improves the structural integrity and alters the electrical conductivity of the materials. In the preferred embodiment PMR-15 polyimides and Celion-6000 graphite fibers are used.

  20. Effect of matrix cracking and material uncertainty on composite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayathri, P.; Umesh, K.; Ganguli, R.

    2010-01-01

    A laminated composite plate model based on first order shear deformation theory is implemented using the finite element method. Matrix cracks are introduced into the finite element model by considering changes in the A, B and D matrices of composites. The effects of different boundary conditions, laminate types and ply angles on the behavior of composite plates with matrix cracks are studied. Finally, the effect of material property uncertainty, which is important for composite material on the composite plate, is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. Probabilistic estimates of damage detection reliability in composite plates are made for static and dynamic measurements. It is found that the effect of uncertainty must be considered for accurate damage detection in composite structures. The estimates of variance obtained for observable system properties due to uncertainty can be used for developing more robust damage detection algorithms.

  1. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  2. A Matrix Splitting Method for Composite Function Minimization

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Ganzhao

    2016-12-07

    Composite function minimization captures a wide spectrum of applications in both computer vision and machine learning. It includes bound constrained optimization and cardinality regularized optimization as special cases. This paper proposes and analyzes a new Matrix Splitting Method (MSM) for minimizing composite functions. It can be viewed as a generalization of the classical Gauss-Seidel method and the Successive Over-Relaxation method for solving linear systems in the literature. Incorporating a new Gaussian elimination procedure, the matrix splitting method achieves state-of-the-art performance. For convex problems, we establish the global convergence, convergence rate, and iteration complexity of MSM, while for non-convex problems, we prove its global convergence. Finally, we validate the performance of our matrix splitting method on two particular applications: nonnegative matrix factorization and cardinality regularized sparse coding. Extensive experiments show that our method outperforms existing composite function minimization techniques in term of both efficiency and efficacy.

  3. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force ...

  4. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy ...

  5. Composite Matrix Systems for Cryogenic Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As an alternative material to aluminum-lithium, cryotanks developed from fiber reinforced composites can offer significant weight savings in applications for fuel...

  6. Mechanical properties of composite sandwich plates containing magnesium matrix composite face sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song-Jeng; Hsieh, Ti-Ching; Lin, Bo-Zhou; Hong, Pin-Sen

    2008-11-01

    The fabrication of magnesium alloy metal-matrix composites (MMCs) and the mechanical properties of the sandwich formed with this material were investigated. Magnesium alloy composites containing various volume percentage of 0.99, 2.91, 4.76 and 9.09 % silicon-carbide (SiC) particles were prepared by molten metal mixing and machined as the faceplate of the sandwich. The particle had been dispersed by the injecting of the argon gas from a stainless pipe. Optical microscopic examination, hardness and tensile test were carried out. The sandwich was combined by the hot press method and studied by bending test. It is observed that the hardness of MMCs increases, but its strength decreases with increasing volume percentage of silicon-carbide particle, according to the results of hardness and bending test. It can be found that the specific strength and specific bending strength of sandwich composites fabricated with the faceplates of magnesium alloy added SiC reinforcements are a little higher than that sandwich with the aluminum alloy faceplates, but less than that of sandwich with magnesium alloy.

  7. Exploration the extrudability of aluminum matrix composite (LM6/TIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminum matrix composites (LM6/TiC) is a mix of excellent properties of aluminum casting alloy (LM6), and particles of (TiC) which make it the first choice in many applications like airplane and marine industries. During this research the extrudability and mechanical specifications of this composite (LM6/TiC) are ...

  8. Development and characterization of 430L matrix composites gradient materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Maria Ruiz-Navas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new concept that is Functionally Gradient Materials (FGM. The materials developed in this work are constituted by a 430L matrix core and composite materials with this matrix and gradient concentration with NbC reinforcement, from the core to the surface, through different steps. Composite powders of different content in NbC were produced through high energy milling in order to obtain the gradient composition. The morphology and microhardness of these powders were characterised and subsequently were processed through conventional P/M techniques, pressing and sintering. The materials obtained show improved wear behaviour.

  9. Characteristics of Matrix Metals in Which Fast Diffusion of Foreign Metallic Elements Occurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mae, Yoshiharu

    2018-04-01

    A few foreign elements are known to diffuse faster than the self-diffusion of the matrix metal. However, the characteristics of the matrix metal, which contribute to such fast diffusion remain unknown. In this study, the diffusion coefficients of various elements were plotted on a TC-YM diagram. The matrix metals that show fast diffusion are located in the low thermal conductivity range of the TC-YM diagram, while diffuser elements that undergo fast diffusion are mainly gulf elements such as Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, and Cu. The gulf elements are those that show the largest combination of thermal conductivity and Young's modulus. The great difference in the electron mobility between the matrix metal and diffuser elements generates a repulsive force between them, and the repulsive force—acting between the soft and large atoms of the matrix metal and the hard and small atoms of the diffuser elements—deforms the atoms of the matrix metal to open passageways for fast diffusion of diffuser elements.

  10. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  11. Classification of Structure Defects of Metal Matrix Castings with Saturated Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Definition of a composite [1] describes an ideal composite material with perfect structure. In real composite materials, structure is usually imperfect - composites contain various types of defects [2, 3-5], especially as the casted composites are of concern. The reason for this is a specific structure of castings, related to course of the manufacturing process. In case of metal matrix composite castings, especially regarding these manufactured by saturation, there is no classification of these defects [2, 4]. Classification of defects in castings of classic materials (cast iron, cast steel, non-ferrous alloys is insufficient and requires completion of specific defects of mentioned materials. This problem (noted during manufacturing metal matrix composite castings with saturated reinforcement in Institute of Basic Technical Sciences of Maritime University Szczecin has become a reason of starting work aimed at creating such classification. As a result, this paper was prepared. It can contribute to improvement of quality of studied materials and, as a consequence, improve the environment protection level.

  12. Classification of Structure Defects of Metal Matrix Castings with Saturated Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gawdzińska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Definition of a composite [1] describes an ideal composite material with perfect structure. In real composite materials, structure isusually imperfect – composites contain various types of defects [2, 3–5], especially as the casted composites are of concern. The reason for this is a specific structure of castings, related to course of the manufacturing process. In case of metal matrix composite castings, especially regarding these manufactured by saturation, there is no classification of these defects [2, 4]. Classification of defects in castings of classic materials (cast iron, cast steel, non-ferrous alloys is insufficient and requires completion of specific defects of mentioned materials. This problem (noted during manufacturing metal matrix composite castings with saturated reinforcement in Institute of Basic Technical Sciences of Maritime University Szczecin has become a reason of starting work aimed at creating such classification. As a result, this paper was prepared. It can contribute to improvement of quality of studied materials and, as a consequence, improve the environment protection level.

  13. Polymer matrix composites research: A survey of federally sponsored programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report identifies research conducted by agencies of the federal government other than the Department of Energy (DOE) in the area of advanced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). DOE commissioned the report to avoid duplicating other agencies' efforts in planning its own research program for PMCs. PMC materials consist of high-strength, short or continuous fibers fused together by an organic matrix. Compared to traditional structural metals, PMCs provide greater strength and stiffness, reduced weight and increased heat resistance. The key contributors to PMC research identified by the survey are the Department of Defense (DOD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). The survey identified a total of 778 projects. More than half of the total projects identified emphasize materials research with a goal toward developing materials with improved performance. Although an almost equal number of identified materials projects focus on thermosets and thermoplastics receive more attention because of their increased impact resistance and their easy formability and re-formability. Slightly more than one third of projects identified target structures research. Only 15 percent of the projects identified focus on manufacturing techniques, despite the need for efficient, economical methods manufacturing products constructed of PMCs--techniques required for PMCs to gain widespread acceptance. Three issues to be addressed concerning PMCs research are economy of use, improvements in processing, and education and training. Five target technologies have been identified that could benefit greatly from increased use of PMCs: aircraft fuselages, automobile frames, high-speed machinery, electronic packaging, and construction.

  14. Acoustic emission as a screening tool for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Goberman, Dan; Holowczak, John

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are composite materials with ceramic fibers in a high temperature matrix of ceramic or glass-ceramic. This emerging class of materials is viewed as enabling for efficiency improvements in many energy conversion systems. The key controlling property of ceramic matrix composites is a relatively weak interface between the matrix and the fiber that aids crack deflection and fiber pullout resulting in greatly increased toughness over monolithic ceramics. United Technologies Research Center has been investigating glass-ceramic composite systems as a tool to understand processing effects on material performance related to the performance of the weak interface. Changes in the interface have been shown to affect the mechanical performance observed in flexural testing and subsequent microstructural investigations have confirmed the performance (or lack thereof) of the interface coating. Recently, the addition of acoustic emission testing during flexural testing has aided the understanding of the characteristics of the interface and its performance. The acoustic emission onset stress changes with strength and toughness and this could be a quality tool in screening the material before further development and use. The results of testing and analysis will be shown and additional material from other ceramic matrix composite systems may be included to show trends.

  15. Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, William

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are ceramic materials, such as SiC, that have been reinforced by high strength fibers, such as carbon. Designers are interested in using ceramic matrix composites because they have the capability of withstanding significant loads while at relatively high temperatures (in excess of 1,000 C). Ceramic matrix composites retain the ceramic materials ability to withstand high temperatures, but also possess a much greater ductility and toughness. Their high strength and medium toughness is what makes them of so much interest to the aerospace community. This work concentrated on two different tasks. The first task was to do an extensive literature search into the mechanical behavior of ceramic matrix composite materials. This report contains the results of this task. The second task was to use this understanding to help interpret the ceramic matrix composite mechanical test results that had already been obtained by NASA. Since the specific details of these test results are subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), they are reported in a separate document (Jordan, 1997).

  16. Wear rate optimization of Al/SiCnp/e-glass fibre hybrid metal matrix composites using Taguchi method and genetic algorithm and development of wear model using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongale, Arunkumar M.; Kumar, Satish; Sachit, T. S.; Jadhav, Priya

    2018-03-01

    Studies on wear properties of Aluminium based hybrid nano composite materials, processed through powder metallurgy technique, are reported in the present study. Silicon Carbide nano particles and E-glass fibre are reinforced in pure aluminium matrix to fabricate hybrid nano composite material samples. Pin-on-Disc wear testing equipment is used to evaluate dry sliding wear properties of the composite samples. The tests were conducted following the Taguchi’s Design of Experiments method. Signal-to-Noise ratio analysis and Analysis of Variance are carried out on the test data to find out the influence of test parameters on the wear rate. Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis and Energy Dispersive x-ray analysis are conducted on the worn surfaces to find out the wear mechanisms responsible for wear of the composites. Multiple linear regression analysis and Genetic Algorithm techniques are employed for optimization of wear test parameters to yield minimum wear of the composite samples. Finally, a wear model is built by the application of Artificial Neural Networks to predict the wear rate of the composite material, under different testing conditions. The predicted values of wear rate are found to be very close to the experimental values with a deviation in the range of 0.15% to 8.09%.

  17. Corrosion behaviour of aluminium matrix composites containing silicon carbide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, S.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Engineering and Materials Design; Noble, B. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Engineering and Materials Design; Trowsdale, A.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Engineering and Materials Design

    1996-12-31

    An examination of the pitting attack in two aluminium matrix composites (1050 and 2124) each reinforced with varying fractions (0-30 wt.%) of silicon carbide particles (SiC{sub p}) in the size range 3-40 {mu}m has been made in 1 N NaCl solution. It has been demonstrated that the existence of pores and crevices at SiC{sub p}/matrix interfaces strongly influences pit initiation. This is further aided by the cracking of large SiC{sub p}{>=}20 {mu}m, during processing. The presence of {theta}(CuAl{sub 2}) and S(CuMgAl{sub 2}) precipitates in 2124-SiC{sub p} composite also promotes pitting attack at SiC{sub p}-matrix and intermetallic-matrix interfaces. (orig.)

  18. A Study of Metal-Cement Composites with Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mironov Victor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of small-sized metal fillers (SMF provides a combination of high bulk density, increased durability and ferromagnetic properties of composite materials on the cement basis. However, the total strength of the composite can be compromised by poor adhesion of metal particles with the cement matrix. The use of versatile additives like microsilica and metakaolin is able to improve the structural integrity and mechanical properties of heavy concretes. The paper considers the results of a study using specimens of heavy concretes with SMF aiming to estimate its strength, structural features and ultrasonic parameters. It was found that the contact of SMF particles with the cement was not perfect, since the voids appeared between them and the cement matrix during the cement hydration process (exothermal reaction. Due to the border porosity, the specimens with the metal fillers have lower compressive strength, lower ultrasound velocity and increased frequency slope of attenuation. Microsilica and metakaolin additives facilitate better contact zone between the cement matrix and metal fillers.

  19. Influence of reinforcement proportion and matrix composition on pitting corrosion behaviour of cast aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Merino, S.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Arrabal, R.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of silicon carbide (SiCp) proportion and matrix composition on four aluminium metal matrix composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) immersed in 1-3.5 wt% NaCl at 22 deg C was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization. The kinetics of the corrosion process was studied on the basis of gravimetric measurements. The nature of corrosion products was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion damage in Al/SiCp composites was caused by pitting attack and by nucleation and growth of Al 2 O 3 . 3H 2 O on the material surface. The main attack nucleation sites were the interface region between the matrix and the reinforcement particles. The corrosion process was influenced more by the concentration of alloy elements in the matrix than by the proportion of SiCp reinforcement and saline concentration

  20. 4TH International Conference on High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... Topic to be covered include fibers, interfaces, interphases, non-oxide ceramic matrix composites, oxide/oxide ceramic matrix composites, coatings, and applications of high-temperature ceramic matrix...

  1. Fundamental Study on Laser Interaction with Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to significantly advance the fundamental understanding of laser interaction with metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) and to overcome the fundamental limits of current laser processing techniques by tuning heat transfer and fluid flow using nanoparticles.Ultrasonic assisted electrocodeposition was used to prepare MMNCs samples (e.g., Ni/Al2O3) for laser melting experiments. Microstructural study showed that uniform distribution and dispersion of nanoparticles wer...

  2. Analysis of Damage in a Ceramic Matrix Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Talreja, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of damage and the associated mechanical response are stud ied for a unidirectionally fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite subjected to uniaxial tensile loading parallel to fibers. A multi-stage development of damage is identified, and for each stage the governing mechanisms...... are discussed. For distributed matrix micro cracking a continuum damage model is used as the basis for describing the associated stress-strain behavior. A simplified analysis of frictional sliding at the fiber/matrix inter face is made to elucidate its effect on the stress-strain response....

  3. Graphene-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites: A Review of Synthesis Methods and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Gupta, Nikhil; Behera, Rakesh K.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2018-03-01

    Graphene-reinforced aluminum (Gr-Al) matrix nanocomposites (NCs) have attracted strong interest from both research and industry in high-performance weight-sensitive applications. Due to the vastly different bonding characteristics of the Al matrix (metallic) and graphene (in-plane covalent + inter-plane van der Waals), the graphene phase has a general tendency to agglomerate and phase separate in the metal matrix, which is detrimental for the mechanical and chemical properties of the composite. Thus, synthesis of Gr-Al NCs is extremely challenging. This review summarizes the different methods available to synthesize Gr-Al NCs and the resulting properties achieved in these NCs. Understanding the effect of processing parameters on the realized properties opens up the possibility of tailoring the synthesis methods to achieve the desired properties for a given application.

  4. Porous ceramic - metal composites obtained by infiltration methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boczkowska

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A pressure-vacuum infiltration (T = 720 ºC, p = 15 MPa, t = 15 min and gas-pressure infiltration (GPI in an autoclave (T = 700ºC, p=4 MPa, t=5 min were applied for infiltration of porous Al2O3 ceramics by cast aluminum alloy. Effect of the method of the infiltration on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ceramic-metal composites, was studied. Ceramic preforms were formed by method of copying the cellular structure of the polymer matrix. The results of the X-ray tomography proved very good infiltration of the pores by the metal for each method.

  5. Fatigue and frictional heating in ceramic matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T.K.; Sørensen, B.F.; Brøndsted, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set...... with a high spatial and temperature resolution and changes in the heat dissipation can be measured almost instantaneously. The technique has been tested on uni-directional ceramic matrix composites. Experimental results are shown and the possibilities and the limitations of the technique are discussed....

  6. Preparing polymeric matrix composites using an aqueous slurry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Towell, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An aqueous process was developed to prepare a consolidated composite laminate from an aqueous slurry. An aqueous poly(amic acid) surfactant solution was prepared by dissolving a poly(amic acid) powder in an aqueous ammonia solution. A polymeric powder was added to this solution to form a slurry. The slurry was deposited on carbon fiber to form a prepreg which was dried and stacked to form a composite laminate. The composite laminate was consolidated using pressure and was heated to form the polymeric matrix. The resulting composite laminate exhibited high fracture toughness and excellent consolidation.

  7. New bismaleimide matrix resins for graphite fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M.-T. S.; Chen, T. S.; Parker, J. A.; Heimbuch, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Two new bismaleimide resins based on the N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have been synthesized and characterized. The mixtures of the two resins gave better handling, processing, mechanical, and thermal properties in graphite composites than did the individual resins. The mechanical strength of the cured graphite composites prepared from the 1:1 copolymer of the two bismaleimide resins was excellent at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The physical and mechanical properties of the composites from the new bismaleimide matrix resin systems are compared with conventional composites based on epoxy and other bismaleimide systems. The copolymer system provides another method for improving bismaleimide resins.

  8. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technology's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  9. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world's largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide

  10. Thermal conductivity of metal-metal microlaminate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, M. C.; Doerr, H. J.; Deshpandey, C. V.; Bunshah, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Microlaminate composites consisting of alternate layers of metal-metal, metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic exhibit anisotropy in thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity in the direction perpendicular to the laminate plane is significantly lower than in the plane of the laminate. Results of the study on thermal conductivity of Ni-NiCoCrAlY and Ti-CoCrAlY microlaminate composites are presented. A semi-quantitative model explaining the thermal conductivity variation in the above systems as a function of number of layers is discussed. An expression correlating the experimental data with the calculated data for the above system is presented.

  11. SOLIDIFICATION CHARACTERISTIC OF TITANIUM CARBIDE PARTICULATE REINFORCED ALUMINIUM ALLOY MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. FATCHURROHMAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research solidification characteristic of metal matrix composites consisted of titanium carbide particulate reinforced aluminium-11.8% silicon alloy matrix is performed. Vortex mixing and permanent casting method are used as the manufacturing method to produce the specimens. Temperature measurements during the casting process are captured and solidification graphs are plotted to represent the solidification characteristic. The results show, as volume fraction of particulate reinforcement is increased, solidification time is faster. Particulate reinforcement promotes rapid solidification which will support finer grain size of the casting specimen. Hardness test is performed and confirmed that hardness number increased as more particulate are added to the system.

  12. Low-Cost Resin Transfer Molding Process Developed for High-Temperature Polyimide Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The use of high-temperature polymer matrix composites (PMC's) in aircraft engine applications can significantly reduce engine weight and improve performance and fuel efficiency. High-temperature PMC's, such as those based on the PMR-15 polyimide matrix resin developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center, have been used extensively in military applications where performance improvements have justified their use regardless of the cost involved in producing the component. However, in commercial engines cost is a primary driver, and PMC components must be produced at costs comparable to those of the metal components that they will replace.

  13. Mechanical behaviour of a continuous fibre reinforced titanium matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, N.A.; Lovett, D.J.; Warwick, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    C/TiB2-coated SiC monofilament has been consolidated in a Ti-6Al-4V matrix. The composite shows strength greater than 1700 MPa and a stiffness of 210 GPa. Exposure to 865 C in vacuum leads to little strength loss after 3.25 hours. The strength of the composite after longer exposure at this temperature also has been studied and related to fracture behavior. 6 refs

  14. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  15. Wear Resistance of TiC Reinforced Cast Steel Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobula S.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wear resistance of TiC-cast steel metal matrix composite has been investigated. Composites were obtained with SHSB method known as SHS synthesis during casting. It has been shown the differences in wear between composite and base cast steel. The Miller slurry machine test were used to determine wear loss of the specimens. The slurry was composed of SiC and water. The worn surface of specimens after test, were studied by SEM. Experimental observation has shown that surface of composite zone is not homogenous and consist the matrix lakes. Microscopic observations revealed the long grooves with SiC particles indented in the base alloy area, and spalling pits in the composite area. Due to the presence of TiC carbides on composite layer, specimens with TiC reinforced cast steel exhibited higher abrasion resistance. The wear of TiC reinforced cast steel mechanism was initially by wearing of soft matrix and in second stage by polishing and spalling of TiC. Summary weight loss after 16hr test was 0,14÷0,23 g for composite specimens and 0,90 g for base steel.

  16. Composite with a metallic matrix Al-AlN: from the powder to the material; Composite a matrice metallique A1-A1N: de la poudre au materiau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troadec, C.

    1996-05-09

    Two types of powders are used: a `composite` powder synthesized by direct nitridation of aluminium by nitrogen, and a `mixed` powder obtained by a mixture of Al and AlN powders. These two powders types are crushed in a high energetic planetary crusher under an Ar atmosphere, then they are sintered under solid phase hot pressure. Microstructure of these materials, studied by Tem and XED, is relatively heterogenous, with high density polycrystalline area and high porous nano-crystals area. Size of these porous area are higher in `mixed` powders, and is linked to AlN percentage and to the crushing time. High density area are composed of Al grains surrounded by AlN nano-crystals with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} needles and few aluminium oxynitride crystals. Physicochemical and mechanical properties, wear and corrosion comportment differ in function of the initial powders (`mixed` or `composite`) and with the AlN percentage. These new materials have, at similar reinforcement concentration, equivalent properties to Al/SiC or Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials. (A.B.) 112 refs.

  17. Processing, microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel particles embedded aluminium matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Devinder; Bauri, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Al-Ni particle composite was successfully processed by FSP. → No harmful intermetallics formed. → The composite showed a 3 fold increase in yield strength with high ductility. → FSP also lead to a refined recrystallized grain structure. → A continuous type dynamic recrystallization process seems to be working during FSP. - Abstract: Nickel particles were embedded into an Al matrix by friction stir processing (FSP) to produce metal particle reinforced composite. FSP resulted in uniform dispersion of nickel particles with excellent interfacial bonding with the Al matrix and also lead to significant grain refinement of the matrix. The novelty of the process is that the composite was processed in one step without any pretreatment being given to the constituents and no harmful intermetallic formed. The novel feature of the composite is that it shows a three fold increase in the yield strength while appreciable amount of ductility is retained. The hardness also improved significantly. The fracture surface showed a ductile failure mode and also revealed the superior bonding between the particles and the matrix. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a dynamically recrystallized equiaxed microstructure. A gradual increase in misorientation from sub-grain to high-angle boundaries is observed from EBSD analysis pointing towards a continuous type dynamic recrystallization mechanism.

  18. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertzen, William Kirby [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Thermosetting polymer-matrix composites for structural repair applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, William Kirby

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporation of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Role of manufacturing process parameters on the characteristics of aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2003-01-01

    Metal matrix composites, (MMC), are engineered combinations of two or more materials (one of which is a metal) in which tailored properties are achieved by systematic combinations consisting of continuous or discontinuous fibers, whiskers, or particles in a metal result in combinations of very high specific strength. Furthermore, systematic design and procedures can be developed to achieve unique combinations of engineering properties such as high elevated-temperature strengths, damping or electrical properties. In this paper, the theory and practice of MMC are reviewed and discussed. The different techniques used in the manufacturing of MMC in general and aluminum matrix composites in particular e.g. unidirectional solidification, squeeze casting, vortex method and compocasting are presented and discussed. The parameters involved in these techniques and their effects on the characteristics of MMC product are also given and discussed. These include: crucible size and shape, melt temperature, size and shape of the impeller, stirring speed, rate of addition of the particles, the degree of agitation and cooling rate. Furthermore, the effect of these parameters on the mechanical strength and machinability are also presented and discussed. Finally, recent research results in aluminum matrix composites and their future developments are outlined and discussed. (author)

  1. Characterization and control of the fiber-matrix interface in ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced SiC composites fabricated by thermal-gradient forced-flow chemical-vapor infiltration (FCVI) have exhibited both composite (toughened) and brittle behavior during mechanical property evaluation. Detailed analysis of the fiber-matrix interface revealed that a silica layer on the surface of Nicalon Si-C-O fibers tightly bonds the fiber to the matrix. The strongly bonded fiber and matrix, combined with the reduction in the strength of the fibers that occurs during processing, resulted in the observed brittle behavior. The mechanical behavior of Nicalon/SiC composites has been improved by applying thin coatings (silicon carbide, boron, boron nitride, molybdenum, carbon) to the fibers, prior to densification, to control the interfacial bond. Varying degrees of bonding have been achieved with different coating materials and film thicknesses. Fiber-matrix bond strengths have been quantitatively evaluated using an indentation method and a simple tensile test. The effects of bonding and friction on the mechanical behavior of this composite system have been investigated. 167 refs., 59 figs., 18 tabs.

  2. Cement matrix composite construction features for production of waterproofing coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Суханевич, Марина Володимирівна

    2014-01-01

    It is investigated the properties of the matrix based on Portland cement, slag-contain and fly-ash- slag-contain cements modified with the addition of natural zeolite and complex additives consisting of carbon nanotubes in C-3 solution plasticizer as the main component of composite waterproofing material that is applied to wet concrete in the form of thin-layer coatings.

  3. exploration the extrudability of aluminum matrix composite (lm6/tic)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lanez

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... The first step includes alignment the die, billet, punch and press. In the second step, the press will push ... available as shafts from the works done by other researcher as shown in "Fig. 8". Length and diameter are reducing by ... Composite shafts before extrusion. In this work, the matrix is aluminum silicon ...

  4. The S-matrix for scattering of composite systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, P. van; Ruijgrok, Th.

    1967-01-01

    It is shown that the asymptotically stationary states, as introduced by Van Hove1), provide a natural tool to describe the scattering of composite systems. The scattering problem is formulated in terms of these a.s. states and a unitary S-matrix is defined. In this paper we treat the formal aspects

  5. Optically-transparent oxide fibre-reinforced glass matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Desimone, D.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Lee, W. E.; Koch, D.; Horvath, J.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 356, 44-49 (2010), s. 2591-2597 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : fracture toughness * glas matrix composites * light transmittance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2010

  6. Effect of reinforcement on the cutting forces while machining metal matrix composites–An experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Shoba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid metal matrix composites are of great interest for researchers in recent years, because of their attractive superior properties over traditional materials and single reinforced composites. The machinabilty of hybrid composites becomes vital for manufacturing industries. The need to study the influence of process parameters on the cutting forces in turning such hybrid composite under dry environment is essentially required. In the present study, the influence of machining parameters, e.g. cutting speed, feed and depth of cut on the cutting force components, namely feed force (Ff, cutting force (Fc, and radial force (Fd has been investigated. Investigations were performed on 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 wt% Silicon carbide (SiC and rice husk ash (RHA reinforced composite specimens. A comparison was made between the reinforced and unreinforced composites. The results proved that all the cutting force components decrease with the increase in the weight percentage of the reinforcement: this was probably due to the dislocation densities generated from the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix. Experimental evidence also showed that built-up edge (BUE is formed during machining of low percentage reinforced composites at high speed and high depth of cut. The formation of BUE was captured by SEM, therefore confirming the result. The decrease of cutting force components with lower cutting speed and higher feed and depth of cut was also highlighted. The related mechanisms are explained and presented.

  7. Composite Coatings with Ceramic Matrix Including Nanomaterials as Solid Lubricants for Oil-Less Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posmyk A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the theoretical basis of manufacturing and chosen applications of composite coatings with ceramic matrix containing nanomaterials as a solid lubricant (AHC+NL. From a theoretical point of view, in order to reduce the friction coefficient of sliding contacts, two materials are required, i.e. one with a high hardness and the other with low shear strength. In case of composite coatings AHC+NL the matrix is a very hard and wear resistant anodic oxide coating (AHC whereas the solid lubricant used is the nanomaterial (NL featuring a low shear strength such as glassy carbon nanotubes (GC. Friction coefficient of cast iron GJL-350 sliding against the coating itself is much higher (0.18-0.22 than when it slides against a composite coating (0.08-0.14. It is possible to reduce the friction due to the presence of carbon nanotubes, or metal nanowires.

  8. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; Kiwi, Miguel, E-mail: m.kiwi.t@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, CEDENNA, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago 7800024 (Chile); Duin, Adri C. T. van [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina)

    2016-07-18

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  9. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix and Polymer Matrix Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Walton, Owen J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic-based, discrete-event progressive damage simulations of ceramic-matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures have been enabled through the development of a unique multiscale modeling tool. This effort involves coupling three independently developed software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/ Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis (FEA) program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating unit cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC. Abaqus is used at the global scale to model the overall composite structure. An Abaqus user-defined material (UMAT) interface, referred to here as "FEAMAC/CARES," was developed that enables MAC/GMC and CARES/Life to operate seamlessly with the Abaqus FEA code. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events, which incrementally progress and lead to ultimate structural failure. This report describes the FEAMAC/CARES methodology and discusses examples that illustrate the performance of the tool. A comprehensive example problem, simulating the progressive damage of laminated ceramic matrix composites under various off-axis loading conditions and including a double notched tensile specimen geometry, is described in a separate report.

  10. Friction Stir Processing of Copper-Coated SiC Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we proposed a novel friction stir processing (FSP to produce a locally reinforced aluminum matrix composite (AMC by stirring copper-coated SiC particulate reinforcement into Al6061 alloy matrix. Electroless-plating process was applied to deposit the copper surface coating on the SiC particulate reinforcement for the purpose of improving the interfacial adhesion between SiC particles and Al matrix. The core-shell SiC structure provides a layer for the atomic diffusion between aluminum and copper to enhance the cohesion between reinforcing particles and matrix on one hand, the dispersion of fine copper in the Al matrix during FSP provides further dispersive strengthening and solid solution strengthening, on the other hand. Hardness distribution and tensile results across the stir zone validated the novel concept in improving the mechanical properties of AMC that was realized via FSP. Optical microscope (OM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM investigations were conducted to investigate the microstructure. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA, and X-ray diffraction (XRD were explored to analyze the atomic inter-diffusion and the formation of intermetallic at interface. The possible strengthening mechanisms of the AMC containing Cu-coated SiC particulate reinforcement were interpreted. The concept of strengthening developed in this work may open a new way of fabricating of particulate reinforced metal matrix composites.

  11. Update on CMH-17 Volume 5 Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulonis, Rachael; Kiser, J. Douglas; David, Kaia E.; Davies, Curtis R.; Ashforth, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of issues must be addressed during the process of certifying CMC (ceramic matrix composite) components for use in commercial aircraft. The Composite Materials Handbook-17, Volume 5, Revision A on ceramic matrix composites has just been revised to help support FAA certification of CMCs for elevated temperature applications. The handbook supports the development and use of CMCs through publishing and maintaining proven, reliable engineering information and standards that have been thoroughly reviewed. Volume 5 contains detailed sections describing CMC materialsprocessing design, analysisguidelines, testing procedures, and data analysis and acceptance. A review of the content of this latest revision will be presented along with a description of how CMH-17, Volume 5 could be used by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and others in the future.

  12. Ceramic superconductor/metal composite materials employing the superconducting proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Matthew J.

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting composite materials having particles of superconducting material disposed in a metal matrix material with a high electron-boson coupling coefficient (.lambda.). The superconducting particles can comprise any type of superconductor including Laves phase materials, Chevrel phase materials, A15 compounds, and perovskite cuprate ceramics. The particles preferably have dimensions of about 10-500 nanometers. The particles preferably have dimensions larger than the superconducting coherence length of the superconducting material. The metal matrix material has a .lambda. greater than 0.2, preferably the .lambda. is much higher than 0.2. The metal matrix material is a good proximity superconductor due to its high .lambda.. When cooled, the superconductor particles cause the metal matrix material to become superconducting due to the proximity effect. In cases where the particles and the metal matrix material are chemically incompatible (i.e., reactive in a way that destroys superconductivity), the particles are provided with a thin protective metal coating. The coating is chemically compatible with the particles and metal matrix material. High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cuprate ceramic particles are reactive and therefore require a coating of a noble metal resistant to oxidation (e.g., silver, gold). The proximity effect extends through the metal coating. With certain superconductors, non-noble metals can be used for the coating.

  13. Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuel Technology for LWR Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Bell, Gary L.; Kiggans, Jim; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for the specific LWR application has been provided. Basic fuel properties and characteristics that aim to improve operational reliability, enlarge performance envelope, and enhance safety margins under design-basis accident scenarios are summarized. Fabrication of M3 rodlets with various coated fuel particles over a temperature range of 800-1300 C is discussed. Results from preliminary irradiation testing of LWR M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles are also reported.

  14. Characterization of selected LDEF polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composite materials which received 5 years and 10 months of exposure to the LEO environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. Resin loss and a decrease in mechanical performance as well as dramatic visual effects were observed. However, chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymeric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure. The potential effect of a silicon-containing molecular contamination of these specimens is addressed.

  15. Incorporation of tungsten metal fibers in a metal and ceramic matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Vokáč, M.; Kolísko, J.; Pokorný, P.; Kubatík, Tomáš František

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, 1-2 (2017), s. 79-82 ISSN 0543-5846 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tungsten wires * tungsten fibers * plasma spraying * metallic coatings * ceramic coatings Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics http://hrcak.srce.hr/168890

  16. Matrix-reinforcement reactivity in P/M titanium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Romero, F.; Salvador, M. D.; Busquets, D.

    2007-01-01

    The high reactivity of titanium and the facility of the same one to form intermetallics makes difficult obtaining composites with this material and brings the need in any case of covering the principal fibres used as reinforcement. To obtain composites of titanium reinforced with ceramic particles ins proposed in this paper, for this reason it turns out to be fundamental to evaluate the reactivity between the matrix and reinforcement. Both titanium nitride and carbide (TiN and TiC) are investigated as materials of low reactivity whereas titanium silicide (TiSi 2 ) is also studied as materials of major reactivity, already stated by the scientific community. This reactivity will be analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) there being obtained distribution maps of the elements that allow to establish the possible influence of the sintering temperature and time. Hereby the matrix-reinforcement interactions are optimized to obtain suitable mechanical properties. (Author) 39 refs

  17. Space environmental effects on LDEF low Earth orbit exposed graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was deployed on April 7, 1984 in low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 482 kilometers. On board experiments experienced the harsh LEO environment including atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation (UV), and thermal cycling. During the 5.8 year mission, the LDEF orbit decayed to 340 kilometers where significantly higher AO concentrations exist. One experiment on board LDEF was M0003, Space Effects on Spacecraft Materials. As a subset of M0003 nearly 500 samples of polymer, metal, and glass matrix composites were flown as the Advanced Composites Experiment M0003-10. The Advanced Composites Experiment is a joint effort between government and industry with the Aerospace Corporation serving as the experiment integrator. A portion of the graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites were furnished by the Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, Washington. Test results and discussions for the Boeing portion of M0003-10 are presented. Experiment and specimen location on the LDEF are presented along with a quantitative summary of the pertinent exposure conditions. Matrix materials selected for the test were epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide. These composite materials were selected due to their suitability for high performance structural capability in spacecraft applications. Graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites offer higher strength to weight ratios along with excellent dimensional stability. The Boeing space exposed and corresponding ground control composite specimens were subjected to post flight mechanical, chemical, and physical testing in order to determine any changes in critical properties and performance characteristics. Among the more significant findings are the erosive effect of atomic oxygen on leading edge exposed specimens and microcracking in non-unidirectionally reinforced flight specimens

  18. Microstructure and hardness of WC-Co particle reinforced iron matrix surface composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Peng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a high Cr cast iron surface composite material reinforced with WC-Co particles 2-6 mm in size was prepared using a pressureless sand mold infiltration casting technique. The composition, microstructure and hardness were determined by means of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA, scanning electron microscope (SEM and Rockwell hardness measurements. It is determined that the obtained composite layer is about 15 mm thick with a WC-Co particle volumetric fraction of ~38%. During solidification, interface reaction takes place between WC-Co particles and high chromium cast iron. Melting and dissolving of prefabricated particles are also found, suggesting that local Co melting and diffusion play an important role in promoting interface metallurgical bonding. The composite layer is composed of ferrite and a series of carbides, such as (Cr, W, Fe23C6, WC, W2C, M6C and M12C. The inhomogeneous hardness in the obtained composite material shows a gradient decrease from the particle reinforced metal matrix composite layer to the matrix layer. The maximum hardness of 86.3 HRA (69.5 HRC is obtained on the particle reinforced surface, strongly indicating that the composite can be used as wear resistant material.

  19. Inorganic Polymer Matrix Composite Strength Related to Interface Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bridge

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin transfer molding of an inorganic polymer binder was successfully demonstrated in the preparation of ceramic fiber reinforced engine exhaust valves. Unfortunately, in the preliminary processing trials, the resulting composite valves were too brittle for in-engine evaluation. To address this limited toughness, the effectiveness of a modified fiber-matrix interface is investigated through the use of carbon as a model material fiber coating. After sequential heat treatments composites molded from uncoated and carbon coated fibers are compared using room temperature 3-point bend testing. Carbon coated Nextel fiber reinforced geopolymer composites demonstrated a 50% improvement in strength, versus that of the uncoated fiber reinforced composites, after the 250 °C postcure.

  20. Processing and Testing Re2Si207 Matrix Composites (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    determined. 1. Introduction The application of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is limited by mechanical property degradation in oxidizing...using the Archimedes method. 2.3. Indentation and Characterization The hardnesses of the sintered pellets were measured by Vickers indentation at...J. Mechanical Properties and Atomistic Deformation Mechanism of g-Y2Si2O7 from First- Principles Investigations. Acta mat. 55, 6019-6026 (2007). 10

  1. Natural fiber reinforced composites with moringa and vnyl ester matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Sundara, Babu Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    In this research work an attempt is carried out for producing a Natural Plant Based fiber Reinforced Composites using the Moringa Resins and Vinyl Ester by utilizing the wastage of natural plant based fiber as Reinforcement material and Matrix material as Natural Resin and Vinyl Ester. The objective of the work is Utilization of Natural Plant Based Bio- degardable wastage into an alternative materials in the industrial applications by analyzing, Various Manufacturing and testing. Initially th...

  2. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howell, Dave [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  3. Fracture Resistance Evaluation of Fibre Reinforced Brittle Matrix Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 290, - (2005), s. 167-174 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramic s /2./. Stará Lesná, 03.10.2004-06.10.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041003; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/02/0683 Keywords : fibre-reinforced ceramic s * glass matrix composites * chevron notch Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.224, year: 2005

  4. Fracture behaviour of hybrid glass matrix composites: thermal ageing effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Boccaccini, D. N.; Atiq, S.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 12 (2003), s. 177-1185 ISSN 1359-835X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003; GA MŠk ME 491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : glass matrix * hybrid composites * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.131, year: 2003 http://www.sciencedirect.com

  5. Micro structural analysis of nanocomposite of metallic matrix of aluminum reinforced by 2% of NTC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Fabio Saldanha; LavaredaCarlos Romulo; Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Queiroz, Jennyson Luz

    2016-01-01

    The study of based on aluminum materials has a high importance level, mainly when is intense wanted in automobile and aerospace industry to transform in light and high perform parts. Aluminum has low specific weight and easiness to join with other materials and these qualities can supply excellent properties and lots of technological applications. Components based on aluminum represents good examples to develop optimized micro structures during the fabrication process that can be basic on properties mechanical performance. As a result this work analyses the micro structure's composites with metallic matrix reinforced by 2% of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes manufactured by aluminum splinters mixed to CNT (author)

  6. Microstructure of reaction zone in WCp/duplex stainless steels matrix composites processing by laser melt injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do Nascimento, A. M.; Ocelik, V.; Ierardi, M. C. F.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    The laser melt injection (LMI) process has been used to create a metal matrix composite consisting of 80gm sized multi-grain WC particles embedded in three cast duplex stainless steels. The microstruture was investigated by scanning electron microscopy with integrated EDS and electron back-scatter

  7. New composite materials to metal sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annenkov, V.V.; Danilovtseva, E.N.; Filina, E.A.; Trofimov, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    Complexing-active polymers are promising substances for detoxication of radioactive elements from the polluted soils and natural waters. Tis work is devoted to searching of new polymeric compositions for detoxication of soils and waters from heavy metals. Three systems (azole-carboxylic polyampholytes, polymer-polymer complexes of poly(1-vinylimidazole) (PVI), Ai- and Al-based organo/inorganic composites) were discussed. Sorption properties of new composites were studied using Cu 2+ ions as an example. The sorption equilibrium range time is equals to 20-60 min, sorption capacity attains 280 mg/g. The most effective sorbents are composites on the basis of PVI, poly(4-vinylpyridine) decrease sorption capacity due to hydrophobia of this polymer. Thus, composites on the basis of nitrogen-containing polymers are promising systems for heavy materials sorption. Introduction of Si-, Al-hydroxides into composites allows to decrease cost of the materials and increase their nature-compatibility

  8. Activation energy for superplastic flow in aluminum matrix composites exhibiting high-strain-rate superplasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabuchi, M. [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya (Japan); Higashi, K. [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai (Japan)

    1996-06-15

    It is recognized that the activation energy for superplastic flow in metals is in agreement with the activation energy for lattice self-diffusion or for grain boundary diffusion. Moreover, Mishra et al. showed that the activation energy for superplastic flow in a high strain rate superplastic SiC{sub w}/2124Al composite was 313 KJ/mol and they noted that the activation energy was higher than the activation energy for lattice self-diffusion of aluminum (=142 KJ/mol). Very recently, Higashi et al. revealed that an apparent value of the activation energy for superplastic flow was increased by the presence of a liquid phase for mechanically-alloyed materials exhibiting high-strain-rate superplasticity. The same trend was reported in the high-strain-rate superplastic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4w}/Al-Zn-Mg composite. However, there are a few works describing the activation energy for superplastic flow in metal matrix composites from the viewpoint of effects of a liquid phase. In this paper, the activation energies for superplastic flow in a variety of high-strain-rate superplastic Al-Mg(5052), Al-Mg-Si(6061), Al-Zn-Mg(7064) and Al-Cu-Mg(2124) alloy matrix composites have been analyzed.

  9. Additive Manufacturing of Silicon Carbide-Based Ceramic Matrix Composites: Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced SiC-based ceramic matrix composites offer significant contributions toward reducing fuel burn and emissions by enabling high overall pressure ratio (OPR) of gas turbine engines and reducing or eliminating cooling air in the hot-section components, such as shrouds, combustor liners, vanes, and blades. Additive manufacturing (AM), which allows high value, custom designed parts layer by layer, has been demonstrated for metals and polymer matrix composites. However, there has been limited activity on additive manufacturing of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). In this presentation, laminated object manufacturing (LOM), binder jet process, and 3-D printing approaches for developing ceramic composite materials are presented. For the laminated object manufacturing (LOM), fiber prepreg laminates were cut into shape with a laser and stacked to form the desired part followed by high temperature heat treatments. For the binder jet, processing optimization was pursued through silicon carbide powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of fibers into the powder bed. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted along with XRD, TGA, and mechanical testing. Various technical challenges and opportunities for additive manufacturing of ceramics and CMCs will be presented.

  10. Resin infusion of layered metal/composite hybrid and resulting metal/composite hybrid laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of fabricating a metal/composite hybrid laminate is provided. One or more layered arrangements are stacked on a solid base to form a layered structure. Each layered arrangement is defined by a fibrous material and a perforated metal sheet. A resin in its liquid state is introduced along a portion of the layered structure while a differential pressure is applied across the laminate structure until the resin permeates the fibrous material of each layered arrangement and fills perforations in each perforated metal sheet. The resin is cured thereby yielding a metal/composite hybrid laminate.

  11. Novel hard metal compositions and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinberg, H.

    1984-01-01

    A new family of hard metal compositions consisting primarily of borides, borocarbides and carbides of nickel, iron and tungsten or molybdenum is made by reaction hot pressing and/or liquid phase sintering mixtures of elemental powders with small quantities of boron carbide. The hardness of these compositions is in the range of the hardest conventional tungsten carbide-cobalt compositions. Density of this family of materials can be varied from about 8 to 17 Mg/m 3 with only slight variations in hardness. Preliminary data on hot hardness, hardness, fracture toughness, and abrasion resistance are encouraging. (Auth.)

  12. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA airworthiness certification for ceramic matrix composite components in civil aircraft systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonczy Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs are being designed and developed for engine and exhaust components in commercial aviation, because they offer higher temperature capabilities, weight savings, and improved durability compared to metals. The United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA issues and enforces regulations and minimum standards covering the safe manufacture, operation, and maintenance of civil aircraft. As new materials, these ceramic composite components will have to meet the certification regulations of the FAA for “airworthiness”. The FAA certification process is defined in the Federal Aviation Regulations (Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, FAA policy statements, orders, advisory circulars, technical standard orders, and FAA airworthiness directives. These regulations and documents provide the fundamental requirements and guidelines for design, testing, manufacture, quality assurance, registration, operation, inspection, maintenance, and repair of aircraft systems and parts. For metallic parts in aircraft, the FAA certification and compliance process is well-established for type and airworthiness certification, using ASTM and SAE standards, the MMPDS data handbook, and FAA advisory circulars. In a similar manner for polymer matrix composites (PMC, the PMC industry and the FAA have jointly developed and are refining parallel guidelines for polymer matrix composites (PMCs, using guidance in FAA circulars and the CMH-17 PMC handbook. These documents discuss design methods and codes, material testing, property data development, life/durability assessment, production processes, QA procedures, inspection methods, operational limits, and repairs for PMCs. For ceramic composites, the FAA and the CMC and aerospace community are working together (primarily through the CMH-17 CMC handbook to define and codify key design, production, and regulatory issues that have to be addressed in the certification of CMC components in

  13. Surface properties of ceramic/metal composite materials for thermionic converter applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.R.; Bozack, M.J.; Swanson, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ceramic/metal composite electrode materials are of interest for thermionic energy conversion (TEC) applications for several reasons. These materials consist of submicron metal fibers or islands in an oxide matrix and therefore provide a basis for fabricating finely structured electrodes, with projecting or recessed metallic regions for more efficient electron emission or collection. Furthermore, evaporation and surface diffusion of matrix oxides may provide oxygen enhancement of cesium adsorption and work function lowering at both the collecting and emitting electrode surfaces of the TEC. Finally, the high work function oxide matrix or oxide-metal interfaces may provide efficient surface ionization of cesium for space-charge reduction in the device. The authors are investigating two types of ceramic/metal composite materials. One type is a directionally solidified eutectic consisting of a bulk oxide matrix such as UO 2 or stabilized ZrO 2 with parallel metal fibers (W) running through the oxide being exposed at the surface by cutting perpendicular to the fiber direction. The second type of material, called a surface eutectic, consists of a refractory substrate (Mo) with a thin layer of deposited and segregated material (Mo-Cr 2 O 3 -A1 2 O 3 ) on the surface. The final configuration of this layer is an oxide matrix with metallic islands scattered throughout

  14. Effect of thermal-mechanical cycling on thermal expansion behavior of boron fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Y.C.; He, S.Y.; Yang, D.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of boron fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composite subjected to thermal-mechanical cycling (TMC) was studied. Experimental results showed that TMC affected greatly the thermal expansion behavior of the composite. Using a simple analysis model of internal stress in the fibers, the stress change during the thermal expansion coefficient measurements of the composite subjected to TMC was calculated. The results indicated that TMC could induce the interfacial degradation of the composite, and the more the numbers of TMC cycles, or the higher the applied stress level of TMC, the more serious the interfacial degradation of the composite became. The proposed one-dimensional analysis model was proved to be a simple and qualitative approach to probing the interfacial degradation of unidirectional fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites during TMC

  15. Aluminium matrix heterophase composites for air compressor pistons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Dyzia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of surface test of composite shaped in the permanent mould casting process. As part of the research anddevelopment project realized in the Department of Materials Technology at the Silesian University of Technology, a pilot plant scale stand was built to manufacture of more than 50 kg suspensions in a single technological cycle. Made in industrial conditions castings to form in the five inner core mould mounted in GM110 permanent mould casting machine confirmed the possibility of the shaping the composite pistons. Castings made from composite suspension AlSi7Mg/SiC and AlSi7Mg/SiC + Cg according to the technology procedure were classified as correct and devoted to the proper machining forming working surfaces of the piston to the air compressor. Comparative tests were performed for the casting of unreinforced AlSi7Mg alloy and composite castings. To assess the ability to fill the mold cavity and the accuracy of mapping used in contour shape FRT analysis of the distance between the grooves on the surface of the piston skirt. Studies have confirmed the differences in the fluidity of alloy matrix and composites suspensions. The difference in the accuracy of the dimensional mapping mould does not disqualify of composite materials, all castings are classified as correct and used for machining.

  16. Al-Ca and Al-Fe metal-metal composite strength, conductivity, and microstructure relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyong June [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Deformation processed metal-metal composites (DMMC’s) are composites formed by mechanical working (i.e., rolling, swaging, or wire drawing) of two-phase, ductile metal mixtures. Since both the matrix and reinforcing phase are ductile metals, the composites can be heavily deformed to reduce the thickness and spacing of the two phases. Recent studies have shown that heavily drawn DMMCs can achieve anomalously high strength and outstanding combinations of strength and conductivity. In this study, Al-Fe wire composite with 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2 volume fractions of Fe filaments and Al-Ca wire composite with 0.03, 0.06, and 0.09 volume fractions of Ca filaments were produced in situ, and their mechanical properties were measured as a function of deformation true strain. The Al-Fe composites displayed limited deformation of the Fe phase even at high true strains, resulting in little strengthening effect in those composites. Al-9vol%Ca wire was deformed to a deformation true strain of 13.76. The resulting Ca second-phase filaments were deformed to thicknesses on the order of one micrometer. The ultimate tensile strength increased exponentially with increasing deformation true strain, reaching a value of 197 MPa at a true strain of 13.76. This value is 2.5 times higher than the value predicted by the rule of mixtures. A quantitative relationship between UTS and deformation true strain was determined. X-ray diffraction data on transformation of Al + Ca microstructures to Al + various Al-Ca intermetallic compounds were obtained at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Electrical conductivity was measured over a range of true strains and post-deformation heat treatment schedules.

  17. Processing of aluminum matrix composites by electroless plating and melt infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, C.A.; Bourassa, A.-M.; Drew, R.A.L.

    2000-01-01

    Reduction of the SiC/ Al interaction and enhancement of wetting between reinforcements and molten aluminum was obtained by modifying the ceramic surface with deposition of nickel and copper coatings. The preparation of nickel- and copper-coated ceramic particles as precursors for MMC fabrication was studied. Al 2 O 3 and SiC powders were successfully coated with Ni and Cu using electroless metal plating. Uniform and continuous metal films were deposited on both, alumina and silicon carbide powders XRD showed that the Ni-P deposit was predominantly amorphous, while the copper deposit was essentially polycrystalline. Infiltration results showed that the use of the coated powders enhances the wettability between the matrix and ceramic phase when processing particulate MMCs by a vacuum infiltration technique, giving a porosity-free composite with a homogeneously distributed reinforcing phase. The coating promoted easy metal flow through the preform, compared to the non-infiltration behavior of the uncoated counterpart samples XRD microstructural analysis of the composites indicates the formation of intermetallic phases such as CuAl 2 , in the case of copper coating, and NiAl and NiAl 3 when nickel-coated powders are infiltrated. Metallization of the ceramics minimizes the interfacial reaction of the SiC/Al composites and promotes wetting of Al 2 O 3 reinforcements with liquid aluminum. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  18. Evaluation of Amorphous Ribbon Reinforced Resin Matrix Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-30

    magnetic properties offered by the ribbons may result in some unique composite applications. UNiLASSMI lED SECURITY CLASIFICATION OF T--- PAGE(Wfa DOMa...presented in Table 2. Excellent transverse to longitudinal property ratios are demonstrated in these data. The cold rolled carbon steel / epoxy system...reinforcements. Amorphous metals have specific strengths significantly higher than that offered by cold rolled steel alloys. The cold rolled steels have an

  19. Hoop Tensile Properties of Ceramic Matrix Composite Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, HeeMan; Barnett, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Tensile stress-strain properties in the hoop direction were obtained for 100-mm diameter SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite cylinders using ring specimens machined form the cylinder ends. The cylinders were fabricated from 2D balanced SiC fabric with several material variants, including wall thickness (6,8, and 12 plies), SiC fiber type (Sylramic, Sylramic-iBN, Hi-Nicalon, and Hi-Nicalon S), fiber sizing type, and matrix type (full CVI SiC, and partial CVI SiC plus slurry cast + melt-infiltrated SiC-Si). Fiber ply splices existed in all the hoops. Tensile hoop measurements are made at room temperature and 1200 C using hydrostatic ring test facilities. The failure mode of the hoops, determined through microstructural examination, is presented. The hoop properties are compared with in-plane data measured on flat panels using same material variants, but containing no splices.

  20. A Unified Model for the Prediction of Yield Strength in Particulate-Reinforced Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Mirza

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lightweighting in the transportation industry is today recognized as one of the most important strategies to improve fuel efficiency and reduce anthropogenic climate-changing, environment-damaging, and human death-causing emissions. However, the structural applications of lightweight alloys are often limited by some inherent deficiencies such as low stiffness, high wear rate and inferior strength. These properties could be effectively enhanced by the addition of stronger and stiffer reinforcements, especially nano-sized particles, into metal matrix to form composites. In most cases three common strengthening mechanisms (load-bearing effect, mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion, and Orowan strengthening have been considered to predict the yield strength of metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs. This study was aimed at developing a unified model by taking into account the matrix grain size and porosity (which is unavoidable in the materials processing such as casting and powder metallurgy in the prediction of the yield strength of MMNCs. The Zener pinning effect of grain boundaries by the nano-sized particles has also been integrated. The model was validated using the experimental data of magnesium- and titanium-based nanocomposites containing different types of nano-sized particles (namely, Al2O3, Y2O3, and carbon nanotubes. The predicted results were observed to be in good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature.

  1. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols resolved via positive matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äijälä, Mikko; Junninen, Heikki; Heikkinen, Liine; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas; Ehn, Mikael

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter is a complex mixture of various chemical species such as organic compounds, sulfates, nitrates, ammonia, chlorides, black carbon and sea salt. As aerosol chemical composition strongly influences aerosol climate effects (via cloud condensation nucleus activation, hygroscopic properties, aerosol optics, volatility and condensation) as well as health effects (toxicity, carcinogenicity, particle morphology), detailed understanding of atmospheric fine particle composition is widely beneficial for understanding these interactions. Unfortunately the comprehensive, detailed measurement of aerosol chemistry remains difficult due to the wide range of compounds present in the atmosphere as well as for the miniscule mass of the particles themselves compared to their carrier gas. Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Canagaratna et al., 2007) is an instrument often used for characterization of non-refractive aerosol types: the near-universal vaporization and ionisation technique allows for measurement of most atmospheric-relevant compounds (with the notable exception of refractory matter such as sea salt, black carbon, metals and crustal matter). The downside of the hard ionisation applied is extensive fragmentation of sample molecules. However, the apparent loss of information in fragmentation can be partly offset by applying advanced statistical methods to extract information from the fragmentation patterns. In aerosol mass spectrometry statistical analysis methods, such as positive matrix factorization (PMF; Paatero, 1999) are usually applied for aerosol organic component only, to keep the number of factors to be resolved manageable, to retain the inorganic components for solution validation via correlation analysis, and to avoid inorganic species dominating the factor model. However, this practice smears out the interactions between organic and inorganic chemical components, and hinders the understanding of the connections between primary and

  2. LDEF results for polymer matrix composite experiment AO 180

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    This report represents a summary of the results obtained to-date on a polymer matrix composite experiment (AO 180) located at station D-12, about 82 deg off the 'ram' direction. Different material systems comprised of graphite, boron, and aramid (Kevlar) fiber reinforcements were studied. Although previous results were presented on in-situ thermal-vacuum cycling effects, particularly dimensional changes associated with outgassing, additional comparative data will be shown from ground-based tests on control and flight samples. The system employed was fully automated for thermal-vacuum cycling using a laser interferometer for monitoring displacements. Erosion of all three classes of materials due to atomic oxygen (AO) will also be discussed, including angle of incidence effects. Data from this experiment will be compared to published results for similar materials in other LDEF experiments. Composite materials' erosion yields will be presented on an AO design nomogram useful for estimating total material loss for given exposure conditions in low Earth orbit (LEO). Optical properties of these materials will also be compared with control samples. A survey of the damage caused by micrometeoroids/debris impacts will be addressed as they relate to polymer matrix composites. Correlations between hole size and damage pattern will be given. Reference to a new nomogram for estimating the number distribution of micrometeoroid/debris impacts for a given space structure as a function of time in LEO will be addressed based on LDEF data.

  3. Multiscale modeling of PVDF matrix carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greminger, Michael; Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh

    2017-06-01

    Self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced composites have the potential to enable structural health monitoring that is inherent to the composite material rather than requiring external or embedded sensors. It has been demonstrated that a self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite can be created by using the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) as the matrix material and using a Kevlar layer to separate two carbon fiber layers. In this configuration, the electrically conductive carbon fiber layers act as electrodes and the Kevlar layer acts as a dielectric to prevent the electrical shorting of the carbon fiber layers. This composite material has been characterized experimentally for its effective d 33 and d 31 piezoelectric coefficients. However, for design purposes, it is desirable to obtain a predictive model of the effective piezoelectric coefficients for the final smart composite material. Also, the inverse problem can be solved to determine the degree of polarization obtained in the PVDF material during polarization by comparing the effective d 33 and d 31 values obtained in experiment to those predicted by the finite element model. In this study, a multiscale micromechanics and coupled piezoelectric-mechanical finite element modeling approach is introduced to predict the mechanical and piezoelectric performance of a plain weave carbon fiber reinforced PVDF composite. The modeling results show good agreement with the experimental results for the mechanical and electrical properties of the composite. In addition, the degree of polarization of the PVDF component of the composite is predicted using this multiscale modeling approach and shows that there is opportunity to drastically improve the smart composite’s performance by improving the polarization procedure.

  4. Analytical Hierarchy Process for Natural Fiber Composites Automotive Armrest Thermoset Matrix Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosli M.U

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The automotive industry is currently shifting to a ‘green’ outlook since that the popularity of natural fibers in composites plastics is accelerating in many areas and particularly the automotive industry. Nowadays, consumers are looking for vehicles more environmentally friendly and lighter in weight. For this reason, the engineers are now focusing to substitute the metal parts on utilizing the natural fiber composites. Selecting the right material in product development is a crucial decision. Imprecise decision can cause the product to be remanufactured and not in optimized condition. One of the methods that can be employed is Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP. This paper illustrates the implementation of AHP method in order to select the most appropriate thermoset matrix for natural fiber composites automotive armrest. The selection is based on the weight reduction as the major aim of the study.

  5. Double Vacuum Bag Process for Resin Matrix Composite Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A double vacuum bag molding assembly with improved void management and laminate net shape control which provides a double vacuum enviromnent for use in fabricating composites from prepregs containing air and/or volatiles such as reactive resin matrix composites or composites from solvent containing prepregs with non-reactive resins matrices. By using two vacuum environments during the curing process, a vacuum can be drawn during a B-stage of a two-step cycle without placing the composite under significant relative pressure. During the final cure stage, a significant pressure can be applied by releasing the vacuum in one of the two environments. Inner and outer bags are useful for creating the two vacuum environments with a perforated tool intermediate the two. The composite is placed intermediate a tool plate and a caul plate in the first environment with the inner bag and tool plate defining the first environment. The second environment is characterized by the outer bag which is placed over the inner bag and the tool plate.

  6. Discontinuously reinforced titanium matrix composites for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, V.; Leguey, T.; Monge, M.A.; Munoz, A.; Pareja, R.; Victoria, M.

    2002-01-01

    We have reinforced α-Ti with different contents of TiC particles using the in situ technique and conventional casting. Compositional and microstructural characterization of the TiC/Ti composite material was made by XRD and SEM-EDS. Tensile tests at RT, 723 and 973 K have been performed on samples heat treated at 1000 K for 30 min which were prepared from cold rolled material. The effect of the content, size and morphology of the TiC particles on the tensile properties has been investigated. The results indicate that the expected improvement in the mechanical characteristics of TiC/Ti composites is inhibited by the detrimental presence of coarse dendritic particles of TiC. The premature failure of these composites at RT is due to cracking of the coarse TiC particles. Local softening due to inhomogeneous plastic deformation of the Ti matrix appears to contribute to the tensile failure of the TiC/Ti composites deformed at 723 and 973 K.

  7. Nondestructive Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composite Combustor Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiangang G.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Stephan, Robert R.; Barnett, Terry R.; Ojard, Greg C.

    2003-01-01

    Combustor liners fabricated from a SiC/SiC composite (silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix) were nondestructively interrogated before and after combustion rig testing by x-ray, ultrasonic, and thermographic techniques. In addition, mechanical test results were obtained from witness coupons, representing the as-manufactured liners, and from coupons machined from the components after combustion exposure. Thermography indications correlated with reduced material properties obtained after rig testing. The thermography indications in the SiC/SiC liners were delaminations and damaged fiber tows, as determined through microstructural examinations.

  8. Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Disk for Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Mike; Genge, Gary; Kiser, Doug

    2000-01-01

    NASA has recently completed testing of a ceramic matrix composite (CMC), integrally bladed disk (blisk) for rocket engine turbopumps. The turbopump's main function is to bring propellants from the tank to the combustion chamber at optimal pressures, temperatures, and flow rates. Advantages realized by using CMC blisks are increases in safety by increasing temperature margins and decreasing costs by increasing turbopump performance. A multidisciplinary team, involving materials, design, structural analysis, nondestructive inspection government, academia, and industry experts, was formed to accomplish the 4.5 year effort. This article will review some of the background and accomplishments of the CMC Blisk Program relative to the benefits of this technology.

  9. Metal-semiconductor, composite radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orvis, W.J.; Yee, J.H.; Fuess, D.

    1992-12-01

    In 1989, Naruse and Hatayama of Toshiba published a design for an increased efficiency x-ray detector. The design increased the efficiency of a semiconductor detector by interspersing layers of high-z metal within it. Semiconductors such as silicon make good, high-resolution radiation detectors, but they have low efficiency because they are low-z materials (z = 14). High-z metals, on the other hand, are good absorbers of high-energy photons. By interspersing high-z metal layers with semiconductor layers, Naruse and Hatayama combined the high absorption efficiency of the high-z metals with the good detection capabilities of a semiconductor. This project is an attempt to use the same design to produce a high-efficiency, room temperature gamma ray detector. By their nature, gamma rays require thicker metal layers to efficiently absorb them. These thicker layers change the behavior of the detector by reducing the resolution, compared to a solid state detector, and shifting the photopeak by a predictable amount. During the last year, the authors have procured and tested a commercial device with operating characteristics similar to those of a single layer of the composite device. They have modeled the radiation transport in a multi-layered device, to verify the initial calculations of layer thickness and composition. They have modeled the electrostatic field in different device designs to locate and remove high-field regions that can cause device breakdown. They have fabricated 14 single layer prototypes

  10. Consumable electrode arc casting of copper-refactory metal composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.L.; Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on consumable electrode arc casting that has been developed as a preparation method for producing high strength/high electrical and thermal conductivity metal-metal matrix composites. Electrode configuration and melting parameters have been studied to improve ingot homogeneity. Alloy ingot impurities have been reduced by a combination of mold material and melting practice. Alloys containing 15 to 20 vol % Cr, Mo, Nb, Ta and V have been prepared with strengths of 150-300 ksi produced in deformation processed Cu-Nb sheet and wire respectively. Significant differences in strengthening behavior are attributed to filament morphology which is related to the deformation mode. Cold axisymmetric deformations of 99.999% reduction in area have been achieved with axisymmetric deformation providing the highest strengthening

  11. Consumable electrode arc casting of copper-refractory metal composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.L.; Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on consumable electrode arc casting that has been developed as a preparation method for producing high strength/high electrical and thermal conductivity metal-metal matrix composites. Electrode configuration and melting parameters have been studied to improve ingot homogeneity. Alloy ingot impurities have been reduced by a combination of mold material and melting practice. Alloys containing 15 to 20 vol. % Cr, Mo, Nb, Ta and V have been prepared with strengths of 150-300 ksi produced in deformation processed Cu-Nb sheet and wire respectively. Significant differences in strengthening behavior are attributed to filament morphology which is related to the deformation mode. Cold axisymmentric deformations of 99.999% reduction in area have been achieved with axisymmetric deformation providing the highest strengthening

  12. Colloidal forming of metal/ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Gutierrez, C.A.; Millan, A.J.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Metal/Ceramic composites have very attractive properties as either structural or electronic materials. For certain applications, complex microstructures and shapes are required. Colloidal processing of ceramics has proved to provide better properties and allows to obtain near net complex shaped parts. However colloidal processing has not received a similar attention in powder metallurgy. This work deals with the colloidal approach to the forming of metallic and metal/ceramic composites in an aqueous medium. Rheological behavior of concentrated pure nickel, nickel/alumina and nickel/zirconia suspensions is studied and optimized for obtaining flat surfaces or near net shaped parts by tape casting and gel casting respectively. In each case the influence of the processing additives (acrylic binders for tape casting and carrageenans for gel casting) on the rheological behavior of the slurries is determined. Pure nickel and nickel/ceramic composites with different compositions have been prepared. Static and dynamic sintering studies were performed at different conditions in order to control the porosity and microstructure of the final bodies, which were characterized by optical microscopy. (orig.)

  13. An Overview of Key Challenges in the Fabrication of Metal Matrix Nanocomposites Reinforced by Graphene Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Saboori

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of research efforts with an emphasis on the fabrication of metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs reinforced by graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs. Particular attention is devoted to finding the challenges in the production of MMNCs through the powder metallurgy techniques. The main technical challenges can be listed as: (I reinforcement selection; (II dispersion of reinforcement within the matrix; (III reactivity between the reinforcement and matrix; (IV interfacial bonding; (V preferred orientation of reinforcement. It is found that some of these difficulties can be attributed to the nature of the materials involved, while the others are related to the preparation routes. It is reported that the challenges related to the process can often be addressed by changing the production process or by using post-processing techniques. More challenging issues instead are related to the composition of the matrix and reinforcement, their reactivity and the dispersion of reinforcement. These topics still bring significant challenges to the materials scientists, and it would be worth mentioning that the fabrication of MMNCs with a uniform dispersion of reinforcement, strong interfacial bonding, without detrimental reactions and improved isotropic properties is still a puzzling issue.

  14. Laser Machining of Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, D. C.; Ojard, G.; Brewer, D.

    2012-01-01

    As interest grows in considering the use of ceramic matrix composites for critical components, the effects of different machining techniques, and the resulting machined surfaces, on strength need to be understood. This work presents the characterization of a Melt Infiltrated SiC/SiC composite material system machined by different methods. While a range of machining approaches were initially considered, only diamond grinding and laser machining were investigated on a series of tensile coupons. The coupons were tested for residual tensile strength, after a stressed steam exposure cycle. The data clearly differentiated the laser machined coupons as having better capability for the samples tested. These results, along with micro-structural characterization, will be presented.

  15. Update on CMH-17 Volume 5: Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Kaia; Pierce, Jennifer; Kiser, James; Keith, William P.; Wilson, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    CMC components are projected to enter service in commercial aircraft in 2016. A wide range of issues must be addressed prior to certification of this hardware. The Composite Materials Handbook-17, Volume 5 on ceramic matrix composites is being revised to support FAA certification of CMCs for hot structure and other elevated temperature applications. The handbook supports the development and use of CMCs through publishing and maintaining proven, reliable engineering information and standards that have been thoroughly reviewed. Volume 5 will contain detailed sections describing CMC materials processing, design analysis guidelines, testing procedures, and data analysis and acceptance. A review of the status of and plans for two of these areas, which are being addressed by the M and P Working Group and the Testing Working Group, will be presented along with a timeline for the preparation of CMH-17, Volume 5.

  16. High Performance High Temperature Thermoelectric Composites with Metallic Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, James M. (Inventor); Bux, Sabah K. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Ravi, Vilupanur A. (Inventor); Firdosy, Samad A. (Inventor); Star, Kurt (Inventor); Kaner, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention provides a composite thermoelectric material. The composite thermoelectric material can include a semiconductor material comprising a rare earth metal. The atomic percent of the rare earth metal in the semiconductor material can be at least about 20%. The composite thermoelectric material can further include a metal forming metallic inclusions distributed throughout the semiconductor material. The present invention also provides a method of forming this composite thermoelectric material.

  17. Life Modeling and Design Analysis for Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The primary research efforts focused on characterizing and modeling static failure, environmental durability, and creep-rupture behavior of two classes of ceramic matrix composites (CMC), silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) and carbon fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC). An engineering life prediction model (Probabilistic Residual Strength model) has been developed specifically for CMCs. The model uses residual strength as the damage metric for evaluating remaining life and is posed probabilistically in order to account for the stochastic nature of the material s response. In support of the modeling effort, extensive testing of C/SiC in partial pressures of oxygen has been performed. This includes creep testing, tensile testing, half life and residual tensile strength testing. C/SiC is proposed for airframe and propulsion applications in advanced reusable launch vehicles. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the models predictive capabilities as well as the manner in which experimental tests are being selected in such a manner as to ensure sufficient data is available to aid in model validation.

  18. Microstructure of a cement matrix composite reinforced with polypropylene fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rincón, J. M.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the microstructural characterization of a composite material, which is comprised of polypropylene fibers in an cement matrix, by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. The microstructure of the different phases that compose the matrix is very heterogeneous, though there is a uniform distribution of the fibers inside it. The surface of this composite is different after setting, cured and hardening depending if the zone is or not in touch with the walls of the mould. The interface between the different crystalline regions of the cement matrix and the dispersed fibers shows compatibility between the matrix and the polymeric fibers. The mechanical properties (compression and bending strength have also been evaluated. The use of melamine formaldehyde as additive leads to a reinforcement of the cement matrix and to the improvement of the mechanical properties.

    Se ha llevado a cabo una observacíón microestructural detallada de un material compuesto de fibras de polipropileno embebidas en una matriz de cemento usando los nuevos tipos de microscopía electrónica de barrido, tales como: un microscopio electrónico medioambiental (acrónimo en inglés: ESEM y uno de emisión de campo (acrónimo en inglés: FESEM. La microestructura de las diferentes fases que componen la matriz es muy heterogénea, aunque hay una distribución uniforme de las fibras dentro de ellas. La superficie de este material compuesto es diferente después del fraguado, curado y endurecimiento según qué zonas estén o no en contacto con las paredes del molde. La interfase entre las diferentes fases cristalinas de la matriz de cemento y las fibras dispersadas se ha observado a diferentes aumentos, comprobándose compatibilidad entre la matriz y las fibras poliméricas. Las propiedades de resistencia mecánica (tanto a flexión como a compresión han sido tambi

  19. Insect phylogenomics: results, problems and the impact of matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letsch, Harald O; Meusemann, Karen; Wipfler, Benjamin; Schütte, Kai; Beutel, Rolf; Misof, Bernhard

    2012-08-22

    In this study, we investigated the relationships among insect orders with a main focus on Polyneoptera (lower Neoptera: roaches, mantids, earwigs, grasshoppers, etc.), and Paraneoptera (thrips, lice, bugs in the wide sense). The relationships between and within these groups of insects are difficult to resolve because only few informative molecular and morphological characters are available. Here, we provide the first phylogenomic expressed sequence tags data ('EST': short sub-sequences from a c(opy) DNA sequence encoding for proteins) for stick insects (Phasmatodea) and webspinners (Embioptera) to complete published EST data. As recent EST datasets are characterized by a heterogeneous distribution of available genes across taxa, we use different rationales to optimize the data matrix composition. Our results suggest a monophyletic origin of Polyneoptera and Eumetabola (Paraneoptera + Holometabola). However, we identified artefacts of tree reconstruction (human louse Pediculus humanus assigned to Odonata (damselflies and dragonflies) or Holometabola (insects with a complete metamorphosis); mayfly genus Baetis nested within Neoptera), which were most probably rooted in a data matrix composition bias due to the inclusion of sequence data of entire proteomes. Until entire proteomes are available for each species in phylogenomic analyses, this potential pitfall should be carefully considered.

  20. Biomimetic Composite-Metal Hip Resurfacing Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habiba Bougherara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip resurfacing technique is a conservative arthroplasty used in the young patient in which the femoral head is reshaped to accept metal cap with small guide stem. In the present investigation, a hybrid composite-metal resurfacing implant is proposed. The cup is made of carbon fiber/polyamide 12 (CF/PA12 covered with a thin layer of cobalt chrome (Co-Cr. Finite element (FE method was applied to analyze and compare the biomechanical performances of the hybrid hip resurfacing (HHR and the conventional Birmingham (BHR. Results of the finite element analysis showed that the composite implant leads to an increase in stresses in the cancellous bone by more than 15% than BHR, indicating a lower potential for stress shielding and bone fracture and higher potential for bone apposition with the HHR.

  1. Thermal expansion behaviour of high performance PEEK matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, R K; Mulik, U P; Tiwari, A N; Negi, Y S

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion behaviour of high performance poly(ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) composites reinforced with micro- (8 μm) and nano- (39 nm) sized Al 2 O 3 particles was studied. The distribution of Al 2 O 3 in the PEEK matrix was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was reduced from 58 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 for pure PEEK to 22 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 at 43 vol% micro-Al 2 O 3 and to 23 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 at 12 vol% nano-Al 2 O 3 composites. For a given volume fraction, nano-Al 2 O 3 particles are more effective in reducing the CTE of composites than that of micro-Al 2 O 3 particles. This may be attributed to the much higher interfacial area or volume of nanocomposites than that of microcomposites. The upper limit and lower limit of the Schapery model separately fit closely the CTE of the micro- and nano-composites, respectively. Other models such as the rule of mixture and Kerner and Turner models were also correlated with the data

  2. Plasma Transferred ARC (PTA Hardfacing of Recycled Hardmetal Reinforced Nickel-matrix Surface Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadi ZIKIN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to apply coarse recycled hardmetal particles in combination with Ni-based matrix to produce wear resistant metal matrix composite (MMC thick coatings using plasma transferred arc hardfacing (PTA technology. Assignment of hardmetal waste as initial material can significantly decrease the production costs and improve the mechanical properties of coatings and, consequently, increase their wear resistance. The microstructure of MMC fabricated from a recycled powder was examined by optical and SEM/EDS microscopes, whereas quantitative analyses were performed by image analysis method. Micro-mechanical properties, including hardness and elastic modulus of features, were measured by nanoindentation. Furthermore, behaviour of materials subjected to abrasive and impact conditions was studied. Results show the recycled powder provides hardfacings of high quality which can be successfully used in the fabrication of wear resistant MMC coatings by PTA-technology.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.1.1334

  3. Consolidation of titanium matrix composites to maximum density by different hot pressing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montealegre Melendez, I.; Neubauer, E.; Danninger, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this present work, TiMMCs were manufactured through conventional and inductive hot pressing techniques. The starting materials were two titanium based powders as metal matrices, and two types of reinforcements, carbon nanofibres and nano-micro-boron particles. After several manufacturing runs with varying parameters, especially, optimized hot pressing parameters, the titanium compacts were characterized. Density and hardness measurements, chemical analyses and microstructural studies were conducted. The two objectives of this work were achieved. On one hand the influence, in the properties of TiMMCs, of the starting materials as matrix powder and reinforcements was determined. Higher content of impurities from the starting materials affected the hardness and the microstructure of the composites, independently of the manufacturing process. On another hand, the study of variations of the manufacturing process as temperature of consolidation and soaking time was reported. Higher densification was obtained at higher consolidation temperature; however, reaction between the matrix and the carbonaceous reinforcement was detected.

  4. Graphitization of diamond with a metallic coating on ferritic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Stenio Cavalier; Oliveira, Hellen Cristine Prata de; Filgueira, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    Iron is a strong catalyst of graphitization of diamonds. This graphitization occurs mainly during the processing of composites - conventional sintering or hot pressing, and during cutting operations. Aiming to avoid or minimize this deleterious effect, there is increasing use of diamond coated with metallic materials in the production of diamond tools processed via powder metallurgy. This work studies the influence of Fe on diamond graphitization diamond-coated Ti after mixing of Fe-diamonds, hot pressing parameters were performed with 3 minutes/35MPa/900 deg C - this is the condition of pressing hot used in industry for production of diamond tools. Microstructural features were observed by SEM, diffusion of Fe in diamond was studied by EDS. Graphitization was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that Fe not activate graphitization on the diamond under the conditions of hot pressing. (author)

  5. Residual thermal stress control in composite reinforced metal structures. [by mechanical loading of metal component prior to bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced composite materials, composed of boron or graphite fibers and a supporting matrix, make significant structural efficiency improvements available to aircraft and aerospace designers. Residual stress induced during bonding of composite reinforcement to metal structural elements can be reduced or eliminated through suitable modification to the manufacturing processes. The most successful method employed during this program used a steel tool capable of mechanically loading the metal component in compression prior to the adhesive bonding cycle. Compression loading combined with heating to 350 F during the bond cycle can result in creep deformation in aluminum components. The magnitude of the deformation increases with increasing stress level during exposure to 350 F.

  6. Fabrication of Ceramic Matrix Composite Tubes Using a Porous Mullite/Alumina Matrix and Alumina/Mullite Fiber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Radsick, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    ... or from inadequate oxide-based ones. A porous mullite/alumina matrix combined with alumina/mullite fiber reinforcement eliminates the need for an interface coating while producing a strong, tough and oxidation resistant composite...

  7. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Li, Wenguang; Bailey, James A.; Gao, Yuan

    2012-10-02

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  8. Surface integrity of solvent-challenged ormocer-matrix composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Larissa Maria; Schneider, Luis Felipe J; Silikas, Nick; Watts, David C

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the surface integrity of solvent-challenged ormocer-matrix composites, photoactivated by different light exposure modes, through surface-hardness measurements at different periods of time; and to compare such behavior with dimethacrylate-based materials. One hundred percent ormocer-based matrix (experimental ormocer (ORM)), a commercial mixed dimethacrylate-ormocer-based matrix (Admira (ADR)) and two commercial dimethacrylate-based matrix composites (experimental controls, (Grandio (GRD) and Premise (PRE)) were evaluated. Disk specimens (4 mm × 2 mm) were prepared from each material and light-activated using either a standard (S) or soft-start (SS) light exposure protocol with an LED-curing unit. Top, irradiated surface Knoop hardness (KHN) was measured within the following experimental groups (n=5): Group 1: immediately after exposure; Group 2: after dry and dark storage, Group 3: after storage in distilled water, and Group 4: immersion in absolute ethanol. Hardness of Groups 2-4 were measured after 7 days storage. Immediate hardness values were submitted to Student's t-tests separately for each material. Hardness values after treatments were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test to compare values among different storage media and light exposure mode protocols. Comparisons among materials were described using percentage of hardness change. Statistical testing was performed at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Immediate hardness values were not affected by the light exposure mode, regardless of the material. In general, exposure mode did not significantly affect hardness after 7 days storage, regardless of storage media or material. After 7 days dry storage, hardness values increased for all materials relative to immediate testing, and decreased after water and ethanol storage, with ethanol showing the greatest effect. The experimental ormocer-based material had the lowest percentage hardness change and thus proved more resistant to solvent

  9. A Brief Research Review for Improvement Methods the Wettability between Ceramic Reinforcement Particulate and Aluminium Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Alaa Mohammed; Majid, Dayang Laila Abang Abdul; Ishak, M. R.; B, Uday M.

    2017-05-01

    The development of new methods for addition fine ceramic powders to Al aluminium alloy melts, which would lead to more uniform distribution and effective incorporation of the reinforcement particles into the aluminium matrix alloy. Recently the materials engineering research has moved to composite materials from monolithic, adapting to the global need for lightweight, low cost, quality, and high performance advanced materials. Among the different methods, stir casting is one of the simplest ways of making aluminium matrix composites. However, it suffers from poor distribution and combination of the reinforcement ceramic particles in the metal matrix. These problems become significantly effect to reduce reinforcement size, more agglomeration and tendency with less wettability for the ceramic particles in the melt process. Many researchers have carried out different studies on the wettability between the metal matrix and dispersion phase, which includes added wettability agents, fluxes, preheating the reinforcement particles, coating the reinforcement particles, and use composting techniques. The enhancement of wettability of ceramic particles by the molten matrix alloy and the reinforcement particles distribution improvement in the solidified matrix is the main objective for many studies that will be discussed in this paper.

  10. Ceramic/metal and A15/metal superconducting composite materials exploiting the superconducting proximity effect and method of making the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    A composite superconducting material made of coated particles of ceramic superconducting material and a metal matrix material is disclosed. The metal matrix material fills the regions between the coated particles. The coating material is a material that is chemically nonreactive with the ceramic. Preferably, it is silver. The coating serves to chemically insulate the ceramic from the metal matrix material. The metal matrix material is a metal that is susceptible to the superconducting proximity effect. Preferably, it is a NbTi alloy. The metal matrix material is induced to become superconducting by the superconducting proximity effect when the temperature of the material goes below the critical temperature of the ceramic. The material has the improved mechanical properties of the metal matrix material. Preferably, the material consists of approximately 10% NbTi, 90% coated ceramic particles (by volume). Certain aspects of the material and method will depend upon the particular ceramic superconductor employed. An alternative embodiment of the invention utilizes A15 compound superconducting particles in a metal matrix material which is preferably a NbTi alloy

  11. Ceramic/metal and A15/metal superconducting composite materials exploiting the superconducting proximity effect and method of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Matthew J.

    1999-01-01

    A composite superconducting material made of coated particles of ceramic superconducting material and a metal matrix material. The metal matrix material fills the regions between the coated particles. The coating material is a material that is chemically nonreactive with the ceramic. Preferably, it is silver. The coating serves to chemically insulate the ceramic from the metal matrix material. The metal matrix material is a metal that is susceptible to the superconducting proximity effect. Preferably, it is a NbTi alloy. The metal matrix material is induced to become superconducting by the superconducting proximity effect when the temperature of the material goes below the critical temperature of the ceramic. The material has the improved mechanical properties of the metal matrix material. Preferably, the material consists of approximately 10% NbTi, 90% coated ceramic particles (by volume). Certain aspects of the material and method will depend upon the particular ceramic superconductor employed. An alternative embodiment of the invention utilizes A15 compound superconducting particles in a metal matrix material which is preferably a NbTi alloy.

  12. Colloidal processing of Fe-based metal ceramic composites with high content of ceramic reinforcement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escribano, J. A.; Ferrari, B.; Alvaredo, P.; Gordo, E.; Sanchez-Herencia, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    Major difficulties of processing metal-matrix composites by means of conventional powder metallurgy techniques are the lack of dispersion of the phases within the final microstructure. In this work, processing through colloidal techniques of the Fe-based metal-matrix composites, with a high content of a ceramic reinforcement (Ti(C,N) ), is presented for the first time in the literature. The colloidal approach allows a higher control of the powders packing and a better homogenization of phases since powders are mixed in a liquid medium. The chemical stability of Fe in aqueous medium determines the dispersion conditions of the mixture. The Fe slurries were formulated by optimising their zeta potential and their rheology, in order to shape bulk pieces by slip-casting. Preliminary results demonstrate the viability of this procedure, also opening new paths to the microstructural design of fully sintered Fe-based hard metal, with 50 vol. % of Ti(C,N) in its composition. (Author)

  13. On matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, Yurii M [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-31

    The state-of-the-art in matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states is analysed. Main aspects of this problem concerning the genealogy of appropriate matrix systems are classified. Relevant examples are given and the data that contradict the scheme proposed are discussed. The thermodynamics of the matrix stabilisation effect is considered using the concept of isomorphic miscibility. The influence of defects and non-equilibrium on the matrix stabilisation effect is discussed. The problem of identification of the oxidation states in matrix systems is examined and various types of matrix systems are considered.

  14. On matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, Yurii M

    2009-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states is analysed. Main aspects of this problem concerning the genealogy of appropriate matrix systems are classified. Relevant examples are given and the data that contradict the scheme proposed are discussed. The thermodynamics of the matrix stabilisation effect is considered using the concept of isomorphic miscibility. The influence of defects and non-equilibrium on the matrix stabilisation effect is discussed. The problem of identification of the oxidation states in matrix systems is examined and various types of matrix systems are considered.

  15. Nanosized-Particle Dispersion-Strengthened Al Matrix Composites Fabricated by the Double Mechanical Alloying Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chungseok

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to fabricate an Al metal matrix composite strengthened by nanosized Al3Ti particles via double mechanical alloying process. Several Al-xTi alloys were fabricated, including Al-12%Ti, Al-15%Ti, and Al-12%Ti-1%Y2O3. The lattice parameter of as-milled state was calculated to be 4.0485 Å; after a milling time of 540 min, it was 4.0401 Å. This decrease was induced by Ti solutionizing into the Al matrix. The equivalent size of a coarse Al3Ti particle was 200-500 nm after the heat treatment; however, the particles were uniformly distributed and were refined through the MA2 process. The particle size of a Al3Ti phase was 30 nm or less, and the particles were uniformly distributed. These particles remained in a fine state in the matrix without growth and coarsening, even after the hot extrusion process. The microstructure of hot extruded alloys consisted of a uniform distribution of Al3Ti particles and other dispersoids in the Al matrix.

  16. Friction stir welding of Aluminium matrix composites – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanya Prabhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is established as one of the prominent welding techniques to join aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. It is a solid state welding process, takes place well below the melting temperature of the material, eliminates the detrimental effects of conventional fusion welding process. Although the process is capable to join AMCs, challenges are still open that need to be fulfill to widen its applications. This paper gives the outline of the friction stir welding technique used to join AMCs. Effect of process variables on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints, behavior of reinforcing materials during welding, effect of tool profiles on the joint strength are discussed in detail. Few improvements and direction for future research are also proposed.

  17. Nondestructive Damage Evaluation in Ceramic Matrix Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos G. Dassios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared thermography (IRT and acoustic emission (AE are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material’s performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately.

  18. Wear and Reactivity Studies of Melt infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, David C.; Ojard, Greg; Brewer, David N.

    2013-01-01

    As interest grows in the use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for critical gas turbine engine components, the effects of the CMCs interaction with the adjoining structure needs to be understood. A series of CMC/material couples were wear tested in a custom elevated temperature test rig and tested as diffusion couples, to identify interactions. Specifically, melt infiltrated silicon carbide/silicon carbide (MI SiC/SiC) CMC was tested in combination with a nickel-based super alloy, Waspaloy, a thermal barrier coating, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a monolithic ceramic, silicon nitride (Si3N4). To make the tests more representative of actual hardware, the surface of the CMC was kept in the as-received state (not machined) with the full surface features/roughness present. Test results include: scanning electron microscope characterization of the surfaces, micro-structural characterization, and microprobe analysis.

  19. Abrasive waterjet machining characteristics of aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Yong Wie; Shin, Young Sam

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum matrix composite Al356/SiCp(Vol. 15%)(Al MMC) material has been cut under various cutting conditions using Abrasive WaterJet (AWJ) machining process. The experimental cutting was carried out using three different material thicknesses of 10, 20, 30mm with a 0.33mm diameter orifice. The pump pressure, traverse rate, StandOff Distance(SOD) were taken as process parameters. After cutting the quality of the specimen in terms of kerf width, kerf taper, and surface finish were measured to characterize machinability of the material. As a result of the study, the maximum traverse rate for 30mm thick Al MMC under the pump pressure of 350 MPa reached up to 70 mm/min and the surface roughness of the material showed surface finish Ra in the range of 2.3∼23.4μm.

  20. Abrasive waterjet machining characteristics of aluminum matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Yong Wie; Shin, Young Sam [Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    Aluminum matrix composite Al356/SiCp(Vol. 15%)(Al MMC) material has been cut under various cutting conditions using Abrasive WaterJet (AWJ) machining process. The experimental cutting was carried out using three different material thicknesses of 10, 20, 30mm with a 0.33mm diameter orifice. The pump pressure, traverse rate, StandOff Distance(SOD) were taken as process parameters. After cutting the quality of the specimen in terms of kerf width, kerf taper, and surface finish were measured to characterize machinability of the material. As a result of the study, the maximum traverse rate for 30mm thick Al MMC under the pump pressure of 350 MPa reached up to 70 mm/min and the surface roughness of the material showed surface finish Ra in the range of 2.3{approx}23.4{mu}m.

  1. Properties of AlSi9Mg Alloy Matrix Composite Reinforced with Short Carbon Fibre after Remelting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łągiewka M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The presented work describes the results of examination of the mechanical properties of castings made either of AlSi9Mg alloy matrix composite reinforced with short carbon fibre or of the pure AlSi9Mg alloy. The tensile strength, the yield strength, Young’s modulus, and the unit elongation were examined both for initial castings and for castings made of the remelted composite or AlSi9Mg alloy. After preparing metallographic specimens, the structure of the remelted materials was assessed. A few non-metallic inclusions were observed in the structure of the remelted composite, not occurring in the initial castings. Mechanical testing revealed that all the examined properties of the initial composite material exceed those of the non-reinforced matrix. A decrease in mechanical properties was stated both for the metal matrix and for the composite after the remelting process, but this decrease was so slight that it either does not preclude them from further use or does not restrict the range of their application.

  2. Stochastic Virtual Tests for High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian N.; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Begley, Matthew; Blacklock, Matthew; Do, Bao-Chan; Fast, Tony; Naderi, Mehdi; Novak, Mark; Rajan, Varun P.; Rinaldi, Renaud G.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Rossol, Michael N.; Shaw, John H.; Sudre, Olivier; Yang, Qingda; Zok, Frank W.; Marshall, David B.

    2014-07-01

    We review the development of virtual tests for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites with textile reinforcement. Success hinges on understanding the relationship between the microstructure of continuous-fiber composites, including its stochastic variability, and the evolution of damage events leading to failure. The virtual tests combine advanced experiments and theories to address physical, mathematical, and engineering aspects of material definition and failure prediction. Key new experiments include surface image correlation methods and synchrotron-based, micrometer-resolution 3D imaging, both executed at temperatures exceeding 1,500°C. Computational methods include new probabilistic algorithms for generating stochastic virtual specimens, as well as a new augmented finite element method that deals efficiently with arbitrary systems of crack initiation, bifurcation, and coalescence in heterogeneous materials. Conceptual advances include the use of topology to characterize stochastic microstructures. We discuss the challenge of predicting the probability of an extreme failure event in a computationally tractable manner while retaining the necessary physical detail.

  3. Reaction sintering of ceramic-metal composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botta Filho, W.J.; Rodrigues, J.A.; Tomasi, R.; Pandolfelli, V.C.; Passos, J.F.S.S.; Folgueras, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    Reaction sintering experiments have been carried out in the system Al 2 O 3 -ZrAl 2 -Nb 2 O 5 with the objective of producing ceramic-metal composites of improved toughness. The sintering treatments have been done in the temperature range of 700 0 C to 1400 0 C under different conditions of vacuum and in air and argon atmospheres. The treated samples have been analysed by X-ray diffraction and analytical electron microscopy. The results are discussed in function of the degree of reaction, the development of microstructure and the densification. These results have shown that although an exchange reaction can occur to produce a composite, the control of the reaction to obtain a dense microstructure has not been possible yet. (author) [pt

  4. Investigation of Selective Laser Melting Surface Alloyed Aluminium Metal Matrix Dispersive Reinforced Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburov, V. V.; Dimitrova, R. B.; Kandeva, M. K.; Sofronov, Y. P.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the improvement of mechanical properties and in particular wear resistance of laser surface alloyed dispersive reinforced thin layers produced by selective laser melting (SLM) technology. The wear resistance investigation of aluminium matrix composite layers in the conditions of dry friction surface with abrasive particles and nanoindentation tests were carried out. The process parameters (as scan speed) and their impact on the wear resistant layers have been evaluated. The alloyed layers containing metalized SiC particles were studied by Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The obtained experimental results of the laser alloyed thin layers show significant development of their wear resistance and nanohardness due to the incorporated reinforced phase of electroless nickel coated SiC particles.

  5. Method of making metal-polymer composite catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelena, Piotr [Los Alamos, NM; Bashyam, Rajesh [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-06-23

    A metal-polymer-carbon composite catalyst for use as a cathode electrocatalyst in fuel cells. The catalyst includes a heteroatomic polymer; a transition metal linked to the heteroatomic polymer by one of nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus, and a recast ionomer dispersed throughout the heteroatomic polymer-carbon composite. The method includes forming a heteroatomic polymer-carbon composite and loading the transition metal onto the composite. The invention also provides a method of making a membrane electrode assembly for a fuel cell that includes the metal-polymer-carbon composite catalyst.

  6. The characterization of an oxide interfacial coating for ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coons, Timothy P.; Reutenauer, Justin W.; Mercado, Andrew; Kmetz, Michael A.; Suib, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    This work focused on the use of metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) to deposit a zinc oxide (ZnO) coating on ceramic fibers as an interfacial system for continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CFR-CMCs). ZnO coatings were deposited on ceramic grade (CG) Nicalon ™ , Hi-Nicalon ™ , and Hi-Nicalon ™ Type S fabric by the thermal decomposition of zinc acetate dihydrate in a low pressure hot wall CVD reactor. A duplex SiO 2 coating was also deposited in order to protect the ZnO layer from the reducing conditions during composite fabrication. Tow testing was used to evaluate the effect of the ZnO coating on the strength retention of the ceramic fabrics. Single strand unidirectional mini composites were fabricated by infiltrating SiC into the ZnO/SiO 2 duplex coated tows in order to understand the interfacial properties of the ZnO coating. The mini composite utilizing Hi-Nicalon ™ Type S produced the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 330 MPa. The coated fabrics and the mini composites were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning Auger microscopy (SAM)

  7. Modeling the Nonlinear, Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites With Hydrostatic Stress Effects Included

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis method based on a deformation (as opposed to damage) approach has been developed to model the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of woven ceramic matrix composites with a plain weave fiber architecture. In the developed model, the differences in the tension and compression response have also been considered. State variable based viscoplastic equations originally developed for metals have been modified to analyze the ceramic matrix composites. To account for the tension/compression asymmetry in the material, the effective stress and effective inelastic strain definitions have been modified. The equations have also been modified to account for the fact that in an orthotropic composite the in-plane shear stiffness is independent of the stiffness in the normal directions. The developed equations have been implemented into a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA, through the use of user defined subroutines (UMATs). The tensile, compressive, and shear deformation of a representative plain weave woven ceramic matrix composite are computed and compared to experimental results. The computed values correlate well to the experimental data, demonstrating the ability of the model to accurately compute the deformation response of woven ceramic matrix composites.

  8. Insight into the Effects of Reinforcement Shape on Achieving Continuous Martensite Transformation in Phase Transforming Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Ren, Junqiang; Wang, Xiaofei; Zong, Hongxiang; Cui, Lishan; Ding, Xiangdong

    2017-12-01

    A continuous martensite transformation is indispensable for achieving large linear superelasticity and low modulus in phase transforming metal-based composites. However, determining how to accurately condition the residual martensite in a shape memory alloy matrix though the reinforcement shape to achieve continuous martensite transformation has been a challenge. Here, we take the finite element method to perform a comparative study of the effects of nanoinclusion shape on the interaction and martensite phase transformation in this new composite. Two typical samples are compared: one reinforced by metallic nanowires and the other by nanoparticles. We find that the residual martensite within the shape memory alloy matrix after a pretreatment can be tailored by the reinforcement shape. In particular, our results show that the shape memory alloy matrix can retain enough residual martensite phases to achieve continuous martensite transformation in the subsequent loading when the aspect ratio of nanoreinforcement is larger than 20. In contrast, the composites reinforced with spherical or low aspect ratio reinforcement show a typical nonlinear superelasticity as a result of a low stress transfer-induced discontinuous martensite transformation within the shape memory alloy matrix.

  9. Incorporation of tungsten metal fibers in a metal and ceramic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Brozek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibers have high tensile strength but a poor oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Using this first characteristic and to prevent oxidation of tungsten coated composite materials in which the primary requirement: reinforcement against destruction or deformation, was studied on tungsten fibers and tungsten wires which were coated by applying the metal and ceramic powders via plasma spraying device in plasma generator WSP®. Deposition took place in an atmosphere of Ar + 7 % H2, sufficient to reduce the oxidized trace amounts of tungsten.

  10. Effective medium theory for elastic matrix composites containing dispersed particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhon, M.S.; Metz, R.J.; Freed, K.F.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new, effective medium theory to study the wave propagation and mechanical properties of a composite system with dispersed particulates. One main emphasis here is in formulating the theory and in analyzing the structure of the contribution of the fillers to the elastic response. By constructing the elastic propagator (whose fluid mechanical counterpart is known as the Oseen tensor), we show that an analogy between the theoretical description of the particulate system and of suspension rheology exists when the former corresponds to a high-rigidity solid matrix (or, analogously, when the Poisson ratio is close to 1/2) in steady state. The effective Lame constants for this case are derived by combining this analogy with the theory developed by Freed and Muthukumar for the rheology of a suspension of spheres. The analogy is also useful in our new prediction of the phenomenon of elastic screening, the possible existence of a cutoff frequency below which elastic waves cannot propagate in the filler system

  11. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; van Roode, Mark; Kashyap, Tania; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are increasingly being considered as structural materials for advanced power generation equipment because of their light weight, higher temperature capability, and oxidation resistance. Limitations of SiC/SiC CMCs include surface recession and component cracking and associated chemical changes in the CMC. The solutions pursued to improve the life of SiC/SiC CMCs include the incorporation of coating systems that provide surface protection, which has become known as an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC). The development of EBCs for the protection of gas turbine hot section CMC components was a continuation of coating development work for corrosion protection of silicon-based monolithics. Work on EBC development for SiC/SiC CMCs has been ongoing at several national laboratories and the original gas turbine equipment manufacturers. The work includes extensive laboratory, rig and engine testing, including testing of EBC coated SiC/SiC CMCs in actual field applications. Another EBC degradation issue which is especially critical for CMC components used in aircraft engines is the degradation from glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) with other minor oxides. This paper addresses the need for and properties of external coatings on SiC/SiC CMCs to extend their useful life in service and the retention of their properties.

  12. Wear Behaviour of Iron Matrix Composite Reinforced by ZTA Particles in Impact Abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, B.; Xing, S. M.; Dong, Q.

    2017-11-01

    Zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) particles reinforced high chromium cast iron composites (ZTA/Iron composites) were prepared by a two-step processing method, i.e. mixing particles by the molten metal and cohering by high pressure, which based on the squeeze casting process. The impact wear resistance under different impact energies were investigated using dynamically loaded abrasive wear tester at room temperature. For comparison, the wear tests of high chromium cast iron were also carried out under the same conditions. Worn surfaces of the samples were observed under scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive detector. The results showed that the composites have better impact wear resistance than that of high Cr cast iron regardless of impact energy level, and the wear resistance of the two materials all decrease with the increase of the impact energy. The main wear mechanisms of the high Cr cast iron were micro-cutting and fatigue peeling, while the wear of composites occurred through micro-cutting of the matrix (lower impact energy) and breaking and shedding of the reinforced particles (higher impact energy).

  13. MAX Phase Modified SiC Composites for Ceramic-Metal Hybrid Cladding Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yang-Il; Kim, Sun-Han; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jeong-Hwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Koo, Yang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A metal-ceramic hybrid cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube, and an outer SiC fiber-matrix SiC ceramic composite with surface coating as shown in Fig. 1 (left-hand side). The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. In addition, the outermost layer prevents the dissolution of SiC during normal operation. On the other hand, a ceramic-metal hybrid cladding consists of an outer zirconium tube, and an inner SiC ceramic composite as shown in Fig. 1 (right-hand side). The outer zirconium protects the fuel rod from a corrosion during reactor operation, as in the present fuel claddings. The inner SiC composite, additionally, is designed to resist the severe oxidation under a postulated accident condition of a high-temperature steam environment. Reaction-bonded SiC was fabricated by modifying the matrix as the MAX phase. The formation of Ti 3 SiC 2 was investigated depending on the compositions of the preform and melt. In most cases, TiSi 2 was the preferential phase because of its lowest melting point in the Ti-Si-C system. The evidence of Ti 3 SiC 2 was the connection with the pressurizing

  14. Matrix Sputtering Method: A Novel Physical Approach for Photoluminescent Noble Metal Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yohei; Corpuz, Ryan D; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2017-12-19

    Noble metal nanoclusters are believed to be the transition between single metal atoms, which show distinct optical properties, and metal nanoparticles, which show characteristic plasmon absorbance. The interesting properties of these materials emerge when the particle size is well below 2 nm, such as photoluminescence, which has potential application particularly in biomedical fields. These photoluminescent ultrasmall nanoclusters are typically produced by chemical reduction, which limits their practical application because of the inherent toxicity of the reagents used in this method. Thus, alternative strategies are sought, particularly in terms of physical approaches, which are known as "greener alternatives," to produce high-purity materials at high yields. Thus, a new approach using the sputtering technique was developed. This method was initially used to produce thin films using solid substrates; now it can be applied even with liquid substrates such as ionic liquids or polyethylene glycol as long as these liquids have a low vapor pressure. This revolutionary development has opened up new areas of research, particularly for the synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions below 10 nm. We are among the first to apply the sputtering technique to the physical synthesis of photoluminescent noble metal nanoclusters. Although typical sputtering systems have relied on the effect of surface composition and viscosity of the liquid matrix on controlling particle diameters, which only resulted in diameters ca. 3-10 nm, that were all plasmonic, our new approach introduced thiol molecules as stabilizers inspired from chemical methods. In the chemical syntheses of metal nanoparticles, controlling the concentration ratio between metal ions and stabilizing reagents is a possible means of systematic size control. However, it was not clear whether this would be applicable in a sputtering system. Our latest results showed that we were able to generically produce a

  15. A Micro Raman Investigation of Viscoelasticity in Short Fibre Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt-Thomsen, Jan

    The purpose of the present Ph.D. project is to investigate the load transfer mechanisms between the fibre and matrix and the stress/strain fields in and around single fibres in short fibre reinforced viscoelastic polymer matrix composites subjected to various loading histories. The materials...... considered are high modulus carbon fibres embedded in a polypropylene matrix. The polypropylene matrix displays nonlinear viscoelasticity and its constitutive behaviour is modelled using the Schapery model....

  16. High Thermal Conductivity Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC) for Advanced Space Radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Bowman, Cheryl; Beach, Duane

    2007-01-01

    High temperature polymer matrix composites (PMC) reinforced with high thermal conductivity (approx. 1000 W/mK) pitch-based carbon fibers are evaluated for a facesheet/fin structure of large space radiator systems. Significant weight reductions along with improved thermal performance, structural integrity and space durability toward its metallic counterparts were envisioned. Candidate commercial resin systems including Cyanate Esters, BMIs, and polyimide were selected based on thermal capabilities and processability. PMC laminates were designed to match the thermal expansion coefficient of various metal heat pipes or tubes. Large, but thin composite panels were successfully fabricated after optimizing cure conditions. Space durability of PMC with potential degradation mechanisms was assessed by simulated thermal aging tests in high vacuum, 1-3 x 10(exp -6) torr, at three temperatures, 227 C, 277 C, and 316 C for up to one year. Nanocomposites with vapor-grown carbon nano-fibers and exfoliated graphite flakes were attempted to improve thermal conductivity (TC) and microcracking resistance. Good quality nanocomposites were fabricated and evaluated for TC and durability including radiation resistance. TC was measured in both in-plan and thru-the-thickness directions, and the effects of microcracks on TC are also being evaluated. This paper will discuss the systematic experimental approaches, various performance-durability evaluations, and current subcomponent design and fabrication/manufacturing efforts.

  17. Tribology of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) Fabricated by Additive Manufacturing (AM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Dunnigan, R.; Salem, A.; Kuentz, L.; Halbig, M. C.; Singh, M.

    2016-01-01

    The integral process of depositing thin layers of material, one after another, until the designed component is created is collectively referred to as Additive Manufacturing (AM). Fused deposition process (FDP) is a type of AM where feedstock is extruded into filaments which then are deposited by 3D printing, and the solidification occurs during cooling of the melt. Currently, complex structures are being fabricated by commercial and open source desktop 3D printers. Recently, metal powder containing composite filaments based on polylactic acid (PLA) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) have emerged, which could be utilized for multifunctional applications. For further deployment in the field, especially for aerospace and ground-based applications, it is critical to understand the tribological behavior of 3D printed materials. In this presentation, we will report the tribological behavior of different polymer matrix composites fabricated by fused deposition process. These results will be compared with the base polymer systems. During this study, the tribological behavior of all the samples will be evaluated with tab-on-disc method and compared for different metallic powder reinforcements.

  18. Wear Behavior of Mechanically Alloyed Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Containing Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sheng Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the preparation and wear behavior of mechanically alloyed Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites containing carbon nanotube (CNT particles. The differential scanning calorimeter results show that the thermal stability of the amorphous matrix is affected by the presence of CNT particles. Changes in glass transition temperature (Tg and crystallization temperature (Tx suggest that deviations in the chemical composition of the amorphous matrix occurred because of a partial dissolution of the CNT species into the amorphous phase. Although the hardness of CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composites is increased with the addition of CNT particles, the wear resistance of such composites is not directly proportional to their hardness, and does not follow the standard wear law. A worn surface under a high applied load shows that the 12 vol. % CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composite suffers severe wear compared with monolithic Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass.

  19. High Temperature Degradation Mechanisms in Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Ronan A.; McManus, Hugh L.

    1997-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in demanding structural applications in which they may be exposed to harsh environments. The durability of such materials is a major concern, potentially limiting both the integrity of the structures and their useful lifetimes. The goal of the current investigation is to develop a mechanism-based model of the chemical degradation which occurs, such that given the external chemical environment and temperatures throughout the laminate, laminate geometry, and ply and/or constituent material properties, we can calculate the concentration of diffusing substances and extent of chemical degradation as functions of time and position throughout the laminate. This objective is met through the development and use of analytical models, coupled to an analysis-driven experimental program which offers both quantitative and qualitative information on the degradation mechanism. Preliminary analyses using coupled diffusion/reaction model are used to gain insight into the physics of the degradation mechanisms and to identify crucial material parameters. An experimental program is defined based on the results of the preliminary analysis which allows the determination of the necessary material coefficients. Thermogravimetric analyses are carried out in nitrogen, air, and oxygen to provide quantitative information on thermal and oxidative reactions. Powdered samples are used to eliminate diffusion effects. Tests in both inert and oxidative environments allow the separation of thermal and oxidative contributions to specimen mass loss. The concentration dependency of the oxidative reactions is determined from the tests in pure oxygen. Short term isothermal tests at different temperatures are carried out on neat resin and unidirectional macroscopic specimens to identify diffusion effects. Mass loss, specimen shrinkage, the formation of degraded surface layers and surface cracking are recorded as functions of exposure time. Geometry effects in

  20. Research and Development Progress of National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites on Advanced Aeronautical Resin Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Bintai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applications and research progress in advanced aeronautical resin matrix composites by National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites (LAC were summarized. A novel interlaminar toughening technology employing ultra-thin TP non-woven fabric was developed in LAC, which significantly improved the compression after impact (CAI performances of composite laminates.Newly designed multilayer sandwich stealth composite structures exhibited a good broadband radar absorbing properties at 1-18 GHz.There were remarkable developments in high toughness and high temperature resin matrix composites, covering major composite processing technologies such as prepreg-autoclave procedure, liquid composite molding and automation manufacture, etc. Finally, numerical simulation and optimization methods were deliberately utilized in the study of composites curing behavior, resin flow and curing deformation. A composite material database was also established.In conclusion, LAC has been a great support for the development of aeronautical equipment, playing such roles as innovation leading, system dominating, foundation supporting and application ensuring of aerocomposites.

  1. New immobilisation methods for radioactive waste. Metal composite and other systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozhovan, M.

    2004-01-01

    New immobilisation hosts and technologies are presented. Some new approaches as crystalline hosts, polyphase crystalline forms (SYNROC), polyphase forms (composites), metal matrix immobilisation are discussed. The potential use and chemical properties and radiation durability of minerals Monazite, Zircon and Zirconolite, Hollandite, Apatites, Britolite and NZP are presented. The most famous polyphase ceramic for nuclear waste immobilisation is SYNROC. The properties of SYNROC and a comparison of SYNROC matrix parameters with nuclear waste glasses is made. Glass composites may be used to immobilise long-lived radionuclides (e.g. An) by incorporating them into the more durable crystalline phases, whereas the short-lived radionuclides may be accommodated in the less durable vitreous phase. An example of such glass composite is so-called SYNROC-glass, which is a glass-composite material with SYNROC crystalline phases in a vitreous matrix. The new technological approaches discussed in the paper are: melting, sintering, thermochemical method. The features and advantages of metal matrix immobilization are also discussed

  2. Preparation and characteristics of CNT-metal composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pityana, SL

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The success in keeping carbon nanotubes (CNT) bonded to stainless steel provides a possible method for the preparation of CNT-metal composites. Alternative methods for the preparation of CNT-metal composites include hot pressing, sintering, etc...

  3. Modeling & processing of ceramic and polymer precursor ceramic matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolin

    of filler particle reaction, microstructure evolution, at the microscale as well as transient fluid flow, heat transfer, and species transport at the macroscale. The model comprises of (i) a microscale model and (ii) a macroscale transport model, and aims to provide optimal conditions for the fabrication process of the ceramics. The porous media macroscale model for SiC-based metal-ceramic materials processing will be developed to understand the thermal polymer pyrolysis, chemical reaction of active fillers and transport phenomena in the porous media. The macroscale model will include heat and mass transfer, curing, pyrolysis, chemical reaction and crystallization in a mixture of preceramic polymers and submicron/nano-sized metal particles of uranium, zirconium, niobium, or hafnium. The effects of heating rate, sample size, size and volume ratio of the metal particles on the reaction rate and product uniformity will be studied. The microscale model will be developed for modeling the synthesis of SiC matrix and metal particles. The macroscale model provides thermal boundary conditions to the microscale model. The microscale model applies to repetitive units in the porous structure and describes mass transport, composition changes and motion of metal particles. The unit-cell is the representation unit of the source material, and it consists of several metal particles, SiC matrix and other components produced from the synthesis process. The reactions between different components, the microstructure evolution of the product will be considered. The effects of heating rate and metal particle size on species uniformity and microstructure are investigated.

  4. Feasibility of producing cast-refractory metal-fiber superalloy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintyre, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of direct casting as a practical method for producing cast superalloy tungsten or columbium alloy fiber composites while retaining a high percentage of fiber strength. Fourteen nickel base, four cobalt, and three iron based matrices were surveyed for their degree of reaction with the metal fibers. Some stress-rupture results were obtained at temperatures of 760, 816, 871, and 1093 C for a few composite systems. The feasibility of producing acceptable composites of some cast nickel, cobalt, and iron matrix alloys with tungsten or columbium alloy fibers was demonstrated.

  5. Application of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al alloy matrix composite on piston for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenqing

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and properties of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite and it’s application on the piston for internal combustion engines are presented. Alumina or aluminosilicate fibers reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite has more excellent synthetical properties at elevated temperature than the matrix alloys. A partially reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite piston produced by squeeze casting technique has a firm interface between reinforced and unreinforced areas, low reject rate and good technical tolerance. As a new kind of piston material, it has been used for mass production of about 400,000 pieces of automobile engines piston. China has become one of a few countries in which aluminum alloy matrix composite materials have been used in automobile industry and attained industrialization.

  6. A Damage Resistance Comparison Between Candidate Polymer Matrix Composite Feedline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T

    2000-01-01

    As part of NASAs focused technology programs for future reusable launch vehicles, a task is underway to study the feasibility of using the polymer matrix composite feedlines instead of metal ones on propulsion systems. This is desirable to reduce weight and manufacturing costs. The task consists of comparing several prototype composite feedlines made by various methods. These methods are electron-beam curing, standard hand lay-up and autoclave cure, solvent assisted resin transfer molding, and thermoplastic tape laying. One of the critical technology drivers for composite components is resistance to foreign objects damage. This paper presents results of an experimental study of the damage resistance of the candidate materials that the prototype feedlines are manufactured from. The materials examined all have a 5-harness weave of IM7 as the fiber constituent (except for the thermoplastic, which is unidirectional tape laid up in a bidirectional configuration). The resin tested were 977-6, PR 520, SE-SA-1, RS-E3 (e-beam curable), Cycom 823 and PEEK. The results showed that the 977-6 and PEEK were the most damage resistant in all tested cases.

  7. Anodization Mechanism on SiC Nanoparticle Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by Power Metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sonia C; Conde, Ana; Arenas, María A; Rocha, Luis A; Velhinho, Alexandre

    2014-12-19

    Specimens of aluminum-based composites reinforced by silicon carbide nanoparticles (Al/SiC np ) produced by powder metallurgy (PM) were anodized under voltage control in tartaric-sulfuric acid (TSA). In this work, the influence of the amount of SiC np on the film growth during anodizing was investigated. The current density versus time response and the morphology of the porous alumina film formed at the composite surface are compared to those concerning a commercial aluminum alloy (AA1050) anodized under the same conditions. The processing method of the aluminum alloys influences the efficiency of the anodizing process, leading to a lower thicknesses for the unreinforced Al-PM alloy regarding the AA1050. The current density versus time response is strongly dependent on the amount of SiC np . The current peaks and the steady-state current density recorded at each voltage step increases with the SiC np volume fraction due to the oxidation of the SiC np . The formation mechanism of the anodic film on Al/SiC np composites is different from that occurring in AA1050, partly due the heterogeneous distribution of the reinforcement particles in the metallic matrix, but also to the entrapment of SiC np in the anodic film.

  8. Amorphous Metals and Composites as Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Agnes, Gregory S. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A mirror or mirror assembly fabricated by molding, pressing, assembling, or depositing one or more bulk metal glass (BMG), bulk metal glass composite (BMGMC), or amorphous metal (AM) parts and where the optical surface and backing of the mirror can be fabricated without machining or polishing by utilizing the unique molding capabilities of this class of materials.

  9. Effect of the type of radiation on the degradation behavior of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, Shigenori

    1992-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer matrix composites (filler: E-glass or carbon fiber cloth; matrix; epoxy or polyimide resin) were irradiated with neutrons and 60 Co γ-rays at room temperature or at 5 K. Three-point bend tests were then carried out at 77 K. Comparison of the neutron and γ-ray irradiation effects shows that the radiation sensitivity of the glass/epoxy and glass/polyimide composites is 1.8-2.6 times higher to neutrons than to γ-rays, indicating a higher sensitivity of the epoxy and polyimide matrix resins to recoil protons than to γ-rays. Absorbed dose calculations, on the other hand, show that the spatial distribution of the microscopic energy deposition in polymer matrix composites is inhomogeneous for neutrons, although almost homogeneous for γ-rays. In addition, the neutron irradiation of boron-containing E-glass fiber composites produces additional radiation damage due to a 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction in the glass fibers, thus significantly enhancing a decrease in the composite strength. These facts indicate that as far as polymer matrix composites are concerned, the irradiation effects of neutrons will be rather difficult to simulate with different types of radiation such as protons and carbon ions from an ion accelerator. Thus, it may be prudent that such simulation irradiation be carried out mainly for pure resins to be used as matrix in polymer matrix composites. (author)

  10. Optimization of Squeeze Casting Process Parameters Using Taguchi in LM13 Matrix B4C Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhil, K. T.; Arul, Sanjivi

    2018-02-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composite has widely used in aerospace and automobile industry due to its high strength to weight ratio. Aluminium LM13 matrix B4C reinforced composites are mainly manufactured by Squeeze casting process. The present work optimizes squeeze casting process parameters using Taguchi method. The control factors used for the experiments were Squeeze Pressure, Die Preheat Temperature and weight percentage of Boron Carbide (B4C) along with multiple performance characteristic of Hardness, Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) and Yield Strength (YS). The L27 orthogonal array was used for experimental design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is used to determine the significant factor and found out that Squeeze pressure is the most significant factor followed by percentage of B4C.

  11. Part I. Corrosion studies of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. Part II. Galvanic corrosion between continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites and 4340 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun

    uncoupled coupons were immersed in various electrolytes, exposed to a humidity chamber, and exposed at outdoor test sites. Results showed that the corrosion rates of the CF-AMCs increased, while those of the 4340 steel decreased after being coupled together, in most cases. Crevice corrosion was also observed in these exposure experiments. Zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) experiments were conducted to record the galvanic-corrosion rates and potentials of the couples. The CF-AMCs were found to serve as anodes, while the steel was cathodic, in most test conditions. Galvanic performance predicted by polarization experiments was in close agreement with the ZRA results. Key words. Aluminum, metal-matrix composites, alumina fiber, pitting corrosion, galvanic corrosion.

  12. Data characterizing compressive properties of Al/Al2O3 syntactic foam core metal matrix sandwich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Yaseer Omar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural observations and compressive property datasets of metal matrix syntactic foam core sandwich composite at quasi-static and high strain rate (HSR conditions (525–845 s−1 are provided. The data supplied in this article includes sample preparation procedure prior to scanning electron and optical microscopy as well as the micrographs. The data used to construct the stress–strain curves and the derived compressive properties of all specimens in both quasi-static and HSR regions are included. Videos of quasi-static compressive failure and that obtained by a high speed image acquisition system during deformation and failure of HSR specimen are also included.

  13. Direct Observation on the Evolution of Shear Banding and Buckling in Tungsten Fiber Reinforced Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, M. Q.; Chen, X. W.; Fu, H. M.; Zhang, H. F.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of micro-damage and deformation of each phase in the composite plays a pivotal role in the clarification of deformation mechanism of composite. However, limited model and mechanical experiments were conducted to reveal the evolution of the deformation of the two phases in the tungsten fiber reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composite. In this study, quasi-static compressive tests were performed on this composite. For the first time, the evolution of micro-damage and deformation of the two phases in this composite, i.e., shear banding of the metallic glass matrix and buckling deformation of the tungsten fiber, were investigated systematically by controlling the loading process at different degrees of deformation. It is found that under uniaxial compression, buckling of the tungsten fiber occurs first, while the metallic glass matrix deforms homogeneously. Upon further loading, shear bands initiate from the fiber/matrix interface and propagate in the metallic glass matrix. Finally, the composite fractures in a mixed mode, with splitting in the tungsten fiber, along with shear fracture in the metallic glass matrix. Through the analysis on the stress state in the composite and resistance to shear banding of the two phases during compressive deformation, the possible deformation mechanism of the composite is unveiled. The deformation map of the composite, which covers from elastic deformation to final fracture, is obtained as well.

  14. Study of Thermal Properties of Cast Metal- Ceramic Composite Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Gawdzińska K.; Chybowski L.; Przetakiewicz W.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to its properties, metallic foams can be used as insulation material. Thermal properties of cast metal-ceramic composite foams have applications in transport vehicles and can act as fire resistant and acoustic insulators of bulkheads. This paper presents basic thermal properties of cast and foamed aluminum, the values of thermal conductivity coefficient of selected gases used in foaming composites and thermal capabilities of composite foams (AlSi11/SiC). A certificate of non-combustibil...

  15. Mechanism of radiation-induced degradation in mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, Shigenori

    1988-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer matrix composites (filler, E-glass or carbon fibre cloth; matrix, epoxy or polyimide resin) and pure epoxy and polyimide resins were irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays or 2 MeV electrons at room temperature. Mechanical tests were then carried out at 77K and at room temperature. Following irradiation, the Young's (tensile) modulus of these composites and pure resins remains practically unchanged even at 170 MGy for both test temperatures. The ultimate strength, however, decreases appreciably with increasing dose. The dose dependence of the composite strength depends not only on the combination of fibre and matrix in the composite but also on the test temperature. A relationship is found between the composite ultimate strain and the matrix ultimate strain, thus indicating that the dose dependence of the composite strength is virtually determined by a change in the matrix ultimate strain due to irradiation. Based on this finding, we propose a mechanism of radiation-induced degradation of a polymer matrix composite in order to explain the dose dependence of the composite strength measured at 77 K and at room temperature. (author)

  16. Jet Electrochemical Machining of Particle Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites with Different Neutral Electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackert-Oschätzchen, M; Lehnert, N; Martin, A; Schubert, A

    2016-01-01

    Conventional mechanical machining of particle reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) is challenging because the hard ceramic particles in the soft aluminum matrix lead to an increased tool wear. Furthermore, the mechanical and thermal impact during conventional machining affects the microstructure of the AMCs. Electrochemical machining (ECM) is an alternative method to machine AMCs. Based on anodic dissolution, ECM has a slight influence on the work piece material structure and is independent of material strength and hardness. So the microstructure of the work piece remains unaffected. One method of ECM is electrochemical machining with continuous electrolytic free jet (Jet-ECM). Hereby the electrochemical removal is localized by the geometry of the electrolyte jet. By moving the electrolyte jet micro-structures and microgeometries can be generated quickly and flexibly in metallic parts [1]. Another advantage of Jet-ECM is the low consumption of electrolyte which allows an easy and inexpensive change of electrolyte for investigations with different types of electrolyte. In this study AMCs reinforced with different amounts of SiC-particles are machined with two pH-neutral electrolytes using Jet-ECM. The results provide information about the suitability of the selected electrolytes for the machining of AMCs. In addition, the influence of the particle content on the electrochemical removal result will be evaluated. (paper)

  17. Numerical Modeling of Macroscopic Behavior of Particulate Composite with Crosslinked Polymer Matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Máša, B.; Hutař, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 465, - (2011), s. 129-132 ISSN 1013-9826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/08/1409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Particle reinforced composites * polymer matrix composite * mechanical response Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  18. Support Services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.

    2000-06-06

    Structural and functional materials used in solid- and liquid-fueled energy systems are subject to gas- and condensed-phase corrosion and erosion by entrained particles. For a given material, its temperature and the composition of the corrodents determine the corrosion rates, while gas flow conditions and particle aerodynamic diameters determine erosion rates. Because there are several mechanisms by which corrodents deposit on a surface, the corrodent composition depends not only on the composition of the fuel, but also on the temperature of the material and the size range of the particles being deposited. In general, it is difficult to simulate under controlled laboratory conditions all of the possible corrosion and erosion mechanisms to which a material may be exposed in an energy system. Therefore, with funding from the Advanced Research Materials Program, the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is coordinating with NCC Engineering and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to provide researchers with no-cost opportunities to expose materials in pilot-scale systems to conditions of corrosion and erosion similar to those occurring in commercial power systems. The EERC has two pilot-scale solid-fuel systems available for exposure of materials coupons. The slagging furnace system (SFS) was built under the DOE Combustion 2000 Program as a testing facility for advanced heat exchanger subsystems. It is a 2.5-MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) solid-fuel combustion system with exit temperatures of 2700 to 2900 F to ensure that the ash in the main combustor is molten and flowing. Sample coupons may be exposed in the system either within the slagging zone or near the convective air heater at 1800 F (980 C). In addition, a pilot-scale entrained-bed gasifier system known as the transport reactor development unit (TRDU) is available. Also operating at approximately 2.5 MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr), it is a pressurized unit

  19. Electrochemical and Friction Characteristics of Metallic Glass Composites at the Microstructural Length-scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyagari, Aditya; Hasannaeimi, Vahid; Arora, Harpreet; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2018-01-17

    Metallic glass composites represent a unique alloy design strategy comprising of in situ crystalline dendrites in an amorphous matrix to achieve damage tolerance unseen in conventional structural materials. They are promising for a range of advanced applications including spacecraft gears, high-performance sporting goods and bio-implants, all of which demand high surface degradation resistance. Here, we evaluated the phase-specific electrochemical and friction characteristics of a Zr-based metallic glass composite, Zr 56.2 Ti 13.8 Nb 5.0 Cu 6.9 Ni 5.6 Be 12.5 , which comprised roughly of 40% by volume crystalline dendrites in an amorphous matrix. The amorphous matrix showed higher hardness and friction coefficient compared to the crystalline dendrites. But sliding reciprocating tests for the composite revealed inter-phase delamination rather than preferred wearing of one phase. Pitting during potentiodynamic polarization in NaCl solution was prevalent at the inter-phase boundary, confirming that galvanic coupling was the predominant corrosion mechanism. Scanning vibration electrode technique demonstrated that the amorphous matrix corroded much faster than the crystalline dendrites due to its unfavorable chemistry. Relative work function values measured using scanning kelvin probe showed the amorphous matrix to be more electropositive, which explain its preferred corrosion over the crystalline dendrites as well as its characteristic friction behavior. This study paves the way for careful partitioning of elements between the two phases in a metallic glass composite to tune its surface degradation behavior for a range of advanced applications.

  20. Aqueous alternatives for metal and composite cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitmeyer, Joann

    1994-01-01

    For many years the metalworking industry has cleaned metal and composite substrates with chlorinated solvents. Recently, however, health and disposal related environmental concerns have increased regarding chlorinated solvents, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, methylene chloride, or Freon'. World leaders have instituted a production ban of certain ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) by 1996. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has instituted worker vapor exposure limitations for virtually all of the solvents used in solvent-based cleaners. In addition, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has defined nearly all solvent-based cleaners as 'hazardous'. Cradle to grave waste responsibility is another reason manufacturers are trying to replace chlorinated solvents in their cleaning processes. Because of these factors, there now is a world wide effort to reduce and/or eliminate the use of chlorinated solvents for industrial cleaning. Waterbased cleaners are among the alternatives being offered to the industry. New technology alkaline cleaners are now available that can be used instead of chlorinated solvents in many cleaning processes. These waterbased cleaners reduce the release of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) by as much as 99 percent. (The definition and method of calculation of VOC's now varies from region to region.) Hazardous waste generation can also be significantly reduced or eliminated with new aqueous technology. This in turn can ease worker exposure restrictions and positively impact the environment. This paper compares the chemical and physical properties of this aqueous cleaners versus chlorinated solvents.

  1. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    OpenAIRE

    Ramm , D.; Hutchings , I.; Clyne , T.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharp...

  2. Cold spray of metal-polymer composite coatings onto carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP)

    OpenAIRE

    Bortolussi, Vincent; Borit, François; Chesnaud, Anthony; Jeandin, Michel; Faessel, Matthieu; Figliuzzi, Bruno; Willot, François; Roche, K.; Surdon, G.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The growing use of Polymer-Matrix Composite (PMC) materials within transport industry raises new security concerns, especially those due to lightning. To protect these electrically insulating materials, conductive coatings can be applied. Due to the high level of required properties, cold spray is believed to be an effective way to achieve these coatings. Recent studies showed that obstacles remained to be overcome when cold spraying metallic particles onto Carbon Fibe...

  3. A Novel Route for Development of Bulk Al/SiC Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payodhar Padhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of nano particles, even in quantities as small as 2 weight percent can enhance the hardness or yield strength by a factor as high as 2. There are several methods for the production of metal matrix nanocomposites including mechanical alloying, vertex process, and spray deposition and so forth. However, the above processes are expensive. Solidification processing is a relatively cheaper route. During solidification processing, nano particulates tend to agglomerate as a result of van der Waals forces and thus proper dispersion of the nano particulate in metal matrix is a challenge. In the present study a noncontact method, where the ultrasonic probe is not in direct contact with the liquid metal, was attempted to disperse nanosized SiC particulates in aluminum matrix. In this method, the mold was subjected to ultrasonic vibration. Hardness measurements and microstructural studies using HRTEM were carried out on samples taken from different locations of the nanocomposite ingot cast by this method.

  4. THERMOPLASTIC MATRIX SELECTION FOR FIBRE METAL LAMINATE USING FUZZY VIKOR AND ENTROPY MEASURE FOR OBJECTIVE WEIGHTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. ISHAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to define the suitable thermoplastic matrix for fibre metal laminate for automotive front hood utilisation. To achieve the accurate and reliable results, the decision making process involved subjective and objective weighting where the combination of Fuzzy VIKOR and entropy method have been applied. Fuzzy VIKOR is used for ranking purpose and entropy method is used to determine the objective weighting. The result shows that polypropylene is the best thermoplastic matrix for fibre metal laminate by satisfying two compromise solutions with validation using least VIKOR index value scored 0.00, compared to low density polyethylene, high density polyethylene and polystyrene. Through a combination of Fuzzy VIKOR and entropy, it is proved that this method gives a higher degree of confidence to the decision maker especially for fibre metal laminate thermoplastic matrix selection due to its systematic and scientific selection method involving MCDM.

  5. Stress and Damage in Polymer Matrix Composite Materials Due to Material Degradation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Hugh L.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods for calculating stresses and damage caused by degradation of the matrix constituent in polymer matrix composite materials. Laminate geometry, material properties, and matrix degradation states are specified as functions of position and time. Matrix shrinkage and property changes are modeled as functions of the degradation states. The model is incorporated into an existing composite mechanics computer code. Stresses, strains, and deformations at the laminate, ply, and micro levels are calculated, and from these calculations it is determined if there is failure of any kind. The rationale for the model (based on published experimental work) is presented, its integration into the laminate analysis code is outlined, and example results are given, with comparisons to existing material and structural data. The mechanisms behind the changes in properties and in surface cracking during long-term aging of polyimide matrix composites are clarified. High-temperature-material test methods are also evaluated.

  6. ASTM and VAMAS activities in titanium matrix composites test methods development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.; Harmon, D. M.; Bartolotta, P. A.; Russ, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMC's) are being considered for a number of aerospace applications ranging from high performance engine components to airframe structures in areas that require high stiffness to weight ratios at temperatures up to 400 C. TMC's exhibit unique mechanical behavior due to fiber-matrix interface failures, matrix cracks bridged by fibers, thermo-viscoplastic behavior of the matrix at elevated temperatures, and the development of significant thermal residual stresses in the composite due to fabrication. Standard testing methodology must be developed to reflect the uniqueness of this type of material systems. The purpose of this paper is to review the current activities in ASTM and Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) that are directed toward the development of standard test methodology for titanium matrix composites.

  7. Study on voids of epoxy matrix composites sandwich structure parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Simin; Wen, Youyi; Yu, Wenjun; Liu, Hong; Yue, Cheng; Bao, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Void is the most common tiny defect of composite materials. Porosity is closely related to composite structure property. The voids forming behaviour in the composites sandwich structural parts with the carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins was researched by adjusting the manufacturing process parameters. The composites laminate with different porosities were prepared with the different process parameter. The ultrasonic non-destructive measurement method for the porosity was developed and verified through microscopic examination. The analysis results show that compaction pressure during the manufacturing process had influence on the porosity in the laminate area. Increasing the compaction pressure and compaction time will reduce the porosity of the laminates. The bond-line between honeycomb core and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins were also analyzed through microscopic examination. The mechanical properties of sandwich structure composites were studied. The optimization process parameters and porosity ultrasonic measurement method for composites sandwich structure have been applied to the production of the composite parts.

  8. Polyvinylpyrrolidone Matrix as an Effective Reducing Agent and Stabilizer during Reception of Silver Nanoparticles in Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Semenyuk, Nataliya; Kostiv, Ulyana; Dudok, Galyna; Nechay, Jaroslav; Skorokhoda, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    The use of polyvinylpyrrolidone matrix as an effective reducing agent and stabilizer during reception of silver nanoparticles in composites is substantiated. The influence of various factors on patterns of obtaining silver nanoparticles and their size.

  9. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The work proposed herein is to demonstrate that the higher temperature capabilities of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) can be fully utilized to reduce emissions and...

  10. Ultra-Low-Density (ULD) Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase I SBIR proposal seeks to demonstrate a new class of ultra-low-density (ULD) polymer matrix composites of high specific modulus and specific strength...

  11. Composite Armor Performance Enhancement by Tethered Polymer Chains at the Fiber-Matrix Interface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalika, D

    1998-01-01

    ... properties of fiber composites. The governing strategy was to tailor the discontinuous fiber-matrix interface so as to introduce a volume of interaction capable of providing additional, molecular-level energy dissipation mechanisms...

  12. Improved Foreign Object Damage Performance for 2D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  13. Improved Foreign Object Damage Performance for 3D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  14. Sediment matrix characterization as a tool for evaluating the environmental impact of heavy metals in metal mining, smelting, and ore processing areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ružičková, Silvia; Remeteiová, Dagmar; Mičková, Vladislava; Dirner, Vojtech

    2018-02-21

    In this work, the matrix characterization (mineralogy, total and local chemical composition, and total organic (TOC) and inorganic carbon (TIC) contents) of different types of sediments from mining- and metallurgy-influenced areas and the assessment of the impact of the matrix on the association of potentially hazardous metals with the mineral phases of these samples, which affect their mobility in the environment, are presented. For these purposes, sediment samples with different origins and from different locations in the environment were analyzed. Anthropogenic sediments from metal-rich post-flotation tailings (Lintich, Slovakia) represent waste from ore processing, natural river sediments from the Hornád River (Košice, Slovakia) represent areas influenced predominantly by the metallurgical industry, and lake sediments from a water reservoir Ružín (inflow from the Hornád and Hnilec Rivers, Slovakia) represent the impact of the metallurgical and/or mining industries. The total metal contents were determined by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, the local chemical and morphological microanalysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and the TOC and TIC contents by infrared (IR) spectrometry. The mobility/bioavailability of Cu, Pb, and Zn in/from sediments at the studied areas was assessed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and acetic acid (AA) extraction and is discussed in the context of the matrix composition. The contents of selected potentially hazardous elements in the extracts were determined by the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS).

  15. Tensile Stress Rupture Behavior of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite in Humid Environments at Intermediate Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaRochelle, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    Stress rupture tests on the Sylramic(TM) fiber with an in-situ layer of boron nitride, boron nitride interphase, and SiC matrix ceramic matrix composite were performed at 550 degrees C and 750 degrees C with 0.0, 0.2...

  16. Anisotropic thermal expansion behaviors of copper matrix in β-eucryptite/copper composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lidong; Xue Zongwei; Qiao Yingjie; Fei, W.D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The thermal expansion behaviors of Cu matrix were studied by in situ XRD. ► The expansion of Cu{1 1 1} plane is linear, that of Cu{2 0 0} is nonlinear. ► The anisotropic thermal expansion of Cu is related to the twinning of Cu matrix. ► The twinning of Cu matrix makes the CTE of the composite increasing. - Abstract: A β-eucryptite/copper composite was fabricated by spark plasma sintering process. The thermal expansion behaviors of Cu matrix of the composite were studied by in situ X-ray diffraction during heating process. The results show that Cu matrix exhibits anisotropic thermal expansion behaviors for different crystallographic directions, the expansion of Cu{1 1 1} plane is linear in the temperature range from 20 °C to 300 °C and the expansion of Cu{2 0 0} is nonlinear with a inflection at about 180 °C. The microstructures of Cu matrix before and after thermal expansion testing were investigated using transmission electronic microscope. The anisotropic thermal expansion behavior is related to the deformation twinning formed in the matrix during heating process. At the same time, the deformation twinning of Cu matrix makes the average coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite increase.

  17. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  18. Stainless steel matrix composites reinforced with AlCr{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, W.M. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (Brazil); Velasco, F.; Torralba, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of AlCr{sub 2} intermetallic addition to austenitic stainless steel powder on the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of sintered specimens has been investigated. It has been recognised that loss of chromium at the grain boundaries of sintered stainless steel decreases its corrosion resistance. With the objective of decreasing this effect and to keep a stable passivity, the intermetallic AlCr{sub 2} in the form of powder was mixed with AISI 316L in different proportions. Samples of these materials were compacted at 700 MPa and sintered at 1120 C for 30 minutes in dissociated ammonia and vacuum. The mechanical properties, the corrosion resistance and the microstructure were studied. Composite materials sintered in dissociated ammonia achieve higher mechanical properties than sintered in vacuum. Studies realised by SEM suggest that metal matrix composites present an increase in the content of chromium, but in the grain boundaries exhibit a transient liquid phase produced by diffusion of aluminium from AlCr{sub 2}. (orig.) 13 refs.

  19. Modelling of polypropylene fibre-matrix composites using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP fibre-matrix composites previously prepared and studied experimentally were modelled using finite element analysis (FEA in this work. FEA confirmed that fibre content and composition controlled stress distribution in all-PP composites. The stress concentration at the fibre-matrix interface became greater with less fibre content. Variations in fibre composition were more significant in higher stress regions of the composites. When fibre modulus increased, the stress concentration at the fibres decreased and the shear stress at the fibre-matrix interface became more intense. The ratio between matrix modulus and fibre modulus was important, as was the interfacial stress in reducing premature interfacial failure and increasing mechanical properties. The model demonstrated that with low fibre concentration, there were insufficient fibres to distribute the applied stress. Under these conditions the matrix yielded when the applied stress reached the matrix yield stress, resulting in increased fibre axial stress. When the fibre content was high, there was matrix depletion and stress transfer was inefficient. The predictions of the FEA model were consistent with experimental and published data.

  20. Advanced Lightweight Metal Matrix Composite Segmented Optic Manufacture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Design, manufacture and test a flat segmented mirror made of optical grade AlBeMet 162 material and fusion bonded through the use of E Beam welding to demonstrate...