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Sample records for metal inclusions distribution

  1. Effect of inhomogeneous distribution of non-metallic inclusions on crack path deflection in G42CrMo4 steel at different loading rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Henschel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An inhomogeneous distribution of non-metallic inclusions can result from the steel casting process. The aim of the present study was to investigate the damaging effect of an inhomogeneous distribution of nonmetallic inclusions on the crack extension behavior. To this end, the fracture toughness behavior in terms of quasi-static J-a curves was determined at room temperature. Additionally, dynamic fracture mechanics tests in an instrumented Charpy impact-testing machine were performed. The fracture surface of fracture mechanics specimens was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that an inhomogeneous distribution significantly affected the path and, therefore, the plane of crack growth. Especially clusters of non-metallic inclusions with a size of up to 200 μm exhibited a very low crack growth resistance. Due to the damaging effect of the clusters, the growing crack was strongly deflected towards the cluster. Furthermore, crack tip blunting was completely inhibited when inclusions were located at the fatigue precrack tip. Due to the large size of the non-metallic inclusion clusters, the height difference introduced by crack path deflection was significantly larger than the stretch zone height due to the crack tip blunting. However, the crack path deflection introduced by a cluster was not associated with a toughness increasing mechanism. The e dynamic loading ( 1 0.5 5 s MPam 10   K did not result in a transition from ductile fracture to brittle fracture. However, the crack growth resistance decreased with increased loading rate. This was attributed to the higher portion of relatively flat regions where the dimples were less distinct.

  2. High Performance High Temperature Thermoelectric Composites with Metallic Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, James M. (Inventor); Bux, Sabah K. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Ravi, Vilupanur A. (Inventor); Firdosy, Samad A. (Inventor); Star, Kurt (Inventor); Kaner, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention provides a composite thermoelectric material. The composite thermoelectric material can include a semiconductor material comprising a rare earth metal. The atomic percent of the rare earth metal in the semiconductor material can be at least about 20%. The composite thermoelectric material can further include a metal forming metallic inclusions distributed throughout the semiconductor material. The present invention also provides a method of forming this composite thermoelectric material.

  3. Corrosion of Metal Inclusions In Bulk Vitrification Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Strachan, Denis M.; Josephson, Gary B.

    2006-07-31

    The primary purpose of the work reported here is to analyze the potential effect of the release of technetium (Tc) from metal inclusions in bulk vitrification waste packages once they are placed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). As part of the strategy for immobilizing waste from the underground tanks at Hanford, selected wastes will be immobilized using bulk vitrification. During analyses of the glass produced in engineering-scale tests, metal inclusions were found in the glass product. This report contains the results from experiments designed to quantify the corrosion rates of metal inclusions found in the glass product from AMEC Test ES-32B and simulations designed to compare the rate of Tc release from the metal inclusions to the release of Tc from glass produced with the bulk vitrification process. In the simulations, the Tc in the metal inclusions was assumed to be released congruently during metal corrosion as soluble TcO4-. The experimental results and modeling calculations show that the metal corrosion rate will, under all conceivable conditions at the IDF, be dominated by the presence of the passivating layer and corrosion products on the metal particles. As a result, the release of Tc from the metal particles at the surfaces of fractures in the glass releases at a rate similar to the Tc present as a soluble salt. The release of the remaining Tc in the metal is controlled by the dissolution of the glass matrix. To summarize, the release of 99Tc from the BV glass within precipitated Fe is directly proportional to the diameter of the Fe particles and to the amount of precipitated Fe. However, the main contribution to the Tc release from the iron particles is over the same time period as the release of the soluble Tc salt. For the base case used in this study (0.48 mass% of 0.5 mm diameter metal particles homogeneously distributed in the BV glass), the release of 99Tc from the metal is approximately the same as the release from 0.3 mass% soluble Tc

  4. Effect of inclusions' distribution on microwave absorbing properties of composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Siliang; Wang, Qingguo; Qu, Zhaoming

    2013-01-01

    Effect of inclusions' spatial distributions on the permeability and permittivity of composites is studied using the generalized Maxwell-Garnett equations. The result indicates that inclusions' orientation distribution can increase the longitudinal electromagnetic parameters. For inclusions' random and orientation distribution, single and three-layer absorbers are designed and optimized using genetic algorithm. The result shows that under a given absorbing requirement, absorber with inclusions' orientation distribution is lighter and thinner than absorber with inclusions' random distribution.

  5. Coulomb effects in particle distributions inclusive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erazmus, B.; Martin, L.; Pluta, J.; Stavinky, A.

    1997-01-01

    Single pion distributions from central 158 A.GeV/c Pb + Pb collisions measured by the NA44 experiment show the effect of Coulomb interaction with the net charge produced during the reaction. Coulomb effects are analyzed with the help of the microscopic model RQMD and a model including the Coulomb interaction. Different sets of kinematical characteristics of the net charge have been used to reproduce the experimental data and a strong sensitivity to the charge value has been found. This study has evidenced the non-negligible influence of a Coulomb charge, present in the region of the central rapidity in heavy ion collisions on the inclusive distributions of the produced particles. A more thorough analysis of the data obtained from the experiment NA44 is now under way to take into account the hyperon decay that can modify the fraction of different particles, particularly at low transverse momenta

  6. Autoradiographic investigation of the removal of non-metallic inclusions in connection with the steel remelting process in vacuum furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolaski, H.; Siewierski, J.

    1978-01-01

    The labelled radioactive non-metallic inclusions in steel were obtained through deoxidation of steel with an activated aluminium alloy containing 1% rare earths. Quantity and distribution of the non-metallic inclusions in the steel were determined by applying autoradiography to the longitudinal and cross sections of the steel slabs. After remelting in an electronic furnace the distribution of non-metallic inclusions was determined by autoradiography of the lateral surfaces and the cross section of the slabs. It was found that 50 - 70% of the inclusions could be removed. The results obtained from autoradiographic investigation allow the exploration of the mechanism of the removal of inclusions. (author)

  7. Preliminary study on metallic inclusion in nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Imoto, Shosuke

    1984-01-01

    In recent postirradiation tests, metallic fission products such as Mo, Ru, Rh and Pd are known to precipitate as metallic inclusions in the fuel. These inclusions remain as insoluble residues and provide various problems in different fields of the reprocessing. In this report are presented preliminary results of the study on the ternary phase diagram of Mo-Ru-Pd system and on their properties in nitric acid or various oxidative environments. It is concluded that (1) most of metallic inclusions which are insoluble in nitric acid show epsilon phase, Ru base hcp alloy, in which a large amount of Mo and Pd are soluble, (2) Pd, however, seems to deposit separately in the fuel pin because of its high vapor pressure, (3) Mo fraction in the inclusion would be highly dependent on oxygen potential in the fuel pin. (author)

  8. On the seagull effect in semi-inclusive distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, W.

    1978-01-01

    Taking into account that pions contain two constituents, the semi-inclusive distributions are derived by information theory. From these distributions the psub(L)psub(T) correlations are especially calculated, the results are compared with experimental data

  9. High temperature behavior of metallic inclusions in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, R.L.

    1980-08-01

    The object of this thesis was to construct a temperature gradient furnace to simulate the thermal conditions in the reactor fuel and to study the migration of metallic inclusions in uranium oxide under the influence of temperature gradient. No thermal migration of molybdenum and tungsten inclusions was observed under the experimental conditions. Ruthenium inclusions, however, dissolved and diffused atomically through grain boundaries in slightly reduced uranium oxide. An intermetallic compound (probably URu 3 ) was formed by reaction of Ru and UO/sub 2-x/. The diffusivity and solubility of ruthenium in uranium oxide were measured

  10. UWB tomosynthesis of objects in mediums with metal inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, V. P.; Shipilov, S. E.; Sukhanov, D. Ya; Minin, I. V.; Minin, O. V.

    2017-08-01

    Radiowave tomography of dielectric objects containing metal inclusions is a rather complex problem, since the scattering of waves by dielectric inhomogeneities occurs against the background of substantially stronger reflections from metal parts, even if they are geometrically small. The arising features of obtaining a tomogram in such conditions, including overcoming of disguising by reinforcing ribbons and the appearance of locational shadows at different depths, are discussed in the paper. Herewith principled importance to achieve high focusing of UWB radiation by tomosynthesis is noted on the basis of direct experimental data.

  11. e+e- inclusive distributions, jets and 2-dim QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantafillou, V.V.

    1978-02-01

    Motivated by the presence of jets, we calculate inclusive distributions of hadrons produced in e + e - collisions in the framework of 1 + 1 dimensional QCD of 't Hooft. The dimensionless quantity 1/sigmasub(tot) dsigma/dz, which is determined solely by the meson wave functions and is independent of all parameters of the theory, agrees well with the existing experimental data. We give also the inclusive distributions for PSI, D, F and a heavy quark mesons in high energy e + e - experiments. (orig.) [de

  12. One-Particle Inclusive Distribution in the Unitarized Pomeron Models

    CERN Document Server

    Alkin, A; Romanets, E; Pauk, V

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that starting from the pomeron contribution with intercept P (0) > 1 one can obtain in a quasi-eikonal approach inclusive cross section which is similar to contribution of triple pole (at t = 0) pomeron. Generalizing this analogy we consider tripole and dipole pomeron contributions to inclusive cross section. They lead to hni / ln3 s (tripole) or hni / ln2 s (dipole) and describe well the data on charged hadron distributions in ¯pp. Predictions of one particle pt and rapidity distributions for LHC energies are given.

  13. Morphology and Orientation Selection of Non-metallic Inclusions in Electrified Molten Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z. C.; Qin, R. S.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of electric current on morphology and orientation selection of non-metallic inclusions in molten metal has been investigated using theoretical modeling and numerical calculation. Two geometric factors, namely the circularity ( fc ) and alignment ratio ( fe ) were introduced to describe the inclusions shape and configuration. Electric current free energy was calculated and the values were used to determine the thermodynamic preference between different microstructures. Electric current promotes the development of inclusion along the current direction by either expatiating directional growth or enhancing directional agglomeration. Reconfiguration of the inclusions to reduce the system electric resistance drives the phenomena. The morphology and orientation selection follow the routine to reduce electric free energy. The numerical results are in agreement with our experimental observations.

  14. 76 FR 71577 - Guidance for Industry on Medication Guide Distribution Requirements and Inclusion of Medication...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ...] Guidance for Industry on Medication Guide Distribution Requirements and Inclusion of Medication Guides in... guidance for industry entitled ``Medication Guides-- Distribution Requirements and Inclusion in Risk... Requirements and Inclusion in Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS).'' This guidance provides...

  15. Refractory metal particles in refractory inclusions in the Allende meteorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, L.H.; Blander, M.

    1980-01-01

    An examination of refractory metal particles in five calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions in the Allende meteorite indicates a complex variety of compositions and large departures from equilibrium. These particles appear to have been primordial condensates which were isolated from the nebula and from each other at different times by cocondensing oxides. Selective diffusion and/or oxidation of the more oxidizable metals (Mo, W, Fe and Ni), phase segregations into different alloy phases (fcc, bcc, hcp and perhaps ordered phases) and the formation of metastable condensates appears to have been involved in the modification of these materials to their present state. Only a small fraction of our observations cannot be reconciled with this picture because of a lack of knowledge of some of the phase equilibria which might have bee involved

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Dielectric Characteristics of the Metallic Band Inclusion Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the desirable properties of functional materials used in various electrical and radio physical equipment and devices, dielectric characteristics, including relative permittivity (hereinafter, permittivity are of importance. The permittivity requirements can be met when a composite with a particular combination of its matrix characteristics and inclusions [1, 2, 3] is used as a functional material. The use of metallic inclusions extends a variation range of dielectric characteristics of the composite, and thereby enhances its application. The composite structure, form of inclusions, and their volume concentration has a significant impact on the permittivity.One of the composite structure embodiments is a dispersion system when in the dispersion medium (in this case | in the composite matrix a dispersed phase (inclusions with highly extended interface between them [4] is distributed. There can be various forms of dispersed inclusions. Band is one of the possible forms of inclusion when its dimensions in three orthogonal directions are significantly different among themselves. For such inclusion, a tri-axial ellipsoid can be taken as an acceptable geometric model to describe its form. This model can be used, in particular, to describe the form of nanostructured elements, which recently are considered as inclusions for advanced composites for various purposes [5].With raising volume concentration of metal inclusions in the dielectric matrix composite there is an increasing probability of direct contact between the inclusions resulting in continuous conductive cluster [3, 6]. In this paper, it is assumed that metal band inclusions are covered with a sufficiently thin layer of the electrically insulating material, eliminating the possibility of direct contact and precluding consideration of the so-called percolation effect [2, 7] in the entire interval of the expectedly changing volume concentration of electrically ellipsoidal inclusions. The

  17. Charged-particle inclusive distributions from hadronic Z0 decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shaughnessy, K.

    1990-05-01

    We have measured inclusive distributions for charged particles in hadronic decays of the Z boson. The variables chosen for study were the mean charged-particle multiplicity (left-angle n ch right-angle), scaled momentum (x), and momenta transverse to the sphericity axes (p perpendicular in and p perpendicular out ). The distributions have been corrected for detector effects and are compared with data from e + e - annihilation at lower energies and with the predictions of several QCD-based models. The data are in reasonable agreement with expectations. 12 refs., 2 figs

  18. Noble Metal Arsenides and Gold Inclusions in Northwest Africa 8186

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P.; McCubbin, F. M.; Rahman, Z.; Keller, L. P.; Agee, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites are a highly thermally altered group of carbonaceous chondrites, experiencing temperatures ranging between approximately 576-867 degrees Centigrade. Additionally, the mineralogy of the CK chondrites record the highest overall oxygen fugacity of all chondrites, above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. Me-tallic Fe-Ni is extremely rare in CK chondrites, but magnetite and Fe,Ni sulfides are commonly observed. Noble metal-rich inclusions have previously been found in some magnetite and sulfide grains. These arsenides, tellurides, and sulfides, which contain varying amounts of Pt, Ru, Os, Te, As, Ir, and S, are thought to form either by condensation from a solar gas, or by exsolution during metamorphism on the chondritic parent body. Northwest Africa (NWA) 8186 is a highly metamorphosed CK chondrite. This meteorite is predominately composed of NiO-rich forsteritic olivine (Fo65), with lesser amounts of plagioclase (An52), augite (Fs11Wo49), magnetite (with exsolved titanomagnetite, hercynite, and titanohematite), monosulfide solid solution (with exsolved pentlandite), and the phosphate minerals Cl-apatite and merrillite. This meteorite contains coarse-grained, homogeneous silicates, and has 120-degree triple junctions between mineral phases, which indicates a high degree of thermal metamorphism. The presence of NiO-rich olivine, oxides phases all bearing Fe3 plus, and the absence of metal, are consistent with an oxygen fugacity above the FMQ buffer. We also observed noble metal-rich phases within sulfide grains in NWA 8186, which are the primary focus of the present study.

  19. Deformation and fracture properties of metals with non-metallic inclusions; Verformung und Bruch von Metallen mit nichtmetallischen Einschluessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmauder, S.; Soppa, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1998-12-31

    Microstructural effects due to formation of non-uniform lines of non-metallic inclusions in the matrix are examined with respect to their macro-, meso-, and micromechanical effects in the alloy Al(6061) reinforced by SiC inclusions. A comparative analysis of results obtained with various microstructures reveals essential differences in the formation of shear bands, stress peaks, and strain concentrations in the material structure. The maxima and the distribution of those field variables are determined not only by the arrangement of inclusions clusters in the stringers but also depend on the presence and number of single-particle inclusions in pure matrix material. The banding of the microstructure causes a strongly anisotropic behaviour in terms of stress and strain distributions. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] In diesem Beitrag werden Gefuegeeinfluesse aufgrund unterschiedlich starker zeiliger Anordnungen der Teilchen in der Matrix im Hinblick auf ihre makro-, meso- und mikromechanischen Auswirkungen am Beispiel einer SiC-teilchenverstaerkten Aluminiumlegierung Al(6061) untersucht. Ein Vergleich der Ergebnisse verschiedener Gefuege zeigt wesentliche Unterschiede hinsichtlich der Ausbildung von Scherbaendern, Spannungsspitzen und von Dehnungskonzentrationen im Werkstoffgefuege. Die Maxima und die Verteilung dieser Feldgroessen sind nicht nur abhaengig davon, wie die Teilchen in den Zeilen angeordnet sind, sondern auch davon, ob einzelne Teilchen in reinen Matrixbereichen vorhanden sind. Die Zeiligkeit des Gefueges fuehrt zu einem stark anisotropen Verhalten hinsichtlich Spannungs- und Dehnungsverteilungen. (orig.)

  20. Solid-State Recycling of Light Metal Reinforced Inclusions by Equal Channel Angular Pressing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Alimi Sami.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state recycling of light metals reinforced inclusions through hot Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP is performed to directly recycle metal scraps and reduce cost of material in engineering applications. The ECAP is one of the most important method in severe plastic deformation (SPD that can convert light metals into finished products. This paper reviews several experimental and numerical works that have been done to investigate the effects of the ECAP parameters such as die angles, material properties, outer corner angle, friction coefficient, temperature, size of chips, pressing force, ram speed and direct effects of number of passes on the strain distributions. It also includes the performance enhancement of aluminium matrix composite reinforced ceramic-based particles that derived from direct recycled aluminium chips for sustainable manufacturing practices.

  1. Influence of crystallization conditions on formation and distribution of nonmetallic inclusions in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The processes were studied of the formation and the distribution of nonmetallic inclusions and the chemical inhomogeneity formation during the solidification of h steel. The variation of the character of oxides and sulfides across ingots was shown by considering st 25 and 20 Kh steels. To improve the distribution of inclusions and the stability of properties throughout the body of ingots, it is recommended to throughly deoxidize the metal, to raise the rate of solidification, to reduce the temperature gradient, to employ powder cooling agents, to use casting under a blanket of slag, to modify steel by active elements (r.e.e., Ca, Ba, Zr, B) which affect favourably the nature and the shape of the nonmetallic phase

  2. Pion inclusive momentum distribution at 900 in hydrodynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.B.; Wang, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that pion inclusive momentum distributions in pp-collisions at 90 0 up to FNAL and ISR energies can be accounted for by a hydrodynamical model, which has frame independence symmetry and incorporates the evaporation phenomena. Within the solution during its space--time development, the matter system only possesses a local thermal equilibrium but not a global equilibrium. The proper time interval needed to achieve this equilibrium comes out to be comparable to (with c = 1) the longitudinal dimension estimated previously based on considerations of quantum statistical fluctuation. (U.S.)

  3. The Effect of Different Non-Metallic Inclusions on the Machinability of Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ånmark, Niclas; Karasev, Andrey; Jönsson, Pär Göran

    2015-02-16

    Considerable research has been conducted over recent decades on the role of non‑metallic inclusions and their link to the machinability of different steels. The present work reviews the mechanisms of steel fractures during different mechanical machining operations and the behavior of various non-metallic inclusions in a cutting zone. More specifically, the effects of composition, size, number and morphology of inclusions on machinability factors (such as cutting tool wear, power consumption, etc .) are discussed and summarized. Finally, some methods for modification of non-metallic inclusions in the liquid steel are considered to obtain a desired balance between mechanical properties and machinability of various steel grades.

  4. The Measurement of Hardness and Elastic Modulus of non-Metallic Inclusions in Steely Welding Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova Anna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Trunk pipelines work under a cyclic dynamical mechanical load because when oil or gas is pumped, the pressure constantly changes - pulsates. Therefore, the fatigue phenomenon is a common reason of accidents. The fatigue phenomenon more often happens in the zone of non-metallic inclusions concentration. To know how the characteristics of nonmetallic inclusions influence the probability of an accident the most modern research methods should be used. It is determined with the help of the modern research methods that the accident rate of welded joints of pipelines is mostly influenced by their morphological type, composition and size of nonmetallic inclusions, this effect is more important than the common level of pollution by non-metallic inclusions. The article presents the results of the investigations of welded joints, obtained after the use of different common welding materials. We used the methods, described in the state standards: scanning electronic microscopy, spectral microprobe analysis and nano-indentation. We found out that non-metallic inclusions act like stress concentrators because they shrink, forming a blank space between metal and nonmetallic inclusions; it strengthens the differential properties on this boundary. Nonmetallic inclusion is not fixed, it can move. The data that we have received mean that during welded joints’ contamination (with non-metallic inclusions monitoring process, more attention should be paid to the content of definite inclusions, but not to total contamination.

  5. 76 FR 10908 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Medication Guides-Distribution Requirements and Inclusion of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Medication Guides--Distribution Requirements and Inclusion of Medication... a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Medication Guides--Distribution Requirements and Inclusion... Inclusion of Medication Guides in Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS).'' This draft guidance is...

  6. Silicate Inclusions in IAB Irons: Correlations Between Metal Composition and Inclusion Properties, and Inferences for Their Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedix, G. K.; McCoy, T. J.; Keil, K.

    1995-09-01

    IAB irons are the largest group of iron meteorites, exhibit a large range of siderophile element concentrations in their metal, and commonly contain silicate inclusions with roughly chondritic composition. They are closely related to IIICD irons [1,2] and their inclusions resemble winonaites [3]. It has been suggested that IAB's and IIICD's formed in individual impact melt pools [4,2] on a common parent body. However, it has also been suggested that fractional crystallization [5,6] of a S-saturated core could produce the observed siderophile element trends. Metal composition is correlated with silicate inclusion mineralogy in IIICD's [1], indicating reactions between solid silicates and the metallic magma in a core. These trends observed in IIICD's differ from those in IAB's, suggesting different parent bodies. A bi-modal grouping, based primarily on mineralogy and mineral abundances, was suggested for IAB inclusions [7]. However, recent recoveries of several new silicate-bearing IAB's, along with the emergence of new ideas on their origins, prompted a comprehensive study to document more fully the range of inclusions within IAB irons, to examine possible correlations between the compositions of the metallic host and the silicate inclusions, and to elucidate the origin of IAB irons. We are studying troilite-graphite-silicate inclusions in 24 IAB irons with Ni concentrations ranging from 6.6-25.0%. These include Odessa and Copiapo types [7], newly recovered meteorites (e.g., Lueders [8]) and meteorites with extreme Ni contents (e.g., Jenny's Creek, 6.8%; San Cristobal, 25.0% [9]). The inclusions exhibit a range of textures from recrystallized to partial melts (e.g., Caddo County [10]). Rigorous classification [7] is hampered by heterogeneities between group meteorites, between different samples of distinct meteorites, and within individual inclusions. While intergroup heterogeneities make comparisons between the suite of IAB's somewhat difficult, some general trends

  7. A brief overview of the distribution test grids with a distributed generation inclusion case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisavljević Aleksandar M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of the electric distribution test grids issued by different technical institutions. They are used for testing different scenarios in operation of a grid for research, benchmarking, comparison and other purposes. Their types, main characteristics, features as well as application possibilities are shown. Recently, these grids are modified with inclusion of distributed generation. An example of modification and application of the IEEE 13-bus for testing effects of faults in cases without and with a distributed generator connection to the grid is presented. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III 042004: Smart Electricity Distribution Grids Based on Distribution Management System and Distributed Generation

  8. Formation of non-metallic inclusions and the possibility of their removal during ingot casting

    OpenAIRE

    Ragnarsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the formation and evolution of non-metallic inclusions during ingot casting. Emphasize have been on understanding the types of inclusions formed and developed through the casting process and on the development of already existing inclusions carried over from the ladle during casting. Industrial experiments carried on at Uddeholm Tooling together with laboratory work and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Ingots of 5.8 tons have bee...

  9. Modification of Non-Metallic Inclusions by Rare-Earth Elements in Microalloyed Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Opiela

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The modification of the chemical composition of non-metallic inclusions by rare-earth elements in the new-developed microalloyed steels was discussed in the paper. The investigated steels are assigned to production of forged elements by thermo- mechanical treatment. The steels were melted in a vaccum induction furnace and modification of non-metallic inclusions was carried out by the michmetal in the amount of 2.0 g per 1 kg of steel. It was found that using material charge of high purity and a realization of metallurgical process in vacuous conditions result in a low concentration of sulfur (0.004%, phosphorus (from 0.006 to 0.008% and oxygen (6 ppm. The high metallurgical purity is confirmed by a small fraction of non-metallic inclusions averaging 0.075%. A large majority of non-metallic inclusions are fine, globular oxide-sulfide or sulfide particles with a mean size 17m2. The chemical composition and morphology of non-metallic inclusions was modified by Ce, La and Nd, what results a small deformability of non- metallic inclusions during hot-working.

  10. Numerical simulation of convection and inclusion distribution during solidification in a heavy steel ingot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Rui; Shen, Houfa

    2015-01-01

    Inclusions content in the steel ingot is an important index for homogeneity, and it becomes more serious for heavy steel ingots which are used for major equipment. However, knowledge about the formation of inclusion in steel ingot is limited, and modeling of inclusion distribution is still challenging, so it is of great significance to research the behavior of inclusion. In this paper, fluid flow during solidification is numerically simulated based on the equilibrium equations of mass, momentum and energy, and then inclusion distribution is modeled according to the Lagrangian Stokes trajectory method. The Results show that the inclusion distribution in the steel ingot is influenced by the flow pattern which is affected by the solidification pattern. Therefore, inclusion distribution could be controlled by the solidification front with the optimization of heat transfer condition such as the hot top design of steel ingot for the high quality steel production. (paper)

  11. Automated Classification and Analysis of Non-metallic Inclusion Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsalam, Mohammad; Zhang, Tongsheng; Tan, Jia; Webler, Bryan A.

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study is to utilize principal component analysis (PCA), clustering methods, and correlation analysis to condense and examine large, multivariate data sets produced from automated analysis of non-metallic inclusions. Non-metallic inclusions play a major role in defining the properties of steel and their examination has been greatly aided by automated analysis in scanning electron microscopes equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The methods were applied to analyze inclusions on two sets of samples: two laboratory-scale samples and four industrial samples from a near-finished 4140 alloy steel components with varying machinability. The laboratory samples had well-defined inclusions chemistries, composed of MgO-Al2O3-CaO, spinel (MgO-Al2O3), and calcium aluminate inclusions. The industrial samples contained MnS inclusions as well as (Ca,Mn)S + calcium aluminate oxide inclusions. PCA could be used to reduce inclusion chemistry variables to a 2D plot, which revealed inclusion chemistry groupings in the samples. Clustering methods were used to automatically classify inclusion chemistry measurements into groups, i.e., no user-defined rules were required.

  12. Study of non-metallic inclusion sources in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khons, Ya.; Mrazek, L.

    1976-01-01

    A study of potential inclusion sources was carried out at the Tvinec steel plant using an unified labelling procedure for different sources. A lanthanum oxide labelling method has been used for refractories with the subsequent La determination in steel by the neutron activation analysis. Samarium and cerium oxides and the 141 Ce radionuclide have been used in conjunction with the testing. The following sources of exogenous inclusions have been studied: 1)Refractory material comprising fireclay and corundum for steel-teeming trough in open-heart furnaces; 2) Fireclay bottom-pouring refractories; 3) Steel-teeming laddle lining; 4) Heat-insulating and exothermic compounds for steel ingots; 5) Vacuum treatment plant lining; 6) Open-hearth and electric arc furnace slag. The major oxide inclusion source in steel was found to be represented by the furnace slag, since it forms about 40 p.c. of all oxide inclusions. The contributions of the remaining sources did not exceede 5 p.c. each

  13. Thermoelectric detection of inclusions in metallic biomaterials by magnetic sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Carreon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The detectability of small inclusions and subtle imperfections by magnetic measurements that senses thermoelectric currents produced by a temperature gradient is ultimately limited by the intrinsic thermoelectric anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the material to be inspected. The probability of detection (POD of a given material flaw is determined by the resulting signal-to-noise ratio rather than by the absolute magnitude of the signal itself. The strength of the magnetic field to be detected greatly depends on the physical nature of the host medium and dimensions of the imperfection. This paper presents experimental data for the magnetic field produced by thermoelectric currents around tin inclusions in different host medium such as 316LVM stainless steel and Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy under external thermal excitation. The diameter of the inclusions and the lift-off distance varied from 0.39 to 3.175 mm and from 1 to 10 mm, respectively. A 0.6 °C/cm temperature gradient in the samples produced peak magnetic flux densities ranging from 0.1 to 280 nT, that was measured by a fluxgate magnetometer. The numerical results were found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions and demonstrated that both property anisotropy and gradient in thermoelectric materials can significantly influence the induced thermoelectric currents and magnetic fields.

  14. Thermoelectric detection of inclusions in metallic biomaterials by magnetic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreon, Hector

    2017-05-01

    The detectability of small inclusions and subtle imperfections by magnetic measurements that senses thermoelectric currents produced by a temperature gradient is ultimately limited by the intrinsic thermoelectric anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the material to be inspected. The probability of detection (POD) of a given material flaw is determined by the resulting signal-to-noise ratio rather than by the absolute magnitude of the signal itself. The strength of the magnetic field to be detected greatly depends on the physical nature of the host medium and dimensions of the imperfection. This paper presents experimental data for the magnetic field produced by thermoelectric currents around tin inclusions in different host medium such as 316LVM stainless steel and Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy under external thermal excitation. The diameter of the inclusions and the lift-off distance varied from 0.39 to 3.175 mm and from 1 to 10 mm, respectively. A 0.6 °C/cm temperature gradient in the samples produced peak magnetic flux densities ranging from 0.1 to 280 nT, that was measured by a fluxgate magnetometer. The numerical results were found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions and demonstrated that both property anisotropy and gradient in thermoelectric materials can significantly influence the induced thermoelectric currents and magnetic fields.

  15. Studies of helium distribution in metal tritides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, R.C. Jr.; Attalla, A.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of helium ( 3 He) in LiT, TiT 2 , and UT 3 , which are regarded as representative metal tritides, was investigated using pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Analyses of the NMR lineshapes and nuclear relaxation times indicate the 3 He atoms are trapped in microscopic gas bubbles for each tritide. The effects of concentration and temperature on the 3 He distributions were investigated as well

  16. Studies of permittivity and permeability of dielectric matrix with cuboid metallic inclusions in different orientations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Wu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the possibility of using the heterogeneous materials, with cuboid metallic inclusions inside a dielectric substrate (host to control the effective permittivity. We find that in the gigahertz range, such a material demonstrates a significantly larger permittivity compared to the pure dielectric substrate. Three principal orientations of microscale cuboid inclusions have been taken into account in this study. The highest permittivity is observed when the orientation provides the largest polarization (electric dipole moment. The detrimental side effect of the metallic inclusion, which leads to the decrease of the effective magnetic permeability, can be suppressed by the proper choice of shape and orientation of the inclusions. This choice can in fact reduce the induced current and hence maximize the permeability. The dissipative losses are shown to be negligible in the relevant range of frequencies and cuboid dimensions.

  17. Contribution of metallic fission product inclusions to axial fuel motion potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, P.; Cronenberg, A.; Stevenson, M.

    1979-01-01

    In the analysis of postulated nuclear reactor accidents, axial fuel motion within the fuel pin prior to cladding failure can have an important mitigating effect. The question of primary importance is whether or not metallic inclusions have the potential to vaporize during an overheating event and thus contribute to fuel motion. To assess this potential, two limiting calculations were made: 1) The inclusion constituent assumed insoluble in one another and 2) The constituents assumed totally miscible in one another. Thermodynamic considerations indicate that the metallic fission products found within inclusions of fuel rods irradiated in a fast neutron spectrum, would form homogeneous solutions. Therefore, it is concluded that the metallic fission products would not enhance fuel swelling during an overheating event. 16 refs

  18. Oxidation behaviour of noble-metal inclusions in used UO2 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEachern, R.

    1997-07-01

    The literature on the chemistry of the noble-metal (Mo-Rh-Ru-Pd-Tc) inclusions found in used nuclear fuel has been reviewed. The Mo-Ru-Pd phase diagram is reasonably well understood, and the pseudoternary Mo-(Tc+Ru)-Rh+Pd) system can be used to qualitatively understand the phase chemistry of the noble-metal inclusions. The kinetics of the oxidation reaction are not particularly well understood, but they are of limited applicability to understanding the properties of used fuel. In contrast, it is important to determine the thermodynamic activity of molybdenum in noble-metal inclusions, so that analysis of their molybdenum content can be used as a probe of the local oxygen potential of the used fuel. (author)

  19. Electromagnetic detection and infrared visualization techniques for non-metallic inclusions in molten aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei Ming; Ludwig, Reinhold; Shankar, Sumanth; Apelian, Diran

    2002-01-01

    The role of detecting non-metallic and weakly conducting inclusions in hot melts during the manufacturing process is of major importance. However, the key impediment to assessing melt cleanliness is the quantification of the level of inclusions. In this paper, we present the theory and practice in using a magnetic force-based detection system capable of monitoring small inclusions of micron-size dimensions. The idea is to force the non-conducting inclusions to a detection location (the free melt surface) by electromagnetic Archimedes forces. Further, an infrared (IR) imaging system can then be applied to detect their thermal signature. Finally, a novel image-processing algorithm is used to analyze the inclusion level on the measurement surface

  20. Effects of small defects and nonmetallic inclusions on the fatigue strength of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The equation for predicting the effects of artificial small defects on the fatigue strength of metals is introduced, and it is applied to the quantitative evaluation of the effects of nonmetallic inclusions on the fatigue strength of high-strength steels. The importance of the concept that nonmetallic inclusions are virtually equivalent to defects, from the viewpoint of fatigue strength and, more practically, are equivalent to small cracks is emphasized. It is shown that nonmetallic inclusions cause relatively low-fatigue strength and large scatter of the fatigue strength of steels with high static strength or high hardness. The statistics of extreme values is used to estimate the expected maximum size of nonmetallic inclusions contained in a definite number of specimens. The lower limit of scatter in the fatigue strength of a high-strength steel is obtained by using the prediction equation for small defects together with the expected maximum size of nonmetallic inclusions

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Electrical Conductivity of Dielectric with Dispersed Metallic Inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composites are increasingly used for application in engineering as structural, thermal protection and functional materials, including dielectrics, because of a wide variety of properties. The relative dielectric constant and the dielectric loss tangent are basic functional characteristics of a composite used as a dielectric. The quantitative level of these characteristics is mainly affected by the properties of the composite matrix and inclusions as well as their shape and volume concentration. Metallic inclusions in a dielectric, which serves as a function of the composite matrix, expand electrical properties of the composite in particular increase its dielectric constant and dielectric loss tangent and thereby greatly expand its application field. Dielectric losses are defined by the imaginary component of the complex value of the relative dielectric constant of the dielectric. At a relatively low vibration frequency of electromagnetic field affecting the dielectric, this value is proportional to the electrical conductivity of the dielectric and inversely proportional to the frequency. In order to predict the expected value of the electric conductivity of the dielectric with metallic inclusions, a mathematical model that properly describes the structure of the composite and the electrical interaction of the matrix and inclusions is required.In the paper, a mathematical model of the electrical interaction of the representative element of the composite structure and a homogeneous isotropic medium with electrical conductivity, which is desired characteristics of the composite, is constructed. Globular shape of the metallic inclusions as an average statistical form of dispersed inclusions with a comparable size in all directions is adopted. The inclusion is covered with a globular layer of electrical insulation to avoid percolation with increasing volume concentration of inclusions. Outer globular layer of representative structure of composite

  2. Analysis and simulation of non-metallic inclusions in spheroidal graphite iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustal, B; Schelnberger, B; Bührig-Polaczek, A

    2016-01-01

    Non-metallic inclusions in spheroidal cast iron (SGI) reduce fatigue strength and yield strength. This type of inclusion usually accumulates at grain boundaries. Papers addressing this topic show the overall impact of both the fraction of so-called white (carbides) and black (non-metallic) inclusions on mechanical properties. In the present work we focus on the origin and the formation conditions of black Mg-bearing inclusions, further distinguishing between Si-bearing and non-Si-bearing Mg inclusions. The formation was simulated applying thermodynamic approaches. Moreover, appropriate experiments have been carried out and a large number of particles have been studied applying innovative feature analysis with regard to shape, size, and composition. Magnesium silicates are predicted at elevated oxygen concentrations, whereas at low levels of oxygen sulphides and carbides appear at a late stage of solidification. Experiments with three consecutive flow obstacles show that the amount of magnesium silicates decrease after each of the three obstacles, whereas the fraction of non-Si-bearing inclusions remains approximately constant. The size of inclusions divides in halves over the flow path and the number of particles increases accordingly. We point out that based on feature analysis Mg-O-C bearing inclusion show disadvantageous form factors for which reason this kind of inclusions may be extremely harmful in terms of crack initiation. All results obtained indicate that magnesium silicates are entrapped on mould filling, whereas Mg-(O, C, S, P, N) bearing particles are precipitates at late stages of solidification. Consequently, the only avoidance strategy is setting up optimum retained magnesium content. (paper)

  3. Numerical simulation of systems of shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plohr, JeeYeon N., E-mail: jplohr@lanl.gov; Plohr, Bradley J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We develop a method for numerical simulations of high strain-rate loading of mesoscale samples of ductile metal with inclusions. Because of its small-scale inhomogeneity, the composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). This method employs the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. 127–139, 1992] to ensure that the micro mechanical behavior of the metal and inclusions is reflected properly in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To find the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, we extend and apply the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands of Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31–41, 1996]. Our tests of the method focus on the stress/strain response in uniaxial-strain flow, both compressive and tensile, of depleted uranium metal containing silicon carbide inclusions. We use the Preston-Tonks-Wallace viscoplasticity model [J. Appl. Phys., vol. 93, pp. 211–220, 2003], which applies to the high strain-rate regime of an isotropic viscoplastic solid. In results, we verify the elevated temperature and thermal softening at shear bands in our simulations of pure DU and DU/SiC composites. We also note that in composites, due the asymmetry caused by the inclusions, shear band form at different times in different subcells. In particular, in the subcells near inclusions, shear band form much earlier than they do in pure DU.

  4. Numerical simulation of systems of shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JeeYeon N. Plohr

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We develop a method for numerical simulations of high strain-rate loading of mesoscale samples of ductile metal with inclusions. Because of its small-scale inhomogeneity, the composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands. This method employs the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. 127–139, 1992] to ensure that the micro mechanical behavior of the metal and inclusions is reflected properly in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To find the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, we extend and apply the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands of Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31–41, 1996]. Our tests of the method focus on the stress/strain response in uniaxial-strain flow, both compressive and tensile, of depleted uranium metal containing silicon carbide inclusions. We use the Preston-Tonks-Wallace viscoplasticity model [J. Appl. Phys., vol. 93, pp. 211–220, 2003], which applies to the high strain-rate regime of an isotropic viscoplastic solid. In results, we verify the elevated temperature and thermal softening at shear bands in our simulations of pure DU and DU/SiC composites. We also note that in composites, due the asymmetry caused by the inclusions, shear band form at different times in different subcells. In particular, in the subcells near inclusions, shear band form much earlier than they do in pure DU.

  5. Numerical simulation of systems of shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plohr, Jeeyeon

    2017-06-01

    We develop a method for numerical simulations of high strain-rate loading of mesoscale samples of ductile metal with inclusions. Because of its small-scale inhomogeneity, the composite material is prone to localized shear deformation. This method employs the Generalized Method of Cells to ensure that the micro mechanical behavior of the metal and inclusions is reflected properly in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To find the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, we extend and apply the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands of Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp. Our tests of the method focus on the stress/strain response in uniaxial-strain flow, both compressive and tensile, of depleted uranium metal containing silicon carbide inclusions. In results, we verify the elevated temperature and thermal softening at shear bands in our simulations of pure DU and DU/SiC composites. We also note that in composites, due the asymmetry caused by the inclusions, shear band form at different times in different subcells. In particular, in the subcells near inclusions, shear band form much earlier than they do in pure DU.

  6. Use of radioactive indicators for the quantitative determination of non-metall inclusions in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rewienska-Kosciuk, B.; Michalik, J.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of determining and investigating the sources of non-metal inclusions in steel are presented together with some results of radiometric investigations. The experience of several years of research in industries as well as profound studies of world literature were used as a basis for systematic and critical discussion of the methods used. Optimum methods have been chosen for the quantitative determination of oxide inclusions and for the identification of their origin (e.g. from the refractory furnace lining, the tap-hole, the runner, the ladle or mold slag). Problems of tracers (type, quantity, condition, activity), of the labelling method suitable for the various origins of inclusions, of sampling, of chemical processing of the material sampled, as well as of radiometric measuring techniques (including possible activation) are discussed. Finally, a method for the determination of inclusions resulting from the deoxidation of steel is briefly outlined. (author)

  7. Particulate trace metals in Cochin backwaters: Distribution of seasonal indices

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Joseph, T.

    that surface distribution pattern of the trace metal concentration of cobalt, nickel and iron was almost similar at the four stations thereby stressing the fact that seasonal fluctuations contributed a major part in the surface distribution of these metals...

  8. Theory of X-ray scattering by strongly distorted aging alloys with lamellar distribution of inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabash, R.I.; Krivoglaz, M.A.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Metallofiziki)

    1981-01-01

    The X-ray scattering by strongly distorted heterogeneous alloys containing inclusions of new phase particles is discussed. Two models describing the lamellar structure with various orientation of inclusion axes in different layers are studied. In the first model the dimensions of inclusions are small in comparison with the layer thickness and they are randomly distributed in it, in the second model lamellar inclusions stretch through the whole layer. It is shown that in both models the Debye broadened line intensity distribution consists of overlapping Lorentz curves. A case of inclusions oriented along directions [100] and layers perpendicular to axes [110] is analyzed in detail. The results obtained for this case are compared with experimental results for the Cu-Be alloy

  9. The Polarised Valence Quark Distribution from semi-inclusive DIS

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Arbuzov, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Chapiro, A.; Chiosso, M.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gazda, R.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heckmann, J.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; d'Hose, N.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, A.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.N.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nikolaev, K.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Procureur, S.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Reggiani, D.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmitt, L.; Schonmeier, P.; Schroder, W.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Siebert, H.W.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Vossen, A.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Zvyagin, A.

    2008-01-01

    The semi-inclusive difference asymmetry A^{h+ - h-} for hadrons of opposite charge has been measured by the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The data were collected in the years 2002-2004 using a 160 GeV polarised muon beam scattered off a large polarised 6-LiD target and cover the range 0.006 < x < 0.7 and 1 < Q^2 < 100 (GeV/c)^2. In leading order QCD (LO) the asymmetry A_d^{h+ - h-} measures the valence quark polarisation and provides an evaluation of the first moment of Delta u_v + Delta d_v which is found to be equal to 0.40 +- 0.07 (stat.) +- 0.05 (syst.) over the measured range of x at Q^2 = 10 (GeV/c)^2. When combined with the first moment of g_1^d previously measured on the same data, this result favours a non-symmetric polarisation of light quarks Delta u-bar = -Delta d-bar at a confidence level of two standard deviations, in contrast to the often assumed symmetric scenario Delta u-bar = Delta d-bar = Delta s-bar = Delta s.

  10. Influence of oxide inclusions in marten bath on the quality of metal during boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elanskii, G N; Kudrin, V A; Ageev, E E; Babiskiirh, V K [Moskovskii Vechernij Metallurgicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1975-01-01

    The effect of oxide inclusions floating in a boiling open-hearth furnace on the quality of steel produced has been determined. During the boiling the metal contains some nonmetallic inclusions. They cannot be completely separated during the boiling period and therefore adversely affect the purity of steel and its mechanical properties. The maximum effect on the mechanical properties (especially on plasticity and impact strenght) is due to relatively large oxide inclusions (greater than 3-3.5 on the scale). The degree of contamination by oxides has been determined for the relative ratio (in %) of polished sections containing oxide inclusions (o.i.). One of the factors determining (%)sub(o.i.) is the rate of carbon oxidation. In the case where the smelting process is carried out under optimal conditions for carbon oxidation, the produced metal is least contaminated with the undesirable large oxide inclusions. Deviation from the optimal range of the oxidation rate during boiling of the steel results in a significant increase in the proportion of smeltings contaminated with the oxides.

  11. Metal Distribution and Mobility under alkaline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dario, Maarten

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of an element, expressed as its distribution between liquid (aquatic) and solid phases in the bio geosphere, largely determines its mobility and transport properties. This is of fundamental importance in the assessment of the performance of e.g. geologic repositories for hazardous elements like radionuclides. Geologic repositories for low and intermediate level nuclear waste will most likely be based on concrete constructions in a suitable bedrock, leading to a local chemical environment with pH well above 12. At this pH metal adsorption is very high, and thus the mobility is hindered. Organic complexing agents, such as natural humic matter from the ground and in the groundwater, as well as components in the waste (cleaning agents, degradation products from ion exchange resins and cellulose, cement additives etc.) would affect the sorption properties of the various elements in the waste. Trace element migration from a cementitious repository through the pH- and salinity gradient created around the repository would be affected by the presence and creation of particulate matter (colloids) that may serve as carriers that enhance the mobility. The objective of this thesis was to describe and quantify the sorption of some selected elements representative of spent nuclear fuel (Eu, Am) and other heavy metals (Zn, Cd, Hg) in a clay/cement environment (pH 10-13) and in the pH-gradient outside this environment. The potential of organic complexing agents and colloids to enhance metal migration was also investigated. It was shown that many organic ligands are able to reduce trace metal sorption under these conditions. It was not possible to calculate the effect of well-defined organic ligands on the metal sorption in a cement environment by using stability constants from the literature. A simple method for comparing the effect of different complexing agents on metal sorption is, however, suggested. The stability in terms of the particle size of suspended

  12. Influence of non-metallic inclusions on fatigue strength of high manganese steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, I.; Shibata, H.; Lee, J.H.; Nishida, Shin-ichi

    1991-01-01

    Six series of high manganese austenitic steel, which contain different inclusion quantity, were prepared. Fatigue experiments, tensile tests and Charpy tests were carried out. Influence of non-metallic inclusion and of temperature on the stress intensity threshold, fatigue crack propagation behavior, elastic-plastic fracture toughness and Charpy value were studied at room temperature and low temperature. In general, strength of this high manganese steel was reduced with increase of inclusion content. Influences of the direction of elongated inclusion with regard to the rolling direction on their strengths were also discussed based on SEM observation and numerical analysis for the stress concentration at a crack tip when an inclusion was near by the tip. According to these results, an inclusion acted as an obstacle to crack propagation for LT specimen. The roughness of fracture surface of ST specimen was larger than that of SL specimen, and the crack growth rate of the former was less than that of the latter. Fatigue life was increased with decrease of temperature, and mechanical parameters such as ΔK th and J 1c were decreased with increase of temperature. The Charpy value decreased clearly with decrease of temperature

  13. Application of the quantitative autoradiography for determination of specific activity of labelled non-metallic inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, J.T.; Wilczynski, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The knowledge of specific activity of labelled non-metallic inclusions, i.e. the knowledge of the content of the radiotracer in a single inclusion, allows to obtain new information about the mechanism and the kinetics of steel deoxidation. In order to determine this specific activity quantitative autoradiography was used. Fo; this purpose, various standards of aluminium oxides with different amounts of cerium oxide Ce 2 O 3 and an aluminium-cerium alloy were prepared. The standards and the alloy were activated with thermal neutrons. Then several autoradiographs were made for these standards (ORWO AF-3 films were used). The autoradiographs served as the basis for evaluation of the standardization curves: optical density versus dimension of particles for a constant cerium concentration; optical density versus concentration of cerium for a constant dimension of particle. The samples of liquid steel were deoxidated with Al-Ce alloy. After labelled non-metallic inclusions had been isolated, the autoradiographs were made under the same conditions as for the standards. The standardization curves were used to determine the cerium content in the single inclusions. (author)

  14. The interaction between non-metallic inclusions and surface roughness in fatigue failure and their influence on fatigue strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saberifar, S.; Mashreghi, A.R.; Mosalaeepur, M.; Ghasemi, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The fatigue strength of a tested steel was affected by inclusions and surface notches. ► Inclusions were the main fatigue crack sources even in rough specimens. ► The stress intensity factor represented the behavior of inclusions properly. ► In rough steels the effect of inclusions was intensified by surface roughness. ► The critical inclusion size increased when surface roughness was removed. -- Abstract: In this study, the influence of non-metallic inclusions on the fatigue behavior of 30MnVS6 steel containing different inclusion sizes and surface roughness has been investigated. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine fatigue fracture origins. It was concluded that the non-metallic inclusions were dominant fatigue crack initiation sites in both smooth and rough specimens. This was justified by the calculation of stress intensity factor generated by both surface roughness and non-metallic inclusions, based on Murakami’s model. In addition, it was found that for a given stress, the critical inclusion size could be increased by eliminating the surface roughness.

  15. Measurement of two-particle semi-inclusive rapidity distributions at the CERN ISR

    CERN Document Server

    Amendolia, S R; Bosisio, L; Braccini, Pier Luigi; Bradaschia, C; Castaldi, R; Cavasinni, V; Cerri, C; Del Prete, T; Finocchiaro, G; Foà, L; Giromini, P; Grannis, P; Green, D; Jöstlein, H; Kephart, R; Laurelli, P; Menzione, A; Ristori, L; Sanguinetti, G; Thun, R; Valdata, M

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented on the semi-inclusive distributions of rapidities of secondary particles produced in pp collisions at very high energies. The experiment was performed at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR). The data given, at centre-of-mass energies of square root s=23 and 62 GeV, include the single-particle distributions and two-particle correlations. The semi-inclusive correlations show pronounced short-range correlation effects which have a width considerably narrower than in the case of inclusive correlations. It is shown that these short-range effects can be understood empirically in terms of three parameters whose energy and multiplicity dependence are studied. The data support the picture of multiparticle production in which clusters of small multiplicity and small dispersion are emitted with subsequent decay into hadrons. (32 refs).

  16. Effect of inclusions on microstructure and toughness of deposited metals of self-shielded flux cored wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tianli; Li, Zhuoxin; Kou, Sindo; Jing, Hongyang; Li, Guodong; Li, Hong; Jin Kim, Hee

    2015-01-01

    The effect of inclusions on the microstructure and toughness of the deposited metals of self-shielded flux cored wires was investigated by optical microscopy, electron microscopy and mechanical testing. The deposited metals of three different wires showed different levels of low temperature impact toughness at −40 °C mainly because of differences in the properties of inclusions. The inclusions formed in the deposited metals as a result of deoxidation caused by the addition of extra Al–Mg alloy and ferromanganese to the flux. The inclusions, spherical in shape, were mixtures of Al 2 O 3 and MgO. Inclusions predominantly Al 2 O 3 and 0.3–0.8 μm in diameter were effective for nucleation of acicular ferrite. However, inclusions predominantly MgO were promoted by increasing Mg in the flux and were more effective than Al 2 O 3 inclusions of the same size. These findings suggest that the control of inclusions can be an effective way to improve the impact toughness of the deposited metal

  17. Local-Field Distribution of Two Dielectric Inclusions at Small Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Yuet-Lun; Yu, Kin-Wah

    2001-03-01

    When two dielectric inclusions approach to each other in a composite medium, significant mutual polarization effects must occur. These effects are multipolar in nature and are difficult to treat from first principles(J. D. Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics), 2nd edition, (Wiley, New York, 1975).. In this work, we employ the discrete-dipole theory(B. T. Draine and P. J. Flatau, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11) 1491 (1994). to account for the mutual polarization effects by dividing the inclusions into many small subparts. We begin the calculation at small inclusion sizes and large separation, where the point-dipole limit being valid, and proceed to larger inclusion sizes and small separation, for which the mutual polarization effect becomes important. Then, we apply the theory to determine the dipole moment of each subpart self-consistently. In this way, each dipole moment yields the local electric field, which in turn polarizes the neighboring dipoles. We also begin the calculation at small inclusion sizes and large separation, where the point-dipole limit being valid, and proceed to larger inclusion sizes and small separation. Our resluts indicate that convergence is achieved with moderate computational effects. The results produce valuable information about the local electric field distribution, which is relevant to optical absorption due to surface phonon-polaritons of ionic microcrystals.

  18. Removal of Non-metallic Inclusions from Nickel Base Superalloys by Electromagnetic Levitation Melting in a Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjili, Mohsen Hajipour; Halali, Mohammad

    2018-02-01

    Samples of INCONEL 718 were levitated and melted in a slag by the application of an electromagnetic field. The effects of temperature, time, and slag composition on the inclusion content of the samples were studied thoroughly. Samples were compared with the original alloy to study the effect of the process on inclusions. Size, shape, and chemical composition of remaining non-metallic inclusions were investigated. The samples were prepared by Standard Guide for Preparing and Evaluating Specimens for Automatic Inclusion Assessment of Steel (ASTM E 768-99) method and the results were reported by means of the Standard Test Methods for Determining the Inclusion Content of Steel (ASTM E 45-97). Results indicated that by increasing temperature and processing time, greater level of cleanliness could be achieved, and numbers and size of the remaining inclusions decreased significantly. It was also observed that increasing calcium fluoride content of the slag helped reduce inclusion content.

  19. Strange quark distribution and parton charge symmetry violation in a semi-inclusive process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Hisashi; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2000-01-01

    It is possible to observe a semi-inclusive reaction with tagged charged kaons using the RICH detector at DESY-HERA. Using the semi-inclusive process we study two kinds of parton properties in the nucleon. We study relations between cross sections and strange quark distributions, which are expected to be measured more precisely in such a process than in the process in which pions are tagged. We also investigate charge symmetry violation (CSV) in the nucleon, which appears in the region x ≤ 0.1. (author)

  20. Metals distribution in Kumkol deposit petroleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musaeva, Z.G.; Nadirov, A.N.; Ajdarbaev, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Metals content in samples of Kumkol deposit petroleum is determined by the method of X-ray diffraction and neutron activation analysis. Specific consideration was devoted to nickel and vanadium. It is possible, that sources of these metals are various petroleum formation as well as both the absorbed or the got in stratum microelements. (author)

  1. Two-particle inclusive and semi-inclusive rapidity distributions of π+-mesons in K-p interactions at 32 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumazhnov, V.A.; Babintsev, V.V.; Bogolyubskij, M.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    The inclusive and semiinclusive invariant differential cross sections of pair π +- mesons for different charged states in K - p-interactions at 32 GeV/c a K - p-interactions at 32 GeV/c are presented as functions of rapidity. Inclusive and semiinclusive pΩduction cross sections of pai pair π +- mesons are determined. The obtained experimental distributions are compared with predictions of quark recombination model

  2. Study of Topological Distributions of Inclusive Three- and Four-jet Events at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ruchi; CMS Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    A study of inclusive topological distributions of three- and four-jet events has been conducted by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1 at a centre of mass energy of 7 TeV. Kinematic and angular distributions in inclusive multijet final states serve as a natural probe of quantum chromodynamics and can reveal its inner dynamics. Comparisons are carried out with the data and predictions of leading order calculations and parton shower generators. The compared data results are corrected for detector effects and can be directly compared with other models or next-to-leading order theoretical predictions.

  3. Effectiveness of Shot Peening In Suppressing Fatigue Cracking At Non-Metallic Inclusions In Udimet(Registered Trademark)720

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Robert L.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter T.; Prescenzi, Anthony; Biles, T.; Bonacuse, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    The fatigue lives of modern powder metallurgy disk alloys can be reduced over an order of magnitude by cracking at inherent non-metallic inclusions. The objective of this work was to study the effectiveness of shot peening in suppressing LCF crack initiation and growth at surface nonmetallic inclusions. Inclusions were carefully introduced at elevated levels during powder metallurgy processing of the nickel-base disk superalloy Udimet 720. Multiple strain-controlled fatigue tests were then performed on machined specimens with and without shot peened test sections at 427 C and 650 C. The low cycle fatigue lives and failure initiation sites varied as functions of inclusion content, shot peening, and fatigue conditions. A large majority of the failures in as-machined specimens with the introduced inclusions occurred at cracks initiating from inclusions intersecting the specimen surface. These inclusions reduced fatigue life by up to 100X, when compared to lives of material without inclusions residing at specimen surface. Large inclusions produced the greatest reductions in life for tests at low strain ranges and high strain ratios. Shot peening improved life in many cases by reducing the most severe effects of inclusions.

  4. The assessment of non-metallic inclusions in steels and nickel alloys for ultra high vacuum applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meriguet, P.J.-L.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of non-metallic inclusions in steels and nickel alloys may create leak-paths under Ultra High Vacuum conditions. This paper shows the application of the ASTM E45 standard to the assessment of these inclusions and gives some design recommendations. Three case-histories encountered at the Joint European Torus Joint Undertaking and a possible explanation of the phenomenon are also presented. (Author)

  5. Polarised quark distributions in the nucleon from semi-inclusive spin asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; Arik, E; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Birsa, R; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, S; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kukhtin, V V; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Rijllart, A; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Roscherr, B; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1998-01-01

    We present a measurement of semi-inclusive spin asymmetries for positively and negatively charged hadrons from deep inelastic scattering of polarised muons on polarised protons and deuterons in the range $0.003$1~GeV$^2$. Compared to our previous publication on this subject, with the new data the statistical errors have been reduced by nearly a factor of two. From these asymmetries and our inclusive spin asymmetries we determine the polarised quark distributions of valence quarks and non-strange sea quarks at $Q^2$=10~GeV$^2$. The polarised $u$ valence quark distribution, $\\Delta u_v(x)$, is positive and the polarisation increases with $x$. The polarised $d$ valence quark distribution, $\\Delta d_v(x)$, is negative and the non-strange sea distribution, $\\Delta \\bar q(x)$, is consistent with zero over the measured range of $x$. We find for the first moments $\\int_0^1 \\Delta u_v(x) {\\rm d}x = 0.77 \\pm 0.10 \\pm 0.08$, $\\int_0^1 \\Delta d_v(x) {\\rm d}x = -0.52 \\pm 0.14 \\pm 0.09$ and $\\int_0^1 \\Delta \\bar q(x) {\\rm ...

  6. Inclusion Characteristics and Acicular Ferrite Nucleation in Ti-Containing Weld Metals of X80 Pipeline Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingxin; Liu, Xianghua; Wang, Guodong

    2018-06-01

    X80 steel weld metals with Ti contents of 0.003 to 0.13 pct were prepared by the single-pass submerged-arc welding process. The effects of Ti content in weld metals on the constituent phases of inclusions and chemical compositions of the constituent phases, as well as the potency of acicular ferrite (AF) nucleation on the inclusions were investigated. Moreover, the crystallographic orientation relationship between the AF and inclusion was examined. The results show that with an increase in Ti content, the primary constituent phases of the inclusions change from the (Mn-Al-Si-O) compound to a mixture of spinel and pseudobrookite solid solutions, and eventually to pseudobrookite. The spinel solid solution is characterized by the MnTi2O4 constituent. Compared to pseudobrookite, spinel has a lower Ti concentration, but a significantly higher Mn content. In the case of the presence of a considerable amount of spinel, the Mn element is enriched strongly in the inclusions, resulting in the development of a Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) in the matrix around the inclusions, which enhances the driving force for AF formation. AF shows the Baker-Nutting orientation relationship with MnTi2O4. The formation of MDZ and the presence of the Baker-Nutting orientation relationship promote the ability of inclusions to nucleate the intragranular AF.

  7. Inclusive transverse momentum distributions of charged particles in diffractive and non-diffractive photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-03-01

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in photoproduction events in the laboratory pseudorapidity range -1.2 T =8 GeV using the ZEUS detector. Diffractive and non-diffractive reactions have been selected with an average γp centre of mass (c.m.) energy of =180 GeV. For diffractive reactions, the p T spectra of the photon dissociation events have been measured in two intervals of the dissociated photon mass with mean values X >=5 GeV and 10 GeV. The inclusive transverse momentum spectra fall exponentially in the low p T region. The non-diffractive data show a pronounced high p T tail departing from the exponential shape. The p T distributions are compared to lower energy photoproduction data and to hadron-hadron collisions at a similar c.m. energy. The data are also compared to the results of a next-to-leading order QCD calculation. (orig.)

  8. Imaged brine inclusions in young sea ice—Shape, distribution and formation timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galley, R.J.; Else, B.G.T.; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Liquid inclusions in sea ice are variable and dependent on the myriad of physical conditions of the atmosphere– sea ice environment in which the sea ice was grown, and whether or not melting processes affected the sea ice. In that light, there exist relatively few observations and resultant quant...... in the context of the environment in which it grew. Finally, we show that a vertical brine volume distribution profile can be calculated using MR image data, extend- ing the (non-imaging) nuclear magnetic resonance work of others in this vein....

  9. Distribution of heavy metals in Tamshui mangrove forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, C Y; Chou, C H

    1990-06-01

    Tamsui estuary area is one of the few places in Taiwan where mangrove is still growing. Heavy metals, carried by the water of the Tamsui river, are accumulated in the estuary soil. Most heavy metals in soil, however, are immobile under reducing conditions and are fixed in the large amount of organic matter present. Heavy metals are distributed at different concentrations in various tissues of Kandelia candel as well as grasses of Phragmites communis, Imperata cylindrica, and Cyperus malaccensis growing in the swamp area. The concentration of heavy metals was significantly higher root than in stems and leaves. The absorption of heavy metals by the plants was less in soil that was frequently submerged. Kandelia candel seems to have no special tolerance to copper and zinc. The soil environment which favors reduced availability of heavy metals may help Kandelia candel adapt to growth in the polluted estuary.

  10. The abundance and distribution of uranium in some oceanic, continental ultramafic inclusions and host basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, E.I.

    1975-01-01

    The abundance and distribution of uranium in various continental and oceanic ultramafic inclusions and host basalts are reported. Uranium was determined by neutron activation (fission products, fission tracks and delayed-neutron methods) and alpha-particle autoradiography; data is also reported for the uranium content of various USGS standard rock powders. The concentration of uranium in both oceanic and continental samples is similar, levels are controlled by mineral compositions and their relative abundance in different rock types. Highest levels are found in feldspathic and lowest in olivine-rich inclusions. Uranium is enriched in mylonitised samples and along some inter-crystal boundaries. With the exception of some apatites, highest levels of uranium are in clinopyroxenes (chrome) and lowest in olivines; no enrichment of uranium in orthopyroxenes was observed. Attention is drawn to the problem of obtaining representative samples from the sea floor which have not been altered by saline solutions and the identification of uranium and daughter products present along inter-crystal boundaries. Differences in observed heat flow between continental and oceanic areas may reflect inadequate sampling of representative rock types present below the sea floor and lack of information for the true abundance and distribution of uranium in such rocks

  11. Inclusive charged particle distributions in deep inelastic scattering events at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-11-01

    A measurement of inclusive charged particle distributions in deep inelastic ep scattering for γ * p centre-of-mass energies 75 2 2 from the ZEUS detector at HERA is presented. The differential charged particle rates in the γ*p centre-of-mass system as a function of the scaled longitudinal momentum, x F , and of the transverse momentum, p* t and t 2 >, as a function of x F , W and Q 2 are given. Separate distributions are shown for events with (LRG) and without (NRG) a rapidity gap with respect to the proton direction. The data are compared with results from experiments at lower beam energies, with the naive quark parton model and with parton models including perturbative QCD corrections. The comparison shows the importance of the higher order QCD processes. Significant differences of the inclusive charged particle rates between NRG and LRG events at the same W are observed. The value of t 2 > for LRG events with a hadronic mass M X , which excludes the forward produced baryonic system, is similar to the t 2 > value observed in fixed target experiments at W∼M X . (orig.)

  12. The oxidative corrosion of carbide inclusions at the surface of uranium metal during exposure to water vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, T.B.; Petherbridge, J.R.; Harker, N.J.; Ball, R.J.; Heard, P.J.; Glascott, J.; Allen, G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → High resolution imagery (FIB, SEM and SIMS) of carbide inclusions in uranium metal. → Real time images following the reaction of the carbide inclusions with water vapour. → Shown preferential consumption of carbide over that of the bulk metal. → Quantity of impurities in the metal therefore seriously influence reaction rate. → Metal purity must be considered when storing uranium in air or moist conditions. - Abstract: The reaction between uranium and water vapour has been well investigated, however discrepancies exist between the described kinetic laws, pressure dependence of the reaction rate constant and activation energies. Here this problem is looked at by examining the influence of impurities in the form of carbide inclusions on the reaction. Samples of uranium containing 600 ppm carbon were analysed during and after exposure to water vapour at 19 mbar pressure, in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) system. After water exposure, samples were analysed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), focused ion beam (FIB) imaging and sectioning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD). The results of the current study indicate that carbide particles on the surface of uranium readily react with water vapour to form voluminous UO 3 .xH 2 O growths at rates significantly faster than that of the metal. The observation may also have implications for previous experimental studies of uranium-water interactions, where the presence of differing levels of undetected carbide may partly account for the discrepancies observed between datasets.

  13. Effect of non-metallic inclusions on hydrogen-induced cracking of API5L X100 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, T.Y.; Liu, Z.Y.; Cheng, Y.F. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    In this work, the type, composition and distribution of inclusions contained in an API5L X100 steel were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. A hydrogen-charging at various current densities was used to introduce hydrogen into the steel, and the correlation between HIC and the inclusions was established. The microstructure of the steel consists of a leather-like bainitic ferrite matrix, with martensite/austenite as the second phase particles. At least four types of inclusions are contained in API5L X100 steel, elongated MnS inclusions and spherical Al-, Si- and Ca-Al-O-S-enriched inclusions. In particular, the majority of inclusions in the steel are Al-enriched. Upon hydrogen-charging, hydrogen blisters and HIC could be caused in the steel in the absence of external stress. The cracks are primarily associated with the Al- and Si-enriched inclusions, rather than the elongated MnS inclusion. The critical amount of hydrogen resulting in HIC of the tested API5L X100 steel is determined to be 3.24 ppm under condition in this work. (author)

  14. The final inclusive and semi-inclusive longitudinal double-spin asymmetries at HERMES. Extraction of quark helicity distributions of the nucleon from deep-inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchenko, Polina

    2010-10-15

    The thesis focuses on two aspects of the HERMES data analysis: the measurement of the semi-inclusive double spin asymmetries and the extraction of quark helicity distributions and quark polarizations of the nucleon from deep-inelastic scattering, as a possible interpretation of the HERMES data. The asymmetries are presented using all possible and accessible information about the HERMES data, including the latest systematic studies provided during the last years by HERMES collaboration. (orig.)

  15. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Alister J; Sandison, Ann; Quinn, Paul; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Sampson, Barry; Atkinson, Kirk D; Skinner, John A; Goode, Angela; Powell, Jonathan J

    2009-01-01

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  16. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Alister J [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Sandison, Ann [Department of Histopathology, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Quinn, Paul; Mosselmans, J Frederick W [Science Division, Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Sampson, Barry [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Atkinson, Kirk D [8 Nuclear Department Defence Academy College of Management and Technology HMS Sultan Military Road Gosport PO12 3BY (United Kingdom); Skinner, John A [Department of Orthopaedics, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Goode, Angela [Dept of Materials, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Powell, Jonathan J, E-mail: Paul.Quinn@diamond.ac.u [Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research Centre, Cambridge CB1 9NL (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  17. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  18. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes 129 Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of 129 Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, 129 Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature

  19. Structural, mechanical and corrosion studies of Cr-rich inclusions in 152 cladding of dissimilar metal weld joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifeng; Wang, Jianqiu; Han, En-Hou; Yang, Chengdong

    2018-01-01

    Cr-rich inclusions were discovered in 152 cladding at the inner wall of domestic dissimilar metal weld joint, and their morphologies, microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors were systematically characterized by SEM, TEM, nanoindentation and FIB. The results indicate that the Cr-rich inclusions originate from large-size Cr particles in 152 welding electrode flux, and they are 50-150 μm in size in most cases, and there is a continuous transition zone of 2-5 μm in width between the Cr inclusion core and 152 cladding matrix, and the transition zone consists of Ni & Fe-rich dendritic austenite and Cr23C6 and Cr matrix. The transition zone has the highest nanoindentation hardness (7.66 GPa), which is much harder than the inclusion core (5.14 GPa) and 152 cladding (3.71 GPa). In-situ microscopic tensile tests show that cracks initialize preferentially in transition zone, and then propagate into the inclusion core, and creep further into 152 cladding after penetrating the core area. The inclusion core and its transition zone both share similar oxide film structure with nickel-base 152 cladding matrix in simulated primary water, while those two parts present better general corrosion resistance than 152 cladding matrix due to higher Cr concentration.

  20. Determination of Three-Dimensional Morphology and Inner Structure of Second-Phase Inclusions in Metals by Non-Aqueous Solution Electrolytic and Room Temperature Organic Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Guo; Keming Fang; Hanjie Guo; Yiwa Luo; Shengchao Duan; Xiao Shi; Wensheng Yang

    2018-01-01

    The secondary-phase particles in metals, particularly those composed of non-metallic materials, are often detrimental to the mechanical properties of metals; thus, it is crucial to control inclusion formation and growth. One of the challenges is determining the three-dimensional morphology and inner structures of such inclusions. In this study, a non-aqueous solution electrolytic method and a room-temperature organic technique were developed based on the principle of electrochemistry to deter...

  1. Characteristics and Modification of Non-metallic Inclusions in Titanium-Stabilized AISI 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Dirk; Garbers-Craig, Andrie

    2017-06-01

    This study describes an investigation into the improvement of castability, final surface quality and formability of titanium-stabilized AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel on an industrial scale. Non-metallic inclusions found in this industrially produced stainless steel were first characterized using SEM-EDS analyses through the INCA-Steel software platform. Inclusions were found to consist of a MgO·Al2O3 spinel core, which acted as heterogeneous nucleation site for titanium solubility products. Plant-scale experiments were conducted to either prevent the formation of spinel, or to modify it by calcium treatment. Modification to spherical dual-phase spinel-liquid matrix inclusions was achieved with calcium addition, which eliminated submerged entry nozzle clogging for this grade. Complete modification to homogeneous liquid calcium aluminates was achieved at high levels of dissolved aluminum. A mechanism was suggested to explain the extent of modification achieved.

  2. Extraction of partonic transverse momentum distributions from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and Drell-Yan data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, Cristian [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pavia; INFN, Sezione di Pavia Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, Italy; Bacchetta, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pavia; INFN, Sezione di Pavia Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, Italy; Delcarro, Filippo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pavia; INFN, Sezione di Pavia Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, Italy; Radici, Marco [INFN, Sezione di Pavia Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, Italy; Signori, Andrea [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-04-01

    We present a first attempt at a global fit of unpolarized quark transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions from available data on semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan and $Z$ boson production processes. This analysis is performed in the low transverse momentum region, at leading order in perturbative QCD and with the inclusion of energy scale evolution effects at the next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy.

  3. Hyperfine field distribution of Fe83B17 glassy metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglierini, M.; Sitek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Convolutions of Gaussian and Lorentzian lines are proposed to fit the Moessbauer spectrum of Fe 83 B 17 metallic glass. The hyperfine field distribution is constructed from three Gaussian lines corresponding to the individual line pairs. (author). 1 fig., 7 refs

  4. AES and SIMS analysis of non-metallic inclusions in a low-carbon chromium-steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammer, Katharina; Rosner, M; Poeckl, G; Hutter, H

    2003-05-01

    In the final step of secondary metallurgical steel processing, calcium is added. Besides Mg, Ca is the most powerful deoxidiser and desulfurisation agent. It reacts with dissolved oxygen and sulfur and reduces oxides and sulfides thereby forming non-metallic inclusions. Within this paper we present the analysis of such inclusions in a low-carbon chromium-steel. Depending on the time of quenching of the steel sample, different structures were revealed by REM, Auger and SIMS: If the steel was quenched immediately after Ca-addition, non-metallic inclusions that appeared to have "cavities" could be detected with SEM. SIMS investigations of these particles showed ring-shaped structures and revealed that the ring is made up of Al, Ca, Mg, O and S. No secondary ions however could be retrieved from the core inside the ring, thus leaving the nature of the "cavities" unclear. If the steel sample was quenched 3 min after Ca addition, inclusions did not have a ring-shaped structure but a compact one.

  5. Origin and spatial distribution of metals in agricultural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadpour, Gh.A.; Karbassi, A.R.; Baghvand, A.

    2016-01-01

    Presence of toxic metals in agricultural soils can impose adverse health impact on consumers. The main purpose of this study was to determine spatial distribution of elements Fe, Sb, Mn in agriculture soils and crops of Hamedan Province in Iran. Soil samples (0-20 cm depth) were collected from an area of 2831 km 2 . Iron, Antimony and Manganese in samples of soil and agricultural crops were extracted and their amount was determined using atomic absorption spectrometer. The spatial distribution map of the studied elements was developed using Kriging method. The main concentration of Fe, Sb and Mn in the soil of the study area is about 3.8%, 2.5 and 403 mg/kg, respectively. According to chemical partitioning studies, the anthropogenic share of Fe, Sb and Mn is about 28.51%, 34.83% and 30.35%, respectively. Results of comparison of heavy metals pollution intensity in the agricultural soil with geoaccumulation index and also pollution index, illustrated that iron and manganese are classified in the Non-polluted class and antimony is in the moderately polluted class. Analysis of zoning map of pollution index showed that Fe, Sb and Mn are of geological sources. In fact, these metals are naturally found in soil. However, anthropogenic activities have led to more accumulation of these metals in the soil. The obtained health risk for metals in agricultural crops is indicative of safe value for consumers.

  6. Distribution of heavy metals from flue gas in algal bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napan, Katerine

    Flue gas from coal-fired power plants is a major source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Microalgae can use this enriched form of CO2 as carbon source and in turn the biomass can be used to produce food, feed, fertilizer and biofuels. However, along with CO2, coal-based flue gas will inevitably introduce heavy metals, which have a high affinity to bind algal cells, could be toxic to the organisms and if transferred to the products could limit their uses. This study seeks to address the distribution and impact of heavy metals present in flue gas on microalgae production systems. To comprehend its effects, algae Scenedesmus obliquus was grown in batch reactors in a multimetal system. Ten heavy metals (Cu, Co, Zn, Pb, As, Se, Cr, Hg, Ni and Cd) were selected and were evaluated at four concentrations (1X, 2X, 5X and 10X). Results show that most heavy metals accumulated mainly in biomass and were found in very low concentrations in media. Hg was shown to be lost from the culture, with low amounts present in the biomass. An upper limit for As uptake was observed, suggesting its likelihood to build-up in the system during medium recycle. The As limited bioaccumulation was overcome by addition of sulfur to the algal medium. Heavy metal at 2X, 5X and 10X inhibited both growth and lipid production, while at the reference concentration both biomass and lipids yields were increased. Heavy metal concentrations in the medium and biomass were time dependent, and at the end of the cultivation most heavy metals in the supernatant solution complied with the recommendations for irrigation water, while biomass was below limits for cattle and poultry feed, fertilizer, plastic and paper. This research shows that bioremediation of CO2 and heavy metals in combination with energy production can be integrated, which is an environmentally friendly form of biotechnology.

  7. Determination for the Entrapment Criterion of Non-metallic Inclusions by the Solidification Front During Steel Centrifugal Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, the three-dimensional fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification in steel centrifugal continuous casting strands were simulated. The volume of fluid model was used to solve the multiphase phenomena between the molten steel and the air. The entrapment and final distribution of inclusions in the solidified shell were studied with the discussion on the effect of rotation behavior of the caster system. Main results indicate that after applying the rotation of the shell, the fluid flow transformed from a recirculation flow to a rotation flow in the mold region and was driven to flow around in the casting direction. As the distance below the meniscus increased, the distribution of the tangential speed of the flow and the centrifugal force along one diameter of the strand became symmetrical gradually. The jet flow from the nozzle hardly impinged on the same location on the shell due to the rotation of the shell during solidification. Thus, the shell thickness on the same height was uniform around, and the thinning shell and a hot spot on the surface of shell were avoided. Both of the measurement and the calculation about the distribution of oxide inclusions along the radial direction indicated the number of inclusions at the side and the center was more than that at the quarter on the cross section of billet. With a larger diameter, inclusions tended to be entrapped toward the center area of the billet.

  8. Model of bidirectional reflectance distribution function for metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kai; Zhu Jing-Ping; Liu Hong; Hou Xun

    2016-01-01

    Based on the three-component assumption that the reflection is divided into specular reflection, directional diffuse reflection, and ideal diffuse reflection, a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model of metallic materials is presented. Compared with the two-component assumption that the reflection is composed of specular reflection and diffuse reflection, the three-component assumption divides the diffuse reflection into directional diffuse and ideal diffuse reflection. This model effectively resolves the problem that constant diffuse reflection leads to considerable error for metallic materials. Simulation and measurement results validate that this three-component BRDF model can improve the modeling accuracy significantly and describe the reflection properties in the hemisphere space precisely for the metallic materials. (paper)

  9. Model of bidirectional reflectance distribution function for metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Zhu, Jing-Ping; Liu, Hong; Hou, Xun

    2016-09-01

    Based on the three-component assumption that the reflection is divided into specular reflection, directional diffuse reflection, and ideal diffuse reflection, a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model of metallic materials is presented. Compared with the two-component assumption that the reflection is composed of specular reflection and diffuse reflection, the three-component assumption divides the diffuse reflection into directional diffuse and ideal diffuse reflection. This model effectively resolves the problem that constant diffuse reflection leads to considerable error for metallic materials. Simulation and measurement results validate that this three-component BRDF model can improve the modeling accuracy significantly and describe the reflection properties in the hemisphere space precisely for the metallic materials.

  10. Evolution of Non-metallic Inclusions and Precipitates in Oriented Silicon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan; Yang, Wen; Ren, Qiang; Hu, Zhiyuan; Li, Ming; Zhang, Lifeng

    2018-06-01

    The evolution of inclusions in oriented silicon steel during the manufacturing process was carried out by chemical composition analysis, non-aqueous electrolytic corrosion, and thermodynamic calculation. The morphology, composition, and size of inclusions were analyzed introducing field emission scanning electron microscope. The oxides were mainly formed during the secondary refining, and the nitrides, sulfides, and compounds were formed during the solidification and cooling of steel in the processes of continuous casting and hot rolling.

  11. Boosted top production: factorization and resummation for single-particle inclusive distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferroglia, Andrea; Marzani, Simone; Pecjak, Ben D.; Yang, Li Lin

    2014-01-01

    We study single-particle inclusive (1PI) distributions in top-quark pair production at hadron colliders, working in the highly boosted regime where the top-quark p T is much larger than its mass. In particular, we derive a novel factorization formula valid in the small-mass and soft limits of the differential partonic cross section. This provides a framework for the simultaneous resummation of soft gluon corrections and small-mass logarithms, and also an efficient means of obtaining higher-order corrections to the differential cross section in this limit. The result involves five distinct one-scale functions, three of which arise through the subfactorization of soft real radiation in the small-mass limit. We list the NNLO corrections to each of these functions, building on results in the literature by performing a new calculation of a soft function involving four light-like Wilson lines to this order. We thus obtain a nearly complete description of the small-mass limit of the differential partonic cross section at NNLO near threshold, missing only terms involving closed top-quark loops in the virtual corrections

  12. Nonequilibrium approach regarding metals from a linearised kappa distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech-Garret, J. L.

    2017-10-01

    The widely used kappa distribution functions develop high-energy tails through an adjustable kappa parameter. The aim of this work is to show that such a parameter can itself be regarded as a function, which entangles information about the sources of disequilibrium. We first derive and analyse an expanded Fermi-Dirac kappa distribution. Later, we use this expanded form to obtain an explicit analytical expression for the kappa parameter of a heated metal on which an external electric field is applied. We show that such a kappa index causes departures from equilibrium depending on the physical magnitudes. Finally, we study the role of temperature and electric field on such a parameter, which characterises the electron population of a metal out of equilibrium.

  13. Non-Metallic Inclusions and Hot-Working Behaviour of Advanced High-Strength Medium-Mn Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajcar A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The work addresses the production of medium-Mn steels with an increased Al content. The special attention is focused on the identification of non-metallic inclusions and their modification using rare earth elements. The conditions of the thermomechanical treatment using the metallurgical Gleeble simulator and the semi-industrial hot rolling line were designed for steels containing 3 and 5% Mn. Hot-working conditions and controlled cooling strategies with the isothermal holding of steel at 400°C were selected. The effect of Mn content on the hot-working behaviour and microstructure of steel was addressed. The force-energetic parameters of hot rolling were determined. The identification of structural constituents was performed using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy methods. The addition of rare earth elements led to the total modification of non-metallic inclusions, i.e., they replaced Mn and Al forming complex oxysulphides. The Mn content in a range between 3 and 5% does not affect the inclusion type and the hot-working behaviour. In contrast, it was found that Mn has a significant effect on a microstructure.

  14. Separation of Non-metallic Inclusions from a Fe-Al-O Melt Using a Super-Gravity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gaoyang; Song, Bo; Guo, Zhancheng; Yang, Yuhou; Song, Mingming

    2018-02-01

    An innovative method for separating non-metallic inclusions from a high temperature melt using super gravity was systematically investigated. To explore the separation behavior of inclusion particles with densities less than that of metal liquid under a super-gravity field, a Fe-Al-O melt containing Al2O3 particles was treated with different gravity coefficients. Al2O3 particles migrated rapidly towards the reverse direction of the super gravity and gathered in the upper region of the sample. It was hard to find any inclusion particles with sizes greater than 2 μm in the middle and bottom areas. Additionally, the oxygen content in the middle region of the sample could be reduced to 0.0022 mass pct and the maximum removal rate of the oxygen content reached 61.4 pct. The convection in the melt along the direction of the super gravity was not generated by the super-gravity field, and the fluid velocity in the molten melt consisted only of the rotating tangential velocity. Moreover, the motion behavior of the Al2O3 particles was approximatively determined by Stokes' law along the direction of super gravity.

  15. The Effect of Cooling Conditions on the Evolution of Non-metallic Inclusions in High Manganese TWIP Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Nan; Yang, Jian; Xin, Xiu-Ling; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Xu, Long-Yun

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the effect of cooling conditions on the evolution of non-metallic inclusions in high manganese TWIP steels was investigated based on experiments and thermodynamic calculations. In addition, the formation and growth behavior of AlN inclusions during solidification under different cooling conditions were analyzed with the help of thermodynamics and dynamics. The inclusions formed in the high manganese TWIP steels are classified into nine types: (1) AlN; (2) MgO; (3) CaS; (4) MgAl2O4; (5) AlN + MgO; (6) MgO + MgS; (7) MgO + MgS + CaS; (8) MgO + CaS; (9) MgAl2O4 + MgS. With the increase in the cooling rate, the volume fraction and area ratio of inclusions are almost constant; the size of inclusions decreases and the number density of inclusions increases in the steels. The thermodynamic results of inclusion types calculated with FactSage are consistent with the observed results. With increasing cooling rate, the diameter of AlN decreases. When the cooling rate increases from 0.75 to 4.83 K s-1, the measured average diameter of AlN decreases from 4.49 to 2.42 μm. Under the high cooling rate of 4.83 K s-1, the calculated diameter of AlN reaches 3.59 μm at the end of solidification. However, the calculated diameter of AlN increases to approximately 5.93 μm at the end of solidification under the low cooling rate of 0.75 K s-1. The calculated diameter of AlN decreases with increasing cooling rate. The theoretical calculation results of the change in diameter of AlN under the different cooling rates have the same trend with the observed results. The existences of inclusions in the steels, especially AlN which average sizes are 2.42 and 4.49 μm, respectively, are not considered to have obvious influences on the hot ductility.

  16. Determination of Three-Dimensional Morphology and Inner Structure of Second-Phase Inclusions in Metals by Non-Aqueous Solution Electrolytic and Room Temperature Organic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The secondary-phase particles in metals, particularly those composed of non-metallic materials, are often detrimental to the mechanical properties of metals; thus, it is crucial to control inclusion formation and growth. One of the challenges is determining the three-dimensional morphology and inner structures of such inclusions. In this study, a non-aqueous solution electrolytic method and a room-temperature organic technique were developed based on the principle of electrochemistry to determine the three-dimensional morphologies and inner structures of non-metallic inclusions in Al-killed steel, Si-killed steel, and ductile cast iron. The inclusions were first extracted without any damage to the inclusions, and then the collected inclusions were wrapped and cut through Cu ion deposition. The results revealed that the inclusions in Al-killed steel had an irregular morphology, that those in the Si-killed steel were mainly spherical, and that almost all the spheroidal graphite in the ductile cast iron featured a uniform globular morphology. In addition, nucleation was not observed in the inner structures of the inclusions in the Al-killed steel, while some dendritic or rod-like MnS phase precipitates appeared on the silicate inclusion surfaces, and some silicate-rich phases were detected in their inner matrix. For spheroidal graphite, rare-earth oxides (one particle or more were observed as nuclei in the center of almost every graphite particle. The formation and evolution of inclusions in these types of metals can be better understood by means of the two developed methods.

  17. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF FOUR LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Saha, Abhijit [NOAO, 950 Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J., E-mail: rosst@nmsu.edu, E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu, E-mail: bjat@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color–color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color–color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%–50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution.

  18. Impact of spherical inclusion mean chord length and radius distribution on three-dimensional binary stochastic medium particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brantley, Patrick S.; Martos, Jenny N.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a parallel benchmark procedure and numerical results for a three-dimensional binary stochastic medium particle transport benchmark problem. The binary stochastic medium is composed of optically thick spherical inclusions distributed in an optically thin background matrix material. We investigate three sphere mean chord lengths, three distributions for the sphere radii (constant, uniform, and exponential), and six sphere volume fractions ranging from 0.05 to 0.3. For each sampled independent material realization, we solve the associated transport problem using the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code. We compare the ensemble-averaged benchmark fiducial tallies of reflection from and transmission through the spatial domain as well as absorption in the spherical inclusion and background matrix materials. For the parameter values investigated, we find a significant dependence of the ensemble-averaged fiducial tallies on both sphere mean chord length and sphere volume fraction, with the most dramatic variation occurring for the transmission through the spatial domain. We find a weaker dependence of most benchmark tally quantities on the distribution describing the sphere radii, provided the sphere mean chord length used is the same in the different distributions. The exponential distribution produces larger differences from the constant distribution than the uniform distribution produces. The transmission through the spatial domain does exhibit a significant variation when an exponential radius distribution is used. (author)

  19. Cleanliness distribution of high-carbon chromium bearing steel billets and growth behavior of inclusions during solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, C.; Bao, Y.; Lin, L.

    2017-01-01

    Variation of cleanliness and distribution of inclusions in thickness and width direction of highcarbon chromium bearing steel billets has been studied using total oxygen and nitrogen analysis and SEM/EDS, and the growth behavior of inclusions during solidification was studied with the help of solidification model. The region wit h relatively high total oxygen contents in the cross profile of billets is between inner arc side 3/16 and outer arc side 1/4; between left edge side 5/16 and right edge side 5/16. The formation sequence of inclusions is MgO-Al2O3 > TiN > MnS. MnS could wrap MgO-Al2O3 and reduces the damage to steel matrix caused by the latter, but generally could not effectively wrap TiN. Besides, TiN could wrap MgO-Al2O3 before MnS, which would weaken the protective capacity of MnS. Moreover, compared with MgO-Al2O3 inclusions, the sizes of TiN inclusions are generally larger. Thus the control of TiN inclusions should be strengthened. In hickness direction, the maximum size regions of TiN and MnS inclusions are inner arc side 1/3 and outer arc side 1/3; in width direction, the regions are edge side 1/3. During bearing processing, these regions and the regions with high total oxygen content should be avoided. [es

  20. Compression behavior of cellular metals with inhomogeneous mass distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroughi, B.

    2001-05-01

    Mechanical behavior of two types of closed cell metals (ALULIGHT and ALPORAS) is investigated experimentally and numerically. Compressive tests performed on prismatic specimens indicate that inhomogeneities in the mass density distribution are a key factor in the deformation behavior of cellular metals. The three dimensional cellular structure of the investigated specimens is recorded using x-ray medical computed tomography (CT). A special procedure called density mapping method has been used to transfer the recorded CT data into a continuum by averaging over a certain domain (averaging domain). This continuum model is implemented using finite elements to study the effect of variations in local mass densities. The finite element model is performed by a simple regular discretization of a specimen's volume with elements which have constant edge length. Mechanical properties derived from compression tests of ALPORAS samples are assigned to the corresponding mesoscopic density value of each element. The effect of averaging domain size is studied to obtain a suitable dimension which fulfils the homogenization requirements and allows the evaluation of inhomogenities in the specimens. The formation and propagation of deformation band(s) and stress-strain responses of tested cellular metals are modeled with respect to their mass distribution. It is shown that the inhomogeneous density distribution leads to plastic strain localization and causes a monotonically increase of the stress in the plateau regime although no hardening response was considered for homogeneous material in this regime. The simulated plastic strain localization and the calculated stress-strain responses are compared with the experimental results. The stiffness values of experiment and simulation agree very well for both cellular materials. The values of plateau strength as well, but it differs in some cases of ALULIGHT samples, where the hardening response can be predicted at least qualitatively

  1. Teachers' Perceptions of the Relationship between Inclusive Education and Distributed Leadership in Two Primary Schools in Slovakia and New South Wales (Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miškolci, Jozef; Armstrong, Derrick; Spandagou, Ilektra

    2016-01-01

    The academic literature on the practice of inclusive education presents diverse and at times contradictory perspectives in how it is connected to practices of distributed leadership. Depending on the approach, on the one hand, inclusive educational practice may enable distributed school leadership, while on the other hand, it may allow for…

  2. Distributions of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and halogens in cabbage leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Hirofumi; Takeda, Akira; Hasegawa, Hidenao

    2007-01-01

    The distributions of stable elements in plant components provide useful information for understanding the behavior of radionuclides in plants. An entire cabbage plant sample was collected from an experimental field, and the distributions of alkali metals (K, Rb and Cs), alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr and Ba) and halogens (Cl and I) were determined for cabbage leaves at different positions. The concentration of Cs in outer (older) cabbage leaves was higher than that in inner (younger) leaves, but the distributions of K and Rb concentrations were relatively similar in cabbage leaves, independent of leaf positions. The concentration of Sr in older cabbage leaves was one order of magnitude higher than that in younger leaves. The distributions of Ca, Ba and Sr concentrations in the plant followed a similar pattern. The concentrations of halogens were also very rich in the outer leaves. The percentage distributions of Cs, Sr, Cl and I in the inedible (extreme outer) leaves were 77, 91, 93 and 96% of the total content in the leaf part, respectively. These results show that the inedible plant components are important for understanding the transfer of the radioactive Cs, Sr Cl and I in soil-plant systems. (author)

  3. Enhancement of light absorption in polyazomethines due to plasmon excitation on randomly distributed metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, P.; Antosiewicz, T. J.; Stefaniuk, T.; Ciesielski, A.; Iwan, A.; Wronkowska, A. A.; Wronkowski, A.; Szoplik, T.

    2015-05-01

    In photovoltaic devices, metal nanoparticles embedded in a semiconductor layer allow the enhancement of solar-toelectric energy conversion efficiency due to enhanced light absorption via a prolonged optical path, enhanced electric fields near the metallic inclusions, direct injection of hot electrons, or local heating. Here we pursue the first two avenues. In the first, light scattered at an angle beyond the critical angle for reflection is coupled into the semiconductor layer and confined within such planar waveguide up to possible exciton generation. In the second, light is trapped by the excitation of localized surface plasmons on metal nanoparticles leading to enhanced near-field plasmon-exciton coupling at the peak of the plasmon resonance. We report on results of a numerical experiment on light absorption in polymer- (fullerene derivative) blends, using the 3D FDTD method, where exact optical parameters of the materials involved are taken from our recent measurements. In simulations we investigate light absorption in randomly distributed metal nanoparticles dispersed in polyazomethine-(fullerene derivative) blends, which serve as active layers in bulkheterojunction polymer solar cells. In the study Ag and Al nanoparticles of different diameters and fill factors are diffused in two air-stable aromatic polyazomethines with different chemical structures (abbreviated S9POF and S15POF) mixed with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) or [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM). The mixtures are spin coated on a 100 nm thick Al layer deposited on a fused silica substrate. Optical constants of the active layers are taken from spectroscopic ellipsometry and reflectance measurements using a rotating analyzer type ellipsometer with auto-retarder performed in the wavelength range from 225 nm to 2200 nm. The permittivities of Ag and Al particles of diameters from 20 to 60 nm are assumed to be equal to those measured on 100 to 200 nm thick metal films.

  4. Dose/volume–response relations for rectal morbidity using planned and simulated motion-inclusive dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thor, Maria; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O.; Karlsdóttir, Àsa; Moiseenko, Vitali; Liu, Mitchell; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many dose-limiting normal tissues in radiotherapy (RT) display considerable internal motion between fractions over a course of treatment, potentially reducing the appropriateness of using planned dose distributions to predict morbidity. Accounting explicitly for rectal motion could improve the predictive power of modelling rectal morbidity. To test this, we simulated the effect of motion in two cohorts. Materials and methods: The included patients (232 and 159 cases) received RT for prostate cancer to 70 and 74 Gy. Motion-inclusive dose distributions were introduced as simulations of random or systematic motion to the planned dose distributions. Six rectal morbidity endpoints were analysed. A probit model using the QUANTEC recommended parameters was also applied to the cohorts. Results: The differences in associations using the planned over the motion-inclusive dose distributions were modest. Statistically significant associations were obtained with four of the endpoints, mainly at high doses (55–70 Gy), using both the planned and the motion-inclusive dose distributions, primarily when simulating random motion. The strongest associations were observed for GI toxicity and rectal bleeding (Rs = 0.12–0.21; Rs = 0.11–0.20). Applying the probit model, significant associations were found for tenesmus and rectal bleeding (Rs = 0.13, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Equally strong associations with rectal morbidity were observed at high doses (>55 Gy), for the planned and the simulated dose distributions including in particular random rectal motion. Future studies should explore patient-specific descriptions of rectal motion to achieve improved predictive power

  5. Modelling chemical abundance distributions for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group: the impact of turbulent metal diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, Ivanna; Wetzel, Andrew; Kirby, Evan N.; Hopkins, Philip F.; Ma, Xiangcheng; Wheeler, Coral; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2018-02-01

    We investigate stellar metallicity distribution functions (MDFs), including Fe and α-element abundances, in dwarf galaxies from the Feedback in Realistic Environment (FIRE) project. We examine both isolated dwarf galaxies and those that are satellites of a Milky Way-mass galaxy. In particular, we study the effects of including a sub-grid turbulent model for the diffusion of metals in gas. Simulations that include diffusion have narrower MDFs and abundance ratio distributions, because diffusion drives individual gas and star particles towards the average metallicity. This effect provides significantly better agreement with observed abundance distributions in dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, including small intrinsic scatter in [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] of ≲0.1 dex. This small intrinsic scatter arises in our simulations because the interstellar medium in dwarf galaxies is well mixed at nearly all cosmic times, such that stars that form at a given time have similar abundances to ≲0.1 dex. Thus, most of the scatter in abundances at z = 0 arises from redshift evolution and not from instantaneous scatter in the ISM. We find similar MDF widths and intrinsic scatter for satellite and isolated dwarf galaxies, which suggests that environmental effects play a minor role compared with internal chemical evolution in our simulations. Overall, with the inclusion of metal diffusion, our simulations reproduce abundance distribution widths of observed low-mass galaxies, enabling detailed studies of chemical evolution in galaxy formation.

  6. Preparation of calcium oxalate-bromopyrogallol red inclusion sorbent and application to treatment of cationic dye and heavy metal wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Gao, Hong-Wen

    2009-05-01

    Dye pollutants are a major class of environmental contaminants. Over 100,000 dyes have been synthesized worldwide and more than 700,000 tons are produced annually and over 5% are discharged into aquatic environments. The adsorption or sorption is one of the most efficient methods to remove dye and heavy metal pollutants from wastewater. However, most of the present sorbents often bear some disadvantages, e.g. low sorption capacity, difficult separation of spoil, complex reproduction, or secondary pollution. Development of novel sorbents that can overcome these limitations is desirable. On the basis of the chemical coprecipitation of calcium oxalate (CaC(2)O(4)), bromopyrogallol red (BPR) was embedded during the growing of CaC(2)O(4) particles. The ternary C(2)O(4) (2-)-BPR-Ca(2+) sorbent was yielded by the centrifugation. Its composition was determined by spectrophotometry and AAS, and its structure and morphology were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser particle-size analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adsorption of ethyl violet (EV) and heavy metals, e.g. Cu(II), Cd(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II) were carried out and their removal rate determined by spectrophotometry and ICP-OES. The adsorption performance of the sorbent was compared with powder activated carbon. The Langmuir isothermal model was applied to fit the embedment of BPR and adsorption of EV. The saturation number of BPR binding to CaC(2)O(4) reached 0.0105 mol/mol and the adsorption constant of the complex was 4.70 x 10(5) M(-1). Over 80% of the sorbent particles are between 0.7 and 1.02 microm, formed by the aggregation of the global CaC(2)O(4)/BPR inclusion grains of 30-50 nm size. Such a material was found to adsorb cationic dyes selectively and sensitively. Ethyl violet (EV) was used to investigate the adsorption mechanism of the material. One BPR molecule may just bind with one EV molecule. The CaC(2)O(4)/BPR inclusion material adsorbed EV over two times more

  7. Formation and Chemical Development of Non-metallic Inclusions in Ladle Treatment of Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Beskow, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate theformation and chemical development of non-metallic inclusionsduring ladle treatment of steel. To begin with, an investigation of the deoxidation processand the impact of aluminium addition was carried out. For thispurpose, a new experimental setup was constructed. The setupallowed the examination of the deoxidation process as afunction of time by using a quenching technique. Preliminaryexperiments showed that homogeneous nucleation of alumin...

  8. Graphene inclusion controlling conductivity and gas sorption of metal-organic framework

    OpenAIRE

    Lamagni, Paolo; Pedersen, Birgitte Lodberg; Godiksen, Anita; Mossin, Susanne; Hu, Xin Ming; Pedersen, Steen Uttrup; Daasbjerg, Kim; Lock, Nina

    2018-01-01

    A general approach to prepare composite films of metal-organic frameworks and graphene has been developed. Films of copper(ii)-based HKUST-1 and HKUST-1/graphene composites were grown solvothermally on glassy carbon electrodes. The films were chemically tethered to the substrate by diazonium electrografting resulting in a large electrode coverage and good stability in solution for electrochemical studies. HKUST-1 has poor electrical conductivity, but we demonstrate that the addition of graphe...

  9. Metal-rich fluid inclusions provide new insights into unconformity-related U deposits (Athabasca Basin and Basement, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Antonin; Cathelineau, Michel; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Mercadier, Julien; Banks, David A.; Cuney, Michel

    2016-02-01

    -rich alteration. Finally, the metal concentrations in the NaCl-rich and CaCl2-rich brines are among the highest recorded compared to present-day sedimentary formation waters and fluid inclusions from basin-hosted base metal deposits (up to 600 ppm U, 3000 ppm Mn, 4000 ppm Zn, 6000 ppm Cu, 8000 ppm Pb, and 10,000 ppm Fe). The CaCl2-rich brine carries up to one order of magnitude more metal than the NaCl-rich brine. Though the exact origin of major cations and metals of the two brines remains uncertain, their contrasting compositions indicate that the two brines had distinct flow paths and fluid-rock interactions. Large-scale circulation of the brines in the Athabasca Basin and Basement was therefore a key parameter for metal mobility (including U) and formation of unconformity-related U deposits.

  10. Lithium inclusion in indium metal-organic frameworks showing increased surface area and hydrogen adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Bosch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of counterion exchange in two anionic In-Metal-Organic Frameworks (In-MOFs showed that partial replacement of disordered ammonium cations was achieved through the pre-synthetic addition of LiOH to the reaction mixture. This resulted in a surface area increase of over 1600% in {Li [In(1,3 − BDC2]}n and enhancement of the H2 uptake of approximately 275% at 80 000 Pa at 77 K. This method resulted in frameworks with permanent lithium content after repeated solvent exchange as confirmed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lithium counterion replacement appears to increase porosity after activation through replacement of bulkier, softer counterions and demonstrates tuning of pore size and properties in MOFs.

  11. Graphene inclusion controlling conductivity and gas sorption of metal-organic framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamagni, Paolo; Pedersen, Birgitte Lodberg; Godiksen, Anita

    2018-01-01

    A general approach to prepare composite films of metal-organic frameworks and graphene has been developed. Films of copper(ii)-based HKUST-1 and HKUST-1/graphene composites were grown solvothermally on glassy carbon electrodes. The films were chemically tethered to the substrate by diazonium...... electrografting resulting in a large electrode coverage and good stability in solution for electrochemical studies. HKUST-1 has poor electrical conductivity, but we demonstrate that the addition of graphene to HKUST-1 partially restores the electrochemical activity of the electrodes. The enhanced activity......, however, does not result in copper(ii) to copper(i) reduction in HKUST-1 at negative potentials. The materials were characterised in-depth: microscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction demonstrate uniform films of crystalline HKUST-1, and Raman spectroscopy reveals that graphene is homogeneously...

  12. Surface-Emitting Distributed Feedback Terahertz Quantum-Cascade Lasers in Metal-Metal Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sushil; Williams, Benjamin S.; Qin, Qi; Lee, Alan W. M.; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2007-01-01

    Single-mode surface-emitting distributed feedback terahertz quantumcascade lasers operating around 2.9 THz are developed in metal-metal waveguides. A combination of techniques including precise control of phase of reflection at the facets, and u e of metal on the sidewalls to eliminate higher-order lateral modes allow robust single-mode operation over a range of approximately 0.35 THz. Single-lobed far-field radiation pattern is obtained using a pi phase-shift in center of the second-order Bragg grating. A grating device operating at 2.93 THz lased up to 149 K in pulsed mode and a temperature tuning of 19 .7 GHz was observed from 5 K to 147 K. The same device lased up to 78 K in continuous-wave (cw) mode emitting more than 6 m W of cw power at 5 K. ln general, maximum temperature of pulsed operation for grating devices was within a few Kelvin of that of multi-mode Fabry-Perot ridge lasers

  13. Friction-Stir Welding - Heavy Inclusions in Bi-metallic welds of Al 2219/2195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Ward W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy Inclusions (HI) were detected for the first time by radiographic examination in aluminum alloy 2219forging/2195plate (advancing/retreating side) Friction Sir Welds (FSW) for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) Program. Radiographic HI indications appear as either small (approx.0.005"-0.025") individual particles or clusters of small particles. Initial work was performed to verify that the HI was not foreign material or caused by FSW pin tool debris. That and subsequent elemental analysis determined that the HI were large agglomerations of Al2Cu (theta phase), which is the strengthening precipitate in Al2219. A literature search on that subject determined that the agglomeration of phase has also been found in Al2219 bead on plate FSW [Ref. 1]. Since this was detected in ET space flight hardware, an investigative study of the effect of agglomerated theta phase particles in FSW Al2219f/2195p was performed. Numerous panels of various lengths were welded per ET weld procedures and radiographically inspected to determine if any HI was detected. Areas that had HI were sampled for room temperature and cyclic cryogenic (-423F) tensile testing and determined no significant adverse affect on mechanical properties when compared to test specimens without HI and historical data. Fracture surface examination using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) revealed smaller phase agglomerations undetectable by radiographic inspection dispersed throughout the Al2219f/2195p FSW. This indicates that phase agglomeration is inherent to the Al2219f/2195p FSW process and only rarely creates agglomerations large enough to be detected by radiography. HI has not been observed in FSW of plate to plate material for either Al2219 or AL2195.

  14. Autoradiographic techniques to determine noble metal distribution in automotive catalyst substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of noble metals in the ceramic substrates of automotive catalytic converter systems is important to the functional characteristics of the systems. A radiotracer technique involving microtomy of bead substrate samples and autoradiography using the resultant thin sections was developed to produce detailed images of the metal distributions. The method is particularly valuable to determine the distribution of one metal in the presence of another to aid in the development of more efficient systems

  15. heavy metals and cyanide distribution in the villages surrounding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    detection limit) were higher in the wells closest to the Tailing Storage Facility ... Key Words: Heavy metals pollution, Total cyanide, ground water pollution and ..... cyanide, heavy metals and probably other hazardous substances, leakage of.

  16. Numerical simulations of the metallicity distribution in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripamonti, E.; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Battaglia, G.; Abel, T.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Recent observations show that the number of stars with very low metallicities in the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way is low, despite the low average metallicities of stars in these systems. We undertake numerical simulations of star formation and metal enrichment of dwarf

  17. Wigner Distribution Functions as a Tool for Studying Gas Phase Alkali Metal Plus Noble Gas Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    WIGNER DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AS A TOOL FOR STUDYING GAS PHASE ALKALI METAL PLUS NOBLE GAS COLLISIONS THESIS Keith A. Wyman, Second Lieutenant, USAF...the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-14-M-39 WIGNER DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AS A TOOL FOR...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENP-14-M-39 WIGNER DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AS A TOOL FOR STUDYING GAS PHASE ALKALI METAL PLUS

  18. Spatial distribution of trace metals in sediments from urban streams of Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widianarko, B.; Verweij, R.A.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; van Straalen, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    Elevated environmental concentrations of metals are usually associated with the impact of urbanization. The present study is focused on metal contamination in urban sediments. A field survey was carried out to determine the distribution of four metals, i.e., cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), and

  19. Inclusive and semi-inclusive distributions of neutral strange particles produced in π-p interactions at 4.9; 7.5 and 40 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhmukhadze, S.V.; Kladnitskaya, E.N.; Popova, V. M.; Toneeva, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    Results on the investigation of inclusive and semi-inclusive distributions of Λ and K 0 particles, produced in π - p interactions at 4.9, 7.5 and 40 GeV/c are presen--ted. It is shown that the inclusive cross section for production of Ksup(0) mesons increases with the energy mainly in the central region, while the inclusive production of Λ hyperons increases in the fragmentation region of the target proton. The normalized structure fucntion PHIsub(x) for K 0 mesons does not achieve the scaling in the considered energy range, while the function PHIsub(x) for Λ hyperons has the scaling behaviour in a wide range of x, -0.5 < x (<=) 0.1 starting from 4.9 GeV/c

  20. Distributions and natural levels of related metals in a trophic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemons, J.D.

    1976-06-01

    The first objective was to test the hypothesis that metal distributions and trends in organisms are, in part, a function of metal positions in the periodic table in unpolluted ecosystems. The data have shown that large soil crustal abundance differences of related elements (e.g. alkali metals) are proportionately approximated in higher organisms. Concentration factors for related nutritious and nonessential and toxic metals were determined along a trophic pathway. When the concentration factors were reported as the concentration of a particular metal by itself, all metal concentrations increased along the trophic pathway. The second objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that distributions and natural levels of chemically related nonessential and toxic metals can better be known when the metals are reported as a ratio, in ash, of the nonessential or toxic metal to its chemically related nutritious metal (e.g. strontium/calcium) as the metals are transferred through trophic pathways. The data have shown that when this method of reporting metal abundances in trophic levels is used, nonessential and toxic metals are discriminated against, relative to their chemically related nutritious metal, as the metals are transferred through the trophic pathway levels. The third objective was designed to test the hypothesis that surface deposition of toxic metals upon plants influences the trends of metal abundances through trophic pathways. This study indicates that metal pollution in the form of deposition upon plant surfaces bypasses the discrimination mechanisms in plants, and consequently elevates the total body burden in herbivores. It is likely that there is no herbivore defense for this type of metal exposure, because herbivores have probably come to rely, in part, upon the discriminatory mechanism of plants throughout the course of evolutionary history to keep toxic metal burdens low

  1. About the Distribution of Metal Objects in Prepalatial Crete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Legarra Herrero

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Although metal objects have been used as evidence in different interpretations of the socioeconomic changes identified in Prepalatial Crete (c.3100-1900 BC, they constitute an understudied category of material. This paper argues that metal objects on Crete were subject to complex processes regarding the creation of meaning; a more comprehensive appraisal of metal objects on the island may cast new light on these issues. Copper-based, gold, lead and silver objects are investigated from their ore extraction locations outside Crete to their final deposition, linking the different steps of the process of creating an artefact with different layers of meanings for the metal and, subsequently, for the finished objects. This study evaluates differences in the use of metals, with a particular focus on their intra-island depositional patterns. It seeks to identify differences in the roles of metals within Cretan communities as well as regional fashions in the use of metal objects. It is suggested that metals had different characters since their depositional patterns vary, and that people consciously chose certain metals to make specific objects and also used metal objects in different ways, reflecting the socio-economic context for each region.

  2. The oxidative corrosion of carbide inclusions at the surface of uranium metal during exposure to water vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, T B; Petherbridge, J R; Harker, N J; Ball, R J; Heard, P J; Glascott, J; Allen, G C

    2011-11-15

    The reaction between uranium and water vapour has been well investigated, however discrepancies exist between the described kinetic laws, pressure dependence of the reaction rate constant and activation energies. Here this problem is looked at by examining the influence of impurities in the form of carbide inclusions on the reaction. Samples of uranium containing 600 ppm carbon were analysed during and after exposure to water vapour at 19 mbar pressure, in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) system. After water exposure, samples were analysed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), focused ion beam (FIB) imaging and sectioning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD). The results of the current study indicate that carbide particles on the surface of uranium readily react with water vapour to form voluminous UO(3) · xH(2)O growths at rates significantly faster than that of the metal. The observation may also have implications for previous experimental studies of uranium-water interactions, where the presence of differing levels of undetected carbide may partly account for the discrepancies observed between datasets. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. DISTRIBUTION OF HEAVY METALS AMONG THE COMPONENTS OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS (REVIEW)

    OpenAIRE

    N. Kolesnyk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To review scientific sources on the distribution of heavy metals among the components of freshwater ecosystems. Findings. The review of the works of many scientists showed that heavy metals are widespread in the biotic and abiotic components of freshwater ecosystems. The article highlights the distribution of heavy metals in water, bottom sediments, natural food base, fish organs and tissues. It has been shown that as a result of global pollution of the ecosystem, the majority of...

  4. Numerical Simulations of Inclusion Behavior in Gas-Stirred Ladles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Wentao; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2013-06-01

    A computation fluid dynamics-population balance model (CFD-PBM) coupled model has been proposed to investigate the bubbly plume flow and inclusion behavior including growth, size distribution, and removal in gas-stirred ladles, and some new and important phenomena and mechanisms were presented. For the bubbly plume flow, a modified k- ɛ model with extra source terms to account for the bubble-induced turbulence was adopted to model the turbulence, and the bubble turbulent dispersion force was taken into account to predict gas volume fraction distribution in the turbulent gas-stirred system. For inclusion behavior, the phenomena of inclusions turbulent random motion, bubbles wake, and slag eye forming on the molten steel surface were considered. In addition, the multiple mechanisms both that promote inclusion growth due to inclusion-inclusion collision caused by turbulent random motion, shear rate in turbulent eddy, and difference inclusion Stokes velocities, and the mechanisms that promote inclusion removal due to bubble-inclusion turbulence random collision, bubble-inclusion turbulent shear collision, bubble-inclusion buoyancy collision, inclusion own floatation near slag-metal interface, bubble wake capture, and wall adhesion were investigated. The importance of different mechanisms and total inclusion removal ratio under different conditions, and the distribution of inclusion number densities in ladle, were discussed and clarified. The results show that at a low gas flow rate, the inclusion growth is mainly attributed to both turbulent shear collision and Stokes collision, which is notably affected by the Stokes collision efficiency, and the inclusion removal is mainly attributed to the bubble-inclusion buoyancy collision and inclusion own floatation near slag-metal interface. At a higher gas flow rate, the inclusions appear as turbulence random motion in bubbly plume zone, and both the inclusion-inclusion and inclusion-bubble turbulent random collisions become

  5. Occurrence and distribution of heavy metals in indoor settled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed widespread heavy metals contamination especially Fe and Zn, which were present as the highest concentration while Cd was the lowest in the settled particles (dust). The order of occurrence of heavy metals in settled particles (dust) collected indoor in 2007 and 2008 respectively were as follows, ...

  6. Sewage sludge pyrolysis - the distribution of heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistler, R.; Widmer, F.; Brunner, P.

    1986-01-01

    The paper informs about the heavy metal contents of sewage sludges and discusses the origin of household, industry and surface sewerage of the respective heavy metals. The study aimed at assessing whether and in how far heavy metal volatility may be checked by reducing the temperature during sewage sludge pyrolysis. The testing equipment used was made of glass/silica glass. Instead of in particles heavy metals were precipitated in the gaseous state. Except from mercury heavy metals are retained by the ashes up to temperatures from 450 to 555/sup 0/C. Due to the persistence of mercury care should be taken to keep the sewerage clear of it from the very beginning. Emissions caused by reactor materials can be avoided by choosing appropriate pyrolysis reactors.

  7. Visualizing Metal Content and Intracellular Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Colvin

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that metal dyshomeostasis plays an important role in human neurodegenerative diseases. Although distinctive metal distributions are described for mature hippocampus and cortex, much less is known about metal levels and intracellular distribution in individual hippocampal neuronal somata. To solve this problem, we conducted quantitative metal analyses utilizing synchrotron radiation X-Ray fluorescence on frozen hydrated primary cultured neurons derived from rat embryonic cortex (CTX and two regions of the hippocampus: dentate gyrus (DG and CA1. Comparing average metal contents showed that the most abundant metals were calcium, iron, and zinc, whereas metals such as copper and manganese were less than 10% of zinc. Average metal contents were generally similar when compared across neurons cultured from CTX, DG, and CA1, except for manganese that was larger in CA1. However, each metal showed a characteristic spatial distribution in individual neuronal somata. Zinc was uniformly distributed throughout the cytosol, with no evidence for the existence of previously identified zinc-enriched organelles, zincosomes. Calcium showed a peri-nuclear distribution consistent with accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. Iron showed 2-3 distinct highly concentrated puncta only in peri-nuclear locations. Notwithstanding the small sample size, these analyses demonstrate that primary cultured neurons show characteristic metal signatures. The iron puncta probably represent iron-accumulating organelles, siderosomes. Thus, the metal distributions observed in mature brain structures are likely the result of both intrinsic neuronal factors that control cellular metal content and extrinsic factors related to the synaptic organization, function, and contacts formed and maintained in each region.

  8. Nutrients and heavy metal distribution in thermally treated pig manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuligowski, Ksawery; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.; Stoholm, Peder

    2008-01-01

    Ash from pig manure treated by combustion and thermal gasification was characterized and compared in terms of nutrient, i.e., potassium (K), phosphorus (P) and heavy metal, i.e., cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) contents. Total nutrient and metal concentrations...... that ash from gasified manure contained more water-extractable K in comparison with combusted manure whereas the opposite was the case with respect to P. Heavy metals Ni, Cr and Cd were present in higher concentrations in the fine particle size fractions (

  9. Dietary toxicity of field-contaminated invertebrates to marine fish: effects of metal doses and subcellular metal distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Fei; Rainbow, Philip S; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2012-09-15

    There is growing awareness of the toxicological effects of metal-contaminated invertebrate diets on the health of fish populations in metal-contaminated habitats, yet the mechanisms underlying metal bioaccumulation and toxicity are complex. In the present study, marine fish Terapon jurbua terepon were fed a commercial diet supplemented with specimens of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor or the clam Scrobicularia plana, collected from four metal-impacted estuaries (Tavy, Restronguet Creek, West Looe, Gannel) in southwest England, as environmentally realistic metal sources. A comparative toxicological evaluation of both invertebrates showed that fish fed S. plana for 21 d exhibited evident mortality compared to those fed N. diversicolor. Furthermore, a spatial effect on mortality was observed. Differences in metal doses rather than subcellular metal distributions between N. diversicolor and S. plana appeared to be the cause of such different mortalities. Partial least squares regression was used to evaluate the statistical relationship between multiple-metal doses and fish mortality, revealing that Pb, Fe, Cd and Zn in field-collected invertebrates co-varied most strongly with the observed mortality. This study provides a step toward exploring the underlying mechanism of dietary toxicity and identifying the potential causality in complex metal mixture exposures in the field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Geologic map of Harrat Hutaymah, with petrologic classification and distribution of ultramafic inclusions, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornber, Carl R.

    1990-01-01

    This map shows detailed geology of the Quaternary and Tertiary volcanic deposits that comprise Harrat Hutaymah and an updated and generalized compilation of the underlying Proterozoic and Paleozoic basement rocks. Quaternary alluvial cover and details of basement geology (that is, faults, dikes, and other features) are not shown. Volcanic unit descriptions and contact relations are based upon field investigation by the author and on compilation and revision of mapping Kellogg (1984; northern half of area) and Pallister (1984; southern half of area). A single K-Ar date of 1.80 ± 0.05 Ma for an alkali olivine basalt flow transected by the Al Hutaymah tuff ring (Pallister, 1984) provides the basis for an estimated late Tertiary to Quaternary age range for all harrat volcanic units other than unit Qtr (tuff reworked during Quaternary age time). Contact relations and unit descriptions for the basement rocks were compiled from Pallister (1984), Kellogg (1984 and 1985), DuBray (1984), Johnson and Williams (1984), Vaslet and others (1987), Cole and Hedge (1986), and Richter and others (1984). All rock unit names in this report are informal and capitalization follows Saudi Arabian stratigraphic nomenclature (Fitch, 1980). Geographic information was compiled from Pallister (1984), Kellogg (1984), and Fuller (in Johnson and Williams, 1984) and from field investigation by the author in 1986. The pie diagrams on the map show the distribution and petrology of ultramafic xenoliths of Harrat Hutaymah. The pie diagrams are explained by a detailed classification of ultramafic xenoliths that is introduced in this report.

  11. Investigation of the origin and distribution of heavy metals around ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-04-28

    Apr 28, 2010 ... JS Ogola1*, HR Mundalamo1 and G Brandl2. 1Department of Mining and ..... CSIR, Environmental Services, Pretoria,. South Africa. ... chemical orientation studies and the platinum potential of Jamaica. Trans. Inst. Min. Metall.

  12. Distributed Bragg grating frequency control in metallic nano lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marell, M.J.H.; Hill, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    We show that Bragg gratings can be readily incorporated into metallic nano-lasers which exploit waveguides with semiconductor cores, via modulation of the waveguide width. This provides a simple way to implement laser wavelength control.

  13. Distribution of Heavy Metals in Organs of Freshwater Fishes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2015-12-24

    Dec 24, 2015 ... indicate that the concentrations of the heavy metals in the samples are generally well above the respective recommended ... weathering processes on rocks and soils (Babel and. Opiso ..... Source apportionment of suspended.

  14. Dissolution of nonmetallic inclusions at high-temperature heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubenko, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of high-temperature a nnealing on size, distribution and general content of non-metallic inclusions in steels is investigated. It is shown that high-temperature annealing of steel permits to reduce total amount of inclusions, their average size, as well as to control their composition and distribution in steel matrix. Partial or complete dissolution of inclusions takes place in respect to the type of non-metallic inclusions, temperature of annealing and holding duration. Cooling rate affects the investigated parameters. Under quenching the total amount of inclusions in steel is lower and average size of inclusions is larger than those under slow cooling. It is explained by precipitation of disperses ''satellites around the initial inclusions under low cooling. Composition of the satellites slightly differs from that of a ''mother's'' one. Change in composition of inclusions and creation of conditions for transition of unstable inclusions to a more stable state promotes change in properties of non-metallic inclusions that affects steel properties

  15. Seasonal and spatial distribution of metals in surface sediment of an urban estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buggy, Conor J.; Tobin, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Aquatic pollution by metals is of concern because of various toxic effects to marine life. The Tolka Estuary, Co. Dublin, Ireland, is a typical Irish urban estuary. It has a significant metal loading originating from the urban environment. Results of a 25 month analysis of cadmium, copper, lead and zinc spatial and temporal distribution over 10 sample locations in this estuary are presented in this paper. Metal concentrations were analysed using differential pulse polarography. Significant seasonal and spatial trends in metal distribution were observed over the 25 months. Sediment metal concentrations gradually increased (30-120%) in spring to a maximum at the end of summer which was followed by a decrease in winter months (30-60%). Sediment organic matter (OM) concentrations exhibited similar seasonal trends and a positive correlation between OM and metal distributions was observed, implying OM had an influence on metal distributions over time. - Assessment and correlation of the seasonal and spatial distribution of metals and organic matter in surface sediment of an urban estuary

  16. Heavy metals distribution in the Dead Sea black mud, Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momani, K.; El-Hasan, T.; Auaydeh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The concentrations of trace metals (Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn, Co, Cr, Cu and Pb) were investigated in the Dead Sea black mud and river sediments in the northern basin of the Dead Sea region, Jordan. The pH of the mud was slightly above 8 while it was around 6 for the seawater. All analyzed heavy metal content in the black mud, except Pb, was less than their contents in other types of mud. Tlis might be due to the effect of the mildly acideic pH of seawater, which would enhance the metal solubility or incorporation within salt mineral structure, rather than precipitation. The sequential extraction results showed that Ni and Co transferred into the carbonate fraction, Mn is found mostly as manganese-iron oxide, and the residual phase contained Cr, Cu, Fe,and Pb. This study illustrated that the black mud had low heavy metal contents, thus indicating low toxicity. additionally, it shows insignificance effect of the mixing of freshwater with seawater on the heavy metal contents in the black mud. (authors).

  17. THE STELLAR METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION OF THE GALACTIC HALO FROM SDSS PHOTOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Deokkeun; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Lee, Young Sun; Bovy, Jo; Ivezić, Željko; Carollo, Daniela; Newby, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    We explore the stellar metallicity distribution function of the Galactic halo based on SDSS ugriz photometry. A set of stellar isochrones is calibrated using observations of several star clusters and validated by comparisons with medium-resolution spectroscopic values over a wide range of metal abundance. We estimate distances and metallicities for individual main-sequence stars in the multiply scanned SDSS Stripe 82, at heliocentric distances in the range 5-8 kpc and |b| > 35°, and find that the in situ photometric metallicity distribution has a shape that matches that of the kinematically selected local halo stars from Ryan and Norris. We also examine independent kinematic information from proper-motion measurements for high Galactic latitude stars in our sample. We find that stars with retrograde rotation in the rest frame of the Galaxy are generally more metal poor than those exhibiting prograde rotation, which is consistent with earlier arguments by Carollo et al. that the halo system comprises at least two spatially overlapping components with differing metallicity, kinematics, and spatial distributions. The observed photometric metallicity distribution and that of Ryan and Norris can be described by a simple chemical evolution model by Hartwick (or by a single Gaussian distribution); however, the suggestive metallicity-kinematic correlation contradicts the basic assumption in this model that the Milky Way halo consists primarily of a single stellar population. When the observed metallicity distribution is deconvolved using two Gaussian components with peaks at [Fe/H] ≈ –1.7 and –2.3, the metal-poor component accounts for ∼20%-35% of the entire halo population in this distance range.

  18. Heavy Metallic Element Distribution in Cisadane River Estuary's Water and Sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Taufik Kaisupy

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Observation of heavy metallic elements in Cisadane River Estuary has been done in July and November 2005. The results show that heavy metallic elements content in seawater is lower and still below the treshold value stated by government for fisheries. There was an indication of heavy metallic elements on sediment. Distribution of Pb on July and of Cu on November 2005 were found higher near the coast and decrease towards the sea, and commonly were found in front of estuary such as Cisadane, Muara Saban and Tanjung Pasir. High Pb and Zn distributions on November 2005 were found only in front of Cisadane estuary. Cd distribution of Cisadane estuary was constant at all station but did not show any correlation with the distance of station and estuary. The Cd content on July and November 2005 is lower than 0,001 ppm. Generally, heavy metallic elements content have a uniform distribution at all stations inspite of its distance to estuary.

  19. Distribution of six heavy metals in contaminated clay soils before and after extractive cleaning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuin, B.J.W.; Tels, M.

    1990-01-01

    A sequential extraction procedure according to Tessier et al. is carried out to compare the distribution of six metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in contaminated clay soils before and after extractive cleaning. Extraction of metals from the ‘soil fractions’ with 0.1 N HC1 or 0.1 M EDTA becomes more

  20. 12 Trace Metals Distribution in Fish Tissues, Bottom Sediments and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    Abstract. Water samples, bottom sediments, Tilapia, and Cat Fish from Okumeshi River in Delta state of Nigeria were analysed ... Keywords: Trace metals, Fish Tissues, Water, Bottom sediments, Okumeshi River. Introduction ..... Grey Mangroove Avicemmia marina (Forsk). ... sewage treatment plant oulet pipe extension on.

  1. Studies on the occurrence and distribution of heavy metals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bacteria isolated and identified were. Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, Arthrobacter sp and Achromobacter sp. Fungi isolated were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida utilissima and Sporobolomyces sp. The values for heavy metals for all zones are of public health significance and pose a threat to the survival of ...

  2. Metal Distribution and Bioaccumulation in Water and Fish of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to investigate the metal (copper, zinc and manganese) concentrations in the surface water and fish of a man-made lake receiving agricultural and domestic effluents in Ibadan, Nigeria. The lake (Main Lake, IITA) is a site of drinking water abstraction and the major water source for the surrounding ...

  3. Geochemical Signature of Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluids Exsolved from the Beauvoir Rare-Metal Granite (Massif Central, France: Insights from LA-ICPMS Analysis of Primary Fluid Inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Harlaux

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Beauvoir granite (Massif Central, France represents an exceptional case in the European Variscan belt of a peraluminous rare-metal granite crosscutting an early W stockwork. The latter was strongly overprinted by rare-metal magmatic-hydrothermal fluids derived from the Beauvoir granite, resulting in a massive topazification of the quartz-ferberite vein system. This work presents a complete study of primary fluid inclusions hosted in quartz and topaz from the Beauvoir granite and the metasomatized stockwork, in order to characterize the geochemical composition of the magmatic fluids exsolved during the crystallization of this evolved rare-metal peraluminous granite. Microthermometric and Raman spectrometry data show that the earliest fluid (L1 is of high temperature (500 to >600°C, high salinity (17–28 wt.% NaCl eq, and Li-rich (Te100 m and interaction with external fluids.

  4. Advanced analysis of metal distributions in human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempson, Ivan M.; Skinner, William M.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of techniques (secondary electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence) were utilized to distinguish metal contamination occurring in hair arising from endogenous uptake from an individual exposed to a polluted environment, in this case a lead smelter. Evidence was sought for elements less affected by contamination and potentially indicative of biogenic activity. The unique combination of surface sensitivity, spatial resolution, and detection limits used here has provided new insight regarding hair analysis. Metals such as Ca, Fe, and Pb appeared to have little representative value of endogenous uptake and were mainly due to contamination. Cu and Zn, however, demonstrate behaviors worthy of further investigation into relating hair concentrations to endogenous function.

  5. Study of inclusive single-jet production in the framework of kt-factorization unintegrated parton distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh Nik, R.; Modarres, M.; Masouminia, M. R.

    2018-05-01

    The present work is intended to study the double-differential cross section of the inclusive single-jet production as the functions of the transverse momentum and the rapidity of the jet in the high-energy hadron-hadron collisions. The angular-ordering-constraint kt-factorization framework is used to calculate the above cross section that is available experimentally. The conditions are taken in accordance with the LHC experiments. The results are compared and analyzed using the existing CMS LHC data. The scheme-dependent unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDF) of Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) and Martin-Ryskin-Watt (MRW) in the leading-order and the next-to-leading order (NLO) are used to predict the input partonic UPDF. The utilized phenomenological frameworks prove to be relatively successful in generating satisfactory results compared to the different experiment data, such as CMS (8 and 13 TeV). Extensive discussions and comparisons are made regarding the behavior of the contributing partonic subprocesses. Finally, it is shown that the application of the KMR UPDF to the single-jet differential cross sections have better agreement with the CMS data; on the other hand, they are very similar to those of NLO-MRW.

  6. Refractory Inclusion Size Distribution and Fabric Measured in a Large Slab of the Allende CV3 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P.; Simon, Justin I.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregate textures of chondrites reflect accretion of early-formed particles in the solar nebula. Explanations for the size and density variations of particle populations found among chondrites are debated. Differences could have risen out of formation in different locations in the nebula, and/or they could have been caused by a sorting process [1]. Many ideas on the cause of chondrule sorting have been proposed; some including sorting by mass [2,3], by X-winds [4], turbulent concentration [5], and by photophoresis [6]. However, few similar studies have been conducted for Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). These particles are known to have formed early, and their distribution could attest to the early stages of Solar System (ESS) history. Unfortunately, CAIs are not as common in chondrites as chondrules are, reducing the usefulness of studies restricted to a few thin sections. Furthermore, the largest sizes of CAIs are generally much larger than chondrules, and therefore rarely present in most studied chondrite thin sections. This study attempts to perform a more representative sampling of the CAI population in the Allende chondrite by investigating a two decimeter-sized slab.

  7. THE BIMODAL METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF THE COOL CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM AT z ∼< 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, N.; Howk, J. C.; Tripp, T. M.; Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C.; Fox, A. J.; Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. K.; O'Meara, J. M.; Ribaudo, J.

    2013-01-01

    We assess the metal content of the cool (∼10 4 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) about galaxies at z ∼ H I ∼ H I selection avoids metallicity biases inherent in many previous studies of the low-redshift CGM. We compare the column densities of weakly ionized metal species (e.g., O II, Si II, Mg II) to N H I in the strongest H I component of each absorber. We find that the metallicity distribution of the LLS (and hence the cool CGM) is bimodal with metal-poor and metal-rich branches peaking at [X/H] ≅ –1.6 and –0.3 (or about 2.5% and 50% solar metallicities). The cool CGM probed by these LLS is predominantly ionized. The metal-rich branch of the population likely traces winds, recycled outflows, and tidally stripped gas; the metal-poor branch has properties consistent with cold accretion streams thought to be a major source of fresh gas for star forming galaxies. Both branches have a nearly equal number of absorbers. Our results thus demonstrate there is a significant mass of previously undiscovered cold metal-poor gas and confirm the presence of metal enriched gas in the CGM of z ∼< 1 galaxies.

  8. The impact of the Fermi-Dirac distribution on charge injection at metal/organic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z B; Helander, M G; Greiner, M T; Lu, Z H

    2010-05-07

    The Fermi level has historically been assumed to be the only energy-level from which carriers are injected at metal/semiconductor interfaces. In traditional semiconductor device physics, this approximation is reasonable as the thermal distribution of delocalized states in the semiconductor tends to dominate device characteristics. However, in the case of organic semiconductors the weak intermolecular interactions results in highly localized electronic states, such that the thermal distribution of carriers in the metal may also influence device characteristics. In this work we demonstrate that the Fermi-Dirac distribution of carriers in the metal has a much more significant impact on charge injection at metal/organic interfaces than has previously been assumed. An injection model which includes the effect of the Fermi-Dirac electron distribution was proposed. This model has been tested against experimental data and was found to provide a better physical description of charge injection. This finding indicates that the thermal distribution of electronic states in the metal should, in general, be considered in the study of metal/organic interfaces.

  9. The distribution of metal elements in plant leaf. Second report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Masuko, Shoji; Noya, Youichi; Kasahara, Shigeru

    2002-01-01

    We have reported in first report as to metal elements containing in some leaf such as clethra, bamboo and maple. This time, we measured the contents zinc, cesium and cobalt about clethra, maple in root, blanch and anthotaxy. As to cesium, the density contained in anthotaxy of clethra was 1.5 times as much as that of soil. In the same manner, the density of cobalt contained in the blanch of clethra was 10 times as much as that of maple. As to zinc, the difference contained root, blanch and leaf between clethra and maple were small. (author)

  10. Distribution and Potential Toxicity of Trace Metals in the Surface Sediments of Sundarban Mangrove Ecosystem, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Ramanathan, A.; Mathukumalli, B. K. P.; Datta, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution, enrichment and ecotoxocity potential of Bangladesh part of Sundarban mangrove was investigated for eight trace metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn) using sediment quality assessment indices. The average concentration of trace metals in the sediments exceeded the crustal abundance suggesting sources other than natural in origin. Additionally, the trace metals profile may be a reflection of socio-economic development in the vicinity of Sundarban which further attributes trace metals abundance to the anthropogenic inputs. Geoaccumulation index suggests moderately polluted sediment quality w.r.t. Ni and As and background concentrations for Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, As and Cd. Contamination factor analysis suggested low contamination by Zn, Cr, Co and Cd, moderate by Fe, Mn, Cu and Pb while Ni and As show considerable and high contamination, respectively. Enrichment factors for Ni, Pb and As suggests high contamination from either biota or anthropogenic inputs besides natural enrichment. As per the three sediment quality guidelines, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, Co and As would be more of a concern with respect to ecotoxicological risk in the Sundarban mangroves. The correlation between various physiochemical variables and trace metals suggested significant role of fine grained particles (clay) in trace metal distribution whereas owing to low organic carbon content in the region the organic complexation may not be playing significant role in trace metal distribution in the Sundarban mangroves.

  11. PM2.5-bound metal metabolic distribution and coupled lipid abnormality at different developmental windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Tingting; Zhang, Yingying; Ji, Xiaotong; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2017-09-01

    Atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) is a serious threat to human health. As a toxicant constituent, metal leads to significant health risks in a population, but exposure to PM 2.5 -bound metals and their biological impacts are not fully understood. In this study, we determined the metal contents of PM 2.5 samples collected from a typical coal-burning city and then investigated the metabolic distributions of six metals (Zn, Pb, Mn, As, Cu, and Cd) following PM 2.5 inhalation in mice in different developmental windows. The results indicate that fine particles were mainly deposited in the lung, but PM 2.5 -bound metals could reach and gather in secondary off-target tissues (the lung, liver, heart and brain) with a developmental window-dependent property. Furthermore, elevations in triglycerides and cholesterol levels in sensitive developmental windows (the young and elderly stages) occurred, and significant associations between metals (Pb, Mn, As and Cd) and cholesterol in the heart, brain, liver and lung were observed. These findings suggest that PM 2.5 inhalation caused selective metal metabolic distribution in tissues with a developmental window-dependent property and that the effects were associated with lipid alterations. This provides a foundation for the underlying systemic toxicity following PM 2.5 exposure based on metal components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Spatial distribution of heavy metals in surficial sediments from Guanabara Bay: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, José Antônio Baptista; Gingele, Franz Xaver; Leipe, Thomas; Brehme, Isa

    2006-04-01

    Ninety-two surface sediment samples were collected in Guanabara Bay, one of the most prominent urban bays in SE Brazil, to investigate the spatial distribution of anthropogenic pollutants. The concentrations of heavy metals, organic carbon and particle size were examined in all samples. Large spatial variations of heavy metals and particle size were observed. The highest concentrations of heavy metals were found in the muddy sediments from the north western region of the bay near the main outlets of the most polluted rivers, municipal waste drainage systems and one of the major oil refineries. Another anomalous concentration of metals was found adjacent to Rio de Janeiro Harbour. The heavy metal concentrations decrease to the northeast, due to intact rivers and the mangrove systems in this area, and to the south where the sand fraction and open-marine processes dominate. The geochemical normalization of metal data to Li or Al has also demonstrated that the anthropogenic input of heavy metals have altered the natural sediment heavy metal distribution.

  13. Correlation of Flux Composition and Inclusion Characteristics With Submerged Arc Weld Metal Properties in HY-100 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    chemistries are complex, the welding engineer needs to obtain the correct CCT diagram for the alloy system in question. Once the CCT diagram is estimated...the CCT diagram must be pertinent to the particular chemistry of the weld metal, especially when the weld metal composition varies with flux

  14. The Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollutants in Suez Bay Using Geographic Information System (GIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.B.; Mohamed, W.M.

    2017-01-01

    Suez city represents the southern entrance of the Suez Canal. As a result of the rapid development of industrialization and anthropogenic activities of Suez city may be entered containments such as heavy metals through Suez bay boundaries. The geographical information system (Arc GIS 9.1) is used to study the spatial distribution of heavy metals concentrations (Cd, Mn, Fe, Ni, Pb, Cu and Zn) of water samples which were collected in four different sampling sites (I, II, III and IV) from Suez bay. In this study, tabular data representation of the spatial distribution was developed using the inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation method. The GIS technique was applied to transfer the information into a final map illustrating the spatial distribution of heavy metals within the studied area. GIS models showed the high concentrations of heavy metals in some sites in the Suez city affecting by their activities. An overall distribution map of heavy metals is observed from GIS special analysis. Site (IV) in Suez City demonstrated the highest polluted are a in the overall distribution map

  15. DISTRIBUTION OF HEAVY METALS AMONG THE COMPONENTS OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kolesnyk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review scientific sources on the distribution of heavy metals among the components of freshwater ecosystems. Findings. The review of the works of many scientists showed that heavy metals are widespread in the biotic and abiotic components of freshwater ecosystems. The article highlights the distribution of heavy metals in water, bottom sediments, natural food base, fish organs and tissues. It has been shown that as a result of global pollution of the ecosystem, the majority of Ukrainian rivers belong to polluted and very polluted. Of special interest are the studies of the distribution of heavy metals in phytoplankton, zooplankton, and zoobenthos because these components occupy a certain position in fish food chain. The presence of heavy metals in the natural food base showed that, on one hand, it could accumulate heavy metals in large amounts in such a way cleaning the water; and on the other hand, the heavy metals could migrate in the food web and contaminate fish. Ones of objects, which should be given attention when assessing toxicologic pollution, are aquatic plants, in particular phytoplankton. Studies showed that the accumulation of heavy metals in plants occurred first of all by their adsorption on the cellular wall. It explains the maximum adsorption of heavy metals by plants immediately after introduction of heavy metals into their culture. Fish as a rule occupy in the food web of water bodies one of the last places. They actively move in the aquatic environment and accumulating heavy metals at the same time they provide the most integrated and precise estimate of environmental pollution. By analyzing the distribution of heavy metals in fish organs and tissues, depending on their ability to accumulate them, it can be noted that the accumulation is the most intensive in such organs as gills, liver, and kidneys. Usually, their lowest content is observed in muscles that is important for human life because they are the main

  16. Effects of Non-metallic Inclusions on Hot Ductility of High Manganese TWIP Steels Containing Different Aluminum Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Nan; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Xin, Xiu-Ling; Xu, Long-Yun

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of inclusions in Fe-16Mn- xAl-0.6C ( x = 0.002, 0.033, 0.54, 2.10 mass pct) steels have been investigated and their effects on hot ductility of the high manganese TWIP steels have been discussed. Ductility is very poor in the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, which is lower than 20 pct in the temperature range of 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C). For the steels containing 0.002 and 2.10 mass pct aluminum, ductility is higher than 40 pct in the same temperature range. The hot ductility of steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum is higher than 30 pct throughout the temperature range under examination. With increasing aluminum content, the main inclusions in the steels change along the route of MnO/(MnO + MnS) → MnS/(Al2O3 + MnS) → AlN/(Al2O3 + MnS)/(MgAl2O4 + MnS) → AlN. The thermodynamic results of inclusion types calculated with FactSage software are in agreement with the experimental observation results. The inclusions in the steels containing 0.002 mass pct aluminum do not deteriorate the hot ductility. MnS inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 1.12 μm, 15.62 mm-2, and 2.51 × 10-6 in the steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum reduce the ductility. In the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, AlN inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 0.878 μm, 16.28 mm-2 and 2.82 × 10-6 can precipitate at the austenite grain boundaries, prevent dynamic recrystallization and deteriorate the hot ductility. On the contrary, in the steel containing 2.10 mass pct aluminum, the average size, number density and volume ratio of AlN inclusions change to 2.418 μm, 35.95 mm-2, and 2.55 × 10-5. They precipitate in the matrix, which do not inhibit dynamic recrystallization and thereby do not lead to poor hot ductility.

  17. Distribution of metals in vacuum residuums, asphaltenes and maltenes by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero G, E.T.; Camacho M, V.; Sanchez B, A.C.; Lopez M, J.; Ramirez T, J.J.; Villasenor S, P.; Aspiazu F, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The PIXE technique for determining directly the distribution and abundance of trace metals in vacuum residuum, asphaltenes and maltenes separated with n-alkanes (C 5 -C 8 ) is used. The metal content of petroleum derivatives revealed that the vacuum residuum contains iron, aluminium, vanadium and nickel mainly, while that the asphaltenes and maltenes maintain inside of their composition only preferably the vanadium and nickel as majority elements. (Author)

  18. Trace metal distributions in Posidonia oceanica and sediments from Taranto Gulf (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. DI LEO

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of metals (Hg, Pb, Sn, Cu, Cd and Zn was determined in sediments and in different tissues of Posidonia oceanica collected from San Pietro Island, Taranto Gulf (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy. In seagrass, results, compared with metal concentrations in sediments, showed that the highest concentrations of Hg, Pb, Sn and Cu were found in the roots, while in the green leaves were found the highest levels of Cd and Zn. Instead the lowest metal concentrations were found in the basal part of the leaf. Levels of  metals in the leaves were similar to those found by other authors in uncontaminated areas of the Mediterranean Sea. Mercury levels in roots were correlated to levels in sediments. This could demonstrate the plant memorizes sediments contamination . This study reinforces the usefulness and the relevance of Posidonia oceanica as an indicator of spatial metal contamination and an interesting tool for environmental quality evaluation.

  19. Heavy metal distribution and bioaccumulation in Chihuahuan Desert Rough Harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus) populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Toro, I.; Floyd, K.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.; Borrok, D.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination can negatively impact arid ecosystems; however a thorough examination of bioaccumulation patterns has not been completed. We analyzed the distribution of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in soils, seeds and ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus) populations of the Chihuahuan Desert near El Paso, TX, USA. Concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, and Pb in soils, seeds and ants declined as a function of distance from a now inactive Cu and Pb smelter and all five metals bioaccumulated in the granivorous ants. The average bioaccumulation factors for the metals from seeds to ants ranged from 1.04x (As) to 8.12x (Cd). The findings show bioaccumulation trends in linked trophic levels in an arid ecosystem and further investigation should focus on the impacts of heavy metal contamination at the community level. - Heavy metals bioaccumulate in desert ants.

  20. [The use of polymer gel dosimetry to measure dose distribution around metallic implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahata, Tomomasa; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Monzen, Hajime; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-10-01

    A semi-solid polymer dosimetry system using agar was developed to measure the dose distribution close to metallic implants. Dosimetry of heterogeneous fields where electron density markedly varies is often problematic. This prompted us to develop a polymer gel dosimetry technique using agar to measure the dose distribution near substance boundaries. Varying the concentration of an oxygen scavenger (tetra-hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride) showed the absorbed dose and transverse relaxation rate of the magnetic resonance signal to be linear between 3 and 12 Gy. Although a change in the dosimeter due to oxidization was observed in room air after 24 hours, no such effects were observed in the first 4 hours. The dose distribution around the metal implants was measured using agar dosimetry. The metals tested were a lead rod, a titanium hip joint, and a metallic stent. A maximum 30% dose increase was observed near the lead rod, but only a 3% increase in the absorbed dose was noted near the surface of the titanium hip joint and metallic stent. Semi-solid polymer dosimetry using agar thus appears to be a useful method for dosimetry around metallic substances.

  1. The use of polymer gel dosimetry to measure dose distribution around metallic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahata, Tomomasa; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Monzen, Hajime; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-01-01

    A semi-solid polymer dosimetry system using agar was developed to measure the dose distribution close to metallic implants. Dosimetry of heterogeneous fields where electron density markedly varies is often problematic. This prompted us to develop a polymer gel dosimetry technique using agar to measure the dose distribution near substance boundaries. Varying the concentration of an oxygen scavenger (tetra-hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride) showed the absorbed dose and transverse relaxation rate of the magnetic resonance signal to be linear between 3 and 12 Gy. Although a change in the dosimeter due to oxidization was observed in room air after 24 hours, no such effects were observed in the first 4 hours. The dose distribution around the metal implants was measured using agar dosimetry. The metals tested were a lead rod, a titanium hip joint, and a metallic stent. A maximum 30% dose increase was observed near the lead rod, but only a 3% increase in the absorbed dose was noted near the surface of the titanium hip joint and metallic stent. Semi-solid polymer dosimetry using agar thus appears to be a useful method for dosimetry around metallic substances. (author)

  2. Heavy Metallic Element Distribution in Cisadane River Estuary's Water and Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    M. Taufik Kaisupy; Abdul Rozak; Endang Rochyatun

    2006-01-01

    Observation of heavy metallic elements in Cisadane River Estuary has been done in July and November 2005. The results show that heavy metallic elements content in seawater is lower and still below the treshold value stated by government for fisheries. There was an indication of heavy metallic elements on sediment. Distribution of Pb on July and of Cu on November 2005 were found higher near the coast and decrease towards the sea, and commonly were found in front of estuary such as Cisadane, Mu...

  3. Uptake and distribution of soil-applied labelled heavy metals in cereal plants and products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlaender, H.E.; Roth, K.

    1983-01-01

    In the present paper investigations are described on the uptake, distribution and translocation of mercury, cadmium, chromium and zinc by spring and winter varieties of wheat, rye and barley. Pot experiments were carried out at low concentrations of the heavy metals in order to avoid growth interference during the uptake. Using radioisotopes the pathway of the metals was traced through different organs into the milling products. An ion-exchanger was added to the soils and its efficiency of reducing the uptake of the metals by the plants was tested

  4. Fate and Distribution of Heavy Metals in Wastewater Irrigated Calcareous Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stietiya, Mohammed Hashem; Duqqah, Mohammad; Udeigwe, Theophilus; Zubi, Ruba; Ammari, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of heavy metals in Jordanian soils irrigated with treated wastewater threatens agricultural sustainability. This study was carried out to investigate the environmental fate of Zn, Ni, and Cd in calcareous soils irrigated with treated wastewater and to elucidate the impact of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) amendment on metal redistribution among soil fractions. Results showed that sorption capacity for Zarqa River (ZR1) soil was higher than Wadi Dhuleil (WD1) soil for all metals. The order of sorption affinity for WD1 was in the decreasing order of Ni > Zn > Cd, consistent with electrostatic attraction and indication of weak association with soil constituents. Following metal addition, Zn and Ni were distributed among the carbonate and Fe/Mn oxide fractions, while Cd was distributed among the exchangeable and carbonate fractions in both soils. Amending soils with 3% HFO did not increase the concentration of metals associated with the Fe/Mn oxide fraction or impact metal redistribution. The study suggests that carbonates control the mobility and bioavailability of Zn, Ni, and Cd in these calcareous soils, even in presence of a strong adsorbent such as HFO. Thus, it can be inferred that in situ heavy metal remediation of these highly calcareous soils using iron oxide compounds could be ineffective. PMID:24723833

  5. Assessment of spatial distribution of soil heavy metals using ANN-GA, MSLR and satellite imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Arman; Delavar, Mohammad Amir; Kaboudin, Babak; Askari, Mohammad Sadegh

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to assess and compare heavy metal distribution models developed using stepwise multiple linear regression (MSLR) and neural network-genetic algorithm model (ANN-GA) based on satellite imagery. The source identification of heavy metals was also explored using local Moran index. Soil samples (n = 300) were collected based on a grid and pH, organic matter, clay, iron oxide contents cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) concentrations were determined for each sample. Visible/near-infrared reflectance (VNIR) within the electromagnetic ranges of satellite imagery was applied to estimate heavy metal concentrations in the soil using MSLR and ANN-GA models. The models were evaluated and ANN-GA model demonstrated higher accuracy, and the autocorrelation results showed higher significant clusters of heavy metals around the industrial zone. The higher concentration of Cd, Pb and Zn was noted under industrial lands and irrigation farming in comparison to barren and dryland farming. Accumulation of industrial wastes in roads and streams was identified as main sources of pollution, and the concentration of soil heavy metals was reduced by increasing the distance from these sources. In comparison to MLSR, ANN-GA provided a more accurate indirect assessment of heavy metal concentrations in highly polluted soils. The clustering analysis provided reliable information about the spatial distribution of soil heavy metals and their sources.

  6. Fate and Distribution of Heavy Metals in Wastewater Irrigated Calcareous Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hashem Stietiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of heavy metals in Jordanian soils irrigated with treated wastewater threatens agricultural sustainability. This study was carried out to investigate the environmental fate of Zn, Ni, and Cd in calcareous soils irrigated with treated wastewater and to elucidate the impact of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO amendment on metal redistribution among soil fractions. Results showed that sorption capacity for Zarqa River (ZR1 soil was higher than Wadi Dhuleil (WD1 soil for all metals. The order of sorption affinity for WD1 was in the decreasing order of Ni > Zn > Cd, consistent with electrostatic attraction and indication of weak association with soil constituents. Following metal addition, Zn and Ni were distributed among the carbonate and Fe/Mn oxide fractions, while Cd was distributed among the exchangeable and carbonate fractions in both soils. Amending soils with 3% HFO did not increase the concentration of metals associated with the Fe/Mn oxide fraction or impact metal redistribution. The study suggests that carbonates control the mobility and bioavailability of Zn, Ni, and Cd in these calcareous soils, even in presence of a strong adsorbent such as HFO. Thus, it can be inferred that in situ heavy metal remediation of these highly calcareous soils using iron oxide compounds could be ineffective.

  7. Interpretation of aerosol trace metal particle size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, T.B.; Van Grieken, R.E.; Winchester, J.W.

    1974-01-01

    Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is capable of rapid routine determination of 10--15 elements present in amounts greater than or equal to 1 ng simultaneously in aerosol size fractions as collected by single orifice impactors over short periods of time. This enables detailed study of complex relationships between elements detected. Since absolute elemental concentrations may be strongly influenced by meteorological and topographical conditions, it is useful to normalize to a reference element. Comparison between the ratios of concentrations with aerosol and corresponding values for anticipated sources may lead to the identification of important sources for the elements. Further geochemical insights may be found through linear correlation coefficients, regression analysis, and cluster analysis. By calculating correlations for elemental pairs, an indication of the degree of covariance between the elements is obtained. Preliminary results indicate that correlations may be particle size dependent. A high degree of covariance may be caused either by a common source or may only reflect the conservative nature of the aerosol. In a regression analysis, by plotting elemental pairs and estimating the regression coefficients, we may be able to conclude if there is more than one source operating for a given element in a certain size range. Analysis of clustering of several elements, previously investigated for aerosol filter samples, can be applied to the analysis of aerosol size fractions. Careful statistical treatment of elemental concentrations as a function of aerosol particle size may thus yield significant information on the generation, transport and deposition of trace metals in the atmosphere

  8. Effect of inclusion content on the creep rupture properties of type 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senior, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    It has been known for some time that austenitic weldments exhibit low and variable creep rupture properties, but many of the factors controlling these properties are not well understood. In this investigation, two welds (Type 316) with similar compositions and fabricated using the same welding parameters, but with different electrode coatings, have been examined after creep testing. The results indicate that the inclusion and silicon content of type 316 welds can strongly influence their creep rupture properties, a high inclusion density being associated with poor creep rupture properties, and a low silicon content with a higher creep rate. This has been explained with reference to the micromechanism of creep failure operating in these welds. (author)

  9. Ore Characteristics and Fluid Inclusion of the Base Metal Vein Deposit in Moncong Bincanai Area, Gowa, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmariyadi Asmariyadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v7i4.146This paper is dealing with ore characteristics and fluid inclusion of the Moncong Bincanai, Biringbulu Subregency of Gowa Regency, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. The mineralization is a vein type, with the orientation of N170oE /65oSW, hosted in open-space filling within basalt. The mineralization consists of galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite. Vein thickness ranges from 5 - 17 cm, showing a crustiform banding texture, with a sequence from outer to centre: quartz, carbonate (siderite, sulphide. The quartz displays primary growth textures such as comb, crystalline, saccharoidal, and colloform. Analytical methods applied include AAS and fluid inclusion microthermometry. Chemical composition of the vein indicates an average of Pb = 47.92%, Cu = 1.27%, Zn = 1.02%, and Fe = 9.46%, which shows a significant concentration of Pb. Fluid inclusion microthermometry results indicate a range of formation temperature of 240 - 250C and salinity of the responsible hydrothermal fluid of 2.1 - 2.5 wt.% NaCl eq. The deposit is categorized into low-sulfidation epithermal deposits, which was formed within a range of 410 - 440 m below paleosurface.

  10. Angular distribution of atoms ejected by laser ablation of different metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomi, I.; Motohiro, T.; Asaoka, T.

    2009-01-01

    Angular distributions of 13 different metals ejected by laser ablation using fourth harmonics (wavelength=266 nm) of neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser and a fluence close to near-threshold value (2.3 J/cm 2 ) have been investigated with a high angular resolution. The angular distribution which is characterized by the exponent n of cos n θ distribution showed very broad range of values between 3 and 24 for different metals. A simple relation that the exponent n is proportional to the square root of particle atomic weight as reported previously has not been observed. Instead, a general trend has been found that the metals with higher sublimation energy such as Ta and Zr show narrower angular distribution than those with lower sublimation energy such as Sn and In. While the sublimation energy of metals has a great influence on the angular distribution of ejected atoms, a simple consideration suggests that their thermal conductivity and specific heat have little effect on it.

  11. THE BIMODAL METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF THE COOL CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM AT z {approx}< 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, N.; Howk, J. C. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C.; Fox, A. J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. K. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); O' Meara, J. M. [Department of Physics, Saint Michael' s College, Vermont, One Winooski Park, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Ribaudo, J. [Department of Physics, Utica College, 1600 Burrstone Road, Utica, New York 13502 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    We assess the metal content of the cool ({approx}10{sup 4} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) about galaxies at z {approx}< 1 using an H I-selected sample of 28 Lyman limit systems (LLS; defined here as absorbers with 16.2 {approx}< log N{sub H{sub I}} {approx}< 18.5) observed in absorption against background QSOs by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The N{sub H{sub I}} selection avoids metallicity biases inherent in many previous studies of the low-redshift CGM. We compare the column densities of weakly ionized metal species (e.g., O II, Si II, Mg II) to N{sub H{sub I}} in the strongest H I component of each absorber. We find that the metallicity distribution of the LLS (and hence the cool CGM) is bimodal with metal-poor and metal-rich branches peaking at [X/H] {approx_equal} -1.6 and -0.3 (or about 2.5% and 50% solar metallicities). The cool CGM probed by these LLS is predominantly ionized. The metal-rich branch of the population likely traces winds, recycled outflows, and tidally stripped gas; the metal-poor branch has properties consistent with cold accretion streams thought to be a major source of fresh gas for star forming galaxies. Both branches have a nearly equal number of absorbers. Our results thus demonstrate there is a significant mass of previously undiscovered cold metal-poor gas and confirm the presence of metal enriched gas in the CGM of z {approx}< 1 galaxies.

  12. Distribution and health risk assessment to heavy metals near smelting and mining areas of Hezhang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briki, Meryem; Zhu, Yi; Gao, Yang; Shao, Mengmeng; Ding, Huaijian; Ji, Hongbing

    2017-08-19

    Mining and smelting areas in Hezhang have generated a large amount of heavy metals into the environment. For that cause, an evaluative study on human exposure to heavy metals including Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cr, As, Cd, Pb, Sb, Bi, Be, and Hg in hair and urine was conducted for their concentrations and correlations. Daily exposure and non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risk were estimated. Sixty-eight scalp hair and 66 urine samples were taken from participants of different ages (6-17, 18-40, 41-60, and ≥ 65 years) living in the vicinity of an agricultural soil near mine and smelting areas. The results compared to the earlier studies showed an elevated concentration of Pb, Be, Bi, Co, Cr, Ni, Sb, and Zn in hair and urine. These heavy metals were more elevated in mining than in smelting. Considering gender differences, females were likely to be more affected than male. By investigating age differences in this area, high heavy metal concentrations in male's hair and urine existed in age of 18-40 and ≥ 66, respectively. However, females did not present homogeneous age distribution. Hair and urine showed a different distribution of heavy metals in different age and gender. In some cases, significant correlation was found between heavy metals in hair and urine (P > 0.05 and P > 0.01) in mining area. The estimated average daily intake of heavy metals in vegetables showed a great contribution compared to the soil and water. Non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risk values of total pathways in mining and smelting areas were higher than 1 and exceeded the acceptable levels. Thus, the obtained data might be useful for further studies. They can serve as a basis of comparison and assessing the effect of simultaneous exposure from heavy metals in mining and smelting areas, and potential health risks from exposure to heavy metals in vegetables need more consideration.

  13. A comprehensive study of metal distribution in three main classes of seaweed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Siobhan; McLoughlin, Peter; O'Donovan, Orla

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides one of the most comprehensive studies of metal distributions in three main macroalgae species. In this novel study, levels of total, intracellular and surface bound Pb, Zn, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn and Ni associated with Polysiphonia lanosa (L) Tandy, Ascophyllum nodosum (L) Le Jolis, Fucus vesiculosus (L) and Ulva sp. were determined. Additionally, water and sediment metal levels were analysed to gain an insight into the relative uptake efficiencies of different macroalgal species. Samples were collected from a clean site in Fethard-on-Sea, Wexford, Ireland (52°11′53.68′N, 6°49′34.64′W), in May 2008. Results demonstrated that total, intracellular and surface bound metal levels varied according to metal and seaweed species, with the highest proportion of metals found to be intracellular. Inhibition of Mn uptake by Zn was indicated for P. lanosa. Furthermore, P. lanosa had enhanced bioaccumulation ability, with the highest Concentration Factor reported of any seaweed to date. - Highlights: ► Three main classes of seaweed were collected from the South-East coast of Ireland. ► Metal levels (total, intracellular and surface-bound) in four seaweed species were determined. ► Metal levels of seawater and sediment samples collected from the same location were quantified. ► The Concentration Factors for P. lanosa, A. nodosum, F. vesiculosus and Ulva sp., were calculated. ► Interspecies variations in seaweed metal concentrations were demonstrated. - This study, reports the most comprehensive uptake efficiencies and distributions of metals in four main seaweed sps., with P. lanosa demonstrating excellent bioaccumulation ability.

  14. Plot of invariant mass distribution of diphoton candidates after all selections of the inclusive analysis for the combined 7 TeV and 8 TeV data

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Invariant mass distribution of diphoton candidates after all selections of the inclusive analysis for the combined 7 TeV and 8 TeV data. The result of a fit to the data with the sum of a SM Higgs boson signal (with mH =126.8 GeV and free signal strength) and background is superimposed. The residuals of the data with respect to the fitted background are displayed in the lower panel.

  15. Distribution of Heavy Metals in the Different Parts of Cerithidea Obtusa and the Relationships between Metal Distribution and Allometric Parameters of the Snail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kong YAP

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The intertidal gastropod, Cerithidea obtusa were obtained from Bako and Sematan (Sarawak and Deralik (Perak. Besides the shell, the snails were dissected into five different soft tissues. The soft tissues and the shell were then analysed for heavy metals. It was found that the highest concentrations of Cu (112 - 178 μg/g dw and Zn (117 - 161 μg/g dw were found in the tentacle; the highest concentrations of Cd (4.41 - 5.37 μg/g dw, Pb (53.2 - 63.8 μg/g dw and Ni (26.1 - 27.9 μg/g dw were found in the shell. On the other hand, the highest Fe concentrations (910 - 2921 μg/g dw were found in the operculum. The Spearman's correlation coefficient and multiple stepwise linear regression also revealed that the allometric parameters can influence the distribution of heavy metals in some of the different parts. From the present findings indicated that the heavy metals accumulated by the C. obtusa from the environment might affect its physical growth, which was shown by the negative correlations found between the metals in the different parts with the allometric parameters.

  16. Tissue distribution patterns of solubilized metals from internalized tungsten alloy in the F344 rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernieda B. Vergara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of its unique physical and chemical properties, tungsten has been increasingly utilized in a variety of civilian and military applications. This expanded use also raises the risk of human exposure through internalization by various routes. In most cases the toxicological and carcinogenic properties of these tungsten-based compounds are not known nor are the dissolution biokinetics and ultimate fate of the associated metals. Using a laboratory rodent model system designed to assess the health effects of embedded metals, and a tungsten alloy comprised of tungsten (91.1%, nickel (6.0%, and cobalt (2.9%, we investigated the tissue distribution patterns of the metals over a six month period. Despite its perceived insolubility, tungsten rapidly solubilized from the implanted metal fragments, as did nickel and cobalt. All three metals distributed systemically over time with extremely elevated levels of all three metals found in kidney, liver, and spleen. Unexpectedly, tungsten was found to cross the blood-brain and blood-testis barriers and localize in those tissues. These results, along with recent reports suggesting that tungsten is a tumor promoter, raises serious concerns as to the long-term health effects of exposure to tungsten and tungsten-based compounds.

  17. Ion activity and distribution of heavy metals in acid mine drainage polluted subtropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongtao; Becquer, Thierry; Dai Jun; Quantin, Cecile; Benedetti, Marc F.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative dissolution of mine wastes gives rise to acidic, metal-enriched mine drainage (AMD) and has typically posed an additional risk to the environment. The poly-metallic mine Dabaoshan in South China is an excellent test site to understand the processes affecting the surrounding polluted agricultural fields. Our objectives were firstly to investigate metal ion activity in soil solution, distribution in solid constituents, and spatial distribution in samples, secondly to determine dominant environment factors controlling metal activity in the long-term AMD-polluted subtropical soils. Soil Column Donnan Membrane Technology (SC-DMT) combined with sequential extraction shows that unusually large proportion of the metal ions are present as free ion in the soil solutions. The narrow range of low pH values prevents any pH effects during the binding onto oxides or organic matter. The differences in speciation of the soil solutions may explain the different soil degradation observed between paddy and non-paddy soils. - First evidence of the real free metal ion concentrations in acid mine drainage context in tropical systems

  18. Moissanite (SiC) with metal-silicide and silicon inclusions from tuff of Israel: Raman spectroscopy and electron microscope studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzhinetskaya, Larissa; Mukhin, Pavel; Wang, Qin; Wirth, Richard; O'Bannon, Earl; Zhao, Wenxia; Eppelbaum, Lev; Sokhonchuk, Tatiana

    2018-06-01

    Here, we present studies of natural SiC that occurs in situ in tuff related to the Miocene alkaline basalt formation deposited in northern part of Israel. Raman spectroscopy, SEM and FIB-assisted TEM studies revealed that SiC is primarily hexagonal polytypes 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC, and that the 4H-SiC polytype is the predominant phase. Both SiC polytypes contain crystalline inclusions of silicon (Sio) and inclusions of metal-silicide with varying compositions (e.g. Si58V25Ti12Cr3Fe2, Si41Fe24Ti20Ni7V5Zr3, and Si43Fe40Ni17). The silicides crystal structure parameters match Si2TiV5 (Pm-3m space group, cubic), FeSi2Ti (Pbam space group, orthorhombic), and FeSi2 (Cmca space group, orthorhombic) respectively. We hypothesize that SiC was formed in a local ultra-reduced environment at respectively shallow depths (60-100 km), through a reaction of SiO2 with highly reducing fluids (H2O-CH4-H2-C2H6) arisen from the mantle "hot spot" and passing through alkaline basalt magma reservoir. SiO2 interacting with the fluids may originate from the walls of the crustal rocks surrounding this magmatic reservoir. This process led to the formation of SiC and accompanied by the reducing of metal-oxides to native metals, alloys, and silicides. The latter were trapped by SiC during its growth. Hence, interplate "hot spot" alkali basalt volcanism can now be included as a geological environment where SiC, silicon, and silicides can be found.

  19. Measurement of Inclusive Momentum Spectra and Multiplicity Distributions of Charged Particles at {radical}s {approx} 2-5 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunwoodie, William

    2003-08-06

    Inclusive momentum spectra and multiplicity distributions of charged particles measured with the BESII detector at center of mass energies of 2.2, 2.6, 3.0, 3.2, 4.6 and 4.8 GeV are presented. Values of the second binomial moment, R{sub 2}, obtained from the multiplicity distributions are reported. These results are compared with both experimental data from high energy e{sup +}e{sup -}, ep and p{bar p} experiments and QCD calculations.

  20. Urbanization effects on sediment and trace metals distribution in an urban winter pond (Netanya, Israel)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zohar, I.; Teutsch, N.; Levin, N.; Mackin, G.; de Stigter, H.; Bookman, R.

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThis paper aims to elucidate urban development-induced processes affecting the sediment and the distribution of contaminating metals in a seasonal pond located in the highly populated Israeli Coastal Plain. The paper demonstrates how an integrated approach, including geochemical,

  1. Metallicity and the spectral energy distribution and spectral types of dwarf O-stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokiem, MR; Martin-Hernandez, NL; Lenorzer, A; de Koter, A; Tielens, AGGA

    We present a systematic study of the effect of metallicity on the stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) of 0 main sequence (dwarf) stars, focussing on the hydrogen and helium ionizing continua, and on the optical and near-IR lines used for spectral classification. The spectra are based on

  2. Metallicity and the spectral energy distribution and spectral types of dwarf O-stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokiem, M.R.; Martín-Hernández, N.L.; Lenorzer, A.; de Koter, A.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of metallicity on the stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) of O main sequence (dwarf) stars, focussing on the hydrogen and helium ionizing continua, and on the optical and near-IR lines used for spectral classification. The spectra are based on

  3. Analysis of the distribution of heavy metals in the soils of Bagega ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uncontrolled exploitation and degradation in the environment over the past few decades as the result of urbanization and poverty has caused a serious damage to lives and properties. The study analysed the spatial distribution of heavy metal (Fe, Cu and Zn) in Bagega, Zamfara state. Three mapping units were identified ...

  4. Determination of size and shape distributions of metal and ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, DI.

    1961-01-01

    For testing the size and shape distributions of metal and ceramic uranium oxide powders the following method for analysing the grain size of powders were developed and implemented: microscopic analysis and sedimentation method. A gravimetry absorption device was constructed for determining the specific surfaces of powders

  5. Distribution of toxic metals, Hg, Cd and Pb in zooplankton along the Indian coasts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sengupta, R.; Kureishy, T.W.

    Distribution of toxic metals such as Hg, Cd and Pb in zooplankton is assessed with a view to correlate it with the prevalent environmental conditions along the Indian coast. While Hg could not be detected in zooplankton the concentrations of Cd...

  6. Distribution of uranium and some selected trace metals in human scalp hair from Balkans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunic, Z S; Tokonami, S; Mishra, S; Arae, H; Kritsananuwat, R; Sahoo, S K

    2012-11-01

    The possible consequences of the use of depleted uranium (DU) used in Balkan conflicts in 1995 and 1999 for the people and the environment of this reason need attention. The heavy metal content in human hair may serve as a good indicator of dietary, environmental and occupational exposures to the metal compounds. The present work summarises the distribution of uranium and some selected trace metals such as Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd and Cs in the scalp hair of inhabitants from Balkans exposed to DU directly and indirectly, i.e. Han Pijesak, Bratoselce and Gornja Stubla areas. Except U and Cs, all other metals were compared with the worldwide reported values of occupationally unexposed persons. Uranium concentrations show a wide variation ranging from 0.9 ± 0.05 to 449 ± 12 µg kg(-1). Although hair samples were collected from Balkan conflict zones, uranium isotopic measurement ((235)U/(238)U) shows a natural origin rather than DU.

  7. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dua, S.K.; Hillol Guha

    2001-01-01

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 microm) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 micro

  8. Grain Size Distribution and Health Risk Assessment of Metals in Outdoor Dust in Chengdu, Southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengqin; Pi, Lu; Luo, Yan; Geng, Meng; Hu, Wenli; Li, Zhi; Su, Shijun; Gan, Zhiwei; Ding, Sanglan

    2016-04-01

    A total of 27 outdoor dust samples from roads, parks, and high spots were collected and analyzed to investigate the contamination of 11 metals (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd, Sb, and Pb) in Chengdu, China. The results showed that the samples from the high spots exhibited the highest heavy metal level compared with those from the roads and the parks, except for Ni, Cu, and Pb. The dust was classified into five grain size fractions. The mean loads of each grain size fraction of 11 determined metals displayed similar distribution, and the contribution of median size (63-125, 125-250, 250-500 μm) fractions accounted for more than 70% of overall heavy metal loads. The health risk posed by the determined metals to human via dust ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation was investigated. Oral and respiratory bioaccessible parts of the metals in dust were extracted using simulated stomach solution and composite lung serum. The mean bioaccessibilities of 11 investigated metals in the gastric solution were much higher than those in the composite lung serum, especially Zn, Cd, and Pb. Ingestion was the most important exposure pathway with percentage greater than 70% for both children and adults. Risk evaluation results illustrated that children in Chengdu might suffer noncarcinogenic risk when exposed to outdoor dust. Given that the cancer risk values of Pb and Cr larger than 1 × 10(-4), potential carcinogenic risk might occur for Chengdu residents through outdoor dust intake.

  9. Size distribution, characteristics and sources of heavy metals in haze episode in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jingchun; Tan, Jihua; Hao, Jiming; Chai, Fahe

    2014-01-01

    Size segragated samples were collected during high polluted winter haze days in 2006 in Beijing, China. Twenty nine elements and 9 water soluble ions were determined. Heavy metals of Zn, Pb, Mn, Cu, As, Cr, Ni, V and Cd were deeply studied considering their toxic effect on human being. Among these heavy metals, the levels of Mn, As and Cd exceeded the reference values of National Ambient Air Quality Standard (GB3095-2012) and guidelines of World Health Organization. By estimation, high percentage of atmospheric heavy metals in PM2.5 indicates it is an effective way to control atmospheric heavy metals by PM2.5 controlling. Pb, Cd, and Zn show mostly in accumulation mode, V, Mn and Cu exist mostly in both coarse and accumulation modes, and Ni and Cr exist in all of the three modes. Considering the health effect, the breakthrough rates of atmospheric heavy metals into pulmonary alveoli are: Pb (62.1%) > As (58.1%) > Cd (57.9%) > Zn (57.7%) > Cu (55.8%) > Ni (53.5%) > Cr (52.2%) > Mn (49.2%) > V (43.5%). Positive matrix factorization method was applied for source apportionment of studied heavy metals combined with some marker elements and ions such as K, As, SO4(2-) etc., and four factors (dust, vehicle, aged and transportation, unknown) are identified and the size distribution contribution of them to atmospheric heavy metals are discussed.

  10. Distribution of metals between particulate and gaseous forms in a volcanic plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, T.K.

    1991-01-01

    In order to gain information on the distribution of metals between particles and gaseous forms in the plume of Kilauea volcano, a filter designed to collect metals associated with particles was followed in series by two other collectors intended to trap metals present in gaseous (atomic, molecular, or complexed) form: first an acid-bubbler bath and then a cold trap. Of the six metals measured, all of the In, Tl and Bi, and almost all of the Cd, Pb and Cu were found on the filter. None of any of the metals was detected in the acid-bubbler bath. Masses equivalent to 0.3% of the amount of Cd on the filter, 0.4% of the amount of Pb, and 9.3% of the Cu, were measured in the cold trap. The results indicate that all or nearly all of the six metals were partitioned to the particulate portion of the physical mixture of gases and particles that constitutes a volcanic plume, but that there may be systematic differences between chalcophile metals in the ways they are partitioned between particulate and gaseous phases in a cooled plume, and possibly differences in the acidity or other chemical properties of the molecular phases. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Pollution distribution of heavy metals in surface soil at an informal electronic-waste recycling site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2014-02-01

    We studied distribution of heavy metals [lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn)] in surface soil at an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling workshop near Metro Manila in the Philippines to evaluate the pollution size (spot size, small area or the entire workshop), as well as to assess heavy metal transport into the surrounding soil environment. On-site length-of-stride-scale (~70 cm) measurements were performed at each surface soil point using field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF). The surface soil at the e-waste recycling workshop was polluted with Cu, Zn and Pb, which were distributed discretely in surface soil. The site was divided into five areas based on the distance from an entrance gate (y-axis) of the e-waste recycling workshop. The three heavy metals showed similar concentration gradients in the y-axis direction. Zn, Pb and Cu concentrations were estimated to decrease to half of their maximum concentrations at ~3, 7 and 7 m from the pollution spot, respectively, inside the informal e-waste recycling workshop. Distance from an entrance may play an important role in heavy metal transport at the soil surface. Using on-site FP-XRF, we evaluated the metal ratio to characterise pollution features of the solid surface. Variability analysis of heavy metals revealed vanishing surficial autocorrelation over metre ranges. Also, the possibility of concentration prediction at unmeasured points using geostatistical kriging was evaluated, and heavy metals had a relative "small" pollution scales and remained inside the original workshop compared with toxic organohalogen compounds. Thus, exposure to heavy metals may directly influence the health of e-waste workers at the original site rather than the surrounding habitat and environmental media.

  12. Microchemical Analysis of Non-Metallic Inclusions in C-Mn Steel Shielded Metal Arc Welds by Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    transformation ( CCT ) diagram Figure 2.2. The microstructures that develop are determined by the cooling rate, alloying element and oxygen content of the weld...TIME Figure 2.2 CCT Diagram for the weld metal of low-carbon, low-alloy steels [From Ref. 2] To assist material scientists in microstructure

  13. Foresighting for Inclusive Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Allan Dahl; Andersen, Per Dannemand

    2017-01-01

    of policymaking processes affects the actual process with a focus on inclusion, and we discuss how it affects policy effectiveness and innovation system transformation. Our argument is that processes of policymaking must be inclusive to affect and transform innovation systems because a set of distributed actors...... in foresight cases in two emerging economies: Brazil and South Korea. We conclude that better systemic and innovation oriented foresight is needed to enhance inclusive development....

  14. Determination of the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles by optical extinction spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, Ovidio; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Luis; Rodriguez-Iglesias, Vladimir; Kellermann, Guinther; Crespo-Sosa, Alejandro; Cheang-Wong, Juan Carlos; Silva-Pereyra, Hector Gabriel; Arenas-Alatorre, Jesus; Oliver, Alicia

    2009-01-01

    A method is proposed to estimate the size distribution of nearly spherical metallic nanoparticles (NPs) from optical extinction spectroscopy (OES) measurements based on Mie's theory and an optimization algorithm. The described method is compared against two of the most widely used techniques for the task: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The size distribution of Au and Cu NPs, obtained by ion implantation in silica and a subsequent thermal annealing in air, was determined by TEM, grazing-incidence SAXS (GISAXS) geometry, and our method, and the average radius obtained by all the three techniques was almost the same for the two studied metals. Concerning the radius dispersion (RD), OES and GISAXS give very similar results, while TEM considerably underestimates the RD of the distribution

  15. Distribution of heavy metals in cocoa farm soils in the Western Region of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackah, Justice Edusei

    2012-10-01

    Western Region is the largest cocoa producer in Ghana. Cocoa farmlands have over the past decades received heavy doses of agrochemical application to boost cocoa production. These agrochemicals, however, may contain heavy metals and it is therefore likely that the metals may have accumulated in the soils. Evaluating the total concentrations and understanding the distribution characteristics of heavy metals in cocoa growing soils can aid environmental managers and even help regulate the rate of agrochemical application. A study was therefore, carried out on some selected soils of major cocoa growing areas in Western Region of Ghana to determine the levels of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) in the soils and also to determine some of the soil factors that control the distribution of the heavy metals in the soil. Eight soils (two Haplic Luvisols, three Ferric Acrisols, one Haplic Ferrasol and two Dystric Fluvisols) and their accompanying pristine soils as control were taken from adjacent natural forests sampled at depths of 0 – 10 cm, 10 – 30 cm, 30 – 50 cm, 50 – 80 cm and 80 – 100 cm. These soils were analysed for their particle size distribution, pH, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable bases, and total and bio-available Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn. The study indicated that the ΔpH which is pH_K_C_l – pH_H_2_O were all negative indicating that the soils generally had net negative charges on their colloidal surface. For all soils, clay content and pH increased with depth indicating co-migration of the two soil parameters whilst total organic carbon content decreased with depth. Cation exchange capacity, however, did not show any clear pattern with depth in the soils. The average abundance of heavy metals determined in these soils decreased as follows: Fe > Mn > Cr > Zn > Cu > Cd > Pb > Ni. The soils had low metal contents, less than or within the range of

  16. Distribution of heavy metals in sediments of the Ciujung watersheds Banten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Th Rina Mulyaningsih; Alfian; Sutisna

    2012-01-01

    Decrease of Ciujung river quality due to industry and community activities. leading to decreased quality of the river. As a result, river designation for raw drinking water, irrigation and fisheries are not suitable. Monitoring the quality of the river is one of the strategies for the environmental protection; therefore a suitable data should be required by government in a regional planning. A study of heavy metal distribution in the watershed Ciujung was carried out to determine its quality. Number of sediment samples was taken from several sampling points in the watershed, based on its pollutant sources identification. Sampling should be limited on main river (not including tributaries) from upstream to downstream river, there are 3] sampling points. Metal was analyzed using neutron activation analysis technique and AAS. The results showed that the distribution of metals Co, As, Sb, Cr, Fe, Mn, Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni and Cd fluctuate depending on the location. The highest concentrations of metals were found in downstream and industries-] area. Evaluation based on the enrichment factor, contamination factor and index of geo accumulation, ware concluded that the quality of upstream is still good has not contaminated / polluted. Industrial-], industrial-2 area and the downstream ware contaminated by Cd metal source from human activity (anthropogenic). Evaluation based on pollution load index indicates that the river has not been contaminated, but the downstream, industry-] and 2 areas has a value almost close IBT baseline level, therefore water quality monitoring in the future remains to be carried out. (author)

  17. Spatial Distribution, Sources Apportionment and Health Risk of Metals in Topsoil in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyuan Sun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to acquire the pollution feature and regularities of distribution of metals in the topsoil within the sixth ring road in Beijing, a total of 46 soil samples were collected, and the concentrations of twelve elements (Nickel, Ni, Lithium, Li, Vanadium, V, Cobalt, Co, Barium, Ba, Strontium, Sr, Chrome, Cr, Molybdenum, Mo, Copper, Cu, Cadmium, Cd, Zinc, Zn, Lead, Pb were analyzed. Geostatistics and multivariate statistics were conducted to identify spatial distribution characteristics and sources. In addition, the health risk of the analyzed heavy metals to humans (adult was evaluated by an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency health risk assessment model. The results indicate that these metals have notable variation in spatial scale. The concentration of Cr was high in the west and low in the east, while that of Mo was high in the north and low in the south. High concentrations of Cu, Cd, Zn, and Pb were found in the central part of the city. The average enrichment degree of Cd is 5.94, reaching the standard of significant enrichment. The accumulation of Cr, Mo, Cu, Cd, Zn, and Pb is influenced by anthropogenic activity, including vehicle exhaustion, coal burning, and industrial processes. Health risk assessment shows that both non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks of selected heavy metals are within the safety standard and the rank of the carcinogenic risk of the four heavy metals is Cr > Co > Ni > Cd.

  18. Spatial Distribution, Sources Apportionment and Health Risk of Metals in Topsoil in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunyuan; Zhao, Wenji; Zhang, Qianzhong; Yu, Xue; Zheng, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jiayin; Lv, Ming

    2016-07-20

    In order to acquire the pollution feature and regularities of distribution of metals in the topsoil within the sixth ring road in Beijing, a total of 46 soil samples were collected, and the concentrations of twelve elements (Nickel, Ni, Lithium, Li, Vanadium, V, Cobalt, Co, Barium, Ba, Strontium, Sr, Chrome, Cr, Molybdenum, Mo, Copper, Cu, Cadmium, Cd, Zinc, Zn, Lead, Pb) were analyzed. Geostatistics and multivariate statistics were conducted to identify spatial distribution characteristics and sources. In addition, the health risk of the analyzed heavy metals to humans (adult) was evaluated by an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency health risk assessment model. The results indicate that these metals have notable variation in spatial scale. The concentration of Cr was high in the west and low in the east, while that of Mo was high in the north and low in the south. High concentrations of Cu, Cd, Zn, and Pb were found in the central part of the city. The average enrichment degree of Cd is 5.94, reaching the standard of significant enrichment. The accumulation of Cr, Mo, Cu, Cd, Zn, and Pb is influenced by anthropogenic activity, including vehicle exhaustion, coal burning, and industrial processes. Health risk assessment shows that both non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks of selected heavy metals are within the safety standard and the rank of the carcinogenic risk of the four heavy metals is Cr > Co > Ni > Cd.

  19. Distribution of metals and metalloids in dried seaweeds and health risk to population in southeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Pan, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Bai-Fen; Han, Jian-Long

    2018-02-23

    Concern about metals and metalloids, especially heavy metals in seaweeds has risen due to potential health risk. This study investigated the distribution of 10 metals and metalloids in 295 dried seaweeds (brown and red) and estimated the possible health risk via hazard index (HI). Elements in seaweeds can be sequenced in descending order by mean values: Al > Mn > As > Cu > Cr > Ni > Cd > Se > Pb > Hg. The levels of Cd, Cu, Mn and Ni in red seaweeds were significantly higher than those in brown seaweeds (P < 0.01). Correlation analysis showed contents of Ni-Cr (r = 0.59, P < 0.01) in seaweeds had moderate positive correlations. Seaweeds from different geographical origins had diverse element distribution. Risk assessment showed that HI at mean level was less than the threshold of 1. It indicates that for the general people there is low health risk to these elements by the intake of seaweeds. Furthermore, in terms of the confirmative toxicity of some metals, such as Cd, Pb and Hg, surveillance of metals in seaweeds should be performed continuously.

  20. Speciation dynamics of metals in dispersion of nanoparticles with discrete distribution of charged binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, Pavel D; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2014-02-07

    We report a comprehensive theory to evaluate the kinetics of complex formation between metal ions and charged spherical nanoparticles. The latter consist of an ion-impermeable core surrounded by a soft shell layer characterized by a discrete axisymmetric 2D distribution of charged sites that bind metal ions. The theory explicitly integrates the conductive diffusion of metal ions from bulk solution toward the respective locations of the reactive sites within the particle shell volume. The kinetic constant k for outer-sphere nanoparticle-metal association is obtained from the sum of the contributions stemming from all reactive sites, each evaluated from the corresponding incoming flux of metal ions derived from steady-state Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. Illustrations are provided to capture the basic intertwined impacts of particle size, overall particle charge, spatial heterogeneity in site distribution, type of particle (hard, core-shell or porous) and concentration of the background electrolyte on k. As a limit, k converges with predictions from previously reported analytical expressions derived for porous particles with low and high charge density, cases that correspond to coulombic and mean-field (smeared-out) electrostatic treatments, respectively. The conditions underlying the applicability of these latter approaches are rigorously identified in terms of (i) the extent of overlap between electric double layers around charged neighbouring sites, and (ii) the magnitude of the intraparticulate metal concentration gradient. For the first time, the proposed theory integrates the differentiated impact of the local potential around the charged binding sites amidst the overall particle field, together with that of the so-far discarded intraparticulate flux of metal ions.

  1. Distribution of Rare Earth Metals in Technogenic Wastes of Energy Enterprises (Results of the Laboratory Studies)

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandr Ivanovich Khanchuk; Aleksandr Alekseevich Yudakov; Mikhail Azaryevich Medkov; Leonid Nikolayevich Alekseyko; Andrey Vasilyevich Taskin; Sergey Igorevich Ivannikov

    2016-01-01

    The results of the research interaction between ash and slag samples from Vladivostok TPP’s landfills saturated with underburning and ammonium hydrodifluoride were given. It was found out that the reactions of the main components of a concentrate with NH4HF2 are flowing with creation of complex ammonium fluoro-metalate. It is shown that the distribution of REM (rare earth metals) between foam and heavier products is going during the flotation process of carbon-containing ash and slag samples ...

  2. Distribution, relationship, and risk assessment of toxic heavy metals in walnuts and growth soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongxiang; Ni, Zhanglin; Li, Shiliang; Qu, Minghua; Tang, Fubin; Mo, Runhong; Ye, Caifen; Liu, Yihua

    2018-04-14

    Walnut is one of the most popular nuts worldwide and contains various mineral nutrients. Little is known, however, about the relationship between toxic heavy metals in walnuts and growth soil. In this study, we investigated the distribution, relationship, and risk assessment of five toxic heavy metals-lead (Pb), arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg)-in walnuts and growth soil in the main production areas of China. The results showed that the main heavy metal pollution in walnut and soil was Pb and Cd. Regionally, positive relationships existed between heavy metals and the pH and organic matter of soil. In addition, we observed a notable uptake effect between walnut and growth soil. In this study, we found a significant correlation (r = 0.786, P toxic heavy metal pollution in walnuts and growth soil could be helpful to screen suitable planting sites to prevent and control heavy metal pollution and improve the quality and safety of walnut.

  3. Spatial distribution and risk assessment of heavy metals in sediments of Shuangtaizi estuary, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chen; Song, Chengwen; Yin, Yanyan; Sun, Menghan; Tao, Ping; Shao, Mihua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Five heavy metals are analyzed in the sediments from Shuangtaizi estuary. • Particle size of the sediment effects the concentration of heavy metals. • Pb, Cu, Zn and Hg pose low ecological risks in the Shuangtaizi estuary. • Heavy metal pollution in Shuangtaizi estuary is mainly dominated by Cd. - Abstract: In order to evaluate the spatial distribution and potential ecological risk of Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Hg, the surface sediments were collected from 18 sites in the Shuangtaizi estuary. The concentrations of Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Hg were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and atomic fluorescence spectrometry after digestion. The particle sizes of the sediments were analyzed using a laser diffraction particle size analyzer. The results show that the heavy metal contents in the sediments are observed in the following order: Zn (18.25–126.75 mg/kg) > Pb (4.38–9.65 mg/kg) > Cu (1.80–17.68 mg/kg) > Cd (0.241–0.764 mg/kg) > Hg (0.007–0.021 mg/kg). In comparison with the concentrations of heavy metals in other regions, the concentrations of Pb, Cu, and Zn in the Shuangtaizi estuary are generally low, and the Cd concentrations are close to those reported in other regions. Both the potential ecological risk index and the geoaccumulation index reveal that the heavy metal pollution in Shuangtaizi estuary is mainly dominated by Cd

  4. A review of the electrodeposition of metal matrix composite coatings by inclusion of particles in a metal layer: an established and diversifying technology

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, F.C.; Ponce de Leon, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Following a brief overview of their history, which dates back to the 1920s with marked developments during the 1960s and 1970s, the principles of composite coatings, achieved by including particles dispersed in a bath into a growing electrodeposited metal layer, are considered. The principles and role of electroplating compared to other techniques for realising such coatings, are considered. A good quality particle dispersion (often aided by a suitable type and concentration of surfactants) a...

  5. Temporal and spatial distribution of alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusions in the transitional high-sulfidation epithermal-porphyry copper system at Red Mountain, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, Pilar; Newton, M. Claiborne; Westman, Erik C.; Kamilli, Robert J.; Canby, Vertrees M.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Red Mountain, Arizona, is a Laramide porphyry Cu system (PCD) that has experienced only a modest level of erosion compared to most other similar deposits in the southwestern United States. As a result, the upper portion of the magmatic–hydrothermal system, which represents the transition from shallower high-sulfidation epithermal mineralization to deeper porphyry Cu mineralization, is well preserved. Within the Red Mountain system, alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusion assemblages show a systematic distribution in both time and space. Early-potassic alteration (characterized by the minerals biotite and magnetite) is paragenetically earlier than late-potassic alteration (K-feldspar–anhydrite) and both are followed by later phyllic (sericite–pyrite) alteration. Advanced argillic alteration (pyrophyllite–alunite–other clay minerals) is thought to be coeval with or postdate phyllic alteration. Minerals characteristic of advanced argillic alteration are present in the near surface. Phyllic alteration extends to greater depths compared to advanced argillic alteration. Early-potassic and late-potassic alteration are only observed in the deepest part of the system. Considerable overlap of phyllic alteration with both early-potassic and late-potassic alteration zones is observed. The hypogene mineralization contains 0.4–1.2% Cu and is spatially and temporally related to the late-potassic alteration event. Molybdenum concentration is typically In the deepest part of the system, an early generation of low-to-moderate density and salinity liquid + vapor inclusions with opaque daughter minerals is followed in time by halite-bearing inclusions that also contain opaque daughter minerals indicating that an early intermediate-density magmatic fluid evolved to a high-density, high-salinity mineralizing fluid. The increase in density and salinity of fluids with time observed in the deeper parts of the system may be the result of immiscibility (“boiling”) of

  6. Levy's distributions for statistical description of fractal structures; discontinuous metal films on dielectric substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobierzewska-Mozrzymas, E.; Szymczak, G.; Bieganski, P.; Pieciul, E.

    2003-01-01

    The ranges of statistical description of the systems may be determined on the basis of the inverse power law of the Mandelbrot. The slope of the straight line representing the power law in a double-logarithmic plot, determined as -1/μ (μ being a critical exponent), characterizes the distribution of elements in the system. In this paper, the inverse power law is used to describe the statistical distribution of discontinuous metal films with higher coverage coefficients (near percolation threshold). For these films the critical exponent μ∼1, both the mean value and the variance are infinite. The objects with such microstructure are described according to the Levy distribution; Cauchy, inverse Gauss and inverse gamma distribution, respectively. The experimental histograms are compared with the calculated ones. Inhomogeneous metal films were obtained experimentally, their microstructures were examined by means of electron microscope. On the basis of electron micrographs, the fractal dimensions were determined for the metal films with coverage coefficient ranging from 0.35 to 1.00

  7. Assessment of heavy metals in loose deposits in drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quanli; Han, Weiqiang; Han, Bingjun; Shu, Min; Shi, Baoyou

    2018-06-09

    Heavy metal accumulation and potential releases from loose deposits in drinking water distribution system (DWDS) can have critical impacts on drinking water safety, but the associated risks have not been sufficiently evaluated. In this work, the potential biological toxicity of heavy metals in loose deposits was calculated based on consensus-based sediment quality guidelines, and the effects of some of the main water quality parameters, such as the pH and bicarbonate and phosphate content, on the release behaviors of pre-accumulated heavy metals were investigated. The results showed that heavy metals (Cu, As, Cr, Pb, and Cd) significantly accumulated in all the samples, but the contents of the heavy metals were multiple magnitudes lower than the Fe and Mn contents. The potential biotoxicity of As and Cu was relatively high, but the biotoxicity of Cd was negligible. The water quality can significantly influence the release of heavy metals from loose deposits. As the pH increased from 7.0 to 9.0, the release of As and Cr obviously increased. The release of As, Cu, Pb, and Cr also accelerated with the addition of phosphate (from 1 to 5 mg/L). In contrast to the trends for the pH and phosphate, variations in the bicarbonate content did not have a significant influence on the release of As and Cr. The release ratios of heavy metals in the samples were very low, and there was not a correlation between the release rate of the heavy metals in the loose deposits and their potential biotoxicity.

  8. Analysis of carbides and inclusions in high speed tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, K.T.; Dahl, K.V.

    2002-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of fatigued specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The aim was to quantify the distribution of cracked carbides and non-metallic inclusions on the fracturesurfaces as well as on polished cross...

  9. Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollution in Surface Soil Samples in China: A Graphical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qiannan; Lee, Jianchao; Liu, Yansong; Chen, Han; Hu, Huanyu

    2016-09-01

    Soil pollution in China is one of most wide and severe in the world. Although environmental researchers are well aware of the acuteness of soil pollution in China, a precise and comprehensive mapping system of soil pollution has never been released. By compiling, integrating and processing nearly a decade of soil pollution data, we have created cornerstone maps that illustrate the distribution and concentration of cadmium, lead, zinc, arsenic, copper and chromium in surficial soil across the nation. These summarized maps and the integrated data provide precise geographic coordinates and heavy metal concentrations; they are also the first ones to provide such thorough and comprehensive details about heavy metal soil pollution in China. In this study, we focus on some of the most polluted areas to illustrate the severity of this pressing environmental problem and demonstrate that most developed and populous areas have been subjected to heavy metal pollution.

  10. Spatial distribution and pollution evaluation of heavy metals in Yangtze estuary sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruimin; Men, Cong; Liu, Yongyan; Yu, Wenwen; Xu, Fei; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-09-15

    To analyze the spatial distribution patterns and ecological risks of heavy metals, 30 sediment samples were taken in the Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) in May 2011. The content of Al, As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Pb increased as follows: inner-regionpollutants. What is more, the greatest contaminated area appeared at the river mouth of the south branch of YRE. In Tucker 3, considering the fractions of metals, Mn turned to be the severest pollutant and As did not contribute too much to the contamination of the YRE. That was most probably because that Mn was closely related to the carbonate-associated (CARB) and As was related to organic-associated (OM) which is more stable than CARB. The fractions played an important role in the contamination assessment of heavy metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Heavy metals concentration and distribution in soils and vegetation at Korle Lagoon area in Accra, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosu-Mensah, Benedicta Yayra; Addae, Emmanuel; Yirenya-Tawiah, Dzidzo

    2017-01-01

    The call for reclamation of land around Korle Lagoon in Accra, Ghana, where burning of E-waste and cultivation of vegetables takes place, make risk assessment of heavy metal contaminations important. This study aimed at evaluating the levels and risk of heavy metal contamination in soils...... and vegetation around the Korle lagoon area in Accra. Geoaccumulation index, enrichment factor and pollution load index were determined to assess the risk of contamination. The levels and distribution of nine heavy metals (Pb, Hg, Cd, As, Zn, Sn, Ni, Cu and Cr) in soil (0 – 20 cm) and common vegetation (Panicum...... was significantly different (p burning of e-waste should be enforced and animals...

  12. Geochemical distribution of trace metals and organochlorine contaminants of a lake ontario shoreline marsh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glooschenko, W A; Capocianco, J; Coburn, J; Glooschenko, V

    1981-02-01

    Rattray Marsh, an 8 ha marsh on the Lake Ontario shoreline at Mississauga, Ontario, is an important local habitat for waterfowl and shorebirds during spring and fall migration. A study was conducted to determine the distribution of nutrients (carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) and potential trace metal and organochlorine pollutants in the marsh as evidenced by the sedimentary concentrations of these compounds. Generally, copper, zinc, lead, and mercury were higher in concentration in local soils than in Lake Ontario sediments. Metals and organic carbon levels did not correlate, and the metals appeared to be associated with silts and clays. Organochlorine contaminants include p,p1-DDE, p,p1-DDD, p,p1-DDT, alpha-chlordane, PCB, mirex, and HCB.

  13. Distribution and mobility of metals in contaminated sites. chemometric investigation of pollutant profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abollino, Ornella; Aceto, Maurizio; Malandrino, Mery; Mentasti, Edoardo; Sarzanini, Corrado; Barberis, Renzo

    2002-01-01

    The distribution and mobility of heavy metals in the soils of two contaminated sites in Piedmont (Italy) was investigated, evaluating the horizontal and vertical profiles of 15 metals, namely Al, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe. La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sc, Ti, V, Y, Zn and Zr. The concentrations in the most polluted areas of the sites were higher than the acceptable limits reported in Italian and Dutch legislations for soil reclamation. Chemometric elaboration of the results by pattern recognition techniques allowed us to identify groups of samples with similar characteristics and to find correlations among the variables. The pollutant mobility was studied by extraction with water, dilute acetic acid and EDTA and by applying Tessier's procedure. The fraction of mobile species, which potentially is the most harmful for the environment, was found to be higher than the one normally present in unpolluted soils, where heavy metals are, to a higher extent, strongly bound to the matrix.

  14. Spatial heavy metals Zn and Cr distribution in soil samples taken from Tatra Mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stobinski, M.; Misiak, R.; Kubica, B.

    2008-03-01

    The basic issue of presented report is showing the spatial heavy metals (Zn and Cr) distribution in soil samples taken from High Mts area. The expertise was done using two analytical techniques: AAS (atomic absorption spectroscopy) and micro-PIXIE (proton induced X-ray emission).Given heavy metals concentration were originated either from soil surface (10 cm depth) or from the whole soil profile. Our evaluation indicates that the Zn and Cr levels measured for mountains region were comparable to the data presented by other authors. Furthermore, the amount of heavy metals is strongly correlated with its natural concentration in parental rock.We also observed that zinc was prone to accumulate in surface, rich in organic matter, soil levels. (author)

  15. Angular and mass resolved energy distribution measurements with a gallium liquid metal ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriott, Philip

    1987-06-01

    Ionisation and energy broadening mechanisms relevant to liquid metal ion sources are discussed. A review of experimental results giving a picture of source operation and a discussion of the emission mechanisms thought to occur for the ionic species and droplets emitted is presented. Further work is suggested by this review and an analysis system for angular and mass resolved energy distribution measurements of liquid metal ion source beams has been constructed. The energy analyser has been calibrated and a series of measurements, both on and off the beam axis, of 69 Ga + , Ga ++ and Ga 2 + ions emitted at various currents from a gallium source has been performed. A comparison is made between these results and published work where possible, and the results are discussed with the aim of determining the emission and energy spread mechanisms operating in the gallium liquid metal ion source. (author)

  16. Fluid inclusion geothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, C.G.

    1977-01-01

    Fluid inclusions trapped within crystals either during growth or at a later time provide many clues to the histories of rocks and ores. Estimates of fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature and density can be obtained using a petrographic microscope with thin sections, and they can be refined using heating and freezing stages. Fluid inclusion studies, used in conjunction with paragenetic studies, can provide direct data on the time and space variations of parameters such as temperature, pressure, density, and composition of fluids in geologic environments. Changes in these parameters directly affect the fugacity, composition, and pH of fluids, thus directly influencing localization of ore metals. ?? 1977 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  17. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline–alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation. PMID:26064038

  18. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-06-01

    Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline-alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation.

  19. Concentrations and distributions of metals associated with dissolved organic matter from the Suwannee River (GA, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, M. Keshia; Neubauer, Elisabeth; Hofmann, Thilo; von der Kammer, Frank; Aiken, George R.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations and distributions of metals in Suwannee River (SR) raw filtered surface water (RFSW) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) processed by reverse osmosis (RO), XAD-8 resin (for humic and fulvic acids [FA]), and XAD-4 resin (for “transphilic” acids) were analyzed by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF). SR samples were compared with DOM samples from Nelson's Creek (NLC), a wetland-draining stream in northern Michigan; previous International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) FA and RO samples from the SR; and an XAD-8 sample from Lake Fryxell (LF), Antarctica. Despite application of cation exchange during sample processing, all XAD and RO samples contained substantial metal concentrations. AsFlFFF fractograms allowed metal distributions to be characterized as a function of DOM component molecular weight (MW). In SR RFSW, Fe, Al, and Cu were primarily associated with intermediate to higher than average MW DOM components. SR RO, XAD-8, and XAD-4 samples from May 2012 showed similar MW trends for Fe and Al but Cu tended to associate more with lower MW DOM. LF DOM had abundant Cu and Zn, perhaps due to amine groups that should be present due to its primarily algal origins. None of the fractograms showed obvious evidence for mineral nanoparticles, although some very small mineral nanoparticles might have been present at trace concentrations. This research suggests that AsFlFFF is important for understanding how metals are distributed in different DOM samples (including IHSS samples), which may be key to metal reactivity and bioavailability.

  20. Concentrations, Distribution, and Ecological Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Daya Bay, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Tang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface sediment samples were collected from 19 sites throughout Daya Bay, China to study the concentrations, spatial distributions, potential ecological risk, and possible sources of heavy, including metals copper (Cu, zinc (Zn, arsenic (As, cadmium (Cd, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb, mercury (Hg, and chromium (Cr. The mean concentrations of the eight heavy metals were 24, 109, 6.5, 0.09, 35.3, 26.8, 0.07, and 109 µg g−1, respectively. The concentrations of most heavy metals were within range of those recorded in previous years. The spatial distribution pattern of most heavy metals were similar, with lowest values recorded along the southeast coast and the open sea area; the highest values were recorded in the northern Daya Bay, especially the northwest. Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb, and Hg were classified as Class I, and Ni and Cr were classified as Class II according to the Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs of China. The potential ecological risk (Eif indices of Cu, Zn, As, Pb, Ni, and Cr specify that these metals pose low risk to the ecosystem of the Bay, whereas Cd and Hg pose a very high risk in some sites. The geoaccumulation indices (Igeo of Cu, Zn, As, Ni, and Cr specify weak or no pollution in Daya Bay, whereas those of Pb, Cd, and Hg in some sites indicate moderate or even high pollution. Spatial distribution, carbon/nitrogen analysis, Pearson correlation, and principal components analysis indicated that Cu, Zn, As, Pb, Ni, Cr, total organic carbon (TOC, and total nitrogen (TN originated from the same sources. Ballast water or sewage from the cargo ships that park at the harbors or anchor in the Bay were the important sources for Cu, Zn, As, Pb, Ni, Cr, TOC, and TN. Other anthropogenic sources, such as agricultural runoff and aquaculture, might also be responsible, whereas Hg and Cd originated from other point sources.

  1. Mathematical modelling for distribution of heavy metals in estuary area of Red River (Vietnam)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N. T. T.; Volkova, I. V.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, the authors studied the features of spatial distribution of some heavy metals (Pb, Hg, As) in the system “suspended substance - bottom sediments” in the mouth area of the Red River (Vietnam). A mathematical modelling for diffusion processes of heavy metals in a suspended form, in bottom sediments and the spatial analysis for the results of these models were proposed and implemented. The studies were carried out during main hydrological seasons of 2014 - 2016 (during the flood and inter-natal periods). The propagation of heavy metals was modeled by solving the equation of turbulent diffusion. A spatial analysis of the content of heavy metals in the suspended form and in the bottom sediments was implemented by using the interpolation model in ArcGIS 10.2.2. The distribution of Pb, Hg, As concentration of the suspended form and bottom sediment phases in the estuary area of the Red River was characterized by maximum in the mouths of the branches and general decreasing gradient towards the sea. Maximum concentrations of Pb, Hg in suspended forms were observed in the surface layer of water at the river-sea barrier. The content of Hg and As in the estuary region of the Red River was observed in the following order: SSsurfBS.

  2. Heavy Metal Distribution in Opportunistic Beach Nourishment: A Case Study in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Foteinis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence and distribution of persistent pollutants, such as heavy metals, in coastal sediment used for opportunistic beach nourishment, is a problem that has not received much attention. Here, we assessed the coastal sediments in one restoration project for the occurrence and distribution of heavy metals, by utilizing an Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF system. Heavy metal point sources included (i the effluents of small industries (tanneries, (ii wastewater treatment plant effluents, and (iii paint and oil scraps from substandard ship maintenance activities that take place on ports breakwaters. A few neighboring beaches were found to have similar heavy metal concentrations, with mean values of Cu, Zn, and Pb ranging from 80 to 130, 15 to 25, and 25 to 40 mg/kg, respectively. Existing legislation regarding dredging activities in Greece appears insufficient for sustainable and environmentally friendly nourishment. We conclude that before opportunistic beach restoration projects materialize with material borrowed from ports and harbors the quality of the dredged material needs to be assessed.

  3. FINITE-ELEMENT MODELING OF HOT FORMING OF BUSHES MADE FROM HIGH-STRENGTH CAST IRON WITH A GRADIENT DISTRIBUTION OF GRAPHITE INCLUSIONS OVER CROSS-SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Pokrovsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Imitation modeling of direct hot extrusion of bushes made from high-strength cast iron is performed using finite-element method. The evolution of stress and strain fields during processing and the probability of crack formation are evaluated. The specific feature of the work is that during hot forming a special technique was used which permitted obtaining a gradient distribution of graphite inclusions over the cross-section of bushes. The results of modeling are used in certain technologies which are implemented in industrial practice.

  4. Surficial and vertical distribution of heavy metals in different estuary wetlands in the Pearl river, South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Honggang; Cui, Baoshan [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Kejiang [Xinjiang Research Center of Water and Wastewater Treatment, Xinjiang Deland Co., LTD., Urumqi (China)

    2012-10-15

    A total of 87 soil profiles sampled from five types of wetlands in the Pearl River estuary were analyzed to investigate the surficial and vertical distributions of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn). The results show that wetlands directly connected with rivers (e.g., riparian wetlands, estuarine wetlands, and mangrove wetlands) has much higher metal concentrations than those indirectly connected with rivers (e.g., pond wetlands and reclaimed wetlands). The river water is the major pollution source for all investigated heavy metals. The vertical distribution of heavy metals can be classified into three patterns: (i) linear distribution pattern. The concentration of heavy metals gradually decreases with an increase in soil depth (for riparian and estuarine wetlands); (ii) irregular and stable pattern (for pond and reclaimed wetlands); and (iii) middle enrichment pattern (for mangrove wetlands). In addition to river-borne inputs, a variety of vegetation composition, hydraulic conditions, and human activities also contribute to the variation in distribution of heavy metals in different wetlands. Soil properties (e.g., particle size, pH, salinity, and SOM) also affect the distribution of trace metals in each soil layer. The major pollution source of heavy metals is industrial wastewater. Other sources include agriculture and domestic premises, and atmospheric deposition. This study provides a sound basis for the risk assessment of heavy metals in the studied wetlands and for wetland conservation in general. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Distribution of particulate trace metals in the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Satyanarayana, D.; Murty, P.V.S.P.; Sarma, V.V.

    continuous increase from surface to bottom in the case ofFe, Ni, which appeared to be related to a combination offactors suchas authigenicprecipita tion/scavenging, rcsuspension of bottom rich sediments, and diffusion followed by precipitation at sedimcnt... ), most of these studies do not provide information onthe interaction of trace elements with particulate matter. The present study deals with the distribution of particulate trace metals (Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd) and their possible interactions...

  6. STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTION PATTERNS IN MECHANICAL AND FATIGUE PROPERTIES OF METALLIC MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Tatsuo, SAKAI; Masaki, NAKAJIMA; Keiro, TOKAJI; Norihiko, HASEGAWA; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ritsumeikan University; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyota College of Technology; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Gifu University; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Gifu University

    1997-01-01

    Many papers on the statistical aspect of materials strength have been collected and reviewed by The Research Group for Statistical Aspects of Materials Strength.A book of "Statistical Aspects of Materials Strength" was written by this group, and published in 1992.Based on the experimental data compiled in this book, distribution patterns of mechanical properties are systematically surveyed paying an attention to metallic materials.Thus one can obtain the fundamental knowledge for a reliabilit...

  7. The distribution of heavy metals in the red abalone, haliotis rufescens, on the california coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderlini, V.

    1974-01-01

    The gills, mantle, digestive gland, and foot muscle of 74 specimens of the red abalone, haliotis rufescens, from five localities on the california coast are analyzed for eight heavy metals. The distribution of these elements in the abalones appears to be non-normal. High lead concentrations in the la jolla-long beach area seem to reflect pollutant inputs; elsewhere lead levels appear to derive from natural sources. (1 graph, 1 map, 31 references, 1 table)

  8. The Particle Distribution in Liquid Metal with Ceramic Particles Mould Filling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qi; Xing, Shu-ming

    2017-09-01

    Adding ceramic particles in the plate hammer is an effective method to increase the wear resistance of the hammer. The liquid phase method is based on the “with the flow of mixed liquid forging composite preparation of ZTA ceramic particle reinforced high chromium cast iron hammer. Preparation method for this system is using CFD simulation analysis the particles distribution of flow mixing and filling process. Taking the 30% volume fraction of ZTA ceramic composite of high chromium cast iron hammer as example, by changing the speed of liquid metal viscosity to control and make reasonable predictions of particles distribution before solidification.

  9. Temporal variations in metallothionein concentration and subcellular distribution of metals in gills and digestive glands of the oyster Crassostrea angulata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Trombini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The metallothionein levels and metal concentrations in whole body, digestive gland and gills of Crassostrea angulata were analyzed in field samples collected from the River Guadalquivir estuary over several years following a mining waste spill upstream. The subcellular distribution of metals was analyzed to determine the mechanisms involved in the detoxification process. The highest metallothionein levels were reported in the digestive gland shortly after the mining contamination event. In this organ, metals are stored preferentially in the non-cytosolic fraction when increased bioaccumulation takes place. In the cytosol of the gills, metals are associated with metallothionein, whereas in the digestive gland, the distribution of metals between metallothioneins and high molecular weight proteins is similar. Metallothionein variation cannot be explained by metals alone; other abiotic factors must be taken into account. In order to use metallothionein as a metal exposure biomarker in field studies, natural variability needs to be taken into account for the correct interpretation of results.

  10. Distribution and Analysis of Heavy Metals Contamination in Soil, Perlis, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihla Kamarudzaman, Ain; Woo, Yee Shan; Jalil, Mohd Faizal Ab

    2018-03-01

    The concentration of six heavy metals such as Cu, Cr, Ni, Cd, Zn and Mn were studied in the soils around Perlis. The aim of the study is to assess the heavy metals contamination distribution due to industrialisation and agricultural activities. Soil samples were collected at depth of 0 - 15 cm in five stations around Perlis. The soil samples are subjected to soil extraction and the concentration of heavy metals was determined via ICP - OES. Overall concentrations of Cr, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cd and Mn in the soil samples ranged from 0.003 - 0.235 mg/L, 0.08 - 41.187 mg/L, 0.065 - 45.395 mg/L, 0.031 - 2.198 mg/L, 0.01 - 0.174 mg/L and 0.165 - 63.789 mg/L respectively. The concentration of heavy metals in the soil showed the following decreasing trend, Mn > Zn > Cu > Ni > Cr > Cd. From the result, the level of heavy metals in the soil near centralised Chuping industrial areas gives maximum value compared to other locations in Perlis. As a conclusion, increasing anthropogenic activities have influenced the environment, especially in increasing the pollution loading.

  11. The spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals in sediments of Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Chloe Wing-yee; Ip, Carman Ching-man; Zhang Gan; Shin, Paul K.S.; Qian Peiyuan; Li Xiangdong

    2008-01-01

    Victoria Harbour has received substantial loadings of pollutants from industrial and municipal wastewater discharged since the 1950s. Inputs of contaminants have declined dramatically during the last two decades as a result of better controls at the source and improved wastewater treatment facilities. To assess the spatial and temporal changes of metal contaminants in sediments in Victoria Harbour, core and grab sediments were collected. The central harbour areas were generally contaminated with heavy metals. The spatial distribution of trace metals can probably be attributed to the proximity of major urban and industrial discharge points, and to the effect of tidal flushing in the harbour. In the sediment cores, the highest concentrations of trace metals were observed to have accumulated during the 1950s-1980s, corresponding with the period of rapid urban and industrial development in Hong Kong. From the late 1980s, there has been a major decline in the concentrations of trace metals, due to a reduction in industrial activities and to the enactment of wastewater pollution controls in the territory. The Pb isotopic compositions of the sediments revealed the anthropogenic inputs of Pb to the harbour. The 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios varied from 1.154 to 1.190, which were lower than those of background geological materials in Hong Kong ( 206 Pb/ 207 Pb: 1.201-1.279). The data also indicated that the Pb in the harbour sediments most likely originated from mixed sources, including the leaded gasoline used in the past and other anthropogenic sources

  12. Study of particle size and trace metal distribution in atmospheric aerosols of islamabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.H.; Shaheen, N.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected on glass fibre filters using high volume air samplers Half of each aerosol sample was solubilized in nitric acid/hydrochloric acid based wet digestion method and the concentration of trace metals was determined through flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Among the eight trace metals analyzed, mean concentration recorded for Zn (844 ng/m3), Fe (642 ng/m3) and Pb (253 ng/m3), was found to be higher than mean levels of Mn, Cr and Co. The size distribution of the collected particulate samples was carried out on mastersizer, which revealed PM/sub 100-10/ as the major fraction (55 %) followed by PM/sub 2.5-10/ (28 %). The correlation study evidenced a strong tendency of trace metals to be associated with fine particulate fractions. The atmospheric trace metal levels showed that the mean metal concentrations in the atmosphere of Islamabad are far higher than background and European urban sites mainly due to the anthropogenic emissions. (author)

  13. Heavy metal concentrations and distribution in surface soils of the Bassa Industrial Zone 1, Douala, Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaah, Victor A.; Abimbola, Akinlolu F.; Suh, Cheo E.

    2006-01-01

    Partial extraction was carried out on 33 soil samples collected from the Bassa Industrial Zone 1, Douala, Cameroon. From the samples analyzed the following metal concentrations (range) were obtained (in ppm): Ag (0-1.3), As (0-64), Cd(0-7.3), Co(0-31), Cr(34-423), Cu(12-909), Mn(55-3282), Mo(0-81.6), Ni(9-284), Pb (0-3320), Sb (0-30), Sc (0.6-7.5), V (26-110), Zn (30-3782) and Fe (in wt%) (1.50-47.31). Results obtained reveal background and anomalous populations for most of the metals except Sc and V, which have only background populations. Multi-element geochemical anomalies occur within the vicinity of industries, waste dump sites, metal workshops and mechanical workshops. R-mode factor analysis reveals three element associations and two singular elements (As, Cd) accounting for 94% of the total data variance. The three associations are: Ag-Cu-Cr-Fe-Mn-Mo-Ni-Sb; Co-Cu-Pb-Sb-Zn and Sc-V. The geoaccumulation indices show that soils in the Bassa Industrial Zone are moderately to very highly pollute. These metal-laden soils constitute a major health risk to the local population and a cause for concern. This study successfully relates the concentration and distribution of toxic metals in the soils of Bassa Industrial Zone to urban effluents generated mainly from industrial activities. (author)

  14. Effects of sulfate on heavy metal release from iron corrosion scales in drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Yang, Fan; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-05-01

    Trace heavy metals accumulated in iron corrosion scales within a drinking water distribution system (DWDS) could potentially be released to bulk water and consequently deteriorate the tap water quality. The objective of this study was to identify and evaluate the release of trace heavy metals in DWDS under changing source water conditions. Experimental pipe loops with different iron corrosion scales were set up to simulate the actual DWDS. The effects of sulfate levels on heavy metal release were systemically investigated. Heavy metal releases of Mn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Cr and As could be rapidly triggered by sulfate addition but the releases slowly decreased over time. Heavy metal release was more severe in pipes transporting groundwater (GW) than in pipes transporting surface water (SW). There were strong positive correlations (R 2  > 0.8) between the releases of Fe and Mn, Fe and Ni, Fe and Cu, and Fe and Pb. When switching to higher sulfate water, iron corrosion scales in all pipe loops tended to be more stable (especially in pipes transporting GW), with a larger proportion of stable constituents (mainly Fe 3 O 4 ) and fewer unstable compounds (β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, FeCO 3 and amorphous iron oxides). The main functional iron reducing bacteria (IRB) communities were favorable for the formation of Fe 3 O 4 . The transformation of corrosion scales and the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) accounted for the gradually reduced heavy metal release with time. The higher metal release in pipes transporting GW could be due to increased Fe 6 (OH) 12 CO 3 content under higher sulfate concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Heavy metals distribution characteristics and ecological risk evaluation in surface sediments of dammed Jinshan lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Long-Mei; Chen, Xi; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Li, Yi-Min; Liu, Biao

    2014-11-01

    In order to reveal the pollution loading of heavy metals in Dammed Jinshan lake, six heavy metals (As, Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, Cr) from 18 sediment samples were analyzed using ICP, and the distribution characteristics of heavy metals in the sediment were comprehensively evaluated through concentration coefficient, geo-acumulation indexes, potential ecological risk evaluation and traceability analysis. The results showed that (1) the average contents of As, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Cd were 23.22, 26.20, 24.42, 143.12, 245.30 and 0.67 mg x kg(-1), respectively, in the surface sediments of dammed Jinshan Lake. The average contents of Pb and Cu were lower than the primary standard and secondary standards of soil environmental quality standards. The average contents of Zn and Cr were lower than the primary standard and higher than the secondary standards of soil environmental quality standards. The average contents of As and Cd were higher than the primary and secondary standards of soil environmental quality standards. From the spatial distribution, the contents of Pb and Zn were the highest at sampling site No. 1, which was located at the Beigushan Square. The contents of As,Cu, Cr, Cd were the highest at sampling sites Nos. 12, 3, 14, and 7, respectively; (2) The order of concentration coefficient was As > Cr > Cd > Pb > Zn > Cu, which indicated that the enrichment amount of As was the highest and that of Cu was the lowest; (3) Based on the geo-acumulation indexes, the Cu is clean and Pb, Zn, Cd is the light pollution and As, Cr moderate pollution; (4) The order of Potential ecological risk coefficient was Cd > As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Zn, Cr, Pb, Cu, Zn were of light ecological risk and As, Cd were of medium ecological risk. From the spatial distribution, the sampling sites Nos. 1, 6, 7 and 12 had medium potential ecological risk, and the rest sample points had slight potential ecological risk; (5) The principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that the main reason for the differences

  16. A STUDY OF LEAKAGE OF TRACE METALS FROM CORROSION OF THE MUNICIPAL DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R SHA MANSOURI

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A high portion of lead and copper concentration in municipal drinking water is related to the metallic structure of the distribution system and facets. The corrosive water in pipes and facets cause dissolution of the metals such as Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn, Fe and Mn into the water. Due to the lack of research work in this area, a study of the trace metals were performed in the drinking water distribution system in Zarin Shahr and Mobareke of Isfahan province. Methods: Based on the united states Environmental protection Agency (USEPA for the cities over than 50,000 population such as Zarin Shahr and Mobareke, 30 water samples from home facets with the minimum 6 hours retention time of water in pipes, were collected. Lead and cadmium concentration were determined using flameless Atomic Absorption. Cupper, Zinc, Iron and Manganese were determined using Atomic Absorption. Results: The average concentration of Pb, Cd, Zn, Fe and Mn in water distribution system fo Zarin Shahr were 5.7, 0.1, 80, 3042, 23065 and in Mobareke were 7.83, 0.8,210,3100, 253, 17µg respectively. The cocentration of Pb, Cd and Zn were zero at the beginning of the water samples from the municipal drinking water distribution system for both cities. Conclusion: The study showed that the corrosion by products (such as Pb, Cd and Zn was the results of dissolution of the galvanized pipes and brass facets. Lead concentration in over that 10 percent of the water samples in zarin shahr exceeded the drinking water standard level, which emphasize the evaluation and control of corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

  17. Spatial distribution and pollution assessment of heavy metals in urban soils from southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Guo; FengchangWu; Fazhi Xie; Ruiqing Zhang

    2012-01-01

    To identify the concentrations and sources of heavy metals,and to assess soil environmental quality,63 soil samples were collected in Yibin City,Sichuan Province,China.Mean concentrations of As,Pb,Zn,and Cu were 10.55,61.23,138.88 and 56.35 mg/kg,respectively.As concentrations were comparable to background values,while Pb,Zn,and Cu concentrations were higher than their corresponding background values.Industrial areas exhibited the highest concentrations of As,Pb,Zn,and Cu,while the lowest concentrations occurred in parks.Statistical analysis was performed and two cluster groups of metals were identified with Pb,Zn,and Cu in one group and As in the other.Spatial distribution maps indicated that Pb,Zn,and Cu were mainly controlled by anthropogenic activities,whereas As could be mainly accounted for by soil parent materials.Pollution index values of As,Pb,Zn,and Cu varied in the range of 0.24-1.93,0.66-7.24,0.42-4.19,and 0.62-5.25,with mean values of 0.86,1.98,1.61,and 1.78,respectively.The integrated pollution index(IPI)values of these metals varied from 0.82 to 3.54,with a mean of 1.6 and more than 90% of soil samples were moderately or highly contaminated with heavy metals.The spatial distribution of IPI showed that newer urban areas displayed relatively lower heavy metal contamination in comparison with older urban areas.

  18. High-resolution insight into the competitive adsorption of heavy metals on natural sediment by site energy distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Limin; Jin, Qiang; Tandon, Puja; Li, Aimin; Shan, Aidang; Du, Jiajie

    2018-04-01

    Investigating competitive adsorption on river/lake sediments is valuable for understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals. Most studies have studied the adsorption isotherms of competitive heavy metals, which mainly comparing the adsorption information on the same concentration. However, intrinsically, the concentration of each heavy metal on competitive adsorption sites is different, while the adsorption energy is identical. Thus, this paper introduced the site energy distribution theory to increase insight into the competitive adsorption of heavy metals (Cu, Cd and Zn). The site energy distributions of each metal with and without other coexisting heavy metals were obtained. It illustrated that site energy distributions provide much more information than adsorption isotherms through screening of the full energy range. The results showed the superior heavy metal in each site energy area and the influence of competitive metals on the site energy distribution of target heavy metal. Site energy distributions can further help in determining the competitive sites and ratios of coexisting metals. In particular, in the high-energy area, which has great environmental significance, the ratios of heavy metals in the competitive adsorption sites obtained for various competitive systems were as follows: slightly more than 3:1 (Cu-Cd), slightly less than 3:1 (Cu-Zn), slightly more than 1:1 (Cd-Zn), and nearly 7:2:2 (Cu-Cd-Zn). The results from this study are helpful to deeply understand competitive adsorption of heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Zn) on sediment. Therefore, this study was effective in presenting a general pattern for future reference in competitive adsorption studies on sediments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatial distribution and potential sources of trace metals in insoluble particles of snow from Urumqi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolan; Jiang, Fengqing; Wang, Shaoping; Turdi, Muyesser; Zhang, Zhaoyong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize trace elements in snow in urban-suburb gradient over Urumqi city, China. The spatial distribution patterns of 11 trace metals in insoluble particulate matters of snow were revealed by using 102 snow samples collected in and around urban areas of Urumqi, a city suffering from severe wintertime air pollution in China. Similar spatial distribution for Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, and Pb was found and their two significant high-value areas located in the west and east, respectively, and a high-value area in the south, which were correlated with factory emissions, traffic activities, and construction fugitive dust. The high-value areas of Cr, Ni, and V occurred in the northeast corner and along main traffic paths, which were linked to oil refinery and vehicular emissions. High value of Be presented in the west of the city. The high-value area of Co in the northeast could be related to local soil. Cd and U displayed relatively even spatial patterns in the urban area. In view of distance from the urban center, e.g., from the first circular belt to the fourth circular belt, except Be, V, Cd, and U, the contents of other metals generally decreased from the first circular belt to the forth circular belt, implying the effect of human activity clearly. Additionally, prevailing northwesterly winds and occasionally southeasterly winds in winter were associated with decreased, generally, concentrations of trace metal in snow from the urban center to the southern suburb along a northwest and southeast transect. The information on concentrations and spatial distributions of these metals in insoluble particles of snow in winter will be valuable for further environmental protection and planning.

  20. Partial Discharge Monitoring on Metal-Enclosed Switchgear with Distributed Non-Contact Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongxing Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Metal-enclosed switchgear, which are widely used in the distribution of electrical energy, play an important role in power distribution networks. Their safe operation is directly related to the reliability of power system as well as the power quality on the consumer side. Partial discharge detection is an effective way to identify potential faults and can be utilized for insulation diagnosis of metal-enclosed switchgear. The transient earth voltage method, an effective non-intrusive method, has substantial engineering application value for estimating the insulation condition of switchgear. However, the practical application effectiveness of TEV detection is not satisfactory because of the lack of a TEV detection application method, i.e., a method with sufficient technical cognition and analysis. This paper proposes an innovative online PD detection system and a corresponding application strategy based on an intelligent feedback distributed TEV wireless sensor network, consisting of sensing, communication, and diagnosis layers. In the proposed system, the TEV signal or status data are wirelessly transmitted to the terminal following low-energy signal preprocessing and acquisition by TEV sensors. Then, a central server analyzes the correlation of the uploaded data and gives a fault warning level according to the quantity, trend, parallel analysis, and phase resolved partial discharge pattern recognition. In this way, a TEV detection system and strategy with distributed acquisition, unitized fault warning, and centralized diagnosis is realized. The proposed system has positive significance for reducing the fault rate of medium voltage switchgear and improving its operation and maintenance level.

  1. Partial Discharge Monitoring on Metal-Enclosed Switchgear with Distributed Non-Contact Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongxing; Dong, Ming; Ren, Ming; Huang, Wenguang; Zhou, Jierui; Gao, Xuze; Albarracín, Ricardo

    2018-02-11

    Metal-enclosed switchgear, which are widely used in the distribution of electrical energy, play an important role in power distribution networks. Their safe operation is directly related to the reliability of power system as well as the power quality on the consumer side. Partial discharge detection is an effective way to identify potential faults and can be utilized for insulation diagnosis of metal-enclosed switchgear. The transient earth voltage method, an effective non-intrusive method, has substantial engineering application value for estimating the insulation condition of switchgear. However, the practical application effectiveness of TEV detection is not satisfactory because of the lack of a TEV detection application method, i.e., a method with sufficient technical cognition and analysis. This paper proposes an innovative online PD detection system and a corresponding application strategy based on an intelligent feedback distributed TEV wireless sensor network, consisting of sensing, communication, and diagnosis layers. In the proposed system, the TEV signal or status data are wirelessly transmitted to the terminal following low-energy signal preprocessing and acquisition by TEV sensors. Then, a central server analyzes the correlation of the uploaded data and gives a fault warning level according to the quantity, trend, parallel analysis, and phase resolved partial discharge pattern recognition. In this way, a TEV detection system and strategy with distributed acquisition, unitized fault warning, and centralized diagnosis is realized. The proposed system has positive significance for reducing the fault rate of medium voltage switchgear and improving its operation and maintenance level.

  2. [Distribution of Urban Soil Heavy Metal and Pollution Evaluation in Different Functional Zones of Yinchuan City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, You-qi; Bai, Yi-ru; Wang, Jian-yu

    2016-02-15

    Surface soil samples (0-20 cm) from eight different functional areas in Yinchuan city were collected. There were 10 samples respectively in each functional area. The urban soil heavy metals (Zn, Cd, Pb, Mn, Cu and Cr) pollution characteristics and sources in eight different functional areas were evaluated by mathematical statistics and geostatistical analysis method. Meanwhile, the spatial distributions of heavy metals based on the geography information system (GIS) were plotted. The average values of total Zn, Cd, Pb, Mn, Cu and Cr were 74.87, 0.15, 29.02, 553.55, 40.37 and 80.79 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The results showed that the average value of soil heavy metals was higher than the soil background value of Ningxia, which indicated accumulation of the heavy metals in urban soil. The single factor pollution index of soil heavy metals was in the sequence of Cu > Pb > Zn > Cr > Cd > Mn. The average values of total Zn, Cd, Pb and Cr were higher in north east, south west and central city, while the average values of Mn and Cu were higher in north east and central city. There was moderate pollution in road and industrial area of Yinchuan, while the other functional areas showed slight pollution according to Nemoro synthesis index. The pollution degree of different functional areas was as follows: road > industrial area > business district > medical treatment area > residential area > public park > development zone > science and education area. The results indicated that the soil heavy metal pollution condition in Yinchuan City has been affected by human activities with the development of economy.

  3. [Effects of Fulvic Acid on Absorption and Form Distribution of Heavy Metals on Sediments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-qing; He, Jiang; Lü, Chang-wei; Fan, Ming-de; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Rui-qing; Xie, Zhi- lei; Wang, Jing-hua; Yu, Bo; En, He; Ding, Tao

    2016-03-15

    Based on the extracted fulvic acid (FA) from Lake Wuliangsuhai sediments by sequential alkali extraction, this work studied the effects of FA on the adsorption and fraction distribution of heavy metals (HM) on sediments using original sediments and sediments treated with 30% H₂O₂ as adsorbents. The results showed both organic matter and FA had effects on the HM adsorption onto sediments; The treatments of FA-free conditions and the sediments treated by H₂O₂ showed relatively strong influence on Cu²⁺ adsorption, which decreased the Cu²⁺ adsorption by 17.85%. With the increasing FA addition, the adsorption percentage of HM on both types of sediments showed gradually decreasing trends, with the order of Cu²⁺ > Cd²⁺ > Zn²⁺ > Pb²⁺; when the FA content was more than 5% , FA became the governing factor on the decreasing adsorption percentage of HM. With increasing FA addition, forms distribution of HM showed significant changes in both types of sediments; i. e. FA additions showed significant negative and positive correlations with percentages of metals bound to carbonates and organic matter, respectively, since the FA addition increased the H⁺ concentration of the system, in which H⁺ could activate the metals bound to carbonate from the sediments. As an organophilic weak element, the fraction percentage of Cd bound to organic matter was the lowest with the minimal changes.

  4. Distribution of Heavy Metal Content Hg and Cr of Environmental Samples at Surabaya Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agus Taftazani

    2007-01-01

    Determination of Hg and Cr content of Surabaya river and coastal environmental samples using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) have been done. The environmental samples were water, sediment, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solmms, Rhizophora stylosa, Johnius (Johnieops) borneensis fish, and Moolgarda delicate fish at 12 locations selected of Surabaya area. Dry powder of sediment and biotic samples and concentrate water samples was irradiated by neutron flux 1.05 x 10 11 n.cm -2 .det -1 during 12 hours. The analytical result showed that the concentration of the heavy metals of river water are smaller than Perda Surabaya City No. 02/2004 for the 4 th level water which are Hg (0.005 ppm) and Cr (1.000 ppm). All locations coastal water samples have Hg and Cr concentrations are higher than Kepmen LH No.51/2004 Hg (0.001 ppm) and Cr (0.005 ppm). The Hg concentration of fish samples have exceeded the threshold according to Kep. Dirjen POM No.03725/B/SK/VII/89 about the maximum concentration of metal pollution in food. The concentration of heavy metals in sediment, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solmms and Rhizophora stylosa are not regulated, so then heavy metals pollution can not be referred to. The concentration of Hg and Cr elements of water samples are smaller than that of biotic and sediment samples. The distribution factor (F d ) is bigger than bioaccumulation factor (F b ). (author)

  5. Spatial distribution of metals in soil samples from Zona da Mata, Pernambuco, Brazil using XRF technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Zahily Herrero; Santos Junior, Jose Araujo dos; Amaral, Romilton dos Santos; Menezes, Romulo Simoes Cezar; Santos, Josineide Marques do Nascimento; Bezerra, Jairo Dias; Damascena, Kennedy Francys Rodrigues; Silva, Edvane Borges da; Silva, Alberto Antonio da

    2015-01-01

    Soil contamination is today one of the most important environmental issues for society. In the past, soil pollution was not considered as important as air and water contamination, because this was more difficult to be controlled, becoming an important topic in studies of environmental protection worldwide. Based on this, this paper provides information on the determination of metals in soil samples collected in Zona da Mata, Pernambuco, Brazil, where normally the application of pesticides, insecticides and other agricultural additives are used in a disorderly manner and without control. A total of 24 sampling points were monitored. The analysis of Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Pb, Ti, La, Al, Si and P were performed using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence. In order to assess the development of analytical method, inorganic Certified Reference Materials (IAEA-SOIL-7 and SRM 2709) were analyzed. In each sampling site, the geoaccumulation index were calculated to estimate the level of metal contamination in the soil, this was made taking into account the resolution 460 of the National Environmental Council (CONAMA in Portuguese). The elemental distribution patterns obtained for each metal were associated with different pollution sources. This assessment provides an initial description of pollution levels presented by metals in soils from several areas of Zona da Mata, providing quantitative evidence and demonstrating the need to improve the regulation of agricultural and industrial activities. (author)

  6. Metal distributions in complexes with Chlorella vulgaris in seawater and wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascucci, P.R.; Kowalak, A.D.

    1999-10-01

    Divalent cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) simultaneous complexes with an algal biomass Chlorella vulgaris were studied for bioremediation purposes in various aqueous media: distilled-deionized water (DDIW), seawater, nuclear-reactor pool water, and process wastewater. Reactions were monitored using various dry masses of algae at constant temperature and constant metal concentrations for reaction times ranging from 0 to 150 minutes. Complexes occurred within 30 minutes and reached a steady state after 80 to 120 minutes. Distribution constants (K{prime}{sub d}) were calculated for the complexes and relative orders of K{prime}{sub d} were reported. The K{prime}{sub d} are used to evaluate relative efficiency of metal remediation from waters. Lead, Cu, and Ni complexes had the greatest K{prime}{sub d} values and those metals were most efficiently removed from these waters. Zinc and Fe formed the most labile complexes. The order of K{prime}{sub d} values for complexes in DDIW was Pb > Cu > Cd > Zn, then Cu > Cd > Zn in seawater, Cd > Cu > Zn in reactor pool water, and Ni > Cd > Cu > Zn > Fe in wastewater. C. vulgaris biomass may potentially be used as an alternative to traditional water treatment methods for simultaneous extraction of metals from seawater, process wastewater, or drinking water.

  7. Speciation and Distribution of Trace Metals and Organic Matter in Marine Lake as In Situ Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, M.; Fiket, Ž.; Cuculić, V.; Cukrov, N.; Geček, S.

    2016-02-01

    Marine lakes are unique, isolated marine systems, also recognized as in situ "laboratories" in which geochemical processes on a different scale compared to the open sea, can be observed. Impact of organic matter cycling on distribution of trace metals in the marine lake Mir, located on Dugi Otok Island, in the central part of the eastern Adriatic Sea, was investigated. Intense spatial and seasonal variations of physico-chemical parameters and organic matter concentrations in the water column of the Lake are governed predominantly by natural processes. Enhanced oxygen consumption in the Lake during summer season, high organic carbon concentrations and low redox potential result in occasional occurrence of anoxic conditions in the bottom layers. Speciation modelling showed that dissolved trace metals Cu, Pb and Zn, are mostly bound to organic matter, while Cd, Co and Ni are present predominantly as free ions and inorganic complexes. Trace metals removal from the water column and their retention in the sediment was found to depend on the nature of the relationship between specific metal and high proportion of organic matter (up to 9%) and inorganic phases, Fe-oxyhydroxydes or biogenic calcite. Surrounding karstic background, with occasional occurrences of red soil characterize deposited sediments as coarse grained and carbonate rich, whose elemental composition is affected by bathymetry of the basin and overall biological production.

  8. Spatial distribution of metals in soil samples from Zona da Mata, Pernambuco, Brazil using XRF technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Zahily Herrero; Santos Junior, Jose Araujo dos; Amaral, Romilton dos Santos; Menezes, Romulo Simoes Cezar; Santos, Josineide Marques do Nascimento; Bezerra, Jairo Dias; Damascena, Kennedy Francys Rodrigues, E-mail: zahily1985@gmail.com, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: rmenezes@ufpe.br, E-mail: neideden@hotmail.com, E-mail: jairo.dias@ufpe.br, E-mail: kennedy.eng.ambiental@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias. Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Alvarez, Juan Reinaldo Estevez, E-mail: jestevez@ceaden.cu [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), Havana (Cuba); Silva, Edvane Borges da, E-mail: edvane.borges@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Vitoria de Santo Antao, PE (Brazil). Nucleo de Biologia; Franca, Elvis Joacir de; Farias, Emerson Emiliano Gualberto de, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Silva, Alberto Antonio da, E-mail: alberto.silva@barreiros.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Barreiros, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Soil contamination is today one of the most important environmental issues for society. In the past, soil pollution was not considered as important as air and water contamination, because this was more difficult to be controlled, becoming an important topic in studies of environmental protection worldwide. Based on this, this paper provides information on the determination of metals in soil samples collected in Zona da Mata, Pernambuco, Brazil, where normally the application of pesticides, insecticides and other agricultural additives are used in a disorderly manner and without control. A total of 24 sampling points were monitored. The analysis of Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Pb, Ti, La, Al, Si and P were performed using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence. In order to assess the development of analytical method, inorganic Certified Reference Materials (IAEA-SOIL-7 and SRM 2709) were analyzed. In each sampling site, the geoaccumulation index were calculated to estimate the level of metal contamination in the soil, this was made taking into account the resolution 460 of the National Environmental Council (CONAMA in Portuguese). The elemental distribution patterns obtained for each metal were associated with different pollution sources. This assessment provides an initial description of pollution levels presented by metals in soils from several areas of Zona da Mata, providing quantitative evidence and demonstrating the need to improve the regulation of agricultural and industrial activities. (author)

  9. The distribution of star formation and metals in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. E.; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Wang, Sharon X.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce the MUSCEL Programme (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry and Evolution of LSB galaxies), a project aimed at determining the star-formation histories of low surface brightness galaxies. MUSCEL utilizes ground-based optical spectra and space-based UV and IR photometry to fully constrain the star-formation histories of our targets with the aim of shedding light on the processes that led low surface brightness galaxies down a different evolutionary path from that followed by high surface brightness galaxies, such as our Milky Way. Here we present the spatially resolved optical spectra of UGC 628, observed with the VIRUS-P IFU at the 2.7-m Harlen J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and utilize emission-line diagnostics to determine the rate and distribution of star formation as well as the gas-phase metallicity and metallicity gradient. We find highly clustered star formation throughout UGC 628, excluding the core regions, and a log(O/H) metallicity around -4.2, with more metal-rich regions near the edges of the galactic disc. Based on the emission-line diagnostics alone, the current mode of star formation, slow and concentrated in the outer disc, appears to have dominated for quite some time, although there are clear signs of a much older stellar population formed in a more standard inside-out fashion.

  10. Spherical electron momentum density distribution and Bayesian analysis of the renormalization parameter in Li metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, Ludwik

    2000-01-01

    The Bayesian analysis of the spherical part of the electron momentum density was carried out with the goal of finding the best estimation of the spherically averaged renormalization parameter, z , quantifying the discontinuity in the electron momentum density distribution in Li metal. Three models parametrizing the electron momentum density were considered and nuisance parameters integrated out. The analysis show that the most likely value of z following from the data of Sakurai et al is in the range of 0.45-0.50, while 0.55 is obtained for the data of Schuelke et al . In the maximum entropy reconstruction of the spherical part of the electron momentum density three different algorithms were used. It is shown that all of them produce essentially the same results. The paper shows that the accurate Compton scattering experiments are capable of bringing information on this very important Fermiological aspect of the electron gas in a metal. (author)

  11. Impact of Saw Dust Application on the Distribution of Potentially Toxic Metals in Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awokunmi, Emmmanuel E

    2017-12-01

    The need to develop an approach for the reclamation of contaminated site using locally available agricultural waste has been considered. The present study investigated the application of sawdust as an effective amendment in the immobilization of potentially toxic metals (PTMs) by conducting a greenhouse experiment on soil collected from an automobile dumpsite. The amended and non-amended soil samples were analyzed for their physicochemical parameters and sequential extraction of PTMs. The results revealed that application of amendment had positive impact on the physicochemical parameters as organic matter content and cation exchange capacity increased from 12.1% to 12.8% and 16.4 to 16.8 meq/100 g respectively. However, the mobility and bioavalability of these metals was reduced as they were found to be distributed mostly in the non-exchangeable phase of soil. Therefore, application of sawdust successfully immobilized PTMs and could be applied for future studies in agricultural soil reclamation.

  12. Distribution of heavy metals (Cu and Fe in sea water of Gresik coastal area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nindyapuspa Ayu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of industrial activities at Gresik Regency will increase the heavy metals concentration on the seawater at Gresik Regency. Therefore, the research of Fe and Cr distribution on the seawater at Gresik Regency has been conducted. Methods that were used is sampling by Nansen water sampler at three sampling points (housing in northern coastal Gresik Regency, Maspion V Industrial Estate, and Petrokimia Port. Samples were analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS to determine the concentration of heavy metals. The results showed that the highest Fe and Cr concentration are located at Maspion V Industrial Estate (0.452 mg/L and 0.081 mg/L respectively. Meanwhile, Fe and Cr concentrations at the housing in northern coastal are (0.408 mg/L and 0.081 mg/L respectively. The concentration of Fe and Cr at Petrokimia Port are 0.174 mg/L and 0.021 mg/L respectively.

  13. Pore size distribution, strength, and microstructure of portland cement paste containing metal hydroxide waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majid, Z.A.; Mahmud, H.; Shaaban, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    Stabilization/solidification of hazardous wastes is used to convert hazardous metal hydroxide waste sludge into a solid mass with better handling properties. This study investigated the pore size development of ordinary portland cement pastes containing metal hydroxide waste sludge and rice husk ash using mercury intrusion porosimetry. The effects of acre and the addition of rice husk ash on pore size development and strength were studied. It was found that the pore structures of mixes changed significantly with curing acre. The pore size shifted from 1,204 to 324 {angstrom} for 3-day old cement paste, and from 956 to 263 {angstrom} for a 7-day old sample. A reduction in pore size distribution for different curing ages was also observed in the other mixtures. From this limited study, no conclusion could be made as to any correlation between strength development and porosity. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Heavy metal distribution in a spruce ecosystem in the Solling mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, R.; Lamersdorf, N.

    1989-01-01

    In this investigation the distribution of Cr, Co, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb was studied in a spruce forest. Heavy metal content was analysed in different compartments of the ecosystem. Inventory of these elements was calculated for tree layer, humus layer and upper soil. A decrease in meter concentration in wood from root to shoot showed strong immobilization of heavy metals in roots. Increasing content of Cu in wood of branches can be explained as storage of this micronutrient. Atmospherically deposited Cr, Cu and Pb were strongly adsorbed to organic substances and accumulate in bark, dead fine roots and humus layer. On the other hand Zn and Cd are more mobile in the ecosystem. High amounts of these elements were found in biomass. Accumulation in bark probably can be a strategy of the tree to store these elements in physiologically inactive forms. Increasing mobilization of Zn, Cd and Co in soil led to intensified root uptake and to higher seepage output. (orig.)

  15. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  16. Distribution, provenance and early diagenesis of major and trace metals in sediment cores from the Mandovi estuary, western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prajith, A.; Rao, V.P.; Chakraborty, P.

    Major elements and trace metals were analyzed in four sediment cores recovered along a transect in the Mandovi estuary for their distribution, provenance and early diagenesis. The sediments were clayey silts in cores from the upper/lower estuary...

  17. Distribution and seasonal variation of trace metals in surface sediments of the Mandovi estuary, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.

    The concentration and distribution of selected trace metals in surface sediments of the Mandovi estuary were studied to determine the extent of anthropogenic inputs from mining activities and to estimate the effects of monsoon on geochemical...

  18. Heavy metals seasonal variability and distribution in Lake Qaroun sediments, El-Fayoum, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwan, Mostafa; Elhaddad, Engy

    2017-10-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the seasonal variability and distribution of heavy metals ;HMs; (Fe, Mn, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and V) in the bottom sediments of Lake Qaroun, in Egypt. The samples were collected from 10 sites in summer and winter seasons in 2015. Total metals concentrations were measured using inductively coupled plasma spectrometer. Multivariate techniques were applied to analyse the distribution and potential source of heavy metals. The mean seasonal concentrations follow a descending order of Fe > Mn > V > Zn > Cr > Ni > Cu > Co > Pb. The mean concentrations of HMs in sediments during summer were higher than the concentrations during winter and above the average world shale values, except for Pb, suggesting potential adverse toxicity to aquatic organisms. All metals showed enrichment during summer and winter at sites S3 and S5 in the southeastern parts of the lake due to the heavy discharge of contaminants from El-Bats and El-Wadi drains. Principal component analysis results suggested two principal components controlling HMs variability in sediments, which accounted for 63.9% (factor 1: Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and V), 15.9% (factor 2: Mn and Fe) during summer, and 76.7% (factor 1: Fe, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and V), 13.8% (factor 2: Mn) during winter of the total variance. Geo-accumulation index (Igeo) showed some pollution risk at the southeastern and southern parts (sites S3 and S5). Dilution during winter, concentration during summer, impact of non-point sources from different agricultural, industrial, municipal sewage and fish farms in the southern part of Lake Qaroun, adsorption and salt dissolution reactions and lithogenic sources are the main controlling factors for HMs in the study area. Monitoring of contaminant discharge at Lake Qaroun should be introduced for future remediation and management strategies.

  19. Distribution, correlation and risk assessment of selected metals in urban soils from Islamabad, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Javed; Shah, Munir H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Water-extract and acid-extract of the soils were analysed for selected metals. → The soils were anthropogenically polluted by Cd, Pb, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Zn and Mn. → Moderate to heavy contamination for Pb and Cd was indicated by I geo and C f . → Most of the metals showed random distribution and diverse correlations. → Overall, considerable degree of contamination was observed in both seasons. - Abstract: Urban soil samples were analyzed for Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb, Sr and Zn by atomic absorption spectrophotometric method. Multivariate statistical approach was used to study the apportionment of selected metals in the soil samples during summer and winter. The degree of contamination along with the geoaccumulation index, enrichment factor and contamination factor was also evaluated. In water-extract of the soil samples, relatively higher levels were noted for Na, Ca, K, Fe, Mg, and Pb with average concentrations of 56.38, 33.82, 12.53, 7.127, 5.994, and 1.045 mg/kg during summer, while the mean metal levels during winter were 76.45, 38.05, 3.928, 0.627, 8.726, and 0.878 mg/kg, respectively. In case of acid-extract of the soils, Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, K, Mn and Sr were found at 27,531, 12,784, 2769, 999.9, 737.9, 393.5, and 115.1 mg/kg, during summer and 23,386, 3958, 3206, 254.6, 1511, 453.6, and 53.30 mg/kg, during winter, respectively. Most of the metals showed random distribution with diverse correlations in both seasons. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis revealed significant anthropogenic intrusions of Cd, Pb, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Zn and Na in the soils. Geoaccumulation indices and contamination factors indicated moderate to heavy contamination for Pb and Cd in the soils, while enrichment factor exhibited significant enrichment (EF > 5) of Cd, Pb, Ca, Co, Li, Mn and Zn by anthropogenic activities. Overall, on the average basis, considerable degree of contamination (C deg > 16) was observed in both seasons, although

  20. Inclusive pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Morten Timmermann; Skov Mortensen, Stig

    This article will present a case for a shift in perspective in inclusive education research towards a continentally inspired approach. Drawing on the age old distinction between continental and Anglo-American educational research the aim is to flesh out what a shift to a continental approach...... will entail, and why it might be beneficial to research in inclusive education...

  1. The spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals in sediments of Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chloe Wing-yee; Ip, Carman Ching-man [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Zhang Gan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Shin, Paul K.S. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Qian Peiyuan [Department of Biology and Coastal Marine Laboratory, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Li Xiangdong [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: cexdli@polyu.edu.hk

    2008-07-01

    Victoria Harbour has received substantial loadings of pollutants from industrial and municipal wastewater discharged since the 1950s. Inputs of contaminants have declined dramatically during the last two decades as a result of better controls at the source and improved wastewater treatment facilities. To assess the spatial and temporal changes of metal contaminants in sediments in Victoria Harbour, core and grab sediments were collected. The central harbour areas were generally contaminated with heavy metals. The spatial distribution of trace metals can probably be attributed to the proximity of major urban and industrial discharge points, and to the effect of tidal flushing in the harbour. In the sediment cores, the highest concentrations of trace metals were observed to have accumulated during the 1950s-1980s, corresponding with the period of rapid urban and industrial development in Hong Kong. From the late 1980s, there has been a major decline in the concentrations of trace metals, due to a reduction in industrial activities and to the enactment of wastewater pollution controls in the territory. The Pb isotopic compositions of the sediments revealed the anthropogenic inputs of Pb to the harbour. The {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios varied from 1.154 to 1.190, which were lower than those of background geological materials in Hong Kong ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb: 1.201-1.279). The data also indicated that the Pb in the harbour sediments most likely originated from mixed sources, including the leaded gasoline used in the past and other anthropogenic sources.

  2. Distribution of heavy metals in peri-urban agricultural areas soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iram, S.; Ahmad, I.; Akhtar, S.

    2012-01-01

    In industry oriented peri-urban areas, the heavy metals accumulation in soils caused by industrialization has become a potential threat. The top soil sample from 48 agricultural fields were collected from a typical industry based peri-urban areas (Lahore, Faisalabad, Multan, Kasur, Islamabad, Wah Cantt.) of Punjab, Pakistan to study the accumulation and distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn) by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The aim of the study was to investigate influence of an industrialized environment on the accumulation of heavy metals in peri-urban agricultural soils. The results of the study showed that the Pb content in the soil ranged from 17.24 to 126.4 mg/kg and the highest Pb content was observed in Islamabad soil samples, and the lowest in that of Multan area. The Cd content ranged from 1.1 to 4.0 mg/kg in Lahore while the highest Cr concentration level was 210.2 mg/kg and it was observed in Kasur and lowest 30.60 in that of Multan. The Cu content ranged from 31.2 to 127.9 mg/kg (Kasur-Lahore). The highest Ni concentration (82.0 mg/kg) was observed in Lahore from the urban area and the lowest level of 12.15 mg/kg was observed in Multan. The Zn content ranged from 42.5 to 267.7 mg/kg (Faisalabad-Wah Cantt). The study concluded that the concentration level of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Ni, Cr, Zn) in the studied peri-urban areas was higher as compared to heavy metal content of normal Dutch soil. High automobile traffic and industrial waste both are the most likely sources of the contamination of the peri urban areas of Pakistan. (author)

  3. Social inclusion and inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsela Robo

    2014-07-01

    In line with global debate on social inclusion and exclusion, the author brings the way this debate has now pervaded both the official and development policy discourse in Albania.Social inclusion is considered as one of the priorities of the current government, with poverty reduction as its main focus, which will be ensured not only through economic development. In the end, the article focuses on the role of education as a very important and useful tool for ensuring social inclusion.Social inclusion through education, in particular through vocational education, considered by the author as the only way towards sustainable development of Albanian society.

  4. The compaction of a random distribution of metal cylinders by the discrete element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redanz, Pia; Fleck, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    -linear springs. The initial packing of the particles is generated by the ballistic deposition method. Salient micromechanical features of closed die and isostatic powder compaction are elucidated for both frictionless and sticking contacts. It is found that substantial rearrangement of frictionless particles......The cold compaction of a 2D random distribution of metal circular cylinders has been investigated numerically by the discrete element method. Each cylindrical particle is located by a node at its centre and the plastic indentation of the contacts between neighbouring particles is represented by non...

  5. Distributions of traces of metals on sorption from solutions of vanadium(V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseeva, N.K.; Turnaov, A.N.; Telegin, G.F.; Kremenskaya, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    A study is made of the distributions of traces of metals between aqueous solutions of vanadium(V) and a solid reagent made by introducing di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid into an inert matrix: a nonionic macroporous copolymer of polystyrene with divinyl benzene (wofatit Y 29). As regards degree of extraction, the trace components fall in the series zinc > cadmium > manganese > copper > cobalt, which resemble the extractability series. The vanadium content of the solution and the concentrations of the trace components have virtually no effect on the sorption. The process is effective in concentrating trace components from solutions containing vanadium(V)

  6. Distribution of microimpurities of metals at their sorption from vanadium (5) solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseeva, N.K.; Turanov, A.N.; Telegin, G.F.; Kremenskaya, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    Distribution of metal microimpurities (Zn, Mn, Cu, Co, Fe) between aqueous solutions of vanadium (5) and solid extracting agent, prepared by means of introduction of di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid into inert matrix-nonionogeneous macropore copolymer of polystyrene with divinylbenzene (vofatit Y-29), has been studied. Accroding to the degree of extraction the microimpurities are arranged in the series: zinc > cadmium > manganese > copper > cobalt, which is similar to the series of extractability. Vanadium content in solution and concentration of microimpurities practically does not affect the sorption. It has been established that the process is effective for microimpurities concentration from solutions containing vanadium (5)

  7. Distribution of microimpurities of metals at their sorption from vanadium (5) solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evseeva, N.K.; Turanov, A.N.; Telegin, G.F.; Kremenskaya, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    Distribution of metal microimpurities (Zn, Mn, Cu, Co, Fe) between aqueous solutions of vanadium (5) and solid extracting agent, prepared by means of introduction of di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid into inert matrix-nonionogeneous macropore copolymer of polystyrene with divinylbenzene (vofatit Y-29), has been studied. According to the degree of extraction the microimpurities are arranged in the series: zinc > cadmium > manganese > copper > cobalt, which is similar to the series of extractability. Vanadium content in solution and concentration of microimpurities practically does not affect the sorption. It has been established that the process is effective for microimpurities concentration from solutions containing vanadium (5).

  8. Distribution of heavy metals in riverine soils and sediments of the Turia River basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Vicente; Gimeno-García, Eugenia; Pascual, Juan Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Water is a scarce and contested good, and a primary need for the population all over. Rivers are one of the mainsources of freshwater to people but, in the same way, receive both point source and difuse pollution, usually frorm wastewaters and agriculture. However, they are not independent bodies but they influence different associated ecosystems that compound the catchment. Soils of the river banks often acts as the last phase of the diffuse contamination pathways, favouring the contaminants input to the river waters. In this sense, the fluvial sedimentary phase usually acts as a sink of pollutants. Sediments can work as resevoirs that accumulate contaminants fixing them or allowing their decomposition or metabolization. However, environmental or human induced, such as variations in water pH, increases in the turbulence or intensity of the water flow, etc.could favour their release to the environment. In this work, the incidence and distribution of seven heavy metals was monitored in riverine soils and sediments of the Turia River. Along the river course, 22 zones were selected for sampling according different lithologies, land uses, size of populations and the proximity to waste waters treatment plants (WWTPs), from the headwaters to the mouth. The selected metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn) were analysed to determine its total and extractable contents in the sediments. Total content of metals was extracted by microwave acid digestion and the extractable fraction by treatment with EDTA. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, using graphite furnace when necessary, was used for the determination of all metals. Highest values for sediments were mainly observed in zones 10 and 22, close to urban areas, reaching values of 172.86 mg/kg for Pb, or 58.34 mg/kg for Cr. However, zone 2 near in the headwaters of the Alfambra River and supposedly of reference for the River authorities shows the highest values of zinc with 96.96 mg/kg. Regarding the available

  9. Inclusive momentum and angular distributions from electron positron annihilation at √s = 3.0, 3.8, and 4.8 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebeek, R.

    1975-05-01

    Inclusive features of multi-hadron final states produced in the annihilations of electrons and positrons are presented. Data were taken at the colliding beam machine, SPEAR, at center-of-mass energies 3.0 GeV, 3.8 GeV, and 4.8 GeV. Reaction products were detected in an approximately 20 m 3 collection of spark chambers and counters, cylindrically arranged, in an axial magnetic field of approximately 4 KG, around the e + e - intersection region. Distributions of single-particle momenta and production angle and two-particle correlations are presented and compared with dynamical models. The results are in disagreement with expectations based on the successful parton--quark model of hadron structure. No generally satisfactory interpretation is available. (U.S.)

  10. A study of the distribution of rare-metals in kuroko-type ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murao, S. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience]|[Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1996-12-31

    We have performed PIXE analysis of kuroko-type ore from the JADE hydrothermal site of the Okinawa Trough, Japan using the proton microprobe (PIXEPROBE). We analysed five kinds of ores dredged from the sea floor: (I) barite ore with small sulfide dissemination; (2) sphalerite-pyrite chimney; (3) pyrite ore; (4) sulfide veinlets in strongly altered rock; and (5) pyrite megacrystals in strongly altered rock. The analyses revealed that the trace element distribution is regulated by the occurrence mode of the ore, and within each ore, by the crystal structure. The distribution suggests that the hydrothermal system for kuroko ore formation is quite heterogeneous and its chemistry is controlled by local factors such as difference in temperature, and that in-situ PIXE analyses are essential for effective beneficiation strategy for the rare-metals from kuroko-type ore. (authors). 10 refs., 1 tab.

  11. A study of the distribution of rare-metals in kuroko-type ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murao, S [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sie, S H; Suter, G F [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1997-12-31

    We have performed PIXE analysis of kuroko-type ore from the JADE hydrothermal site of the Okinawa Trough, Japan using the proton microprobe (PIXEPROBE). We analysed five kinds of ores dredged from the sea floor: (I) barite ore with small sulfide dissemination; (2) sphalerite-pyrite chimney; (3) pyrite ore; (4) sulfide veinlets in strongly altered rock; and (5) pyrite megacrystals in strongly altered rock. The analyses revealed that the trace element distribution is regulated by the occurrence mode of the ore, and within each ore, by the crystal structure. The distribution suggests that the hydrothermal system for kuroko ore formation is quite heterogeneous and its chemistry is controlled by local factors such as difference in temperature, and that in-situ PIXE analyses are essential for effective beneficiation strategy for the rare-metals from kuroko-type ore. (authors). 10 refs., 1 tab.

  12. A study of the distribution of rare-metals in kuroko-type ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, S.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    We have performed PIXE analysis of kuroko-type ore from the JADE hydrothermal site of the Okinawa Trough, Japan using the proton microprobe (PIXEPROBE). We analysed five kinds of ores dredged from the sea floor: (I) barite ore with small sulfide dissemination; (2) sphalerite-pyrite chimney; (3) pyrite ore; (4) sulfide veinlets in strongly altered rock; and (5) pyrite megacrystals in strongly altered rock. The analyses revealed that the trace element distribution is regulated by the occurrence mode of the ore, and within each ore, by the crystal structure. The distribution suggests that the hydrothermal system for kuroko ore formation is quite heterogeneous and its chemistry is controlled by local factors such as difference in temperature, and that in-situ PIXE analyses are essential for effective beneficiation strategy for the rare-metals from kuroko-type ore. (authors). 10 refs., 1 tab

  13. Impact of implanted metal plates on radiation dose distribution in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ming; Li Xingde; Niu Qingguo; Zhai Fushan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of metal plate on radiation dose distribution in surrounding tissues in cadaver specimens. Methods: Stainless steel plate, titanium plate, and muscle strip were implanted into the left thigh of a corpse, respectively. All the specimens were irradiated with 6 MV X-ray , SSD = 100 cm. The absorbed dose of surface was measured by thermoluminescent elements. Results: Surface dose distributions differed significantly among the three different materials (F = 57.35, P < 0.01), with the amounts of 1.18 Gy ± 0.04 Gy (stainless steel plate), 1.12 Gy ± 0.04 Gy (titanium plate) and 0.97 Gy ± 0.03 Gy (muscle strip), respectively. The surface absorbed doses on incident plane of stainless steel plate and titanium plate were significantly increased by 21.65% and 15.46% respectively as compared with that of muscle strip. The absorbed doses on the exit surface of stainless steel plate, titanium plate and muscle strip were 0.87 Gy ± 0.03 Gy, 0.90 Gy ± 0.02 Gy and 0.95 Gy ± 0.04 Gy, respectively (F =13.37, P <0.01). The doses on the exit surface of stainless steel plate and titanium plate were significantly lowered by 8.42% and 5.26% when compared with that of muscle strip. Using treatment planning system,the differences between dose distribution with and without metal plate were compared. Within 1 cm away from the incident plate, there was an obvious increase in the absorbed dose, while the influence was less than 5% 1 cm outside the surface. The effect of dose distribution on exit surface was less than 2%. Conclusions: The influence of metal plate on the radiotherapy dose distribution is significant. The deviations ranges from 5% to 29%. Under the same condition, the impact of stainless steel plate is much more than that of titanium alloy plate. (authors)

  14. Hadron production by e+e- annihilation at center-of-mass energies between 2.6 and 7.8 GeV. II. Jet structure and related inclusive distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.; Alam, M.S.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Dakin, J.T.; Dorfan, J.M.; Feldman, G.J.; Fischer, G.E.; Fryberger, D.; Hartill, D.L.; Jaros, J.A.; Jean-Marie, B.; Larsen, R.R.; Lueth, V.; Lynch, H.L.; Lyon, D.; Morehouse, C.C.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Schindler, R.H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Siegrist, J.L.; Tanenbaum, W.; Vannucci, F.; Abrams, G.S.; Briggs, D.; Carithers, W.C.; Chinowsky, W.; Cooper, S.; DeVoe, R.G.; Friedberg, C.E.; Goldhaber, G.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Johnson, A.D.; Kadyk, J.A.; Litke, A.M.; Madaras, R.J.; Nguyen, H.K.; Pierre, F.M.; Sadoulet, B.; Trilling, G.H.; Whitaker, J.S.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Wiss, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    We present results on the jet structure observed in multihadronic events produced by e + e - annihilation in the Mark I magnetic detector at SPEAR. The evidence for jet structure and the jet-axis angular distribution are reported. We give inclusive distributions of the hadrons in Feynman x, rapidity, and transverse momentum relative to the jet axis

  15. Production of titanium alloys with uniform distribution of heat resisting metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznichenko, V.A.; Goncharenko, T.V.; Khalimov, F.B.; Vojtechova, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    Consideration is given to the process of the formation of a titanium sponge alloyed with niobium or tantalum, in the joint metallic reduction of titanium, niobium and tantanum chlorides. A percentage composition of the phases observed and the structure of the alloyed sponge have been studied. It is shown that after one remelting operation of the alloyed sponge the alloys of titanium with niobium and tantalum have a uniform component distribution. At the stage of chloride reduction there appear solid solutions based on titanium and an alloying component. The stage of vacuum separation of the reaction mass is associated with a mutual dissolution of the primary phases and the formation of the solid solutions of the alloyed titanium sponge, which, by their composition, are close to the desired alloy composition. The principal features of the formation of a titanium sponge alloyed with niobium and tantalum are in a perfect agreemet with those typical of Ti-Mo and Ti-W sponges, therefore it can be assumed that these features will be also common to the other cases of the metallic reduction of titanium and refractory metals chlorides

  16. Production of titanium alloys with uniform distribution of heat resisting metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznichenko, V A; Goncharenko, T V; Khalimov, F B; Voitechova, E A

    1976-01-01

    Consideration is given to the process of the formation of a titanium sponge alloyed with niobium or tantalum, in the joint metallic reduction of titanium, niobium and tantanum chlorides. A percentage composition of the phases observed and the structure of the alloyed sponge have been studied. It is shown that after one remelting operation of the alloyed sponge the alloys of titanium with niobium and tantalum have a uniform component distribution. At the stage of chloride reduction there appear solid solutions based on titanium and an alloying component. The stage of vacuum separation of the reaction mass is associated with a mutual dissolution of the primary phases and the formation of the solid solutions of the alloyed titanium sponge, which, by their composition, are close to the desired alloy composition. The principal features of the formation of a titanium sponge alloyed with niobium and tantalum are in a perfect agreemet with those typical of Ti-Mo and Ti-W sponges, therefore it can be assumed that these features will be also common to the other cases of the metallic reduction of titanium and refractory metals chlorides.

  17. Distribution of heavy metals in urban soils - a case study of Danang-Hoian area (Vietnam)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuy, H.T.T.; Tobschall, H.J. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; An, P.V. [Univ. of Mining and Geology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2000-04-01

    This work is part of a research study which is intended to study the degree of anthropogenic influences of the trace metal distribution of soils from Danang-Hoian area (Vietnam). Cu, Ni, Zn and Zr show significant effects in most of the cultivated soil categories, especially in the industrial soils. Extremely high levels of Pb (up to 742 {mu}g/g) are observed in the industrial soil category, which shows an enrichment factor 114 as compared to rural soils. Cd shows only a relative local enrichment with the maximum level of 4.6 {mu}g/g in urban soils. Sequential extraction was performed in selected samples to evaluate the geochemical trace metals. The result indicates that Zn and Cr are mainly found in the crystal and amorphous Fe oxide bounded forms. The contents of Cr in these fractions comprise more than 94% of total extractable Cr. In the case of Zn, 85% of total extractable Zn is in fractions F{sub V} and F{sub VI}. Cu is mainly found in the organic fraction at an average of 39.3% of total extractable content. On the other hand, heavy metal contents show an increasing tendency in the fine fraction (slit and clay). (orig.)

  18. Strong links between metal contamination, habitat modification and estuarine larval fish distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinley, Andrew C., E-mail: andrew.mckinley@hotmail.com [Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Miskiewicz, Anthony [Environment and Recreation, Wollongong City Council, 41 Burelli Street, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Taylor, Matthew D.; Johnston, Emma L. [Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    Changes to larval fish assemblages may have far reaching ecological impacts. Correlations between habitat modification, contamination and marine larval fish communities have rarely been assessed in situ. We investigated links between the large-scale distribution of stressors and larval fish assemblages in estuarine environments. Larval fish communities were sampled using a benthic sled within the inner and outer zones of three heavily modified and three relatively unmodified estuaries. Larval abundances were significantly greater in modified estuaries, and there were trends towards greater diversity in these systems. Differences in larval community composition were strongly related to sediment metal levels and reduced seagrass cover. The differences observed were driven by two abundant species, Paedogobius kimurai and Ambassis jacksoniensis, which occurred in large numbers almost exclusively in highly contaminated and pristine locations respectively. These findings suggest that contamination and habitat alteration manifest in substantial differences in the composition of estuarine larval fish assemblages. - Highlights: > We examine contamination/habitat modification impacts on larval fish. > Larvae communities differ between modified/unmodified estuaries. > Larvae are more abundant/diverse in modified areas. > Trends are strongly related to sediment metals/seagrass cover. > Larval impacts have wider ecological importance. - We describe strong links between sediment metals contamination, habitat modification and substantial differences in the composition of the estuarine larval fish assemblage.

  19. Strong links between metal contamination, habitat modification and estuarine larval fish distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, Andrew C.; Miskiewicz, Anthony; Taylor, Matthew D.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2011-01-01

    Changes to larval fish assemblages may have far reaching ecological impacts. Correlations between habitat modification, contamination and marine larval fish communities have rarely been assessed in situ. We investigated links between the large-scale distribution of stressors and larval fish assemblages in estuarine environments. Larval fish communities were sampled using a benthic sled within the inner and outer zones of three heavily modified and three relatively unmodified estuaries. Larval abundances were significantly greater in modified estuaries, and there were trends towards greater diversity in these systems. Differences in larval community composition were strongly related to sediment metal levels and reduced seagrass cover. The differences observed were driven by two abundant species, Paedogobius kimurai and Ambassis jacksoniensis, which occurred in large numbers almost exclusively in highly contaminated and pristine locations respectively. These findings suggest that contamination and habitat alteration manifest in substantial differences in the composition of estuarine larval fish assemblages. - Highlights: → We examine contamination/habitat modification impacts on larval fish. → Larvae communities differ between modified/unmodified estuaries. → Larvae are more abundant/diverse in modified areas. → Trends are strongly related to sediment metals/seagrass cover. → Larval impacts have wider ecological importance. - We describe strong links between sediment metals contamination, habitat modification and substantial differences in the composition of the estuarine larval fish assemblage.

  20. Planar Indium Tin Oxide Heater for Improved Thermal Distribution for Metal Oxide Micromachined Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cihan Çakır

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although they lack selectivity. To introduce selectivity, the operating temperature of a single sensor is swept, and the measurements are fed to a discriminating algorithm. The efficiency of those data processing methods strongly depends on temperature uniformity across the active area of the sensor. To achieve this, hot plate structures with complex resistor geometries have been designed and additional heat-spreading structures have been introduced. In this work we designed and fabricated a metal oxide gas sensor integrated with a simple square planar indium tin oxide (ITO heating element, by using conventional micromachining and thin-film deposition techniques. Power consumption–dependent surface temperature measurements were performed. A 420 °C working temperature was achieved at 120 mW power consumption. Temperature distribution uniformity was measured and a 17 °C difference between the hottest and the coldest points of the sensor at an operating temperature of 290 °C was achieved. Transient heat-up and cool-down cycle durations are measured as 40 ms and 20 ms, respectively.

  1. Planar Indium Tin Oxide Heater for Improved Thermal Distribution for Metal Oxide Micromachined Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, M Cihan; Çalışkan, Deniz; Bütün, Bayram; Özbay, Ekmel

    2016-09-29

    Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although they lack selectivity. To introduce selectivity, the operating temperature of a single sensor is swept, and the measurements are fed to a discriminating algorithm. The efficiency of those data processing methods strongly depends on temperature uniformity across the active area of the sensor. To achieve this, hot plate structures with complex resistor geometries have been designed and additional heat-spreading structures have been introduced. In this work we designed and fabricated a metal oxide gas sensor integrated with a simple square planar indium tin oxide (ITO) heating element, by using conventional micromachining and thin-film deposition techniques. Power consumption-dependent surface temperature measurements were performed. A 420 °C working temperature was achieved at 120 mW power consumption. Temperature distribution uniformity was measured and a 17 °C difference between the hottest and the coldest points of the sensor at an operating temperature of 290 °C was achieved. Transient heat-up and cool-down cycle durations are measured as 40 ms and 20 ms, respectively.

  2. The distribution and extent of heavy metal accumulation in song sparrows along Arizona's upper Santa Cruz River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Michael B.; van Riper, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals are persistent environmental contaminants, and transport of metals into the environment poses a threat to ecosystems, as plants and wildlife are susceptible to long-term exposure, bioaccumulation, and potential toxicity. We investigated the distribution and cascading extent of heavy metal accumulation in southwestern song sparrows (Melospiza melodia fallax), a resident riparian bird species that occurs along the US/Mexico border in Arizona’s upper Santa Cruz River watershed. This study had three goals: (1) quantify the degree of heavy metal accumulation in sparrows and determine the distributional patterns among study sites, (2) compare concentrations of metals found in this study to those found in studies performed prior to a 2009 international wastewater facility upgrade, and (3) assess the condition of song sparrows among sites with differing potential levels of exposure. We examined five study sites along with a reference site that reflect different potential sources of contamination. Body mass residuals and leukocyte counts were used to assess sparrow condition. Birds at our study sites typically had higher metal concentrations than birds at the reference site. Copper, mercury, nickel, and selenium in song sparrows did exceed background levels, although most metals were below background concentrations determined from previous studies. Song sparrows generally showed lower heavy metal concentrations compared to studies conducted prior to the 2009 wastewater facility upgrade. We found no cascading effects as a result of metal exposure.

  3. Review of algorithms for modeling metal distribution equilibria in liquid-liquid extraction processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano, L. J.

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on general guidelines to be considered for application of least-squares routines and artificial neural networks (ANN in the estimation of metal distribution equilibria in liquid-liquid extraction process. The goal of the procedure in the statistical method is to find the values of the equilibrium constants (Kj for the reactions involved in the metal extraction which minimizes the differences between experimental distribution coefficient (Dexp and theoretical distribution coefficients according to the mechanism proposed (Dtheor- In the first part of the article, results obtained with the most frequently routine reported in the bibliography are compared with those obtained using the algorithms previously discussed. In the second part, the main features of a single back-propagation neural network for the same purpose are discussed, and the results obtained are compared with those obtained with the classical methods.

    El trabajo presenta las líneas generales a considerar para la estimación del equilibrio de distribución de metales en procesos de extracción líquido-líquido, según dos métodos: algoritmo clásico de mínimos cuadrados y redes neuronales artificiales. El objetivo del procedimiento, en el caso del método estadístico, es encontrar los valores de las constantes de equilibrio (Kj para las reacciones involucradas en la extracción del metal, que minimizan las diferencias entre el coeficiente de distribución experimental y el coeficiente de distribución teórico, de acuerdo al mecanismo propuesto. En la primera parte del artículo se comparan los resultados obtenidos a partir de los algoritmos usados más habitualmente en la bibliografía, con los datos obtenidos mediante el algoritmo previamente descrito. En la segunda parte, se presentan las características fundamentales para aplicar una red neuronal sencilla con algoritmo back-propagation y los

  4. Regional distribution and pollution evaluation of heavy metal pollution in topsoils of the Chengdu plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bing; Wang Changquan; Yang Juan; Tan Ting; Li Huanxiu; Li Qiquan; Yuan Quan

    2009-01-01

    197 farm field samples were designated by GPS and the spatial distribution characteristic and pollution evaluation of Cd, Pb, Cr and Hg in the soils were studied. Compared to the background investigated 20 years ago, the content of Cd in Guanghan, Xindu, Qionglai increased 1, 1.26 and 2 times; respectively; and the content of Pb in Xinjin, Deyang, Guanghan, Xindu increased 1.1 and 3.3 times. However, the content of Cr and Hg in most regions changed much smaller. The results of Kriging interpolation analysis of the heavy metals showed that the content of Cd was grandly decreased followed with the direction from northeast to southwest, the content of other elements exhibited the regional characteristics. The geoaccumulation index was used to evaluate the heavy metals pollution and results indicated that nearly 50% of the soils was polluted by Pb and Cd in different degrees influenced by men activities. With the key contaminated area of Xindu, Guanghan, Xinjing, Deyang the pollution ranks of Pb in soils was in 1 to 4. The Cd pollution although small, but still ranks in 1 to 2 level, the pollution area was bigger, mainly distributed in Xindu, Deyang, Guanghan, Shuangliu, Xinjing, Pengzhou. Only a small number of samples was contaminated by Cr or Hg. (authors)

  5. [Distribution and pollution assessment of heavy metals in soil of relocation areas from the Danjiangkou Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Qin, Yan-Wen; Zheng, Bing-Hui; Shi, Yao; Han, Chao-Nan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore the pollution level and potential ecological risk of heavy metals in soil of the relocation areas from the Danjiangkou Reservoir. The contents and spatial distribution of Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr and As in soil of the relocation areas from the Danjiangkou Reservoir were analyzed. The integrated pollution index and potential ecological risk index were used to evaluate the contamination degree and potential ecological risk of these elements. The results indicated that the average contents of Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr and As in the samples were 0.61, 23.11, 58.25, 22.65, 58.99 and 16.95 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Compared with the background value of soils from Henan province, all these 6 elements except Zn were enriched to some extent, especially Cd. Similar patterns were observed for the spatial distribution of Cu, Zn, and Pb. Compared with the contents of heavy metals in surface sediments of the typical domestic reservoirs, Cd and As in soil of the relocation areas from the Danjiangkou Reservoir were heavily accumulated. The correlation analysis showed that there were significant positive correlations among Pb, Cu, and Zn. And there was also significant positive correlation between Cr and Pb. In contrast, negative correlation was found between Cr and As. To sum up, the comprehensive assessment results showed that Cd was the primary element with high ecological risk.

  6. Difference in metallic wear distribution released from commercially pure titanium compared with stainless steel plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischak, G D; Gebhard, F; Mohr, W; Krivan, V; Ignatius, A; Beck, A; Wachter, N J; Reuter, P; Arand, M; Kinzl, L; Claes, L E

    2004-03-01

    Stainless steel and commercially pure titanium are widely used materials in orthopedic implants. However, it is still being controversially discussed whether there are significant differences in tissue reaction and metallic release, which should result in a recommendation for preferred use in clinical practice. A comparative study was performed using 14 stainless steel and 8 commercially pure titanium plates retrieved after a 12-month implantation period. To avoid contamination of the tissue with the elements under investigation, surgical instruments made of zirconium dioxide were used. The tissue samples were analyzed histologically and by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for accumulation of the metals Fe, Cr, Mo, Ni, and Ti in the local tissues. Implant corrosion was determined by the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). With grades 2 or higher in 9 implants, steel plates revealed a higher extent of corrosion in the SEM compared with titanium, where only one implant showed corrosion grade 2. Metal uptake of all measured ions (Fe, Cr, Mo, Ni) was significantly increased after stainless steel implantation, whereas titanium revealed only high concentrations for Ti. For the two implant materials, a different distribution of the accumulated metals was found by histological examination. Whereas specimens after steel implantation revealed a diffuse siderosis of connective tissue cells, those after titanium exhibited occasionally a focal siderosis due to implantation-associated bleeding. Neither titanium- nor stainless steel-loaded tissues revealed any signs of foreign-body reaction. We conclude from the increased release of toxic, allergic, and potentially carcinogenic ions adjacent to stainless steel that commercially pure Ti should be treated as the preferred material for osteosyntheses if a removal of the implant is not intended. However, neither material provoked a foreign-body reaction in the local tissues, thus cpTi cannot be

  7. A stochastic differential equations approach for the description of helium bubble size distributions in irradiated metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Dariush; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2014-12-01

    A rate theory model based on the theory of nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDEs) is developed to estimate the time-dependent size distribution of helium bubbles in metals under irradiation. Using approaches derived from Itô's calculus, rate equations for the first five moments of the size distribution in helium-vacancy space are derived, accounting for the stochastic nature of the atomic processes involved. In the first iteration of the model, the distribution is represented as a bivariate Gaussian distribution. The spread of the distribution about the mean is obtained by white-noise terms in the second-order moments, driven by fluctuations in the general absorption and emission of point defects by bubbles, and fluctuations stemming from collision cascades. This statistical model for the reconstruction of the distribution by its moments is coupled to a previously developed reduced-set, mean-field, rate theory model. As an illustrative case study, the model is applied to a tungsten plasma facing component under irradiation. Our findings highlight the important role of stochastic atomic fluctuations on the evolution of helium-vacancy cluster size distributions. It is found that when the average bubble size is small (at low dpa levels), the relative spread of the distribution is large and average bubble pressures may be very large. As bubbles begin to grow in size, average bubble pressures decrease, and stochastic fluctuations have a lessened effect. The distribution becomes tighter as it evolves in time, corresponding to a more uniform bubble population. The model is formulated in a general way, capable of including point defect drift due to internal temperature and/or stress gradients. These arise during pulsed irradiation, and also during steady irradiation as a result of externally applied or internally generated non-homogeneous stress fields. Discussion is given into how the model can be extended to include full spatial resolution and how the

  8. A stochastic differential equations approach for the description of helium bubble size distributions in irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seif, Dariush; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2014-01-01

    A rate theory model based on the theory of nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDEs) is developed to estimate the time-dependent size distribution of helium bubbles in metals under irradiation. Using approaches derived from Itô’s calculus, rate equations for the first five moments of the size distribution in helium–vacancy space are derived, accounting for the stochastic nature of the atomic processes involved. In the first iteration of the model, the distribution is represented as a bivariate Gaussian distribution. The spread of the distribution about the mean is obtained by white-noise terms in the second-order moments, driven by fluctuations in the general absorption and emission of point defects by bubbles, and fluctuations stemming from collision cascades. This statistical model for the reconstruction of the distribution by its moments is coupled to a previously developed reduced-set, mean-field, rate theory model. As an illustrative case study, the model is applied to a tungsten plasma facing component under irradiation. Our findings highlight the important role of stochastic atomic fluctuations on the evolution of helium–vacancy cluster size distributions. It is found that when the average bubble size is small (at low dpa levels), the relative spread of the distribution is large and average bubble pressures may be very large. As bubbles begin to grow in size, average bubble pressures decrease, and stochastic fluctuations have a lessened effect. The distribution becomes tighter as it evolves in time, corresponding to a more uniform bubble population. The model is formulated in a general way, capable of including point defect drift due to internal temperature and/or stress gradients. These arise during pulsed irradiation, and also during steady irradiation as a result of externally applied or internally generated non-homogeneous stress fields. Discussion is given into how the model can be extended to include full spatial resolution and how the

  9. A stochastic differential equations approach for the description of helium bubble size distributions in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seif, Dariush, E-mail: dariush.seif@iwm-extern.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institut für Werkstoffmechanik, Freiburg 79108 (Germany); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Ghoniem, Nasr M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A rate theory model based on the theory of nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDEs) is developed to estimate the time-dependent size distribution of helium bubbles in metals under irradiation. Using approaches derived from Itô’s calculus, rate equations for the first five moments of the size distribution in helium–vacancy space are derived, accounting for the stochastic nature of the atomic processes involved. In the first iteration of the model, the distribution is represented as a bivariate Gaussian distribution. The spread of the distribution about the mean is obtained by white-noise terms in the second-order moments, driven by fluctuations in the general absorption and emission of point defects by bubbles, and fluctuations stemming from collision cascades. This statistical model for the reconstruction of the distribution by its moments is coupled to a previously developed reduced-set, mean-field, rate theory model. As an illustrative case study, the model is applied to a tungsten plasma facing component under irradiation. Our findings highlight the important role of stochastic atomic fluctuations on the evolution of helium–vacancy cluster size distributions. It is found that when the average bubble size is small (at low dpa levels), the relative spread of the distribution is large and average bubble pressures may be very large. As bubbles begin to grow in size, average bubble pressures decrease, and stochastic fluctuations have a lessened effect. The distribution becomes tighter as it evolves in time, corresponding to a more uniform bubble population. The model is formulated in a general way, capable of including point defect drift due to internal temperature and/or stress gradients. These arise during pulsed irradiation, and also during steady irradiation as a result of externally applied or internally generated non-homogeneous stress fields. Discussion is given into how the model can be extended to include full spatial resolution and how the

  10. Inclusive pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Morten Timmermann; Mortensen, Stig Skov

    of education. The article explores the relationship between Continental and Anglo-American educational theory, and why they seem to have developed in such distinct directions. Beginning with the Anglo-American perspective it is outlined how pedagogy and the so called educational interest became replaced...... and the politicisation of inclusive education, and a positive aim in the form of an argument for a move towards constructing a pedagogical ideal of inclusion....

  11. Distribution of metals and extent of contamination in sediments from the south-eastern Baltic Sea (Lithuanian zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijolė Remeikaitė-Nikienė

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The distribution of metals (Pb, Cu, Cd, Ni, Cr, Zn in surface sediments and the potential pollution sources in the south-eastern part (SE of the Baltic Sea (Lithuanian zone were investigated in relation to the environmental characteristics (amount of fine-grained particles, TOC content in sediments, origin of sedimentary organic matter, salinity, water depth in 2011–2014. The higher metal concentrations were measured in sediments of the Curonian Lagoon and in the open waters. An approach using various environmental indices (enrichment factor EF, geoaccumulation index Igeo and contamination factor CF was used to quantitatively assess a contamination degree. The principal component analysis (PCA was applied in order to further scrutinize pollution from metal sources. The values of the contamination indices showed no/very low sediment contamination with Ni and Cr, minor–moderate contamination with Cu, Zn and Pb and moderate–considerable pollution with Cd. The strong relationships among metals suggested their similar distribution pattern and a combination of natural and anthropogenic sources. The higher metal concentrations coincided with an increasing amount of fine-grained fraction and organic carbon. In the territorial waters, the distribution of elements was related to the water depth. In addition, the binding of metals with insoluble iron sulphides might explain their high concentrations at the most remote and deepest stations. Keywords: Metals, Enrichment factor, Geoaccumulation index, Contamination factor, The Baltic Sea, The Curonian Lagoon

  12. Distributing Characteristics of Heavy Metal Elements in A Tributary of Zhedong River in Laowangzhai Gold Deposit, Yunnan (China): An Implication to Environmentology from Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuran; Danĕk, Tomáš; Yang, Xiaofeng; Cheng, Xianfeng

    2016-10-01

    Five heavy metal contents from five sediments and seven sediment profiles in an upstream reach of Zhedong river in Laowangzhai gold deposit were investigated in this research, along with analysis of the horizontal distribution, the surface distribution, the vertical distribution and the interlayer distribution of five heavy metal contents: arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn). The potential ecological risk of five heavy metals was evaluated to help understanding pollution control of Laowangzhai deposit.

  13. Trace metal distribution in the Arosa estuary (N.W. Spain): The application of a recently developed sequential extraction procedure for metal partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria-Fernandez, Rebeca; Cave, Mark R.; Hill, Steve J.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the trace metal distribution in sediment samples from the Galician coast (Spain) has been performed. A multielement extraction method optimised via experimental design has been employed. The method uses centrifugation to pass the extractant solution at varying pH, through the sediment sample. The sequential leaches were collected and analysed by ICP-AES. Chemometric approaches were utilised to identify the composition of the physico-chemical components in order to characterise the sample. The samples collected at different sites could be classified according to their differences in metal bio-availability and important information regarding element distribution within the physico-chemical components is given. The method has proved to be a quick and reliable way to evaluate sediment samples for environmental geochemistry analysis. In addition, this approach has potential as fast screening method for the bio-availability of metals in the environment

  14. Content and distribution of trace metals in pristine permafrost environments of Northeastern Siberia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antcibor, I.; Eschenbach, A.; Kutzbach, L.; Bolshiyanov, D.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Arctic regions are one of the most sensitive areas with respect to climatic changes and human impacts. Research is required to discover how the function of permafrost soils as a buffering system for metal pollutants could change in response to the predicted changes. The goal of this work is to determine the background levels of trace metals in the pristine arctic ecosystems of the Lena River Delta in Northeastern Siberia and to evaluate the possible effect of human impacts on this arctic region. The Lena River Delta represents areas with different dominating geomorphologic processes that can generally be divided between accumulation and erosion sites. Frequent changes of the river water level create different periods of sedimentation and result in the formation of stratified soils and sediment layers which are dominated either by mineral substrates with allochthonous organic matter or pure autochthonous peat. The deposited sediments that have formed the delta islands are mostly composed of sand fractions; therefore the buffering effects of clay materials can be neglected. Samoylov Island is representative of the south-central and eastern modern delta surfaces of the Lena River Delta and is selected as a pilot study site. We determined total element contents of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Ni, Cu, As, Pb, Co and Hg in soil horizons from different polygonal elevated rims, polygonal depressed centers and the middle floodplain. High gravimetric concentrations (related to dry mass of soil material) of Mn and Fe are found within all soil profiles and vary from 0.14 to 1.39 g kg-1 and from 10.7 to 41.2 g kg-1, respectively. While the trace element concentrations do not exceed typical crustal abundances, the maximum values of most of the metals are observed within the soil profile situated at the middle floodplain. This finding suggests that apart from the parent material the second potential source of trace metals is due to allochthonous substance input during annual flooding of the

  15. Heavy metals in Semarang`s urban streams: Spatial distribution and bioindication using the guppy (Lepistes reticulatus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widianarko, B. [Universitas Katolik Soegijapranata, Semarang (Indonesia)

    1996-12-31

    A field survey on cadmium, lead, copper, and zinc was performed in Semarang, the fifth largest city in Indonesia. Water, sediment, and fish samples were collected from 101 grids of 2 x 2 km. The objectives of the study were (1) to identify the spatial distribution of metals in the sediments of the greater Semarang area, (2) to estimate the background concentrations of the metals present in Semarang, (3) to provide a simple tool for deriving standards for metals in the sediment, and (4) to explore the potential use of the guppy (Lebistes reticulatus) as a bioindicator of urban metal pollution. To map the spatial distribution of the metals, concentrations of each metal in sediment were plotted against the corresponding city coordinate. On the basis of these plots, background concentrations of the metals were estimated. A combined pollution index can be derived thereafter by calculating the difference between metals concentrations from a particular grid and their respective background concentrations. Potential use of the guppy as a bioindicator is assessed, based on a comparison on several demographic parameters (i.e., size structure, sex ratio, reproductive success and energetic status) between unpolluted and heavily polluted populations. 31 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Distribution and Identification of Sources of Heavy Metals in the Voghji River Basin Impacted by Mining Activities (Armenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Gabrielyan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to assess the distribution of heavy metals in the waters and sediments of the Voghji River and its tributaries impacted by mining activity and to reveal the real source of each of the heavy metals in the environment for assessing the pollution level of heavy metals. Voghji River with two main tributaries (Geghi and Norashenik drain two mining regions. To identify distribution and pollution sources of heavy metals, the water and sediment samples were collected from eight sampling sites. The results of statistical analysis based on data sets of the period 2014–2016 showed that, after the influence of drainage water and wastewater of mining regions, heavy metal contents in the Voghji River basin dramatically increased. The waters of the Voghji River were highly polluted by Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb. The relation of metals content was highly changed due to anthropogenic impact disturbing the geochemical balance of the Voghji River. The water quality based on only heavy metal contents in the source of the Voghji River belongs to “good” chemical status, and in the sources of Geghi and Norashenik Rivers it is “moderate.” The water quality of Voghji and Norashenik Rivers is sharply worsening after the influence of mining activity, becoming “bad” chemical status. The research revealed the pollution sources of each metal.

  17. Implication of heavy metals distribution for a municipal solid waste management system - a case study in Shanghai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hua; He Pinjing; Shao Liming

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination in municipal solid waste (MSW) is of increasing concern. The occurrence and distribution of heavy metals in MSW and their implications for the integrated MSW management system in mega-cities have been investigated by means of material flow analysis based on a case study of Shanghai in China. A good statistical basis was provided through a one-year monitoring program on the mass and metals composition of the waste from three MSW treatment facilities. The results showed that the main heavy metals in the MSW were Zn, Cr, Cu, and Pb (on average > 100 mg kg -1 ), followed by Ni, Cd, and Hg. The MSW contained higher levels of Cu and Ni in metals, Cr and Pb in plastics, and Pb and Zn in the inorganic fractions. Regardless of the sources, the statistically similar heavy metal contents in the organic fractions indicated that effective blending and diffusion of heavy metals had taken place throughout the MSW collection, transfer, transportation, and storage, leading to cross-contamination of the waste fractions. PU (composed of putrescible waste and miscellaneous indistinguishable particles) contributed the majority of the heavy metals to the MSW, followed by plastics, as a result of the predominance in the overall composition of PU and plastics rather than from differences in their heavy metal contents. Therefore, manual or mechanical separation of some significantly heavy metal-rich fractions alone is not sufficient to reduce the heavy metal contents in the MSW. Source separation of organic waste and the diversion of tailored inorganic waste such as hazardous components, construction and demolition waste, etc., are proposed to control the heavy metal contamination in MSW. For the mixed MSW management system, physicochemical fractionation to exclude particles containing high levels of heavy metals can be conducted

  18. Implication of heavy metals distribution for a municipal solid waste management system - a case study in Shanghai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hua [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)], E-mail: solidwaste@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2008-09-01

    Heavy metal contamination in municipal solid waste (MSW) is of increasing concern. The occurrence and distribution of heavy metals in MSW and their implications for the integrated MSW management system in mega-cities have been investigated by means of material flow analysis based on a case study of Shanghai in China. A good statistical basis was provided through a one-year monitoring program on the mass and metals composition of the waste from three MSW treatment facilities. The results showed that the main heavy metals in the MSW were Zn, Cr, Cu, and Pb (on average > 100 mg kg{sup -1}), followed by Ni, Cd, and Hg. The MSW contained higher levels of Cu and Ni in metals, Cr and Pb in plastics, and Pb and Zn in the inorganic fractions. Regardless of the sources, the statistically similar heavy metal contents in the organic fractions indicated that effective blending and diffusion of heavy metals had taken place throughout the MSW collection, transfer, transportation, and storage, leading to cross-contamination of the waste fractions. PU (composed of putrescible waste and miscellaneous indistinguishable particles) contributed the majority of the heavy metals to the MSW, followed by plastics, as a result of the predominance in the overall composition of PU and plastics rather than from differences in their heavy metal contents. Therefore, manual or mechanical separation of some significantly heavy metal-rich fractions alone is not sufficient to reduce the heavy metal contents in the MSW. Source separation of organic waste and the diversion of tailored inorganic waste such as hazardous components, construction and demolition waste, etc., are proposed to control the heavy metal contamination in MSW. For the mixed MSW management system, physicochemical fractionation to exclude particles containing high levels of heavy metals can be conducted.

  19. Atmospheric quality and distribution of heavy metals in Argentina employing Tillandsia capillaris as a biomonitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, M L; Gudiño, G L; Wannaz, E D; Plá, R R; González, C M; Carreras, H A; Orellana, L

    2002-01-01

    The atmospheric quality and distribution of heavy metals were evaluated throughout a wide region of Argentina. In addition, the biomonitor performance of Tillandsia capillaris Ruiz & Pav. f. capillaris was studied in relation to the accumulation of heavy metals and to its physiologic response to air pollutants. A sampling area of 50,000 km2 was selected in the central region of the Argentine Republic. This area was subdivided into grids of 25 x 25 km. Pools of T. capillaris, where present, were collected at each intersection point. From each pool three sub-samples were analyzed independently. Furthermore, five replicates were collected at 20% of the points in order to analyze the variability within the site. The content of Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Mn, Pb and Zn was determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Chemical-physiological parameters were also determined to detect symptoms of foliar damage. Chlorophylls, phaeophytins, hydroperoxy conjugated dienes, malondialdehyde and sulfur were quantified in T. capillaris. Some of these parameters were used to calculate a foliar damage index. Data sets were evaluated by one-way ANOVA, correlation analysis, principal component analysis and mapping. Geographical distribution patterns were obtained for the different metals reflecting the contribution of natural and anthropogenic emission sources. According to our results it can be inferred that Fe, Mn and Co probably originated in the soil. For Pb, the highest values were found in the mountainous area, which can be attributed to the presence of Pb in the granitic rocks. Ni showed mainly an anthropogenic origin, with higher values found in places next to industrial centers. For Zn the highest values were in areas of agricultural development. The same was observed for Cu, whose presence could be related to the employment of pesticides. The foliar damage index distribution map showed that the central and southeastern zones were the ones where the major damage in the bioindicator was

  20. Magmatic fluid inclusions from the Zaldivar Deposits, Northern Chile: The role of early metal-bearing fluids in a Porphyry copper system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs Campos, E.; Touret, J.L.R.; Nikogosian, I.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of a distinct type of multi-solid, highly-saline fluid inclusions, hosted in igneous quartz phenocrysts from the Llamo porphyry, in the Zaldívar porphyry copper deposit of northern Chile is documented. Total homogenization of the multi-solid type inclusions occurs at magmatic

  1. "Magmatic fluid inclusions from the Zaldivar deposit, Northern Chile: The role of Early metal-bearing fluids in a porphyry copper system."

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs Campos, E.; Touret, J.L.R.; Nikogosian, I.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of a distinct type of multi-solid, highly-saline fluid inclusions, hosted in igneous quartz phenocrysts from the Llamo porphyry, in the Zaldívar porphyry copper deposit of northern Chile is documented. Total homogenization of the multi-solid type inclusions occurs at magmatic

  2. The effects of pH and concentration on heavy metal speciation and mobility, and its relation to heavy metal hyperaccumulation and distribution in selected native Australian flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, D.D.; McPhail, D.C.; Hallam, N.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this research is to establish a clearer understanding of the relations that exist between heavy metal activity, speciation, bioavailability and their uptake and spatial distribution into plants. A combination of experimental modeling and pot trials using toxic heavy metals (cadmium, lead, mercury, copper, chromium and zinc) will be carried out. In the experiments, selected native Australian flora (Eucalyptus, Acacia, Atriplex) adapted to adverse environmental conditions will be used. Varying external factors such as pH, and metal concentration altered the composition of heavy metal speciation in the soil solution. Mathematical and geochemical (PHREEQC) models were used to vary these factors and emulate the conditions under which experimentation will be taking place. These variations help determine the possible heavy metal speciation that would occur in both soil and hydroponic based experiments under given conditions. The rhizosphere, soil solution and the plant material will be analysed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICPMS). Proton Ion X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Secondary Ion Mass spectrometry will help ascertain the distribution, concentration of heavy metal taken up into plant tissues. Information derived from these data will be used to determine and understand how varying such environmental conditions and hence heavy metal speciation affect their bioavailability in the medium, and how their acceptance, accumulation and storage within the selected flora. Preliminary experimentation showed that, for lead and cadmium, the variation in soil solution pH affected the quantity of heavy metal accumulated into selected native Australian flora. ICP-MS analysis of plants subjected to a known soil solution spiked with 200 μmol of lead and cadmium showed that the quantities of lead and cadmium accumulated into plant sections (roots, stems and leaves) varied in the selected woody species. A. heteroclita, A. saligna, and A

  3. [Distribution of heavy metals in waters and pollution assessment in thallium contaminated area of Yunfu, Guangdong].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-ping; Qi, Jian-ying; Wang, Chun-lin; Chen, Yong-heng

    2011-05-01

    Distribution of Thallium(T1), Cadmium( Cd), Chromium (Cr), Lead (Pb), Nickel (Ni), Arsenic (As), Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn) in water and sediments of Yunfu pyrite mine area was studied. The environmental risk assessment was conducted systematically using Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs) and Hakanson potential ecological risk index. The results indicated that concentration range of Tl in stream water was 0.19-65.25 microg/L, which is higher than the environmental quality standards for surface water. Concentration ranges of Tl, Zn, As, Cd, Pb in sediments were 5.89-63.0 mg/kg, 1215-5754 mg/kg, 208.4-1327 mg/kg, 4.20-17.5 mg/kg, 282-13,770 mg/kg. According to Sediments Quality Guidelines, sediments was moderately to severe level of pollution since concentrations of Tl, Cd, Cr, Pb, Ni, As, Cu, Zn were much higher than LEL (lowest effect level) values, and the concentrations of Pb, As, Zn were higher than SEL (severe effect level) values, the others were partly higher than SEL values, which may result in severe negative biota effects in the watersheds. Compared to soil background values of Guangdong province, the metals in stream sediment showed strong to severe strong ecological risk, and the ecological risk of heavy metals in the descending order of Tl, Cd, As, Pb, Cr, Ni, Zn and Cu. Besides, the sediments were severe contained by toxic element thallium and cadmium. Besides, the mainly ecological risk of heavy metal is thallium. More emphasis should be placed on thallium and cadmium control and disposal in

  4. Heavy metal distribution at dump-field Ľubietová – Podlipa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Andráš

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The article present the results of the environmental study at the Ľubietová Podlipa dump-field. The distribution of the selectedelements and heavy metals is unequal and depend on the geochemical behaviour of the elements (mainly on their migration ability.The present natural sorbents are predominantly the clay minerals (illite, muscovite, caolinite, smectite and hydrogoethite. The clay mineralsare good sorbents of K, Na, Li, Al, Rb, Sr, Hf, V, Cr, Ti, W, Zr, Nb, Ta a Th and at the hydrogoethite of Cu, Zn, Mo, Mn, Mg, P (± Fe, Cd,Co, Ca. In the case of the Fe, As, Sb, Ag, Pb, Zn, Mn, Mo, Bi, U was proved also the free sorption capacity.

  5. Mass spectrometric probes of metal cluster distributions and metastable ion decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, E.K.; Liu, K.; Cole, S.K.; Riley, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The study of metal clusters has provided both an opportunity and a challenge to the application of mass spectrometry. These days the most often-used technique for cluster generation - laser vaporization - leads to extensive distributions of cluster sizes, from one to perhaps thousands of atoms, and most studies reported to date use excimer laser ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry for cluster detection. Our apparatus is a simple one-stage TOF design employing Wiley-McLauren spatial focusing and a one-meter drift tube. In a second apparatus employing a pulsed valve in the cluster source, we see asymmetric broadening of niobium cluster mass peaks under multiphoton ionization conditions, indicating metastable decay of parent cluster ions. Other studies of niobium clusters have shown no such asymmetric peaks. 2 figs

  6. A geometrical optics polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function for dielectric and metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, M W; Schmidt, J D; Havrilla, M J

    2009-11-23

    A polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (pBRDF), based on geometrical optics, is presented. The pBRDF incorporates a visibility (shadowing/masking) function and a Lambertian (diffuse) component which distinguishes it from other geometrical optics pBRDFs in literature. It is shown that these additions keep the pBRDF bounded (and thus a more realistic physical model) as the angle of incidence or observation approaches grazing and better able to model the behavior of light scattered from rough, reflective surfaces. In this paper, the theoretical development of the pBRDF is shown and discussed. Simulation results of a rough, perfect reflecting surface obtained using an exact, electromagnetic solution and experimental Mueller matrix results of two, rough metallic samples are presented to validate the pBRDF.

  7. MATERIAL DEPENDENCE OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN MULTI-LAYER MULTI-METAL COOKWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMADREZA SEDIGH

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laminated structure is becoming more popular in cookware markets; however, there seems to be a lack of enough scientific studies to evaluate its pros and cons, and to show that how it functions. A numerical model using a finite element method with temperature-dependent material properties has been performed to investigate material and layer dependence of temperature distribution in multi-layer multi-metal plate exposed to irregular heating. Behavior of two parameters including mean temperature value and uniformity on the inner surface of plate under variations of thermal properties and geometrical conditions have been studied. The results indicate that conductive metals used as first layer in bi-layer plates have better thermal performance than those used in the second layer. In addition, since cookware manufacturers increasingly prefer to use all-clad aluminium plate, recently, this structure is analysed in the present study as well. The results show all-clad copper and aluminum plate possesses lower temperature gradient compared with single layer aluminum and all-clad aluminum core plates.

  8. Metallicity Distribution of Disk Stars and the Formation History of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyouchi, Daisuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the formation history of the stellar disk component in the Milky Way (MW) based on our new chemical evolution model. Our model considers several fundamental baryonic processes, including gas infall, reaccretion of outflowing gas, and radial migration of disk stars. Each of these baryonic processes in the disk evolution is characterized by model parameters that are determined by fitting to various observational data of the stellar disk in the MW, including the radial dependence of the metallicity distribution function (MDF) of the disk stars, which has recently been derived in the APOGEE survey. We succeeded to obtain the best set of model parameters that well reproduces the observed radial dependences of the mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis of the MDFs for the disk stars. We analyze the basic properties of our model results in detail to gain new insights into the important baryonic processes in the formation history of the MW. One of the remarkable findings is that outflowing gas, containing many heavy elements, preferentially reaccretes onto the outer disk parts, and this recycling process of metal-enriched gas is a key ingredient for reproducing the observed narrower MDFs at larger radii. Moreover, important implications for the radial dependence of gas infall and the influence of radial migration on the MDFs are also inferred from our model calculation. Thus, the MDF of disk stars is a useful clue for studying the formation history of the MW.

  9. Distribution and temporal variation of trace metal enrichment in surface sediments of San Jorge Bay, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Jorge; Román, Domingo; Guiñez, Marcos; Rivera, Lidia; Morales, Tatiana; Morales, Tomás; Avila, Juan; Cortés, Pedro

    2010-08-01

    Cu, Pb, and Hg concentrations were determined in surface sediment samples collected at three sites in San Jorge Bay, northern Chile. This study aims to evaluate differences in their spatial distribution and temporal variability. The highest metal concentrations were found at the site "Puerto", where minerals (Cu and Pb) have been loaded for more than 60 years. On the other hand, Hg does not pose a contamination problem in this bay. Cu and Pb concentrations showed significant variations from 1 year to another. These variations seem to be a consequence of the combination of several factors, including changes in the loading and/or storage of minerals in San Jorge Bay, the dredging of bottom sediments (especially at Puerto), and seasonal changes in physical-chemical properties of the water column that modify the exchange of metals at the sediment-water interface. Differences in the contamination factor and geoaccumulation index suggest that pre-industrial concentrations measured in marine sediments of this geographical zone, were better than geological values (average shale, continental crust average) for evaluating the degree of contamination in this coastal system. Based on these last two indexes, San Jorge Bay has a serious problem of Cu and Pb pollution at the three sampling locations. However, only Cu exceeds the national maximum values used to evaluate ecological risk and the health of marine environments. It is suggested that Chilean environmental legislation for marine sediment quality--presently under technical discussion--is not an efficient tool for protecting the marine ecosystem.

  10. Distribution and contamination of metals in the soil of Guandu Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Pacheco Ferreira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas provide important benefits to humans in terms of food resources and ecosystem services. At the same time, human activities can have significant negative impacts on ecosystem health. Thus, control of watershed pollution is both necessary and essential in order to reduce and systematically eliminate the detrimental consequences that are evident in marine and estuarine ecosystems. The present study investigated the distribution of metals at the Guandu Watershed. Five sampling sites were selected for the soil analysis. Samples were collected from February 2013 to December 2014 and analysed for concentrations of As, Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, and Co, using ICP. For control, some samples were used in uncontaminated areas outside the direct effect of chemical industries. The data indicate the presence of metals at the research sites. While the levels of contamination are still slightly below the peak concentrations established by Brazilian legislation, they are approaching levels of concern, particularly with regard to As, Cd, Pb and Cr. The results indicate that the use of water from the Guandu Watershed for recreational purposes and fishing is harmful to both human health and the environment.

  11. Distribution of trace metals at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Berks and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Reif, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Hopewell Furnace, located approximately 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, was a cold-blast, charcoal iron furnace that operated for 113 years (1771 to 1883). The purpose of this study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, was to determine the distribution of trace metals released to the environment from an historical iron smelter at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (NHS). Hopewell Furnace used iron ore from local mines that contained abundant magnetite and accessory sulfide minerals enriched in arsenic, cobalt, copper, and other metals. Ore, slag, cast iron furnace products, soil, groundwater, stream base flow, streambed sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled for this study. Soil samples analyzed in the laboratory had concentrations of trace metals low enough to meet Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection standards for non-residential use. Groundwater samples from the supply well met U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water regulations. Concentrations of metals in surface-water base flow at the five stream sampling sites were below continuous concentration criteria for protection of aquatic organisms. Concentrations of metals in sediment at the five stream sites were below probable effects level guidelines for protection of aquatic organisms except for copper at site HF-3. Arsenic, copper, lead, zinc, and possibly cobalt were incorporated into the cast iron produced by Hopewell Furnace. Manganese was concentrated in slag along with iron, nickel, and zinc. The soil near the furnace has elevated concentrations of chromium, copper, iron, lead, and zinc compared to background soil concentrations. Concentrations of toxic elements were not present at concentrations of concern in water, soil, or stream sediments, despite being elevated in ore, slag, and cast iron furnace products. The base-flow surface-water samples indicated good overall quality. The five sampled sites generally had

  12. Spatial distribution and sources of heavy metals in natural pasture soil around copper-molybdenum mine in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Hong, Chen; Xing, Yi; Wang, Kang; Li, Yifei; Feng, Lihui; Ma, Silu

    2018-06-15

    The characterization of the content and source of heavy metals are essential to assess the potential threat of metals to human health. The present study collected 140 topsoil samples around a Cu-Mo mine (Wunugetushan, China) and investigated the concentrations and spatial distribution pattern of Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Mo and Cd in soil using multivariate and geostatistical analytical methods. Results indicated that the average concentrations of six heavy metals, especially Cu and Mo, were obviously higher than the local background values. Correlation analysis and principal component analysis divided these metals into three groups, including Cr and Ni, Cu and Mo, Zn and Cd. Meanwhile, the spatial distribution maps of heavy metals indicated that Cr and Ni in soil were no notable anthropogenic inputs and mainly controlled by natural factors because their spatial maps exhibited non-point source contamination. The concentrations of Cu and Mo gradually decreased with distance away from the mine area, suggesting that human mining activities may be crucial in the spreading of contaminants. Soil contamination of Zn were associated with livestock manure produced from grazing. In addition, the environmental risk of heavy metal pollution was assessed by geo-accumulation index. All the results revealed that the spatial distribution of heavy metals in soil were in agreement with the local human activities. Investigating and identifying the origin of heavy metals in pasture soil will lay the foundation for taking effective measures to preserve soil from the long-term accumulation of heavy metals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Particle size distribution and characteristics of heavy metals in road-deposited sediments from Beijing Olympic Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Shi, Anbang; Zhang, Xiaoran

    2015-06-01

    Due to rapid urbanization and industrialization, heavy metals in road-deposited sediments (RDSs) of parks are emitted into the terrestrial, atmospheric, and water environment, and have a severe impact on residents' and tourists' health. To identify the distribution and characteristic of heavy metals in RDS and to assess the road environmental quality in Chinese parks, samples were collected from Beijing Olympic Park in the present study. The results indicated that particles with small grain size (Pb>Cu>Zn. This study analyzed the mobility of heavy metals in sediments using partial sequential extraction with the Tessier procedure. The results revealed that the apparent mobility and potential metal bioavailability of heavy metals in the sediments, based on the exchangeable and carbonate fractions, decreased in the order: Cd>Zn≈Pb>Cu. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A preliminary investigation of the distribution of heavy metals in surface sediments of the Cona tidal marsh (Venice Lagoon)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, S.; Costa, F.; Vazzoler, S.; Zonta, R.

    1988-01-01

    Data are from the two series of surface sediment sampling in an interface area between the Venice Lagoon and the mainland. The distribution of heavy metals gives a correlation with polluted sourcesites-identified in the channel systems with a highly polluted input-and allows us to identify the localities of accumulation. Restricted to the estuary of the river tributary transporting a high concentration of pollutants into a tidal marsh area of the lagoon, the study shows the effect of the fresh water forcing to distribute heavy metals on surface sediments. Within the scope of this preliminary investigation, indications from sampling identify a sector of the 'palude of Cona' in this estuary, which is highly suitable for detailed studies on precesses affecting heavy-metal distributions in bottom surface sediments of shallow-water areas

  15. On the distribution of metals deposited onto the limiter and the liner of tokamaks after long-term operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, H.; Grote, H.; Herrmann, A.; Hildebrandt, D.; Laux, M.; Pech, P.; Reiner, H.D.; Ziegenhagen, G.; Chicherov, V.M.; Grashin, S.A.; Kopecky, V.; Jakubka, K.

    1987-01-01

    Three inspections of the inner parts of the discharge vessels of T-10 and TM1-MH after long-term operation revealed that metals originating from the various construction materials are distributed inhomogeneously over the first wall of these tokamaks. This partially allows one to identify local metal sources and to indicate anisotropies of the transport. Different materials from inner structures, even if they were only used in earlier experiments, are observed at all limiter surfaces and as components of the debris consisting of macroparticles of different size, shape and elemental composition. There are metallic deposits of the form of structured films or of solidified droplets. (orig.)

  16. Enhanced chlorine dioxide decay in the presence of metal oxides: Relevance to drinking water distribution systems

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chao; von Gunten, Urs; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) decay in the presence of typical metal oxides occurring in distribution systems was investigated. Metal oxides generally enhanced ClO2 decay in a second-order process via three pathways: (1) catalytic disproportionation with equimolar formation of chlorite and chlorate, (2) reaction to chlorite and oxygen, and (3) oxidation of a metal in a reduced form (e.g., cuprous oxide) to a higher oxidation state. Cupric oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) showed significantly stronger abilities than goethite (α-FeOOH) to catalyze the ClO2 disproportionation (pathway 1), which predominated at higher initial ClO2 concentrations (56-81 μM). At lower initial ClO2 concentrations (13-31 μM), pathway 2 also contributed. The CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay is a base-assisted reaction with a third-order rate constant of 1.5 × 10 6 M-2 s-1 in the presence of 0.1 g L -1 CuO at 21 ± 1 C, which is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than in the absence of CuO. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) significantly enhanced the formation of chlorite and decreased the ClO 2 disproportionation in the CuO-ClO2 system, probably because of a higher reactivity of CuO-activated ClO2 with NOM. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to simulate CuO-enhanced ClO 2 decay at various pH values. Model simulations that agree well with the experimental data include a pre-equilibrium step with the rapid formation of a complex, namely, CuO-activated Cl2O4. The reaction of this complex with OH- is the rate-limiting and pH-dependent step for the overall reaction, producing chlorite and an intermediate that further forms chlorate and oxygen in parallel. These novel findings suggest that the possible ClO2 loss and the formation of chlorite/chlorate should be carefully considered in drinking water distribution systems containing copper pipes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Enhanced chlorine dioxide decay in the presence of metal oxides: Relevance to drinking water distribution systems

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chao

    2013-07-19

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) decay in the presence of typical metal oxides occurring in distribution systems was investigated. Metal oxides generally enhanced ClO2 decay in a second-order process via three pathways: (1) catalytic disproportionation with equimolar formation of chlorite and chlorate, (2) reaction to chlorite and oxygen, and (3) oxidation of a metal in a reduced form (e.g., cuprous oxide) to a higher oxidation state. Cupric oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) showed significantly stronger abilities than goethite (α-FeOOH) to catalyze the ClO2 disproportionation (pathway 1), which predominated at higher initial ClO2 concentrations (56-81 μM). At lower initial ClO2 concentrations (13-31 μM), pathway 2 also contributed. The CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay is a base-assisted reaction with a third-order rate constant of 1.5 × 10 6 M-2 s-1 in the presence of 0.1 g L -1 CuO at 21 ± 1 C, which is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than in the absence of CuO. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) significantly enhanced the formation of chlorite and decreased the ClO 2 disproportionation in the CuO-ClO2 system, probably because of a higher reactivity of CuO-activated ClO2 with NOM. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to simulate CuO-enhanced ClO 2 decay at various pH values. Model simulations that agree well with the experimental data include a pre-equilibrium step with the rapid formation of a complex, namely, CuO-activated Cl2O4. The reaction of this complex with OH- is the rate-limiting and pH-dependent step for the overall reaction, producing chlorite and an intermediate that further forms chlorate and oxygen in parallel. These novel findings suggest that the possible ClO2 loss and the formation of chlorite/chlorate should be carefully considered in drinking water distribution systems containing copper pipes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. Effect of dimensional error of metallic bipolar plate on the GDL pressure distribution in the PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dong' an; Peng, Linfa; Lai, Xinmin [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2009-01-15

    Recently, the metallic bipolar plate (BPP) has received considerable attention because of its advantageous electrical and mechanical properties. In this study, a methodology based on FEA model and Monte Carlo simulation is developed to investigate the effect of dimensional error of the metallic BPP on the pressure distribution of gas diffusion layer (GDL). At first, a parameterized FEA model of metallic BPP/GDL assembly is established, and heights of the channel and rib are considered to be randomly varying parameters of normal distribution due to the dimensional error. Then, GDL pressure distributions with different dimensional errors are obtained respectively based on the Monte Carlo simulation, and the desirability function method is employed to evaluate them. At last, a regression equation between the GDL pressure distribution and the dimensional error is modeled. With the regression equation, the allowed maximum dimensional error for the metallic BPP is calculated. The methodology in this study can be applied to guide the design and manufacturing of the metallic BPP. (author)

  19. Determination of distribution pattern of the heavy metal concentrations in the potable network of Gachsaran by Geographical Information System (GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Paraham

    2013-12-01

    . Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, samples were taken from11 spots of the drinking water distribution network and tested for concentration of 10 metals by Inductivity Coupled Ions Plasma (ICP method in summer of 2010. The research data were compared with national and international water standards. Then the distribution map of heavy metals concentrations in the drinking water wells of the region was prepared by using the Geographical Information System (GIS software. Data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: In all samples, the average concentration of heavy metals were: Arsenic 0.54, Cadmium 0.05, Zinc 55.9, Lead 0.18, Copper .82, Chromium 1.6, Barium 36.5, Selenium0.5, Mercury 0.1 and Silver 0.05 micrograms per liter and was less than the water quality standard. Conclusion: Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that concentrations of heavy metals in Gachsaran’s drinking water distribution network are not higher than national and international standards and therefore not harmful for people. Key words: Heavy metals, Distribution network, Gachsaran, geographical information system (GIS

  20. inclusions revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Migórski

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we confirm the validity of some recent results of Hu, Lakshmikantham, Papageorgiou [4] and Papageorgiou [13] concerning the existence and relaxation for nonlinear evolution inclusions. We fill a gap in the proofs of these results due to the use of incorrect Nagy's compactness embedding theorem.

  1. Nonlinear Color–Metallicity Relations of Globular Clusters. VII. Nonlinear Absorption-line Index versus Metallicity Relations and Bimodal Index Distributions of NGC 5128 Globular Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin, E-mail: sjyoon0691@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-01

    Spectroscopy on the globular cluster (GC) system of NGC 5128 revealed bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of its old GCs. GC division is a widely observed and studied phenomenon whose interpretation has depicted host galaxy formation and evolution such that it harbors two distinct metallicity groups. Such a conventional view of GC bimodality has mainly been based on photometry. The recent GC photometric data, however, presented an alternative perspective in which the nonlinear metallicity-to-color transformation is responsible for color bimodality of GC systems. Here we apply the same line of analysis to the spectral indices and examine the absorption-line index versus metallicity relations for the NGC 5128 GC system. NGC 5128 GCs display nonlinearity in the metallicity-index planes, most prominently for the Balmer lines and by a non-negligible degree for the metallicity-sensitive magnesium line. We demonstrate that the observed spectroscopic division of NGC 5128 GCs can be caused by the nonlinear nature of the metallicity-to-index conversions and thus one does not need to resort to two separate GC subgroups. Our analysis incorporating this nonlinearity provides a new perspective on the structure of NGC 5128's GC system, and a further piece to the global picture of the formation of GC systems and their host galaxies.

  2. Horizontal and Vertical Distribution of Heavy Metals in Farm Produce and Livestock around Lead-Contaminated Goldmine in Dareta and Abare, Zamfara State, Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Orisakwe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hitherto studies in response to the June 2010 lead poisoning, Zamfara State, Nigeria, have focused on clinical interventions without information on livestock and other metals. Objective. This study has investigated the distribution of heavy metals in farm produce and livestock around lead-contaminated goldmine in Dareta and Abare, Zamfara State, Nigeria. Methods. Vegetables, soil, water, blood, and different meat samples were harvested from goat, sheep, cattle, and chicken from Dareta, Abare, and Gusau communities. The samples were digested with 10 mL of a mix of nitric and perchloric acids; the mixture was then heated to dryness. Lead, cadmium, zinc, chromium, copper, magnesium, and nickel were analysed using flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The daily intake, bioaccumulation factor, and target hazard quotient (THQ were calculated. Results. Chicken bone-muscles from Dareta had the highest concentrations of lead, zinc, and nickel (28.2750, 16.1650, and 4.2700 mg/kg, resp., while chicken brain had the highest levels of cadmium, magnesium (0.3800 and 67.5400 mg/kg, and chromium (6.1650 mg/kg, kidney tissue inclusive. Conclusion. In addition to lead, cadmium may also be of concern in the contaminated mining communities of Zamfara State, Nigeria, given the high levels of cadmium in meat and vegetables samples from these areas.

  3. Effect of cadmium exposure on lipids, lipid peroxidation and metal distribution in rat brain regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, T; Ali, M M; Chandra, S V

    1985-01-01

    Effect of cadmium treatment on brain lipids, lipid peroxidation and distribution of Zn, Cu and Fe in rat brain regions was investigated. Adult male rats were exposed to Cd (100 ppm Cd as cadmium acetate) in drinking water for 30 days. The Cd exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the phospholipid content and an increase in the lipid peroxidation in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. The total lipid content was not affected in any of the regions but a significant decrease in cholesterol and cerebroside contents were observed only in the cerebral cortex. A positive correlation between the increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease in the phospholipid content in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum was observed. A maximum accumulation of Cd occurred in the cerebral cortex. The Cu and Fe contents were significantly increased but the Zn levels decreased in the Cd-treated rats in all but the midbrain region. Results suggest that the increased peroxidation decomposition of structural lipids and the altered distribution of the essential trace metals in brain may play a significant role in Cd-induced neurotoxicity. 27 references, 2 tables.

  4. Spatial distribution of heavy metals in solid adjacent to the Naples-Salerno motor way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imperato, M.; Monetti, V.; Naimo, D.; Stanzione, D.

    1999-01-01

    This work analyses the distribution of heavy metal in soil adjacent to the Naples-Salerno motor way, an area which typically contains volcanic products from Somma-Vesuvio. The various concentrations of Pb, Cd, Zn, Mn, Cu and Cr found in different portions of the motor way (embankment, road cut, field level) are reported. The data obtained indicate high level of pollution in soil adjacent to the motor way fencing, with maximum concentrations of 1220 ppm Pb, 1.9 ppm Cd and 341 ppm Zn. Gradients of decreasing pollution with distance from the fencing and with altitude from the road surface are highest for Zn followed by Pb and Cd. The presence of these three materials in depth follows an averagely constant falling gradient, with minimum detected values at 50 cm depth. The spatial distribution of Cr does not reveal any significant differences. Relatively big levels are due to the presence in the soil of Chromium-rich minerals such as augite and olivine. Mn and Cu are found, due to local contribution, probably as a consequence of the use of copper compounds in agriculture [it

  5. Measurements of jet quenching with semi-inclusive hadron+jet distributions in Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2017-08-01

    The STAR Collaboration reports the measurement of semi-inclusive distributions of charged-particle jets recoiling from a high transverse momentum hadron trigger, in central and peripheral Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. Charged jets are reconstructed with the anti-kT algorithm for jet radii R between 0.2 and 0.5 and with low infrared cutoff of track constituents (pT>0.2 GeV / c ). A novel mixed-event technique is used to correct the large uncorrelated background present in heavy ion collisions. Corrected recoil jet distributions are reported at midrapidity, for charged-jet transverse momentum pT,jet ch<30 GeV / c . Comparison is made to similar measurements for Pb +Pb collisions at √{s }=2.76 TeV, to calculations for p +p collisions at √{s }=200 GeV based on the pythia Monte Carlo generator and on a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD approach, and to theoretical calculations incorporating jet quenching. The recoil jet yield is suppressed in central relative to peripheral collisions, with the magnitude of the suppression corresponding to medium-induced charged energy transport out of the jet cone of 2.8 ±0.2 (stat )±1.5 (sys ) GeV /c , for 10 distribution of low-pT,jet ch recoil jets may be enhanced at large azimuthal angles to the trigger axis, due to scattering off quasiparticles in the hot QCD medium. Measurement of this distribution gives a 90% statistical confidence upper limit to the yield enhancement at large deflection angles in central Au +Au collisions of 50 ±30 (sys )% of the large-angle yield in p +p collisions predicted by pythia.

  6. Distribution of rare-earth (Y, La, Ce) and other heavy metals in the profiles of the podzolic soil group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Goryachkin, S. V.; Savichev, A. T.

    2011-05-01

    Along with Fe and Al, many heavy metals (Mn, Cr, Zn, Cu, and Ni) show a markedly pronounced eluvial-illuvial redistribution in the profiles of soils of the podzolic group. The intensity of the redistribution of the bulk forms of these metals is comparable with that of Fe and exceeds that of Al. Although the podzolic soils are depleted of rare-earth metals, the latter respond readily to soil podzolization. The inactive participation of Al is explained by an insignificant portion of the active reaction-capable fraction. Podzolization does not influence the profile distribution of Sr and Ba. The leaching degree of heavy metals such as Mn, Cr, Zn, Ni, and Zr is noticeably higher in the sandy podzols than in the loamy podzolic soils. Leaching of heavy metals from the podzolic horizons is of geochemical importance, whereas the depletion of metals participating in plant nutrition and biota development is of ecological importance. The leaching of heavy metals is related to the destruction of clay particles in the heavy-textured podzolic soils; the effect of the soil acidity on the leaching of heavy metals is less significant.

  7. Pb, Cu, and Zn distributions at humic acid-coated metal-oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingge; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Levard, Clement; Siebner, Hagar; Gu, Baohua; Bargar, John R.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    (II) mobilized from the ESHA coatings onto the α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces increased from 40% (no added Ca) to 58% (with 2 mM Ca) after 72 h of reaction time, possibly due to displacement of Pb(II) by Ca(II) from binding sites in the ESHA coatings. In contrast, Pb(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) present in the ESHA coatings were found to be unreactive with the α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) surface. The observed reactivities of the three ESHA-coated metal-oxide surfaces with respect to metal-ion sorption are consistent with the trend observed for the uncoated metal-oxide surfaces: α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) > α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) > α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1). In addition, Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces increased with increasing pH from 4.0 to 9.0 as a result of the increasingly negative surface charge. These results show that intrinsic properties (nature of binding sites, binding affinities, and surface charge) of the ESHA coatings and metal-oxide surfaces, as well as external parameters such as pH and competing ions, are key factors governing the distribution and speciation of metal ions at complex NOM/mineral interfaces.

  8. Analysis of the Elastic Large Deflection Behavior for Metal Plates under Nonuniformly Distributed Lateral Pressure with In-Plane Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeom Kee Paik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Galerkin method is applied to analyze the elastic large deflection behavior of metal plates subject to a combination of in-plane loads such as biaxial loads, edge shear and biaxial inplane bending moments, and uniformly or nonuniformly distributed lateral pressure loads. The motive of the present study was initiated by the fact that metal plates of ships and ship-shaped offshore structures at sea are often subjected to non-uniformly distributed lateral pressure loads arising from cargo or water pressure, together with inplane axial loads or inplane bending moments, but the current practice of the maritime industry usually applies some simplified design methods assuming that the non-uniform pressure distribution in the plates can be replaced by an equivalence of uniform pressure distribution. Applied examples are presented, demonstrating that the current plate design methods of the maritime industry may be inappropriate when the non-uniformity of lateral pressure loads becomes more significant.

  9. Supplemental figures for ``Constraints on jet quenching in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} =5.02$ TeV measured by the event-activity dependence of semi-inclusive hadron-jet distributions''

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This note presents supplemental figures that support the analysis and discussion in the ALICE paper ``Constraints on jet quenching in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} =5.02$ TeV measured by the event-activity dependence of semi-inclusive hadron-jet distributions"

  10. Translating Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallov, Mia Arp; Birk, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how practices of translation shape particular paths of inclusion for people living in marginalized residential areas in Denmark. Inclusion, we argue, is not an end-state, but rather something which must be constantly performed. Active citizenship, today......, is not merely a question of participation, but of learning to become active in all spheres of life. The paper draws on empirical examples from a multi-sited field work in 6 different sites of local community work in Denmark, to demonstrate how different dimensions of translation are involved in shaping active...... citizenship. We propose the following different dimensions of translation: translating authority, translating language, translating social problems. The paper takes its theoretical point of departure from assemblage urbanism, arguing that cities are heterogeneous assemblages of socio-material interactions...

  11. DISTRIBUTION OF METALS IN PARTICLE SIZE FRACTIONS IN SOILS OF TWO FORESTED CATENAS (SMOLENSK-MOSCOW UPLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Samonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations and distribution of Fe, Ti, Zr, Mn, Cu. Ni, Co, Cr, Pb, and Zn associated with various particle size fractions have been analyzed in soils of two forested catenas located in the middle Protva River basin on the Smolensk-Moscow Upland. The results showed that concentration of metals in a particular size fraction was defined by a complex of factors: element chemical properties, soil type, genesis of a soil horizon, and position in the catena. A clearly defined relationship between the fraction size and metal concentrations was found for Ti and Zr. The highest levels of Ti were found in coarse and medium silt, while Zr had its highest values only in coarse silt and, in some cases, in fine sand. Such metals as Fe, Mn, Co, Cu and Pb had high concentrations in sand, fine silt, and clay fractions depending on a soil type and a genetic horizon. The maximum load of Cr, Zn, and Ni (in the majority of cases was found in clay fraction. The minimum loads of Fe, Mn, Co, Cu, and Ni were found in the coarse silt fraction. Variation in concentrations of heavy metals differed depending on particle size. For most metals, the variations were decreasing from coarser to finer fractions.Key words: soils, heavy metals, grain-size fractionation, vertical and lateral distribution patterns

  12. Trace metal distribution in sediments of the Pearl River Estuary and the surrounding coastal area, South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ip, Carman C.M.; Li Xiangdong; Zhang Gan; Wai, Onyx W.H.; Li, Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Surface sediments and sediment cores collected at the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and its surrounding coastal area were analysed for total metal concentrations, chemical partitioning, and Pb isotopic compositions. The distribution of Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn demonstrated a typical diffusion pattern from the land to the direction of the sea. Two hotspots of trace metal contamination were located at the mixed zone between freshwater and marine waters. The enrichment of metals in the sediments could be attributed to the deposition of the dissolved and particulate trace metals in the water column at the estuarine area. The similar Pb isotopic signatures of the sediments at the PRE and its surrounding coastal area offered strong evidence that the PRE was a major source of trace metals to the adjacent coastal area. Slightly lower 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios in the coastal sediments may indicate other inputs of Pb in addition to the PRE sources, including the inputs from Hong Kong and other parts of the region. - The distribution of trace metals in sediments reflected contaminant sources, physical and chemical deposition processes

  13. Spatial Distribution and Pollution Characteristics of Heavy Metals in Soil of Mentougou Mining Area of Beijing City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XING Yu-xin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The pollution characteristics and spatial distribution of soil heavy metals around mine-concentrated area in Mentougou were comprehensive studied using ArcGIS carried by inverse distance weighted interpolation mathematical model and SPSS multivariate statistical analysis. The ecological risk assessment was carried out by the potential ecological risk index. The results showed that the spatial distribution of soil heavy metal concentrations increased gradually from the west to the east of study area. Harmful degrees of heavy metals decreased in the order of Hg > Cd > Pb > Cr > Zn > Cu > Ni > As. Combination of coal mining and human activity caused the strongest risk, while the risks caused by heavy metals from sandstone minerals was relatively weak. The potential ecological risk indexes(RI of eight heavy metals were between 67.81 and 668.53. The order of the potential ecological risk was Hg > Cd > As > Pb > Ni > Cu > Cr > Zn. In summary, the heavy metals in soil of the study area were harmful. Because the study area is located in the ecological conservation district of Beijing, the ecological harm should not be overlooked, and needs to be evaluated and repaired.

  14. Spatial distribution of heavy metals in sediments from the Gulf of Paria, Trinidad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norville, W.

    2005-01-01

    The Gulf of Paria receives heavy metal input from urban runoff, industrial and agricultural activity, sewage and domestic wastes: both from the west coast and from inland areas of Trinidad. Non-residual concentrations of nine metals, as well as total mercury concentrations, were used to determine spatial distributions of heavy metals in sediments in the Gulf of Paria. Surficial sediment samples were collected at 37 stations, which included the mouths of 11 major rivers that flow into the Gulf of Paria. Stations were sampled twice during the wet season (July 1998 and November/ December 1998) and twice during the dry season (March 1999 and April 1999). Sediments were analyzed for aluminium (Al), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn) and mercury (Hg). Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and grain size analyses were also performed on the sediments. Principal component analysis showed that sediments from river mouths subject to greatest land use and anthropogenic input, were distinct from other sediments in the Gulf of Paria. This was due to higher Pb, Zn, Cu and Hg concentrations (3.53-73.30 μ g-', 45.8-313.9 μg g-', 8.43-39.71 μg g' and 0.03-0.10 μg g-', respectively). Sediments further from the coast were also distinct due to their higher Al, Fe, Cr and Mn concentrations (1.37-3.16 mg g-', 9.51-18.91 mg g-',17.22-28.41 μg g-' and 323.6--1,564.2 pg g-', respectively). Cd and Pb were higher in the wet season while Ni was higher in the dry season. Pb, Zn, Cu and Hg were correlated with each other and with TOC. Correlation was also observed between Al, Fe, Cr, Mn and Ni. Al, Fe, Cr and Mn were correlated with percentage clay in sediments. The results suggest that Pb, Zn, Cu and Hg are preferentially removed by organic matter, which settles at the river-mouths, while Al, Fe, Cr, Mn, and Ni become associated with clay minerals and are transported away from the coast.(From the author) [es

  15. [Distribution patterns and pollution assessments of heavy metals in the Spartina alterniflora salt-marsh wetland of Rudong, Jiangsu province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long-Hui; Du, Yong-Fen; Wang, Dan-Dan; Gao, Shu; Gao, Wen-Hua

    2014-06-01

    To understand the ecological impact of Spartina alterniflora on the coastal wetland environment, field survey was carried out in July, 2010, over the intertidal areas of Rudong coast, Jiangsu province; sediment samples were collected from a series of stations with different conditions of vegetation cover and S. alterniflora growth. The contents of eight heavy metals, together with sediment composition and total organic carbon were analyzed to reveal the distribution patterns of the heavy metals. Environmental quality status was evaluated using both the index of geoaccumulation (I(geo)) and the index of the Håkanson ecological risk. The analytical results showed that the average contents of Pb, Cd, As, Hg, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn were below the standard for the Category I sediment quality, among which Cd, Hg, Ni and Zn exceeded the sediment background value of the region. On the whole, the contents of eight heavy metals in vegetation areas were higher than those associated with the adjacent bare flat areas. These data sets indicate a non-polluted condition in term of I(geo) estimation; however, a critical state of low to moderate degrees of pollution and a low level of risk were deduced according to the index of the Håkanson potential ecological risk. Both indices suggested that the pollution level of Hg and Cd were the highest among the eight metals measured. Along the transection from seaward to landward, the contents of As, Cu and Hg, their indices of I(geo) and Håkanson ecological risk all showed an increasing tread, in accordance with the condition of vegetation cover. Along the coastline with S. alterniflora being distributed in patchiness, all metal contents and their ecological risk level values for the marshes were higher than those for the unvegetated sediments nearby; moreover, except for Hg, other seven metals exhibited relatively low values than those in the shore-normal section with a better S. alterniflora growth. These findings indicate that S

  16. Distribution and behaviour of selected heavy metals and other elements in various components of the southern Baltic ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szefer, P.

    1998-01-01

    The concentrations and discrimination of selected heavy metals in biota from the southern Baltic indicate that a large group of the Baltic organisms bioaccumulates Fe and Pb but discriminates against U. There appears to be no significant transfer of heavy metals along successive levels of the food chain. The distribution of the heavy metals in the associated sediments is a result of the anthropogenic input of Zn, Pb, Cd, Ag, P and Cu. It is suggested that Pb is introduced to the Polish sector of the Baltic Sea mainly by atmospheric transport whereas other heavy-metal pollutants are introduced mainly from the Vistula River. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Influence of heavy metals on the formation and the distribution behavior of PAH and PCDD/F during simulated fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobst, M; Wichmann, H; Bahadir, M

    2003-04-01

    Combustion experiments were performed with an artificial fire load (polystyrene and quartz powder) in a laboratory scale incinerator in the presence of gaseous HCl to simulate accidental fire conditions. The aim of this investigation was to trace back the alterations of the formation and the distribution behavior of PAH and PCDD/PCDF to the presence of CuO or a mixture of metal oxides (CdO, CuO, Fe(2)O(3), PbO, MoO(3), ZnO). The total amount of the 16 PAH target compounds was reduced by the factor of 5-9 when the mixture of metal oxides was present rather than merely CuO. PAH patterns as well as their distribution behavior were significantly influenced by these oxides. In general, transportation inside the installation was enhanced for most of the 16 analyzed PAH. Only fluorene and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene were transported to a smaller extent. In contrast to PAH, total concentrations of PCDD were increased by factor 9 and of PCDF by factor 10, respectively, when CuO was present. Adding the mixture of metal oxides resulted in an increase of PCDD by factor 14 and of PCDF by factor 7. CuO and the mixture of metal oxides had a different influence on the PCDD/F homologue patterns. For instance, the HxCDF to OCDF ratio after incineration without any metal oxide was 1 to 6, whereas addition of CuO or the mixture of the metal oxides shifted the HxCDF to OCDF ratios towards 1 to 40 or 1 to 17, respectively. Combustion along with CuO increased transportation of higher chlorinated PCDF congeners, whereas the mixture of the metal oxides caused a strong decrease of PCDF distribution throughout the system.

  18. THE EATING HABITS OF MILKY WAY-MASS HALOS: DESTROYED DWARF SATELLITES AND THE METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF ACCRETED STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deason, Alis J.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-01-01

    We study the mass spectrum of destroyed dwarfs that contribute to the accreted stellar mass of Milky Way (MW)-mass (M vir  ∼ 10 12.1 M ⊙ ) halos using a suite of 45 zoom-in dissipationless simulations. Empirical models are employed to relate (peak) subhalo mass to dwarf stellar mass, and we use constraints from z = 0 observations and hydrodynamical simulations to estimate the metallicity distribution of the accreted stellar material. The dominant contributors to the accreted stellar mass are relatively massive dwarfs with M star  ∼ 10 8 –10 10 M ⊙ . Halos with more quiescent accretion histories tend to have lower mass progenitors (10 8 –10 9 M ⊙ ), and lower overall accreted stellar masses. Ultra-faint mass (M star  < 10 5 M ⊙ ) dwarfs contribute a negligible amount (≪1%) to the accreted stellar mass and, despite having low average metallicities, supply a small fraction (∼2%–5%) of the very metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] < −2. Dwarfs with masses 10 5  < M star /M ⊙  < 10 8 provide a substantial amount of the very metal-poor stellar material (∼40%–80%), and even relatively metal-rich dwarfs with M star  > 10 8 M ⊙ can contribute a considerable fraction (∼20%–60%) of metal-poor stars if their metallicity distributions have significant metal-poor tails. Finally, we find that the generic assumption of a quiescent assembly history for the MW halo seems to be in tension with the mass spectrum of its surviving dwarfs. We suggest that the MW could be a “transient fossil”; a quiescent halo with a recent accretion event(s) that disguises the preceding formation history of the halo

  19. Inclusion Extraction of Alkali Metals by Emulsion Liquid Membranes and Nano-baskets of p-tert-Calix[4]arene Bearing Di-[N-(X)sulfonyl Carboxamide] and Di-(1-propoxy) in ortho-cone Conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Bahram; Pourabdollah, Kobra [Islamic Azad University, Province (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Nano-assisted inclusion separation of alkali metals from basic solutions was reported by inclusion-facilitated emulsion liquid membrane process. The novelty of this study is application of nano-baskets of calixarene in the selective and efficient separation of alkali metals as both the carrier and the surfactant. For this aim, four derivatives of p-tert-calix[4]arene bearing different sulfonamide moieties were synthesized and their inclusionextraction parameters were optimized including the calixarene scaffold 3 (4 wt %) as the carrier/demulsifier, the commercial kerosene as diluent in membrane, sulphonic acid (0.2 M) and ammonium carbonate (0.4 M) as the strip and the feed phases, the phase and the treat ratios of 0.8 and 0.3, mixing speed (300 rpm), and initial solute concentration (100 mg/L). The selectivity of membrane over more than ten interfering cations was examined and the results reveled that under the optimized operating condition, the degree of inclusionextraction of alkali metals was as high as 98-99%.

  20. Inclusion Extraction of Alkali Metals by Emulsion Liquid Membranes and Nano-baskets of p-tert-Calix[4]arene Bearing Di-[N-(X)sulfonyl Carboxamide] and Di-(1-propoxy) in ortho-cone Conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, Bahram; Pourabdollah, Kobra

    2012-01-01

    Nano-assisted inclusion separation of alkali metals from basic solutions was reported by inclusion-facilitated emulsion liquid membrane process. The novelty of this study is application of nano-baskets of calixarene in the selective and efficient separation of alkali metals as both the carrier and the surfactant. For this aim, four derivatives of p-tert-calix[4]arene bearing different sulfonamide moieties were synthesized and their inclusionextraction parameters were optimized including the calixarene scaffold 3 (4 wt %) as the carrier/demulsifier, the commercial kerosene as diluent in membrane, sulphonic acid (0.2 M) and ammonium carbonate (0.4 M) as the strip and the feed phases, the phase and the treat ratios of 0.8 and 0.3, mixing speed (300 rpm), and initial solute concentration (100 mg/L). The selectivity of membrane over more than ten interfering cations was examined and the results reveled that under the optimized operating condition, the degree of inclusionextraction of alkali metals was as high as 98-99%

  1. Extensive distribution of glial cytoplasmic inclusions in an autopsied case of multiple system atrophy with a prolonged 18-year clinical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Kenta; Nakata, Yukako; Fujii, Naoki; Iwaki, Toru

    2012-02-01

    We describe herein an autopsied case of multiple system atrophy (MSA) with prolonged clinical course of 18 years, and evaluate the extent of neurodegeneration and glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) in the entire brain of this rare case. A 64-year-old woman presented with typical neurological symptoms and imaging features of MSA. Thereafter, she became bedridden, and breathing was assisted through a tracheostomy for 12 years. She died at the age of 82 after 18 years from the initial symptom. Post mortem examination revealed severe neurodegeneration in the inferior olive, pontine nuclei, substantia nigra, locus ceruleus, putamen and cerebellum. Notably, phosphorylated α-synuclein (p-α-syn)-positive GCIs were found in these areas, but their number was very low. In contrast, the density of GCIs was much higher in such regions as the tectum/tegmentum of the brainstem, pyramidal tracts, neocortices and limbic system, which usually contain a small number of GCIs. Another constituent of GCIs, ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-associated autophagy substrate p62, were also positive in some GCIs, and distribution of Ub/p62 immunoreactivity was proportionate to that of p-α-syn+ GCIs despite the very long duration of the disease. Furthermore, this case had complicated hypoxic encephalopathy, but p-α-syn+ GCIs were also found in the damaged white matter, indicating the contribution of α-syncleinopathy as well as hypoxic effect to the secondary myelin and axonal loss in the white matter. Together, this rare case suggests the contribution of the disease duration to the prevalence of GCIs, and the possible involvement of the limbic system in extensive-stage disease. © 2011 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  2. A Theoretical Study on Quantitative Prediction and Evaluation of Thermal Residual Stresses in Metal Matrix Composite (Case 1 : Two-Dimensional In-Plane Fiber Distribution)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Son, Bong Jin

    1997-01-01

    Although discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composite(MMC) is one of the most promising materials for applications of aerospace, automotive industries, the thermal residual stresses developed in the MMC due to the mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion between the matrix and the fiber under a temperature change has been pointed out as one of the serious problem in practical applications. There are very limited nondestructive techniques to measure the residual stress of composite materials. However, many difficulties have been reported in their applications. Therefore it is important to establish analytical model to evaluate the thermal residual stress of MMC for practical engineering application. In this study, an elastic model is developed to predict the average thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber of a misoriented short fiber composite. The thermal residual stresses are induced by the mismatch in the coefficient of the thermal expansion of the matrix and fiber when the composite is subjected to a uniform temperature change. The model considers two-dimensional in-plane fiber misorientation. The analytical formulation of the model is based on Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and is unique in that it is able to account for interactions among fibers. This model is more general than past models to investigate the effect of parameters which might influence thermal residual stress in composites. The present model is to investigate the effects of fiber volume fraction, distribution type, distribution cut-off angle, and aspect ratio on thermal residual stress for in-plane fiber misorientation. Fiber volume fraction, aspect ratio, and distribution cut-off angle are shown to have more significant effects on the magnitude of the thermal residual stresses than fiber distribution type for in-plane misorientation

  3. Angular distribution of scattered electron and medium energy electron spectroscopy for metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguri, Takeo; Ishioka, Hisamichi; Fukuda, Hisashi; Irako, Mitsuhiro

    1986-01-01

    The angular distribution (AD) of scattered electrons produced by medium energy incident electrons (E P = 50 ∼ 300 eV) from polycrystalline Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu and Au were obtained by the angle-resolved medium energy electron spectrometer. The AD of the energy loss peaks are similar figures to AD of the elastically reflected electron peaks. Therefore, the exchanged electrons produced by the knock-on collision between the incident electrons and those of metals without momentum transfer are observed as the energy loss spectra (ELS). This interpretation differs from the inconsequent interpretation by the dielectric theory or the interband transition. The information depth and penetration length are obtained from AD of the Auger electron peaks. The contribution of the surface to spectra is 3 % at the maximum for E P = 50 eV. The true secondary peaks representing the secondary electron emission spectroscopy (SES) are caused by the emissions of the energetic electrons (kT e ≥ 4 eV), and SES is the inversion of ELS. The established fundamental view is that the medium energy electron spectra represent the total bulk density of states. (author)

  4. Thermocouple and Infrared Sensor-Based Measurement of Temperature Distribution in Metal Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdil Kus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining.

  5. Thermocouple and infrared sensor-based measurement of temperature distribution in metal cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-12

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining.

  6. Metal leaching in drinking water domestic distribution system: an Italian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate metal contamination of tap water in seven public buildings in Brescia (Italy). Two monitoring periods were performed using three different sampling methods (overnight stagnation, 30-min stagnation, and random daytime). The results show that the water parameters exceeding the international standards (Directive 98/83/EC) at the tap were lead (max = 363 μg/L), nickel (max = 184 μg/L), zinc (max = 4900 μg/L), and iron (max = 393 μg/L). Compared to the total number of tap water samples analyzed (122), the values higher than limits of Directive 98/83/EC were 17% for lead, 11% for nickel, 14% for zinc, and 7% for iron. Three buildings exceeded iron standard while five buildings exceeded the standard for nickel, lead, and zinc. Moreover, there is no evident correlation between the leaching of contaminants in the domestic distribution system and the age of the pipes while a significant influence is shown by the sampling methods.

  7. Thermocouple and Infrared Sensor-Based Measurement of Temperature Distribution in Metal Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M. Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining. PMID:25587976

  8. Metal contamination in campus dust of Xi'an, China: A study based on multivariate statistics and spatial distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hao [School of Tourism and Environment, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Lu, Xinwei, E-mail: luxinwei@snnu.edu.cn [School of Tourism and Environment, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Li, Loretta Y., E-mail: lli@civil.ubc.ca [Department of Civil Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Gao, Tianning; Chang, Yuyu [School of Tourism and Environment, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2014-06-01

    The concentrations of As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in campus dust from kindergartens, elementary schools, middle schools and universities of Xi'an, China were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Correlation coefficient analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) were used to analyze the data and to identify possible sources of these metals in the dust. The spatial distributions of metals in urban dust of Xi'an were analyzed based on the metal concentrations in campus dusts using the geostatistics method. The results indicate that dust samples from campuses have elevated metal concentrations, especially for Pb, Zn, Co, Cu, Cr and Ba, with the mean values of 7.1, 5.6, 3.7, 2.9, 2.5 and 1.9 times the background values for Shaanxi soil, respectively. The enrichment factor results indicate that Mn, Ni, V, As and Ba in the campus dust were deficiently to minimally enriched, mainly affected by nature and partly by anthropogenic sources, while Co, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in the campus dust and especially Pb and Zn were mostly affected by human activities. As and Cu, Mn and Ni, Ba and V, and Pb and Zn had similar distribution patterns. The southwest high-tech industrial area and south commercial and residential areas have relatively high levels of most metals. Three main sources were identified based on correlation coefficient analysis, PCA, CA, as well as spatial distribution characteristics. As, Ni, Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn and Cr have mixed sources — nature, traffic, as well as fossil fuel combustion and weathering of materials. Ba and V are mainly derived from nature, but partly also from industrial emissions, as well as construction sources, while Co principally originates from construction. - Highlights: • Metal content in dust from schools was determined by XRF. • Spatial distribution of metals in urban dust was focused on campus samples. • Multivariate statistic and spatial distribution were used to identify metal

  9. Metal contamination in campus dust of Xi'an, China: A study based on multivariate statistics and spatial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hao; Lu, Xinwei; Li, Loretta Y.; Gao, Tianning; Chang, Yuyu

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in campus dust from kindergartens, elementary schools, middle schools and universities of Xi'an, China were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Correlation coefficient analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) were used to analyze the data and to identify possible sources of these metals in the dust. The spatial distributions of metals in urban dust of Xi'an were analyzed based on the metal concentrations in campus dusts using the geostatistics method. The results indicate that dust samples from campuses have elevated metal concentrations, especially for Pb, Zn, Co, Cu, Cr and Ba, with the mean values of 7.1, 5.6, 3.7, 2.9, 2.5 and 1.9 times the background values for Shaanxi soil, respectively. The enrichment factor results indicate that Mn, Ni, V, As and Ba in the campus dust were deficiently to minimally enriched, mainly affected by nature and partly by anthropogenic sources, while Co, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in the campus dust and especially Pb and Zn were mostly affected by human activities. As and Cu, Mn and Ni, Ba and V, and Pb and Zn had similar distribution patterns. The southwest high-tech industrial area and south commercial and residential areas have relatively high levels of most metals. Three main sources were identified based on correlation coefficient analysis, PCA, CA, as well as spatial distribution characteristics. As, Ni, Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn and Cr have mixed sources — nature, traffic, as well as fossil fuel combustion and weathering of materials. Ba and V are mainly derived from nature, but partly also from industrial emissions, as well as construction sources, while Co principally originates from construction. - Highlights: • Metal content in dust from schools was determined by XRF. • Spatial distribution of metals in urban dust was focused on campus samples. • Multivariate statistic and spatial distribution were used to identify metal sources.

  10. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR.

  11. The mechanical behavior of metal alloys with grain size distribution in a wide range of strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripnyak, V. A.; Skripnyak, V. V.; Skripnyak, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    The paper discusses a multiscale simulation approach for the construction of grain structure of metals and alloys, providing high tensile strength with ductility. This work compares the mechanical behavior of light alloys and the influence of the grain size distribution in a wide range of strain rates. The influence of the grain size distribution on the inelastic deformation and fracture of aluminium and magnesium alloys is investigated by computer simulations in a wide range of strain rates. It is shown that the yield stress depends on the logarithm of the normalized strain rate for light alloys with a bimodal grain distribution and coarse-grained structure.

  12. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR

  13. Spatial distribution of heavy metals in sediments from the Gulf of Paria,Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Norville

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The Gulf of Paria receives heavy metal input from urban runoff,industrial and agricultural activity, sewage and domestic wastes:both from the west coast and from inland areas of Trinidad.Non-residual concentrations of nine metals,as well as total mercury concentrations,were used to determine spatial distributions of heavy metals in sediments in the Gulf of Paria.Surficial sediment samples were collected at 37 stations,which included the mouths of 11 major rivers that flow into the Gulf of Paria.Stations were sampled twice during the wet season (July 1998 and November/December 1998and twice during the dry season (March 1999 and April 1999.Sediments were analyzed for aluminium (Al,cadmium (Cd,chromium (Cr,copper (Cu,iron (Fe, lead (Pb,manganese (Mn,nickel (Ni,zinc (Znand mercury (Hg.Total Organic Carbon (TOCand grain size analyses were also performed on the sediments.Principal component analysis showed that sediments from river mouths subject to greatest land use and anthropogenic input,were distinct from other sediments in the Gulf of Paria.This was due to higher Pb,Zn,Cu and Hg concentrations (3.53-73.30 µg g-1 ,45.8-313.9 µg g-1 ,8.43-39.71 µg g-1 and 0.03-0.10 µg g-1 ,respectively.Sediments further from the coast were also distinct due to their higher Al,Fe,Cr and Mn concentrations (1.37-3.16 mg g-1 ,9.51-18.91 mg g-1 ,17.22-28.41 µg g-1 and 323.6 -1,564.2 µg g-1 ,respectively.Cd and Pb were higher in the wet season while Ni was higher in the dry season.Pb,Zn,Cu and Hg were correlated with each other and with TOC.Correlation was also observed between Al,Fe,Cr,Mn and Ni.Al,Fe,Cr and Mn were correlated with percentage clay in sediments.The results suggest that Pb,Zn, Cu and Hg are preferentially removed by organic matter,which settles at the river-mouths,while Al,Fe,Cr,Mn, and Ni become associated with clay minerals and are transported away from the coast.El Golfo de Paria recibe metales pesados de zonas urbanas,industriales y agr

  14. Assessment of heavy metal pollution in vegetables and relationships with soil heavy metal distribution in Zhejiang province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuezhu; Xiao, Wendan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Zhao, Shouping; Wang, Gangjun; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    There are increasing concerns on heavy metal contaminant in soils and vegetables. In this study, we investigated heavy metal pollution in vegetables and the corresponding soils in the main vegetable production regions of Zhejiang province, China. A total of 97 vegetable samples and 202 agricultural soil samples were analyzed for the concentrations of Cd, Pb, As, Hg, and Cr. The average levels of Cd, Pb, and Cr in vegetable samples [Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris spp. Pekinensis), pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.), celery (Apium graveolens), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), cucumber (Colletotrichum lagenarium), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.), and eggplant (Solanum melongena)] were 0.020, 0.048, and 0.043 mg kg(-1), respectively. The Pb and Cr concentrations in all vegetable samples were below the threshold levels of the Food Quality Standard (0.3 and 0.5 mg kg(-1), respectively), except that two eggplant samples exceeded the threshold levels for Cd concentrations (0.05 mg kg(-1)). As and Hg contents in vegetables were below the detection level (0.005 and 0.002 mg kg(-1), respectively). Soil pollution conditions were assessed in accordance with the Chinese Soil Quality Criterion (GB15618-1995, Grade II); 50 and 68 soil samples from the investigated area exceeded the maximum allowable contents for Cd and Hg, respectively. Simple correlation analysis revealed that there were significantly positive correlations between the metal concentrations in vegetables and the corresponding soils, especially for the leafy and stem vegetables such as pakchoi, cabbage, and celery. Bio-concentration factor values for Cd are higher than those for Pb and Cr, which indicates that Cd is more readily absorbed by vegetables than Pb and Cr. Therefore, more attention should be paid to the possible pollution of heavy metals in vegetables, especially Cd.

  15. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Börries, S., E-mail: stefan.boerries@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Metz, O.; Pranzas, P.K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Bücherl, T. [ZTWB Radiochemie München (RCM), Technische Universität München (TUM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Söllradl, S. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRMII), Technische Universität München (TUM), Lichtenbergstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2015-10-11

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  16. Heavy metals distribution in soils surrounding an abandoned mine in NW Madrid (Spain) and their transference to wild flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Peñalosa, Jesús M; Manzano, Rebeca; Carpena-Ruiz, Ramón O; Gamarra, Roberto; Esteban, Elvira

    2009-03-15

    The present work concerns the distribution and mobility of heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn and Cd) in the surrounding soils of a mine site and their transfer to wild flora. Thus, soils and plants were sampled from a mining valley in NW Madrid (Spain), and total and extractable heavy metals were analysed. Soils affected by mining activities presented total Cd, Cu and Zn concentrations above toxic thresholds. The percentage of extractable element was highest for Cd and lowest for Cu. A highly significant correlation was observed between the total and extractable concentrations of metals in soils, indicating that, among the factors studied, total metals concentration is the most relevant for heavy metals extractability in these soils. (NH(4))(2)SO(4)-extractable metal concentrations in soils are correlated better with metal concentrations in several plant species than total metals in soils, and thus can be used as a suitable and robust method for the estimation of the phytoavailable fraction present in soils. Twenty-five vascular plant species (3 ferns and 22 flowering plants) were analysed, in order to identify exceptional characteristics that would be interesting for soil phytoremediation and/or reclamation. High Cd and Zn concentrations have been found in the aerial parts of Hypericum perforatum (Cd), Salix atrocinerea (Cd, Zn) and Digitalis thapsi (Cd, Zn). The present paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of the metal accumulation ability of the two latter plant species. The phytoremediation ability of S. atrocinerea for Cd and Zn was estimated, obtaining intervals of time that could be considered suitable for the phytoextraction of polluted soils.

  17. Real-Time Measurement of Electronic Cigarette Aerosol Size Distribution and Metals Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, Vladimir B; Brinkman, Marielle C; Granville, Courtney A; Gordon, Sydney M; Clark, Pamela I

    2016-09-01

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is increasing worldwide and is highest among both daily and nondaily smokers. E-cigarettes are perceived as a healthier alternative to combustible tobacco products, but their health risk factors have not yet been established, and one of them is lack of data on aerosol size generated by e-cigarettes. We applied a real-time, high-resolution aerosol differential mobility spectrometer to monitor the evolution of aerosol size and concentration during puff development. Particles generated by e-cigarettes were immediately delivered for analysis with minimal dilution and therefore with minimal sample distortion, which is critically important given the highly dynamic aerosol/vapor mixture inherent to e-cigarette emissions. E-cigarette aerosols normally exhibit a bimodal particle size distribution: nanoparticles (11-25nm count median diameter) and submicron particles (96-175nm count median diameter). Each mode has comparable number concentrations (10(7)-10(8) particles/cm(3)). "Dry puff" tests conducted with no e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid) present in the e-cigarette tank demonstrated that under these conditions only nanoparticles were generated. Analysis of the bulk aerosol collected on the filter showed that e-cigarette emissions contained a variety of metals. E-cigarette aerosol size distribution is different from that of combustible tobacco smoke. E-cigarettes generate high concentrations of nanoparticles and their chemical content requires further investigation. Despite the small mass of nanoparticles, their toxicological impact could be significant. Toxic chemicals that are attached to the small nanoparticles may have greater adverse health effects than when attached to larger submicron particles. The e-cigarette aerosol size distribution is different from that of combustible tobacco smoke and typically exhibits a bimodal behavior with comparable number concentrations of nanoparticles and submicron particles. While vaping the e

  18. Direct observation of radial distribution change during tensile deformation of metallic glass by high energy X-ray diffraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasu, Toshio, E-mail: nasu@kekexafs.kj.yamagata-u.ac.j [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Sasaki, Motokatsu [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Usuki, Takeshi; Sekine, Mai [Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Takigawa, Yorinobu; Higashi, Kenji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Harima Science Garden City, Sayo town, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Sakurai, Masaki; Wei Zhang; Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-08-26

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the micro-mechanism of deformation behavior of metallic glasses. We report the results of direct observations of short-range and medium-range structural change during tensile deformation of metallic glasses by high energy X-ray diffraction method. Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass samples in the ribbon shape (1.5 mm width and 25 mum) were made by using rapid quenching method. Tensile deformation added to the sample was made by using special equipment adopted for measuring the high energy X-ray diffraction. The peaks in pair distribution function g(r) for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and N{sub 30}iZr{sub 70} metallic glasses move zigzag into front and into rear during tensile deformation. These results of direct observation on atomic distribution change for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass ribbons during tensile deformation suggest that the micro-relaxations occur.

  19. Heavy metal in sediments of Ziya River in northern China: distribution, potential risks, and source apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Shan, Baoqing; Tang, Wenzhong

    2016-12-01

    The concentration partitioning between the sediment particle and the interstitial water phase plays an important role in controlling the toxicity of heavy metals in aquatic systems. The aim of this study was to assess the sediment quality in a polluted area of the Ziya River, Northern China. The contamination potential and bioavailability of six metals were determined from the concentrations of total metals and the bioavailable fractions. The results showed that the concentrations of Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Pb exceeded the probable effect concentration at several sites. The high geoaccumulation indices showed that the sediments were seriously contaminated by Cd. The ratio of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) to simultaneously extracted metal (SEM) was higher than 1, which indicated that the availability of metals in sediments was low. The risk assessment of interstitial waters confirmed that there was little chance of release of metals associated with acid-volatile sulfide into the water column. Values of the interstitial water criteria toxicity unit indicated that none of the concentrations of the studied metals exceeded the corresponding water quality thresholds of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Positive matrix factorization showed that the major sources of metals were related to anthropogenic activities. Further, if assessments are based on total heavy metal concentrations, the toxicity of heavy metals in sediment may be overestimated.

  20. Heavy metal distributions in Peru Basin surface sediments in relation to historic, present and disturbed redox environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschinsky, Andrea

    Heavy metal distributions in deep-sea surface sediments and pore water profiles from five areas in the Peru Basin were investigated with respect to the redox environment and diagenetic processes in these areas. The 10-20-cm-thick Mn oxide-rich and minor metal-rich top layer is underlain by an increase in dissolved Mn and Ni concentrations resulting from the reduction of the MnO 2 phase below the oxic zone. The mobilised associated metals like Co, Zn and Cu are partly immobilised by sorption on clay, organic or Fe compounds in the post-oxic environment. Enrichment of dissolved Cu, Zn, Ni, Co, Pb, Cd, Fe and V within the upper 1-5 cm of the oxic zone can be attributed to the degradation of organic matter. In a core from one area at around 22-25 cm depth, striking enrichments of these metals in dissolved and solid forms were observed. Offset distributions between oxygen penetration and Mn reduction and the thickness of the Mn oxide-rich layer indicate fluctuations of the Mn redox boundary on a short-term time scale. Within the objectives of the German ATESEPP research programme, the effect of an industrial impact such as manganese nodule mining on the heavy metal cycle in the surface sediment was considered. If the oxic surface were to be removed or disturbed, oxygen would penetrate deep into the formerly suboxic sediment and precipitate Mn 2+ and metals like Ni and Co which are preferably scavenged by MnO 2. The solid enrichments of Cd, V, and other metals formed in post-oxic environments would move downward with the new redox boundary until a new equilibrium between oxygen diffusion and consumption is reached.

  1. Investigation of exposure rates and radionuclide and trace metal distributions along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, A.T.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    Studies have been conducted to investigate exposure rates, and radionuclide and trace metal distributions along the Columbia River where it borders the Hanford Site. The last major field study was conducted in 1979. With recently renewed interest in various land use and resource protection alternatives, it is important to have data that represent current conditions. Radionuclides and trace metals were surveyed in Columbia River shoreline soils along the Hanford Site (Hanford Reach). The work was conducted as part of the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The survey consisted of taking exposure rate measurements and soil samples primarily at locations known or expected to have elevated exposure rates

  2. NEW RARE EARTH ELEMENT ABUNDANCE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR THE SUN AND FIVE r-PROCESS-RICH VERY METAL-POOR STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneden, Christopher; Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth A.; Cowan, John J.; Ivans, Inese I.

    2009-01-01

    We have derived new abundances of the rare earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low-metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally consistent Ba, rare earth, and Hf (56 ≤ Z ≤ 72) element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

  3. Hazardous Heavy metal distribution in Dahuofang catchment, Fushun, Liaoning, an important industry city in China: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Gang [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing (China); The CAS/Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Process, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Yantai Institute of Costal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai (China); Wu, Ji-You [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Shao, Hong-Bo [The CAS/Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Process, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Yantai Institute of Costal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai (China); Institute for Life Sciences, Qingdao University of Science and Technology (QUST), Qingdao (China)

    2012-12-15

    Located in Liaoning Province, one of the traditional heavy industrial areas in China, Dahuofang Reservoir provides drinking water for nearly 30 000 000 citizens, as well as industrial and agricultural water for dozens of several cities and rural areas. The distribution of hazardous heavy metals is described in several types of soil, crops, and in different industrial or mining areas and main sewage irrigation areas. Five possible reasons that may cause the pollution are analyzed and listed. Also we provide some pragmatic suggestions for the remediation of heavy metals in contaminated soils. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Foresighting for Inclusive Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Andersen, Allan; Andersen, Per Dannemand

    and transform innovation systems because a set of distributed actors, rather than ministries and innovation agencies, is the gatekeepers of change. From this perspective, inclusion is a precondition rather than an obstacle for transformation. We develop a conceptual framework and use it to study design...... and processes in two foresight cases in two emerging economies - Brazil and South Korea. Although the research is exploratory and the results tentative, the empirical studies support our main propositions....

  5. PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. XII. MAPPING STELLAR METALLICITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregersen, Dylan; Seth, Anil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Johnson, L. C.; Lewis, Alexia R. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lang, Dustin [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Girardi, Leó [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell’Osservatori 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bell, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Fouesneau, Morgan [MPIA, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hamren, Katherine M. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kalirai, Jason [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Monachesi, Antonela [MPA, Garching (Germany); Olsen, Knut, E-mail: dylan.gregersen@utah.edu, E-mail: aseth@astro.utah.edu [NOAO, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We present a study of spatial variations in the metallicity of old red giant branch stars in the Andromeda galaxy. Photometric metallicity estimates are derived by interpolating isochrones for over seven million stars in the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey. This is the first systematic study of stellar metallicities over the inner 20 kpc of Andromeda’s galactic disk. We see a clear metallicity gradient of −0.020 ± 0.004 dex kpc{sup −1} from ∼4–20 kpc assuming a constant red giant branch age. This metallicity gradient is derived after correcting for the effects of photometric bias and completeness and dust extinction, and is quite insensitive to these effects. The unknown age gradient in M31's disk creates the dominant systematic uncertainty in our derived metallicity gradient. However, spectroscopic analyses of galaxies similar to M31 show that they typically have small age gradients that make this systematic error comparable to the 1σ error on our metallicity gradient measurement. In addition to the metallicity gradient, we observe an asymmetric local enhancement in metallicity at radii of 3–6 kpc that appears to be associated with Andromeda’s elongated bar. This same region also appears to have an enhanced stellar density and velocity dispersion.

  6. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (η 5 -C 5 H 4 X)Rh(CO) 2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C 60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs

  7. THE DISTRIBUTION OF COMMERCIAL CROWN ETHER DC18C6 AND THE EXTRACTION STUDY OF ALKALI AND EARTH ALKALI METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Rusdiarso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of A and B isomers of crown-ether DC18C6 on their organic and water phases (chloride, nitrate and sulphocyanide salts and extraction of alkali and earth alkali metals has been studied. In LiCl 0.1 M environment, lithium extraction could be ignored. The presence of extracted potassium metal may affect the crown ether DC18C6 distribution albeit only a little. In KNO3 0.1 M environment, the distribution coefficient values (d were 6.1 and 10.3 for A and B isomers, respectively ; while in KCl  0.1 M environment the values were 4.9 and 11.8, respectively. In KSCN 0.1 M, d values for A and B isomers were 40.4 and 36.6, respectively, which were higher than the value obtained from both KNO3 and KCl  0.1 M environments. Caesium metal extraction using DC18C6 occurred weakly, up to only 5%. Strontium extraction using DC18C6 achieved better yield than the caesium extraction. The percentage of extraction increased under organic solvent according to the following: toluene (4% < chloroform (28% < TBP (35%.   Keywords: distribution, crown-ether DC18C6, extraction.

  8. The metallicity distribution of H I systems in the EAGLE cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Alireza; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.

    2018-06-01

    The metallicity of strong H I systems, spanning from damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) to Lyman-limit systems (LLSs), is explored between z = 5 → 0 using the EAGLE high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulation of galaxy formation. The metallicities of LLSs and DLAs steadily increase with time in agreement with observations. DLAs are more metal rich than LLSs, although the metallicities in the LLS column density range (N_{H I }≈ 10^{17}-10^{20} cm^{-2}) are relatively flat, evolving from a median H I-weighted metallicity of {Z}≲ 10^{-2} Z_{⊙} at z = 3 to ≈10-0.5 Z⊙ by z = 0. The metal content of H I systems tracks the increasing stellar content of the Universe, holding ≈ 5 {per cent} of the integrated total metals released from stars at z = 0. We also consider partial LLS (pLLS, N_{H I}≈ 10^{16}-10^{17} cm^{-2}) metallicities, and find good agreement with Wotta et al. for the fraction of systems above (37 per cent) and below (63 per cent) 0.1 Z⊙. We also find a large dispersion of pLLS metallicities, although we do not reproduce the observed metallicity bimodality and instead we make the prediction that a larger sample will yield more pLLSs around 0.1 Z⊙. We underpredict the median metallicity of strong LLSs, and predict a population of Z 3 that are not observed, which may indicate more widespread early enrichment in the real Universe compared to EAGLE.

  9. Application of Different Extraction Methods for Investigation of Nonmetallic Inclusions and Clusters in Steels and Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Janis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of nonmetallic inclusions is of importance for the production of clean steel in order to improve the mechanical properties. In this respect, a three-dimensional (3D investigation is considered to be useful for an accurate evaluation of size, number, morphology of inclusions, and elementary distribution in each inclusion particle. In this study, the application of various extraction methods (chemical extraction/etching by acid or halogen-alcohol solutions, electrolysis, sputtering with glow discharge, and so on for 3D estimation of nonmetallic Al2O3 inclusions and clusters in high-alloyed steels was examined and discussed using an Fe-10 mass% Ni alloy and an 18/8 stainless steel deoxidized with Al. Advantages and limitations of different extraction methods for 3D investigations of inclusions and clusters were discussed in comparison to conventional two-dimensional (2D observations on a polished cross section of metal samples.

  10. Effect of Grain Boundary Character Distribution on the Impact Toughness of 410NiMo Weld Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Chowdhury, Sandip Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundary character distributions in 410NiMo weld metal were studied in the as-welded, first-stage, and second-stage postweld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions, and these were correlated with the Charpy-V impact toughness values of the material. The high impact toughness values in the weld...... metal in the as-welded and first-stage PWHT conditions compared to that in the second-stage condition are attributed to the higher fraction of low-energy I pound boundaries. A higher volume fraction of retained austenite and coarser martensite after second-stage PWHT accompanied by the formation...... in the impact toughness. In addition to this, grain refinement during 4-hour PWHT in the second stage also increased the toughness of the weld metal....

  11. The distribution of some rare metals in the process of separation of organic matter from Estonian dictyonema argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palvadre, R.; Ahelik, V.

    1993-01-01

    The distribution of rare metals Mo, U and V in the process of separation of organic matter from Maardu and Toolse argillite s is discussed. The beneficiation process of argillite consists of the hydro cycling treatment, in the course of which organic matter is separated as a light fraction, followed by direct flotation of organic matter and pyrite concentrates. Determinations of Mo and U were made by X-ray fluorescence, V by titration and pyrite by titration of iron. It can be concluded that rare metals Mo, U and V were concentrating in organic matter, their recovery in pyrite and quartz was negligible, depending on the degree of pyrite separation. The recovery of rare metals, especially that of V in the mineral phase, was more considerable in the processing of Maardu argillite, whose content of clay minerals was higher than that of Toolse argillite. 4 tabs., 6 refs

  12. Spatial distribution of trace metals in water resources impacted by PGM activities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Walters, Chavon R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available the aquatic environment from natural and anthropogenic sources (such as industrial effluents and mining wastes). Trace metals can accumulate in fish (which are often at the top of the aquatic food chain) either through water or the food chain (1), and metals...

  13. Metals distribution in Kumkol deposit petroleum; Raspredelenie metallov v nefti Kumkol`skogo mestorozhdeniya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musaeva, Z G; Nadirov, A N; Ajdarbaev, A S

    1997-11-04

    Metals content in samples of Kumkol deposit petroleum is determined by the method of X-ray diffraction and neutron activation analysis. Specific consideration was devoted to nickel and vanadium. It is possible, that sources of these metals are various petroleum formation as well as both the absorbed or the got in stratum microelements. (author) 10 refs., 1 tab. Suppl. Neft` i gaz Kazakhstana

  14. Altitudinal patterns and controls of trace metal distribution in soils of a remote high mountain, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Bing, Haijian; Wu, Yanhong; Zhou, Jun; Xiang, Zhongxiang

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the effects of regional human activity on trace metal accumulation in remote alpine ecosystems under long-distance atmospheric transport. Trace metals (Cd, Pb, and Zn) in soils of the Mt. Luoji, Southwest China, were investigated along a large altitudinal gradient [2200-3850 m above sea level (a.s.l.)] to elaborate the key factors controlling their distribution by Pb isotopic composition and statistical models. The concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn in the surface soils (O and A horizons) were relatively low at the altitudes of 3500-3700 m a.s.l. The enrichment factors of trace metals in the surface soils increased with altitude. After normalization for soil organic matter, the concentrations of Cd still increased with altitude, whereas those of Pb and Zn did not show a clear altitudinal trend. The effects of vegetation and cold trapping (CTE) (pollutant enrichment by decreasing temperature with increasing altitude) mainly determined the distribution of Cd and Pb in the O horizon, whereas CTE and bedrock weathering (BW) controlled that of Zn. In the A horizon, the distribution of Cd and Pb depended on the vegetation regulation, whereas that of Zn was mainly related to BW. Human activity, including ores mining and fossil fuels combustion, increased the trace metal deposition in the surface soils. The anthropogenic percentage of Cd, Pb, and Zn quantified 92.4, 67.8, and 42.9% in the O horizon, and 74.5, 33.9, and 24.9% in the A horizon, respectively. The anthropogenic metals deposited at the high altitudes of Mt. Luoji reflected the impact of long-range atmospheric transport on this remote alpine ecosystem from southern and southwestern regions.

  15. [Study on distribution of five heavy metal elements in different parts of Cordyceps sinensis by microwave digestion ICP-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Hao, Qing-Xiu; Wang, Sheng; Yang, Quan; Kang, Chuan-Zhi; Yang, Wan-Zhen; Guo, Lan-Ping

    2017-08-01

    The contents of five heavy metals (Cu, Pb, As, Cd, Hg) in 17 batches of Cordyceps sinensis were determined by microwave digestion-ICP-MS, and their distribution in C. sinensis were analyzed. The results showed that the contents of Cu, Pb, Cd and Hg in all batches were in accordance with the international standards of Chinese Medicine-Chinese Herbal Medicine Heavy Metal Limit, with their contents in the stroma higher than that in the caterpillar body, and the excess rate of As, which mainly concentrated in the caterpillar body part of C. sinensis, was 88.24%, as the content of As in the caterpillar body was 7 to 12 fold of that in the stroma. In this study, the distribution of five heavy metals in C. sinensis was clarified, and the existing problems of arsenic limit of heavy metal in C. sinensis were analyzed, and some suggestions were put forward. It is hoped that the reference standard can be provided for the limited standard of arsenic in C. sinensis. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  16. The Eating Habits of Milky Way-mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites and the Metallicity Distribution of Accreted Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deason, Alis J.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-04-01

    We study the mass spectrum of destroyed dwarfs that contribute to the accreted stellar mass of Milky Way (MW)-mass (Mvir ˜ 1012.1 M⊙) halos using a suite of 45 zoom-in dissipationless simulations. Empirical models are employed to relate (peak) subhalo mass to dwarf stellar mass, and we use constraints from z = 0 observations and hydrodynamical simulations to estimate the metallicity distribution of the accreted stellar material. The dominant contributors to the accreted stellar mass are relatively massive dwarfs with Mstar ˜ 108-1010M⊙. Halos with more quiescent accretion histories tend to have lower mass progenitors (108-109 M⊙), and lower overall accreted stellar masses. Ultra-faint mass (Mstar 108 M⊙ can contribute a considerable fraction (˜20%-60%) of metal-poor stars if their metallicity distributions have significant metal-poor tails. Finally, we find that the generic assumption of a quiescent assembly history for the MW halo seems to be in tension with the mass spectrum of its surviving dwarfs. We suggest that the MW could be a “transient fossil” a quiescent halo with a recent accretion event(s) that disguises the preceding formation history of the halo.

  17. Concentration levels and spatial distribution of sulphur and metals in fine-grained sediments in western Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. ÅSTRÖM

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available On the coastal plains of Finland, widespread Holocene marine and lacustrine sediments have developed into acid sulphate soil as a result of extensive artificial drainage for agricultural purposes. This has caused a variety of environmental problems. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration levels and spatial distribution of sulphur, carbon and metals [titanium, vanadium, chromium, manganese (Mn, iron, cobalt (Co, nickel (Ni, copper (Cu, zinc (Zn] in these sediments, in order to increase the geochemical understanding of the parent materials from which acid sulphate soil develops. Sediment samples were collected at 317 sites from a depth of 1.5–3 m. While the sediments have high S (sulphide concentrations (median = 0.54% and thus a strong acidification potential, they carry transition metals mainly in smallsized silicates close to “background concentrations” far below contamination limits. The previously documented extensive release of Co, Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn from oxidised and acidified layers of these sediments (i.e. acid sulphate soil is thus not explained by anomalously high natural or anthropogenic metal concentrations of the soils/sediments, but by an inherent highly mobile metal pool. Spatial-distribution maps highlight areas of elevated S and Mn concentrations, where it is likely that ditching and subsequent oxidation will result in an exceptionally large release of protons and Mn respectively.;

  18. Distributions and contamination assessment of heavy metals in the surface sediments of western Laizhou Bay: Implications for the sources and influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pan; Hu, Rijun; Zhu, Longhai; Wang, Peng; Yin, Dongxiao; Zhang, Lianjie

    2017-06-15

    Heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Cr, Cd and As) contents in surface sediments from western Laizhou Bay were analysed to evaluate the spatial distribution pattern and their contamination level. As was mainly concentrated in the coastal area near the estuaries and the other metals were mainly concentrated in the central part of the study area. The heavy metals were present at unpolluted levels overall evaluated by the sediment quality guidelines and geoaccumulation index. Principal component analysis suggest that Cu, Pb and Cd were mainly sourced from natural processes and As was mainly derived from anthropogenic inputs. Meanwhile, Cr originated from both natural processes and anthropogenic contributions. Tidal currents, sediments and human activities were important factors affecting the distribution of heavy metals. The heavy metal environment was divided into four subareas to provide a reference for understanding the distribution and pollution of heavy metals in the estuary-bay system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Distribution of stable and radioactive metals among the biomass compartments of the macrophytes of the Yenisei river and estimation of the dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotina, T.A.; Bolsunovskiy, A.Ya.; Sukovatyj, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Artificial radioactive metals are annually detected in the biomass of submerged macrophytes in the zone radioactive contamination of the Yenisei river. It has been shown by other authors that metals are not uniformly distributed in the biomass of aquatic macrophytes. In this research the distribution of stable and radioactive isotopes of metals was investigated among the biomass compartments of the macrophytes from the Yenisei river with chemical fractionation technique. Dose rates from the intra- and extracellular radionuclides have been estimated. According to the data obtained the distribution of metals among intra- and extracellular compartments was different. The major portion of Co, Mn and Zn was accumulated in the biomass in more mobile form, than Cr and Fe. Artificial radioactive isotopes were detected in the same compartments as stable metals. Essential portion of artificial radionuclides and stable metals was detected in the particles of seston, attached to the surface of the macrophytes.

  20. Study of the transverse momentum distribution in the inclusive reactions K+p→K0+X between 5 and 32GeV/c and K+p→π-+X between 8.2 and 32 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chliapnikov, P.V.; Gerdyukov, D.N.; Klimenko, S.V.; Minaev, N.G.; Perevoztchikov, V.M.; Rubin, A.M.; Uvarov, V.A.; Vorobjev, A.P.; Grard, F.; Henri, V.P.; Windmolders, R.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis of the transverse momentum spectra in the inclusive reactions K + p→K 0 +X at 5, 8.2, 16 and 32GeV/c and K + p→π - +X at 8.2, 16 and 32GeV/c in terms of a Bose-Einstein distribution reveals a strong correlation between the values of the temperature and the Feynman variable x. The variation of the temperature versus the incident momentum is also discussed [fr

  1. Comparison of the stress distribution in the metallic layers of flexible pipes using two alternative Bflex formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yunzhu

    2014-01-01

    Axisymmetric load is the most common load acting on flexible pipe. Modelling axisymmetric load correctly is very important to estimate the strength of a flexible pipe. The purpose of the thesis is to compare the stress distribution in metallic layers under three load case, i.e. tension, internal pressure and external pressure. Literature study and discussion to mechanical properties of flexible pipe and finite element modelling method are included in the thesis. The modelling program is BFLEX...

  2. Marine lake as in situ laboratory for studies of organic matter influence on speciation and distribution of trace metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, Marina; Fiket, Željka; Geček, Sunčana; Cukrov, Neven; Cuculić, Vlado

    2015-07-01

    Karst marine lakes are unique marine systems, also recognized as in situ "laboratories" in which geochemical processes on a different scale compared to the open sea, can be observed. In this study, organic matter cycle and its impact on distribution of trace metals in the marine lake Mir, located on Dugi Otok Island, in the central part of the eastern Adriatic Sea, was investigated for the first time. Studied marine lake is small, isolated, shallow basin, with limited communication with the open sea. Intense spatial and seasonal variations of organic matter, dissolved and particulate (DOC, POC), and dissolved trace metals concentrations in the water column of the Lake are governed predominantly by natural processes. Enhanced oxygen consumption in the Lake during summer season, high DOC and POC concentrations and low redox potential result in occasional occurrence of anoxic conditions in the bottom layers with appearance of sulfur species. Speciation modeling showed that dissolved trace metals Cu, Pb and Zn, are mostly bound to organic matter, while Cd, Co and Ni are present predominantly as free ions and inorganic complexes. Trace metals removal from the water column and their retention in the sediment was found to depend on the nature of the relationship between specific metal and organic or inorganic phases, sulfides, Fe-oxyhydroxydes or biogenic calcite. The above is reflected in the composition of the sediments, which are, in addition to influence of karstic background and bathymetry of the basin, significantly affected by accumulation of detritus at the bottom of the Lake.

  3. Speciation and distribution characteristics of heavy metals and pollution assessments in the sediments of Nashina Lake, Heilongjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Zang, Shuying; Xiao, Haifeng; Wu, Changshan

    2014-05-01

    Sediment core samples from Nashina Lake, Heilongjiang, China were collected using a gravity sampler. The cores were sliced horizontally at 1 cm each to determine the particle size, total concentrations and speciation of Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn. Total concentrations of heavy metals were extracted using an acid mixture (containing hydro fluoric acid, nitric acid, and sulphuric acid) and analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. A sequential extraction procedure was employed to separate chemical species. Analysis of results indicate that the concentrations of heavy metals in the sediments of Nashina Lake in descending order are Mn, Cr, Zn, Pb, Ni, Cu, and Cd. The ratios of the average concentrations of four heavy metals (e.g.Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn) to their background values were >1; and those of Mn, Cd, and Pb were >1. Moreover, some toxic metals were mainly distributed in bioavailable fractions. For instance, both Cd and Mn were typically found in Acid-extractable species or Fe-Mn oxide species, and thus can be easily remobilized and enter the food chain. Finally, the analysis of geo-accumulation index showed that anthropogenic pollution levels of Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn were low, but those of Pb and Cd were at the moderate level. As both Pb and Cd are toxic metals, it is highly necessary to prohibit their transformation and accumulation in the sediments.

  4. Spatial distribution and risk assessment of heavy metals and As pollution in the sediments of a shallow lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiancai; Wang, Yuansheng; Liu, Xin; Hu, Weiping; Zhu, Jinge; Zhu, Lin

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations and spatial distributions of eight heavy metals in surface sediments and sediment core samples from a shallow lake in China were investigated to evaluate the extent of the contamination and potential ecological risks. The results showed that the heavy metal concentrations were higher in the northern and southwestern lake zones than those in the other lake zones, with lower levels of As, Hg, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cr, and Ni primarily observed in the central and eastern lake regions and Cd primarily confined to areas surrounding the lake. The concentrations of the eight heavy metals in the sediment profiles tended to decrease with increasing sediment depth. The contents of Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd in the surface sediment were approximately 1.23-18.41-fold higher than their background values (BVs), whereas the contents of Cr, As, and Hg were nearly identical to their BVs. The calculated pollution load index (PLI) suggested that the surface sediments of this lake were heavily polluted by these heavy metals and indicated that Cd was a predominant contamination factor. The comprehensive potential ecological risk index (PERI) in the surface sediments ranged from 99.2 to 2882.1, with an average of 606.1. Cd contributed 78.7 % to the PERI, and Hg contributed 8.4 %. Multivariate statistical analyses revealed that the surface sediment pollution with heavy metals mainly originated from industrial wastewater discharged by rivers located in the western and northwestern portion of the lake.

  5. Spatial distribution and source identification of heavy metals in surface soils in a typical coal mine city, Lianyuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Feng, Chunting; Zeng, Guangming; Gao, Xiang; Zhong, Minzhou; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Xin; He, Xinyue; Fang, Yilong

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the pollution degree and spatial distribution of heavy metals and determined their sources in topsoil in a typical coal mine city, Lianyuan, Hunan Province, China. We collected 6078 soil surface samples in different land use types. And the concentrations of Zn, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Sb, As, Mo, V, Mn, Fe and Cr were measured. The average contents of all heavy metals were lower than their corresponding Grade II values of Chinese Soil Quality Standard with the exception of Hg. However, average contents of twelve heavy metals, except for Mn, exceeded their background level in soils in Hunan Province. Based on one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), the contents of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Hg, Mo and V were related to the anthropogenic source and there were statistically significant differences in their concentrations among different land use patterns. The spatial variation of heavy metal was visualized by GIS. The PMF model was used to ascertain contamination sources of twelve heavy metals and apportion their source contributions in Lianyuan soils. The results showed that the source contributions of the natural source, atmospheric deposition, industrial activities and agricultural activities accounted for 33.6%, 26.05%, 23.44% and 16.91%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. POPULATION EFFECTS ON THE METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION DERIVED FROM THE RED GIANT BRANCH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordoñez, Antonio J.; Sarajedini, Ata

    2015-01-01

    We have tested the reliability of the red giant branch (RGB) as a metallicity indicator accounting for observational errors as well as the complexity of star formation histories and chemical evolution histories observed in various stellar systems. We generate model color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs) produced with a variety of evolutionary histories and compare the resultant metallicity estimates from the colors and magnitudes of RGB stars to the true input metallicities. We include realistic models for photometric errors and completeness in our synthetic CMDs. As expected, for simple simple stellar populations dominated by old stars, the RGB provides a very accurate estimate of the modular metallicity value for a population. An error in the age of a system targeted for this type of study may produce metallicity errors of a few tenths of a dex. The size of this metallicity error depends linearly on the age error, and we find this dependence to be stronger with more precise photometry. If the population has experienced any significant star formation within the last ∼6 Gyr, the metallicity estimates, [M/H], derived from the RGB may be in error by up to ∼0.5 dex. Perhaps the most important consideration for this technique is an accurate, independent estimate of the average age for the target stellar system, especially if it is probable that a significant fraction of the population formed less than ∼6 Gyr ago

  7. Distribution and source apportionment studies of heavy metals in soil of cotton/wheat fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Nazia; Tariq, Saadia R

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metals enriched agricultural soils have been the subject of great concern because these metals have potential to be transferred to the soil solution and afterward accumulated in food chain. To study the trace metal persistence in crop soil, 90 representative soil samples were collected and analyzed for heavy metal (As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and anions (chloride, nitrates, phosphates and sulfates). Cluster and factor analysis techniques were used for the source identification of these excessive heavy metal levels and ecological risk was determined with potential ecological risk assessment. The degree of enrichment of eight studied heavy metals in comparison with the corresponding background levels decreased in order: Cd > Pb > Fe > Ni > Mn > As > Cu ~ Zn. Arsenic and cadmium exhibited 1.30- and 1.64-fold exceeded levels than threshold limits set by National environment quality standards, respectively. Cd in cotton field's soil may lead to higher potential risk than other heavy metals. On overall basis, the cumulative mean potential ecological risk for the district (207.75) corresponded to moderate risk level with higher contributions from As and Pb especially from Cd. Cadmium formed strong positive correlation with phosphate content of soil at p < 0.01. Cluster analysis indicated that Cluster 1 (extremely polluted) probably originated from anthropogenic inputs of phosphate fertilizer and past usage of arsenical pesticides.

  8. The GALAH Survey: Stellar streams and how stellar velocity distributions vary with Galactic longitude, hemisphere and metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillen, Alice C.; De Silva, Gayandhi; Sharma, Sanjib; Hayden, Michael; Freeman, Ken; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Žerjal, Maruša; Asplund, Martin; Buder, Sven; D'Orazi, Valentina; Duong, Ly; Kos, Janez; Lin, Jane; Lind, Karin; Martell, Sarah; Schlesinger, Katharine; Simpson, Jeffrey D.; Zucker, Daniel B.; Zwitter, Tomaz; Anguiano, Borja; Carollo, Daniela; Casagrande, Luca; Cotar, Klemen; Cottrell, Peter L.; Ireland, Michael; Kafle, Prajwal R.; Horner, Jonathan; Lewis, Geraint F.; Nataf, David M.; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Watson, Fred; Wittenmyer, Rob; Wyse, Rosemary

    2018-04-01

    Using GALAH survey data of nearby stars, we look at how structure in the planar (u, v) velocity distribution depends on metallicity and on viewing direction within the Galaxy. In nearby stars with distance d ≲ 1 kpc, the Hercules stream is most strongly seen in higher metallicity stars [Fe/H]>0.2. The Hercules stream peak v value depends on viewed galactic longitude, which we interpret as due to the gap between the stellar stream and more circular orbits being associated with a specific angular momentum value of about 1640 km s-1 kpc. The association of the gap with a particular angular momentum value supports a bar resonant model for the Hercules stream. Moving groups previously identified in Hipparcos observations are easiest to see in stars nearer than 250 pc, and their visibility and peak velocities in the velocity distributions depends on both viewing direction (galactic longitude and hemisphere) and metallicity. We infer that there is fine structure in local velocity distributions that varies over distances of a few hundred pc in the Galaxy.

  9. Particle-size dependence on metal(loid) distributions in mine wastes: Implications for water contamination and human exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.S.; Wilson, K.M.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The mining and processing of metal-bearing ores has resulted in contamination issues where waste materials from abandoned mines remain in piles of untreated and unconsolidated material, posing the potential for waterborne and airborne transport of toxic elements. This study presents a systematic method of particle size separation, mass distribution, and bulk chemical analysis for mine tailings and adjacent background soil samples from the Rand historic mining district, California, in order to assess particle size distribution and related trends in metal(loid) concentration as a function of particle size. Mine tailings produced through stamp milling and leaching processes were found to have both a narrower and finer particle size distribution than background samples, with significant fractions of particles available in a size range (???250 ??m) that could be incidentally ingested. In both tailings and background samples, the majority of trace metal(loid)s display an inverse relationship between concentration and particle size, resulting in higher proportions of As, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in finer-sized fractions which are more susceptible to both water- and wind-borne transport as well as ingestion and/or inhalation. Established regulatory screening levels for such elements may, therefore, significantly underestimate potential exposure risk if relying solely on bulk sample concentrations to guide remediation decisions. Correlations in elemental concentration trends (such as between As and Fe) indicate relationships between elements that may be relevant to their chemical speciation. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Distribution of heavy metals in the coastal area of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rashdi, Saeed; Arabi, Alya A; Howari, Fares M; Siad, Abdi

    2015-08-15

    Fifty-seven sediment samples were collected from Abu Dhabi coastal area, United Arab Emirates (UAE). The concentrations of heavy metals including antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, lead, molybdenum, nickel and zinc were obtained using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence. Heavy metal contaminations in Abu Dhabi had increased since 2004. Nevertheless, the enrichment factors, geoaccumulation indices and the pollution load index of 0.3 showed no pollution with any of the measured metals except arsenic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatial distribution, temporal variation, and sources of heavy metal pollution in groundwater of a century-old nonferrous metal mining and smelting area in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xing; Chen, Zhihua; Luo, Zhaohui

    2014-12-01

    This study first presents the spatial distribution, temporal variation, and sources of heavy metal pollution in groundwater of a nonferrous metal mine area in China. Unconfined groundwater was polluted by Pb, Zn, As, and Cu, in order, while confined karst water in the mines showed pollution in the following sequence: Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb, and As. Pollution by Pb was widespread, while Zn, As, Cu, and Cd were found to be high in the north-central industrial region and to decrease gradually with distance from smelters and tailings. Vertically, more Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd have accumulated in shallow Quaternary groundwater, while more As have migrated into the deeper fracture groundwater in the local discharge area. Zn, Cd, and Cu concentrations in groundwater along the riverside diminished owing to reduced wastewater drainage since 1977, while samples in the confluence area were found to have increasing contents of Pb, Zn, As, Cu, and Cd since industrialization began in the 1990s. Sources of heavy metals in groundwater were of anthropogenic origin except for Cr. Pb originated primarily from airborne volatile particulates, wastewater, and waste residues and deposited continuously, while Zn, Cd, and Cu were derived from the wastewater of smelters and leakage of tailings, which corresponded to the related soil and surface residue researches. Elevated As values around factories might be the result of chemical reactions. Flow patterns in different hydrogeological units and adsorption capability of from Quaternary sediments restricted their cross-border diffusion.

  12. THE EATING HABITS OF MILKY WAY-MASS HALOS: DESTROYED DWARF SATELLITES AND THE METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF ACCRETED STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deason, Alis J.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Wechsler, Risa H., E-mail: adeason@stanford.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    We study the mass spectrum of destroyed dwarfs that contribute to the accreted stellar mass of Milky Way (MW)-mass (M{sub vir} ∼ 10{sup 12.1} M{sub ⊙}) halos using a suite of 45 zoom-in dissipationless simulations. Empirical models are employed to relate (peak) subhalo mass to dwarf stellar mass, and we use constraints from z = 0 observations and hydrodynamical simulations to estimate the metallicity distribution of the accreted stellar material. The dominant contributors to the accreted stellar mass are relatively massive dwarfs with M{sub star} ∼ 10{sup 8}–10{sup 10}M{sub ⊙}. Halos with more quiescent accretion histories tend to have lower mass progenitors (10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}), and lower overall accreted stellar masses. Ultra-faint mass (M{sub star} < 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙}) dwarfs contribute a negligible amount (≪1%) to the accreted stellar mass and, despite having low average metallicities, supply a small fraction (∼2%–5%) of the very metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] < −2. Dwarfs with masses 10{sup 5} < M{sub star}/M{sub ⊙} < 10{sup 8} provide a substantial amount of the very metal-poor stellar material (∼40%–80%), and even relatively metal-rich dwarfs with M{sub star} > 10{sup 8} M{sub ⊙} can contribute a considerable fraction (∼20%–60%) of metal-poor stars if their metallicity distributions have significant metal-poor tails. Finally, we find that the generic assumption of a quiescent assembly history for the MW halo seems to be in tension with the mass spectrum of its surviving dwarfs. We suggest that the MW could be a “transient fossil”; a quiescent halo with a recent accretion event(s) that disguises the preceding formation history of the halo.

  13. Spatial and temporal distribution of metals in suspended particulate matter of the Kali estuary, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suja, S.; Kessarkar, Pratima M.; Fernandes, Lina L.; Kurian, Siby; Tomer, Arti

    2017-09-01

    Major (Al, Fe, Mn, Ti, Mg) and trace (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co, Zr, Rb, Sr, Ba, Li, Be, Sc, V, Ga, Nb, Mo, Sn, Sb, Cs, Hf, Ta, Bi, Th, U) elements and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations in surface suspended particulate matter (SPM) of the Kali estuary, (central west coast of India) were studied during the pre-monsoon, monsoon and post monsoon seasons to infer estuarine processes, source of SPM and Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) assigned pollutionIgeo levels. Distribution of SPM indicates the presence of the estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) during all three seasons near the river mouth and a second ETM during the post monsoon time in the upstream associated with salinities gradient. The SPM during the monsoon is finer grained (avg. 53 μm), characterized by uniformly low normalized elemental concentration, whereas the post and pre monsoon are characterized by high normalized elemental concentration with coarser grain size (avg. 202 μm and 173 μm respectively) with highest ratios in the upstream estuary. The elemental composition and principal component analysis for the upstream estuary SPM support more contribution from the upstream catchment area rocks during the monsoon season; there is additional contribution from the downstream catchment area during the pre and post monsoon period due to the tidal effect. The Kali estuarine SPM has higher Al, Fe, Mn, Ti, Mg, Ni, Co, Ba, Li and V with respect to Average World River SPM (WRSPM). Igeo values for the SPM indicate Kali Estuary to be severely enriched with Mn and moderately enriched with Cu, Zn, Ni, Co, U and Mo in the upstream estuary during pre and post monsoon seasons. Seasonal changes in salinity gradient (reduced freshwater flow due to closing of the dam gates), reduced velocity at meandering region of the estuary and POC of 1.6-2.3% resulted in co-precipitation of trace elements that were further fortified by flocculation and coagulation throughout the water column resulting in metal trapping in the

  14. Seasonal Distribution of Trace Metals in Ground and Surface Water of Golaghat District, Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boarh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A study has been carried out on the quality of ground and surface water with respect to chromium, manganese, zinc, copper, nickel, cadmium and arsenic contamination from 28 different sources in the predominantly rural Golaghat district of Assam (India. The metals were analysed by using atomic absorption spectrometer. Water samples were collected from groundwater and surface water during the dry and wet seasons of 2008 from the different sources in 28 locations (samples. The results are discussed in the light of possible health hazards from the metals in relation to their maximum permissible limits. The study shows the quality of ground and surface water in a sizeable number of water samples in the district not to be fully satisfactory with respect to presence of the metals beyond permissible limits of WHO. The metal concentration of groundwater in the district follows the trend As>Zn>Mn>Cr>Cu>Ni>Cd in both the seasons.

  15. Distribution of Heavy Metals in the Soils Associated with the Commonly Used Pesticides in Cotton Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadia Rashid Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural soils contain both heavy metals and pesticides originating from various agricultural practices. It is quite important to study the relationships between these two classes of compounds. To accomplish this, 52 soil samples were collected from cotton fields and analyzed for their metal contents (Ni, Cu, Co, Pb, Cr, and Cd and levels of most commonly used pesticides (imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and emamectin. FAAS was used for metal estimation and the pesticides were determined by HPLC equipped with UV detector. The results of the study revealed slightly enhanced levels of Ni and Cd in these samples while the rest of the metals were present within tolerable range. Acetamiprid residues in soil were strongly positively correlated with Cu and negatively correlated with Cr. Similarly, imidacloprid in soil was negatively correlated with Ni. Thus it was evidenced that Cu stabilizes acetamiprid while Cr and Ni facilitate the degradation of acetamiprid and imidacloprid in the soil.

  16. Concentration distribution and potential health risk of heavy metals in Mactra veneriformis from Bohai Bay, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuhu; Liu, Hui; Zhou, Hailong; Ma, Wandong; Han, Qian; Diao, Xiaoping; Xue, Qinzhao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mn was dominant in the heavy metals, followed by Zn, and Pb was the lowest. • THQs of Co were the highest at three sections and the others were less than 1. • Heavy metal concentration in clam was affected by pollution sources, and itself. • Consumer should be aware of their health risks associated with the consuming clam. - Abstract: To investigate the pollution level and evaluate the potential health risks of heavy metals, the concentrations of chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), cadmium (Cd), antimony (Sb), and lead (Pb) were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in 198 clams (Mactra veneriformis) collected from 11 sites of the Bohai Bay. The results showed that heavy metal concentrations in the clams were different at different sites (p < 0.05). Mn was dominant with a percentage of 22.08–77.03% in heavy metals, followed by Zn with 12.66–57.11%, and the concentration of Pb was the lowest with 0.45–1.04%. The potential health risk to consumers was evaluated by the target hazard quotient (THQ) and the maximum daily consumption rate (CR max ). The results indicated that the THQs of Co were the highest with the values of 1.125, 1.665, and 1.144 at three sections; the values of other individual metals were <1, which indicated that consumption of clams from the study areas caused health risks due to Co. Moreover, the CR max values also indicated the potential health risk caused by Co in clams consumed in this area. Pearson correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that there were significantly positive or negative correlations between the heavy metals (p < 0.05), and the studied metals were divided into four groups. The results indicated that the concentrations of heavy metals in clams were affected not only by pollution sources but also by the characteristics of clams that could absorb

  17. Spatial distribution of heavy metals in soil, water, and vegetables of farms in Sanandaj, Kurdistan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Afshin; Amini, Hassan; Nazmara, Shahrokh; Zandi, Shiva; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals are ubiquitous elsewhere in nature and their measurement in environment is necessary to develop health management strategies. In this study, we aimed to find out concentrations and spatial patterns of heavy metals in main farms of Sanandaj in Kurdistan, Iran. Over May to October 2012, six farms were selected to analyze concentrations and spatial patterns of several heavy metals, namely aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in their soil, irrigation water, and edible vegetables. Overall, 36 samples of soil and water and 72 samples of vegetables including coriander (Coriandrum sativum), dill (Anethum graveolens), radish (Raphanus sativus) root and radish leaf were collected. The concentrations of metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The spatial surfaces of heavy metals were created using geospatial information system. The order of metals in soil was Al > Zn > Ni > Cu > Cr > Pb > Co > As > Cd while in water it was Cr > Co > Zn > Pb > Cu > Ni > Al = As = Cd. The order of heavy metals in vegetables was Al > Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb > Co > As > Cd. Totally, the minimum concentrations of Al, Cu, Pb, and Zn were found in radish root while the maximum of Al, Co, Cr, and Ni were found in radish leaf. The minimum concentrations of Cd and Cr and maximum concentrations of Cu and Zn were also deciphered in dill. Noteworthy, coriander had the minimum concentrations of Co and Ni. The concentrations of Cr and Pb in vegetables were more than maximum allowable limits of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO). In summary, albeit the concentrations of heavy metals in soil and water samples were below FAO and the WHO standards, vegetables were contaminated by chromium and lead.

  18. Pollution distribution and health risk assessment of heavy metals in indoor dust in Anhui rural, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuesheng; Fang, Fengman; Wang, Fei; Xu, Minglu

    2015-09-01

    Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, V, Ni, Co, and As concentrations of indoor dust in Anhui rural were determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The degrees of metal pollution in indoor dust ranked as follows: Zn > Pb > Cr > Cu > V > Ni > Co > As, on average. The arithmetic means of Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, V, Ni, Co, and As were 427.17, 348.73, 107.05, 113.68, 52.64, 38.93, 10.29, and 4.46 mg/kg, respectively. These were higher than background values of Anhui soil for Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, and Ni, especially for Pb with the mean value of 13.21 times the background value. Heavy metal concentrations of indoor dust were different from different rural areas. House type (bungalows or storied house), sweeping frequency, and external environment around the house (such as the road grade) affected heavy metal concentrations in indoor dust. The results of factor analysis and correlation analysis indicated that Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, and Co concentrations were mainly due to interior paint, metal objects, and building materials. Pb and As concentrations were due to vehicle emissions. V concentration was mainly of natural source. Average daily doses for the exposure pathway of the studied heavy metals decreased in children in the following order: hand-to-mouth ingestion > dermal contact > inhalation. The non-carcinogenic risks of heavy metals ranked as Pb > V > Cr > Cu > Zn > As > Co > Ni, and the carcinogenic risks of metals decreased in the order of Cr > Co > As > Ni. The non-carcinogenic hazard indexes and carcinogenic risks of metals in indoor dust were both lower than the safe values.

  19. Study of Selected Metals Distribution, Source Apportionment, and Risk Assessment in Suburban Soil, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Javed; Shah, Munir H.

    2015-01-01

    Composite soil samples collected from suburban areas were analyzed for Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Sr, and Zn by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Based on pseudototal metal analysis, Fe, Mn, Sr, and Zn were the prevailing metals while Cd, Co, Cr, and Pb were the least participants. However, based on bioavailability, Cd, Co, Pb, and Sr were easily leachable and might pose adverse effects to soil biota. In ecological risk assessment, contamination factor demonstrated moderate contamination ...

  20. The origin of the Tongkeng-Changpo tin deposit, Dachang metal district, Guangxi, China: clues from fluid inclusions and He isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minghai, Cai; Jingwen, Mao; Ting, Liang; Pirajno, Franco; Huilan, Huang

    2007-08-01

    Tongkeng-Changpo is the largest tin deposit within the giant Dachang polymetallic tin ore field in Guangxi, southern China, which is part of a large skarn system associated with Cretaceous granitoids. The Tongkeng-Changpo mineralization consists of veins and stockworks in the upper levels and replacement stratiform orebodies (mantos) at lower levels. Based on textural relationships, three major mineralizing stages can be recognized: stage I with cassiterite, sulphides, stannite, tourmaline, and quartz; stage II with cassiterite, sulphides, sulphosalts, quartz, and calcite; and stage III with calcite as the main phase. The study of fluid inclusions has shown that there are two main fluid types: CO2 and NaCl-H2O. Homogenization temperatures are 270 to 365°C, 210 to 240°C, and 140 to 190°C for stages I, II, and III, respectively. Salinities range from 1 to 7 wt.% NaCl equiv. in the early ore stage and 3 to 10 wt.% NaCl equiv. in the late stages. Laser Raman Spectroscopy indicates that the inclusion fluids in stages I and II were of carbono-aqueous composition, with minor amounts of CH4 and H2S, whereas those in stage III were aqueous. Helium isotopic analyses of inclusion fluids indicate that the 3He/4He ratios in the ore veins are in between 1.2 to 2.9 Ra (Ra = 1.4 × 10-6, modern atmospheric ratio), and range from 1.6 to 2.5 Ra in the stratiform orebodies. This range of 3He/4He ratios is significantly higher than that of crustal fluids (0.01-0.05 Ra). The similar characteristics of fluid inclusions and their He isotopic composition, as well as age constraints, indicate that the ore veins and stratiform orebodies of the Tongkeng-Changpo deposit formed from the same hydrothermal system, likely related to granite intrusions of the Mesozoic Yanshanian tectono-thermal event. In addition, the high R/Ra ratios indicate a mantle contribution in the ore fluids.

  1. PRELIMINARY RESULTS ON THE DISTRIBUTION AND SOLUBILITY OF HEAVY METALS IN URBAN AND SUBURBAN SOILS OF RAVENNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Gatti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Three location types with of different environmental impacts were considered in the district of Ravenna, a city park, a suburban pinewood and arable fields. In this paper we report the preliminary results about the relationship between land use and soil management with chemical fractionation of heavy metals. The distribution and solubility of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb was determined by water and LMWOAs extraction procedures in horizons A1 and A2 of 13 soils. In general the maximum potentially toxic element concentrations were associated with soil collected from the pinewood, and they tended to decrease with depth. The upper layer enrichment of the pinewood soils clearly revealed an anthropogenic origin of pollution. Under the pinewood, the extraction power by the single extraction procedures showed a pattern quite similar in terms of ranking of metals extracted, except that Zn and Ni were more dissolved than Cu by the use of LMWOAs. Under the pinewood, the metal levels presented a rather similar distribution pattern in terms of ranking of extractive power by the single extraction procedures, with Zn and Ni being more dissolved than Cu by the use of LMWOAs extractant. However, both readily available pools were demonstrated to be more enriched in Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb compared those of city park and arable soils. City park and arable soils had high contents of  Cu. The highest concentrations were particularly shown by the arable soil under orchard, due to frequent fungicide applications. Single extractions were compared to metals dissoved in aqua regia by bivariate correlations. By comparison, pinewood soils showed higher positive relationships between pseudo-total contents determined by aqua regia and metal concentrations from single extraction procedures than city park and arable soils. The highest correlation coefficients were found for Zn and Cd by water extraction, and for Cu and Pb by LMWOAs extraction. Both water and LMWOAs pools exhibited

  2. [Accumulation, distribution and pollution assessment of heavy metals in surface sediment of Caohai plateau wetland, Guizhou province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Hai; Lin, Chang-Hu; Tan, Hong; Lin, Shao-Xia; Yang, Hong-Bo

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the concentrations and distribution characteristics of heavy metals in surface sediments of different areas in the Caohai plateau wetland. 16 samples of surface sediments were collected and 7 heavy metals were analyzed. Heavy metal pollution in surface sediments of different areas in the Caohai plateau wetland was estimated by the Tomlinson Pollution Load Index (PLI) method. The analyzed results indicated that the average contents of Cd, Hg, As, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn were 0.985, 0.345, 15.8, 38.9, 38.6, 22.8 and 384 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The heavy metal distributions varied with regional environment changes, the order of average contents of Cd and Hg in different regions was E (the eastern region) > S (the southern region) > N (the northern region), the order of the average content of Pb was N > E > S, and that of Zn was S > E > N. The results also suggested a medium heavy metal pollution level in the surface sediment of the Caohai plateau wetland with the PLI(zone) reaching 1.17. The order of pollution level in surface sediments of different regions was E > S > N. The results showed medium pollution levels in E and Hg which reached the extreme intensity pollution level were also the major polluted elements in surface sediments of the Caohai plateau wetland. And also, results showed medium pollution levels of Cd and Pb in surface sediments of Caohai plateau wetland. Cluster analysis results showed similar pollution sources of Cd, Zn, Pb and Hg, which should be attached great importance in terms of the prevention of the Caohai plateau wetland.

  3. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Han, Tae Jin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-01-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Global direct pressures on biodiversity by large-scale metal mining: Spatial distribution and implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murguía, Diego I; Bringezu, Stefan; Schaldach, Rüdiger

    2016-09-15

    Biodiversity loss is widely recognized as a serious global environmental change process. While large-scale metal mining activities do not belong to the top drivers of such change, these operations exert or may intensify pressures on biodiversity by adversely changing habitats, directly and indirectly, at local and regional scales. So far, analyses of global spatial dynamics of mining and its burden on biodiversity focused on the overlap between mines and protected areas or areas of high value for conservation. However, it is less clear how operating metal mines are globally exerting pressure on zones of different biodiversity richness; a similar gap exists for unmined but known mineral deposits. By using vascular plants' diversity as a proxy to quantify overall biodiversity, this study provides a first examination of the global spatial distribution of mines and deposits for five key metals across different biodiversity zones. The results indicate that mines and deposits are not randomly distributed, but concentrated within intermediate and high diversity zones, especially bauxite and silver. In contrast, iron, gold, and copper mines and deposits are closer to a more proportional distribution while showing a high concentration in the intermediate biodiversity zone. Considering the five metals together, 63% and 61% of available mines and deposits, respectively, are located in intermediate diversity zones, comprising 52% of the global land terrestrial surface. 23% of mines and 20% of ore deposits are located in areas of high plant diversity, covering 17% of the land. 13% of mines and 19% of deposits are in areas of low plant diversity, comprising 31% of the land surface. Thus, there seems to be potential for opening new mines in areas of low biodiversity in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Jin Han, Tae; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Ju Kim, Kyoung, E-mail: kjkim@hallym.or.kr; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-10-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation.

  6. Measurement of distributions sensitive to the underlying event in inclusive Z-boson production in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Struebig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-12-10

    A measurement of charged-particle distributions sensitive to the properties of the underlying event is presented for an inclusive sample of events containing a Z-boson , decaying to an electron or muon pair. The measurement is based on data collected using the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton--proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with an integrated luminosity of $4.6$ fb$^{-1}$. Distributions of the charged particle multiplicity and of the charged particle transverse momentum are measured in regions of azimuthal angle defined with respect to the Z-boson direction. The measured distributions are compared to similar distributions measured in jet events, and to the predictions of various Monte Carlo generators implementing different underlying event models.

  7. REM effect on nonmetallic inclusion composition and heat resistance in an austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farafonov, V.K.; Shtejnberg, M.M.; Kikhtin, M.V.; Cheremnykh, V.P.; Vojnov, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    Studies were made to elucidate the effect of rare earths (lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium, cerium) on the composition of non-metallic inclusions and heat resistance of an austenitic chromium-nickel steel. Common sulfide and oxide inclusions are shown to be substituted by rare earth sulfide and oxide inclusions at RE metal content in the steel up to 0.1%. Further increase of RE metal content results in increasing non-metallic inclusions containing RE metals, phosphorus and non-ferrous impurities. Creep rate changes insignificantly at RE metal content up to 0.1%, and then it sharply grows with the quantity of non-metallic inclusions in the steel

  8. Distribution of heavy metals in muscles and internal organs of Korean cephalopods and crustaceans: risk assessment for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Jong Soo; Kwon, Ji Young; Son, Kwang Tae; Choi, Woo Seok; Shim, Kil Bo; Lee, Tae Seek; Kim, Ji Hoe

    2014-12-01

    Samples of seven species of cephalopods and crustaceans were collected from major fish markets on the Korean coast and analyzed for mercury (Hg) using a direct Hg analyzer and for the metals cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), chromium, silver, nickel, copper, and zinc using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The distributions of heavy metals in muscles, internal organs, and whole tissues were determined, and a risk assessment was conducted to provide information concerning consumer safety. The heavy metals accumulated to higher levels (P octopus (relatively large cephalopods), red snow crab, and snow crab exceeded the European Union limits. The estimated dietary intake of Cd, Pb, and Hg for each part of all species accounted for 1.73 to 130.57%, 0.03 to 0.39%, and 0.93 to 1.67%, respectively, of the provisional tolerable daily intake adopted by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives; the highest values were found in internal organs. The hazard index (HI) is recognized as a reasonable parameter for assessing the risk of heavy metal consumption associated with contaminated food. Because of the high HI (>1.0) of the internal organs of cephalopods and the maximum HI for whole tissue of 0.424, consumers eating internal organs or whole tissues of cephalopods could be at risk of high heavy metal exposure. Therefore, the internal organs of relatively large cephalopods and crabs (except blue crab) are unfit for consumption. However, consumption of flesh after removing internal organs is a suitable approach for decreasing exposure to harmful metals.

  9. Biogeochemical and hydrological controls on fate and distribution of trace metals in oiled Gulf salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keevan, J.; Natter, M.; Lee, M.; Keimowitz, A.; Okeke, B.; Savrda, C.; Saunders, J.

    2011-12-01

    On April 20, 2010, the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting in the release of approximately 5 million barrels of crude oil into the environment. Oil and its associated trace metals have been demonstrated to have a detrimental effect on coastal wetland ecosystems. Wetlands are particularly susceptible to oil contamination because they are composed largely of fine-grained sediments, which have a high capacity to adsorb organic matter and metals. The biogeochemical cycling of trace metals can be strongly influenced by microbial activity, specifically those of sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria. Microbial activity may be enhanced by an increase in amounts of organic matter such as oil. This research incorporates an assessment of levels of trace metals and associated biogeochemical changes from ten coastal marshes in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. These sampling sites range in their pollution levels from pristine to highly contaminated. A total digestion analysis of wetland sediments shows higher concentrations of certain trace metals (e.g., Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn, Sr, Co, V, Ba, Hg, As) in heavily-oiled areas compared to less-affected and pristine sites. Due to chemical complexation among organic compounds and metals, crude oils often contain elevated levels (up to hundreds of mg/kg) of trace metals At the heavily-oiled Louisiana sites (e.g., Bay Jimmy, Bayou Dulac, Bay Batiste), elevated levels of metals and total organic carbon have been found in sediments down to depths of 30 cm. Clearly the contamination is not limited to shallow sediments and oil, along with various associated metals, may be invading into deeper (pre-industrial) portions of the marsh sediments. Pore-waters extracted from contaminated sediments are characterized by very high levels of reduced sulfur (up to 80 mg/kg), in contrast to fairly low ferrous iron concentrations (<0.02 mg/kg). The influx of oil into the wetlands might provide the initial substrate and

  10. Spatial distribution of heavy metal contamination in soils near a primitive e-waste recycling site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Sheng-Xiang; Yan, Bo; Yang, Fan; Li, Ning; Xiao, Xian-Ming; Fu, Jia-Mo

    2015-01-01

    The total concentrations of 12 heavy metals in surface soils (SS, 0-20 cm), middle soils (MS, 30-50 cm) and deep soils (DS, 60-80 cm) from an acid-leaching area, a deserted paddy field and a deserted area of Guiyu were measured. The results showed that the acid-leaching area was heavily contaminated with heavy metals, especially in SS. The mean concentrations of Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sn, Sb and Pb in SS from the acid-leaching area were 278.4, 684.1, 572.8, 1.36, 3,472, 1,706 and 222.8 mg/kg, respectively. Heavy metal pollution in the deserted paddy field was mainly concentrated in SS and MS. The average values of Sb in SS and MS from the deserted paddy field were 16.3 and 20.2 mg/kg, respectively. However, heavy metal contamination of the deserted area was principally found in the DS. Extremely high concentrations of heavy metals were also observed at some special research sites, further confirming that the level of heavy metal pollution was very serious. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo) values revealed that the acid-leaching area was severely polluted with heavy metals in the order of Sb > Sn > Cu > Cd > Ni > Zn > Pb, while deserted paddy field was contaminated predominately by metals in the order of Sb > Sn > Cu. It was obvious that the concentrations of some uncommon contaminants, such as Sb and Sn, were higher than principal contaminants, such as Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb, suggesting that particular attention should be directed to Sn and Sb contamination in the future research of heavy metals in soils from e-waste-processing areas. Correlation analysis suggested that Li and Be in soils from the acid-leaching area and its surrounding environment might have originated from other industrial activities and from batteries, whereas Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Sn and Sb contamination was most likely caused by uncontrolled electronic waste (e-waste) processing. These results indicate the significant need for optimisation of e-waste-dismantling technologies and remediation of polluted soil

  11. Heavy metal distribution frequency in Iranian and imported rice varieties marketed in central Iran, Yazd, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Morekian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aimed to determine the concentration of heavy metals including lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd, and arsenic (As in rice samples in Yazd markets. Materials and Methods: In this study, 108 rice samples were collected from 36 different brands including 26 imported and 10 Iranian rice varieties from July-December 2011. Determination of heavy metals was carried out by wet ashing and digestion methods following graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Results: The average concentrations of lead in both Iranian and imported samples were 328.3 ± 81.44 and 254.55 ± 77.2 μg/kg, respectively, well above the safe limit set by Iranian standard, whereas mean concentrations of cadmium and arsenic were both below their permissible limit. In homemade rice samples, their concentration levels were shown to be 37.25 ± 23.39 and 33.5 ± 18.35 μg/kg, respectively. However, for imported products, their levels were 43.71 ± 13.74 and 87.55 ± 72.99 μg/kg, respectively. Conclusion: Deterministic estimation of exposure to heavy metals from rice showed that there was no health issue concerning exposure to toxic metals through rice intake in Iran when potential risk of each heavy metal is considered individually, cumulative risk assessment must be applied in future studies.

  12. Spatial distribution of heavy metals in urban dust from Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Cortés

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available E n Ensenada, Baja California, los barcos y vehículos emiten partículas con metales pesados. Las partículas se transportan con el viento y se depositan en el suelo, donde se mezclan con él dando lugar a los polvos urbanos. Los metales pesados pueden afectar la salud de la población, por lo que se requiere un diagnóstico rápido para encontrar soluciones. El objetivo de este trabajo fue identificar las zonas con mayor contaminación en la ciudad. Se tomaron 86 muestras de polvo urbano sobre diferentes sustratos (suelo, cemento y asfalto. Los metales se analizaron mediante f luorescencia de rayos X. Las diferencias entre los sustratos se identificaron mediante un análisis de varianza. Por otra parte, se hizo un análisis para conocer la distribución espacial de los metales pesados, utilizando la interpolación con kriging ordinario. El asfalto contiene las mayores concentraciones de Cr, Ni, Pb y Zn; el cemento contiene mayores concentracions de Cu y V; y el suelo es el que más Rb contiene. El mapa que integra las clases de mayor concentración de metales indica que la zona suroeste, donde se localiza el puerto y pasa la carretera transpeninsular, es la más contaminada.

  13. Parametric analysis of plastic strain and force distribution in single pass metal spinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Shashank; Tejesh, Chiruvolu Mohan; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash; Suresh, Kurra

    2013-01-01

    Metal spinning also known as spin forming is one of the sheet metal working processes by which an axis-symmetric part can be formed from a flat sheet metal blank. Parts are produced by pressing a blunt edged tool or roller on to the blank which in turn is mounted on a rotating mandrel. This paper discusses about the setting up a 3-D finite element simulation of single pass metal spinning in LS-Dyna. Four parameters were considered namely blank thickness, roller nose radius, feed ratio and mandrel speed and the variation in forces and plastic strain were analysed using the full-factorial design of experiments (DOE) method of simulation experiments. For some of these DOE runs, physical experiments on extra deep drawing (EDD) sheet metal were carried out using En31 tool on a lathe machine. Simulation results are able to predict the zone of unsafe thinning in the sheet and high forming forces that are hint to the necessity for less-expensive and semi-automated machine tools to help the household and small scale spinning workers widely prevalent in India

  14. Parametric analysis of plastic strain and force distribution in single pass metal spinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Shashank; Tejesh, Chiruvolu Mohan; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash; Suresh, Kurra

    2013-12-01

    Metal spinning also known as spin forming is one of the sheet metal working processes by which an axis-symmetric part can be formed from a flat sheet metal blank. Parts are produced by pressing a blunt edged tool or roller on to the blank which in turn is mounted on a rotating mandrel. This paper discusses about the setting up a 3-D finite element simulation of single pass metal spinning in LS-Dyna. Four parameters were considered namely blank thickness, roller nose radius, feed ratio and mandrel speed and the variation in forces and plastic strain were analysed using the full-factorial design of experiments (DOE) method of simulation experiments. For some of these DOE runs, physical experiments on extra deep drawing (EDD) sheet metal were carried out using En31 tool on a lathe machine. Simulation results are able to predict the zone of unsafe thinning in the sheet and high forming forces that are hint to the necessity for less-expensive and semi-automated machine tools to help the household and small scale spinning workers widely prevalent in India.

  15. ICP-MS: suitable method to study the metals distribution in estuarine regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Danilo C.; Oliveira, Arno H.; Santos, Silvio J. dos; Brito, Veronica F.O.; Severo, Maria Isabel G.

    2005-01-01

    Anthropogenic inputs of pollutants such as heavy metals into the marine environment have increased their levels to large extents within past a few decades. These pollutants tend to accumulate in the bottom sediments. As a result, ecosystems such as seaports or other industrialized coastal areas that have chronic inputs of metals have highly contaminated sediments. This characteristic has led to concerns over the ecological effects that may be associated with sediment quality. Of particular concern are toxic effects and the potential for bioaccumulation of metals in biota exposed to the sediments. The bivalves Crassostrea rhizophorae, Lucina pectinata and Mytella falcata have been used as biomonitors of trace metal contamination in two estuaries from Ilheus city, Bahia state, in Brazil. Bivalves, sediment and water samples were collected in March 2004 in Acuipe and Rio do Engenho mangroves. The proposed technique to analyze the studied matrices was the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results suggested that the studied molluscs are bioaccumulators of metals and showed the Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) as an adequate technique to determine a large range of inorganic elements, because its high sensibility and low detection limits. (author)

  16. [Distribution Characteristics of Heavy Metals in Environmental Samples Around Electroplating Factories and the Health Risk Assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng-ran; Lei, Yong-qian; Zhou, Qiao-li; Wang, Chang; Pan, Jia-chuan

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pollution degree and human health risk of heavy metals in soil and air samples around electroplating factories. Soil, air and waste gas samples were collected to measure 8 heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn) in two electroplating factories, located in Baiyun district of Guangzhou city. Geoaccumulation index and USEPA Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS) were respectively carried out. Results showed that concentrations of Hg and Pb in waste gas and Cr in air samples were higher than limits of the corresponding quality standards, and concentrations of Cd, Hg and Zn in soil samples reached the moderate pollution level. The HQ and HI of exposure by heavy metals in air and soil samples were both lower than 1, indicating that there was no non-carcinogen risk. CRAs and CRCr in soil samples were beyond the maximum acceptable level of carcinogen risk (10(-4)), and the contribution rate of CRCr to TCR was over 81%. CRCr, CRNi and TCR in air samples were in range of 10(-6) - 10(-4), indicating there was possibly carcinogen risk but was acceptable risk. CR values for children were higher than adults in soils, but were higher for adults in air samples. Correlation analysis revealed that concentrations of heavy metals in soils were significantly correlated with these in waste gas samples, and PCA data showed pollution sources of Cd, Hg and Zn in soils were different from other metals.

  17. Parametric analysis of plastic strain and force distribution in single pass metal spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Shashank, E-mail: shashankbit08@gmail.com, E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com, E-mail: regalla@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in, E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Tejesh, Chiruvolu Mohan, E-mail: shashankbit08@gmail.com, E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com, E-mail: regalla@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in, E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash, E-mail: shashankbit08@gmail.com, E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com, E-mail: regalla@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in, E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Suresh, Kurra, E-mail: shashankbit08@gmail.com, E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com, E-mail: regalla@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in, E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, BITS-Pilani, Hyderabad Campus, Shamirpet, Hyderabad, 500078, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2013-12-16

    Metal spinning also known as spin forming is one of the sheet metal working processes by which an axis-symmetric part can be formed from a flat sheet metal blank. Parts are produced by pressing a blunt edged tool or roller on to the blank which in turn is mounted on a rotating mandrel. This paper discusses about the setting up a 3-D finite element simulation of single pass metal spinning in LS-Dyna. Four parameters were considered namely blank thickness, roller nose radius, feed ratio and mandrel speed and the variation in forces and plastic strain were analysed using the full-factorial design of experiments (DOE) method of simulation experiments. For some of these DOE runs, physical experiments on extra deep drawing (EDD) sheet metal were carried out using En31 tool on a lathe machine. Simulation results are able to predict the zone of unsafe thinning in the sheet and high forming forces that are hint to the necessity for less-expensive and semi-automated machine tools to help the household and small scale spinning workers widely prevalent in India.

  18. Distribution of oxides in a Zr-Cu-Ni-Al-Nb-Si bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, Jochen; Busch, Ralf [Chair of Metallic Materials, Saarland University, PO Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Mueller, Frank; Huefner, Stefan [Chair of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, PO Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The course of oxide presence with distance from the sample surface and bonding partner was studied for the bulk metallic glass with the nominal composition Zr{sub 57.9}Cu{sub 15.4}Ni{sub 12.7}Al{sub 10.2}Nb{sub 2.8}Si{sub 1} (at%) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Investigated specimens are taken from vacuum quench-cast rods subjected to oxidation at room temperature and atmosphere. Binding energies were determined in various depths using ion beam ablation of up to 100 nanometers. XPS spectra confirm oxidation primarily of the pure zirconium and aluminum constituents, all other peaks correspond to metallic bonds. While the surface area shows a passivating zirconia layer a few nanometers thick, oxygen is bonded predominantly with aluminum inside the bulk. Since the concentration of oxygen is a crucial factor in the crystallization behavior of bulk metallic glass forming liquids on basis of oxygen affine metals, so far only high purity materials were thought to be suitable. The findings in this study, however, are promising for alloys with industrial grade elements with sufficient glass forming ability. Comparisons of the alloy with differing oxygen content support the conclusion that aluminum acts as an appropriate scavenger for both adsorbed and large amounts of intrinsic oxygen in zirconium based amorphous metals.

  19. Constraints on jet quenching in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV measured by the event-activity dependence of semi-inclusive hadron-jet distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; The ALICE collaboration; Adolfsson, Jonatan; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Al-turany, Mohammad; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Ali, Yasir; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altenkamper, Lucas; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andreou, Dimitra; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Angeletti, Massimo; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Apadula, Nicole; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartsch, Esther; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bazo Alba, Jose Luis; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhaduri, Partha Pratim; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Antonio; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Bratrud, Lars; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Soto Camacho, Rabi; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Chandra, Sinjini; Chang, Beomsu; Chang, Wan; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Chowdhury, Tasnuva; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Delsanto, Silvia; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Ding, Yanchun; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Van Doremalen, Lennart Vincent; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dudi, Sandeep; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dukhishyam, Mallick; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Jhuma; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guittiere, Manuel; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Haque, Md Rihan; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hassan, Hadi; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Gonzalez Hernandez, Emma; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; 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Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khabanova, Zhanna; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shaista; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Byungchul; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Eun Joo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Varga-kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kreis, Lukas; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lai, Yue Shi; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xing Long; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lim, Bong-hwi; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lindsay, Scott William; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Liu, Alwina; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Luhder, Jens Robert; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Masson, Erwann; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Toledo Matuoka, Paula Fernanda; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Auro Prasad; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Arratia Munoz, Miguel Ignacio; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Myrcha, Julian Wojciech; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Narayan, Amrendra; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Neskovic, Gvozden; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nobuhiro, Akihide; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Hoonjung; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Paic, Guy; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Pathak, Surya Prakash; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pliquett, Fabian; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogalev, Roman; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Dominguez Rosas, Edgar; Roslon, Krystian; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Vazquez Rueda, Omar; Rui, Rinaldo; Rumyantsev, Boris; Rustamov, Anar; 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Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vermunt, Luuk; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wegrzynek, Adam; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wenzel, Sandro Christian; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Willsher, Emily; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Xu, Ran; Yalcin, Serpil; Yamakawa, Kosei; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yun, Eungyu; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Ya; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann; Zou, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration reports the measurement of semi-inclusive distributions of charged-particle jets recoiling from a high-transverse momentum trigger hadron in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV. Jets are reconstructed from charged-particle tracks using the anti-$k_{T}$ algorithm with resolution parameter $R=0.2$ and 0.4. A data-driven statistical approach is used to correct the uncorrelated background jet yield. Recoil jet distributions are reported for jet transverse momentum $15inclusive observable is self-normalized and such comparisons do not require the interpretation of p-Pb event activity in terms of collision geometry, in contrast to inclusive jet observables. These measurements provide new constraints on the magnitude of jet quenching in small systems at the LHC. ...

  20. Self-similarity analysis of semi-inclusive distributions in anti pp collisions at √S = 540 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbaidze, Ya.Z.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Slepchenko, L.A.; Torosyan, G.T.

    1982-01-01

    In the framework of the phenomenological model it is shown the increase in the total ''anomalous dimension'' for solving a renormalization group equation corresponding to the production of many correlated hadron systems of different types in the multiparticle reaction. A satisfactory description is obtained of the semi-inclusive spectra with respect to pseudorapidity in anti pp-collisions at √ S = 540 GeV

  1. Distribution of heavy metals in internal organs and tissues of Korean molluscan shellfish and potential risk to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Jong Soo; Kwon, Ji Young; Son, Kwang Tae; Choi, Woo Seok; Kim, Poong Ho; Lee, Tae Seek; Kim, Ji Hoe

    2015-09-01

    Molluscan shellfish (gastropods and bivalves) were collected from major fish markets on the Korean coast and analyzed for mercury by direct Hg analyzer and for other metals, such as cadmium, lead, chromium, silver, nickel, copper and zinc, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Distribution of heavy metals in muscles, internal organs and whole tissues were determined and a potential risk assessment was conducted to evaluate their hazard for human consumption. Heavy metals were accumulated significantly higher (P hazardous metals (Cd, Pb, and Hg) in all internal-organ samples were above the regulatory limit of Korea and the mean level in whole tissue samples of the selected gastropod species, bay scallop and comb pen shell, exceeded the limit (except in a few cases). The sum of the estimated dietary intake of Cd, Pb and Hg for each part of all tested species accounted for 1.59-16.94, 0.02-0.36, and 0.07-0.16% respectively, of the provisional tolerable daily intake adopted by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. The hazard index for each part of gastropods and bivalves was below 1.0, however, the maximum HI for internal organs of all analysed species was quite high (0.71). These results suggest that consumption of flesh after removing the internal organs of some molluscan shellfish (all gastropod species, bay scallop and comb pen shell) is a suitable way for reducing Cd exposure.

  2. Distributions and concentrations of thallium in surface waters of a region impacted by historical metal mining (Cornwall, UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsi, Kristi; Turner, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Thallium is a highly toxic heavy metal whose concentrations and distributions in the aquatic environment are poorly defined. In this study, concentrations of aqueous and total Tl have been measured in water samples from a variety of rivers and effluents (the latter related to historical metal mining) in the county of Cornwall, SW England. Aqueous concentrations ranged from about 13 ng L(-1) in a river whose catchment contained no metal mines to 2,640 ng L(-1) in water abstracted directly from an abandoned mine shaft. Concentrations of Tl in rivers were greatest in the vicinity of mine-related effluents, with a maximum value measured of about 770 ng L(-1). Thallium was not efficiently removed by the conventional, active treatment of mine water, and displayed little interaction with suspended particles. Its mobility in surface waters, coupled with concentrations that are close to a quality guideline of 800 ng L(-1), is cause for concern. Accordingly, we recommend that the metal is more closely monitored in this and other regions impacted by mining activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Heavy metals distribution and risk assessment in soil from an informal E-waste recycling site in Lagos State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isimekhai, Khadijah A; Garelick, Hemda; Watt, John; Purchase, Diane

    2017-07-01

    Informal E-waste recycling can pose a risk to human health and the environment which this study endeavours to evaluate. The distribution of a number of heavy metals in soil from an informal recycling site in the largest market for used and new electronics and electrical equipment in West Africa was investigated. The potential bioavailability of heavy metals, extent of contamination, potential risk due to the recycling activities and impact of external factors such as rainfall were also assessed. The concentrations of all the heavy metals tested were higher in the area where burning of the waste occurred than at the control site, suggesting an impact of the recycling activities on the soil. The order of total metal concentrations was Cu > Pb > Zn > Mn > Ni > Sb > Cr > Cd for both the dry and wet seasons. The total concentrations of Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn were all significantly higher (p  Sb > Zn > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cr. When the risk was assessed using the Potential Ecological Risk Index (PERI), Cu was found to contribute the most to the potential ecological risk and Cd gave rise to the greatest concern due to its high toxic-response factor within the study site. Similarly, utilising the Risk Assessment Code (RAC) suggested that Cd posed the most risk in this site. This research establishes a high level of contamination in the study site and underscores the importance of applying the appropriate chemical speciation in risk assessment.

  4. Stable isotopes and heavy metal distribution in Dreissena polymorpha (Zebra Mussels) from western basin of Lake Erie, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Aasm, I.S.; Clarke, J.D.; Fryer, B.J. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1998-02-01

    Dreissena polymorpha is an exotic freshwater bivalve species which was introduced into the Great Lakes system in the fall of 1985 through the release of ballast water from European freighters. Utilizing individual growth rings of the shells, the stable isotope distribution ({delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C) was determined for the life history of selected samples which were collected from the western basin of Lake Erie. These bivalves deposit their shell in near equilibrium with the ambient water and thus reflect any annual variation of the system in the isotopic records held within their shells. Observed values for {delta}{sup 18}O range from -6.64 to -9.46 permille with an average value of -7.69 permille PDB, while carbon values ranged from -0.80 to -4.67 permille with an average value of -1.76 permille PDB. Dreissena polymorpha shells incorporate metals into their shells during growth. Individual shell growth increments were analyzed for Pb, Fe, Mg, Mn, Cd, Cu, and V concentrations. The shells show increased uptake of certain metals during periods of isotopic enrichment which correspond with warmer water temperatures. Since metals are incorporated into the shells, the organism may be useful as a biomonitor of metal pollution within aquatic environments. (orig.)

  5. [Pollution Assessment and Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Heavy Metals in Soils of Coal Mining Area in Longkou City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuo; Wu, Quan-yuan; Cao, Xue-jiang; Wang, Ji-ning; Zhang, Long-long; Cai, Dong-quan; Zhou, Li-yuan; Liu, Na

    2016-01-15

    The present paper takes the coal mining area of Longkou City as the research area. Thirty-six topsoil (0-20 cm) samples were collected and the contents of 5 kinds of heavy metals were determined, including Cd, As, Ni, Ph, Cr. Geo-statistics analysis was used to analyze the spatial distribution of heavy metals. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to explore the pollution sources of heavy metals and the degree of heavy metals pollution was evaluated by weighted average comprehensive pollution evaluation method. The results showed that enrichment phenomenon was significant for the 5 kinds of heavy metals. Taking secondary standard of National Environment Quality Standard for Soil as the background value, their exceed standard rates were 72.22%, 100%, 100%, 91.67%, 100%, respectively. Average contents of heavy metals in the soil samples were all over the national standard level two and were 1.53, 11.86, 2.40, 1.31, 4.09 times of the background value. In addition, the average contents were much higher than the background value of the topsoil in the eastern part of Shandong Province and were 9.85, 39.98, 8.85, 4.29, 12.71 times of the background value. According to the semivariogram model, we obtained the nugget-effects of 5 kinds of heavy metals and their values were in the order of As (0.644) > Cd (0.627) > Cr (0.538) > Ni (0.411) > Pb (0.294), all belonging to moderate spatial correlation. On the whole, the central part of the Sangyuan Coal Mine and its surrounding areas were the most seriously polluted, while the pollution of heavy metals in the east and west of the study area was relatively light. Principal component analysis suggested that the enrichment of Cd, As, Ni, Cr was due to irrigation of wastewater, the discharge of industry and enterprise, and the industrial activity. Automobile exhaust and coal combustion were the main pollution sources of Pb. The single-factor assessment of heavy metals pollution showed that the degree of different heavy metals

  6. Lead (Pb) and other metals in New York City community garden soils: factors influencing contaminant distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca G; Spliethoff, Henry M; Ribaudo, Lisa N; Lopp, Donna M; Shayler, Hannah A; Marquez-Bravo, Lydia G; Lambert, Veronique T; Ferenz, Gretchen S; Russell-Anelli, Jonathan M; Stone, Edie B; McBride, Murray B

    2014-04-01

    Urban gardens provide affordable fresh produce to communities with limited access to healthy food but may also increase exposure to lead (Pb) and other soil contaminants. Metals analysis of 564 soil samples from 54 New York City (NYC) community gardens found at least one sample exceeding health-based guidance values in 70% of gardens. However, most samples (78%) did not exceed guidance values, and medians were generally below those reported in NYC soil and other urban gardening studies. Barium (Ba) and Pb most frequently exceeded guidance values and along with cadmium (Cd) were strongly correlated with zinc (Zn), a commonly measured nutrient. Principal component analysis suggested that contaminants varied independently from organic matter and geogenic metals. Contaminants were associated with visible debris and a lack of raised beds; management practices (e.g., importing uncontaminated soil) have likely reduced metals concentrations. Continued exposure reduction efforts would benefit communities already burdened by environmental exposures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dose distribution close to metal implants in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Yu, K.N.; Chan, Josie F.K.; Ho, Robert T.K.; Yu, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    Materials with high atomic numbers favor the occurrence of the photoelectric effect when they are irradiated with gamma rays. Therefore, the photoelectric effects of metal implants within the target regions in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery are worth studying. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations using EGS4 were employed to investigate the resulting dose enhancements. A dose enhancement as high as 10% was observed close to a platinum implant along the x and y axes, while no significant dose enhancements were observed for silver, stainless steel 301, and titanium ones. A dose enhancement as high as 20% was observed close to the platinum implant along the z axis at the superior position of the metal-phantom interface and was 10% higher for other metal implants

  8. Distribution and risk evaluation of heavy metals in agricultural soils of southeastern Zunyi city, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hongliang; Xu Huajie; Song Yuping; Tan Hong; Xie Feng; He Jinlin

    2008-01-01

    The pollution of heavy metals (As, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Hg) in agricultural soils of Southeastern Zunyi, Guizhou Province were investigated and assessed in this paper. The results showed that the average contents of heavy metals in the soils were As 11.39mg/kg, Pb 38.75mg/kg, Cd 0.34mg/kg, Cr 40.45mg/kg, Hg 0.21mg/kg. The Cd is the main contamination element, with an average single pollution index of 1.13, and an average single ecological risk index of 50.85, showing this area is in medium ecological risk class. The highest pollution index is 1.43 in Zunyi County, with an average single ecological risk index of 64.35. The results also indicated that Cd and Hg had caused some relevant ecological risk by comparing the pollution index with the ecological risk index of heavy metals. (authors)

  9. Applications of Total Scattering & Pair Distribution Function Analysis in Metal-Organic Framework Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Hui; Birgisson, Steinar; Sommer, Sanna

    structure. At the same time, there is an ongoing debate on whether the SBU is present prior, or during MOF crystallization in MOF chemistry. However, little is known about MOFs formation mechanism. Currently techniques to study the in situ MOF formation process mainly focused on after......-crystallization process, for example in situ XRD and SAXS/WAXS study on MOF formation. However, the pre-crystallization process in the early stage of MOF formation is still unexplored. In this project, total scattering and PDF study will be carried out to explore the MOF formation process in early stage. This includes......Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) is constructed by metal-oxide nodes and organic ligands. The formation of different structures of metal-oxide nodes (also called secondary building units, SBU) is crucial for MOF final structures, because the connectivity of SBU greatly influence the final MOF...

  10. Lead (Pb) and other metals in New York City community garden soils: factors influencing contaminant distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca G.; Spliethoff, Henry M.; Ribaudo, Lisa N.; Lopp, Donna M.; Shayler, Hannah A.; Marquez-Bravo, Lydia G.; Lambert, Veronique T.; Ferenz, Gretchen S.; Russell-Anelli, Jonathan M.; Stone, Edie B.; McBride, Murray B.

    2014-01-01

    Urban gardens provide affordable fresh produce to communities with limited access to healthy food but may also increase exposure to lead (Pb) and other soil contaminants. Metals analysis of 564 soil samples from 54 New York City (NYC) community gardens found at least one sample exceeding health-based guidance values in 70% of gardens. However, most samples (78%) did not exceed guidance values, and medians were generally below those reported in NYC soil and other urban gardening studies. Barium (Ba) and Pb most frequently exceeded guidance values and along with cadmium (Cd) were strongly correlated with zinc (Zn), a commonly measured nutrient. Principal component analysis suggested that contaminants varied independently from organic matter and geogenic metals. Contaminants were associated with visible debris and a lack of raised beds; management practices (e.g., importing uncontaminated soil) have likely reduced metals concentrations. Continued exposure reduction efforts would benefit communities already burdened by environmental exposures. PMID:24502997

  11. Metal distribution in urban soil around steel industry beside Queen Alia Airport, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khashman, Omar A; Shawabkeh, Reyad A

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the extent and severity of metal contamination in urban soil around Queen Alia Airport, Jordan. Thirty-two soil samples were collected around steel manufacturing plants located in the Al-Jiza area, south Jordan, around the Queen Alia Airport. The samples were obtained at two depths, 0-10 and 10-20 cm, and were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry for lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and chromium (Cr) levels. The physicochemical factors believed to affect the mobility of metals in the soil of the study area were also examined, including pH, electrical conductivity, total organic matter, calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) content and cation exchange capacity. The high concentrations of Pb, Zn and Cd in the soil samples were found to be related to anthropogenic sources, such as the steel manufacturing plants, agriculture and traffic emissions, with the highest concentrations of these metals close to the site of the steel plants; in contrast the concentration of Cr was low in the soil sampled close to the steel plants. The metals were concentrated in the surface soil, and concentrations decreased with increasing depth, reflecting the physical properties of the soil and its alkaline pH. The mineralogical composition of the topsoil, identified by X-ray diffraction, was predominantly quartz, calcite, dolomite and minor minerals, such as gypsum and clay minerals. Metal concentrations were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compute the statistical significance of the mean. The results of the ANOVA showed significant differences between sites for Pb, Cd and Cu, but no significant differences for the remaining metals tested. Factor analysis revealed that polluted soil occurs predominantly at sites around the steel plants and that there is no significant variation in the characteristics of the unpolluted soil, which are uniform in the study area.

  12. Distribution and accumulation of metals in tadpoles inhabiting the metalliferous streams of eastern Chalkidiki, northeast Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelepertzis, Efstratios; Argyraki, Ariadne; Valakos, Efstratios; Daftsis, Emmanouil

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigates the accumulation of heavy metals [copper (Cu), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), magnesium (Mn), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), and chromium (Cr)] in tadpoles inhabiting the metalliferous streams flowing within the Asprolakkas River basin (northeast Chalkidiki peninsula, Greece) and the effect of potentially harmful elements in stream water and sediment on the corresponding levels in their tissue. Animals were collected from six sampling sites influenced by a wide range of surface water and stream sediment trace element concentrations. The results of the chemical analyses showed that tadpoles accumulated significant levels of all of the examined metals. The range of whole-body mean measured concentrations were (in dry mass) as follows: Cu (46-182 mg/kg), Pb (103-4,490 mg/kg), Zn (494-11,460 mg/kg), Mn (1,620-13,310 mg/kg), Cd (1.2-82 mg/kg), Ni (57-163 mg/kg), and Cr (38-272 mg/kg). The mean concentrations of Pb, Zn, Mn, Ni, Cr, and Cd in Kokkinolakkas stream, which drains a currently active mining area, were the highest ever reported in tadpoles. Our results indicate that whole-body levels of Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd increase with stream sediment concentrations and that these organisms tend to accumulate metals bound to Fe and Mn oxides. In addition, high dissolved concentrations and significant concentrations associated with more labile geochemical phases of sediments for specific metals were contributing factors determining whole-body levels. Given the observed bioconcentration factors, as well as the correlation with sediment concentrations, it is proposed that these organisms could be considered as bioindicators of environmental contamination and may be used for monitoring purposes within this metal-rich zone and, perhaps, within other rivers affected by metal mining.

  13. Temporal variations and spatial distributions of heavy metals in a wastewater-irrigated soil-eggplant system and associated influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Shiwei; Liu, Bailin; Yang, Ying; Ding, Jian; Yang, Wenzhi; Bai, Xiaojuan; Naeem, Sajid; Zhang, Yingmei

    2018-05-30

    Heavy metal pollution in farmlands is highly concerned as crops' easy-uptake of heavy metal can ultimately affect consumers. In order to offer suggestions on cultivating safe quality vegetable, specifically eggplant which is widely consumed for its nutritional value and antioxidant activity, a field study was undertaken to investigate the temporal variations and spatial distributions of heavy metals in a wastewater-irrigated soil-eggplant system. In the present study, eggplants were planted in the farmlands of Weichuan village (WC) (relatively unpolluted field), Liangzhuang village (LZ) (moderately polluted field) and Minqin village (MQ) (seriously polluted field) to elucidate their temporal uptake processes of heavy metals described by the sigmoid model. Eggplant tissues from severely polluted farmlands were found with higher heavy metal concentrations and lower yields compared with other two groups. What is more, 25 farmlands along the Dongdagou stream (heavy metals polluted stream) were chosen to analyze the spatial distribution of heavy metals in soils and eggplants. Heavy metal concentrations in eggplants decreased with the decline of heavy metal concentrations in soil from upstream (pollution source) to downstream. Moreover, several methods were employed to assess bioavailability of heavy metals in soils. All the bioavailable heavy metals were found in linear positive correlations with heavy metal concentrations. Meanwhile, linear correlations were found between heavy metals in soils and eggplants. At last, redundancy analysis was used to investigate the effects of soil properties (pH, organic matter and texture of soils) and heavy metals on eggplants' uptake. The results indicated that soil heavy metals had a dominant impact on their accumulations in eggplant fruit, with a variance contribution of 78.0%, while soil properties had a regulatory effect, with a variance contribution of 5.2%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Heavy metal distribution in organic and siliceous marine sponge tissues measured by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, S; Annibaldi, A; Truzzi, C; Scarponi, G

    2016-10-15

    May sponge spicules represent a "tank" to accumulate heavy metals? In this study we test this hypothesis determining the distribution of Cd, Pb and Cu concentrations between organic and siliceous tissues in Antarctic Demospongia (Sphaerotylus antarcticus, Kirkpatrikia coulmani and Haliclona sp.) and in the Mediterranean species Petrosia ficiformis. Results show that although, in these sponges, spicules represent about 80% of the mass content, the accumulation of pollutant is lower in the spicules than in the corresponding organic fraction. The contribution of tissues to the total sponge content of Cd, Pb and Cu is respectively 99%, 82% and 97% for Antarctic sponges and 96%, 95% and 96% for P. ficiformis, similar in polar and temperate organisms. These results pave the way to a better understanding of the role of marine sponges in uptaking heavy metals and to their possible use as monitor of marine ecosystems, recommend by the Water Framework Directive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Controlling the length scale and distribution of the ductile phase in metallic glass composites through friction stir processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harpreet Singh; Mridha, Sanghita; Grewal, Harpreet Singh; Singh, Harpreet; Hofmann, Douglas C; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the refinement and uniform distribution of the crystalline dendritic phase by friction stir processing (FSP) of titanium based in situ ductile-phase reinforced metallic glass composite. The average size of the dendrites was reduced by almost a factor of five (from 24 μ m to 5 μ m) for the highest tool rotational speed of 900 rpm. The large inter-connected dendrites become more fragmented with increased circularity after processing. The changes in thermal characteristics were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The reduction in crystallization enthalpy after processing suggests partial devitrification due to the high strain plastic deformation. FSP resulted in increased hardness and modulus for both the amorphous matrix and the crystalline phase. This is explained by interaction of shear bands in amorphous matrix with the strain-hardened dendritic phase. Our approach offers a new strategy for microstructural design in metallic glass composites.

  16. Confronting New Demands : Inclusive Growth, Inclusive Trade ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Confronting New Demands : Inclusive Growth, Inclusive Trade. Policymakers, businesspeople and civil society advocates need evidence-based research to react ... understood implications, such as labour standards and intellectual property; ...

  17. Winter-time size distribution and source apportionment of total suspended particulate matter and associated metals in Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Arun; Gupta, Sandeep; Jain, V. K.

    2009-03-01

    A study of the winter time size distribution and source apportionment of total suspended particulate matter (TSPM) and associated heavy metal concentrations have been carried out for the city of Delhi. This study is important from the point of view of implementation of compressed natural gas (CNG) as alternate of diesel fuel in the public transport system in 2001 to reduce the pollution level. TSPM were collected using a five-stage cascade impactor at six sites in the winters of 2005-06. The results of size distribution indicate that a major portion (~ 40%) of TSPM concentration is in the form of PM0.7 (heavy metals associated with various size fractions of TSPM. A very good correlation between coarse and fine size fraction of TSPM was observed. It was also observed that the metals associated with coarse particles have more chances of correlation with other metals; rather they are associated with fine particles. Source apportionment was carried out separately in coarse and fine size modes of TSPM by Chemical Mass Balance Receptor Model (CMB8) as well as by Principle Component Analysis (PCA) of SPSS. Source apportionment by PCA reveals that there are two major sources (possibly vehicular and crustal re-suspension) in both coarse and fine size fractions. Results obtained by CMB8 show the dominance of vehicular pollutants and crustal dust in fine and coarse size mode respectively. Noticeably the dominance of vehicular pollutants are now confined to fine size only whilst during pre CNG era it dominated both coarse and fine size mode. An increase of 42.5, 44.4, 48.2, 38.6 and 38.9% in the concentrations of TSPM, PM10.9, coarse particles, fine particles and lead respectively was observed during pre (2001) to post CNG (2005-06) period.

  18. [Spatial distribution and ecological significance of heavy metals in soils from Chatian mercury mining deposit, western Hunan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Fei; Li, Yong-Hu; Ji, Yan-Fang; Yang, Lin-Sheng; Wang, Wu-Yi

    2009-04-15

    Ores, waste tailings and slag, together with three typical soil profiles (natural soil profiles far from mine entrance and near mine entrance, soil profile under slag) in Chatian mercury mining deposit (CMD), western Hunan province were sampled and their concentrations of mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn) were determined by HG-ICP-AES and ICP-MS. Enrichment factor and correlation analysis were taken to investigate the origins, distribution and migration of Hg, as well as other heavy metals in the CMD. The results show that Hg is enriched in the bottom of the soil profile far from mine entrance but accumulated in the surface of soil profiles near mine entrance and under slag. The soil profiles near mine entrance and under slag are both contaminated by Hg, while the latter is contaminated more heavily. In the soil profile under slag, Hg concentration in the surface soil, Hg average concentration in the total profile, and the leaching depth of soil Hg are 640 microg x g(-1), (76.74 +/- 171.71) microg x g(-1), and more than 100 cm, respectively; while 6.5 microg x g(-1), (2.74 +/- 1.90) microg x g(-1), and 40 cm, respectively, are found in the soil profile near mine entrance. Soil in the mercury mine area is also polluted by Cd, As, Pb, Zn besides metallogenic element Hg, among which Cd pollution is relatively heavier than others. The mobility of the studied heavy metals in soil follows the order as Hg > Cd > As > Zn approximately equal to Pb. The leaching depth of the heavy metals is influenced by total concentration in the surface soil and soil physico-chemical parameters. The origins, distribution and migration of heavy metals in soil profile in the mining area are related to primary geological environment, and strongly influenced by human mining activities.

  19. The spatial thickness distribution of metal films produced by large area pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen; Linderoth, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of metals have been deposited in the large-area Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) Facility at Riso National Laboratory. Thin films of Ag and Ni were deposited with laser pulses from an excimer laser at 248 nm with a rectangular beam spot at a fluence of 10 J/cm(2) on glass substrates of 127...

  20. [Distribution characteristics of heavy metals along an elevation gradient of montane forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jia-rong; Nie, Ming; Zou, Qin; Hu, Shao-chang; Chen, Jia-kuan

    2011-12-01

    In the present paper, the concentrations of fourteen heavy metals (Fe, Al, Ti, Cu, Cr, Mn, V, Zn, Ni, Co, Pb, Se, Cd and As) were determined by ICP-AES and atomic absorption spectroscopy along an elevation gradient of montane forest. The results show that the elevation gradient had significant effects on the concentrations of Fe, Al, Ti, V, Pb and As. And the concentrations of Cu, Cr, Mn, Zn, Ni, Co, Se and Cd were not significantly affected by the elevation gradient. Because the studying area is red soil, the elevation gradient had significant effects on the concentrations of Fe, Al and Ti which are characteristic heavy metals of red soil, suggesting that the red soil at different elevations has different intensities of weathering desilication and bioaccumulation. Other heavy metals have different relationships with the elevation gradient, such as the concentrations of Cr, Zn and Cd were high at relatively high elevation and Pb and As were high at relatively low elevation. These results suggest that the different elevations of montane forest soils were polluted by differently types of heavy metals.

  1. Processes affecting the distribution and speciation of heavy metals in the Rhine/Meuse estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paalman, M.A.A.

    1997-01-01

    When rivers drain areas with a high population density the sediments are often contaminated with heavy metals, such as chromium, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, cadmium, mercury and lead. The extent and seriousness of sediment contamination is most pronounced in the lower reaches of rivers, where

  2. Distribution and accumulation of heavy metals in the sediments of Akkaya Dam, Nigde, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Şeref

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-one surface sediment samples were collected from Akkaya Dam. Heavy metal concentrations (Mo, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Co, Mn, Fe, Cr, As, V and Cd), grain size, organic carbon and carbonate contents were studied in order to assess the extent of environmental pollution and to discuss the origin of these contaminants in sediments of dam. The sediments in the study area are mostly very fine sands. However, mud was observed in the northeast of the dam. Sediment pollution assessment was carried out using enrichment factor. The calculation of enrichment factors showed that Mo is depleted by 1.0 whereas Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Co, Mn, As, V, Cr and Cd are enriched by 3, 5.4, 7, 2.7, 2.2, 3.4, 42.3, 2.1, 1.8 and 7.2, respectively. Relatively high concentrations heavy metals occurred in north (textile industry area) and east (Karasu River) due to enrichment controlled by anthropogenic wastes. The results of correlation analysis show low-medium positive and negative correlations among metals, grain size, carbonate contents and organic carbon and indicate that heavy metals in sediments of the Akkaya Dam have different anthropogenic sources.

  3. Mapping the Spatial Distribution of Metal-Bearing Oxides in VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew; Booth, S. Tom; Remijan, Anthony; Carroll, Brandon; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2015-06-01

    The formation of silicate-based dust grains is not well constrained. Despite this, grain surface chemistry is essential to modern astrochemical formation models. In carbon-poor stellar envelopes, such as the red hypergiant VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa), metal-bearing oxides, the building blocks of silicate grains, dominate the grain formation, and thus are a key location to study dust chemistry. TiO_2, which was only first detected in the radio recently (Kaminski et al., 2013a), has been proposed to be a critical molecule for silicate grain formation, and not oxides containing more abundant metals (eg. Si, Fe, and Mg) (Gail and Sedlmayr, 1998). In addition, other molecules, such as SO_2, have been found to trace shells produced by numerous outflows pushing through the expanding envelope, resulting in a complex velocity structure (Ziurys et al., 2007). With the advanced capabilities of ALMA, it is now possible to individually resolve the velocity structure of each of these outflows and constrain the underlying chemistry in the region. Here, we present high resolution maps of rotational transitions of several metal-bearing oxides in VY CMa from the ALMA Band 7 and Band 9 Science Verification observations. With these maps, the physical parameters of the region and the formation chemistry of metal-bearing oxides will be studied.

  4. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichienberger, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    This quarter has witnessed further progress both in our experimental methods of photoelectron spectroscopy and in our understanding the fundamental relationships between ionization energies and the chemistry of transition metal species. Progress continues on the new gas phase photoelectron spectrometer that combine improved capabilities for HeI/HeII UPS, XPS, and Auger investigations of organometallic molecules. Several measurements have been accomplished this year that were not possible previously. We have published the formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies, and applied the relationships to homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules, multiple bonds, and metal-ligand bonds. Studies of C-H bond activation have continued with examination of different degrees of Si-H bond addition to metals. the electronic effects of intermolecular interactions have been observed by comparing the ionizations of metal complexes in the gas phase with the ionizations of monolayer solid organometallic films prepared in ultra-high vacuum. The orientations of the molecules have been determined by scanning tunneling microscopy. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene. Studies of the following complexes are described : Fe, Os, Nb, Mo, Rh, Re, Al, and Mn. 19 refs

  5. WITNESSING GAS MIXING IN THE METAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE HICKSON COMPACT GROUP HCG 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Flores, S.; Alfaro-Cuello, M.; De Oliveira, C. Mendes; Amram, P.; Carrasco, E. R.; De Mello, D. F.

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time direct evidence that in a merger of disk galaxies, the pre-existing central metallicities will mix as a result of gas being transported in the merger interface region along the line that joins the two coalescing nuclei. This is shown using detailed two-dimensional kinematics as well as metallicity measurements for the nearby ongoing merger in the center of the compact group HCG 31. We focus on the emission line gas, which is extensive in the system. The two coalescing cores display similar oxygen abundances. While in between the two nuclei, the metallicity changes smoothly from one nucleus to the other indicating a mix of metals in this region, which is confirmed by the high-resolution Hα kinematics (R = 45,900). This nearby system is especially important because it involves the merging of two fairly low-mass and clumpy galaxies (LMC-like galaxies), making it an important system for comparison with high-redshift galaxies

  6. WITNESSING GAS MIXING IN THE METAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE HICKSON COMPACT GROUP HCG 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Flores, S.; Alfaro-Cuello, M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de La Serena, Av. Cisternas 1200, La Serena (Chile); De Oliveira, C. Mendes [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas da Universidade de São Paulo, Cidade Universitária, CEP:05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amram, P. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Carrasco, E. R. [Gemini Observatory/AURA, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); De Mello, D. F., E-mail: storres@dfuls.cl [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time direct evidence that in a merger of disk galaxies, the pre-existing central metallicities will mix as a result of gas being transported in the merger interface region along the line that joins the two coalescing nuclei. This is shown using detailed two-dimensional kinematics as well as metallicity measurements for the nearby ongoing merger in the center of the compact group HCG 31. We focus on the emission line gas, which is extensive in the system. The two coalescing cores display similar oxygen abundances. While in between the two nuclei, the metallicity changes smoothly from one nucleus to the other indicating a mix of metals in this region, which is confirmed by the high-resolution Hα kinematics (R = 45,900). This nearby system is especially important because it involves the merging of two fairly low-mass and clumpy galaxies (LMC-like galaxies), making it an important system for comparison with high-redshift galaxies.

  7. Distribution and Ecological Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Arable Soils in Bijiang Watershed, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Wei-heng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been paid much attention to soil heavy metal pollution in the Bijiang watershed caused by the Lanping lead-zinc mine. We collected 35 arable soil samples along Bijiang, then sampled and tested the contents of As, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Hg. And then with Nemerow Multi-Factor Index and the Potential Ecological Risk Index method, we evaluated the heavy metal pollution risk. The results showed:(1The accumulation of Pb, Zn, Cd was in a relatively high level, the average was 1 146.97, 579.15, 4.85 mg·kg-1 respectively, which was seriously polluted; the average accumulation of As was 26.85 mg·kg-1; but Cu, Hg was slightly polluted. (2Statistical analysis showed that Lanping area was a main point source pollution of As, Zn, Pb, Cd, while Cu, Hg was pollution caused by different non-point source pollution.(3Within this basin, the Nemerow index was 17.69, which was serious heavy metal pollution, while the comprehensive potential ecological risk index was 773.38, which was a strong potential ecological risk. The contribution of pollutants was Cd > Pb > Zn> As> Hg > Cu. (4As a whole, the soil heavy metal pollution of paddy field was higher than of the dry land.

  8. Benthic foraminifera and heavy metals distribution: A case study from the Naples Harbour (Tyrrhenian Sea, Southern Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraro, L.; Sprovieri, M.; Alberico, I.; Lirer, F.; Prevedello, L.; Marsella, E.

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of 90 surficial sediments from three docks of the Naples Harbour (Levante, Granili, and Diaz) permits to compare the distribution modes of heavy metals with grain sizes, total organic carbon content (TOC) and distribution patterns of benthic foraminifera. Foraminiferal density and species richness decrease with the increasing toxic elements concentrations from the Levante to the Diaz dock. Median concentrations of Ni, Pb, Zn, and Hg (medians of 21.43 mg/kg, 270.24 mg/kg, 489.65 mg/kg, and 1.18 mg/kg, respectively) were reported for the Diaz dock where foraminifera are absent, thus suggesting a possible impact of toxic elements on the benthic ecosystem balance. Compared to the unpolluted marine sediments of the Granili dock, the Levante area shows higher heavy metals levels and a quasi-oligotypic benthic assemblage. This is dominated by the tolerant species Ammonia tepida that may be used as bio-indicator of pollution of anthropised marine sediments. - Benthic foraminiferal density and species distribution may be used as pollution indicators

  9. Incidence and distribution of heavy metals in soils of a Mediterranean coastal wetland (L'Albufera de Valencia, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, V.; Gimeno, E.; Fernandez-Despiau, E.; Pascual, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important issues in environmental conservation nowadays is the preservation of wetlands, mainly the coastal ones. This becomes more imperative in the Mediterranean. These particular ecosystems have suffered during the last decades an increasing human pressure. This has been reflected through the intensification of agriculture and construction of infrastructures in their surroundings or even draining part of them. As a result, the density of population and its residues affect them in a first place. This work has been developed in the Natural Park of La Albufera (Valencia, Spain), which includes a coastal lagoon, marshlands, dunes and pinewoods, surrounded by rice fields in its not urbanized part. In spite of this great ecological value, it suffers impacts derived from the high human and industrial occupation, and of the hydrological contributions from the connected irrigation systems. In addition, this park is one of the most important wetland in Europe, included in the RAMSAR agreement, being a key point for migratory birds and contains in its area one of the most important zones on rice production in Europe. In the park area, 28 sampling zones were selected to determine the degree of heavy metals incidence in soils. Total concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were evaluated. Their distribution in the surficial and sub-surficial horizons was determined together with their spatial distribution, and the possible sources of contamination. Zn, Cr and Cu show the highest concentrations in all land uses and zones. Cr is the metal that present maximum concentration in the studied area (254.93 ppm), being almost the only metal studied that exceeds the limits established by the Spanish an EU legislation. Co and Ni shows a tendency to accumulate below the 30 cm depth, the other metal studied continue with the cumulative trend in surface horizons. All the studied metals, except Co have highly significant correlations with the available phosphorous

  10. Assessing spatial distribution, sources, and potential ecological risk of heavy metals in surface sediments of the Nansi Lake, Eastern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianshu Lv; Bin Dai; Zulu Zhang; Yuanyuan Sun; Shuang Li; Yang Liu

    2014-01-01

    The study is conducted to investigate the spatial distribution, sources and ecological risk of seven heavy metals in surface sediments of Nansi Lake, Eastern China. A total of 29 samples were collected in surface sediments of Nansi Lake, and were analyzed for three nutrients (TN, TOC and TP), two major metals (Al and Fe), as well as seven trace metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn). The mean concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Zn, Fe and Al were 14.41, 0.22, 71.10, 30.1, 0.048, 29.14, 90.2, 30,816 and 70,653 mg kg -1 , respectively, and the mean contents of these metals were higher than the background values with the exception of Cu and Fe. The spatial distribution indicated that the contents of all seven heavy metals were characterized by relatively higher contents in the upper lake than the lower lake. The hotspots with high values of As, Cd and Hg were associated with the river mouths, and the hotspots of Pb were mainly located around the dam in the central part, while no significant associations were displayed between spatial distribution of Cr, Cu, Zn and the river mouths. The mean enrichment factor (EF) values of As, Cd, Hg and Pb were 2.03, 2.93, 3.21 and 2.18, respectively, showing their moderate enrichment, while Cr, Cu and Zn with mean EF values of 1.19, 0.89 and 1.01 were deficiency to minimal enrichment. Multivariate and geo