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Sample records for metal hole arrays

  1. Transmission of light through periodic arrays of square holes : from a metallic wire mesh to an array of tiny holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bravo-Abad, J.; Martin-Moreno, L.; Garcia-Vidal, F.J.; Hendry, E.; Gómez Rivas, J.

    2007-01-01

    A complete landscape is presented of the electromagnetic coupling between square holes forming a two-dimensional periodic array in a metallic film. By combining both experimental and theoretical results along with a first-principles Fano model, we study the crossover between the physics of metallic

  2. Using a Semiconductor-to-Metal Transition to Control Optical Transmission through Subwavelength Hole Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. U. Donev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple configuration in which the extraordinary optical transmission effect through subwavelength hole arrays in noble-metal films can be switched by the semiconductor-to-metal transition in an underlying thin film of vanadium dioxide. In these experiments, the transition is brought about by thermal heating of the bilayer film. The surprising reverse hysteretic behavior of the transmission through the subwavelength holes in the vanadium oxide suggest that this modulation is accomplished by a dielectric-matching condition rather than plasmon coupling through the bilayer film. The results of this switching, including the wavelength dependence, are qualitatively reproduced by a transfer matrix model. The prospects for effecting a similar modulation on a much faster time scale by using ultrafast laser pulses to trigger the semiconductor-to-metal transition are also discussed.

  3. Metamaterial-based theoretical description of light scattering by metallic nano-hole array structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mahi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London N6A 3K7 (Canada); Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Carson, Jeffrey J. L. [Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph' s Health Care, 268 Grosvenor Street, London N6A 4V2 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London N6A 3K7 (Canada); Balakrishnan, Shankar [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London N6A 3K7 (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph' s Health Care, 268 Grosvenor Street, London N6A 4V2 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2015-05-14

    We have experimentally and theoretically investigated the light-matter interaction in metallic nano-hole array structures. The scattering cross section spectrum was measured for three samples each having a unique nano-hole array radius and periodicity. Each measured spectrum had several peaks due to surface plasmon polaritons. The dispersion relation and the effective dielectric constant of the structure were calculated using transmission line theory and Bloch's theorem. Using the effective dielectric constant and the transfer matrix method, the surface plasmon polariton energies were calculated and found to be quantized. Using these quantized energies, a Hamiltonian for the surface plasmon polaritons was written in the second quantized form. Working with the Hamiltonian, a theory of scattering cross section was developed based on the quantum scattering theory and Green's function method. For both theory and experiment, the location of the surface plasmon polariton spectral peaks was dependant on the array periodicity and radii of the nano-holes. Good agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical results. It is proposed that the newly developed theory can be used to facilitate optimization of nanosensors for medical and engineering applications.

  4. Fabrication of a micro-hole array on metal foil by nanosecond pulsed laser beam machining using a cover plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Se Won; Jee, Won Young; Chu, Chong Nam; Kim, Janggil

    2015-01-01

    A novel laser beam machining (LBM) method is proposed to achieve higher precision and better quality beyond the limits of a commercialized nanosecond pulsed laser system. The use of a cover plate is found to be effective for the precision machining of a thin metal foil at micro scale. For verifying the capability of cover plate laser beam machining (c-LBM) technology, a 30 by 30 array of micro-holes was fabricated on 8 µm-thick stainless steel 304 (STS) foil. As a result, thermal deformation and cracks were significantly reduced in comparison with the results using LBM without a cover plate. The standard deviation of the inscribed and circumscribed circle of the holes with a diameter of 12 µm was reduced to 33% and 81%, respectively and the average roundness improved by 77%. Moreover, the smallest diameter obtainable by c-LBM in the given equipment was found to be 6.9 µm, which was 60% less than the minimum size hole by LBM without a cover plate. (technical note)

  5. Enhanced Circular Dichroism of Gold Bilayered Slit Arrays Embedded with Rectangular Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Yongkai; Luo, Lina; Wang, Haiqing; Zhang, Zhongyue

    2017-01-01

    Gold bilayered slit arrays with rectangular holes embedded into the metal surface are designed to enhance the circular dichroism (CD) effect of gold bilayered slit arrays. The rectangular holes in these arrays block electric currents and generate localized surface plasmons around these holes, thereby strengthening the CD effect. The CD enhancement factor depends strongly on the rotational angle and the structural parameters of the rectangular holes; this factor can be enhanced further by drilling two additional rectangular holes into the metal surfaces of the arrays. These results help facilitate the design of chiral structures to produce a strong CD effect and large electric fields.

  6. Resonant Excitation of Terahertz Surface Plasmons in Subwavelength Metal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of experimental studies of resonant excitation of terahertz surface plasmons in two-dimensional arrays of subwavelength metal holes. Resonant transmission efficiency higher than unity was recently achieved when normalized to the area occupied by the holes. The effects of hole shape, hole dimensions, dielectric function of metals, polarization dependence, and array film thickness on resonant terahertz transmission in metal arrays were investigated by the state-of-the-art terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. In particular, extraordinary terahertz transmission was demonstrated in arrays of subwavelength holes made even from Pb, a generally poor metal, and having thickness of only one-third of skin depth. Terahertz surface plasmons have potential applications in terahertz imaging, biosensing, interconnects, and development of integrated plasmonic components for terahertz generation and detection.

  7. Depth of array micro-holes with large aspect ratio in Al based cast alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meiling; Qu, Yingdong; Li, Rongde

    2018-03-01

    In order to study on the depth of array micro-holes on Al base cast alloy, micro-hole with depth of 50 mm and diameter of 0.55 mm are successfully prepared by using poor wetting between carbon and Al. Accordingly, the mold of depth is established, the results show that calculated depth of micro-hole is 53.22 mm, relative error is 6% compare with the actual measured depth, and the depth of hole exponentially increases with the increasing of distance between two micro-holes. Surface tension and metallostatic pressure of metal molten are mainly affecting factors for depth of micro-holes.

  8. Extraordinary light transmission through opaque thin metal film with subwavelength holes blocked by metal disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Di; Hu, Jonathan; Chou, Stephen Y

    2011-10-10

    We observed that when subwavelength-sized holes in an optically opaque metal film are completely covered by opaque metal disks larger than the holes, the light transmission through the holes is not reduced, but rather enhanced. Particularly we report (i) the observation of light transmission through the holes blocked by the metal disks up to 70% larger than the unblocked holes; (ii) the observation of tuning the light transmission by varying the coupling strength between the blocking disks and the hole array, or by changing the size of the disks and holes; (iii) the observation and simulation that the metal disk blocker can improve light coupling from free space to a subwavelength hole; and (iv) the simulation that shows the light transmission through subwavelength holes can be enhanced, even though the gap between the disk and the metal film is partially connected with a metal. We believe these finding should have broad and significant impacts and applications to optical systems in many fields.

  9. Ultrafast optical control of terahertz surface plasmons in subwavelength hole-arrays at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, Abul Kalam [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Hou - Tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    Extraordinary optical transmission through subwavelength metallic hole-arrays has been an active research area since its first demonstration. The frequency selective resonance properties of subwavelength metallic hole arrays, generally known as surface plasmon polaritons, have potential use in functional plasmonic devices such as filters, modulators, switches, etc. Such plasmonic devices are also very promising for future terahertz applications. Ultrafast switching or modulation of the resonant behavior of the 2-D metallic arrays in terahertz frequencies is of particular interest for high speed communication and sensing applications. In this paper, we demonstrate optical control of surface plasmon enhanced resonant terahertz transmission in two-dimensional subwavelength metallic hole arrays fabricated on gallium arsenide based substrates. Optically pumping the arrays creates a conductive layer in the substrate reducing the terahertz transmission amplitude of both the resonant mode and the direct transmission. Under low optical fluence, the terahertz transmission is more greatly affected by resonance damping than by propagation loss in the substrate. An ErAs:GaAs nanoisland superlattice substrate is shown to allow ultrafast control with a switching recovery time of {approx}10 ps. We also present resonant terahertz transmission in a hybrid plasmonic film comprised of an integrated array of subwavelength metallic islands and semiconductor holes. A large dynamic transition between a dipolar localized surface plasmon mode and a surface plasmon resonance near 0.8 THz is observed under near infrared optical excitation. The reversal in transmission amplitude from a stopband to a passband and up to {pi}/2 phase shift achieved in the hybrid plasmonic film make it promising in large dynamic phase modulation, optical changeover switching, and active terahertz plasmonics.

  10. Simulation of polarization-dependent film with subwavelength nano-hole array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Wei, Dong; Long, Huabao; Xin, Zhaowei; Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Haiwei; Xie, Changsheng

    2018-02-01

    When lightwave passes through a metal thin film with a periodic subwavelength hole arrays structure, its transmittance is significantly improved in the partial band compared to other wavelength. Changing the size of the hole, the period or metal material, will make the transmission curve different. Here, we add a layer of dielectric material on the surface of the metal film, such as liquid crystal(LC), by controlling voltage on LC to change the refractive index of this layer, then we can change the transmission curve, and achieve using voltage to move the transmission curve. When there is need for polarization, the holes can be made of a rectangle whose length and width are different or other shapes, for different polarization state of the light, and the film will display different transmission characteristics.

  11. A study of angle dependent surface plasmon polaritons in nano-hole array structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Shankar [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Carson, Jeffrey J. L. [Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Singh, Mahi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2016-07-21

    We report that the light-matter interaction in metallic nano-hole array structures possess a subwavelength hole radius and periodicity. The transmission coefficient for nano-hole array structures was measured for different angles of incidence of light. Each measured transmission spectrum had several peaks due to surface plasmon polaritons. A theory of the transmission coefficient was developed based on the quantum density matrix method. It was found that the location of the surface plasmon polariton and the heights of the spectral peaks were dependent on the angle of incidence of light. Good agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical results. This property of these structures has opened up new possibilities for sensing applications.

  12. Microwave response of hole and patch arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Melita C.; Edmunds, James D.; Hendry, Euan; Hibbins, Alastair P.; Sambles, J. Roy

    2010-10-01

    The electromagnetic response of two-dimensional square arrays of perfectly conducting square patches, and their complementary structures, is modeled utilizing a modal matching technique and employing Babinet’s principle. This method allows for the introduction of progressively higher diffracted orders and waveguide modes to be included in the calculation, hence aiding understanding of the underlying causal mechanism for the observed response. At frequencies close to, but below, the onset of diffraction, a near-complete reflection condition is predicted, even for low filling fractions: conversely, for high filling fractions a near-complete transmission condition results. These resonance phenomena are associated with evanescent diffraction, which is sufficiently strong to reverse the step change in transmission upon establishment of electrical continuity; i.e., the connected structure demonstrates increased transmission with increasing filling fraction.

  13. Ordered metal nanotube arrays fabricated by PVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, F; Morant, C; Campo, T; Sanz, J M; Elizalde, E

    2010-02-01

    In this work we report a simple method to fabricate ordered arrays of metal nanotubes. This method is based on the deposition of a metal by PVD onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template. The dimensions of the synthesized nanotubes depend both on the AAO template and on the deposited metal. In fact, it is observed that the aspect ratios of the nanotubes clearly depend significantly on the metal, ranging from 0.6 (Fe) to at least 3 (Zr).

  14. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  15. Gradient index metamaterials realized by drilling hole arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Zhonglei; Cui Tiejun; Bai Jing

    2010-01-01

    Gradient index metamaterials have wide applications in the microwave and optical fields. Based on the quasi-static theory, such materials at the microwave band have been realized by drilling hole arrays on ordinary dielectric materials. As applications of the gradient index metamaterials, novel devices including a 45 0 dielectric wave-bending structure, a 16 0 wave-steering lens and a microwave focusing lens are designed and fabricated. Field mapping measurements validate the proposed gradient index metamaterials and the device designs. The method can be directly and easily extended to the design of cloaks, various lenses, beam shifters and beam-steering devices. It can also be applied in the optical band as long as quasi-static conditions are satisfied. The method and the devices may find applications in integrated circuit systems.

  16. Enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence by ordered Ag nanodot array on indium tin oxide anode in organic light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mi, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Mo Yoon, Dang; Kim, Miyoung [Korea Printed Electronics Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Jeollabuk-do, 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulki; Lee, Taikjin; Hun Kim, Jae; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deokha, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Si-Hyung [School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    We report the enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence (EL) in an organic light emitting diode (OLED) with an ordered Ag nanodot array on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode. Until now, most researches have focused on the improved performance of OLEDs by plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles due to the difficulty in fabricating metal nanodot arrays. A well-ordered Ag nanodot array is fabricated on the ITO anode of OLED using the nanoporous alumina as an evaporation mask. The OLED device with Ag nanodot arrays on the ITO anode shows higher current density and EL enhancement than the one without any nano-structure. These results suggest that the Ag nanodot array with the plasmonic effect has potential as one of attractive approaches to enhance the hole injection and EL in the application of the OLEDs.

  17. Composite vortex ordering in superconducting films with arrays of blind holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdiyorov, G R; Milosevic, M V; Peeters, F M

    2009-01-01

    The pinning properties of a superconducting thin film with a square array of blind holes are studied using the nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau theory. Although blind holes provide a weaker pinning potential than holes (also called antidots), several novel vortex structures are predicted for different size and thickness of the blind holes. Orientational dimer and trimer vortex states as well as concentric vortex shells can nucleate in the blind holes. In addition, we predict the stabilization of giant vortices that may be located both in the pinning centers and/or at the interstitial sites, as well as the combination of giant vortices with sets of individual vortices. For large blind holes, local vortex shell structures inside the blind holes may transfer their symmetry to interstitial vortices as well. The subtle interplay of shell formation and traditional Abrikosov vortex lattices inside the blind holes is also studied for different numbers of trapped vortices.

  18. Yield surfaces for perforated plates with square arrays of holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2004-01-01

    A symmetric model of a perforated plate containing a 3x3 array of circular holes, arranged in a square pattern, was chosen and elastoplastic finite element analyses were carried out to determine the limit stresses for both pitch and diagonal directions of loading, for different values of biaxiality ratios. Plane stress conditions were assumed and the Tresca and von Mises yield criteria were employed to obtain two different sets of results. Yield surfaces were constructed and 'general cut-out factors' were determined for four different ligament efficiencies. The FEM results obtained by the authors using the Tresca and von Mises yield criteria were compared with the corresponding results of [J. Pressure Vessel Technol. Trans. ASME (1975) 146-154] and [J. Pressure Vessel Technol. Trans. ASME (1997) 122-126], respectively. The results based on the Tresca yield criterion obtained by the present authors and those in [J. Pressure Vessel Technol. Trans. ASME (1975) 146-154] were found to agree well with each other. In the case of the von Mises yield criterion, the agreement with [J. Pressure Vessel Technol. Trans. ASME 122-126] is generally good. The estimates based on the Tresca yield criterion are seen to result in lower values of limit stresses and cut-out factors as compared to those based on the von Mises yield criterion. The difference is attributed to the yield criterion and the flow rule chosen for the analysis. The shape as well as the size of the yield surface was found to depend on the ligament efficiency

  19. Pulsar Timing Array Based Search for Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in the Square Kilometer Array Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D

    2017-04-14

    The advent of next generation radio telescope facilities, such as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), will usher in an era where a pulsar timing array (PTA) based search for gravitational waves (GWs) will be able to use hundreds of well timed millisecond pulsars rather than the few dozens in existing PTAs. A realistic assessment of the performance of such an extremely large PTA must take into account the data analysis challenge posed by an exponential increase in the parameter space volume due to the large number of so-called pulsar phase parameters. We address this problem and present such an assessment for isolated supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) searches using a SKA era PTA containing 10^{3} pulsars. We find that an all-sky search will be able to confidently detect nonevolving sources with a redshifted chirp mass of 10^{10}  M_{⊙} out to a redshift of about 28 (corresponding to a rest-frame chirp mass of 3.4×10^{8}  M_{⊙}). We discuss the important implications that the large distance reach of a SKA era PTA has on GW observations from optically identified SMBHB candidates. If no SMBHB detections occur, a highly unlikely scenario in the light of our results, the sky-averaged upper limit on strain amplitude will be improved by about 3 orders of magnitude over existing limits.

  20. Domain wall energy landscapes in amorphous magnetic films with asymmetric arrays of holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alija, A; Perez-Junquera, A; RodrIguez-RodrIguez, G; Velez, M; Alameda, J M; MartIn, J I; Marconi, V I; Kolton, A B; Parrondo, J M R; Anguita, J V

    2009-01-01

    Arrays of asymmetric holes have been defined in amorphous Co-Si films by e-beam lithography in order to study domain wall motion across the array subject to the asymmetric pinning potential created by the holes. Experimental results on Kerr effect magnetooptical measurements and hysteresis loops are compared with micromagnetic simulations in films with arrays of triangular holes. These show that the potential asymmetry favours forward wall propagation for flat walls but, if the wall contains a kink, net backward wall propagation is preferred at low fields, in agreement with minor loop experiments. The difference between the fields needed for forward and backward flat wall propagation increases as the size of the triangular holes is reduced, becoming maximum for 1 μm triangles, which is the characteristic length scale set by domain wall width.

  1. Domain wall energy landscapes in amorphous magnetic films with asymmetric arrays of holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alija, A.; Pérez-Junquera, A.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, G.; Vélez, M.; Marconi, V. I.; Kolton, A. B.; Anguita, J. V.; Alameda, J. M.; Parrondo, J. M. R.; Martín, J. I.

    2009-02-01

    Arrays of asymmetric holes have been defined in amorphous Co-Si films by e-beam lithography in order to study domain wall motion across the array subject to the asymmetric pinning potential created by the holes. Experimental results on Kerr effect magnetooptical measurements and hysteresis loops are compared with micromagnetic simulations in films with arrays of triangular holes. These show that the potential asymmetry favours forward wall propagation for flat walls but, if the wall contains a kink, net backward wall propagation is preferred at low fields, in agreement with minor loop experiments. The difference between the fields needed for forward and backward flat wall propagation increases as the size of the triangular holes is reduced, becoming maximum for 1 µm triangles, which is the characteristic length scale set by domain wall width.

  2. Influence of hole transport material/metal contact interface on perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Zhang, Shude; Yang, Songwang; Li, Xiaomin; Yu, Yu; Wei, Qingzhu; Ni, Zhichun; Li, Ming

    2018-06-01

    Interfaces have a significant impact on the performance of perovskite solar cells. This work investigated the influence of hole transport material/metal contact interface on photovoltaic behaviours of perovskite solar devices. Different hole material/metal contact interfaces were obtained by depositing the metal under different conditions. High incident kinetic energy metal particles were proved to penetrate and embed into the hole transport material. These isolated metal particles in hole transport materials capture holes and increase the apparent carrier transport resistance of the hole transport layer. Sample temperature was found to be of great significance in metal deposition. Since metal vapour has a high temperature, the deposition process accumulated a large amount of heat. The heat evaporated the additives in the hole transport layer and decreased the hole conductivity. On the other hand, high temperature may cause iodization of the metal contact.

  3. Tailorable chiroptical activity of metallic nanospiral arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Junhong; Fu, Junxue; Ng, Jack; Huang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-28

    The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation together with LC circuit theory illustrates that the UV irradiation is mainly adsorbed in the metal and the visible is preferentially scattered by the AgNSs, accounting for the wavelength-related chiroptical distinction. This work contributes to broadening the horizons in understanding and engineering chiroptical responses, primarily desired for developing a wide range of potential chiroplasmonic applications.

  4. Solution processed metal oxide thin film hole transport layers for high performance organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steirer, K. Xerxes; Berry, Joseph J.; Chesin, Jordan P.; Lloyd, Matthew T.; Widjonarko, Nicodemus Edwin; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.; Olson, Dana C.

    2017-01-10

    A method for the application of solution processed metal oxide hole transport layers in organic photovoltaic devices and related organic electronics devices is disclosed. The metal oxide may be derived from a metal-organic precursor enabling solution processing of an amorphous, p-type metal oxide. An organic photovoltaic device having solution processed, metal oxide, thin-film hole transport layer.

  5. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations.

  6. Quadrilateral Micro-Hole Array Machining on Invar Thin Film: Wet Etching and Electrochemical Fusion Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woong-Kirl Choi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-precision products which contain a micro-hole array have recently shown remarkable demand growth in many fields, especially in the semiconductor and display industries. Photoresist etching and electrochemical machining are widely known as precision methods for machining micro-holes with no residual stress and lower surface roughness on the fabricated products. The Invar shadow masks used for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs contain numerous micro-holes and are currently machined by a photoresist etching method. However, this method has several problems, such as uncontrollable hole machining accuracy, non-etched areas, and overcutting. To solve these problems, a machining method that combines photoresist etching and electrochemical machining can be applied. In this study, negative photoresist with a quadrilateral hole array pattern was dry coated onto 30-µm-thick Invar thin film, and then exposure and development were carried out. After that, photoresist single-side wet etching and a fusion method of wet etching-electrochemical machining were used to machine micro-holes on the Invar. The hole machining geometry, surface quality, and overcutting characteristics of the methods were studied. Wet etching and electrochemical fusion machining can improve the accuracy and surface quality. The overcutting phenomenon can also be controlled by the fusion machining. Experimental results show that the proposed method is promising for the fabrication of Invar film shadow masks.

  7. Babinet's principle and the band structure of surface waves on patterned metal arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, J. D.; Taylor, M. C.; Hibbins, A. P.; Sambles, J. R.; Youngs, I. J.

    2010-05-01

    The microwave response of an array of square metal patches and its complementary structure, an array of square holes, has been experimentally studied. The resonant phenomena, which yield either enhanced transmission or reflection, are attributed to the excitation of diffractively coupled surface waves. The band structure of these surface modes has been quantified for both p-(transverse magnetic) and s-(transverse electric) polarized radiation and is found to be dependent on the periodicity of the electric and magnetic fields on resonance. The results are in excellent accord with predictions from finite element method modeling and the electromagnetic form of Babinet's principle [Babinet, C. R. Acad. Sci. 4, 638 (1837)].

  8. Babinet's principle and the band structure of surface waves on patterned metal arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmunds, J. D.; Taylor, M. C.; Hibbins, A. P.; Sambles, J. R.; Youngs, I. J.

    2010-01-01

    The microwave response of an array of square metal patches and its complementary structure, an array of square holes, has been experimentally studied. The resonant phenomena, which yield either enhanced transmission or reflection, are attributed to the excitation of diffractively coupled surface waves. The band structure of these surface modes has been quantified for both p-(transverse magnetic) and s-(transverse electric) polarized radiation and is found to be dependent on the periodicity of the electric and magnetic fields on resonance. The results are in excellent accord with predictions from finite element method modeling and the electromagnetic form of Babinet's principle [Babinet, C. R. Acad. Sci. 4, 638 (1837)].

  9. Plasmonic fluorescence enhancement of DBMBF2 monomers and DBMBF2-toluene exciplexes using al-hole arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, T.M.; Bochenkov, V.E.; Espinoza, J.D.A.; Smits, E.C.P.; Muzafarov, A.M.; Kononevich, Y.N.; Sutherland, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of aluminum hole arrays fabricated via colloidal lithography were investigated. By tuning the hole diameter and hole spacing independently, their influence on the Bloch wave-surface plasmon polariton (BW-SPP) and localized surface plasmon resonances resonances (LSPR) could be

  10. Functional metasurfaces based on metallic and dielectric subwavelength slits and stripes array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yinghui; Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Gao, Ping; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2018-04-01

    Starting with the early works of extraordinary optical transmission and extraordinary Young’s interference, researchers have been fascinated by the unusual optical properties displayed by metallic holes/slits and subsequently found similar abnormities in dielectric counterparts. Benefiting from the shrinking wavelength of surface plasmon polaritons excited in metallic slits and high refractive index of dielectric stripes, one can realize local phase modulation and approach desired dispersion by engineering the geometries of a slits and stripes array. In this review, we review recent developments in functional metasurfaces composed of various metallic and dielectric subwavelength slits and stripes arrays, with special emphasis on achromatic, ultra-broadband, quasi-continuous, multifunctional and reconfigurable metasurfaces. Particular attention is paid to provide insight into the design strategies for these devices. Finally, we give an outlook of the development in this fascinating area.

  11. Massive subcritical compact arrays of plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    Two experimental critical-approach programs are reported. Both were performed at the Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colorado; and both date back to the late 1960s. Both involve very large arrays of massive plutonium ingots. These ingots had been cast in the foundry at the Rocky Flats Plant as part of their routine production operations; they were not specially prepared for either study. Consequently, considerable variation in ingot mass is encountered. This mass varied between approximately 7 kg and a little more than 10 kg. One program, performed in the spring of 1969, involved stacked arrays of ingots contained within cylindrical, disk-shaped, thin, steel cans. This program studied four arrays defined by the pattern of steel cans in a single layer. The four were: 1 x N, 3 x N, 2 x 2 x N, and 3 x 3 x N. The second was a tightly-packed, triangular-pitched patterns; the last two were square-pitched patterns. The other program, performed about a year earlier, involved similar ingots also contained in similar steel cans, but these canned plutonium ingots were placed in commercial steel drums. This study pertained to one-, two-, and three-layered horizontal arrays of drums. All cases proved to be well subcritical. Most would have remained subcritical had the parameters of the array under study been continued infinitely beyond the reciprocal multiplication safety limit. In one case for the drum arrays, an uncertain extrapolation of the data of the earlier program suggests that criticality might have eventually been attained had several thousand additional kilograms of plutonium been available for use.

  12. Massive subcritical compact arrays of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    Two experimental critical-approach programs are reported. Both were performed at the Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colorado; and both date back to the late 1960s. Both involve very large arrays of massive plutonium ingots. These ingots had been cast in the foundry at the Rocky Flats Plant as part of their routine production operations; they were not specially prepared for either study. Consequently, considerable variation in ingot mass is encountered. This mass varied between approximately 7 kg and a little more than 10 kg. One program, performed in the spring of 1969, involved stacked arrays of ingots contained within cylindrical, disk-shaped, thin, steel cans. This program studied four arrays defined by the pattern of steel cans in a single layer. The four were: 1 x N, 3 x N, 2 x 2 x N, and 3 x 3 x N. The second was a tightly-packed, triangular-pitched patterns; the last two were square-pitched patterns. The other program, performed about a year earlier, involved similar ingots also contained in similar steel cans, but these canned plutonium ingots were placed in commercial steel drums. This study pertained to one-, two-, and three-layered horizontal arrays of drums. All cases proved to be well subcritical. Most would have remained subcritical had the parameters of the array under study been continued infinitely beyond the reciprocal multiplication safety limit. In one case for the drum arrays, an uncertain extrapolation of the data of the earlier program suggests that criticality might have eventually been attained had several thousand additional kilograms of plutonium been available for use

  13. Scanning probe lithography for fabrication of Ti metal nanodot arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, B.; Jo, W.; Gwon, M.J.; Lee, E.; Kim, D.-W.

    2010-01-01

    We report fabrication of Ti metal nanodot arrays by scanning probe microscopic indentation. A thin poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) layer was spin-coated on Si substrates with thickness of 70 nm. Nanometer-size pore arrays were formed by indenting the PMMA layer using a cantilever of a scanning probe microscope. Protuberances with irregular boundaries appeared during the indentation process. Control of approach and pulling-out speed during indentation was able to dispose of the protrusions. Ti metal films were deposited on the patterned PMMA layers by a radio-frequency sputtering method and subsequently lifted off to obtain metal nanodot arrays. The fabricated metal nanodot arrays have 200 nm of diameter and 500 nm of interdistance, which corresponds to a density of 4x10 8 /cm 2 . Scanning probe-based measurement of current-voltage (I-V) behaviors for a single Ti metal nanodot showed asymmetric characteristics. Applying external bias is likely to induce oxidation of Ti metal, since the conductance decreased and volume change of the dots was observed. I-V behaviors of Ti metal nanodots by conventional e-beam lithography were also characterized for comparison.

  14. Trapping of light by metal arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khardikov, Vyacheslav V.; Iarko, Ekaterina O.; Prosvirnin, Sergey L.

    2010-04-01

    The problem of the near-IR light reflection from and transmittance through a planar 2D periodic metal-dielectric structure with a square periodic cell of two complex-shaped asymmetric metal elements has been solved. Conditions of the light confinement by excitation of the trapped mode resonances in certain structures, both polarization-sensitive and polarization-insensitive, were studied. For the first time, the existence of a high-order trapped mode resonance with the greater quality factor than that of the lowest one has been shown. It was ascertained that the Babinet principle provides a good prediction of the resonance properties of the complementary structures, despite the very high Joule losses in the metal strips in near-IR, a finite thickness of the metal elements and the presence of a dielectric substrate.

  15. Specific features of implosion of metallized fiber arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Grabovski, E. V.; Frolov, I. N.; Laukhin, Ya. N.; Breshkov, S. S. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Implosion of metallized fiber arrays was studied experimentally at the Angara-5-1 facility. The use of such arrays makes it possible to investigate the production and implosion dynamics of plasmas of various metals (such as tin, indium, and bismuth) that were previously unavailable for such studies. The plasma production rates m-dot (in μg/(cm{sup 2} ns)) for different metals were determined and quantitatively compared. Varying the thickness of the metal layer deposited on kapron fibers (the total linear mass of the metal coating being maintained at the level of 220 μg/cm), the current and velocity of the plasma precursor were studied as functions of the thickness of the metal coating. The strong difference in the rates of plasma production from the metal coating and kapron fibers results in the redistribution of the discharge current between the Z-pinch and the trailing fiber plasma. The outer boundary of the plasma produced from the metal coating is found to be stable against instabilities typical of the final stage of implosion of conventional wire arrays.

  16. Phased array ultrasonic testing of dissimilar metal pipe weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajeev, J.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Sharma, Govind K; Joseph, A.; Purnachandra Rao, B.

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joints made of stainless steel and ferritic steel is used in nuclear industries as well as oil and gas industries. These joints are prone to frequent failures which makes the non-destructive testing of dissimilar metal weld joints utmost important for reliable and safe operation of nuclear power plants and oil and gas industries. Ultrasonic inspection of dissimilar metal weld joints is still challenging due to the inherent anisotropic and highly scattering nature. Phased array ultrasonic testing (PAUT) is an advanced technique and its capability has not been fully explored for the inspection of dissimilar metal welds

  17. Silica needle template fabrication of metal hollow microneedle arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, M W; Li, H W; Chen, X L; Tang, Y F; Lu, M H; Chen, Y F

    2009-01-01

    Drug delivery through hollow microneedle (HMN) arrays has now been recognized as one of the most promising techniques because it minimizes the shortcomings of the traditional drug delivery methods and has many exciting advantages—pain free and tunable release rates, for example. However, this drug delivery method has been hindered greatly from mass clinical application because of the high fabrication cost of HMN arrays. Hence, we developed a simple and cost-effective procedure using silica needles as templates to massively fabricate HMN arrays by using popular materials and industrially applicable processes of micro- imprint, hot embossing, electroplating and polishing. Metal HMN arrays with high quality are prepared with great flexibility with tunable parameters of area, length of needle, size of hollow and array dimension. This efficient and cost-effective fabrication method can also be applied to other applications after minor alterations, such as preparation of optic, acoustic and solar harvesting materials and devices

  18. Silica needle template fabrication of metal hollow microneedle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M. W.; Li, H. W.; Chen, X. L.; Tang, Y. F.; Lu, M. H.; Chen, Y. F.

    2009-11-01

    Drug delivery through hollow microneedle (HMN) arrays has now been recognized as one of the most promising techniques because it minimizes the shortcomings of the traditional drug delivery methods and has many exciting advantages—pain free and tunable release rates, for example. However, this drug delivery method has been hindered greatly from mass clinical application because of the high fabrication cost of HMN arrays. Hence, we developed a simple and cost-effective procedure using silica needles as templates to massively fabricate HMN arrays by using popular materials and industrially applicable processes of micro- imprint, hot embossing, electroplating and polishing. Metal HMN arrays with high quality are prepared with great flexibility with tunable parameters of area, length of needle, size of hollow and array dimension. This efficient and cost-effective fabrication method can also be applied to other applications after minor alterations, such as preparation of optic, acoustic and solar harvesting materials and devices.

  19. Trapping of light by metal arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khardikov, Vyacheslav V; Iarko, Ekaterina O; Prosvirnin, Sergey L

    2010-01-01

    The problem of the near-IR light reflection from and transmittance through a planar 2D periodic metal–dielectric structure with a square periodic cell of two complex-shaped asymmetric metal elements has been solved. Conditions of the light confinement by excitation of the trapped mode resonances in certain structures, both polarization-sensitive and polarization-insensitive, were studied. For the first time, the existence of a high-order trapped mode resonance with the greater quality factor than that of the lowest one has been shown. It was ascertained that the Babinet principle provides a good prediction of the resonance properties of the complementary structures, despite the very high Joule losses in the metal strips in near-IR, a finite thickness of the metal elements and the presence of a dielectric substrate

  20. Coulomb gap triptych in a periodic array of metal nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianran; Skinner, Brian; Shklovskii, B I

    2012-09-21

    The Coulomb gap in the single-particle density of states (DOS) is a universal consequence of electron-electron interaction in disordered systems with localized electron states. Here we show that in arrays of monodisperse metallic nanocrystals, there is not one but three identical adjacent Coulomb gaps, which together form a structure that we call a "Coulomb gap triptych." We calculate the DOS and the conductivity in two- and three-dimensional arrays using a computer simulation. Unlike in the conventional Coulomb glass models, in nanocrystal arrays the DOS has a fixed width in the limit of large disorder. The Coulomb gap triptych can be studied via tunneling experiments.

  1. Complementary periodic diffracting metallic nanohole and nanodipole arrays in the mid-infrared range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Feng Ma, Hui; Yao, Jie; Wang, Xudong

    2012-10-01

    Metallic nanohole arrays and metallic nanodipole arrays are fabricated and experimentally characterized. A complementary response is observed in both transmission and reflection. For the metallic nanohole arrays, a peak (dip) in transmission (reflection) is observed at resonance whereas the metallic nanodipole arrays display a dip (peak) in transmission (reflection). The resonant frequency of both the metallic nanohole arrays and the nanodipole arrays depends on the dipole arm length, the incident angle, and the period. The resonant position of the nanohole arrays matches that of its complement, which means that Babinet's principle nearly holds for these structures in the mid-infrared region.

  2. Fabrication of Metallic Quantum Dot Arrays For Nanoscale Nonlinear Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M. D.; Hmelo, A. B.; Lopez Magruder, R., III; Weller Haglund, R. A., Jr.; Feldman, L. C.

    2003-03-01

    Ordered arrays of metal nanocrystals embedded in or sequestered on dielectric hosts have potential applications as elements of nonlinear or near-field optical circuits, as sensitizers for fluorescence emitters and photo detectors, and as anchor points for arrays of biological molecules. Metal nanocrystals are strongly confined electronic systems with size-, shape and spatial orientation-dependent optical responses. At the smallest scales (below about 15 nm diameter), their band structure is drastically altered by the small size of the system, and the reduced population of conduction-band electrons. Here we report on the fabrication of two-dimensional ordered metallic nanocrystal arrays, and one-dimensional nanocrystal-loaded waveguides for optical investigations. We have employed strategies for synthesizing metal nanocrystal composites that capitalize on the best features of focused ion beam (FIB) machining and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The FIB generates arrays of specialized sites; PLD vapor deposition results in the directed self-assembly of Ag nanoparticles nucleated at the FIB generated sites on silicon substrates. We present results based on the SEM, AFM and optical characterization of prototype composites. This research has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-01ER45916.

  3. Anomalous transmission through heavily doped conducting polymer films with periodic subwavelength hole array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Tatsunosuke; Vardeny, Z. Valy; Agrawal, Amit; Nahata, Ajay; Menon, Reghu

    2006-08-01

    We observed resonantly enhanced (or anomalous transmission) terahertz transmission through two-dimensional (2D) periodic arrays of subwavelength apertures with various periodicities fabricated on metallic organic conducting polymer films of polypyrrole heavily doped with PF 6 molecules [PPy(PF6)]. The anomalous transmission spectra are in good agreement with a model involving surface plasmon polariton excitations on the film surfaces. We also found that the resonantly enhanced transmission peaks are broader in the exotic metallic PPy(PF6) films compared to those formed in 2D aperture array in regular metallic films such as silver, indicating that the surface plasmon polaritons on the PPy(PF6) film surfaces have higher attenuation.

  4. Constraints on the Dynamical Environments of Supermassive Black-Hole Binaries Using Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen R; Simon, Joseph; Sampson, Laura

    2017-05-05

    We introduce a technique for gravitational-wave analysis, where Gaussian process regression is used to emulate the strain spectrum of a stochastic background by training on population-synthesis simulations. This leads to direct Bayesian inference on astrophysical parameters. For pulsar timing arrays specifically, we interpolate over the parameter space of supermassive black-hole binary environments, including three-body stellar scattering, and evolving orbital eccentricity. We illustrate our approach on mock data, and assess the prospects for inference with data similar to the NANOGrav 9-yr data release.

  5. Determination of stress multipliers for thin perforated plates with square array of holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Murli, B.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    The peak stress multipliers are required to determine the maximum stresses in perforated plates for the realistic evaluation of their fatigue life. The Section III of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessels Code does not provide any information about such multipliers to be used in thin perforated plates with square penetration pattern. Although such multipliers for membrane loadings are available in literature, they were obtained either by classical analysis or by photoelastic experiments and there is no significant finite element analysis in this area. Also it has been a common practice among designers to apply the same multipliers for loads producing bending type of stress. The stress multipliers in bending are lower than those in membrane. Therefore a reduction of resultant peak stress occurs if proper stress multipliers are used for bending. The present paper is aimed at developing a finite element technique which can be used for determining the peak stress multipliers in thin plates for membrane as well as bending loads. A quarter symmetric part of a 3 x 3 square array was chosen for the analysis. The results were obtained by computer programs PAFEC and COSMOS/M using 2-D plane stress elements for the membrane and degenerated 3-D shell element for the bending part. The results for the membrane are compared with Bailey, Hicks and Hulbert and with Meijers' finite element results for the bending part. A study was made at the initial stage by analysing a 6 x 6 square array to see the effect of holes beyond one pitch, which were left out by the 3 x 3 array and the effect of additional holes was found to be negligible. Therefore it was decided to carry out further analysis with 3 x 3 square array. Photoelastic experiments were also performed to validate the results obtained by theoretical analysis. (author)

  6. Fabrication of Arrays of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanotubes by Shadow Evaporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickey, Michael D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Smythe, Elizabeth J.; Chiechi, Ryan C.; Capasso, Federico; Whitesides, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for fabricating uniform arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes with controlled heights and diameters. The technique involves depositing material onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template using a collimated electron beam evaporation source. The

  7. Maximizing omnidirectional light harvesting in metal oxide hyperbranched array architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wu-Qiang; Feng, Hao-Lin; Rao, Hua-Shang; Xu, Yang-Fan; Kuang, Dai-Bin; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2014-05-01

    The scrupulous design of nanoarchitectures and smart hybridization of specific active materials are closely related to the overall photovoltaic performance of an anode electrode. Here we present a solution-based strategy for the fabrication of well-aligned metal oxide-based nanowire-nanosheet-nanorod hyperbranched arrays on transparent conducting oxide substrates. For these hyperbranched arrays, we observe a twofold increment in dye adsorption and enhanced light trapping and scattering capability compared with the pristine titanium dioxide nanowires, and thus a power conversion efficiency of 9.09% is achieved. Our growth approach presents a strategy to broaden the photoresponse and maximize the light-harvesting efficiency of arrays architectures, and may lead to applications for energy conversion and storage, catalysis, water splitting and gas sensing.

  8. Fabrication of an artificial nanosucker device with a large area nanotube array of metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Manivannan, Karthikeyan; Yu, Chia-Chi; Chu, Jinn P; Chen, Jem-Kun

    2018-01-18

    The concurrent attachment and detachment movements of geckos on virtually any type of surface via their foot pads have inspired us to develop a thermal device with numerous arrangements of a multi-layer thin film together with electrodes that can help modify the temperature of the surface via application of a voltage. A sequential fabrication process was employed on a large-scale integration to generate well-defined contact hole arrays of photoresist for use as templates on the electrode-based device. The photoresist templates were then subjected to sputter deposition of the metallic glass Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 . Consequently, a metallic glass nanotube (MGNT) array having a nominal wall thickness of 100 nm was obtained after removal of the photoresist template. When a water droplet was placed on the MGNT array, close nanochambers of metallic glass were formed. By applying voltage, the surface was heated to increase the pressure inside the nanochambers; this generated an expanding force that raised the droplet; thus, the static water contact angle (SWCA) was increased. In contrast, a sucking force was generated during surface cooling, which decreased the SWCA. Our fabrication strategy exploits the MGNT array surface as nanosuckers, which can mimic the climbing aptitude of geckos as they attach to (>10 N m -2 ) and detach from (0.26 N m -2 ) surfaces at 0.5 and 3 V of applied voltage, respectively. Thus, the climbing aptitude of geckos can be mimicked by employing the processing strategy presented herein for the development of artificial foot pads.

  9. Fabrication and Optical Characterization of Silicon Nanostructure Arrays by Laser Interference Lithography and Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Heydari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper metal-assisted chemical etching has been applied to pattern porous silicon regions and silicon nanohole arrays in submicron period simply by using positive photoresist as a mask layer. In order to define silicon nanostructures, Metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE was carried out with silver catalyst. Provided solution (or materiel in combination with laser interference lithography (LIL fabricated different reproducible pillars, holes and rhomboidal structures. As a result, Submicron patterning of porous areas and nanohole arrays on Si substrate with a minimum feature size of 600nm was achieved. Measured reflection spectra of the samples present different optical characteristics which is dependent on the shape, thickness of metal catalyst and periodicity of the structure. These structures can be designed to reach a photonic bandgap in special range or antireflection layer in energy harvesting applications. The resulted reflection spectra of applied method are comparable to conventional expensive and complicated dry etching techniques.

  10. Acoustic transmission resonance and suppression through double-layer subwavelength hole arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhifeng; Jin Guojun

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of acoustic waves passing through double-layer subwavelength hole arrays. The acoustic transmission resonance and suppression are observed. There are three mechanisms responsible for the transmission resonance: the excitation of geometrically induced acoustic surface waves, the Fabry-Perot resonance in a hole cavity (I-FP resonance) and the Fabry-Perot resonance between two plates (II-FP resonance). We can differentiate these mechanisms via the dispersion relation of acoustic modes supported by the double-layer structure. It is confirmed that the coupling between two single-layer perforated plates, associated with longitudinal interval and lateral displacement, plays a crucial role in modulating the transmission properties. The strong coupling between two plates can induce the splitting of the transmission peak, while the decoupling between plates leads to the appearance of transmission suppression. By analyzing the criterion derived for transmission suppression, we conclude that it is the destructive interference between the diffracted waves and the direct transmission waves assisted by the I-FP resonance of the first plate that leads to the decoupling between plates and then the transmission suppression.

  11. Optical Sensing with Simultaneous Electrochemical Control in Metal Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janos Vörös

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the alternative use of noble metal nanowire systems in large-scale array configurations to exploit both the nanowires’ conductive nature and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR. The first known nanowire-based system has been constructed, with which optical signals are influenced by the simultaneous application of electrochemical potentials. Optical characterization of nanowire arrays was performed by measuring the bulk refractive index sensitivity and the limit of detection. The formation of an electrical double layer was controlled in NaCl solutions to study the effect of local refractive index changes on the spectral response. Resonance peak shifts of over 4 nm, a bulk refractive index sensitivity up to 115 nm/RIU and a limit of detection as low as 4.5 × 10−4 RIU were obtained for gold nanowire arrays. Simulations with the Multiple Multipole Program (MMP confirm such bulk refractive index sensitivities. Initial experiments demonstrated successful optical biosensing using a novel form of particle-based nanowire arrays. In addition, the formation of an ionic layer (Stern-layer upon applying an electrochemical potential was also monitored by the shift of the plasmon resonance.

  12. Micro-hole array fluorescent sensor based on AC-Dielectrophoresis (DEP) for simultaneous analysis of nano-molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jin; Kang, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Eunji; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Kim, Jinsik

    2018-02-01

    We propose a simple fluorescent bio-chip based on two types of alternative current-dielectrophoretic (AC-DEP) force, attractive (positive DEP) and repulsive (negative DEP) force, for simultaneous nano-molecules analysis. Various radius of micro-holes on the bio-chip are designed to apply the different AC-DEP forces, and the nano-molecules are concentrated inside the micro-hole arrays according to the intensity of the DEP force. The bio-chip was fabricated by Micro Electro Mechanical system (MEMS) technique, and was composed of two layers; a SiO2 layer and Ta/Pt layer were accomplished for an insulation layer and a top electrode with micro-hole arrays to apply electric fields for DEP force, respectively. Each SiO2 and Ta/Pt layers were deposited by thermal oxidation and sputtering, and micro-hole arrays were fabricated with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) etching process. For generation of each positive and negative DEP at micro-holes, we applied two types of sine-wave AC voltage with different frequency range alternately. The intensity of the DEP force was controlled by the radius of the micro-hole and size of nano-molecule, and calculated with COMSOL multi-physics. Three types of nano-molecules labelled with different fluorescent dye were used and the intensity of nano-molecules was examined by the fluorescent optical analysis after applying the DEP force. By analyzing the fluorescent intensities of the nano-molecules, we verify the various nano-molecules in analyte are located successfully inside corresponding micro-holes with different radius according to their size.

  13. Nanomolar Trace Metal Analysis of Copper at Gold Microband Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, A.; Dawson, K.; Sassiat, N.; Quinn, A. J.; O'Riordan, A.

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and electrochemical characterization of gold microband electrode arrays designated as a highly sensitive sensor for trace metal detection of copper in drinking water samples. Gold microband electrodes have been routinely fabricated by standard photolithographic methods. Electrochemical characterization were conducted in 0.1 M H2SO4 and found to display characteristic gold oxide formation and reduction peaks. The advantages of gold microband electrodes as trace metal sensors over currently used methods have been investigated by employing under potential deposition anodic stripping voltammetry (UPD-ASV) in Cu2+ nanomolar concentrations. Linear correlations were observed for increasing Cu2+ concentrations from which the concentration of an unknown sample of drinking water was estimated. The results obtained for the estimation of the unknown trace copper concentration in drinking was in good agreement with expected values.

  14. Nanomolar Trace Metal Analysis of Copper at Gold Microband Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, A; Dawson, K; Sassiat, N; Quinn, A J; O'Riordan, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and electrochemical characterization of gold microband electrode arrays designated as a highly sensitive sensor for trace metal detection of copper in drinking water samples. Gold microband electrodes have been routinely fabricated by standard photolithographic methods. Electrochemical characterization were conducted in 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 and found to display characteristic gold oxide formation and reduction peaks. The advantages of gold microband electrodes as trace metal sensors over currently used methods have been investigated by employing under potential deposition anodic stripping voltammetry (UPD-ASV) in Cu 2+ nanomolar concentrations. Linear correlations were observed for increasing Cu 2+ concentrations from which the concentration of an unknown sample of drinking water was estimated. The results obtained for the estimation of the unknown trace copper concentration in drinking was in good agreement with expected values.

  15. Effect of the final-state interaction on the initial core-hole lifetime: the case of the 4s-hole lifetime of Sn metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2003-01-01

    The first theoretical study of the effect of the final-state interaction on the initial core-hole lifetime is presented. The 4s-hole lifetime width of Sn metal is calculated by an ab-initio atomic many-body theory (Green's function method). When the final-state interaction in the 4p4d two-hole state, created by the 4s -1 -4p -1 4d -1 εf super Coster-Kronig (CK) transition of the initial 4s hole, is explicitly taken into account, the ab-initio atomic many-body calculation of the 4s-hole X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectrum of Sn atom can provide excellent agreement with experiment in both the 4s-hole energy and the 4s-hole lifetime width. Otherwise, the many-body calculation underestimates considerably the 4s-hole lifetime width. The 4p4d two-hole state interacts strongly with the 4d triple-hole state by the 4p -1 4d -1 -4d -3 εf super CK transition. The interaction affects greatly the initial 4s-hole lifetime width

  16. Supermassive Black Hole Binaries: Multi-Messenger Astrophysics and Long Baselines with the Next-Generation Very Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Lazio, Joseph; Nyland, Kristina; Blecha, Laura; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Comerford, Julie; Liu, Xin; Taylor, Gregory; Shen, Yue; Maccarone, T. J.; Chomiuk, Laura; Reines, Amy

    2018-01-01

    Dual ( physical processes that drive both the remnant's dynamics and the inspiral of the black hole pair. A systematic census of the dual supermassive black hole population will also directly constrain the strength and distribution of objects emitting gravitational waves that will be detected by pulsar timing arrays and future space-based laser interferometers. Although the population of dual supermassive black holes in galaxy merger products is central to these topics and others, few have yet been discovered.A suite of radio, visible-infrared, and X-ray telescopes have just begun to reveal the population of kiloparsec-separation dual active nuclei. This poster will present the unique capability of radio observations to explore the dual and binary population of supermassive black hole binaries, and will highlight the observational techniques and discoveries expected for the Next-Generation Very Large Array.Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The NANOGrav project receives support from NSF Physics Frontier Center award number 1430284.

  17. Ratchet Effects and Domain Wall Energy Landscapes in Amorphous Magnetic Films with 2D Arrays of Asymmetric Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. I.; Alija, A.; Sobrado, I.; Perez-Junquera, A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, G.; Velez, M.; Alameda, J. M.; Marconi, V. I.; Kolton, A. B.; Parrondo, J. M. R.

    2009-03-01

    The driven motion of domain walls in extended magnetic films patterned with 2D arrays of asymmetric holes has been found to be subject to two different crossed ratchet effects [1] which results in an inversion of the sign of domain wall motion rectification as a function of the applied magnetic field. This effect can be understood in terms of the competition between drive, elasticity and asymmetric pinning as revealed by a simple 4̂-model. In order to optimize the asymmetric hole design, the relevant energy landscapes for domain wall motion across the array of asymmetric holes have been calculated by micromagnetic simulations as a function of array geometrical characteristics. The effects of a transverse magnetic field on these two crossed ratchet effects will also be discussed in terms of the decrease in domain wall energy per unit area and of the modifications in the magnetostatic barriers for domain wall pinning at the asymmetric inclusions. Work supported by Spanish MICINN.[1] A. Perez-Junquera et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 (2008) 037203

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from metal and transition metal nano-caped arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huanhuan; Gao, Renxian; Zhu, Aonan; Hua, Zhong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Yaxin; Zhang, Yongjun

    2018-03-01

    The metal and transition metal cap-shaped arrays on polystyrene colloidal particle (PSCP) templates were fabricated to study the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. We obtained the Ag and Fe complex film by a co-sputtering deposition method. The size of the deposited Fe particle was changed by the sputtering power. We also study the SERS enhancement mechanism by decorating the PATP probe molecule on the different films. The SERS signals increased firstly, and then decreased as the size of Fe particles grows gradually. The finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulation and experimental Raman results manifest that SERS enhancement was mainly attributed to surface plasma resonance (SPR) between Ag and Ag nanoparticles. The SERS signals of PATP molecule were enhanced to reach a lowest detectable concentration of 10-8 mol/L. The research demonstrates that the SERS substrates with Ag-Fe cap-shaped arrays have a high sensitivity.

  19. Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on Photovoltaic Metallization Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A photovoltaic Metallization Research forum, under the sponsorship of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project consisted of five sessions, covering: (1) the current status of metallization systems, (2) system design, (3) thick-film metallization, (4) advanced techniques, and (5) future metallization challenges.

  20. Core-hole effects in the x-ray-absorption spectra of transition-metal silicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEIJS, PJW; CZYZYK, MT; VANACKER, JF; SPEIER, W; GOEDKOOP, JB; VANLEUKEN, H; HENDRIX, HJM; DEGROOT, RA; VANDERLAAN, G; BUSCHOW, KHJ; WIECH, G; FUGGLE, JC

    1990-01-01

    We report systematic differences between the shape of the Si K x-ray-absorption spectra of transition-metal silicides and broadened partial densities of Si p states. We use a variety of calculations to show that the origin of these discrepancies is the core-hole potential appropriate to the final

  1. Fabrication of arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes by shadow evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michael D; Weiss, Emily A; Smythe, Elizabeth J; Chiechi, Ryan C; Capasso, Federico; Whitesides, George M

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for fabricating uniform arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes with controlled heights and diameters. The technique involves depositing material onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template using a collimated electron beam evaporation source. The evaporating material enters the porous openings of the AAO membrane and deposits onto the walls of the pores. The membrane is tilted with respect to the column of evaporating material, so the shadows cast by the openings of the pores onto the inside walls of the pores define the geometry of the tubes. Rotation of the membrane during evaporation ensures uniform deposition inside the pores. After evaporation, dissolution of the AAO in base easily removes the template to yield an array of nanotubes connected by a thin backing of the same metal or metal oxide. The diameter of the pores dictates the diameter of the tubes, and the incident angle of evaporation determines the height of the tubes. Tubes up to approximately 1.5 mum in height and 20-200 nm in diameter were fabricated. This method is adaptable to any material that can be vapor-deposited, including indium-tin oxide (ITO), a conductive, transparent material that is useful for many opto-electronic applications. An array of gold nanotubes produced by this technique served as a substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: the Raman signal (per molecule) from a monolayer of benzenethiolate was a factor of approximately 5 x 10(5) greater than that obtained using bulk liquid benzenethiol.

  2. Localization of CO2 Leakage from a Circular Hole on a Flat-Surface Structure Using a Circular Acoustic Emission Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwang Cui

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leak localization is essential for the safety and maintenance of storage vessels. This study proposes a novel circular acoustic emission sensor array to realize the continuous CO2 leak localization from a circular hole on the surface of a large storage vessel in a carbon capture and storage system. Advantages of the proposed array are analyzed and compared with the common sparse arrays. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory-scale stainless steel plate and leak signals were obtained from a circular hole in the center of this flat-surface structure. In order to reduce the influence of the ambient noise and dispersion of the acoustic wave on the localization accuracy, ensemble empirical mode decomposition is deployed to extract the useful leak signal. The time differences between the signals from the adjacent sensors in the array are calculated through correlation signal processing before estimating the corresponding distance differences between the sensors. A hyperbolic positioning algorithm is used to identify the location of the circular leak hole. Results show that the circular sensor array has very good directivity toward the circular leak hole. Furthermore, an optimized method is proposed by changing the position of the circular sensor array on the flat-surface structure or adding another circular sensor array to identify the direction of the circular leak hole. Experiential results obtained on a 100 cm × 100 cm stainless steel plate demonstrate that the full-scale error in the leak localization is within 0.6%.

  3. Metal nanoparticle mediated space charge and its optical control in an organic hole-only device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligorio, G.; Nardi, M. V. [Institut für Physik & IRIS Adlershof, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor Str. 6, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Steyrleuthner, R.; Neher, D. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht Str. 24, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Ihiawakrim, D. [Institut de Physique et de Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS UMR 7504, 23 rue du Loess, BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg, Cedex2 (France); Crespo-Monteiro, N.; Brinkmann, M. [Institut Charles Sadron CNRS, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); Koch, N., E-mail: norbert.koch@physik.hu-berlin.de [Institut für Physik & IRIS Adlershof, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor Str. 6, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Erneuerbare Energien, Albert-Einstein Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-04-11

    We reveal the role of localized space charges in hole-only devices based on an organic semiconductor with embedded metal nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs act as deep traps for holes and reduce the current density compared to a device without MNPs by a factor of 10{sup 4} due to the build-up of localized space charge. Dynamic MNPs charged neutrality can be realized during operation by electron transfer from excitons created in the organic matrix, enabling light sensing independent of device bias. In contrast to the previous speculations, electrical bistability in such devices was not observed.

  4. Metal nanoparticle mediated space charge and its optical control in an organic hole-only device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligorio, G.; Nardi, M. V.; Steyrleuthner, R.; Neher, D.; Ihiawakrim, D.; Crespo-Monteiro, N.; Brinkmann, M.; Koch, N.

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the role of localized space charges in hole-only devices based on an organic semiconductor with embedded metal nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs act as deep traps for holes and reduce the current density compared to a device without MNPs by a factor of 10 4 due to the build-up of localized space charge. Dynamic MNPs charged neutrality can be realized during operation by electron transfer from excitons created in the organic matrix, enabling light sensing independent of device bias. In contrast to the previous speculations, electrical bistability in such devices was not observed.

  5. Metal nanoparticle mediated space charge and its optical control in an organic hole-only device

    OpenAIRE

    Ligorio, G.; Nardi, M. V.; Steyrleuthner, Robert; Ihiawakrim, D.; Crespo-Monteiro, N.; Brinkmann, M.; Neher, D.; Koch, N.

    2017-01-01

    We reveal the role of localized space charges in hole-only devices based on an organic semiconductor with embedded metal nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs act as deep traps for holes and reduce the current density compared to a device without MNPs by a factor of 104 due to the build-up of localized space charge. Dynamic MNPs charged neutrality can be realized during operation by electron transfer from excitons created in the organic matrix, enabling light sensing independent of device bias. In contr...

  6. Optical response of a flat metallic surface coated with a monolayer array of latex spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lei; Liu Xiaohan; Yin Haiwei; Zi Jian

    2010-01-01

    We report on the fabrication, characterization and simulation of a structure consisting of a flat metallic surface coated with a monolayer array of latex spheres. This structure shows interesting optical response: over flat metallic surfaces a series of reflection minima appear in reflection spectra. Numerical simulations revealed that the structure can support two types of surface modes: surface plasmon-polaritons bound at the metallic surface and guided modes confined to the array of latex spheres, or their hybrids. Both experimental and theoretical results indicated that these surface modes show well-defined band structures due to the introduced periodicity by the monolayer array of latex spheres.

  7. Design and array signal suggestion of array type pulsed eddy current probe for health monitoring of metal tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Kil [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    An array type probe for monitoring metal tubes is proposed in this paper which utilizes peak value and peak time of a pulsed eddy current(PEC) signal. The probe consists of an array of encircling coils along a tube and the outside of coils is shielded by ferrite to prevent source magnetic fields from directly affecting sensor signals since it is the magnetic fields produced by eddy currents that reflect the condition of metal tubes. The positions of both exciter and sensor coils are consecutively moved automatically so that manual scanning is not necessary. At one position of send-receive coils, peak value and peak time are extracted from a sensor PEC signal and these data are accumulated for all positions to form an array type peak value signal and an array type peak time signal. Numerical simulation was performed using the backward difference method in time and the finite element method for spatial analysis. Simulation results showed that peak value increases and the peak appears earlier as the defect depth or length increases. The proposed array signals are shown to be excellent in reflecting the defect location as well as variations of defect depth and length within the array probe.

  8. A general melt-injection-decomposition route to oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dongqiang; Zhang, Xinwei; Hua, Zhenghe; Yang, Shaoguang, E-mail: sgyang@nju.edu.cn

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • A general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route is proposed for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. • Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire arrays have been realized as examples through the developed MID route. • The mechanism of the developed MID route is discussed using Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis technique. • The MID route is a versatile, simple, facile and effective way to prepare different kinds of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays in the future. - Abstract: In this manuscript, a general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route has been proposed and realized for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Nitrate was used as the starting materials, which was injected into the nanopores of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane through the capillarity action in its liquid state. At higher temperature, the nitrate decomposed into corresponding metal oxide within the nanopores of the AAO membrane. Oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays were formed within the AAO membrane as a result of the confinement of the nanopores. Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire arrays are presented here as examples fabricated by this newly developed process. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed clear evidence of the formations of the oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanowire arrays is discussed based on the Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis measurement results.

  9. A general melt-injection-decomposition route to oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dongqiang; Zhang, Xinwei; Hua, Zhenghe; Yang, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route is proposed for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. • Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn_2O_3, Co_3O_4 and Cr_2O_3) nanowire arrays have been realized as examples through the developed MID route. • The mechanism of the developed MID route is discussed using Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis technique. • The MID route is a versatile, simple, facile and effective way to prepare different kinds of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays in the future. - Abstract: In this manuscript, a general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route has been proposed and realized for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Nitrate was used as the starting materials, which was injected into the nanopores of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane through the capillarity action in its liquid state. At higher temperature, the nitrate decomposed into corresponding metal oxide within the nanopores of the AAO membrane. Oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays were formed within the AAO membrane as a result of the confinement of the nanopores. Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn_2O_3, Co_3O_4 and Cr_2O_3) nanowire arrays are presented here as examples fabricated by this newly developed process. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed clear evidence of the formations of the oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanowire arrays is discussed based on the Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis measurement results.

  10. Determination of Focal Laws for Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing of Dissimilar Metal Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Ye; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Song, Myung Ho; Kang, Suk Chull; Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Kyung Cho

    2008-01-01

    Inspection of dissimilar metal welds using phased array ultrasound is not easy at all, because crystalline structure of dissimilar metal welds cause deviation and splitting of the ultrasonic beams. Thus, in order to have focusing and/or steering phased array beams in dissimilar metal welds, proper time delays should be determined by ray tracing. In this paper, we proposed an effective approach to solve this difficult problem. Specifically, we modify the Oglivy's model parameters to describe the crystalline structure of real dissimilar metal welds in a fabricated specimen. And then, we calculate the proper time delay and incident angle of linear phased array transducer in the anisotropic and inhomogeneous material for focusing and/or steering phased array ultrasonic beams on the desired position

  11. Proceedings of the flat-plate solar array project research forum on photovoltaic metallization systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-11-15

    A Photovoltaic Metallization Research Forum, under the sponsorship of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Flat-Plate Solar Array Project and the US Department of Energy, was held March 16-18, 1983 at Pine Mountain, Georgia. The Forum consisted of five sessions, covering (1) the current status of metallization systems, (2) system design, (3) thick-film metallization, (4) advanced techniques and (5) future metallization challenges. Twenty-three papers were presented.

  12. Laser-drilled micro-hole arrays on polyurethane synthetic leather for improvement of water vapor permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.; Wang, A.H.; Zheng, R.R.; Tang, H.Q.; Qi, X.Y.; Ye, B.

    2014-01-01

    Three kinds of lasers at 1064, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths respectively were adopted to construct micro-hole arrays on polyurethane (PU) synthetic leather with an aim to improve water vapor permeability (WVP) of PU synthetic leather. The morphology of the laser-drilled micro-holes was observed to optimize laser parameters. The WVP and slit tear resistance of the laser-drilled leather were measured. Results show that the optimized pulse energy for the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers are 0.8, 1.1 and 0.26 mJ, respectively. The diameters of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized laser pulse energy were about 20, 15 and 10 μm, respectively. The depths of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized pulse energy were about 21, 60 and 69 μm, respectively. Compared with the untreated samples, the highest WVP growth ratio was 38.4%, 46.8% and 53.5% achieved by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. And the highest decreasing ratio of slit tear resistance was 11.1%, 14.8%, and 22.5% treated by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Analysis of the interaction mechanism between laser beams at three kinds of laser wavelengths and the PU synthetic leather revealed that laser micro-drilling at 355 nm wavelength displayed both photochemical ablation and photothermal ablation, while laser micro-drilling at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths leaded to photothermal ablation only.

  13. Laser-drilled micro-hole arrays on polyurethane synthetic leather for improvement of water vapor permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Wang, A. H.; Zheng, R. R.; Tang, H. Q.; Qi, X. Y.; Ye, B.

    2014-06-01

    Three kinds of lasers at 1064, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths respectively were adopted to construct micro-hole arrays on polyurethane (PU) synthetic leather with an aim to improve water vapor permeability (WVP) of PU synthetic leather. The morphology of the laser-drilled micro-holes was observed to optimize laser parameters. The WVP and slit tear resistance of the laser-drilled leather were measured. Results show that the optimized pulse energy for the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers are 0.8, 1.1 and 0.26 mJ, respectively. The diameters of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized laser pulse energy were about 20, 15 and 10 μm, respectively. The depths of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized pulse energy were about 21, 60 and 69 μm, respectively. Compared with the untreated samples, the highest WVP growth ratio was 38.4%, 46.8% and 53.5% achieved by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. And the highest decreasing ratio of slit tear resistance was 11.1%, 14.8%, and 22.5% treated by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Analysis of the interaction mechanism between laser beams at three kinds of laser wavelengths and the PU synthetic leather revealed that laser micro-drilling at 355 nm wavelength displayed both photochemical ablation and photothermal ablation, while laser micro-drilling at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths leaded to photothermal ablation only.

  14. The effects of electron-hole separation on the photoconductivity of individual metal oxide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prades, J D; Hernandez-Ramirez, F; Jimenez-Diaz, R; Manzanares, M; Andreu, T; Cirera, A; Romano-Rodriguez, A; Morante, J R

    2008-01-01

    The responses of individual ZnO nanowires to UV light demonstrate that the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) state is directly related to the electron-hole separation near the surface. Our results demonstrate that the electrical transport in these nanomaterials is influenced by the surface in two different ways. On the one hand, the effective mobility and the density of free carriers are determined by recombination mechanisms assisted by the oxidizing molecules in air. This phenomenon can also be blocked by surface passivation. On the other hand, the surface built-in potential separates the photogenerated electron-hole pairs and accumulates holes at the surface. After illumination, the charge separation makes the electron-hole recombination difficult and originates PPC. This effect is quickly reverted after increasing either the probing current (self-heating by Joule dissipation) or the oxygen content in air (favouring the surface recombination mechanisms). The model for PPC in individual nanowires presented here illustrates the intrinsic potential of metal oxide nanowires to develop optoelectronic devices or optochemical sensors with better and new performances.

  15. Chemical hole doping into large-area transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers using boron-based oxidant

    KAUST Repository

    Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Kanahashi, Kaito; Tanaka, Naoki; Shoji, Yoshiaki; Li, Lain-Jong; Pu, Jiang; Ito, Hiroshi; Ohta, Hiromichi; Fukushima, Takanori; Takenobu, Taishi

    2018-01-01

    Hole carrier doping into single-crystalline transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) films can be achieved with various chemical reagents. However, large-area polycrystalline TMDC monolayers produced by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth method have yet to be chemically doped. Here, we report that a salt of a two-coordinate boron cation, Mes2B+ (Mes: 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl group), with a chemically stable tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate anion, [(C6F5)4B]−, can serve as an efficient hole-doping reagent for large-area CVD-grown tungsten diselenide (WSe2) films. Upon doping, the sheet resistance of large-area polycrystalline WSe2 monolayers decreased from 90 GΩ/sq to 3.2 kΩ/sq.

  16. Chemical hole doping into large-area transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers using boron-based oxidant

    KAUST Repository

    Matsuoka, Hirofumi

    2018-01-18

    Hole carrier doping into single-crystalline transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) films can be achieved with various chemical reagents. However, large-area polycrystalline TMDC monolayers produced by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth method have yet to be chemically doped. Here, we report that a salt of a two-coordinate boron cation, Mes2B+ (Mes: 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl group), with a chemically stable tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate anion, [(C6F5)4B]−, can serve as an efficient hole-doping reagent for large-area CVD-grown tungsten diselenide (WSe2) films. Upon doping, the sheet resistance of large-area polycrystalline WSe2 monolayers decreased from 90 GΩ/sq to 3.2 kΩ/sq.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured metallic arrays with multi-shapes in monolayer and bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Shaoli, E-mail: slzhu@ntu.edu.s [Nanyang Technological University, School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering (Singapore); Fu Yongqi [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, School of Physical Electronics (China)

    2010-06-15

    Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured metallic arrays with different shapes in monolayer and bilayer were presented in this article. Nano-rhombic, nano-hexagon, and nano-column metallic arrays with the tunable shapes and in-plane dimensions were fabricated by means of vertical reactive ion etching and nanosphere lithography. The nanosize range of nanoparticles is from 50 to 300 nm. Optical characterization of these arrays was performed experimentally by spectroscopy. Specifically, we compared spectra width at site of full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the measured extinction spectra in the visible range to that of the traditional hexagonal-arranged triangular nanoparticles. The results show that the combination of vertical reactive ion etching and nanosphere lithography approach yields as tunable masks and provides an easy way for a flexible nanofabrication. These metallic arrays have narrower FWHM of the spectra which makes them potential applications in biosensors, data storage, and bioreactors.

  18. Enhanced water collection through a periodic array of tiny holes in dropwise condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Gyeonghee; Oh, Sunjong; Lim, Hyuneui

    2018-02-01

    This paper introduces a simple method of water collection by increasing the coalescence effects in dropwise condensation with the use of microscale holes. The tiny holes modified the surface free energy states of the droplets on the plate, yielding a surface free energy barrier between the flat solid surface and the holes. The spatial difference in the surface free energy of the droplets enabled the droplets to move toward the adjacent droplets, thus increasing the possibility of coalescence. The water collection experiments were performed using a Peltier-based cooling system at 2 °C inside a chamber at 30 °C and 70% humidity. The results demonstrated that the perforated plates without any additional treatment provided the water collection rate of up to 22.64 L/m2 day, which shows an increase of 30% compared to that demonstrated by the bare plate. By comparing the experimental results for the surface of filmwise condensation, it was proved that the dominant water collecting improvement results from the increased coalescence effects. This simple technique can enhance the performance of systems exposed to water condensation, including water collection, heat-transfer, and dehumidifying systems.

  19. A general melt-injection-decomposition route to oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongqiang; Zhang, Xinwei; Hua, Zhenghe; Yang, Shaoguang

    2016-12-01

    In this manuscript, a general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route has been proposed and realized for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Nitrate was used as the starting materials, which was injected into the nanopores of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane through the capillarity action in its liquid state. At higher temperature, the nitrate decomposed into corresponding metal oxide within the nanopores of the AAO membrane. Oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays were formed within the AAO membrane as a result of the confinement of the nanopores. Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn2O3, Co3O4 and Cr2O3) nanowire arrays are presented here as examples fabricated by this newly developed process. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed clear evidence of the formations of the oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanowire arrays is discussed based on the Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis measurement results.

  20. Crosstalk in a KID Array Caused by the Thickness Variation of Superconducting Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adane, A.; Boucher, C.; Coiffard, G.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Goupy, J.; Calvo, M.; Hoarau, C.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-07-01

    The work presented in this paper is focused on the improvement of the kinetic detectors used on NIKA2 instrument (New IRAM KID array 2). Based on the simulation and low temperature measurements, it aims at showing how the variations of the superconducting metal corrupt the frequency comb of the kinetic Inductance detectors (KID) in the frequency range (between 1 and 3 GHz), i.e., how the superconducting metal inhomogeneity induces the resonance-to-resonance cross-coupling which deteriorates the homogeneity of the resonance quality factor and the frequency resonance separation. Solutions are then proposed to fight against the effect of these metallic variations when designing the KID array.

  1. A grating coupler with a trapezoidal hole array for perfectly vertical light coupling between optical fibers and waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Akio; Eto, Yohei; Kikuta, Hisao

    2017-12-01

    A grating coupler with a trapezoidal hole array was designed and fabricated for perfectly vertical light coupling between a single-mode optical fiber and a silicon waveguide on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. The grating coupler with an efficiency of 53% was computationally designed at a 1.1-µm-thick buried oxide (BOX) layer. The grating coupler and silicon waveguide were fabricated on the SOI substrate with a 3.0-µm-thick BOX layer by a single full-etch process. The measured coupling efficiency was 24% for TE-polarized light at 1528 nm wavelength, which was 0.69 times of the calculated coupling efficiency for the 3.0-µm-thick BOX layer.

  2. Metal-support interactions in electrocatalysis: Hydrogen effects on electron and hole transport at metal-support contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of hydrogen on electron and hole transport at metal support contacts during electrocatalysis. When hydrogen dissolves in high work function metals such as Pt, Rh or Ru the contact forms between the semiconductor and the hydrogenated metal, which has a work function that is lower than that of the pure metal. Thus by changing the gaseous atmosphere that envelopes metal-substrate contacts, it is possible to reversibly change their diode characteristics. In some cases, such as Pt on n-TiO/sub 2/, Rh on n-TiO/sub 2/ and Ru on n-TiO/sub 2/, it is even possible to reversibly convert Schottky diodes into ohmic contacts by changing the atmosphere from air to hydrogen. In contacts between hydrogen dissolving group VIII metals and semiconducting substrates, one can test for interfacial reaction of the catalysts and the substrate by examining the electrical characteristics of the contacts in air (oxygen) and in hydrogen. In the absence of interfacial reaction, large hydrogen induced variation in the barrier heights is observed and the hydrogenated contacts, approach ideality (i.e. their non-ideality factor is close to unity). When a group VIII metal and a substrate do react, the reaction often produces a phase that blocks hydrogen transport to the interface between the substrate and the reaction product. In this case the hydrogen effect is reduced or absent. Furthermore, because such reaction often introduces defects into the surface of the semiconductor, the contacts have non-ideal diode characteristics

  3. Hole polaron-polaron interaction in transition metal oxides and its limit to p-type doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiyou; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2014-03-01

    Traditionally the origin of the poor p-type conductivity in some transition metal oxides (TMOs) was attributed to the limited hole concentration: the charge-compensating donor defects, such as oxygen vacancies and cation interstitials, can form spontaneously as the Fermi energy shifts down to near the valence band maximum. Besides the thermodynamic limit to the hole concentration, the limit to the hole mobility can be another possible reason, e.g., the hole carrier can form self-trapped polarons with very low carrier mobility. Although isolated hole polarons had been found in some TMOs, the polaron-polaron interaction is not well-studied. Here we show that in TMOs such as TiO2 and V2O5, the hole polarons prefer to bind with each other to form bipolarons, which are more stable than free hole carriers or separated polarons. This pushes the hole states upward into the conduction band and traps the holes. The rise of the Fermi energy suppresses the spontaneous formation of the charge-compensating donor defects, so the conventional mechanism becomes ineffective. Since it can happen in the impurity-free TMO lattices, independent of any extrinsic dopant, it acts as an intrinsic and general limit to the p-type conductivity in these TMOs. This material is based upon work performed by the JCAP, a US DOE Energy Innovation Hub, the NSFC (No. 61106087 and 91233121) and special funds for major state basic research (No. 2012CB921401).

  4. Plasmonic nanoparticle lithography: Fast resist-free laser technique for large-scale sub-50 nm hole array fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenying; Yu, Ye Feng; Valuckas, Vytautas; Yap, Sherry L. K.; Vienne, Guillaume G.; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.

    2018-05-01

    Cheap large-scale fabrication of ordered nanostructures is important for multiple applications in photonics and biomedicine including optical filters, solar cells, plasmonic biosensors, and DNA sequencing. Existing methods are either expensive or have strict limitations on the feature size and fabrication complexity. Here, we present a laser-based technique, plasmonic nanoparticle lithography, which is capable of rapid fabrication of large-scale arrays of sub-50 nm holes on various substrates. It is based on near-field enhancement and melting induced under ordered arrays of plasmonic nanoparticles, which are brought into contact or in close proximity to a desired material and acting as optical near-field lenses. The nanoparticles are arranged in ordered patterns on a flexible substrate and can be attached and removed from the patterned sample surface. At optimized laser fluence, the nanohole patterning process does not create any observable changes to the nanoparticles and they have been applied multiple times as reusable near-field masks. This resist-free nanolithography technique provides a simple and cheap solution for large-scale nanofabrication.

  5. Near-unity transparency of a continuous metal film via cooperative effects of double plasmonic arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhengqi; Liu Guiqiang; Liu Xiaoshan; Huang Kuan; Chen Yuanhao; Fu Guolan; Zhou Haiqing

    2013-01-01

    Metal structures with high optical transparency and conductivity are of great importance for practical applications in optoelectronic devices. Here we investigate the transparency response of a continuous metal film sandwiched by double plasmonic nanoparticle arrays. The upper nanoparticle array shows efficient light trapping of the incident field, acting as a light input coupler, and the lower nanoparticle array shows a light release gate opening at the other side, acting as the light output coupler. The strong near-field light–matter interactions of the nano-scale separated plasmonic nanoparticles, the excitation of surface plasmon waves of the metal film, and their cooperative coupling effects result in broadband scattering cancellation and near-unity transparency (up to 96%) in the optical regime. The transparency response in such a structure can be efficiently modified by varying the gap distance of adjacent nanoparticles, dielectric environments, and the distance between the plasmonic array and the metal film. This motif may provide a new alternative approach to obtain transparent and highly conducting metal structures with potential applications in transparent conductors, plasmonic filters, and highly integrated light input and output components. (paper)

  6. Vortex lattice in effective type-I superconducting films with periodic arrays of submicron holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdiyorov, G.R.; Milosevic, M.V.; Peeters, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    The vortex matter and related phenomena in superconducting films with periodic arrays of microholes (antidots) are studied within the nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory. By varying the GL parameter κ, the vortex-vortex interaction is fine tuned, from repulsive to attractive behavior. This interaction is of crucial importance for equilibrium vortex structures, the saturation number of the antidots, and the related quantities, such as critical current. Due to vortex attraction in effectively type-I samples, the giant-vortex state becomes energetically favorable (contrary to the type-II behavior). For the same reason, the number of vortices which can be captured by antidots, increases with decreasing κ. As a result, for given magnetic field, the critical current is larger for effectively type-I superconductors than in conventional type-II cases

  7. Metallic nickel nanorod arrays embedded into ordered block copolymer templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifarth, O.; Krenek, R.; Tokarev, I.; Burkov, Y.; Sidorenko, A.; Minko, S.; Stamm, M.; Schmeisser, D.

    2007-01-01

    We report on metallic Nickel nanorods prepared by utilizing a mask of ordered nanostructured hollow channels in a block copolymer matrix. These polymeric templates were formed by a self organized process in block copolymer supramolecular assemblies. Nickel was filled into with two different techniques, electrodeposition and washing in. We monitor the formation process of these nanorods by means of atomic force microscopy and synchrotron radiation soft X-ray based photoelectron emission microscopy. The oxidation state of the nickelrods is evaluated with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at the Ni L edges and lateral distributions of the Ni nanorods were detected with micrometer resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The finding is that the Ni rods were metallic despite their preparation under ambient conditions, inside the particles no hints for NiO complexes were found. This indicates that the polymer protects Ni nanoparticles against oxidation

  8. Reproducible increased Mg incorporation and large hole concentration in GaN using metal modulated epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, Shawn D.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Namkoong, Gon; Look, David C.; Clafin, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The metal modulated epitaxy (MME) growth technique is reported as a reliable approach to obtain reproducible large hole concentrations in Mg-doped GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on c-plane sapphire substrates. An extremely Ga-rich flux was used, and modulated with the Mg source according to the MME growth technique. The shutter modulation approach of the MME technique allows optimal Mg surface coverage to build between MME cycles and Mg to incorporate at efficient levels in GaN films. The maximum sustained concentration of Mg obtained in GaN films using the MME technique was above 7x10 20 cm -3 , leading to a hole concentration as high as 4.5x10 18 cm -3 at room temperature, with a mobility of 1.1 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and a resistivity of 1.3 Ω cm. At 580 K, the corresponding values were 2.6x10 19 cm -3 , 1.2 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , and 0.21 Ω cm, respectively. Even under strong white light, the sample remained p-type with little change in the electrical parameters

  9. Reproducible increased Mg incorporation and large hole concentration in GaN using metal modulated epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Shawn D.; Namkoong, Gon; Look, David C.; Clafin, Bruce; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2008-07-01

    The metal modulated epitaxy (MME) growth technique is reported as a reliable approach to obtain reproducible large hole concentrations in Mg-doped GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on c-plane sapphire substrates. An extremely Ga-rich flux was used, and modulated with the Mg source according to the MME growth technique. The shutter modulation approach of the MME technique allows optimal Mg surface coverage to build between MME cycles and Mg to incorporate at efficient levels in GaN films. The maximum sustained concentration of Mg obtained in GaN films using the MME technique was above 7×1020cm-3, leading to a hole concentration as high as 4.5×1018cm-3 at room temperature, with a mobility of 1.1cm2V-1s-1 and a resistivity of 1.3Ωcm. At 580K, the corresponding values were 2.6×1019cm-3, 1.2cm2V-1s-1, and 0.21Ωcm, respectively. Even under strong white light, the sample remained p-type with little change in the electrical parameters.

  10. Stable field emission from arrays of vertically aligned free-standing metallic nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xavier, S.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Ferain, E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a fully elaborated process to grow arrays of metallic nanowires with controlled geometry and density, based on electrochemical filling of nanopores in track-etched templates. Nanowire growth is performed at room temperature, atmospheric pressure and is compatible with low cost...

  11. Growth of carbon nanocone arrays on a metal catalyst: The effect of carbon flux ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levchenko, I.; Khachan, J.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Ostrikov, K.

    2008-01-01

    The growth of carbon nanocone arrays on metal catalyst particles by deposition from a low-temperature plasma is studied by multiscale Monte Carlo/surface diffusion numerical simulation. It is demonstrated that the variation in the degree of ionization of the carbon flux provides an effective control of the growth kinetics of the carbon nanocones, and leads to the formation of more uniform arrays of nanostructures. In the case of zero degree of ionization (neutral gas process), a width of the distribution of nanocone heights reaches 360 nm with the nanocone mean height of 150 nm. When the carbon flux of 75% ionization is used, the width of the distribution of nanocone heights decreases to 100 nm, i.e., by a factor of 3.6. A higher degree of ionization leads to a better uniformity of the metal catalyst saturation and the nanocone growth, thus contributing to the formation of more height-uniform arrays of carbon nanostructures.

  12. Ground state oxygen holes and the metal-insulator transition in rare earth nickelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Thorsten; Bisogni, Valentina; Huang, Yaobo; Strocov, Vladimir [Research Department Synchrotron Radiation and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Catalano, Sara; Gibert, Marta; Scherwitzl, Raoul; Zubko, Pavlo; Triscone, Jean-Marc [Departement de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Green, Robert J.; Balandeh, Shadi; Sawatzky, George [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Perovskite rare-earth (Re) nickelates ReNiO{sub 3} continue to attract a lot of interest owing to their intriguing properties like a sharp metal to insulator transition (MIT), unusual magnetic order and expected superconductivity in specifically tuned super-lattices. Full understanding of these materials, however, is hampered by the difficulties in describing their electronic ground state (GS). From X-ray absorption (XAS) at the Ni 2p{sub 3/2} edge of thin films of NdNiO{sub 3} and corresponding RIXS maps vs. incident and transferred photon energies we reveal that the electronic GS configuration of NdNiO{sub 3} is composed of delocalized and localized components. Our study conveys that a Ni 3d{sup 8}-like configuration with holes at oxygen takes on the leading role in the GS and the MIT of ReNiO{sub 3} as proposed by recent model theories.

  13. Bond Formation in Diatomic Transition Metal Hydrides: Insights from the Analysis of Domain-Averaged Fermi Holes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cooper, D.L.; Ponec, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 2 (2013), s. 102-111 ISSN 0020-7608 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0118 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : transition metal hydrides * bond formation * analysis of domain averaged Fermi holes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.166, year: 2013

  14. Damage detection in multilayered fiber-metal laminates using guided-wave phased array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghsoodi, Ameneh; Ohadi, Abdolrezap; Sadighi, Mojtaba; Amindavar, Hamidreza [Amirkabir University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This study employs the Lamb wave method to detect damage in Fiber-metal laminates (FMLs). The method is based on quasiisotropic behavior approximation and beam forming techniques. Delay and sum and minimum variance distorsionless response beam formers are applied to a uniform linear phased array. The simulation in finite element software is conducted to evaluate the performance of the presented procedure. The two types of damage studied are the following: (1) Delamination between fiber-epoxy and metal layers and (2) crack on the metal layer. The present study has the following important contributions: (1) Health monitoring of multi-damaged FMLs using Lamb waves and beam forming technique, (2) detection of damage type, (3) detection of damage size by 1D phased array, and (4) identification of damages that occurred very close to the laminate edges or close to each other.

  15. 3D highly oriented nanoparticulate and microparticulate array of metal oxide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vayssieres, Lionel; Guo, Jinghua; Nordgren, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Advanced nano and micro particulate thin films of 3d transition and post-transition metal oxides consisting of nanorods and microrods with parallel and perpendicular orientation with respect to the substrate normal, have been successfully grown onto various substrates by heteronucleation, without template and/or surfactant, from the aqueous condensation of solution of metal salts or metal complexes (aqueous chemical growth). Three-dimensional arrays of iron oxide nanorods and zinc oxide nanorods with parallel and perpendicular orientation are presented as well as the oxygen K-edge polarization dependent x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) study of anisotropic perpendicularly oriented microrod array of ZnO performed at synchrotron radiation source facility

  16. The effect of holes in the dispersion relation of propagative surface plasmon modes of nanoperforated semitransparent metallic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kekesi, R., E-mail: renata.kekesi@csic.es; Meneses-Rodríguez, D.; García-Pérez, F.; González, M. U.; García-Martín, A.; Cebollada, A.; Armelles, G., E-mail: gaspar@imm.cnm.csic.es [IMM-Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM, E-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-07

    We have analysed the effect that holes have on the properties of propagative surface plasmon modes in semitransparent nanoperforated Au films. The modes have been excited in Kretschmann configuration. Contrary to continuous films, where only one mode is excited, two modes are observed in Au nanohole array. The origin of this different behavior is discussed using effective optical properties for the nanoperforated films. The presence of the holes affects the effective optical constants of the membranes in two ways: it changes the contribution of the free electrons, and it gives rise to a localized transition due to a hole induced plasmon resonance. This localized transition interacts with the propagative surface plasmon modes, originating the two detected modes.

  17. The effect of holes in the dispersion relation of propagative surface plasmon modes of nanoperforated semitransparent metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kekesi, R.; Meneses-Rodríguez, D.; García-Pérez, F.; González, M. U.; García-Martín, A.; Cebollada, A.; Armelles, G.

    2014-01-01

    We have analysed the effect that holes have on the properties of propagative surface plasmon modes in semitransparent nanoperforated Au films. The modes have been excited in Kretschmann configuration. Contrary to continuous films, where only one mode is excited, two modes are observed in Au nanohole array. The origin of this different behavior is discussed using effective optical properties for the nanoperforated films. The presence of the holes affects the effective optical constants of the membranes in two ways: it changes the contribution of the free electrons, and it gives rise to a localized transition due to a hole induced plasmon resonance. This localized transition interacts with the propagative surface plasmon modes, originating the two detected modes.

  18. Radiation-Induced Correlation between Molecules Nearby Metallic Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Osaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate optical absorption of molecules embedded nearby metallic antennas by using discrete dipole approximation method. It is found that the spectral peak of the absorption is shifted due to the radiation-induced correlation between the molecules. The most distinguishing feature of our work is to show that the shift is largely enhanced even when the individual molecules couple with localized surface plasmons near the different antennas. Specifically, we first consider the case that two sets of dimeric gold blocks with a spacing of a few nanometers are arranged and reveal that the intensity and spectral peak of the optical absorption strongly depend on the position of the molecules. In addition, when the dimeric blocks and the molecules are periodically arranged, the peak shift is found to increase up to ~1.2 meV (300 GHz. Because the radiation-induced correlation is essential for collective photon emission, our result implies the possibility of plasmon-assisted superfluorescence in designed antenna-molecule complex systems.

  19. Multifractal metal in a disordered Josephson junctions array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, M.; Kravtsov, V. E.; Altshuler, B. L.; Ioffe, L. B.

    2017-12-01

    We report the results of the numerical study of the nondissipative quantum Josephson junction chain with the focus on the statistics of many-body wave functions and local energy spectra. The disorder in this chain is due to the random offset charges. This chain is one of the simplest physical systems to study many-body localization. We show that the system may exhibit three distinct regimes: insulating, characterized by the full localization of many-body wave functions, a fully delocalized (metallic) one characterized by the wave functions that take all the available phase volume, and the intermediate regime in which the volume taken by the wave function scales as a nontrivial power of the full Hilbert-space volume. In the intermediate nonergodic regime the Thouless conductance (generalized to the many-body problem) does not change as a function of the chain length indicating a failure of the conventional single-parameter scaling theory of localization transition. The local spectra in this regime display the fractal structure in the energy space which is related with the fractal structure of wave functions in the Hilbert space. A simple theory of fractality of local spectra is proposed, and a scaling relationship between fractal dimensions in the Hilbert and energy spaces is suggested and numerically tested.

  20. Bilayer–metal assisted chemical etching of silicon microwire arrays for photovoltaic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Silicon microwires with lateral dimension from 5 μm to 20 μm and depth as long as 20 μm are prepared by bilayer metal assisted chemical etching (MaCE. A bilayer metal configuration (Metal 1 / Metal 2 was applied to assist etching of Si where metal 1 acts as direct catalyst and metal 2 provides mechanical support. Different metal types were investigated to figure out the influence of metal catalyst on morphology of etched silicon. We find that silicon microwires with vertical side wall are produced when we use Ag/Au bilayer, while cone–like and porous microwires formed when Pt/Au is applied. The different micro-/nano-structures in as-etched silicon are demonstrated to be due to the discrepancy of work function of metal catalyst relative to Si. Further, we constructed a silicon microwire arrays solar cells in a radial p–n junction configurations in a screen printed aluminum paste p–doping process.

  1. Metal modulation epitaxy growth for extremely high hole concentrations above 1019 cm-3 in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, Gon; Trybus, Elaissa; Lee, Kyung Keun; Moseley, Michael; Doolittle, W. Alan; Look, David C.

    2008-10-01

    The free hole carriers in GaN have been limited to concentrations in the low 1018cm-3 range due to the deep activation energy, lower solubility, and compensation from defects, therefore, limiting doping efficiency to about 1%. Herein, we report an enhanced doping efficiency up to ˜10% in GaN by a periodic doping, metal modulation epitaxy growth technique. The hole concentrations grown by periodically modulating Ga atoms and Mg dopants were over ˜1.5×1019cm-3.

  2. Metal modulation epitaxy growth for extremely high hole concentrations above 1019 cm-3 in GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namkoong, Gon; Trybus, Elaissa; Lee, Kyung Keun; Moseley, Michael; Doolittle, W. Alan; Look, David C.

    2008-01-01

    The free hole carriers in GaN have been limited to concentrations in the low 10 18 cm -3 range due to the deep activation energy, lower solubility, and compensation from defects, therefore, limiting doping efficiency to about 1%. Herein, we report an enhanced doping efficiency up to ∼10% in GaN by a periodic doping, metal modulation epitaxy growth technique. The hole concentrations grown by periodically modulating Ga atoms and Mg dopants were over ∼1.5x10 19 cm -3

  3. Extracting and focusing of surface plasmon polaritons inside finite asymmetric metal/insulator/metal structure at apex of optical fiber by subwavelength holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikane, Yasushi; Murai, Kensuke; Nakano, Motohiro

    2013-09-01

    We have been studied a finite asymmetric metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure on glass plate for near-future visible light communication (VLC) system with white LED illuminations in the living space (DOI: 10.1117/12.929201). The metal layers are vacuum-evaporated thin silver (Ag) films (around 50 nm and 200 nm, respectively), and the insulator layer (around 150 nm) is composed of magnesium fluoride (MgF2). A characteristic narrow band filtering of the MIM structure at visible region might cause a confinement of intense surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at specific monochromatic frequency inside a subwavelength insulator layer of the MIM structure. Central wavelength and depth of such absorption dip in flat spectral reflectance curve is controlled by changing thicknesses of both insulator and thinner metal layers. On the other hand, we have proposed a twin-hole pass-through wave guide for SPPs in thick Ag film (DOI: 10.1117/12.863587). At that time, the twin-hole converted a incoming plane light wave into a pair of channel plasmon polaritons (CPPs), and united them at rear surface of the Ag film. This research is having an eye to extract, guide, and focus the SPPs through a thicker metal layer of the MIM with FIBed subwavelength pass-through holes. The expected outcome is a creation of noble, monochromatic, and tunable fiber probe for scanning near-field optical microscopes (SNOMs) with intense white light sources. Basic experimental and FEM simulation results will be presented.

  4. Introducing nanoresonators into a metal–dielectric–metal waveguide array to allow beam manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Gaige; Xu, Linhua; Chen, Yunyun; Wu, Yigen; Liu, Yuzhu

    2013-01-01

    Stub and circular ring-shaped plasmonic resonators are introduced into a metal–dielectric–metal (MDM) waveguide array to allow light transmission control. Light focusing and splitting effects are verified by the finite difference time domain method; the simulation results reveal that the resonators can be used for modulating the superposition phase of the interference between the surface plasmon wave (SPW) from the end of the resonator and the passing SPW in the waveguide array. Furthermore, a structure utilizing a stub cavity with nonlinear material to control the phase of the transmitted SPW is proposed; the deflection angle of the light can be controlled by means of the intensity of the incident light. The proposed MDM waveguide array with plasmonic resonators, with its compact size, ease of integration, and high output, certainly has potential for application in nanophotonic circuits. (paper)

  5. Assembly of metallic nanoparticle arrays on glass via nanoimprinting and thin-film dewetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Kyu Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a nanofabrication process to generate large-area arrays of noble metal nanoparticles on glass substrates via nanoimprinting and dewetting of metallic thin films. Glass templates were made via pattern transfer from a topographic Si mold to an inorganically cross-linked sol–gel (IGSG resist on glass using a two-layer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS stamp followed by annealing, which turned the imprinted resist into pure silica. The transparent, topographic glass successfully templated the assembly of Au and Ag nanoparticle arrays via thin-film deposition and dewetting at elevated temperatures. The microstructural and mechanical characteristics that developed during the processes were discussed. The results are promising for low-cost mass fabrication of devices for several photonic applications.

  6. Assembly of metallic nanoparticle arrays on glass via nanoimprinting and thin-film dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Kyu; Hwang, Sori; Kim, Yoon-Kee; Oh, Yong-Jun

    2017-01-01

    We propose a nanofabrication process to generate large-area arrays of noble metal nanoparticles on glass substrates via nanoimprinting and dewetting of metallic thin films. Glass templates were made via pattern transfer from a topographic Si mold to an inorganically cross-linked sol-gel (IGSG) resist on glass using a two-layer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp followed by annealing, which turned the imprinted resist into pure silica. The transparent, topographic glass successfully templated the assembly of Au and Ag nanoparticle arrays via thin-film deposition and dewetting at elevated temperatures. The microstructural and mechanical characteristics that developed during the processes were discussed. The results are promising for low-cost mass fabrication of devices for several photonic applications.

  7. Anomalous refraction of light through slanted-nanoaperture arrays on metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myungji; Jung, Yun Suk; Xi, Yonggang; Kim, Hong Koo

    2015-01-01

    We report a nanoapertured metal surface that demonstrates anomalous refraction of light for a wide range of incident angles. A nanoslit aperture is designed to serve as a tilted vertical-dipole whose radiation pattern orients to a glancing angle direction to substrate. An array of such slanted nanoslits formed in a metal film redirects an incident beam into the direction of negative refraction angle: the aperture-transmitted wave makes a far-field propagation to the tilt-oriented direction of radiation pattern. The thus-designed nanoaperture array demonstrates the −1st order diffraction (i.e., to the negative refraction-angle direction) with well-suppressed background transmission (the zero-order direct transmission and other higher-order diffractions). Engineering the radiation pattern of nanoaperture offers an approach to overcoming the limits of conventional diffractive/refractive optics and complementing metasurface-based nano-optics

  8. Light polarization management via reflection from arrays of sub-wavelength metallic twisted bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, M.; Haberko, J.; Zinkiewicz, Ł.; Wasylczyk, P.

    2017-12-01

    With constant progress of nano- and microfabrication technologies, photolithography in particular, a number of sub-wavelength metallic structures have been demonstrated that can be used to manipulate light polarization. Numerical simulations of light propagation hint that helical twisted bands can have interesting polarization properties. We use three-dimensional two-photon photolithography (direct laser writing) to fabricate a few-micrometer-thick arrays of twisted bands and coat them uniformly with metal. We demonstrate that circular polarization can be generated from linear polarization upon reflection from such structures over a broad range of frequencies in the mid infrared.

  9. Gold nanodisc arrays as near infrared metal-enhanced fluorescence platforms with tuneable enhancement factors

    KAUST Repository

    Pang, J.; Theodorou, I. G.; Centeno, A.; Petrov, P. K.; Alford, N. M.; Ryan, M. P.; Xie, F.

    2016-01-01

    Metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) is a physical effect through which the near-field interaction of fluorophores with metallic nanoparticles can lead to large fluorescence enhancement. MEF can be exploited in many fluorescence-based biomedical applications, with potentially significant improvement in detection sensitivity and contrast enhancement. Offering lower autofluorescence and minimal photoinduced damage, the development of effective and multifunctional MEF platforms in the near-infrared (NIR) region, is particularly desirable. In this work, the enhancement of NIR fluorescence caused by interaction with regular arrays of cylindrical gold (Au) nanoparticles (nanodiscs), fabricated through nanosphere lithography, is reported. Significant MEF of up to 235 times is obtained, with tuneable enhancement factors. The effect of array structure on fluorescence enhancement is investigated by semi-quantitatively de-convoluting excitation enhancement from emission enhancement, and modelling the local electric field enhancement. By considering arrays of Au nanodiscs with the same extinction maximum, it is shown that the excitation enhancement, due to increased electric field, is not significantly different for the particle sizes and separation distances considered. Rather, it is seen that the emission from the fluorophore is strongly enhanced, and is dependent on the topography, in particular particle size. The results show that the structural characteristics of Au nanodisc arrays can be manipulated to tune their enhancement factor, and hence their sensitivity.

  10. Gold nanodisc arrays as near infrared metal-enhanced fluorescence platforms with tuneable enhancement factors

    KAUST Repository

    Pang, J.

    2016-12-28

    Metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) is a physical effect through which the near-field interaction of fluorophores with metallic nanoparticles can lead to large fluorescence enhancement. MEF can be exploited in many fluorescence-based biomedical applications, with potentially significant improvement in detection sensitivity and contrast enhancement. Offering lower autofluorescence and minimal photoinduced damage, the development of effective and multifunctional MEF platforms in the near-infrared (NIR) region, is particularly desirable. In this work, the enhancement of NIR fluorescence caused by interaction with regular arrays of cylindrical gold (Au) nanoparticles (nanodiscs), fabricated through nanosphere lithography, is reported. Significant MEF of up to 235 times is obtained, with tuneable enhancement factors. The effect of array structure on fluorescence enhancement is investigated by semi-quantitatively de-convoluting excitation enhancement from emission enhancement, and modelling the local electric field enhancement. By considering arrays of Au nanodiscs with the same extinction maximum, it is shown that the excitation enhancement, due to increased electric field, is not significantly different for the particle sizes and separation distances considered. Rather, it is seen that the emission from the fluorophore is strongly enhanced, and is dependent on the topography, in particular particle size. The results show that the structural characteristics of Au nanodisc arrays can be manipulated to tune their enhancement factor, and hence their sensitivity.

  11. Characteristics of a plasma flow field produced by a metal array bridge foil explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junying, WU; Long, WANG; Yase, LI; Lijun, YANG; Manzoor, SULTAN; Lang, CHEN

    2018-07-01

    To improve the energy utilization efficiency of metal bridge foil explosion, and increase the function range of plasmas, array bridge foil explosion experiments with different structures were performed. A Schlieren photographic measurement system with a double-pulse laser source was used to observe the flow field of a bridge foil explosion. The evolution laws of plasmas and shock waves generated by array bridge foil explosions of different structures were analyzed and compared. A multi-phase flow calculation model was established to simulate the electrical exploding process of a metal bridge foil. The plasma equation of state was determined by considering the effect of the changing number of particles and Coulomb interaction on the pressure and internal energy. The ionization degree of the plasma was calculated via the Saha–Eggert equation assuming conditions of local thermal equilibrium. The exploding process of array bridge foils was simulated, and the superposition processes of plasma beams were analyzed. The variation and distribution laws of the density, temperature, pressure, and other important parameters were obtained. The results show that the array bridge foil has a larger plasma jet diameter than the single bridge foil for an equal total area of the bridge foil. We also found that the temperature, pressure, and density of the plasma jet’s center region sharply increase because of the superposition of plasma beams.

  12. Pure Electric and Pure Magnetic Resonances in Near-Infrared Metal Double-Triangle Metamaterial Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhi-Shen; Pan Jian; Chen Zhuo; Zhan Peng; Min Nai-Ben; Wang Zhen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the optical properties of metamaterial arrays composed of double partially-overlapped metallic nanotriangles fabricated by an angle-resolved nanosphere lithography. We demonstrate that each double-triangle can be viewed as an artificial magnetic element analogous to the conventional metal split-ring-resonator. It is shown that under normal-incidence conditions, individual double-triangle can exhibit a strong local magnetic resonance, but the collective response of the metamaterial arrays is purely electric because magnetic resonances of the two double-triangles in a unit cell having opposite openings are out of phase. For oblique incidences the metamaterial arrays are shown to support a pure magnetic response at the same frequency band. Therefore, switchable electric and magnetic resonances are achieved in double-triangle arrays. Moreover, both the electric and magnetic resonances are shown to allow for a tunability over a large spectral range down to near-infrared. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  13. Metallic and highly conducting two-dimensional atomic arrays of sulfur enabled by molybdenum disulfide nanotemplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuze; Geng, Xiumei; Han, Yang; Benamara, Mourad; Chen, Liao; Li, Jingxiao; Bilgin, Ismail; Zhu, Hongli

    2017-10-01

    Element sulfur in nature is an insulating solid. While it has been tested that one-dimensional sulfur chain is metallic and conducting, the investigation on two-dimensional sulfur remains elusive. We report that molybdenum disulfide layers are able to serve as the nanotemplate to facilitate the formation of two-dimensional sulfur. Density functional theory calculations suggest that confined in-between layers of molybdenum disulfide, sulfur atoms are able to form two-dimensional triangular arrays that are highly metallic. As a result, these arrays contribute to the high conductivity and metallic phase of the hybrid structures of molybdenum disulfide layers and two-dimensional sulfur arrays. The experimentally measured conductivity of such hybrid structures reaches up to 223 S/m. Multiple experimental results, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transition electron microscope (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), agree with the computational insights. Due to the excellent conductivity, the current density is linearly proportional to the scan rate until 30,000 mV s-1 without the attendance of conductive additives. Using such hybrid structures as electrode, the two-electrode supercapacitor cells yield a power density of 106 Wh kg-1 and energy density 47.5 Wh kg-1 in ionic liquid electrolytes. Our findings offer new insights into using two-dimensional materials and their Van der Waals heterostructures as nanotemplates to pattern foreign atoms for unprecedented material properties.

  14. Simulation Based Investigation of Focusing Phased Array Ultrasound in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Hee Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Flaws at dissimilar metal welds (DMWs, such as reactor coolant systems components, Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM, Bottom Mounted Instrumentation (BMI etc., in nuclear power plants have been found. Notably, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC in the DMWs could cause significant reliability problems at nuclear power plants. Therefore, phased array ultrasound is widely used for inspecting surface break cracks and stress corrosion cracks in DMWs. However, inspection of DMWs using phased array ultrasound has a relatively low probability of detection of cracks, because the crystalline structure of welds causes distortion and splitting of the ultrasonic beams which propagates anisotropic medium. Therefore, advanced evaluation techniques of phased array ultrasound are needed for improvement in the probability of detection of flaws in DMWs. Thus, in this study, an investigation of focusing and steering phased array ultrasound in DMWs was carried out using a time reversal technique, and an adaptive focusing technique based on finite element method (FEM simulation. Also, evaluation of focusing performance of three different focusing techniques was performed by comparing amplitude of phased array ultrasonic signals scattered from the targeted flaw with three different time delays.

  15. Analysis of the current density characteristics in through-mask electrochemical micromachining (TMEMM for fabrication of micro-hole arrays on invar alloy film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-som JIN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Invar alloy consisting of 64% iron and 36% nickel has been widely used for the production of shadow masks for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs because of its low thermal expansion coefficient (1.86 × 10−6 cm/°C. To fabricate micro-hole arrays on 30 μm invar alloy film, through-mask electrochemical micromachining (TMEMM was developed and combined with a portion of the photolithography etching process. For precise hole shapes, patterned photoresist (PR film was applied as an insulating mask. To investigate the relationship between the current density and the material removal rate, the principle of the electrochemical machining was studied with a focus on the equation. The finite element method (FEM was used to verify the influence of each parameter on the current density on the invar alloy film surface. The parameters considered were the thickness of the PR mask, inter-electrode gap (IEG, and electrolyte concentration. Design of experiments (DOE was used to figure out the contribution of each parameter. A simulation was conducted with varying parameters to figure out their relationships with the current density. Optimization was conducted to select the suitable conditions. An experiment was carried out to verify the simulation results. It was possible to fabricate micro-hole arrays on invar alloy film using TMEMM, which is a promising method that can be applied to fabrications of OLEDs shadow masks.

  16. Spatially correlated two-dimensional arrays of semiconductor and metal quantum dots in GaAs-based heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevedomskiy, V. N.; Bert, N. A.; Chaldyshev, V. V.; Preobrazhernskiy, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    A single molecular-beam epitaxy process is used to produce GaAs-based heterostructures containing two-dimensional arrays of InAs semiconductor quantum dots and AsSb metal quantum dots. The twodimensional array of AsSb metal quantum dots is formed by low-temperature epitaxy which provides a large excess of arsenic in the epitaxial GaAs layer. During the growth of subsequent layers at a higher temperature, excess arsenic forms nanoinclusions, i.e., metal quantum dots in the GaAs matrix. The two-dimensional array of such metal quantum dots is created by the δ doping of a low-temperature GaAs layer with antimony which serves as a precursor for the heterogeneous nucleation of metal quantum dots and accumulates in them with the formation of AsSb metal alloy. The two-dimensional array of InAs semiconductor quantum dots is formed via the Stranski–Krastanov mechanism at the GaAs surface. Between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots, a 3-nm-thick AlAs barrier layer is grown. The total spacing between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots is 10 nm. Electron microscopy of the structure shows that the arrangement of metal quantum dots and semiconductor quantum dots in the two-dimensional arrays is spatially correlated. The spatial correlation is apparently caused by elastic strain and stress fields produced by both AsSb metal and InAs semiconductor quantum dots in the GaAs matrix

  17. Metal-modified and vertically aligned carbon nanotube sensors array for landfill gas monitoring applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penza, M; Rossi, R; Alvisi, M; Serra, E

    2010-03-12

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) layers were synthesized on Fe-coated low-cost alumina substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology. A miniaturized CNT-based gas sensor array was developed for monitoring landfill gas (LFG) at a temperature of 150 degrees C. The sensor array was composed of 4 sensing elements with unmodified CNT, and CNT loaded with 5 nm nominally thick sputtered nanoclusters of platinum (Pt), ruthenium (Ru) and silver (Ag). Chemical analysis of multicomponent gas mixtures constituted of CO(2), CH(4), H(2), NH(3), CO and NO(2) has been performed by the array sensor responses and pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA results demonstrate that the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor array is able to discriminate the NO(2) presence in the multicomponent mixture LFG. The NO(2) gas detection in the mixture LFG was proved to be very sensitive, e.g.: the CNT:Ru sensor shows a relative change in the resistance of 1.50% and 0.55% for NO(2) concentrations of 3.3 ppm and 330 ppb dispersed in the LFG, respectively, with a wide NO(2) gas concentration range measured from 0.33 to 3.3 ppm, at the sensor temperature of 150 degrees C. The morphology and structure of the CNT networks have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. A forest-like nanostructure of vertically aligned CNT bundles in the multi-walled form appeared with a height of about 10 microm and a single-tube diameter varying in the range of 5-35 nm. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectroscopy D-peak and G-peak indicates the presence of disorder and defects in the CNT networks. The size of the metal (Pt, Ru, Ag) nanoclusters decorating the CNT top surface varies in the range of 5-50 nm. Functional characterization based on electrical charge transfer sensing mechanisms in the metal-modified CNT-chemoresistor array

  18. Construction of 3D Metallic Nanowire Arrays on Arbitrarily-Shaped Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Li, Jingning; Yu, Fangfang; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu; Mu Wang Team

    Formation of three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures is an important step of advanced manufacture for new concept devices with novel functionality. Despite of great achievements in fabricating nanostructures with state of the art lithography approaches, these nanostructures are normally limited on flat substrates. Up to now it remains challenging to build metallic nanostructures directly on a rough and bumpy surface. Here we demonstrate a unique approach to fabricate metallic nanowire arrays on an arbitrarily-shaped surface by electrodeposition, which is unknown before 2016. Counterintuitively here the growth direction of the nanowires is perpendicular to their longitudinal axis, and the specific geometry of nanowires can be achieved by introducing specially designed shaped substrate. The spatial separation and the width of the nanowires can be tuned by voltage, electrolyte concentration and temperature in electrodeposition. By taking cobalt nanowire array as an example, we demonstrate that head-to-head and tail-to-tail magnetic domain walls can be easily introduced and modulated in the nanowire arrays, which is enlightening to construct new devices such as domain wall racetrack memory. We acknowledge the foundation from MOST and NSF(China).

  19. Phosphorization boosts the capacitance of mixed metal nanosheet arrays for high performance supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yingying; Zhao, Hongyang; Zong, Yan; Li, Xinghua; Sun, Yong; Feng, Juan; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xinliang; Du, Yaping

    2018-05-01

    Binary transition metal phosphides hold immense potential as innovative electrode materials for constructing high-performance energy storage devices. Herein, porous binary nickel-cobalt phosphide (NiCoP) nanosheet arrays anchored on nickel foam (NF) were rationally designed as self-supported binder-free electrodes with high supercapacitance performance. Taking the combined advantages of compositional features and array architectures, the nickel foam supported NiCoP nanosheet array (NiCoP@NF) electrode possesses superior electrochemical performance in comparison with Ni-Co LDH@NF and NiCoO2@NF electrodes. The NiCoP@NF electrode shows an ultrahigh specific capacitance of 2143 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 and retained 1615 F g-1 even at 20 A g-1, showing excellent rate performance. Furthermore, a binder-free all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor device is designed, which exhibits a high energy density of 27 W h kg-1 at a power density of 647 W kg-1. The hierarchical binary nickel-cobalt phosphide nanosheet arrays hold great promise as advanced electrode materials for supercapacitors with high electrochemical performance.

  20. Lung counting: Comparison of a four detector array that has either metal or carbon fiber end caps, and the effect on array performance characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbir Ahmed, Asm; Kramer, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    This study described the performance of an array of HPGe detectors, made by ORTEC. In the existing system, a metal end cap was used in the detector construction. In general, the natural metal contains some radioactive materials, create high background noises and signals during in vivo counting. ORTEC proposed a novel carbon fiber to be used in end cap, without any radio active content. This paper described the methodology of developing a model of the given HPGe array-detectors, comparing the detection efficiency and cross talk among the detectors using two end cap materials: either metal or carbon fiber and to provide a recommendation about the end cap material. The detector's counting efficiency were studied using point and plane sources. The cross talk among the array detectors were studied using a homogeneous attenuating medium made of tissue equivalent material. The cross talk was significant when single or multiple point sources (simulated to heterogeneous hot spots) were embedded inside the attenuating medium. With carbon fiber, the cross talk increased about 100% for photon energy at about 100 keV. For a uniform distribution of radioactive material, the cross talk increased about 5-10% when the end cap was made of carbon instead of steel. Metal end cap was recommended for the array of HPGe detectors.

  1. Extended lanthanide-transition metal arrays with cyanide bridges: syntheses, structures, and catalytic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shengming; Poplaukhin, Pavel; Ding Errun; Plecnik, Christine E.; Chen Xuenian; Keane, Mark A.; Shore, Sheldon G.

    2006-01-01

    Systematic synthetic procedures produced several different structural types of extended lanthanide-transition metal (group 10) complexes with cyanide bridges. Of these, one-dimensional ladder arrays containing a Yb-Pd combination have been converted to bimetallic heterogeneous catalysts on an oxide (SiO 2 ) surface that is more effective than supported Pd alone. Two lanthanide-Cu(I) complexes have been prepared. One type, an inclusion complex consists of lanthanide(III) cations encapsulated in the pockets of a three-dimensional anionic array that contains Cu(I)-CN-Cu(I) bridges. The second type, an extended layer complex, consists of joined five-membered rings in a 'tile-like' pattern with Ln-CN-Cu and Cu-CN-Cu bridges

  2. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Light Trapping in Metal/Silicon Nanobowl Arrays for Thin Film Photovoltaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruinan Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing the light absorption in thin film silicon solar cells with nanophotonic and plasmonic structures is important for the realization of high efficiency solar cells with significant cost reduction. In this work, we investigate periodic arrays of conformal metal/silicon nanobowl arrays (MSNBs for light trapping applications in silicon solar cells. They exhibited excellent light-harvesting ability across a wide range of wavelengths up to infrared regimes. The optimized structure (MSNBsH covered by SiO2 passivation layer and hemisphere Ag back reflection layer has a maximal short-circuit density (Jsc 25.5 mA/cm2, which is about 88.8% higher than flat structure counterpart, and the light-conversion efficiency (η is increased two times from 6.3% to 12.6%. The double-side textures offer a promising approach to high efficiency ultrathin silicon solar cells.

  3. Electrical characterization of Ω-gated uniaxial tensile strained Si nanowire-array metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors with - and channel orientations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habicht, Stefan; Feste, Sebastian; Zhao, Qing-Tai; Buca, Dan; Mantl, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Nanowire-array metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) were fabricated along and crystal directions on (001) un-/strained silicon-on-insulator substrates. Lateral strain relaxation through patterning was employed to transform biaxial tensile strain into uniaxial tensile strain along the nanowire. Devices feature ideal subthreshold swings and maximum on-current/off-current ratios of 10 11 for n and p-type transistors on both substrates. Electron and hole mobilities were extracted by split C–V method. For p-MOSFETs an increased mobility is observed for channel direction devices compared to devices. The n-MOSFETs showed a 45% increased electron mobility compared to devices. The comparison of strained and unstrained n-MOSFETs along and clearly demonstrates improved electron mobilities for strained channels of both channel orientations.

  4. Structural anomalies induced by the metal deposition methods in 2D silver nanoparticle arrays prepared by nanosphere lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shengli, E-mail: huangsl@xmu.edu.cn [Fujian Provincial Key Lab of Semiconductors and Applications, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang, Qianqian [Fujian Provincial Key Lab of Semiconductors and Applications, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, Chunjing; Kong, Lingqi; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong [Fujian Provincial Key Lab of Semiconductors and Applications, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Silver nanoparticle arrays with 2-dimensional hexagonal arrangement were fabricated on the silicon substrates by nanosphere lithography. The silver film was deposited either by thermal evaporation or by magnetron sputtering under different conditions. The nanostructures of the achieved sphere template and the array units were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and were found to be anomalous under different deposition parameters. Comparative study indicated that the formation of the various 2-dimensional silver nanoparticle array structures was dominated by the thermal energy (temperature), kinetic energy and deposition direction of the deposited metal atoms as well as the size and nanocurvature of the colloidal particles and the metal clusters. - Highlights: • Silver nanoparticle arrays with different nanostructures on silicon substrates. • Various deposition parameters in arrays formation systematically examined. • Possible mechanisms and optimization of nanostructures formation addressed.

  5. The fabrication of metal silicide nanodot arrays using localized ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jin; Kim, Tae-Gon; Min, Byung-Kwon; Lee, Sang Jo

    2010-01-01

    We propose a process for fabricating nanodot arrays with a pitch size of less than 25 nm. The process consists of localized ion implantation in a metal thin film on a Si wafer using a focused ion beam (FIB), followed by chemical etching. This process utilizes the etching resistivity changes of the ion beam irradiated region that result from metal silicide formation by ion implantation. To control the nanodot diameter, a threshold ion dose model is proposed using the Gaussian distribution of the ion beam intensities. The process is verified by fabricating nanodots with various diameters. The mechanism of etching resistivity is investigated via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES).

  6. A method for the formation of Pt metal nanoparticle arrays using nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owusu-Ansah, Ebenezer; Horwood, Corie A.; Birss, Viola I.; Shi, Yujun J., E-mail: shiy@ucalgary.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); El-Sayed, Hany A. [Institute for Technical Electrochemistry, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films, deposited on a dimpled Ta (DT) surface, has been studied here in order to form ordered Pt nanoparticle (NP) arrays. The DT substrate was fabricated via a simple electrochemical anodization process in a highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and HF solution. Pt thin films (3–5 nm) were sputter coated on DT and then dewetted under vacuum to generate NPs using a 355 nm laser radiation (6–9 ns, 10 Hz). The threshold laser fluence to fully dewet a 3.5 nm thick Pt film was determined to be 300 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our experiments have shown that shorter irradiation times (≤60 s) produce smaller nanoparticles with more uniform sizes, while longer times (>60 s) give large nanoparticles with wider size distributions. The optimum laser irradiation time of 1 s (10 pulses) has led to the formation of highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays with an average nanoparticle size of 26 ± 3 nm with no substrate deformation. At the optimum condition of 1 s and 500 mJ/cm{sup 2}, as many as 85% of the dewetted NPs were found neatly in the well-defined dimples. This work has demonstrated that pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films on a pre-patterned dimpled substrate is an efficient and powerful technique to produce highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays. This method can thus be used to produce arrays of other high-melting-point metal nanoparticles for a range of applications, including electrocatalysis, functionalized nanomaterials, and analytical purposes.

  7. In situ measurement of plasma and shock wave properties inside laser-drilled metal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajdic, Mihael; Hermans, Martin; Horn, Alexander; Kelbassa, Ingomar

    2008-10-01

    High-speed imaging of shock wave and plasma dynamics is a commonly used diagnostic method for monitoring processes during laser material treatment. It is used for processes such as laser ablation, cutting, keyhole welding and drilling. Diagnosis of laser drilling is typically adopted above the material surface because lateral process monitoring with optical diagnostic methods inside the laser-drilled hole is not possible due to the hole walls. A novel method is presented to investigate plasma and shock wave properties during the laser drilling inside a confined environment such as a laser-drilled hole. With a novel sample preparation and the use of high-speed imaging combined with spectroscopy, a time and spatial resolved monitoring of plasma and shock wave dynamics is realized. Optical emission of plasma and shock waves during drilling of stainless steel with ns-pulsed laser radiation is monitored and analysed. Spatial distributions and velocities of shock waves and of plasma are determined inside the holes. Spectroscopy is accomplished during the expansion of the plasma inside the drilled hole allowing for the determination of electron densities.

  8. High aspect ratio 10-nm-scale nanoaperture arrays with template-guided metal dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying Min; Lu, Liangxing; Srinivasan, Bharathi Madurai; Asbahi, Mohamed; Zhang, Yong Wei; Yang, Joel K W

    2015-04-10

    We introduce an approach to fabricate ordered arrays of 10-nm-scale silica-filled apertures in a metal film without etching or liftoff. Using low temperature (dewetting of metal films guided by nano-patterned templates, apertures with aspect ratios up to 5:1 are demonstrated. Apertures form spontaneously during the thermal process without need for further processing. Although the phenomenon of dewetting has been well studied, this is the first demonstration of its use in the fabrication of nanoapertures in a spatially controllable manner. In particular, the achievement of 10-nm length-scale patterning at high aspect ratio with thermal dewetting is unprecedented. By varying the nanotemplate design, we show its strong influence over the positions and sizes of the nanoapertures. In addition, we construct a three-dimensional phase field model of metal dewetting on nano-patterned substrates. The simulation data obtained closely corroborates our experimental results and reveals new insights to template dewetting at the nanoscale. Taken together, this fabrication method and simulation model form a complete toolbox for 10-nm-scale patterning using template-guided dewetting that could be extended to a wide range of material systems and geometries.

  9. Quantum spill-out in few-nanometer metal gaps: Effect on gap plasmons and reflectance from ultrasharp groove arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjølstrup, Enok Johannes Haahr; Søndergaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2018-01-01

    Plasmons in ultranarrow metal gaps are highly sensitive to the electron density profile at the metal surfaces. Using a quantum mechanical approach and assuming local response, we study the effects of electron spill-out on gap plasmons and reflectance from ultrasharp metal grooves.We demonstrate...... the reflectance from arrays of ultrasharp metal grooves. These findings are explained in terms of enhanced gap plasmon absorption taking place inside the gap 1–2 °A from the walls and delocalization near the groove bottom. Reflectance calculations taking spill-out into account are shown to be in much better...

  10. States and properties of metallic systems at a threshold breakdown of the through holes under power laser action (part 2. Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalashnikov E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Threshold breakdown of the through holes by power laser radiation of metallic foils is considered as response of metallic system to laser radiation. Binding experimentally determined response to the absolute temperature scale allows to determine the value of the imaginary part of the generalized susceptibility depending on temperature, the critical temperature of the transition “liquid metal - gas”, states of the electronic subsystems at this temperature, and the reflectance coefficient values.

  11. Optical pumping of a single hole spin in a p-doped quantum dot coupled to a metallic nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, M. A.; Carreño, F.; Melle, Sonia; Calderón, Oscar G.; Cabrera-Granado, E.; Singh, Mahi R.

    2013-05-01

    The preparation of quantum states with a defined spin is analyzed in a hybrid system consisting of a p-doped semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to a metallic nanoparticle. The quantum dot is described as a four-level atom-like system using the density matrix formalism. The lower levels are Zeeman-split hole spin states and the upper levels correspond to positively charged excitons containing a spin-up, spin-down hole pair and a spin electron. A metallic nanoparticle with spheroidal geometry is placed in close proximity to the quantum dot, and its effects are considered in the quasistatic approximation. A linearly polarized laser field drives two of the optical transitions of the QD and produces localized surface plasmons in the nanoparticle which act back upon the QD. The frequencies of these localized plasmons are very different along the two principal axes of the nanoparticle, thus producing an anisotropic modification of the spontaneous emission rates of the allowed optical transitions which is accompanied by local-field corrections. This effect translates into a preferential acceleration of some of the optical pathways and therefore into a fast initialization of the QD by excitation with a short optical pulse. The population transfer between the lower levels of the QD and the fidelity is analyzed as a function of the nanoparticle's aspect ratio, the external magnetic field, and the Rabi frequency of the driving field. It is also shown that the main effect of the local-field corrections is a lengthening of the time elapsed to reach the steady-state. The hole spin is predicted to be successfully cooled from 5 to 0.04 K at a magnetic field of 4.6 T applied in the Voigt geometry.

  12. Oxygen hole mechanism of superconductivity in cuprates and other metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, C.N.R.

    1989-01-01

    Several theoretical models have been proposed to explain high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates. An issue that is central to any model is the nature of copper and oxygen species in the cuprates since superconductivity clearly owes its origin to the Cu-O sheets universally present in all the cuprate families. Thus, the five families of cuprate superconductors, La 2 - x M x CuO 4 (M = Ca, Sr or Ba) of the K 2 NiF 4 structure, LnBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 - δ (Ln = Y or rare earth), Bi 2 (Ca, Sr) n + 1 Cu n O 2n + 4 , Tl 2 (Ca, Ba) n + 1 Cu n O 2n + 4 and Tl (Ca, Ba) n + 1 Cu n O 2n + 3 , all contain two-dimensional Cu-O sheets. The Cu-O chains additionally present in the 123 compounds do not seem to play any crucial role. It has been generally believed that magnetic, superconducting and related properties of cuprates have some thing to do with the mixed valency of copper. For example, the resonating valence bond (RVB) model requires the presence of holes on Cu sites (Cu 3 + species). There are also a few models, however, based on the presence of holes on oxygen sites (O - species); dimerization of oxygen holes has also been suggested to occur by a few workers. It is the purpose of this article to briefly present the available experimental evidence for the presence of oxygen holes and to discuss their role in high-temperature conductivity. It will be shown that these holes play a role in other oxide materials as well as including the Cu-free Ba 1 - x K x BiO 3 superconductor

  13. Development of Ultra-Low Power Metal Oxide Sensors and Arrays for Embedded Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Brent; Wind, Rikard; Kostelecky, Clayton; Routkevitch, Dmitri; Deininger, Debra

    2011-09-01

    Metal oxide semiconductor sensors are widely used as individual sensors and in arrays, and a variety of designs for low power microhotplates have been demonstrated.1 Synkera Technologies has developed an embeddable chemical microsensor platform, based on a unique ceramic MEMS technology, for practical implementation in cell phones and other mobile electronic devices. Key features of this microsensor platform are (1) small size, (2) ultra-low power consumption, (3) high chemical sensitivity, (4) accurate response to a wide-range of threats, and (5) low cost. The sensor platform is enabled by a combination of advances in ceramic micromachining, and precision deposition of sensing films inside the high aspect ratio pores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO).

  14. Intelligent Design of Metal Oxide Gas Sensor Arrays Using Reciprocal Kernel Support Vector Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Andrew W.

    Metal oxides are a staple of the sensor industry. The combination of their sensitivity to a number of gases, and the electrical nature of their sensing mechanism, make the particularly attractive in solid state devices. The high temperature stability of the ceramic material also make them ideal for detecting combustion byproducts where exhaust temperatures can be high. However, problems do exist with metal oxide sensors. They are not very selective as they all tend to be sensitive to a number of reduction and oxidation reactions on the oxide's surface. This makes sensors with large numbers of sensors interesting to study as a method for introducing orthogonality to the system. Also, the sensors tend to suffer from long term drift for a number of reasons. In this thesis I will develop a system for intelligently modeling metal oxide sensors and determining their suitability for use in large arrays designed to analyze exhaust gas streams. It will introduce prior knowledge of the metal oxide sensors' response mechanisms in order to produce a response function for each sensor from sparse training data. The system will use the same technique to model and remove any long term drift from the sensor response. It will also provide an efficient means for determining the orthogonality of the sensor to determine whether they are useful in gas sensing arrays. The system is based on least squares support vector regression using the reciprocal kernel. The reciprocal kernel is introduced along with a method of optimizing the free parameters of the reciprocal kernel support vector machine. The reciprocal kernel is shown to be simpler and to perform better than an earlier kernel, the modified reciprocal kernel. Least squares support vector regression is chosen as it uses all of the training points and an emphasis was placed throughout this research for extracting the maximum information from very sparse data. The reciprocal kernel is shown to be effective in modeling the sensor

  15. 2D Metal-Organic Frameworks Derived Nanocarbon Arrays for Substrate Enhancement in Flexible Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ximeng; Guan, Cao; Hu, Yating; Zhang, Lei; Elshahawy, Abdelnaby M; Wang, John

    2017-10-27

    Direct assembling of active materials on carbon cloth (CC) is a promising way to achieve flexible electrodes for energy storage. However, the overall surface area and electrical conductivity of such electrodes are usually limited. Herein, 2D metal-organic framework derived nanocarbon nanowall (MOFC) arrays are successfully developed on carbon cloth by a facile solution + carbonization process. Upon growth of the MOFC arrays, the sites for growth of the active materials are greatly increased, and the equivalent series resistance is decreased, which contribute to the enhancement of the bare CC substrate. After decorating ultrathin flakes of MnO 2 and Bi 2 O 3 on the flexible CC/MOFC substrate, the hierarchical electrode materials show an abrupt improvement of areal capacitances by around 50% and 100%, respectively, compared to those of the active materials on pristine carbon cloth. A flexible supercapacitor can be further assembled using two hierarchical electrodes, which demonstrates an energy density of 124.8 µWh cm -2 at the power density of 2.55 mW cm -2 . © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A new surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s−1 and good linearity were observed.

  17. Fabrication of a Ti porous microneedle array by metal injection molding for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiyu; Liu, Bin; Zhou, Yingying; Chen, Zhipeng; Jiang, Lelun; Yuan, Wei; Liang, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Microneedle arrays (MA) have been extensively investigated in recent decades for transdermal drug delivery due to their pain-free delivery, minimal skin trauma, and reduced risk of infection. However, porous MA received relatively less attention due to their complex fabrication process and ease of fracturing. Here, we present a titanium porous microneedle array (TPMA) fabricated by modified metal injection molding (MIM) technology. The sintering process is simple and suitable for mass production. TPMA was sintered at a sintering temperature of 1250°C for 2 h. The porosity of TPMA was approximately 30.1% and its average pore diameter was about 1.3 μm. The elements distributed on the surface of TPMA were only Ti and O, which may guarantee the biocompatibility of TPMA. TPMA could easily penetrate the skin of a human forearm without fracture. TPMA could diffuse dry Rhodamine B stored in micropores into rabbit skin. The cumulative permeated flux of calcein across TPMA with punctured skin was 27 times greater than that across intact skin. Thus, TPMA can continually and efficiently deliver a liquid drug through open micropores in skin.

  18. Fabrication of a Ti porous microneedle array by metal injection molding for transdermal drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyu Li

    Full Text Available Microneedle arrays (MA have been extensively investigated in recent decades for transdermal drug delivery due to their pain-free delivery, minimal skin trauma, and reduced risk of infection. However, porous MA received relatively less attention due to their complex fabrication process and ease of fracturing. Here, we present a titanium porous microneedle array (TPMA fabricated by modified metal injection molding (MIM technology. The sintering process is simple and suitable for mass production. TPMA was sintered at a sintering temperature of 1250°C for 2 h. The porosity of TPMA was approximately 30.1% and its average pore diameter was about 1.3 μm. The elements distributed on the surface of TPMA were only Ti and O, which may guarantee the biocompatibility of TPMA. TPMA could easily penetrate the skin of a human forearm without fracture. TPMA could diffuse dry Rhodamine B stored in micropores into rabbit skin. The cumulative permeated flux of calcein across TPMA with punctured skin was 27 times greater than that across intact skin. Thus, TPMA can continually and efficiently deliver a liquid drug through open micropores in skin.

  19. Waveguide resonance mode response of stacked structures of metallic sub-wavelength slit arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Yasunori; Takano, Keisuke; Sakaguchi, Koichiro; Kato, Kosaku; Nakajima, Makoto; Akiyama, Koichi

    2018-05-01

    Detailed measurements of the optical properties of two-tier systems composed of metallic plates perforated with periodic sub-wavelength slit patterns were carried out using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the transmission properties observed experimentally for various configurations can be reproduced successfully by simulations based on the finite-differential time-domain method. Fabry-Perot-like waveguide resonance mode behaviors specific to this quasi-dielectric system were then investigated. For structures with no lateral displacement between the slit-array plates, mode disappearance phenomena, which are caused by destructive interference between the odd-order mode and the blue- or red-shifted even-order modes, were observed experimentally. The uncommon behavior of the even-order modes was examined precisely to explain the slit-width dependence. For structures with half-pitched displacement between the plates, extraordinarily strong transmission was observed experimentally, even when the optical paths were shut off. This result was interpreted in terms of the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons through very thin and labyrinthine spacings that inevitably exist between the metallic plates. Furthermore, the optical mode disappearance phenomena are revealed to be characterized by anticrossing of the two mixing modes formed by even- and odd-order modes. These experimental observations that are supported theoretically are indispensable to the practical use of this type of artificial dielectric and are expected to encourage interest in optical mode behaviors that are not typically observed in conventional dielectric systems.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and application of electroless metal assisted silicon nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, Sumanta Kumar [Centre for Nanoscience & Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mepco Schlenk Engineering College, Sivakasi 626 005, Tamilnadu (India); Marikani, Arumugam, E-mail: amari@mepcoeng.ac.in [Department of Physics, Mepco Schlenk Engineering College, Sivakasi 626 005, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Preparation of Silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWs) by electroless metal deposition technique. • From analysis, it has been found that the as-prepared SiNWs are of 3.5–4.0 μm and 75 nm of length and diameter in average respectively. Further a characteristic Raman peak at 520 cm{sup −1} also has been observed. • It exhibits good electron field-emission properties with turn-on field (E{sub 0}) of about 8.26 V μm{sup −1} at current density (J) of 4.9 μA cm{sup −2}. • Functionalized SiNWs have been used for electrochemical detection bovine serum albumin protein bio-molecules. - Abstract: Vertically aligned silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWs) have been synthesized by electroless metal deposition process. The fabricated SiNWs have an average diameter of 75 nm and 3.5–4.0 μm length, as confirmed from scanning electron microscopy. A characteristic asymmetric peak broadening at 520 cm{sup −1} from Raman spectroscopy was obtained for the SiNWs as compared to the bulk silicon crystal due to phonon confinement. The as-prepared SiNWs exhibit good electron field-emission properties with turn-on field of about 8.26 V μm{sup −1} at a current density of 4.9 μA cm{sup −2}. The SiNWs was functionalized by coating with a thin gold metallic film for 60 s, and then used as bio-probe for the detection of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein molecules. From the linear sweep voltammetry analysis, the Au coated SiNWs, exhibit linear response to the BSA analyte with increase in concentration. The minimum detection limit of the protein molecule was calculated of about 1.16 μM by the as-synthesized SiNWs probe.

  1. Metal-semiconductor phase transition of order arrays of VO2 nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Rene; Suh, Jae; Feldman, Leonard; Haglund, Richard

    2004-03-01

    The study of solid-state phase transitions at nanometer length scales provides new insights into the effects of material size on the mechanisms of structural transformations. Such research also opens the door to new applications, either because materials properties are modified as a function of particle size, or because the nanoparticles interact with a surrounding matrix material, or with each other. In this paper, we describe the formation of vanadium dioxide nanoparticles in silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition of ion beam lithographically selected sites and thermal processing. We observe the collective behavior of 50 nm diameter VO2 oblate nanoparticles, 10 nm high, and ordered in square arrays with arbitrary lattice constant. The metal-semiconductor-transition of the VO2 precipitates shows different features in each lattice spacing substrate. The materials are characterized by electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering. The features of the phase transition are studied via infrared optical spectroscopy. Of particular interest are the enhanced scattering and the surface plasmon resonance when the particles reach the metallic state. This resonance amplifies the optical contrast in the range of near-infrared optical communication wavelengths and it is altered by the particle-particle coupling as in the case of noble metals. In addition the VO2 nanoparticles exhibit sharp transitions with up to 50 K of hysteresis, one of the largest values ever reported for this transition. The optical properties of the VO2 nanoarrays are correlated with the size of the precipitates and their inter-particle distance. Nonlinear and ultra fast optical measurements have shown that the transition is the fastest known solid-solid transformation. The VO2 nanoparticles show the same bulk property, transforming in times shorter than 150 fs. This makes them remarkable candidates for ultrafast optical and electronic switching applications.

  2. The local surface plasmon resonance property and refractive index sensitivity of metal elliptical nano-ring arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Weihua, E-mail: linwh-whu@hotmail.com; Wang, Qian; Dong, Anhua [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro-and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Li, Qiuze [School of Physics and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023, Henan (China)

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we systematically investigate the optical property and refractive index sensitivity (RIS) of metal elliptical nano-ring (MENR) arranged in rectangle lattice by finite-difference time-domain method. Eight kinds of considered MENRs are divided into three classes, namely fixed at the same outer size, at the same inner size, and at the same middle size. All MENR arrays show a bonding mode local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak in the near-infrared region under longitudinal and transverse polarizations, and lattice diffraction enhanced LSPR peaks emerge, when the LSPR peak wavelength (LSPRPW) matches the effective lattice constant of the array. The LSPRPW is determined by the charge moving path length, the parallel and cross interactions induced by the stable distributed charges, and the moving charges inter-attraction. High RIS can be achieved by small particle distance arrays composed of MENRs with big inner size and small ring-width. On the other hand, for a MENR array, the comprehensive RIS (including RIS and figure of merit) under transverse polarization is superior to that under longitudinal polarization. Furthermore, on condition that compared arrays are fixed at the same lattice constant, the phenomenon that the RIS of big ring-width MENR arrays may be higher than that of small ring-width MENR arrays only appears in the case of compared arrays with relatively small lattice constant and composed of MENRs fixed at the same inner size simultaneously. Meanwhile, the LSPRPW of the former MENR arrays is also larger than that of the latter MENR arrays. Our systematic results may help experimentalists work with this type of systems.

  3. The local surface plasmon resonance property and refractive index sensitivity of metal elliptical nano-ring arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Weihua; Wang, Qian; Dong, Anhua; Li, Qiuze

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we systematically investigate the optical property and refractive index sensitivity (RIS) of metal elliptical nano-ring (MENR) arranged in rectangle lattice by finite-difference time-domain method. Eight kinds of considered MENRs are divided into three classes, namely fixed at the same outer size, at the same inner size, and at the same middle size. All MENR arrays show a bonding mode local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak in the near-infrared region under longitudinal and transverse polarizations, and lattice diffraction enhanced LSPR peaks emerge, when the LSPR peak wavelength (LSPRPW) matches the effective lattice constant of the array. The LSPRPW is determined by the charge moving path length, the parallel and cross interactions induced by the stable distributed charges, and the moving charges inter-attraction. High RIS can be achieved by small particle distance arrays composed of MENRs with big inner size and small ring-width. On the other hand, for a MENR array, the comprehensive RIS (including RIS and figure of merit) under transverse polarization is superior to that under longitudinal polarization. Furthermore, on condition that compared arrays are fixed at the same lattice constant, the phenomenon that the RIS of big ring-width MENR arrays may be higher than that of small ring-width MENR arrays only appears in the case of compared arrays with relatively small lattice constant and composed of MENRs fixed at the same inner size simultaneously. Meanwhile, the LSPRPW of the former MENR arrays is also larger than that of the latter MENR arrays. Our systematic results may help experimentalists work with this type of systems

  4. Metallic witness packs for behind-armour debris characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verolme, J.L.; Szymczak, M.; Broos, J.P.F.

    1999-01-01

    For the experimental characterization of behind-armour debris so-called metallic witness packs can be used. A metallic witness pack consists of an array of metallic plates interspaced by polystyrene foam sheets. To quantify the fragment mass and velocity from the corresponding hole area and position

  5. Plasmonic black metals via radiation absorption by two-dimensional arrays of ultra-sharp convex grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, Jonas; Eriksen, René L.; Stær, Tobias Holmgaard

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic black surfaces formed by two-dimensional arrays of ultra-sharp convex metal grooves, in which the incident radiation is converted into gap surface plasmon polaritons (GSPPs) and subsequently absorbed (via adiabatic nanofocusing), are fabricated and investigated experimentally for gold......%, averaged over the investigated wavelength range of 400-985 nm. The highest averaged absorption level (similar to 97%) is achieved with 250-nm-period arrays in palladium that also has the highest melting temperature(similar to 15526 degrees C), promising thereby potential applications for broadband...

  6. Block-copolymer assisted synthesis of arrays of metal nanoparticles and their catalytic activities for the growth of SWNTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaviripudi, Sreekar; Reina, Alfonso; Qi, Jifa; Kong, Jing; Belcher, Angela M

    2006-01-01

    Block copolymer micellar templates were used for the controlled synthesis of large arrays of mono-metallic (Fe, Co, Ni, Mo) and bi-metallic (Fe-Mo) nanoparticles with average diameters ranging from 1 to 4 nm and the distance between the nanoparticles ranging from 40 to 45 nm. XPS data reveal the presence of mono-metallic nanoparticles in their oxidized states. These uniform arrays of nanoparticles serve as an excellent tool to investigate the catalytic effect of different metal/metal oxide nanoparticles for the growth of carbon nanotubes, and in this work, they were used to investigate the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes with the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process, using both ethanol and hydrocarbon (methane + ethylene) gases as carbon sources. The periodicity and the arrangement of nanoparticles were unaffected even at high growth temperatures, indicating that nanoparticle agglomeration on the Si substrate does not take place during growth. AFM and SEM results reveal uniform growth of nanotubes with diameters smaller than the initial size of the catalyst nanoparticles. The Fe, Co and Ni nanoparticles all serve as effective catalysts for nanotube growth with both types of carbon feed stock, and Co and Ni give rise to a relatively higher yield than Fe. The catalytic activity of Fe and bi-metallic Fe-Mo nanoparticles of similar size and identical densities using ethanol CVD are also compared

  7. Evaluation of flooded 3 x3x3 arrays of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, M.; Rahnema, F.

    1997-01-01

    In the early 1980's, thirteen experiments using plutonium metal cylinders were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory. The experimental method consisted of flooding a 3 x3 x3 array with water until criticality was achieved. Ten of the thirteen experiments went critical while the other three remained subcritical upon full reflection. This paper evaluates these experiments to develop benchmark descriptions for validation of computational tools used by criticality safety specialists. Six of the ten critical experiments were found acceptable as benchmark experiments. Sensitivity studies were performed to find the effect of experimental limits and uncertainties on the k eff value. Analysis of the experiments was performed by MCNP with continuous energy ENDF/B-V cross section data. K eff values for all benchmark experiments were computed using MCNP with ENDF/B-V data, KENO-Va with Hansen Roach cross section, and KENO-Va with 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Although these experiments were flooded, KENO-Va calculations show that these were, in fact, fast systems. 3 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  8. Ultrasonic fingerprint sensor using a piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer array integrated with complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y.; Fung, S.; Wang, Q.; Horsley, D. A. [Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Tang, H.; Boser, B. E. [Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tsai, J. M.; Daneman, M. [InvenSense, Inc., 1745 Technology Drive, San Jose, California 95110 (United States)

    2015-06-29

    This paper presents an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor based on a 24 × 8 array of 22 MHz piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (PMUTs) with 100 μm pitch, fully integrated with 180 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry through eutectic wafer bonding. Each PMUT is directly bonded to a dedicated CMOS receive amplifier, minimizing electrical parasitics and eliminating the need for through-silicon vias. The array frequency response and vibration mode-shape were characterized using laser Doppler vibrometry and verified via finite element method simulation. The array's acoustic output was measured using a hydrophone to be ∼14 kPa with a 28 V input, in reasonable agreement with predication from analytical calculation. Pulse-echo imaging of a 1D steel grating is demonstrated using electronic scanning of a 20 × 8 sub-array, resulting in 300 mV maximum received amplitude and 5:1 contrast ratio. Because the small size of this array limits the maximum image size, mechanical scanning was used to image a 2D polydimethylsiloxane fingerprint phantom (10 mm × 8 mm) at a 1.2 mm distance from the array.

  9. Role of shape of hole in transmission and negative refractive index of sandwiched metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Min; Ye Yong-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Transmission and negative refractive index (NRI) of metal—dielectric—metal (MDM) sandwiched metamaterial perforated with four kinds of shapes of holes are numerically studied. Results indicate that positions of all transmission peaks of these kinds of holes are sensitive to the shape of the hole. Under the same conditions, the circular hole can obtain the maximum NRI and the rectangular hole can obtain the maximum frequency bandwidth of NRI. Moreover, the figure of merit (FOM) of the circular hole is the maximum too. As a result, we can obtain a higher NRI and FOM metamaterial by drilling circular hole arrays on MDM metamaterial. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  10. The electric field at hole injecting metal/organic interfaces as a cause for manifestation of exponential bias-dependent mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvikl, B.

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the well-known empirical exponential bias-dependent mobility is an approximation function of the relevant term emerging in the Mott–Gurney space charge limited current model when the constant non-zero electric field at the hole injecting metal/organic interface E int is taken into account. The term in question is the product of the bias-independent (but organic layer thickness-dependent) effective mobility coefficient and the algebraic function, f(λ), of the argument λ = E int /E a , where E a is the externally applied electric field. On account of the non-zero interfacial field, E int , the singularity of the spatial dependence of the hole current density, p(x), is removed. The resulting hole drift current density, j, is tested as a function of E a against a number of published room temperature hole current j–E a data sets, all characterized by good ohmic contact at the hole injecting interface. It is shown that the calculated current density provides a very good fit to the measurements within a high range of E a intervals. Low values of E a , are investigated analytically under the assumption of hole drift-diffusion. The extremely large internal electric fields at the anode/organic junction indicate drift-diffusion to be an improbable process for the structures investigated. However, a description of hole transport throughout the whole interval of experimental E a values may be obtained at low values of E a by an extended Mark–Helfrich drift model with traps occupying the exponentially distributed energy levels, followed by the extended Mott–Gurney model description within the remaining part of the E a interval. In both models the same (bias-independent) effective mobility coefficient is incorporated into the calculations. The results present evidence that within the framework of the extended Mott–Gurney expression the properly derived term should replace the empirical exponential bias-dependent mobility, making it redundant in the

  11. THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY Pi GHz SKY SURVEY. III. THE ELAIS-N1, COMA, AND LOCKMAN HOLE FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, Steve; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Whysong, David [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, B-20 Hearst Field Annex 3411, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    We present results from a total of 459 repeated 3.1 GHz radio continuum observations (of which 379 were used in a search for transient sources) of the ELAIS-N1, Coma, Lockman Hole, and NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey fields as part of the Pi GHz Sky Survey. The observations were taken approximately once per day between 2009 May and 2011 April. Each image covers 11.8 square degrees and has 100'' FWHM resolution. Deep images for each of the four fields have rms noise between 180 and 310 {mu}Jy, and the corresponding catalogs contain {approx}200 sources in each field. Typically 40-50 of these sources are detected in each single-epoch image. This represents one of the shortest cadence, largest area, multi-epoch surveys undertaken at these frequencies. We compare the catalogs generated from the combined images to those from individual epochs, and from monthly averages, as well as to legacy surveys. We undertake a search for transients, with particular emphasis on excluding false positive sources. We find no confirmed transients, defined here as sources that can be shown to have varied by at least a factor of 10. However, we find one source that brightened in a single-epoch image to at least six times the upper limit from the corresponding deep image. We also find a source associated with a z = 0.6 quasar which appears to have brightened by a factor {approx}3 in one of our deep images, when compared to catalogs from legacy surveys. We place new upper limits on the number of transients brighter than 10 mJy: fewer than 0.08 transients deg{sup -2} with characteristic timescales of months to years; fewer than 0.02 deg{sup -2} with timescales of months; and fewer than 0.009 deg{sup -2} with timescales of days. We also plot upper limits as a function of flux density for transients on the same timescales.

  12. The gravitational wave background from massive black hole binaries in Illustris: spectral features and time to detection with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Blecha, Laura; Hernquist, Lars; Sesana, Alberto; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2017-11-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) around the world are using the incredible consistency of millisecond pulsars to measure low-frequency gravitational waves from (super)massive black hole (MBH) binaries. We use comprehensive MBH merger models based on cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to predict the spectrum of the stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB). We use real time-of-arrival specifications from the European, NANOGrav, Parkes, and International PTA (IPTA) to calculate realistic times to detection of the GWB across a wide range of model parameters. In addition to exploring the parameter space of environmental hardening processes (in particular: stellar scattering efficiencies), we have expanded our models to include eccentric binary evolution which can have a strong effect on the GWB spectrum. Our models show that strong stellar scattering and high characteristic eccentricities enhance the GWB strain amplitude near the PTA-sensitive `sweet-spot' (near the frequency f = 1 yr-1), slightly improving detection prospects in these cases. While the GWB amplitude is degenerate between cosmological and environmental parameters, the location of a spectral turnover at low frequencies (f ≲ 0.1 yr-1) is strongly indicative of environmental coupling. At high frequencies (f ≳ 1 yr-1), the GWB spectral index can be used to infer the number density of sources and possibly their eccentricity distribution. Even with merger models that use pessimistic environmental and eccentricity parameters, if the current rate of PTA expansion continues, we find that the IPTA is highly likely to make a detection within about 10 yr.

  13. EVIDENCE FROM THE VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY THAT J1502SE/SW ARE DOUBLE HOTSPOTS, NOT A SUPERMASSIVE BINARY BLACK HOLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Walker, R. C.; Fu, H.

    2014-01-01

    SDSS J150243.09+111557.3 is a merging system at z = 0.39 that hosts two confirmed active galactic nuclei (AGNs), one unobscured and one dust-obscured, offset by several kiloparsecs. Deane et al. recently reported evidence from the European VLBI Network (EVN) that the dust-obscured AGN exhibits two flat-spectrum radio sources, J1502SE/SW, offset by 26 mas (140 pc), with each source being energized by its own supermassive black hole (BH). This intriguing interpretation of a close binary BH was reached after ruling out a double-hotspot scenario, wherein both hotspots are energized by a single, central BH, a configuration occurring in the well-studied compact symmetric objects. When observed with sufficient sensitivity and resolution, an object with double hotspots should have an edge-brightened structure. We report evidence from the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) for just such a structure in an image of the obscured AGN with higher sensitivity and resolution than the EVN images. We thus conclude that a double-hotspot scenario should be reconsidered as a viable interpretation for J1502SE/SW, and suggest further VLBA tests of that scenario. A double-hotspot scenario could have broad implications for feedback in obscured AGNs. We also report a VLBA detection of high-brightness-temperature emission from the unobscured AGN that is offset several kiloparsecs from J1502SE/SW

  14. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10 to 20 mAcm(2). The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150 mAcm(2), respectively.

  15. Atomically precise arrays of fluorescent silver clusters: a modular approach for metal cluster photonics on DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Stacy M; Schultz, Danielle E; Swasey, Steven; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2015-03-24

    The remarkable precision that DNA scaffolds provide for arraying nanoscale optical elements enables optical phenomena that arise from interactions of metal nanoparticles, dye molecules, and quantum dots placed at nanoscale separations. However, control of ensemble optical properties has been limited by the difficulty of achieving uniform particle sizes and shapes. Ligand-stabilized metal clusters offer a route to atomically precise arrays that combine desirable attributes of both metals and molecules. Exploiting the unique advantages of the cluster regime requires techniques to realize controlled nanoscale placement of select cluster structures. Here we show that atomically monodisperse arrays of fluorescent, DNA-stabilized silver clusters can be realized on a prototypical scaffold, a DNA nanotube, with attachment sites separated by <10 nm. Cluster attachment is mediated by designed DNA linkers that enable isolation of specific clusters prior to assembly on nanotubes and preserve cluster structure and spectral purity after assembly. The modularity of this approach generalizes to silver clusters of diverse sizes and DNA scaffolds of many types. Thus, these silver cluster nano-optical elements, which themselves have colors selected by their particular DNA templating oligomer, bring unique dimensions of control and flexibility to the rapidly expanding field of nano-optics.

  16. THE RESPONSE OF METAL-RICH GAS TO X-RAY IRRADIATION FROM A MASSIVE BLACK HOLE AT HIGH REDSHIFT: PROOF OF CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aykutalp, A.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700-AV Groningen (Netherlands); Wise, J. H., E-mail: aycin.aykutalp@sns.it, E-mail: meijerink@astro.rug.nl, E-mail: spaans@astro.rug.nl, E-mail: jwise@physics.gatech.edu [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Observational studies show that there is a strong link between the formation and evolution of galaxies and the growth of their supermassive black holes. However, the underlying physics behind this observed relation is poorly understood. In order to study the effects of X-ray radiation on black hole surroundings, we implement X-ray-dominated region physics into Enzo and use the radiation transport module Moray to calculate the radiative transfer for a polychromatic spectrum. In this work, we investigate the effects of X-ray irradiation, produced by a central massive black hole (MBH) with a mass of M = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }, on ambient gas with solar and zero metallicity. We find that in the solar metallicity case, the energy deposition rate in the central region ({<=}20 pc) is high due to the high opacity of the metals. Hence, the central temperatures are on the order of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} K. Moreover, due to the cooling ability and high intrinsic opacity of solar metallicity gas, column densities of 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} are reached at a radius of 20 pc from the MBH. These column densities are about three orders of magnitudes higher than in the zero metallicity case. Furthermore, in the zero metallicity case, an X-ray-induced H II region is already formed after 5.8 Myr. This causes a significant outflow of gas ({approx}8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }) from the central region; the gas reaches outflow velocities up to {approx}100 km s{sup -1}. At later times, {approx}23 Myr after we insert the MBH, we find that the solar metallicity case also develops an X-ray-induced H II region, but it is delayed by {approx}17 Myr compared to the zero metallicity case.

  17. A Customized Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Based Gas Sensor Array for Onion Quality Evaluation: System Development and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharun Konduru

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A gas sensor array, consisting of seven Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS sensors that are sensitive to a wide range of organic volatile compounds was developed to detect rotten onions during storage. These MOS sensors were enclosed in a specially designed Teflon chamber equipped with a gas delivery system to pump volatiles from the onion samples into the chamber. The electronic circuit mainly comprised a microcontroller, non-volatile memory chip, and trickle-charge real time clock chip, serial communication chip, and parallel LCD panel. User preferences are communicated with the on-board microcontroller through a graphical user interface developed using LabVIEW. The developed gas sensor array was characterized and the discrimination potential was tested by exposing it to three different concentrations of acetone (ketone, acetonitrile (nitrile, ethyl acetate (ester, and ethanol (alcohol. The gas sensor array could differentiate the four chemicals of same concentrations and different concentrations within the chemical with significant difference. Experiment results also showed that the system was able to discriminate two concentrations (196 and 1964 ppm of methlypropyl sulfide and two concentrations (145 and 1452 ppm of 2-nonanone, two key volatile compounds emitted by rotten onions. As a proof of concept, the gas sensor array was able to achieve 89% correct classification of sour skin infected onions. The customized low-cost gas sensor array could be a useful tool to detect onion postharvest diseases in storage.

  18. Process Development And Simulation For Cold Fabrication Of Doubly Curved Metal Plate By Using Line Array Roll Set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, D. S.; Jung, C. G.; Seong, D. Y.; Yang, D. Y.; Han, J. M.; Han, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    For effective manufacturing of a doubly curved sheet metal, a novel sheet metal forming process is proposed. The suggested process uses a Line Array Roll Set (LARS) composed of a pair of upper and lower roll assemblies in a symmetric manner. The process offers flexibility as compared with the conventional manufacturing processes, because it does not require any complex-shaped die and loss of material by blank-holding is minimized. LARS allows flexibility of the incremental forming process and adopts the principle of bending deformation, resulting in a slight deformation in thickness. Rolls composed of line array roll sets are divided into a driving roll row and two idle roll rows. The arrayed rolls in the central lines of the upper and lower roll assemblies are motor-driven so that they deform and transfer the sheet metal using friction between the rolls and the sheet metal. The remaining rolls are idle rolls, generating bending deformation with driving rolls. Furthermore, all the rolls are movable in any direction so that they are adaptable to any size or shape of the desired three-dimensional configuration. In the process, the sheet is deformed incrementally as deformation proceeds simultaneously in rolling and transverse directions step by step. Consequently, it can be applied to the fabrication of doubly curved ship hull plates by undergoing several passes. In this work, FEM simulations are carried out for verification of the proposed incremental forming system using the chosen design parameters. Based on the results of the simulation, the relationship between the roll set configuration and the curvature of a sheet metal is determined. The process information such as the forming loads and torques acting on every roll is analyzed as important data for the design and development of the manufacturing system

  19. Implantable liquid metal-based flexible neural microelectrode array and its application in recovering animal locomotion functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Liu, Jing

    2017-10-01

    With significant advantages in rapidly restoring the nerve function, electrical stimulation of nervous tissue is a crucial treatment of peripheral nerve injuries leading to common movement disorder. However, the currently available stimulating electrodes generally based on rigid conductive materials would cause a potential mechanical mismatch with soft neural tissues which thus reduces long-term effects of electrical stimulation. Here, we proposed and fabricated a flexible neural microelectrode array system based on the liquid metal GaIn alloy (75.5% Ga and 24.5% In by weight) and via printing approach. Such an alloy with a unique low melting point (10.35 °C) owns excellent electrical conductivity and high compliance, which are beneficial to serve as implantable flexible neural electrodes. The flexible neural microelectrode array embeds four liquid metal electrodes and stretchable interconnects in a PDMS membrane (500 µm in thickness) that possess a lower elastic modulus (1.055 MPa), which is similar to neural tissues with elastic moduli in the 0.1-1.5 MPa range. The electrical experiments indicate that the liquid metal interconnects could sustain over 7000 mechanical stretch cycles with resistance approximately staying at 4 Ω. Over the conceptual experiments on animal sciatic nerve electrical stimulation, the dead bullfrog implanted with flexible neural microelectrode array could even rhythmically contract and move its lower limbs under the electrical stimulations from the implant. This demonstrates a highly efficient way for quickly recovering biological nerve functions. Further, the good biocompatibility of the liquid metal material was justified via a series of biological experiments. This liquid metal modality for neural stimulation is expected to play important roles as biologic electrodes to overcome the fundamental mismatch in mechanics between biological tissues and electronic devices in the coming time.

  20. Implantable liquid metal-based flexible neural microelectrode array and its application in recovering animal locomotion functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Rui; Liu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    With significant advantages in rapidly restoring the nerve function, electrical stimulation of nervous tissue is a crucial treatment of peripheral nerve injuries leading to common movement disorder. However, the currently available stimulating electrodes generally based on rigid conductive materials would cause a potential mechanical mismatch with soft neural tissues which thus reduces long-term effects of electrical stimulation. Here, we proposed and fabricated a flexible neural microelectrode array system based on the liquid metal GaIn alloy (75.5% Ga and 24.5% In by weight) and via printing approach. Such an alloy with a unique low melting point (10.35 °C) owns excellent electrical conductivity and high compliance, which are beneficial to serve as implantable flexible neural electrodes. The flexible neural microelectrode array embeds four liquid metal electrodes and stretchable interconnects in a PDMS membrane (500 µ m in thickness) that possess a lower elastic modulus (1.055 MPa), which is similar to neural tissues with elastic moduli in the 0.1–1.5 MPa range. The electrical experiments indicate that the liquid metal interconnects could sustain over 7000 mechanical stretch cycles with resistance approximately staying at 4 Ω. Over the conceptual experiments on animal sciatic nerve electrical stimulation, the dead bullfrog implanted with flexible neural microelectrode array could even rhythmically contract and move its lower limbs under the electrical stimulations from the implant. This demonstrates a highly efficient way for quickly recovering biological nerve functions. Further, the good biocompatibility of the liquid metal material was justified via a series of biological experiments. This liquid metal modality for neural stimulation is expected to play important roles as biologic electrodes to overcome the fundamental mismatch in mechanics between biological tissues and electronic devices in the coming time. (paper)

  1. Arrays of hollow out-of-plane microneedles made by metal electrodeposition onto solvent cast conductive polymer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, I; Liu, Y; Stoeber, B; Häfeli, U O

    2013-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery using microneedles is a technique to potentially replace hypodermic needles for injection of many vaccines and drugs. Fabrication of hollow metallic microneedles so far has been associated with time-consuming steps that restrict batch production of these devices. Here, we are presenting a novel method for making metallic microneedles with any desired height, spacing, and lumen size. In our process, we use solvent casting to coat a mold, which contains an array of pillars, with a conductive polymer composite layer. The conductive layer is then used as a seed layer in a metal electrodeposition process. To characterize the process, the conductivity of the polymer composite with respect to different filler concentrations was investigated. In addition, plasma etching of the polymer was characterized. The electroplating process was also studied further to control the thickness of the microneedle array plate. The strength of the microneedle devices was evaluated through a series of compression tests, while their performance for transdermal drug delivery was tested by injection of 2.28 µm fluorescent microspheres into animal skin. The fabricated metallic microneedles seem appropriate for subcutaneous delivery of drugs and microspheres. (paper)

  2. A tale of two metals: contrasting criticalities in the pnictides and hole-doped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, N. E.; Buhot, J.; Licciardello, S.

    2018-05-01

    The iron-based high temperature superconductors share a number of similarities with their copper-based counterparts, such as reduced dimensionality, proximity to states of competing order, and a critical role for 3d electron orbitals. Their respective temperature-doping phase diagrams also contain certain commonalities that have led to claims that the metallic and superconducting (SC) properties of both families are governed by their proximity to a quantum critical point (QCP) located inside the SC dome. In this review, we critically examine these claims and highlight significant differences in the bulk physical properties of both systems. While there is now a large body of evidence supporting the presence of a (magnetic) QCP in the iron pnictides, the situation in the cuprates is much less apparent, at least for the end point of the pseudogap phase. We argue that the opening of the normal state pseudogap in cuprates, so often tied to a putative QCP, arises from a momentum-dependent breakdown of quasiparticle coherence that sets in at much higher doping levels but which is driven by the proximity to the Mott insulating state at half filling. Finally, we present a new scenario for the cuprates in which this loss of quasiparticle integrity and its evolution with momentum, temperature and doping plays a key role in shaping the resultant phase diagram. This key issues review is dedicated to the memory of Dr John Loram whose pioneering measurements, analysis and ideas inspired much of its content.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous metal oxide arrays with enhanced properties for electrochemical energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Anguo; Zhou, Shibiao; Zuo, Chenggang; Zhuan, Yongbing; Ding, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • NiO mesoporous nanowall arrays are prepared via hydrothermal method. • Mesoporous nanowall arrays are favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. • NiO mesoporous nanowall arrays show good supercapacitor performance. - Abstract: Mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays are prepared by a facile hydrothermal synthesis method with a following annealing process. The NiO nanowall shows continuous mesopores ranging from 5 to 10 nm and grows vertically on the substrate forming a porous net-like structure with macropores of 20–300 nm. A plausible mechanism is proposed for the growth of mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays. As cathode material of pseudocapacitors, the as-prepared mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays show good pseudocapacitive performances with a high capacitance of 600 F g −1 at 2 A g −1 and impressive high-rate capability with a specific capacitance of 338 F g −1 at 40 A g −1 . In addition, the mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays possess good cycling stability. After 6000 cycles at 2 A g −1 , a high capacitance of 660 F g −1 is attained, and no obvious degradation is observed. The good electrochemical performance is attributed to its highly porous morphology, which provides large reaction surface and short ion diffusion paths, leading to enhanced electrochemical properties

  4. Surface plasmon enhanced quantum transport in a hybrid metal nanoparticle array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Lin; Nan, Yali; Xu, Shang; Zhang, Sishi; Han, Min

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid Pd–Ag nanoparticle arrays composed of randomly distributed Pd nanoparticles in dense packing and a small number of dispersed Ag nanoparticles were fabricated with controlled coverage. Photo-enhanced conductance was observed in the nanoparticle arrays. Largest enhancement, which can be higher than 20 folds, was obtained with 450 nm light illumination. This wavelength was found to correlate with the surface plasmon resonance of the Ag nanoparticles. Electron transport measurements showed there were significant Coulomb blockade in the nanoparticle arrays and the blockade could be overcome with the surface plasmon enhanced local field of Ag nanoparticles induced by light illumination. - Highlights: • We study photo-enhanced electron conductance of a hybrid Pd–Ag nanoparticle array. • The light-induced conductance enhancement is as high as 20 folds at 10 K. • The enhancement is correlate with the surface plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles. • Coulomb blockades is overcome with the surface plasmon enhanced local field

  5. Monitoring concept for structural integration of PZT-fiber arrays in metal sheets: a numerical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossel, Welf-Guntram; Schubert, Andreas; Putz, Matthias; Koriath, Hans-Joachim; Wittstock, Volker; Hensel, Sebastian; Pierer, Alexander; Müller, Benedikt; Schmidt, Marek

    2018-01-01

    The technique joining by forming allows the structural integration of piezoceramic fibers into locally microstructured metal sheets without any elastic interlayers. A high-volume production of the joining partners causes in statistical deviations from the nominal dimensions. A numerical simulation on geometric process sensitivity shows that the deviations have a high significant influence on the resulting fiber stresses after the joining by forming operation and demonstrate the necessity of a monitoring concept. On this basis, the electromechanical behavior of piezoceramic array transducers is investigated experimentally before, during and after the joining process. The piezoceramic array transducer consists of an arrangement of five electrical interconnected piezoceramic fibers. The findings show that the impedance spectrum depends on the fiber stresses and can be used for in-process monitoring during the joining process. Based on the impedance values the preload state of the interconnected piezoceramic fibers can be specifically controlled and a fiber overload.

  6. Layered-metal-hydroxide nanosheet arrays with controlled nanostructures to assist direct electronic communication at biointerfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Zhe; Lu, Shan; Zhao, Liwei; He, Jing

    2011-10-18

    In this work, ordered vertical arrays of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets have been developed to achieve electron transfer (eT) at biointerfaces in electrochemical devices. It is found that tailoring the gap size of LDH nanosheet arrays could significantly promote the eT rate. This research has successfully extended nanomaterials for efficient modifications of electrode surfaces from nanoparticles, nanowires, nanorods, and nanotubes to nanosheets. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Frequency-addressed tunable transmission in optically thin metallic nanohole arrays with dual-frequency liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Qingzhen; Zhao Yanhui; Juluri, Bala Krishna; Kiraly, Brian; Huang, Tony Jun; Liou, Justin; Khoo, Iam Choon

    2011-01-01

    Frequency-addressed tunable transmission is demonstrated in optically thin metallic nanohole arrays embedded in dual-frequency liquid crystals (DFLCs). The optical properties of the composite system are characterized by the transmission spectra of the nanoholes, and a prominent transmission peak is shown to originate from the resonance of localized surface plasmons at the edges of the nanoholes. An ∼17 nm shift in the transmission peak is observed between the two alignment configurations of the liquid crystals. This DFLC-based active plasmonic system demonstrates excellent frequency-dependent switching behavior and could be useful in future nanophotonic applications.

  8. Hole-Collection Mechanism in Passivating Metal-Oxide Contacts on Si Solar Cells: Insights From Numerical Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Vijayan, Ramachandran Ammapet

    2018-02-14

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells enable high conversion efficiencies, thanks to their passivating contacts which consist of layered stacks of intrinsic and doped amorphous silicon. However, such contacts may reduce the photo current, when present on the illuminated side of the cell. This motivates the search for wider bandgap contacting materials, such as metal oxides. In this paper, we elucidate the precise impact of the material parameters of MoO$_{x}$ on device characteristics, based on numerical simulations. The simulation results allow us to propose design principles for hole-collecting induced junctions. We find that if MoO$_{x}$ has a sufficiently high electron affinity ($\\\\ge\\\\! \\\\text{{5.7 eV}}$), direct band-to-band tunneling is the dominant transport mechanism; whereas if it has a lower electron affinity ($ <\\\\! \\\\text{{5.7 eV}}$), trap-assisted tunneling dominates, which might introduce additional series resistance. At even lower electron affinity, S-shaped J–V curves may appear for these solar cells, which are found to be due to an insufficient trap state density in the MoO$_{x}$ film in contrast to the expectation of better performance at low trap density. These traps may assist carrier transport when present near the conduction band edge of the MoO$_{x}$ film. Our simulations predict that performance optimization for the MoO$_{x}$ film has to target either 1) a high electron affinity and a moderate doping density film or, 2) if the electron affinity is lower than the optimum value, a high defect density not exceeding the doping density inside the film.

  9. Magnonic black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Roldán-Molina, A.; Nunez, A.S.; Duine, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    We show that the interaction between spin-polarized current and magnetization dynamics can be used to implement black-hole and white-hole horizons for magnons - the quanta of oscillations in the magnetization direction in magnets. We consider three different systems: easy-plane ferromagnetic metals, isotropic antiferromagnetic metals, and easy-plane magnetic insulators. Based on available experimental data, we estimate that the Hawking temperature can be as large as 1 K. We comment on the imp...

  10. Preparing nano-hole arrays by using porous anodic aluminum oxide nano-structural masks for the enhanced emission from InGaN/GaN blue light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Duy; Nguyen, Hieu Pham Trung; Lee, Jae-jin; Mho, Sun-Il

    2012-01-01

    We report on the achievement of the enhanced cathodoluminescence (CL) from InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by using roughening surface. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) mask was utilized to form nano-hole arrays on the surface of InGaN/GaN LEDs. AAO membranes with ordered hexagonal structures were fabricated from aluminum foils by a two-step anodization method. The average pore densities of ∼1.0 × 10 10 cm −2 and 3.0 × 10 10 cm −2 were fabricated with the constant anodization voltages of 25 and 40 V, respectively. Anodic porous alumina film with a thickness of ∼600 nm has been used as a mask for the induced couple plasma etching process to fabricate nano-hole arrays on the LED surface. Diameter and depth of nano-holes can be controlled by varying the etching duration and/or the diameter of AAO membranes. Due to the reduction of total internal reflection obtained in the patterned samples, we have observed that the cathodoluminescence intensity of LEDs with nanoporous structures is increased up to eight times compared to that of samples without using nanoporous structure. (paper)

  11. Preparing nano-hole arrays by using porous anodic aluminum oxide nano-structural masks for the enhanced emission from InGaN/GaN blue light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Duy; Nguyen, Hieu Pham Trung; Lee, Jae-jin; Mho, Sun-Il

    2012-12-01

    We report on the achievement of the enhanced cathodoluminescence (CL) from InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by using roughening surface. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) mask was utilized to form nano-hole arrays on the surface of InGaN/GaN LEDs. AAO membranes with ordered hexagonal structures were fabricated from aluminum foils by a two-step anodization method. The average pore densities of ˜1.0 × 1010 cm-2 and 3.0 × 1010 cm-2 were fabricated with the constant anodization voltages of 25 and 40 V, respectively. Anodic porous alumina film with a thickness of ˜600 nm has been used as a mask for the induced couple plasma etching process to fabricate nano-hole arrays on the LED surface. Diameter and depth of nano-holes can be controlled by varying the etching duration and/or the diameter of AAO membranes. Due to the reduction of total internal reflection obtained in the patterned samples, we have observed that the cathodoluminescence intensity of LEDs with nanoporous structures is increased up to eight times compared to that of samples without using nanoporous structure.

  12. Growth of Vertically Aligned ZnO Nanowire Arrays Using Bilayered Metal Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    12] J. P. Liu, C. X. Guo, C. M. Li et al., “Carbon-decorated ZnO nanowire array: a novel platform for direct electrochemistry of enzymes and...cited. Vertically aligned, high-density ZnO nanowires (NWs) were grown for the first time on c-plane sapphire using binary alloys of Ni/Au or Cu/Au as...deleterious to the ZnO NW array growth. Significant improvement of the Au adhesion on the substrate was noted, opening the potential for direct

  13. Biological sensing and control of emission dynamics of quantum dot bioconjugates using arrays of long metallic nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyed M; Gutha, Rithvik R; Wing, Waylin J; Sharp, Christina; Capps, Lucas; Mao, Chuanbin

    2017-01-01

    We study biological sensing using plasmonic and photonic-plasmonic resonances of arrays of ultralong metallic nanorods and analyze the impact of these resonances on emission dynamics of quantum dot bioconjugates. We demonstrate that the LSPRs and plasmonic lattice modes of such array can be used to detect a single self-assembled monolayer of alkanethiol at the visible (550 nm) and near infrared (770 nm) range with well resolved shifts. We study adsorption of streptavidin-quantum dot conjugates to this monolayer, demonstrating that formation of nearly two dimensional arrays of quantum dots with limited emission blinking can lead to extra well-defined wavelength shifts in these modes. Using spectrally-resolved lifetime measurements we study the emission dynamics of such quantum dot bioconjugates within their monodispersed size distribution. We show that, despite their close vicinity to the nanorods, the rate of energy transfer from these quantum dots to nanorods is rather weak, while the plasmon field enhancement can be strong. Our results reveal that the nanorods present a strongly wavelength or size-dependent non-radiative decay channel to the quantum dot bioconjugates.

  14. Fabrication of periodic arrays of metallic nanoparticles by block copolymer templates on HfO_2 substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frascaroli, Jacopo; Seguini, Gabriele; Spiga, Sabina; Perego, Michele; Boarino, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Block copolymer-based templates can be exploited for the fabrication of ordered arrays of metal nanoparticles (NPs) with a diameter down to a few nanometers. In order to develop this technique on metal oxide substrates, we studied the self-assembly of polymeric templates directly on the HfO_2 surface. Using a random copolymer neutralization layer, we obtained an effective HfO_2 surface neutralization, while the effects of surface cleaning and annealing temperature were carefully examined. Varying the block copolymer molecular weight, we produced regular nanoporous templates with feature size variable between 10 and 30 nm and a density up to 1.5 × 10"1"1 cm"−"2. With the adoption of a pattern transfer process, we produced ordered arrays of Pt and Pt/Ti NPs with diameters of 12, 21 and 29 nm and a constant size dispersion (σ) of 2.5 nm. For the smallest template adopted, the NP diameter is significantly lower than the original template dimension. In this specific configuration, the granularity of the deposited film probably influences the pattern transfer process and very small NPs of 12 nm were achieved without a significant broadening of the size distribution. (paper)

  15. Investigation of the effects of metal-wire resonators in sub-wavelength array based on time-reversal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Hui-Lin; Xiao, Shao-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    The resonant metalens consisting of metal-wire resonators with equally finite length can break the diffraction barrier well suited for super-resolution imaging. In this study, a basic combination constructed by two metal-wire resonators with different lengths is proposed, and its resonant characteristics is analyzed using the method of moments (MoM). Based on the time reversal (TR) technique, this kind of combination can be applied to a sub-wavelength two-element antenna array with a 1/40-wavelength interval to make the elements work simultaneously with little interference in the frequency band of 1.0-1.5 GHz and 1.5-2.0 GHz, respectively. The simulations and experiments show that analysis of MoM and the application of the resonators can be used to design multi-frequency sub-wavelength antenna arrays efficiently. This general design method is convenient and can be used for many applications, such as weakening jamming effectiveness in communication systems, and sub-wavelength imaging in a broad frequency band.

  16. Simulated near-field mapping of ripple pattern supported metal nanoparticles arrays for SERS optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Mahima; Bhatnagar, Mukul; Ranjan, Mukesh; Mukherjee, Subroto; Nath, Rabinder; Mitra, Anirban

    2017-11-01

    An analytical model has been developed using a modified Yamaguchi model along with the wavelength dependent plasmon line-width correction. The model has been used to calculate the near-field response of random nanoparticles on the plane surface, elongated and spherical silver nanoparticle arrays supported on ion beam produced ripple patterned templates. The calculated near-field mapping for elongated nanoparticles arrays on the ripple patterned surface shows maximum number of hot-spots with a higher near-field enhancement (NFE) as compared to the spherical nanoparticle arrays and randomly distributed nanoparticles on the plane surface. The results from the simulations show a similar trend for the NFE when compared to the far field reflection spectra. The nature of the wavelength dependent NFE is also found to be in agreement with the observed experimental results from surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The calculated and the measured optical response unambiguously reveal the importance of interparticle gap and ordering, where a high intensity Raman signal is obtained for ordered elongated nanoparticles arrays case as against non-ordered and the aligned configuration of spherical nanoparticles on the rippled surface.

  17. Plasmon hybridization in silver nanoislands as semishell arrays coupled to a thin metallic film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaroof, Abbas; Nygaard, Jens Vinge; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2011-01-01

    We obtained experimentally strong plasmon interactions between localized surface plasmon with delocalized surface plasmon polaritons in a new nanosystem of silver semishells island film arrays arranged as a closed-packing structure coupled to an adjacent thin silver film. We show that plasmon int...

  18. Injection of holes at indium tin oxide/dendrimer interface: An explanation with new theory of thermionic emission at metal/organic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yingquan; Lu Feiping

    2006-01-01

    The traditional theory of thermionic emission at metal/inorganic crystalline semiconductor interfaces is no longer applicable for the interface between a metal and an organic semiconductor. Under the assumption of thermalization of hot carriers in the organic semiconductor near the interface, a theory for thermionic emission of charge carriers at metal/organic semiconductor interfaces is developed. This theory is used to explain the experimental result from Samuel group [J.P.J. Markham, D.W. Samuel, S.-C. Lo, P.L. Burn, M. Weiter, H. Baessler, J. Appl. Phys. 95 (2004) 438] for the injection of holes from indium tin oxide into the dendrimer based on fac-tris(2-phenylpyridyl) iridium(III)

  19. 1-D Metal Nanobead Arrays within Encapsulated Nanowires via a Red-Ox-Induced Dewetting: Mechanism Study by Atom-Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Tzaguy, Avra; Hazut, Ori; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Yerushalmi, Roie; Seidman, David N

    2017-12-13

    Metal nanoparticle arrays are excellent candidates for a variety of applications due to the versatility of their morphology and structure at the nanoscale. Bottom-up self-assembly of metal nanoparticles provides an important complementary alternative to the traditional top-down lithography method and makes it possible to assemble structures with higher-order complexity, for example, nanospheres, nanocubes, and core-shell nanostructures. Here we present a mechanism study of the self-assembly process of 1-D noble metal nanoparticles arrays, composed of Au, Ag, and AuAg alloy nanoparticles. These are prepared within an encapsulated germanium nanowire, obtained by the oxidation of a metal-germanium nanowire hybrid structure. The resulting structure is a 1-D array of equidistant metal nanoparticles with the same diameter, the so-called nanobead (NB) array structure. Atom-probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to investigate the details of the morphological and chemical evolution during the oxidation of the encapsulated metal-germanium nanowire hybrid-structures. The self-assembly of nanoparticles relies on the formation of a metal-germanium liquid alloy and the migration of the liquid alloy into the nanowire, followed by dewetting of the liquid during shape-confined oxidation where the liquid column breaks-up into nanoparticles due to the Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Our results demonstrate that the encapsulating oxide layer serves as a structural scaffold, retaining the overall shape during the eutectic liquid formation and demonstrates the relationship between the oxide mechanical properties and the final structural characteristics of the 1-D arrays. The mechanistic details revealed here provide a versatile tool-box for the bottom-up fabrication of 1-D arrays nanopatterning that can be modified for multiple applications according to the RedOx properties of the material system components.

  20. Radiation Resistant, Reconfigurable, Shape Memory Metal Rubber Space Arrays, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has demonstrated that Shape Memory Metal RubberTM (SM-MR) adaptive skins exhibit reconfigurable and durable RF properties. It is hypothesized that such...

  1. Bottom-Up Nanofabrication of Supported Noble Metal Alloy Nanoparticle Arrays for Plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nugroho, Ferry A. A.; Iandolo, Beniamino; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2016-01-01

    Mixing different elements at the nanoscale to obtain alloy nanostructures with fine-tuned physical and chemical properties offers appealing opportunities for nanotechnology and nanoscience. However, despite widespread successful application of alloy nanoparticles made by colloidal synthesis...... in heterogeneous catalysis, nanoalloy systems have been used very rarely in solid-state devices and nanoplasmonics-related applications. One reason is that such applications require integration in arrays on a surface with compelling demands on nanoparticle arrangement, uniformity in surface coverage......, and optimization of the surface density. These cannot be fulfilled even using state-of-the-art self -assembly strategies of colloids. As a solution, we present here a generic bottom-up nanolithography-compatible fabrication approach for large-area arrays of alloy nanoparticles on surfaces. To illustrate...

  2. Comparison of junctionless and inversion-mode p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors in presence of hole-phonon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dib, E., E-mail: elias.dib@for.unipi.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Università di Pisa, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Carrillo-Nuñez, H. [Integrated Systems Laboratory ETH Zürich, Gloriastrasse 35, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Cavassilas, N.; Bescond, M. [IM2NP, UMR CNRS 6242, Bât. IRPHE, Technopôle de Château-Gombert, 13384 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2016-01-28

    Junctionless transistors are being considered as one of the alternatives to conventional metal-oxide field-effect transistors. In this work, it is then presented a simulation study of silicon double-gated p-type junctionless transistors compared with its inversion-mode counterpart. The quantum transport problem is solved within the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, whereas hole-phonon interactions are tackled by means of the self-consistent Born approximation. Our findings show that junctionless transistors should perform as good as a conventional transistor only for ultra-thin channels, with the disadvantage of requiring higher supply voltages in thicker channel configurations.

  3. Comparison of junctionless and inversion-mode p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors in presence of hole-phonon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dib, E.; Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Cavassilas, N.; Bescond, M.

    2016-01-01

    Junctionless transistors are being considered as one of the alternatives to conventional metal-oxide field-effect transistors. In this work, it is then presented a simulation study of silicon double-gated p-type junctionless transistors compared with its inversion-mode counterpart. The quantum transport problem is solved within the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, whereas hole-phonon interactions are tackled by means of the self-consistent Born approximation. Our findings show that junctionless transistors should perform as good as a conventional transistor only for ultra-thin channels, with the disadvantage of requiring higher supply voltages in thicker channel configurations

  4. Black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feast, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    This article deals with two questions, namely whether it is possible for black holes to exist, and if the answer is yes, whether we have found any yet. In deciding whether black holes can exist or not the central role in the shaping of our universe played by the forse of gravity is discussed, and in deciding whether we are likely to find black holes in the universe the author looks at the way stars evolve, as well as white dwarfs and neutron stars. He also discusses the problem how to detect a black hole, possible black holes, a southern black hole, massive black holes, as well as why black holes are studied

  5. Metallic nanocone array photonic substrate for high-uniformity surface deposition and optical detection of small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Xu Zhida; Chen Yi; Logan Liu, G

    2011-01-01

    Molecular probe arrays printed on solid surfaces such as DNA, peptide, and protein microarrays are widely used in chemical and biomedical applications especially genomic and proteomic studies (Pollack et al 1999 Nat. Genet. 23 41-6, Houseman et al 2002 Nat. Biotechnol. 20 270-4, Sauer et al 2005 Nat. Rev. Genet. 6 465-76) as well as surface imaging and spectroscopy (Mori et al 2008 Anal. Biochem. 375 223-31, Liu et al 2006 Nat. Nanotechnol. 1 47-52, Liu 2010 IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 16 662-71). Unfortunately the printed molecular spots on solid surfaces often suffer low distribution uniformity due to the lingering 'coffee stain' (Deegan et al 1997 Nature 389 827-9) problem of molecular accumulations and blotches, especially around the edge of deposition spots caused by solvent evaporation and convection processes. Here we present, without any surface chemistry modification, a unique solid surface of high-aspect-ratio silver-coated silicon nanocone arrays that allows highly uniform molecular deposition and thus subsequent uniform optical imaging and spectroscopic molecular detection. Both fluorescent Rhodamine dye molecules and unlabeled oligopeptides are printed on the metallic nanocone photonic substrate surface as circular spot arrays. In comparison with the printed results on ordinary glass slides and silver-coated glass slides, not only high printing density but uniform molecular distribution in every deposited spot is achieved. The high-uniformity and repeatability of molecular depositions on the 'coffee stain'-free nanocone surface is confirmed by laser scanning fluorescence imaging and surface enhanced Raman imaging experiments. The physical mechanism for the uniform molecular deposition is attributed to the superhydrophobicity and localized pinned liquid-solid-air interface on the silver-coated silicon nanocone surface. The unique surface properties of the presented nanocone surface enabled high-density, high-uniformity probe spotting beneficial

  6. Heterogeneous metal-oxide nanowire micro-sensor array for gas sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMeo, Dante; E Vandervelde, Thomas; MacNaughton, Sam; Sonkusale, Sameer; Wang, Zhilong; Zhang, Xinjie

    2014-01-01

    Vanadium oxide, manganese oxide, tungsten oxide, and nickel oxide nanowires were investigated for their applicability as chemiresistive gas sensors. Nanowires have excellent surface-to-volume ratios which yield higher sensitivities than bulk materials. Sensing elements consisting of these materials were assembled in an array to create an electronic nose platform. Dielectrophoresis was used to position the nanomaterials onto a microfabricated array of electrodes, which was subsequently mounted onto a leadless chip carrier and printed circuit board for rapid testing. Samples were tested in an enclosed chamber with vapors of acetone, isopropanol, methanol, and aqueous ammonia. The change in resistance of each assembly was measured. Responses varied between nanowire compositions, each demonstrating unique and repeatable responses to different gases; this enabled direct detection of the gases from the ensemble response. Sensitivities were calculated based on the fractional resistance change in a saturated environment and ranged from 6 × 10 −4 to 2 × 10 −5 %change ppm −1 . (papers)

  7. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Reactor Coolant System (Carbon Steel-to-CASS) Dissimilar Metal Weld Mockup Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, S. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cinson, A. D. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC (United States); Diaz, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, M. T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-23

    In the summer of 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff traveled to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct phased-array ultrasonic testing on a large bore, reactor coolant pump nozzle-to-safe-end mockup. This mockup was fabricated by FlawTech, Inc. and the configuration originated from the Port St. Lucie nuclear power plant. These plants are Combustion Engineering-designed reactors. This mockup consists of a carbon steel elbow with stainless steel cladding joined to a cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) safe-end with a dissimilar metal weld and is owned by Florida Power & Light. The objective of this study, and the data acquisition exercise held at the EPRI NDE Center, were focused on evaluating the capabilities of advanced, low-frequency phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) examination techniques for detection and characterization of implanted circumferential flaws and machined reflectors in a thick-section CASS dissimilar metal weld component. This work was limited to PA-UT assessments using 500 kHz and 800 kHz probes on circumferential flaws only, and evaluated detection and characterization of these flaws and machined reflectors from the CASS safe-end side only. All data were obtained using spatially encoded, manual scanning techniques. The effects of such factors as line-scan versus raster-scan examination approaches were evaluated, and PA-UT detection and characterization performance as a function of inspection frequency/wavelength, were also assessed. A comparative assessment of the data is provided, using length-sizing root-mean-square-error and position/localization results (flaw start/stop information) as the key criteria for flaw characterization performance. In addition, flaw signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the key criterion for detection performance.

  8. Frontier molecular orbitals of a single molecule adsorbed on thin insulating films supported by a metal substrate: electron and hole attachment energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scivetti, Iván; Persson, Mats

    2017-09-06

    We present calculations of vertical electron and hole attachment energies to the frontier orbitals of a pentacene molecule absorbed on multi-layer sodium chloride films supported by a copper substrate using a simplified density functional theory (DFT) method. The adsorbate and the film are treated fully within DFT, whereas the metal is treated implicitly by a perfect conductor model. We find that the computed energy gap between the highest and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals-HOMO and LUMO -from the vertical attachment energies increases with the thickness of the insulating film, in agreement with experiments. This increase of the gap can be rationalised in a simple dielectric model with parameters determined from DFT calculations and is found to be dominated by the image interaction with the metal. We find, however, that this simplified model overestimates the downward shift of the energy gap in the limit of an infinitely thick film.

  9. Ultrasonic Phased Array Technique for Accurate Flaw Sizing in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonathan D Buttram

    2005-01-01

    Described is a manual, portable non-destructive technique to determine the through wall height of cracks present in dissimilar metal welds used in the primary cooling systems of pressure water and boiler light water reactors. Current manual methods found in industry have proven not to exhibit the sizing accuracy required by ASME inspection requirement. The technique described demonstrated an accuracy approximately three times that required to ASME Section XI, Appendix 8 qualification

  10. Charge-compensation in 3d-transition-metal-oxide intercalation cathodes through the generation of localized electron holes on oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Roberts, Matthew R; Hao, Rong; Guerrini, Niccoló; Pickup, David M; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Edström, Kristina; Guo, Jinghua; Chadwick, Alan V; Duda, Laurent C; Bruce, Peter G

    2016-07-01

    During the charging and discharging of lithium-ion-battery cathodes through the de- and reintercalation of lithium ions, electroneutrality is maintained by transition-metal redox chemistry, which limits the charge that can be stored. However, for some transition-metal oxides this limit can be broken and oxygen loss and/or oxygen redox reactions have been proposed to explain the phenomenon. We present operando mass spectrometry of (18)O-labelled Li1.2[Ni0.13(2+)Co0.13(3+)Mn0.54(4+)]O2, which demonstrates that oxygen is extracted from the lattice on charging a Li1.2[Ni0.13(2+)Co0.13(3+)Mn0.54(4+)]O2 cathode, although we detected no O2 evolution. Combined soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy demonstrates that, in addition to oxygen loss, Li(+) removal is charge compensated by the formation of localized electron holes on O atoms coordinated by Mn(4+) and Li(+) ions, which serve to promote the localization, and not the formation, of true O2(2-) (peroxide, O-O ~1.45 Å) species. The quantity of charge compensated by oxygen removal and by the formation of electron holes on the O atoms is estimated, and for the case described here the latter dominates.

  11. Black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Brügmann, B.; Ghez, A. M.; Greiner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in black hole research is illustrated by three examples. We discuss the observational challenges that were met to show that a supermassive black hole exists at the center of our galaxy. Stellar-size black holes have been studied in x-ray binaries and microquasars. Finally, numerical simulations have become possible for the merger of black hole binaries.

  12. Enhanced Light Narrow Transmission through Cascaded Metallic Structure with Periodic Aperture Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hong-Yan; Zhong Yan-Ru; Xiao Gong-Li; Zhang Zhen-Rong

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental and numerical studies on the enhanced light narrow transmission through cascaded Au/SiO x N y /Au aperture arrays by varying the refractive index and thickness of SiO x N y . It is found that the enhancement as well as narrowing of the optical transmission originates from the coupling role of surface plasmon polaritons. The results indicate that the transmission enhancement is highly dependent on the refractive index and thickness of SiO x N y . A higher transmission efficiency and narrower peak are obtained in Au/SiO 2.1 N 0.3 /Au structure with a small refractive index (1.6) and thin thickness (0.2 μm)

  13. Minimizing Isolate Catalyst Motion in Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching for Deep Trenching of Silicon Nanohole Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingyu; Zhao, Yunshan; Dasgupta, Binayak; Ren, Yi; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Li, Xiuling; Chim, Wai Kin; Chiam, Sing Yang

    2017-06-21

    The instability of isolate catalysts during metal-assisted chemical etching is a major hindrance to achieve high aspect ratio structures in the vertical and directional etching of silicon (Si). In this work, we discussed and showed how isolate catalyst motion can be influenced and controlled by the semiconductor doping type and the oxidant concentration ratio. We propose that the triggering event in deviating isolate catalyst motion is brought about by unequal etch rates across the isolate catalyst. This triggering event is indirectly affected by the oxidant concentration ratio through the etching rates. While the triggering events are stochastic, the doping concentration of silicon offers a good control in minimizing isolate catalyst motion. The doping concentration affects the porosity at the etching front, and this directly affects the van der Waals (vdWs) forces between the metal catalyst and Si during etching. A reduction in the vdWs forces resulted in a lower bending torque that can prevent the straying of the isolate catalyst from its directional etching, in the event of unequal etch rates. The key understandings in isolate catalyst motion derived from this work allowed us to demonstrate the fabrication of large area and uniformly ordered sub-500 nm nanoholes array with an unprecedented high aspect ratio of ∼12.

  14. Metal micro-arrays for collimating neutrons and X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allman, B.E.; Cimmino, A.; Klein, A.G.; Hamilton, W.A.

    1998-08-01

    The authors describe the theory, fabrication and experimental results of novel, compact optical elements for collimating and/or focusing beams of X-rays or thermal neutrons. These optical elements are solid composites consisting of regular stacks of alternating micro-foils, analogous in action to Soller slits. They are made out of pairs of metals with suitable refractive indices for reflection and/or absorption of the radiation. The performance of these proof-in-principle collimating elements is limited only by the choice of micro-foil materials and the uniformity of their interfaces

  15. Structural control of nonlinear optical absorption and refraction in dense metal nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlgraf-Owens, Dana C; Kik, Pieter G

    2009-08-17

    The linear and nonlinear optical properties of a composite containing interacting spherical silver nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric host are studied as a function of interparticle separation using three dimensional frequency domain simulations. It is shown that for a fixed amount of metal, the effective third-order nonlinear susceptibility of the composite chi((3))(omega) can be significantly enhanced with respect to the linear optical properties, due to a combination of resonant surface plasmon excitation and local field redistribution. It is shown that this geometry-dependent susceptibility enhancement can lead to an improved figure of merit for nonlinear absorption. Enhancement factors for the nonlinear susceptibility of the composite are calculated, and the complex nature of the enhancement factors is discussed.

  16. Synthesis of Various Metal/TiO2 Core/shell Nanorod Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Guan-zhong; Hong, Xun; Shen, Xiao-shuang

    2011-02-01

    We present a general approach to fabricate metal/TiO2 core/shell nanorod structures by two-step electrodeposition. Firstly, TiO2 nanotubes with uniform wall thickness are prepared in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes by electrodeposition. The wall thickness of the nanotubes could be easily controlled by modulating the deposition time, and their outer diameter and length are only limited by the channel diameter and the thickness of the AAO membranes, respectively. The nanotubes' tops prepared by this method are open, while the bottoms are connected directly with the Au film at the back of the AAO membranes. Secondly, Pd, Cu, and Fe elements are filled into the TiO2 nanotubes to form core/shell structures. The core/shell nanorods prepared by this two-step process are high density and free-standing, and their length is dependent on the deposition time.

  17. Lunar Metal Oxide Electrolysis with Oxygen and Photovoltaic Array Production Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A.; Ethridge, E.; Hudson, S.; Sen, S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a Marshall Space Flight Center funded effort to conduct an experimental demonstration of the processing of simulated lunar resources by the molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) process to produce oxygen and metal from lunar resources to support human exploration of space. Oxygen extracted from lunar materials can be used for life support and propellant, and silicon and metallic elements produced can be used for in situ fabrication of thin-film solar cells for power production. The Moon is rich in mineral resources, but it is almost devoid of chemical reducing agents, therefore, molten oxide electrolysis, MOE, is chosen for extraction, since the electron is the most practical reducing agent. MOE was also chosen for following reasons. First, electrolytic processing offers uncommon versatility in its insensitivity to feedstock composition. Secondly, oxide melts boast the twin key attributes of highest solubilizing capacity for regolith and lowest volatility of any candidate electrolytes. The former is critical in ensuring high productivity since cell current is limited by reactant solubility, while the latter simplifies cell design by obviating the need for a gas-tight reactor to contain evaporation losses as would be the case with a gas or liquid phase fluoride reagent operating at such high temperatures. In the experiments reported here, melts containing iron oxide were electrolyzed in a low temperature supporting oxide electrolyte (developed by D. Sadoway, MIT). The production of oxygen and reduced iron were observed. Electrolysis was also performed on the supporting electrolyte with JSC-1 Lunar Simulant. The cell current for the supporting electrolyte alone is negligible while the current for the electrolyte with JSC-1 shows significant current and a peak at about -0.6 V indicating reductive reaction in the simulant.

  18. Rational design of binder-free noble metal/metal oxide arrays with nanocauliflower structure for wide linear range nonenzymatic glucose detection

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhenzhen; Xin, Yanmei; Zhang, Zhonghai; Wu, Hongjun; Wang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional nanocomposites of metal-oxide and noble metal were expected to present superior performance for nonenzymatic glucose detection due to its good conductivity and high catalytic activity inherited from noble metal and metal oxide

  19. Magnonic Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Molina, A; Nunez, Alvaro S; Duine, R A

    2017-02-10

    We show that the interaction between the spin-polarized current and the magnetization dynamics can be used to implement black-hole and white-hole horizons for magnons-the quanta of oscillations in the magnetization direction in magnets. We consider three different systems: easy-plane ferromagnetic metals, isotropic antiferromagnetic metals, and easy-plane magnetic insulators. Based on available experimental data, we estimate that the Hawking temperature can be as large as 1 K. We comment on the implications of magnonic horizons for spin-wave scattering and transport experiments, and for magnon entanglement.

  20. Enhancing the far-ultraviolet sensitivity of silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor imaging arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Bai, Yibin; Ryu, Kevin K.; Gregory, James A.; Welander, Paul B.; Davis, Michael W.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Winters, Gregory S.; Suntharalingam, Vyshnavi; Beletic, James W.

    2015-10-01

    We report our progress toward optimizing backside-illuminated silicon P-type intrinsic N-type complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices developed by Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS) for far-ultraviolet (UV) planetary science applications. This project was motivated by initial measurements at Southwest Research Institute of the far-UV responsivity of backside-illuminated silicon PIN photodiode test structures, which revealed a promising QE in the 100 to 200 nm range. Our effort to advance the capabilities of thinned silicon wafers capitalizes on recent innovations in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) doping processes. Key achievements to date include the following: (1) representative silicon test wafers were fabricated by TIS, and set up for MBE processing at MIT Lincoln Laboratory; (2) preliminary far-UV detector QE simulation runs were completed to aid MBE layer design; (3) detector fabrication was completed through the pre-MBE step; and (4) initial testing of the MBE doping process was performed on monitoring wafers, with detailed quality assessments.

  1. Residual stress measurements in a ferritic steel/In625 superalloy dissimilar metal weldment using neutron diffraction and deep-hole drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skouras, A.; Paradowska, A.; Peel, M.J.; Flewitt, P.E.J.; Pavier, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the use of non-invasive and semi-invasive techniques to measure the residual stresses in a large dissimilar weldment. This took the form of a butt weld between two sections of a P92 steel pipe, joined using an In625 welding consumable. Residual stress measurements have been carried out on the 30 mm thick welded pipe using the deep-hole drilling technique to characterise the through wall section residual stress distribution for the weld metal, HAZ and parent material. In addition, neutron diffraction measurements have been carried out within the weld zone. Diffraction patterns presented a high intensity and sharp peaks for the base P92 steel material. However measurements in the weld superalloy material were proven problematic as very weak diffraction patterns were observed. A thorough examination of the weld material suggested that the likely cause of this phenomenon was texture in the weld material created during the solidification phase of the welding procedure. This paper discusses the challenges in the execution and interpretation of the neutron diffraction results and demonstrates that realistic measurements of residual stresses can be achieved, in complex dissimilar metal weldments. Highlights: ► One of the few papers to measure residual stresses on dissimilar metal welds. ► Paper managed to provide realistic measurements of residual stresses using the DHD and ND technique. ► Results of this study have demonstrated the effect of texture during the ND measurements.

  2. Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, P. K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with several not-quantum aspects of black holes, with emphasis on theoretical and mathematical issues related to numerical modeling of black hole space-times. Part of the material has a review character, but some new results or proposals are also presented. We review the experimental evidence for existence of black holes. We propose a definition of black hole region for any theory governed by a symmetric hyperbolic system of equations. Our definition reproduces the usu...

  3. Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Horowitz, Gary T.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1998-01-01

    Black holes are among the most intriguing objects in modern physics. Their influence ranges from powering quasars and other active galactic nuclei, to providing key insights into quantum gravity. We review the observational evidence for black holes, and briefly discuss some of their properties. We also describe some recent developments involving cosmic censorship and the statistical origin of black hole entropy.

  4. Fe2Ni2N nanosheet array: an efficient non-noble-metal electrocatalyst for non-enzymatic glucose sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chao; Dai, Rui; Cao, Xiaoqin; Ji, Yuyao; Qu, Fengli; Liu, Zhiang; Du, Gu; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Xiong, Xiaoli; Sun, Xuping; Huang, Ke

    2017-09-01

    It is very important to develop enhanced electrochemical sensing platforms for molecular detection and non-noble-metal nanoarray architecture, as electrochemical catalyst electrodes have attracted great attention due to their large specific surface area and easy accessibility to target molecules. In this paper, we demonstrate that an Fe2Ni2N nanosheet array grown on Ti mesh (Fe2Ni2N NS/TM) shows high electrocatalytic activity toward glucose electrooxidation in alkaline medium. As an electrochemical glucose sensor, such an Fe2Ni2N NS/TM catalyst electrode demonstrates superior sensing performance with a short response time of less than 5 s, a wide linear range of 0.05 μM-1.5 mM, a low detection limit of 0.038 μM (S/N = 3), a high sensitivity of 6250 μA mM-1 cm-2, as well as high selectivity and long-term stability.

  5. Mapping the Galvanic Corrosion of Three Coupled Metal Alloys Using Coupled Multielectrode Array: Influence of Chloride Ion Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ju

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The galvanic corrosion behavior of three metal alloys commonly used in water desalination plants was investigated using coupled multielectrode arrays consisting of aluminum-brass (HAl77-2, titanium alloy (TA2, and 316L stainless steel (316L SS. The three electrode types were coupled galvanically and arranged in different geometric configurations. Their corrosion behavior was characterized as a function of the chloride concentration. The potential and current distributions of the three-electrode coupling systems display electrochemical inhomogeneity. Generally, the aluminum-brass wires are anodic versus the titanium alloy and stainless steel. The titanium alloy acts as a primary cathode, and the 316L SS acts as a secondary cathode. The corrosion rate of aluminum-brass depends on the concentration of chloride ion, with a maximum corrosion rate at a chloride concentration of 2.3 wt %. In terms of geometrical arrangements, when the anodic HAl77-2 wires are located on the edge and are connected to the 316L SS wires in the coupling system, the main anodic area enlarges, especially in the area adjacent to the 316L SS wires. When the HAl77-2 wires are located between (in the middle of the two other types of wires, the corrosion rates are higher than the corrosion rates observed from the other two geometrical arrangements.

  6. Mapping the Galvanic Corrosion of Three Coupled Metal Alloys Using Coupled Multielectrode Array: Influence of Chloride Ion Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hong; Duan, JinZhuo; Yang, Yuanfeng; Cao, Ning; Li, Yan

    2018-04-20

    The galvanic corrosion behavior of three metal alloys commonly used in water desalination plants was investigated using coupled multielectrode arrays consisting of aluminum-brass (HAl77-2), titanium alloy (TA2), and 316L stainless steel (316L SS). The three electrode types were coupled galvanically and arranged in different geometric configurations. Their corrosion behavior was characterized as a function of the chloride concentration. The potential and current distributions of the three-electrode coupling systems display electrochemical inhomogeneity. Generally, the aluminum-brass wires are anodic versus the titanium alloy and stainless steel. The titanium alloy acts as a primary cathode, and the 316L SS acts as a secondary cathode. The corrosion rate of aluminum-brass depends on the concentration of chloride ion, with a maximum corrosion rate at a chloride concentration of 2.3 wt %. In terms of geometrical arrangements, when the anodic HAl77-2 wires are located on the edge and are connected to the 316L SS wires in the coupling system, the main anodic area enlarges, especially in the area adjacent to the 316L SS wires. When the HAl77-2 wires are located between (in the middle of) the two other types of wires, the corrosion rates are higher than the corrosion rates observed from the other two geometrical arrangements.

  7. Nanoparticle-Assisted Diffusion Brazing of Metal Microchannel Arrays: Nanoparticle Synthesis, Deposition, and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluri, Ravindranadh T.

    Microchannel process technology (MPT) offers several advantages to the field of nanomanufacturing: 1) improved process control over very short time intervals owing to shorter diffusional distances; and 2) reduced reactor size due to high surface area to volume ratios and enhanced heat and mass transfer. The objective of this thesis was to consider how nanomaterials, produced in part using MPT, could be used to solve problems associated with the fabrication of MPT devices. Specifically, many MPT devices are produced using transient liquid-phase brazing involving an electroplated interlayer consisting of a brazing alloy designed for melting temperature suppression. Unfortunately, these alloys can form brittle secondary phases which significantly reduce bond strength. In contrast, prior efforts have shown that it is possible to leverage the size-dependent properties of nanomaterials to suppress brazing temperatures. In this prior work, thin films of off-the-shelf elemental nanoparticles were used as interlayers yielding joints with improved mechanical properties. In the present investigation, efforts have been made to characterize the synthesis and deposition of various elemental nanoparticle suspensions for use in the transient liquid-phase brazing of aluminum and stainless steel. Advances were used to demonstrate the nanoparticle-assisted diffusion brazing of a microchannel array. In the first section, a silver nanoparticle (AgNP) interlayer was produced for the diffusion brazing of heat exchanger aluminum. Efforts are made to examine the effect of braze filler particle size (˜5 nm and ˜50 nm) and processing parameters (heating rate: 5ºC/min and 25ºC/min; brazing temperature: 550ºC and 570ºC) on thin coupons of diffusion-brazed 3003 Al. A tensile strength of 69.7 MPa was achieved for a sample brazed at 570°C for 30 min under 1 MPa with an interlayer thickness of approximately 7 microm. Further suppression of the brazing temperature to 500ºC was achieved by

  8. Distinguishing between deep trapping transients of electrons and holes in TiO2 nanotube arrays using planar microwave resonator sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarifi, Mohammad H; Wiltshire, Benjamin Daniel; Mahdi, Najia; Shankar, Karthik; Daneshmand, Mojgan

    2018-05-16

    A large signal DC bias and a small signal microwave bias were simultaneously applied to TiO2 nanotube membranes mounted on a planar microwave resonator. The DC bias modulated the electron concentration in the TiO2 nanotubes, and was varied between 0 and 120 V in this study. Transients immediately following the application and removal of DC bias were measured by monitoring the S-parameters of the resonator as a function of time. The DC bias stimulated Poole-Frenkel type trap-mediated electrical injection of excess carriers into TiO2 nanotubes which resulted in a near constant resonant frequency but a pronounced decrease in the microwave amplitude due to free electron absorption. When ultraviolet illumination and DC bias were both present and then step-wise removed, the resonant frequency shifted due to trapping -mediated change in the dielectric constant of the nanotube membranes. Characteristic lifetimes of 60-80 s, 300-800 s and ~3000 s were present regardless of whether light or bias was applied and are also observed in the presence of a hole scavenger, which we attribute to oxygen adsorption and deep electron traps while another characteristic lifetime > 9000 s was only present when illumination was applied, and is attributed to the presence of hole traps.

  9. Time-dependent transport of a localized surface plasmon through a linear array of metal nanoparticles: Precursor and normal mode contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compaijen, P. J.; Malyshev, V. A.; Knoester, J.

    2018-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the time-dependent transport of a localized surface plasmon excitation through a linear array of identical and equidistantly spaced metal nanoparticles. Two different signals propagating through the array are found: one traveling with the group velocity of the surface plasmon polaritons of the system and damped exponentially, and the other running with the speed of light and decaying in a power-law fashion, as x-1 and x-2 for the transversal and longitudinal polarizations, respectively. The latter resembles the Sommerfeld-Brillouin forerunner and has not been identified in previous studies. The contribution of this signal dominates the plasmon transport at large distances. In addition, even though this signal is spread in the propagation direction and has the lateral dimension larger than the wavelength, the field profile close to the chain axis does not change with distance, indicating that this part of the signal is confined to the array.

  10. Supported noble metals on hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanotube arrays as highly ordered electrodes for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changkun; Yu, Hongmei; Li, Yongkun; Gao, Yuan; Zhao, Yun; Song, Wei; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanotube (H-TNT) arrays serve as highly ordered nanostructured electrode supports, which are able to significantly improve the electrochemical performance and durability of fuel cells. The electrical conductivity of H-TNTs increases by approximately one order of magnitude in comparison to air-treated TNTs. The increase in the number of oxygen vacancies and hydroxyl groups on the H-TNTs help to anchor a greater number of Pt atoms during Pt electrodeposition. The H-TNTs are pretreated by using a successive ion adsorption and reaction (SIAR) method that enhances the loading and dispersion of Pt catalysts when electrodeposited. In the SIAR method a Pd activator can be used to provide uniform nucleation sites for Pt and leads to increased Pt loading on the H-TNTs. Furthermore, fabricated Pt nanoparticles with a diameter of 3.4 nm are located uniformly around the pretreated H-TNT support. The as-prepared and highly ordered electrodes exhibit excellent stability during accelerated durability tests, particularly for the H-TNT-loaded Pt catalysts that have been annealed in ultrahigh purity H2 for a second time. There is minimal decrease in the electrochemical surface area of the as-prepared electrode after 1000 cycles compared to a 68 % decrease for the commercial JM 20 % Pt/C electrode after 800 cycles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that after the H-TNT-loaded Pt catalysts are annealed in H2 for the second time, the strong metal-support interaction between the H-TNTs and the Pt catalysts enhances the electrochemical stability of the electrodes. Fuel-cell testing shows that the power density reaches a maximum of 500 mWcm(-2) when this highly ordered electrode is used as the anode. When used as the cathode in a fuel cell with extra-low Pt loading, the new electrode generates a specific power density of 2.68 kWg(Pt) (-1) . It is indicated that H-TNT arrays, which have highly ordered nanostructures, could be used as ordered electrode supports

  11. Damage-Free Smooth-Sidewall InGaAs Nanopillar Array by Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingyu; Song, Yi; Kim, Jeong Dong; Yu, Lan; Wasserman, Daniel; Chim, Wai Kin; Chiam, Sing Yang; Li, Xiuling

    2017-10-24

    Producing densely packed high aspect ratio In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As nanostructures without surface damage is critical for beyond Si-CMOS nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. However, conventional dry etching methods are known to produce irreversible damage to III-V compound semiconductors because of the inherent high-energy ion-driven process. In this work, we demonstrate the realization of ordered, uniform, array-based In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As pillars with diameters as small as 200 nm using the damage-free metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) technology combined with the post-MacEtch digital etching smoothing. The etching mechanism of In x Ga 1-x As is explored through the characterization of pillar morphology and porosity as a function of etching condition and indium composition. The etching behavior of In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As, in contrast to higher bandgap semiconductors (e.g., Si or GaAs), can be interpreted by a Schottky barrier height model that dictates the etching mechanism constantly in the mass transport limited regime because of the low barrier height. A broader impact of this work relates to the complete elimination of surface roughness or porosity related defects, which can be prevalent byproducts of MacEtch, by post-MacEtch digital etching. Side-by-side comparison of the midgap interface state density and flat-band capacitance hysteresis of both the unprocessed planar and MacEtched pillar In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors further confirms that the surface of the resultant pillars is as smooth and defect-free as before etching. MacEtch combined with digital etching offers a simple, room-temperature, and low-cost method for the formation of high-quality In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As nanostructures that will potentially enable large-volume production of In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As-based devices including three-dimensional transistors and high-efficiency infrared photodetectors.

  12. Preparation of Microcrystals of Piroxicam Monohydrate by Antisolvent Precipitation via Microfabricated Metallic Membranes with Ordered Pore Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Rahimah; Vladisavljević, Goran T; Simone, Elena; Nagy, Zoltan K; Holdich, Richard G

    2017-12-06

    Microcrystals of piroxicam (PRX) monohydrate with a narrow size distribution were prepared from acetone/PRX solutions by antisolvent crystallization via metallic membranes with ordered pore arrays. Crystallization was achieved by controlled addition of the feed solution through the membrane pores into a well-stirred antisolvent. A complete transformation of an anhydrous form I into a monohydrate form of PRX was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The size of the crystals was 7-34 μm and was controlled by the PRX concentration in the feed solution (15-25 g L -1 ), antisolvent/solvent volume ratio (5-30), and type of antisolvent (Milli-Q water or 0.1-0.5 wt % aqueous solutions of hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), poly(vinyl alcohol) or Pluronic P-123). The smallest crystals were obtained by injecting 25 g L -1 PRX solution through a stainless-steel membrane with a pore size of 10 μm into a 0.06 wt % HPMC solution stirred at 1500 rpm using an antisolvent/solvent ratio of 20. HPMC provided better steric stabilization of microcrystals against agglomeration than poly(vinyl alcohol) and Pluronic P-123, due to hydrogen bonding interactions with PRX and water. A continuous production of large PRX monohydrate microcrystals with a volume-weighted mean diameter above 75 μm was achieved in a continuous stirred membrane crystallizer. Rapid pouring of Milli-Q water into the feed solution resulted in a mixture of highly polydispersed prism-shaped and needle-shaped crystals.

  13. An all metal array of antennae for RF heating of TOKAMAKS in the ion cyclotron range of frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquinot, J.; Lebot, H.; Adam, J.; Kuus, H.

    1980-09-01

    500 KW, the maximum available RF power, at a frequency of 60 MHz and in 50 to 100 ms pulses, has been launched in TFR plasmas using an array of 4 half turn antennae. The array has a potential power capability of 1 MW through a single port. The electrical coupling efficiency is about 90%

  14. Fabrication of a two-dimensional piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer array using a top-crossover-to-bottom structure and metal bridge connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joontaek; Kim, Sangwon; Lee, Wonjun; Choi, Hongsoo

    2013-01-01

    A new design methodology and fabrication process for two-dimensional (2D) piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (pMUT) arrays using a top-crossover-to-bottom (TCTB) structure was developed. Individual sensing and actuation of pMUT elements from a small number of connection lines was enabled by the TCTB structure, and the parasitic coupling capacitance of the array was significantly reduced as a result. A 32 × 32 pMUT array with a TCTB structure was fabricated, resulting in 64 connection lines over an area of 4.8 × 4.8 mm 2 . The top electrodes for each pMUT element were re-connected by metal bridging after bottom-electrode etching caused them to become disconnected. A deep reactive ion etching process was used to compactify the array. Each pMUT element was a circular-shaped K 31 -type ultrasonic transducer using a 1 µm thick sol–gel lead zirconate titanate (PZT: Pb1.10 Zr0.52 Ti0.48) thin film. To characterize a single element in the 2D pMUT array, the resonant frequency and coupling coefficient of 20 pMUT elements were averaged to 3.85 MHz and 0.0112, respectively. The maximum measured ultrasound intensity in water, measured at a distance of 4 mm, was 4.6 µW cm −2  from a single pMUT element driven by a 5 V pp  sine wave at 2.22 MHz. Potential applications for development of a TCTB-arranged 2D pMUT array include ultrasonic medical imaging, ultrasonic communication, ultrasonic range-finding and handwriting input systems. (paper)

  15. Fabrication of Metal Nanoparticle Arrays in the ZrO2(Y, HfO2(Y, and GeOx Films by Magnetron Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Gorshkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The single sheet arrays of Au nanoparticles (NPs embedded into the ZrO2(Y, HfO2(Y, and GeOx (x≈2 films have been fabricated by the alternating deposition of the nanometer-thick dielectric and metal films using Magnetron Sputtering followed by annealing. The structure and optical properties of the NP arrays have been studied, subject to the fabrication technology parameters. The possibility of fabricating dense single sheet Au NP arrays in the matrices listed above with controlled NP sizes (within 1 to 3 nm and surface density has been demonstrated. A red shift of the plasmonic optical absorption peak in the optical transmission spectra of the nanocomposite films (in the wavelength band of 500 to 650 nm has been observed. The effect was attributed to the excitation of the collective surface plasmon-polaritons in the dense Au NP arrays. The nanocomposite films fabricated in the present study can find various applications in nanoelectronics (e.g., single electronics, nonvolatile memory devices, integrated optics, and plasmonics.

  16. Steel, hard metal and diamonds. The history of drilling blast holes in mining and tunneling; Stahl, Hartmetall und Diamanten. Zur Geschichte des Sprenglochbohrens im Berg- und Tunnelbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feistkorn, E. [Inst. fuer Vortrieb und Gewinnung, DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Beginning of the blasting technique in mining and tunneling during the 17th century required drilling holes to take the explosive. Following the use of hammer and wedge, drilling was done over a long period of time by hand with mallet and drillsteel. Continuously, during the 19th century the handwork was replaced by drilling machines. Technically, the evolution of drilling equipment is marked by electrohydraulic control and automatization with the assistance of microelectronics. Regarding the material, the introduction of hard metal and - in addition for rotary drilling - the development of synthetic diamond material are the main features. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mit der Einfuehrung der Sprengtechnik im Bergbau und Tunnelbau im 17. Jahrhundert mussten verfahrensbedingt Bohrloecher zur Aufnahme des Sprengstoffes hergestellt werden. In Anlehnung an die Arbeit mit Schlaegel und Eisen erfolgte dies lange Zeit manuell mit dem Bohrfaeustel und Stahlbohrern. Die Handarbeit wurde waehrend der 2. Haelfte des 19. Jahrhunderts kontinuierlich durch Bohrmaschinen verdraengt. Maschinentechnisch ist die weitere Entwicklung durch elektrohydraulische Steuerungen und die Automatisierung der Bohrgeraete mit Hilfe der Mikroelektronik gekennzeichnet. Materialtechnisch stellen die Einfuehrung des Hartmetalls und beim drehenden Bohren zusaetzlich die Entwicklung synthetischer Diamantwerkstoffe die herausragenden Marksteine dar. (orig.)

  17. I. Hole-transporting dendrimers and their use in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and II. Novel layered catalysts containing bipyridinium and zero-valent metal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koene, Shannon Carol

    A series of polyaromatic ether/ester dendrimers containing a hole transporting naphthylphenylbenzyl amine at the periphery and a variety of fluorescent dyes at the core has been studied in an effort to observe energy transfer in these species. The dyes incorporated in these dendrimers include 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone (quinizarin), Coumarin 343, and a benzopentathiophene. These dendrimers have been incorporated into both single layer and heterostructure organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). In the case of first generation dendrimer OLEDs, excimer/exciplex formation was predominant. In third generation dendrimers, complete energy transfer from the periphery to the dye at the core was observed both in photoluminescence spectra and electroluminescence in OLEDs. Dendrimers containing different dye cores can be combined to achieve color mixing/tuning. In addition, layered catalysts were prepared via both covalent and electrostatic means to achieve the catalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from hydrogen and oxygen. Covalent catalysts were prepared by first growing layers of zirconium and a bipyridinium containing bisphosphonate onto silica particles. Palladium and/or platinum was ion-exchanged into the structure and reduced to the zero valent metal by hydrogen gas. A second set of catalysts was prepared by electrostatically depositing polycations/polyanions onto carboxylate or amine functionalized polystyrene microspheres. Anionic colloidal particles were adsorbed to the polycationic surface. An octacationic viologen oligomer was used in an attempt to increase the affinity of adsorption of the Pd particles to the surface of the microspheres. Catalytic studies of both types of catalysts are herein reported.

  18. Improving light harvesting in polymer photodetector devices through nanoindented metal mask films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macedo, A. G.; Zanetti, F.; Mikowski, A.; Hummelen, J. C.; Lepienski, C. M.; da Luz, M. G. E.; Roman, L. S.

    2008-01-01

    To enhance light harvesting in organic photovoltaic devices, we propose the incorporation of a metal (aluminum) mask film in the system's usual layout. We fabricate devices in a sandwich geometry, where the mask (nanoindented with a periodic array of holes of sizes d and spacing s) is added between

  19. Rational design of binder-free noble metal/metal oxide arrays with nanocauliflower structure for wide linear range nonenzymatic glucose detection

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhenzhen

    2015-06-12

    One-dimensional nanocomposites of metal-oxide and noble metal were expected to present superior performance for nonenzymatic glucose detection due to its good conductivity and high catalytic activity inherited from noble metal and metal oxide respectively. As a proof of concept, we synthesized gold and copper oxide (Au/CuO) composite with unique one-dimensional nanocauliflowers structure. Due to the nature of the synthesis method, no any foreign binder was needed in keeping either Au or CuO in place. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt in combining metal oxide and noble metal in a binder-free style for fabricating nonenzymatic glucose sensor. The Au/CuO nanocauliflowers with large electrochemical active surface and high electrolyte contact area would promise a wide linear range and high sensitive detection of glucose with good stability and reproducibility due to its good electrical conductivity of Au and high electrocatalytic activity of CuO.

  20. Assessing the potential of group 13 and 14 metal/metalloid phthalocyanines as hole transport layers in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plint, Trevor; Lessard, Benoît H. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E5 (Canada); Bender, Timothy P. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E5 (Canada); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2016-04-14

    In this study, we have assessed the potential application of group 13 and 14 metal and metalloid phthalocyanines ((X){sub n}-MPcs) and their axially substituted derivatives as hole-transporting layers in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). OLEDs studied herein have the generic structure of glass/ITO/(N,N′-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N′-diphenyl-(1,1′-biphenyl)-4,4′-diamine (NPB) or (X){sub n}-MPc)(50 nm)/Alq{sub 3} (60 nm)/LiF (1 nm)/Al (80 nm), where X is an axial substituent group. OLEDs using chloro aluminum phthalocyanine (Cl-AlPc) showed good peak luminance values of 2620 ± 113 cd/m{sup 2} at 11 V. To our knowledge, Cl-AlPc has not previously been shown to work as a hole transport material (HTL) in OLEDs. Conversely, the di-chlorides of silicon, germanium, and tin phthalocyanine (Cl{sub 2}-SiPc, Cl{sub 2}-GePc, and Cl{sub 2}-SnPc, respectively) showed poor performance compared to Cl-AlPc, having peak luminances of only 38 ± 4 cd/m{sup 2} (12 V), 23 ± 1 cd/m{sup 2} (8.5 V), and 59 ± 5 cd/m{sup 2} (13.5 V), respectively. However, by performing a simple axial substitution of the chloride groups of Cl{sub 2}-SiPc with pentafluorophenoxy groups, the resulting bis(pentafluorophenoxy) silicon phthalocyanine (F{sub 10}-SiPc) containing OLED had a peak luminance of 5141 ± 941 cd/m{sup 2} (10 V), a two order of magnitude increase over its chlorinated precursor. This material showed OLED characteristics approaching those of a baseline OLED based on the well-studied triarylamine NPB. Attempts to attach the pentafluorophenoxy axial group to both SnPc and GePc were hindered by synthetic difficulties and low thermal stability, respectively. In light of the performance improvements observed by simple axial substitution of SiPc in OLEDs, the use of axially substituted MPcs in organic electronic devices remains of continuing interest to us and potentially the field in general.

  1. Assessing the potential of group 13 and 14 metal/metalloid phthalocyanines as hole transport layers in organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plint, Trevor; Lessard, Benoît H.; Bender, Timothy P.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have assessed the potential application of group 13 and 14 metal and metalloid phthalocyanines ((X)n-MPcs) and their axially substituted derivatives as hole-transporting layers in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). OLEDs studied herein have the generic structure of glass/ITO/(N,N'-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB) or (X)n-MPc)(50 nm)/Alq3 (60 nm)/LiF (1 nm)/Al (80 nm), where X is an axial substituent group. OLEDs using chloro aluminum phthalocyanine (Cl-AlPc) showed good peak luminance values of 2620 ± 113 cd/m2 at 11 V. To our knowledge, Cl-AlPc has not previously been shown to work as a hole transport material (HTL) in OLEDs. Conversely, the di-chlorides of silicon, germanium, and tin phthalocyanine (Cl2-SiPc, Cl2-GePc, and Cl2-SnPc, respectively) showed poor performance compared to Cl-AlPc, having peak luminances of only 38 ± 4 cd/m2 (12 V), 23 ± 1 cd/m2 (8.5 V), and 59 ± 5 cd/m2 (13.5 V), respectively. However, by performing a simple axial substitution of the chloride groups of Cl2-SiPc with pentafluorophenoxy groups, the resulting bis(pentafluorophenoxy) silicon phthalocyanine (F10-SiPc) containing OLED had a peak luminance of 5141 ± 941 cd/m2 (10 V), a two order of magnitude increase over its chlorinated precursor. This material showed OLED characteristics approaching those of a baseline OLED based on the well-studied triarylamine NPB. Attempts to attach the pentafluorophenoxy axial group to both SnPc and GePc were hindered by synthetic difficulties and low thermal stability, respectively. In light of the performance improvements observed by simple axial substitution of SiPc in OLEDs, the use of axially substituted MPcs in organic electronic devices remains of continuing interest to us and potentially the field in general.

  2. Green's tensor calculations of plasmon resonances of single holes and hole pairs in thin gold films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alegret, Joan; Kaell, Mikael; Johansson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We present numerical calculations of the plasmon properties of single-hole and hole-pair structures in optically thin gold films obtained with the Green's tensor formalism for stratified media. The method can be used to obtain the optical properties of a given hole system, without problems associated with the truncation of the infinite metal film. The calculations are compared with previously published experimental data and an excellent agreement is found. In particular, the calculations are shown to reproduce the evolution of the hole plasmon resonance spectrum as a function of hole diameter, film thickness and hole separation.

  3. Brane holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that in models with large extra dimensions under special conditions one can extract information from the interior of 4D black holes. For this purpose we study an induced geometry on a test brane in the background of a higher-dimensional static black string or a black brane. We show that, at the intersection surface of the test brane and the bulk black string or brane, the induced metric has an event horizon, so that the test brane contains a black hole. We call it a brane hole. When the test brane moves with a constant velocity V with respect to the bulk black object, it also has a brane hole, but its gravitational radius r e is greater than the size of the bulk black string or brane r 0 by the factor (1-V 2 ) -1 . We show that bulk ''photon'' emitted in the region between r 0 and r e can meet the test brane again at a point outside r e . From the point of view of observers on the test brane, the events of emission and capture of the bulk photon are connected by a spacelike curve in the induced geometry. This shows an example in which extra dimensions can be used to extract information from the interior of a lower-dimensional black object. Instead of the bulk black string or brane, one can also consider a bulk geometry without a horizon. We show that nevertheless the induced geometry on the moving test brane can include a brane hole. In such a case the extra dimensions can be used to extract information from the complete region of the brane-hole interior. We discuss thermodynamic properties of brane holes and interesting questions which arise when such an extra-dimensional channel for the information mining exists.

  4. On the Temporal Stability of Analyte Recognition with an E-Nose Based on a Metal Oxide Sensor Array in Practical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Ilia; Sysoev, Victor; Kaikov, Igor; Koronczi, Ilona; Adil Akai Tegin, Ruslan; Smanalieva, Jamila; Sommer, Martin; Ilicali, Coskan; Hauptmannl, Michael

    2018-02-11

    The paper deals with a functional instability of electronic nose (e-nose) units which significantly limits their real-life applications. Here we demonstrate how to approach this issue with example of an e-nose based on a metal oxide sensor array developed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany). We consider the instability of e-nose operation at different time scales ranging from minutes to many years. To test the e-nose we employ open-air and headspace sampling of analyte odors. The multivariate recognition algorithm to process the multisensor array signals is based on the linear discriminant analysis method. Accounting for the received results, we argue that the stability of device operation is mostly affected by accidental changes in the ambient air composition. To overcome instabilities, we introduce the add-training procedure which is found to successfully manage both the temporal changes of ambient and the drift of multisensor array properties, even long-term. The method can be easily implemented in practical applications of e-noses and improve prospects for device marketing.

  5. Simple, Fast, and Cost-Effective Fabrication of Wafer-Scale Nanohole Arrays on Silicon for Antireflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Di

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, fast, and cost-effective method was developed in this paper for the high-throughput fabrication of nanohole arrays on silicon (Si, which is utilized for antireflection. Wafer-scale polystyrene (PS monolayer colloidal crystal was developed as templates by spin-coating method. Metallic shadow mask was prepared by lifting off the oxygen etched PS beads from the deposited chromium film. Nanohole arrays were fabricated by Si dry etching. A series of nanohole arrays were fabricated with the similar diameter but with different depth. It is found that the maximum depth of the Si-hole was determined by the diameter of the Cr-mask. The antireflection ability of these Si-hole arrays was investigated. The results show that the reflection decreases with the depth of the Si-hole. The deepest Si-hole arrays show the best antireflection ability (reflection 600 nm, which was about 28 percent of the nonpatterned silicon wafer’s reflection. The proposed method has the potential for high-throughput fabrication of patterned Si wafer, and the low reflectivity allows the application of these wafers in crystalline silicon solar cells.

  6. X-ray M4,5 Resonant Raman Scattering from La metal with final 4p hole: Calculations with 4p-4d-4f configuration interaction in the final state and comparison with the experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, M.; Braicovich, L.; Tagliaferri, A.; Dallera, C.; Giarda, K.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Brookes, N.B.; Borgatti, F.

    2001-03-01

    We consider the X-Ray Resonant Raman Scattering (RRS) in La in the whole M 4,5 region ending with a state with a 4p hole, along the sequence 3d 10 4f 0 →3d 9 4f 1 →3d 10 4p 5 4f 1 . The final state configuration mixes with that with two 4d holes i.e. 3d 10 4d 8 4f n+2 having almost the same energy. Thus RRS must be described by introducing final state Configuration Interaction (CI) between states with one 4p hole and with two 4d holes. This approach allows detailed experimental data on La-metal to be interpreted on the basis of a purely ionic approach. It is shown that the inclusion of CI is crucial and has very clear effects. The calculations with the Kramers-Heisenberg formula describe all measured spectral features appearing in the strict Raman regime i.e. dispersing with the incident photon energy. In the experiment also a nondispersive component is present when the excitation energy is greater than about 2 eV above the M 5 peak. The shape and position of this component is well accounted for by a model based on all possible partitions of the excitation energy between localised and extended states. However, the intensity of the nondispersive component is greater in the measurements, suggesting a rearrangement in the intermediate excited state. The comparison of ionic calculations with the metal measurements is legitimate, as shown by the comparison between the measurements on La-metal and on LaF 3 with M 5 excitation, giving the same spectrum within the experimental accuracy. Moreover, the experiment shows that the final lifetime broadening is much greater in the final states corresponding to lower outgoing photon energies than in the states corresponding to higher outgoing photon energies. (author)

  7. Photochemical induced growth and aggregation of metal nanoparticles in diode-array spectrophotometer via excited dimethyl-sulfoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidki, Tomer; Cohen, Haim; Meyerstein, Dan

    2010-10-21

    Ag(0) and Au(0) nanoparticles suspended in dilute aqueous solutions containing (CH(3))(2)SO are photochemically unstable. The light source of a diode-array spectrophotometer induces, within less than a minute, particle growth and aggregation. The results indicate that this process is triggered by UV light absorption by the (CH(3))(2)SO.

  8. Black holes at neutrino telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, M.; Ringwald, A.; Tu, H.

    2002-01-01

    In scenarios with extra dimensions and TeV-scale quantum gravity, black holes are expected to be produced in the collision of light particles at center-of-mass energies above the fundamental Planck scale with small impact parameters. Black hole production and evaporation may thus be studied in detail at the large hadron collider (LHC). But even before the LHC starts operating, neutrino telescopes such as AMANDA/IceCube, ANTARES, Baikal, and RICE have an opportunity to search for black hole signatures. Black hole production in the scattering of ultrahigh energy cosmic neutrinos on nucleons in the ice or water may initiate cascades and through-going muons with distinct characteristics above the Standard Model rate. In this Letter, we investigate the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to black hole production and compare it to the one expected at the Pierre Auger Observatory, an air shower array currently under construction, and at the LHC. We find that, already with the currently available data, AMANDA and RICE should be able to place sensible constraints in black hole production parameter space, which are competitive with the present ones from the air shower facilities Fly's Eye and AGASA. In the optimistic case that a ultrahigh energy cosmic neutrino flux significantly higher than the one expected from cosmic ray interactions with the cosmic microwave background radiation is realized in nature, one even has discovery potential for black holes at neutrino telescopes beyond the reach of LHC. (orig.)

  9. Facile conversion of bulk metal surface to metal oxide single-crystalline nanostructures by microwave irradiation: Formation of pure or Cr-doped hematite nanostructure arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seungho; Jeong, Haeyoon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2010-01-01

    We report a method for converting the surfaces of bulk metal substrates (pure iron or stainless steel) to metal oxide (hematite or Cr-doped hematite) nanostructures using microwave irradiation. When microwave radiation (2.45 GHz, single-mode) was applied to a metal substrate under the flow of a gas mixture containing O 2 and Ar, metal oxide nanostructures formed and entirely covered the substrate. The nanostructures were single crystalline, and the atomic ratios of the substrate metals were preserved in the nanostructures. When a pure iron sheet was used as a substrate, hematite nanowires (1000 W microwave radiation) or nanosheets (1800 W microwave radiation) formed on the surface of the substrate. When a SUS410 sheet was used as a substrate, slightly curved rod-like nanostructures were synthesized. The oxidation states of Fe and Cr in these nanorods were Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ . Quantitative analyses revealed an average Fe/Cr atomic ratio of 9.2, nearly identical to the ratio of the metals in the SUS410 substrate.

  10. Black hole astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandford, R.D.; Thorne, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    Following an introductory section, the subject is discussed under the headings: on the character of research in black hole astrophysics; isolated holes produced by collapse of normal stars; black holes in binary systems; black holes in globular clusters; black holes in quasars and active galactic nuclei; primordial black holes; concluding remarks on the present state of research in black hole astrophysics. (U.K.)

  11. White holes and eternal black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Stephen D H

    2012-01-01

    We investigate isolated white holes surrounded by vacuum, which correspond to the time reversal of eternal black holes that do not evaporate. We show that isolated white holes produce quasi-thermal Hawking radiation. The time reversal of this radiation, incident on a black hole precursor, constitutes a special preparation that will cause the black hole to become eternal. (paper)

  12. A novel microneedle array for the treatment of hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jonghyun; Liu, Kewei; Medina, Tim; Kralick, Francis; Noh, Hongseok Moses

    2014-06-01

    We present a microfabricated 10 by 10 array of microneedles for the treatment of a neurological disease called communicating hydrocephalus. Together with the previously reported microvalve array, the current implantable microneedle array completes the microfabricated arachnoid granulations (MAGs) that mimic the function of normal arachnoid granulations (AGs). The microneedle array was designed to enable the fixation of the MAGs through dura mater membrane in the brain and thus provide a conduit for the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Cone-shaped microneedles with hollow channels were fabricated using a series of microfabrication techniques: SU-8 photolithography for tapered geometry, reactive ion etching for sharpening the microneedles, 248 nm deep UV excimer laser machining for creating through-hole inside the microneedles, and metal sputtering for improved rigidity. Puncture tests were conducted using porcine dura mater and the results showed that the fabricated microneedle array is strong enough to pierce the dura mater. The in-vitro biocompatibility test result showed that none of the 100 outlets of the microneedles exposed to the bloodstream were clogged significantly by blood cells. We believe that these test results demonstrate the potential use of the microneedle array as a new treatment of hydrocephalus.

  13. Investigations on effects of the hole size to fix electrodes and interconnection lines in polydimethylsiloxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behkami, Saber; Frounchi, Javad; Ghaderi Pakdel, Firouz; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Translational research in bioelectronics medicine and neural implants often relies on established material assemblies made of silicone rubber (polydimethylsiloxane-PDMS) and precious metals. Longevity of the compound is of utmost importance for implantable devices in therapeutic and rehabilitation applications. Therefore, secure mechanical fixation can be used in addition to chemical bonding mechanisms to interlock PDMS substrate and insulation layers with metal sheets for interconnection lines and electrodes. One of the best ways to fix metal lines and electrodes in PDMS is to design holes in electrode rims to allow for direct interconnection between top to bottom layer silicone. Hence, the best layouts and sizes of holes (up to 6) which provide sufficient stability against lateral and vertical forces have been investigated with a variety of numbers of hole in line electrodes, which are simulated and fabricated with different layouts, sizes and materials. Best stability was obtained with radii of 100, 72 and 62 µm, respectively, and a single central hole in aluminum, platinum and MP35N foil line electrodes of 400  ×  500 µm2 size and of thickness 20 µm. The study showed that the best hole size which provides line electrode immobility (of thickness less than 30 µm) within a central hole is proportional to reverse value of Young’s Modulus of the material used. Thus, an array of line electrodes was designed and fabricated to study this effect. Experimental results were compared with simulation data. Subsequently, an approximation curve was generated as design rule to propose the best radius to fix line electrodes according to the material thickness between 10 and 200 µm using PDMS as substrate material.

  14. Enhancement mode GaN-based multiple-submicron channel array gate-recessed fin metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chi

    2018-04-01

    To study the function of channel width in multiple-submicron channel array, we fabricated the enhancement mode GaN-based gate-recessed fin metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron mobility transistors (MOS-HEMTs) with a channel width of 450 nm and 195 nm, respectively. In view of the enhanced gate controllability in a narrower fin-channel structure, the transconductance was improved from 115 mS/mm to 151 mS/mm, the unit gain cutoff frequency was improved from 6.2 GHz to 6.8 GHz, and the maximum oscillation frequency was improved from 12.1 GHz to 13.1 GHz of the devices with a channel width of 195 nm, compared with the devices with a channel width of 450 nm.

  15. A metal-organic framework derived hierarchical nickel-cobalt sulfide nanosheet array on Ni foam with enhanced electrochemical performance for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kai; Han, Xue; Ma, Qingxiang; Han, Lei

    2018-03-06

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as a new platform for the construction of various functional materials for energy related applications. Here, a facile MOF templating method is developed to fabricate a hierarchical nickel-cobalt sulfide nanosheet array on conductive Ni foam (Ni-Co-S/NF) as a binder-free electrode for supercapacitors. A uniform 2D Co-MOF nanowall array is first grown in situ on Ni foam in aqueous solution at room temperature, and then the Co-MOF nanowalls are converted into hierarchical Ni-Co-S nanoarchitectures via an etching and ion-exchange reaction with Ni(NO 3 ) 2 , and a subsequent solvothermal sulfurization. Taking advantage of the compositional and structural merits of the hierarchical Ni-Co-S nanosheet array and conductive Ni foam, such as fast electron transportation, short ion diffusion path, abundant active sites and rich redox reactions, the obtained Ni-Co-S/NF electrode exhibits excellent electrochemical capacitive performance (1406.9 F g -1 at 0.5 A g -1 , 53.9% retention at 10 A g -1 and 88.6% retention over 1000 cycles), which is superior to control CoS/NF. An asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) assembled by using the as-fabricated Ni-Co-S/NF as the positive electrode and activated carbon (AC) as the negative electrode delivers a high energy density of 24.8 W h kg -1 at a high power density of 849.5 W kg -1 . Even when the power density is as high as 8.5 kW kg -1 , the ASC still exhibits a high energy density of 12.5 W h kg -1 . This facile synthetic strategy can also be extended to fabricate other hierarchical integrated electrodes for high-efficiency electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices.

  16. Hole superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.E.; Marsiglio, F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors review recent work on a mechanism proposed to explain high T c superconductivity in oxides as well as superconductivity of conventional materials. It is based on pairing of hole carriers through their direct Coulomb interaction, and gives rise to superconductivity because of the momentum dependence of the repulsive interaction in the solid state environment. In the regime of parameters appropriate for high T c oxides this mechanism leads to characteristic signatures that should be experimentally verifiable. In the regime of conventional superconductors most of these signatures become unobservable, but the characteristic dependence of T c on band filling survives. New features discussed her include the demonstration that superconductivity can result from repulsive interactions even if the gap function does not change sign and the inclusion of a self-energy correction to the hole propagator that reduces the range of band filling where T c is not zero

  17. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  18. Fabrication of micro-channel arrays on thin metallic sheet using internal fluid pressure: Investigations on size effects and development of design guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahabunphachai, Sasawat [NSF I/UCR Center for Precision Forming, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Koc, Muammer [NSF I/UCR Center for Precision Forming, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States)

    2008-01-03

    Micro-feature (channel, protrusion, cavity, etc.) arrays on large area-thin metallic sheet alloys are increasingly needed for compact and integrated heat/mass transfer applications (such as fuel cells and fuel processors) that require high temperature resistance, corrosion resistance, good electrical/thermal conductivity, etc. The performance of these micro-feature arrays mainly affects the volume flow velocity of the reactants inside the arrays which directly controls the rate of convection mass/heat transport. The key factors that affect the flow velocity include channel size and shape, flow field pattern, flow path length, fluid pressure, etc. In this study, we investigated these micro-feature arrays from the manufacturability perspective since it is also an important factor to be considered in the design process. Internal fluid pressure (hydroforming) technique is investigated in this study with the specific goals to, first, understand if the so-called ''size effects'' (grain vs. feature size) are effective on the manufacturability of thin metallic sheet into micro-channels, and second, to establish design guidelines for the micro-channel hydroforming technique for robust mass production conditions. Thin stainless steel 304 blanks of 0.051 mm thick with three different grain sizes of 9.3, 10.6, and 17.0 {mu}m were used in hydroforming experiments to form micro-channels with the dimensions between 0.46-1.33 and 0.15-0.98 mm in width and height, respectively. Based on the experimental results, the effect of the grain size on the channel formability was found to be insignificant for the grain size range used in this study. On the other hand, the effect of the channel (feature) size was shown to dominate the overall formability. In addition, FE models of the process were developed and validated with the experimental results, then used to conduct a parametric study to establish micro-channel design guidelines. The results from the parametric

  19. Transparent, double-sided, ITO-free, flexible dye-sensitized solar cells based on metal wire/ZnO nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Qing; Li, Heng; Yu, Dapeng [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wu, Hongwei; Zou, Dechun [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Polymer Chemistry and Physics of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-07-10

    Transparent, double-sided, flexible, ITO-free dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are fabricated in a simple, facile, and controllable way. Highly ordered, high-crystal-quality, high-density ZnO nanowire arrays are radially grown on stainless steel, Au, Ag, and Cu microwires, which serve as working electrodes. Pt wires serve as the counter electrodes. Two metal wires are encased in electrolyte between two poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films (or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films) to render the device both flexible and highly transparent. The effect of the dye thickness on the photovoltaic performance of the DSSCs as a function of dye-loading time is investigated systematically. Shorter dye-loading times lead to thinner dye layers and better device performance. A dye-loading time of 20 min results in the best device performance. An oxidation treatment of the metal wires is developed effectively to avoid the galvanic-battery effect found in the experiment, which is crucial for real applications of double-metal-wire DSSC configurations. The device shows very good transparency and can increase sunlight use efficiency through two-sided illumination. The double-wire DSSCs remain stable for a long period of time and can be bent at large angles, up to 107 , reversibly, without any loss of performance. The double-wire-PET, planar solar-cell configuration can be used as window stickers and can be readily realized for large-area-weave roll-to-roll processing. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. 30 CFR 56.7013 - Covering or guarding drill holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Covering or guarding drill holes. 56.7013 Section 56.7013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7013 Covering or guarding drill holes. Drill holes large enough to...

  1. 30 CFR 57.7013 - Covering or guarding drill holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Covering or guarding drill holes. 57.7013 Section 57.7013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7013 Covering or guarding drill holes. Drill holes...

  2. Transistor memory devices with large memory windows, using multi-stacking of densely packed, hydrophobic charge trapping metal nanoparticle array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Ikjun; Cho, Jinhan; Kim, Beom Joon; Cho, Jeong Ho; Ryu, Sook Won

    2014-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistor (OFET) memories have rapidly evolved from low-cost and flexible electronics with relatively low-memory capacities to memory devices that require high-capacity memory such as smart memory cards or solid-state hard drives. Here, we report the high-capacity OFET memories based on the multilayer stacking of densely packed hydrophobic metal NP layers in place of the traditional transistor memory systems based on a single charge trapping layer. We demonstrated that the memory performances of devices could be significantly enhanced by controlling the adsorption isotherm behavior, multilayer stacking structure and hydrophobicity of the metal NPs. For this study, tetraoctylammonium (TOA)-stabilized Au nanoparticles (TOA-Au NPs ) were consecutively layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with an amine-functionalized poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (PAD). The formed (PAD/TOA-Au NP ) n films were used as a multilayer stacked charge trapping layer at the interface between the tunneling dielectric layer and the SiO 2 gate dielectric layer. For a single Au NP layer (i.e. PAD/TOA-Au NP ) 1 ) with a number density of 1.82 × 10 12 cm −2 , the memory window of the OFET memory device was measured to be approximately 97 V. The multilayer stacked OFET memory devices prepared with four Au NP layers exhibited excellent programmable memory properties (i.e. a large memory window (ΔV th ) exceeding 145 V, a fast switching speed (1 μs), a high program/erase (P/E) current ratio (greater than 10 6 ) and good electrical reliability) during writing and erasing over a relatively short time scale under an operation voltage of 100 V applied at the gate. (paper)

  3. Room temperature oxidative intercalation with chalcogen hydrides: Two-step method for the formation of alkali-metal chalcogenide arrays within layered perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranmohotti, K.G. Sanjaya; Montasserasadi, M. Dariush; Choi, Jonglak; Yao, Yuan; Mohanty, Debasish; Josepha, Elisha A.; Adireddy, Shiva; Caruntu, Gabriel; Wiley, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Topochemical reactions involving intercalation allow construction of metal chalcogenide arrays within perovskite hosts. ► Gaseous chalcogen hydrides serve as effect reactants for intercalation of sulfur and selenium. ► New compounds prepared by a two-step intercalation strategy are presented. -- Abstract: A two-step topochemical reaction strategy utilizing oxidative intercalation with gaseous chalcogen hydrides is presented. Initially, the Dion-Jacobson-type layered perovskite, RbLaNb 2 O 7 , is intercalated reductively with rubidium metal to make the Ruddlesden-Popper-type layered perovskite, Rb 2 LaNb 2 O 7 . This compound is then reacted at room-temperature with in situ generated H 2 S gas to create Rb-S layers within the perovskite host. Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data (tetragonal, a = 3.8998(2) Å, c = 15.256(1) Å; space group P4/mmm) shows the compound to be isostructural with (Rb 2 Cl)LaNb 2 O 7 where the sulfide resides on a cubic interlayer site surrounded by rubidium ions. The mass increase seen on sulfur intercalation and the refined S site occupation factor (∼0.8) of the product indicate a higher sulfur content than expected for S 2− alone. This combined with the Raman studies, which show evidence for an H-S stretch, indicate that a significant fraction of the intercalated sulfide exists as hydrogen sulfide ion. Intercalation reactions with H 2 Se (g) were also carried out and appear to produce an isostructural selenide compound. The utilization of such gaseous hydride reagents could significantly expand multistep topochemistry to a larger number of intercalants.

  4. Room temperature oxidative intercalation with chalcogen hydrides: Two-step method for the formation of alkali-metal chalcogenide arrays within layered perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranmohotti, K.G. Sanjaya; Montasserasadi, M. Dariush; Choi, Jonglak; Yao, Yuan; Mohanty, Debasish; Josepha, Elisha A.; Adireddy, Shiva; Caruntu, Gabriel [Department of Chemistry and the Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148-2820 (United States); Wiley, John B., E-mail: jwiley@uno.edu [Department of Chemistry and the Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148-2820 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Topochemical reactions involving intercalation allow construction of metal chalcogenide arrays within perovskite hosts. ► Gaseous chalcogen hydrides serve as effect reactants for intercalation of sulfur and selenium. ► New compounds prepared by a two-step intercalation strategy are presented. -- Abstract: A two-step topochemical reaction strategy utilizing oxidative intercalation with gaseous chalcogen hydrides is presented. Initially, the Dion-Jacobson-type layered perovskite, RbLaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}, is intercalated reductively with rubidium metal to make the Ruddlesden-Popper-type layered perovskite, Rb{sub 2}LaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}. This compound is then reacted at room-temperature with in situ generated H{sub 2}S gas to create Rb-S layers within the perovskite host. Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data (tetragonal, a = 3.8998(2) Å, c = 15.256(1) Å; space group P4/mmm) shows the compound to be isostructural with (Rb{sub 2}Cl)LaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7} where the sulfide resides on a cubic interlayer site surrounded by rubidium ions. The mass increase seen on sulfur intercalation and the refined S site occupation factor (∼0.8) of the product indicate a higher sulfur content than expected for S{sup 2−} alone. This combined with the Raman studies, which show evidence for an H-S stretch, indicate that a significant fraction of the intercalated sulfide exists as hydrogen sulfide ion. Intercalation reactions with H{sub 2}Se{sub (g)} were also carried out and appear to produce an isostructural selenide compound. The utilization of such gaseous hydride reagents could significantly expand multistep topochemistry to a larger number of intercalants.

  5. A CuNi/C Nanosheet Array Based on a Metal-Organic Framework Derivate as a Supersensitive Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Ye, Chen; Li, Xu; Ding, Yaru; Liang, Hongbo; Zhao, Guangyu; Wang, Yan

    2018-06-01

    Bimetal catalysts are good alternatives for non-enzymatic glucose sensors owing to their low cost, high activity, good conductivity, and ease of fabrication. In the present study, a self-supported CuNi/C electrode prepared by electrodepositing Cu nanoparticles on a Ni-based metal-organic framework (MOF) derivate was used as a non-enzymatic glucose sensor. The porous construction and carbon scaffold inherited from the Ni-MOF guarantee good kinetics of the electrode process in electrochemical glucose detection. Furthermore, Cu nanoparticles disturb the array structure of MOF derived films and evidently enhance their electrochemical performances in glucose detection. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the CuNi/C electrode possesses a high sensitivity of 17.12 mA mM-1 cm-2, a low detection limit of 66.67 nM, and a wider linearity range from 0.20 to 2.72 mM. Additionally, the electrode exhibits good reusability, reproducibility, and stability, thereby catering to the practical use of glucose sensors. Similar values of glucose concentrations in human blood serum samples are detected with our electrode and with the method involving glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase; the results further demonstrate the practical feasibility of our electrode.

  6. Monolithic integration of a silicon nanowire field-effect transistors array on a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor chip for biochemical sensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livi, Paolo; Kwiat, Moria; Shadmani, Amir; Pevzner, Alexander; Navarra, Giulio; Rothe, Jörg; Stettler, Alexander; Chen, Yihui; Patolsky, Fernando; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-10-06

    We present a monolithic complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based sensor system comprising an array of silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) and the signal-conditioning circuitry on the same chip. The silicon nanowires were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition methods and then transferred to the CMOS chip, where Ti/Pd/Ti contacts had been patterned via e-beam lithography. The on-chip circuitry measures the current flowing through each nanowire FET upon applying a constant source-drain voltage. The analog signal is digitized on chip and then transmitted to a receiving unit. The system has been successfully fabricated and tested by acquiring I-V curves of the bare nanowire-based FETs. Furthermore, the sensing capabilities of the complete system have been demonstrated by recording current changes upon nanowire exposure to solutions of different pHs, as well as by detecting different concentrations of Troponin T biomarkers (cTnT) through antibody-functionalized nanowire FETs.

  7. X-ray focusing using capillary arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugent, K.A.; Chapman, H.N.

    1990-01-01

    A new form of X-ray focusing device based on glass capillary arrays is presented. Theoretical and experimental results for array of circular capillaries and theoretical and computational results for square hole capillaries are given. It is envisaged that devices such as these will find wide applications in X-ray optics as achromatic condensers and collimators. 3 refs., 4 figs

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: The mechanism of the drilling of holes in vertical metallic plates by cw CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanskii, V. V.; Loboiko, A. I.; Antonova, G. F.; Krasyukov, A. G.; Sayapin, V. P.

    1999-02-01

    The possibility of making a hole in a vertical plate with the aid of laser radiation at a surface temperature not exceeding the boiling point is analysed neglecting the vapour pressure. The mechanism of the degradation of the liquid layer involving a reduction of its thickness, as a result of the redistribution of the molten mass owing to the operation of the force of gravity and of thermocapillary convection, is examined. The theoretical dependence of the critical size of the molten zone on the plate thickness is obtained and a comparison is made with experimental data.

  9. Molecular electrostatic potential and "atoms-in-molecules" analyses of the interplay between π-hole and lone pair···π/X-H···π/metal···π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauzá, Antonio; Seth, Saikat Kumar; Frontera, Antonio

    2018-04-05

    Using ab initio calculations, we analyze the interplay between π-hole interactions involving the nitro group of 1,4-dinitrobenzene and lone pair···π (lp···π), C-H···π or metal(M)···π noncovalent interactions. Moreover, we have also used 1,4-phenylenebis(phosphine dioxide) for comparison purposes. Interesting cooperativity effects are found when π-hole (F···N,P) and lp···π/C-H···π/M···π interactions coexist in the same supramolecular assembly. These effects are studied theoretically in terms of energetic and geometric features of the complexes, which are computed by ab initio methods (RI-MP2/def2-TZVP). A charge density analysis using the Bader's theory of "atoms in molecules" is carried out to characterize the interactions and to analyze their strengthening or weakening depending on the variation of charge density at critical points. The importance of electrostatic effects on the mutual influence of the interaction is studied by means of molecular electrostatic potential calculations. By taking advantage of these computational tools, the present study examines interplay of these interactions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effect of the metal work function on the electrical properties of carbon nanotube network transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Ko, Dae Young; Kil, Joon Pyo; Lee, Jung Wha; Park, Wan Jun

    2012-01-01

    A nearly perfect semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube random network thin film transistor array was fabricated, and its reproducible transport properties were investigated. The effects of the metal work function for both the source and the drain on the electrical properties of the transistors were systematically investigated. Three different metal electrodes, Al, Ti, and Pd, were employed. As the metal work function increased, p-type behavior became dominant, and the field effect hole mobility dramatically increased. Also, the Schottky barrier of the Ti-nanotube contact was invariant to the molecular adsorption of species in air.

  11. Black holes. Chapter 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, R.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions for the formation of a black hole are considered, and the properties of black holes. The possibility of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole is discussed. Einstein's theory of general relativity in relation to the formation of black holes is discussed. (U.K.)

  12. Search for black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherepashchuk, Anatolii M

    2003-01-01

    Methods and results of searching for stellar mass black holes in binary systems and for supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei of different types are described. As of now (June 2002), a total of 100 black hole candidates are known. All the necessary conditions Einstein's General Relativity imposes on the observational properties of black holes are satisfied for candidate objects available, thus further assuring the existence of black holes in the Universe. Prospects for obtaining sufficient criteria for reliably distinguishing candidate black holes from real black holes are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  13. Fabrication of large area nanoprism arrays and their application for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, B; Clime, L; Li, K; Veres, T

    2008-01-01

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of metallic nanoprism (triangular nanostructure) arrays using a low-cost and high-throughput process. In the method, the triangular structure is defined by the shadow of a pyramid during angle evaporation of a metal etching mask. The pyramids were created by nanoimprint lithography in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) using a mould having an inverse-pyramid-shaped hole array formed by KOH wet etching of silicon. Silver and gold nanoprism arrays with a period of 200 nm and an edge length of 100 nm have been fabricated and used as effective substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules. Numerical calculations confirmed the great enhancement of electric field near the sharp nanoprism corners, as well as the detrimental effect of the chromium adhesion layer on localized surface plasmon resonance. The current method can also be used to fabricate non-equilateral nanoprism and three-dimensional (3D) nanopyramid arrays, and it can be readily extended to other metals

  14. Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    properties of these black holes should be very helpful. In addition to Chandra, three radio arrays (the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope, the Very Large Array and the Very Long Baseline Array), two millimeter telescopes (the Plateau de Bure Interferometer and the Submillimeter Array), and Lick Observatory in the optical were used to monitor M81. These observations were made simultaneously to ensure that brightness variations because of changes in feeding rates did not confuse the results. Chandra is the only X-ray satellite able to isolate the faint X-rays of the black hole from the emission of the rest of the galaxy. This result confirms less detailed earlier work by Andrea Merloni from the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Garching, Germany and colleagues that suggested that the basic properties of larger black holes are similar to the smaller ones. Their study, however, was not based on simultaneous, multi-wavelength observations nor the application of a detailed physical model. These results will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass.

  15. A Dancing Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre; Smith, Kenneth; Schnetter, Erik; Fiske, David; Laguna, Pablo; Pullin, Jorge

    2002-04-01

    Recently, stationary black holes have been successfully simulated for up to times of approximately 600-1000M, where M is the mass of the black hole. Considering that the expected burst of gravitational radiation from a binary black hole merger would last approximately 200-500M, black hole codes are approaching the point where simulations of mergers may be feasible. We will present two types of simulations of single black holes obtained with a code based on the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formulation of the Einstein evolution equations. One type of simulations addresses the stability properties of stationary black hole evolutions. The second type of simulations demonstrates the ability of our code to move a black hole through the computational domain. This is accomplished by shifting the stationary black hole solution to a coordinate system in which the location of the black hole is time dependent.

  16. Sensitivity of GRETINA position resolution to hole mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasher, V.S. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Cromaz, M. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Merchan, E.; Chowdhury, P. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Crawford, H.L. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lister, C.J. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Campbell, C.M.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Radford, D.C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wiens, A. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-02-21

    The sensitivity of the position resolution of the gamma-ray tracking array GRETINA to the hole charge-carrier mobility parameter is investigated. The χ{sup 2} results from a fit of averaged signal (“superpulse”) data exhibit a shallow minimum for hole mobilities 15% lower than the currently adopted values. Calibration data on position resolution is analyzed, together with simulations that isolate the hole mobility dependence of signal decomposition from other effects such as electronics cross-talk. The results effectively exclude hole mobility as a dominant parameter for improving the position resolution for reconstruction of gamma-ray interaction points in GRETINA.

  17. Spatial separation of electrons and holes for enhancing the gas-sensing property of a semiconductor: ZnO/ZnSnO3 nanorod arrays prepared by a hetero-epitaxial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Gao, Peng; Sha, Linna; Chi, Qianqian; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Jianjiao; Chen, Yujin; Zhang, Milin

    2018-04-01

    The construction of semiconductor composites is known as a powerful method used to realize the spatial separation of electrons and the holes in them, which can result in more electrons or holes and increase the dispersion of oxygen ions ({{{{O}}}2}- and O - ) (one of the most critical factors for their gas-sensing properties) on the surface of the semiconductor gas sensor. In this work, using 1D ZnO/ZnSnO3 nanoarrays as an example, which are prepared through a hetero-epitaxial growing process to construct a chemically bonded interface, the above strategy to attain a better semiconductor gas-sensing property has been realized. Compared with single ZnSnO3 nanotubes and no-matching ZnO/ZnSnO3 nanoarrays gas sensors, it has been proven by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectrum examination that the as-obtained ZnO/ZnSnO3 sensor showed a greatly increased quantity of active surface electrons with exceptional responses to trace target gases and much lower optimum working temperatures (less than about 170 °C). For example, the as-obtained ZnO/ZnSnO3 sensor exhibited an obvious response and short response/recovery time (less than 10 s) towards trace H2S gas (a detection limit down to 700 ppb). The high responses and dynamic repeatability observed in these sensors reveal that the strategy based on the as-presented electron and hole separation is reliable for improving the gas-sensing properties of semiconductors.

  18. Experimental Study on Environment Friendly Tap Hole Clay for Blast Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva kumar, R.; Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    Blast furnace (BF) is the best possible route of iron production available. Blast furnace is a high pressure vessel where iron ore is melted and liquid iron is produced. The liquid iron is tapped through the hole in Blast Furnace called tap hole. The tapped liquid metal flowing through the tap hole is plugged using a clay called tap hole clay. Tap hole clay (THC) is a unshaped refractory used to plug the tap hole. The tap hole clay extruded through the tap hole using a gun. The tap hole clay is designed to expand and plug the tap hole. The tap hole filled with clay is drilled using drill bit and the hole made through the tap hole to tap the liquid metal accumulated inside the furnace. The number of plugging and drilling varies depending on the volume of the furnace. The tap hole clay need to have certain properties to avoid problems during plugging and drilling. In the present paper tap hole clay properties in industrial use was tested and studied. The problems were identified related to tap hole clay manufacturing. Experiments were conducted in lab scale to solve the identified problems. The present composition was modified with experimental results. The properties of the modified tap hole clay were found suitable and useful for blast furnace operation with lab scale experimental results.

  19. Black hole critical phenomena without black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    large values of Ф, black holes do form and for small values the scalar field ... on the near side of the ridge ultimately evolve to form black holes while those configu- ... The inset shows a bird's eye view looking down on the saddle point.

  20. Black hole hair removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Mandal, Ipsita; Sen, Ashoke

    2009-01-01

    Macroscopic entropy of an extremal black hole is expected to be determined completely by its near horizon geometry. Thus two black holes with identical near horizon geometries should have identical macroscopic entropy, and the expected equality between macroscopic and microscopic entropies will then imply that they have identical degeneracies of microstates. An apparent counterexample is provided by the 4D-5D lift relating BMPV black hole to a four dimensional black hole. The two black holes have identical near horizon geometries but different microscopic spectrum. We suggest that this discrepancy can be accounted for by black hole hair - degrees of freedom living outside the horizon and contributing to the degeneracies. We identify these degrees of freedom for both the four and the five dimensional black holes and show that after their contributions are removed from the microscopic degeneracies of the respective systems, the result for the four and five dimensional black holes match exactly.

  1. Noncommutative black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-DomInguez, J C [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico); Obregon, O [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico); RamIrez, C [Facultad de Ciencias FIsico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, PO Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Sabido, M [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    We study noncommutative black holes, by using a diffeomorphism between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model, which is generalized to noncommutative minisuperspace. Through the use of the Feynman-Hibbs procedure we are able to study the thermodynamics of the black hole, in particular, we calculate Hawking's temperature and entropy for the 'noncommutative' Schwarzschild black hole.

  2. Black holes without firewalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larjo, Klaus; Lowe, David A.; Thorlacius, Larus

    2013-05-01

    The postulates of black hole complementarity do not imply a firewall for infalling observers at a black hole horizon. The dynamics of the stretched horizon, that scrambles and reemits information, determines whether infalling observers experience anything out of the ordinary when entering a large black hole. In particular, there is no firewall if the stretched horizon degrees of freedom retain information for a time of the order of the black hole scrambling time.

  3. Black holes are hot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, G.

    1976-01-01

    Recent work, which has been investigating the use of the concept of entropy with respect to gravitating systems, black holes and the universe as a whole, is discussed. The resulting theory of black holes assigns a finite temperature to them -about 10 -7 K for ordinary black holes of stellar mass -which is in complete agreement with thermodynamical concepts. It is also shown that black holes must continuously emit particles just like ordinary bodies which have a certain temperature. (U.K.)

  4. Monopole Black Hole Skyrmions

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, Ian G; Shiiki, N; Winstanley, E

    2000-01-01

    Charged black hole solutions with pion hair are discussed. These can be\\ud used to study monopole black hole catalysis of proton decay.\\ud There also exist\\ud multi-black hole skyrmion solutions with BPS monopole behaviour.

  5. Ballistic hole magnetic microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haq, E.; Banerjee, T.; Siekman, M.H.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to study nanoscale spin transport of holes is presented: ballistic hole magnetic microscopy. The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is used to inject hot electrons into a ferromagnetic heterostructure, where inelastic decay creates a distribution of electron-hole pairs.

  6. What is black hole?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. What is black hole? Possible end phase of a star: A star is a massive, luminous ball of plasma having continuous nuclear burning. Star exhausts nuclear fuel →. White Dwarf, Neutron Star, Black Hole. Black hole's gravitational field is so powerful that even ...

  7. Array capabilities and future arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, D.

    1993-01-01

    Early results from the new third-generation instruments GAMMASPHERE and EUROGAM are confirming the expectation that such arrays will have a revolutionary effect on the field of high-spin nuclear structure. When completed, GAMMASHPERE will have a resolving power am order of magnitude greater that of the best second-generation arrays. When combined with other instruments such as particle-detector arrays and fragment mass analysers, the capabilites of the arrays for the study of more exotic nuclei will be further enhanced. In order to better understand the limitations of these instruments, and to design improved future detector systems, it is important to have some intelligible and reliable calculation for the relative resolving power of different instrument designs. The derivation of such a figure of merit will be briefly presented, and the relative sensitivities of arrays currently proposed or under construction presented. The design of TRIGAM, a new third-generation array proposed for Chalk River, will also be discussed. It is instructive to consider how far arrays of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors could be taken. For example, it will be shown that an idealised open-quote perfectclose quotes third-generation array of 1000 detectors has a sensitivity an order of magnitude higher again than that of GAMMASPHERE. Less conventional options for new arrays will also be explored

  8. Method to fabricate hollow microneedle arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravitz, Stanley H [Placitas, NM; Ingersoll, David [Albuquerque, NM; Schmidt, Carrie [Los Lunas, NM; Flemming, Jeb [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-11-07

    An inexpensive and rapid method for fabricating arrays of hollow microneedles uses a photoetchable glass. Furthermore, the glass hollow microneedle array can be used to form a negative mold for replicating microneedles in biocompatible polymers or metals. These microneedle arrays can be used to extract fluids from plants or animals. Glucose transport through these hollow microneedles arrays has been found to be orders of magnitude more rapid than natural diffusion.

  9. Black hole levitron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsiwalla, Xerxes D.; Verlinde, Erik P.

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of spatially stabilizing four dimensional extremal black holes in background electric/magnetic fields. Whilst looking for stationary stable solutions describing black holes placed in external fields we find that taking a continuum limit of Denef et al.'s multicenter supersymmetric black hole solutions provides a supergravity description of such backgrounds within which a black hole can be trapped within a confined volume. This construction is realized by solving for a levitating black hole over a magnetic dipole base. We comment on how such a construction is akin to a mechanical levitron.

  10. Black holes in binary stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction Distinguishing neutron stars and black holes Optical companions and dynamical masses X-ray signatures of the nature of a compact object Structure and evolution of black-hole binaries High-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black holes Formation of black holes

  11. SNP Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Louhelainen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The papers published in this Special Issue “SNP arrays” (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays focus on several perspectives associated with arrays of this type. The range of papers vary from a case report to reviews, thereby targeting wider audiences working in this field. The research focus of SNP arrays is often human cancers but this Issue expands that focus to include areas such as rare conditions, animal breeding and bioinformatics tools. Given the limited scope, the spectrum of papers is nothing short of remarkable and even from a technical point of view these papers will contribute to the field at a general level. Three of the papers published in this Special Issue focus on the use of various SNP array approaches in the analysis of three different cancer types. Two of the papers concentrate on two very different rare conditions, applying the SNP arrays slightly differently. Finally, two other papers evaluate the use of the SNP arrays in the context of genetic analysis of livestock. The findings reported in these papers help to close gaps in the current literature and also to give guidelines for future applications of SNP arrays.

  12. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  13. Hole history, rotary hole DC-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Purpose of hole DC-3 was to drill into the Umtanum basalt flow using both conventional rotary and core drilling methods. The borehole is to be utilized for geophysical logging, future hydrological testing, and the future installation of a borehole laboratory for long-term pressure, seismic, and moisture migration or accumulation recording in the Umtanum basalt flow in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. Hole DC-3 is located east of the 200 West barricaded area on the Hanford reservation

  14. electrode array

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    A geoelectric investigation employing vertical electrical soundings (VES) using the Ajayi - Makinde Two-Electrode array and the ... arrangements used in electrical D.C. resistivity survey. These include ..... Refraction Tomography to Study the.

  15. The effect of particle-hole interaction on the XPS core-hole spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide; Sjoegren, Lennart

    2004-01-01

    How the effective particle-hole interaction energy, U, or the polarization effect on a secondary electron in a final two-hole one-particle (2h1p) state created by the Coster-Kronig (CK) transition can solely affect the density of the CK particle states and consequently the core-hole spectral function, is discussed. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-hole spectrum is predominantly governed by the unperturbed initial core-hole energy relative to the zero-point energy. At the latter energy, the real part of the initial core-hole self-energy becomes zero (no relaxation energy shift) and the imaginary part (the lifetime broadening) approximately maximizes. The zero-point energy relative to the double-ionization threshold energy is governed by the ratio of U relative to the bandwidth of the CK continuum. As an example, we study the 5p XPS spectra of atomic Ra (Z=88), Th (Z=90) and U (Z=92). The spectra are interpreted in terms of the change in the unperturbed initial core-hole energy relative to the zero-point energy. We explain why in general an ab initio atomic many-body calculation can provide an overall good description of solid-state spectra predominantly governed by the atomic-like localized core-hole dynamics. We explain this in terms of the change from free atom to metal in both U and the zero-point energy (self-energy)

  16. Black and white holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeldovich, Ya.; Novikov, I.; Starobinskij, A.

    1978-01-01

    The theory is explained of the origination of white holes as a dual phenomenon with regard to the formation of black holes. Theoretically it is possible to derive the white hole by changing the sign of time in solving the general theory of relativity equation implying the black hole. The white hole represents the amount of particles formed in the vicinity of a singularity. For a distant observer, matter composed of these particles expands and the outer boundaries of this matter approach from the inside the gravitational radius Rsub(r). At t>>Rsub(r)/c all radiation or expulsion of matter terminates. For the outside observer the white hole exists for an unlimited length of time. In fact, however, it acquires the properties of a black hole and all processes in it cease. The qualitative difference between a white hole and a black hole is in that a white hole is formed as the result of an inner quantum explosion from the singularity to the gravitational radius and not as the result of a gravitational collapse, i.e., the shrinkage of diluted matter towards the gravitational radius. (J.B.)

  17. Black and white holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeldovich, Ya; Novikov, I; Starobinskii, A

    1978-07-01

    The theory is explained of the origination of white holes as a dual phenomenon with regard to the formation of black holes. Theoretically it is possible to derive the white hole by changing the sign of time in solving the general theory of relativity equation implying the black hole. The white hole represents the amount of particles formed in the vicinity of a singularity. For a distant observer, matter composed of these particles expands and the outer boundaries of this matter approach from the inside the gravitational radius R/sub r/. At t>>R/sub r//c all radiation or expulsion of matter terminates. For the outside observer the white hole exists for an unlimited length of time. In fact, however, it acquires the properties of a black hole and all processes in it cease. The qualitative difference between a white hole and a black hole is in that a white hole is formed as the result of an inner quantum explosion from the singularity to the gravitational radius and not as the result of a gravitational collapse, i.e., the shrinkage of diluted matter towards the gravitational radius.

  18. Primary black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, I.; Polnarev, A.

    1981-01-01

    Proves are searched for of the formation of the so-called primary black holes at the very origin of the universe. The black holes would weigh less than 10 13 kg. The formation of a primary black hole is conditional on strong fluctuations of the gravitational field corresponding roughly to a half of the fluctuation maximally permissible by the general relativity theory. Only big fluctuations of the gravitational field can overcome the forces of the hot gas pressure and compress the originally expanding matter into a black hole. Low-mass black holes have a temperature exceeding that of the black holes formed from stars. A quantum process of particle formation, the so-called evaporation takes place in the strong gravitational field of a black hole. The lower the mass of the black hole, the shorter the evaporation time. The analyses of processes taking place during the evaporation of low-mass primary black holes show that only a very small proportion of the total mass of the matter in the universe could turn into primary black holes. (M.D.)

  19. Andreev reflections and the quantum physics of black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Sreenath K.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2017-12-01

    We establish an analogy between superconductor-metal interfaces and the quantum physics of a black hole, using the proximity effect. We show that the metal-superconductor interface can be thought of as an event horizon and Andreev reflection from the interface is analogous to the Hawking radiation in black holes. We describe quantum information transfer in Andreev reflection with a final state projection model similar to the Horowitz-Maldacena model for black hole evaporation. We also propose the Andreev reflection analogue of Hayden and Preskill's description of a black hole final state, where the black hole is described as an information mirror. The analogy between crossed Andreev reflections and Einstein-Rosen bridges is discussed: our proposal gives a precise mechanism for the apparent loss of quantum information in a black hole by the process of nonlocal Andreev reflection, transferring the quantum information through a wormhole and into another universe. Given these established connections, we conjecture that the final quantum state of a black hole is exactly the same as the ground state wave function of the superconductor/superfluid in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity; in particular, the infalling matter and the infalling Hawking quanta, described in the Horowitz-Maldacena model, forms a Cooper pairlike singlet state inside the black hole. A black hole evaporating and shrinking in size can be thought of as the analogue of Andreev reflection by a hole where the superconductor loses a Cooper pair. Our model does not suffer from the black hole information problem since Andreev reflection is unitary. We also relate the thermodynamic properties of a black hole to that of a superconductor, and propose an experiment which can demonstrate the negative specific heat feature of black holes in a growing/evaporating condensate.

  20. Direct electronic communication at bio-interfaces assisted by layered-metal-hydroxide slab arrays with controlled nano-micro structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Zhe; He, Jing

    2011-10-28

    The electronic transfer (eT) at bio-interfaces has been achieved by orientating 2D inorganic slabs in a regular arrangement with the slab ab-planes vertical to the electrode substrate. The eT rate is effectively promoted by tuning the nano-micro scale structures of perpendicular LDH arrays. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  1. Astrophysical black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, Vittorio; Moschella, Ugo; Treves, Aldo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Based on graduate school lectures in contemporary relativity and gravitational physics, this book gives a complete and unified picture of the present status of theoretical and observational properties of astrophysical black holes. The chapters are written by internationally recognized specialists. They cover general theoretical aspects of black hole astrophysics, the theory of accretion and ejection of gas and jets, stellar-sized black holes observed in the Milky Way, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers and quasars as well as their influence on the dynamics in galactic nuclei. The final chapter addresses analytical relativity of black holes supporting theoretical understanding of the coalescence of black holes as well as being of great relevance in identifying gravitational wave signals. With its introductory chapters the book is aimed at advanced graduate and post-graduate students, but it will also be useful for specialists.

  2. Accreting Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2014-01-01

    I outline the theory of accretion onto black holes, and its application to observed phenomena such as X-ray binaries, active galactic nuclei, tidal disruption events, and gamma-ray bursts. The dynamics as well as radiative signatures of black hole accretion depend on interactions between the relatively simple black-hole spacetime and complex radiation, plasma and magnetohydrodynamical processes in the surrounding gas. I will show how transient accretion processes could provide clues to these ...

  3. Nonextremal stringy black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.

    1997-01-01

    We construct a four-dimensional BPS saturated heterotic string solution from the Taub-NUT solution. It is a nonextremal black hole solution since its Euler number is nonzero. We evaluate its black hole entropy semiclassically. We discuss the relation between the black hole entropy and the degeneracy of string states. The entropy of our string solution can be understood as the microscopic entropy which counts the elementary string states without any complications. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  4. Naked black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, G.T.; Ross, S.F.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that there are large static black holes for which all curvature invariants are small near the event horizon, yet any object which falls in experiences enormous tidal forces outside the horizon. These black holes are charged and near extremality, and exist in a wide class of theories including string theory. The implications for cosmic censorship and the black hole information puzzle are discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. Surprise: Dwarf Galaxy Harbors Supermassive Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The surprising discovery of a supermassive black hole in a small nearby galaxy has given astronomers a tantalizing look at how black holes and galaxies may have grown in the early history of the Universe. Finding a black hole a million times more massive than the Sun in a star-forming dwarf galaxy is a strong indication that supermassive black holes formed before the buildup of galaxies, the astronomers said. The galaxy, called Henize 2-10, 30 million light-years from Earth, has been studied for years, and is forming stars very rapidly. Irregularly shaped and about 3,000 light-years across (compared to 100,000 for our own Milky Way), it resembles what scientists think were some of the first galaxies to form in the early Universe. "This galaxy gives us important clues about a very early phase of galaxy evolution that has not been observed before," said Amy Reines, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Virginia. Supermassive black holes lie at the cores of all "full-sized" galaxies. In the nearby Universe, there is a direct relationship -- a constant ratio -- between the masses of the black holes and that of the central "bulges" of the galaxies, leading them to conclude that the black holes and bulges affected each others' growth. Two years ago, an international team of astronomers found that black holes in young galaxies in the early Universe were more massive than this ratio would indicate. This, they said, was strong evidence that black holes developed before their surrounding galaxies. "Now, we have found a dwarf galaxy with no bulge at all, yet it has a supermassive black hole. This greatly strengthens the case for the black holes developing first, before the galaxy's bulge is formed," Reines said. Reines, along with Gregory Sivakoff and Kelsey Johnson of the University of Virginia and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and Crystal Brogan of the NRAO, observed Henize 2-10 with the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array radio telescope and

  6. Filter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  7. Law of substitution for mixed arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koudelka, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear safety justification of a mixed array of dissimilar fissile units of metal units and dilute solution units, according to Clayton, has been a persistent and nagging problem. Dissimilar uranium metal or dissimilar uranium solution units in a mixed array can also create a modeling nightmare for the nuclear criticality safety engineer. Now, a calculational method known as the Law of Substitution has been developed to ensure that the k/sub eff/ of an array of uranium metal and uranium solution units will satisfy any k/sub eff/ limit set by the nuclear safety engineer. The nuclear criticality safety engineer can utilize the Law of Substitution to safely mix or substitute different uranium metal units, different uranium solution units, and more importantly, uranium metal and dilute UO 2 solution units in an array. The Law of Substitution is as follows: (1) calculate the k/sub eff/ of each unit type in its own infinite planar array. (2) Determine the edge-to-edge spacing of the infinite planar array of each type of unit to satisfy a desired k/sub eff/. (3) Select the largest edge-to-edge spacing from among the similar units in their infinite planar arrays and use that spacing for the finite or infinite planar array of mixed units

  8. Black hole Berry phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.; Papadodimas, K.; Verlinde, E.

    2009-01-01

    Supersymmetric black holes are characterized by a large number of degenerate ground states. We argue that these black holes, like other quantum mechanical systems with such a degeneracy, are subject to a phenomenon which is called the geometric or Berry’s phase: under adiabatic variations of the

  9. Black holes are warm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravndal, F.

    1978-01-01

    Applying Einstein's theory of gravitation to black holes and their interactions with their surroundings leads to the conclusion that the sum of the surface areas of several black holes can never become less. This is shown to be analogous to entropy in thermodynamics, and the term entropy is also thus applied to black holes. Continuing, expressions are found for the temperature of a black hole and its luminosity. Thermal radiation is shown to lead to explosion of the black hole. Numerical examples are discussed involving the temperature, the mass, the luminosity and the lifetime of black mini-holes. It is pointed out that no explosions corresponding to the prediction have been observed. It is also shown that the principle of conservation of leptons and baryons is broken by hot black holes, but that this need not be a problem. The related concept of instantons is cited. It is thought that understanding of thermal radiation from black holes may be important for the development of a quantified gravitation theory. (JIW)

  10. Black holes matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge Stjernholm

    2016-01-01

    Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).......Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015)....

  11. Quantum black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Hooft, G. 't

    1987-01-01

    This article is divided into three parts. First, a systematic derivation of the Hawking radiation is given in three different ways. The information loss problem is then discussed in great detail. The last part contains a concise discussion of black hole thermodynamics. This article was published as chapter $6$ of the IOP book "Lectures on General Relativity, Cosmology and Quantum Black Holes" (July $2017$).

  12. Black hole levitron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsiwalla, X.D.; Verlinde, E.P.

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of spatially stabilizing four dimensional extremal black holes in background electric/magnetic fields. Whilst looking for stationary stable solutions describing black holes placed in external fields we find that taking a continuum limit of Denef et al.’s multicenter

  13. Newborn Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Swift satellite say they have found newborn black holes, just seconds old, in a confused state of existence. The holes are consuming material falling into them while somehow propelling other material away at great speeds. "First comes a blast of gamma rays followed by intense pulses of x-rays. The energies involved are much…

  14. Lifshitz topological black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    I find a class of black hole solutions to a (3+1) dimensional theory gravity coupled to abelian gauge fields with negative cosmological constant that has been proposed as the dual theory to a Lifshitz theory describing critical phenomena in (2+1) dimensions. These black holes are all asymptotic to a Lifshitz fixed point geometry and depend on a single parameter that determines both their area (or size) and their charge. Most of the solutions are obtained numerically, but an exact solution is also obtained for a particular value of this parameter. The thermodynamic behaviour of large black holes is almost the same regardless of genus, but differs considerably for small black holes. Screening behaviour is exhibited in the dual theory for any genus, but the critical length at which it sets in is genus-dependent for small black holes.

  15. Holographic duality: Stealing dimensions from metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaanen, Jan

    2013-10-01

    Although electrically charged black holes seem remote from superconductors and strange metals in the laboratory, they might be intimately related by the holographic dualities discovered in string theory.

  16. Tunable plasmon resonances in anisotropic metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penninkhof, J. J.

    2006-09-01

    Coherent oscillations of free electrons in a metal, localized in a small volume or at an interface between a metal and a dielectric medium, have attracted a lot of attention in the past decades. These so-called surface plasmons have special optical properties that can be used in many applications ranging from optoelectronics to sensing of small quantities of molecules. One of the key issues is that electromagnetic energy can be confined to a relatively small volume close to the metal surface. This field enhancement and the resonance frequency strongly depend on the shape and size of the metal structures. In this thesis, several fabrication methods to create these metal structures on the nanometer to micrometer scale are presented. The optical properties are studied with a special emphasis on the effect of shape anisotropy. Self-assembled 2D colloidal crystals are used as mask to fabricate arrays of metal triangles on a substrate. One of the limitations of this nanosphere lithography technique is that the size of the holes in the colloidal mask (through which the metal is evaporated) is determined by the size of the colloids in the mask. The masks, however, can be modified by use of MeV ion beams and/or wet-chemical growth of a thin layer of silica, resulting in a reduced hole size. Arbitrary symmetry and spacing can be obtained by use of optical tweezers and angle-resolved metal deposition. In contrast to pure metals, amorphous materials like silica are known to show anisotropic plastic deformation at constant volume when subject to MeV ion irradiation. Gold cores embedded in a silica matrix, however, show an elongation along the direction of the ion beam, whereas silver cores rather disintegrate. Silver nanocrystals in an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass redistribute themselves in arrays along the ion beam direction. The optical extinction becomes polarization-dependent, with red- and blue-shifts of the plasmon resonances for polarizations longitudinal and transverse

  17. Integrated lithography to prepare periodic arrays of nano-objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipos, Áron; Szalai, Anikó; Csete, Mária

    2013-01-01

    We present an integrated lithography method to prepare versatile nano-objects with variable shape and nano-scaled substructure, in wavelength-scaled periodic arrays with arbitrary symmetry. The idea is to illuminate colloid sphere monolayers by polarized beams possessing periodic lateral intensity modulations. Finite element method was applied to determine the effects of the wavelength, polarization and angle of incidence of the incoming beam, and to predict the characteristics of nano-objects, which can be fabricated on thin metal layer covered substrates due to the near-field enhancement under silica colloid spheres. The inter-object distance is controlled by varying the relative orientation of the periodic intensity modulation with respect to the silica colloid sphere monolayer. It is shown that illuminating silica colloid sphere monolayers by two interfering beams, linear patterns made of elliptical holes appear in case of linear polarization, while circularly polarized beams result in co-existent rounded objects, as more circular nano-holes and nano-crescents. The size of the nano-objects and their sub-structure is determined by the spheres diameter and by the wavelength. We present various complex plasmonic patterns made of versatile nano-objects that can be uniquely fabricated applying the inherent symmetry breaking possibilities in the integrated lithography method.

  18. Materials and mechanisms of hole superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, J.E., E-mail: jhirsch@ucsd.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0319 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    We study the applicability of the model of hole superconductivity to materials. Both conventional and unconventional materials are considered. Many different classes of materials are discussed. The theory is found suitable to describe all of them. No other theory of superconductivity can describe all these classes of materials. The theory of hole superconductivity proposes that there is a single mechanism of superconductivity that applies to all superconducting materials. This paper discusses several material families where superconductivity occurs and how they can be understood within this theory. Materials discussed include the elements, transition metal alloys, high T{sub c} cuprates both hole-doped and electron-doped, MgB{sub 2}, iron pnictides and iron chalcogenides, doped semiconductors, and elements under high pressure.

  19. Entropy of quasiblack holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2010-01-01

    We trace the origin of the black hole entropy S, replacing a black hole by a quasiblack hole. Let the boundary of a static body approach its own gravitational radius, in such a way that a quasihorizon forms. We show that if the body is thermal with the temperature taking the Hawking value at the quasihorizon limit, it follows, in the nonextremal case, from the first law of thermodynamics that the entropy approaches the Bekenstein-Hawking value S=A/4. In this setup, the key role is played by the surface stresses on the quasihorizon and one finds that the entropy comes from the quasihorizon surface. Any distribution of matter inside the surface leads to the same universal value for the entropy in the quasihorizon limit. This can be of some help in the understanding of black hole entropy. Other similarities between black holes and quasiblack holes such as the mass formulas for both objects had been found previously. We also discuss the entropy for extremal quasiblack holes, a more subtle issue.

  20. ULTRAMASSIVE BLACK HOLE COALESCENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Fazeel Mahmood; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Berczik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Although supermassive black holes (SMBHs) correlate well with their host galaxies, there is an emerging view that outliers exist. Henize 2-10, NGC 4889, and NGC 1277 are examples of SMBHs at least an order of magnitude more massive than their host galaxy suggests. The dynamical effects of such ultramassive central black holes is unclear. Here, we perform direct N-body simulations of mergers of galactic nuclei where one black hole is ultramassive to study the evolution of the remnant and the black hole dynamics in this extreme regime. We find that the merger remnant is axisymmetric near the center, while near the large SMBH influence radius, the galaxy is triaxial. The SMBH separation shrinks rapidly due to dynamical friction, and quickly forms a binary black hole; if we scale our model to the most massive estimate for the NGC 1277 black hole, for example, the timescale for the SMBH separation to shrink from nearly a kiloparsec to less than a parsec is roughly 10 Myr. By the time the SMBHs form a hard binary, gravitational wave emission dominates, and the black holes coalesce in a mere few Myr. Curiously, these extremely massive binaries appear to nearly bypass the three-body scattering evolutionary phase. Our study suggests that in this extreme case, SMBH coalescence is governed by dynamical friction followed nearly directly by gravitational wave emission, resulting in a rapid and efficient SMBH coalescence timescale. We discuss the implications for gravitational wave event rates and hypervelocity star production

  1. Plasmonic Photovoltaic Cells with Dual-Functional Gold, Silver, and Copper Half-Shell Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Kim, Gyu Min; Nishi, Hiroyasu; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2017-09-12

    Solid-state photovoltaic cells based on plasmon-induced charge separation (PICS) have attracted growing attention during the past decade. However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the previously reported devices, which are generally loaded with dispersed metal nanoparticles as light absorbers, has not been sufficiently high. Here we report simpler plasmonic photovoltaic cells with interconnected Au, Ag, and Cu half-shell arrays deposited on SiO 2 @TiO 2 colloidal crystals, which serve both as a plasmonic light absorber and as a current collector. The well-controlled and easily prepared plasmonic structure allows precise comparison of the PICS efficiency between different plasmonic metal species. The cell with the Ag half-shell array has higher photovoltaic performance than the cells with Au and Cu half-shell arrays because of the high population of photogenerated energetic electrons, which gives a high electron injection efficiency and suppressed charge recombination probability, achieving the highest PCE among the solid-state PICS devices even without a hole transport layer.

  2. Black holes new horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Hayward, Sean Alan

    2013-01-01

    Black holes, once just fascinating theoretical predictions of how gravity warps space-time according to Einstein's theory, are now generally accepted as astrophysical realities, formed by post-supernova collapse, or as supermassive black holes mysteriously found at the cores of most galaxies, powering active galactic nuclei, the most powerful objects in the universe. Theoretical understanding has progressed in recent decades with a wider realization that local concepts should characterize black holes, rather than the global concepts found in textbooks. In particular, notions such as trapping h

  3. Silver Nanowire Arrays : Fabrication and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yuyi

    2016-01-01

    Nanowire arrays have increasingly received attention for their use in a variety of applications such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), plasmonic sensing, and electrodes for photoelectric devices. However, until now, large scale fabrication of device-suitable metallic nanowire arrays on supporting substrates has seen very limited success. This thesis describes my work rst on the development of a novel successful processing route for the fabrication of uniform noble metallic (e.g. A...

  4. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration of a tomographic array in which the object can rotate about its axis is described. The X-ray detector is a cylindrical screen perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The X-ray source has a line-shaped focus coinciding with the axis of rotation. The beam is fan-shaped with one side of this fan lying along the axis of rotation. The detector screen is placed inside an X-ray image multiplier tube

  5. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomographic array with the following characteristics is described. An X-ray screen serving as detector is placed before a photomultiplier tube which itself is placed in front of a television camera connected to a set of image processors. The detector is concave towards the source and is replacable. Different images of the object are obtained simultaneously. Optical fibers and lenses are used for transmission within the system

  6. UV plasmonic enhancement through three dimensional nano-cavity antenna array in aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jieying; Stevenson, Peter; Montanaric, Danielle; Wang, Yunshan; Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer S.; Harris, Joel M.; Blair, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Metallic nanostructure can enhance fluorescence through excited surface plasmons which increase the local field as well as improve its quantum efficiency. When coupling to cavity resonance with proper gap dimension, gap hot spots can be generated to interact with fluorescence at their excitation/emission region in UV. A 3D nano-cavity antenna array in Aluminum has been conducted to generate local hot spot resonant at fluorescence emission resonance. Giant field enhancement has been achieved through coupling fundamental resonance modes of nanocavity into surface plasmons polaritons (SPPs). In this work, two distinct plasmonic structure of 3D resonant cavity nanoantenna has been studied and its plasmonic response has been scaled down to the UV regime through finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method. Two different strategies for antenna fabrication will be conducted to obtain D-coupled Dots-on-Pillar Antenna array (D2PA) through Focus Ion Beam (FIB) and Cap- Hole Pair Antenna array (CHPA) through nanosphere template lithography (NTL). With proper optimization of the structures, D2PA and CHPA square array with 280nm pitch have achieved distinct enhancement at fluorophore emission wavelength 350nm and excitation wavelength 280nm simultaneously. Maximum field enhancement can reach 20 and 65 fold in the gap of D2PA and CHPA when light incident from substrate, which is expected to greatly enhance fluorescent quantum efficiency that will be confirmed in fluorescence lifetime measurement.

  7. Black holes with halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monten, Ruben; Toldo, Chiara

    2018-02-01

    We present new AdS4 black hole solutions in N =2 gauged supergravity coupled to vector and hypermultiplets. We focus on a particular consistent truncation of M-theory on the homogeneous Sasaki–Einstein seven-manifold M 111, characterized by the presence of one Betti vector multiplet. We numerically construct static and spherically symmetric black holes with electric and magnetic charges, corresponding to M2 and M5 branes wrapping non-contractible cycles of the internal manifold. The novel feature characterizing these nonzero temperature configurations is the presence of a massive vector field halo. Moreover, we verify the first law of black hole mechanics and we study the thermodynamics in the canonical ensemble. We analyze the behavior of the massive vector field condensate across the small-large black hole phase transition and we interpret the process in the dual field theory.

  8. Introducing the Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, Remo; Wheeler, John A.

    1971-01-01

    discusses the cosmology theory of a black hole, a region where an object loses its identity, but mass, charge, and momentum are conserved. Include are three possible formation processes, theorized properties, and three way they might eventually be detected. (DS)

  9. Do Hypervolumes Have Holes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonder, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Hypervolumes are used widely to conceptualize niches and trait distributions for both species and communities. Some hypervolumes are expected to be convex, with boundaries defined by only upper and lower limits (e.g., fundamental niches), while others are expected to be maximal, with boundaries defined by the limits of available space (e.g., potential niches). However, observed hypervolumes (e.g., realized niches) could also have holes, defined as unoccupied hyperspace representing deviations from these expectations that may indicate unconsidered ecological or evolutionary processes. Detecting holes in more than two dimensions has to date not been possible. I develop a mathematical approach, implemented in the hypervolume R package, to infer holes in large and high-dimensional data sets. As a demonstration analysis, I assess evidence for vacant niches in a Galapagos finch community on Isabela Island. These mathematical concepts and software tools for detecting holes provide approaches for addressing contemporary research questions across ecology and evolutionary biology.

  10. Colliding black hole solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Mainuddin

    2005-01-01

    A new solution of Einstein equation in general relativity is found. This solution solves an outstanding problem of thermodynamics and black hole physics. Also this work appears to conclude the interpretation of NUT spacetime. (author)

  11. Black-hole thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekenstein, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Including black holes in the scheme of thermodynamics has disclosed a deep-seated connection between gravitation, heat and the quantum that may lead us to a synthesis of the corresponding branches of physics

  12. Plasmonic excitations on metallic nanowires embedded in silica photonic crystal fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prill Sempere, Luis

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the theoretical and experimental investigation of metal-filled photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) and their fabrication. The thesis explains how to overcome the obstacles when infiltrating molten metals into sub-micron holes in fused silica (SiO 2 ) PCF. The optical properties of such filled fibers are theoretically and experimentally investigated, focusing on the coupling between the core mode of the fibers and the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the metal wires. The thesis introduces the ideas, physical challenges and results of two new filling techniques: the pressure cell technique and the splicing technique. These techniques make it possible for the first time to fill different fiber structures with sub-micron sized holes, such as PCFs and single-hole capillaries, with different metals like gold (Au) and silver (Ag). Samples with hole diameters between 120 nm and 20 μm and aspect ratios as high as 75000 have been realized. Theoretical simulations and models have been developed in order to understand the optical behavior of these novel structures. The light guided in the core of the filled PCF structure will couple to SPP modes on the wires. Several measurements have been performed to determine the resonance wavelengths and losses of such filled PCF structures. Also, different phenomena such as the shift of the resonance position with the wire diameter or pitch and the polarization dependence of SPP in polarization maintaining (PM)-PCF have been investigated. The fabrication of free standing metal arrays was another focus of this work. The critical question was how to remove the surrounding SiO 2 from the metal wires. Two different approaches have been tried: etching of the SiO 2 and cleaving the PCF. (orig.)

  13. Plasmonic excitations on metallic nanowires embedded in silica photonic crystal fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prill Sempere, Luis

    2010-06-17

    This thesis describes the theoretical and experimental investigation of metal-filled photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) and their fabrication. The thesis explains how to overcome the obstacles when infiltrating molten metals into sub-micron holes in fused silica (SiO{sub 2}) PCF. The optical properties of such filled fibers are theoretically and experimentally investigated, focusing on the coupling between the core mode of the fibers and the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the metal wires. The thesis introduces the ideas, physical challenges and results of two new filling techniques: the pressure cell technique and the splicing technique. These techniques make it possible for the first time to fill different fiber structures with sub-micron sized holes, such as PCFs and single-hole capillaries, with different metals like gold (Au) and silver (Ag). Samples with hole diameters between 120 nm and 20 {mu}m and aspect ratios as high as 75000 have been realized. Theoretical simulations and models have been developed in order to understand the optical behavior of these novel structures. The light guided in the core of the filled PCF structure will couple to SPP modes on the wires. Several measurements have been performed to determine the resonance wavelengths and losses of such filled PCF structures. Also, different phenomena such as the shift of the resonance position with the wire diameter or pitch and the polarization dependence of SPP in polarization maintaining (PM)-PCF have been investigated. The fabrication of free standing metal arrays was another focus of this work. The critical question was how to remove the surrounding SiO{sub 2} from the metal wires. Two different approaches have been tried: etching of the SiO{sub 2} and cleaving the PCF. (orig.)

  14. White dwarfs - black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexl, R.; Sexl, H.

    1975-01-01

    The physical arguments and problems of relativistic astrophysics are presented in a correct way, but without any higher mathematics. The book is addressed to teachers, experimental physicists, and others with a basic knowledge covering an introductory lecture in physics. The issues dealt with are: fundamentals of general relativity, classical tests of general relativity, curved space-time, stars and planets, pulsars, gravitational collapse and black holes, the search for black holes, gravitational waves, cosmology, cosmogony, and the early universe. (BJ/AK) [de

  15. Supersymmetric black holes

    OpenAIRE

    de Wit, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    The effective action of $N=2$, $d=4$ supergravity is shown to acquire no quantum corrections in background metrics admitting super-covariantly constant spinors. In particular, these metrics include the Robinson-Bertotti metric (product of two 2-dimensional spaces of constant curvature) with all 8 supersymmetries unbroken. Another example is a set of arbitrary number of extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes. These black holes break 4 of 8 supersymmetries, leaving the other 4 unbroken. We ha...

  16. Black Holes and Thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Wald, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    We review the remarkable relationship between the laws of black hole mechanics and the ordinary laws of thermodynamics. It is emphasized that - in analogy with the laws of thermodynamics - the validity the laws of black hole mechanics does not appear to depend upon the details of the underlying dynamical theory (i.e., upon the particular field equations of general relativity). It also is emphasized that a number of unresolved issues arise in ``ordinary thermodynamics'' in the context of gener...

  17. Sub-threshold wavelength splitting in coupled photonic crystal cavity arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Martin; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Skovgård, Troels Suhr

    Coupled photonic crystal (PhC) cavity arrays have recently been found to increase the output power of nanocavity lasers by coherent coupling of a large number of cavities [1]. We have measured the sub-threshold behaviour of such structures in order to gain better understanding of the mode structure....... PhC structures defined by circular holes placed in a quadratic lattice with pitch a=280 nm were fabricated in a GaAs membrane and cavity arrays were realized by introducing single missing holes with intracavity hole distances of two, three, five and seven holes. Arrays with different number...... of coupled cavities were fabricated and characterized using photoluminescence measurements of quantum dots embedded in the GaAs PhC membrane. Since the collection spot size was ~2.5 μm and therefore small compared to the arrays, spectra were taken at several positions of each array....

  18. Energy of ground state of laminar electron-hole liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of a possible existence of metal electron-hole liquid in semiconductors is considered. The calculation has been carried out for the following model: two parallel planes are separated with the distance on one of the planes electrons moving, on the other holes doing. Transitions between the planes are forbidden. The density of particles for both planes is the same. The energy of the ground state and correlation functions for such electron-and hole system are calculated. It is shown that the state of a metal liquid is more advantageous against the exciton gas. For the mass ratio of electrons and holes, msub(e)/msub(h) → 0 a smooth rearrangement of the system into a state with ordered heavy particles is observed

  19. Micro-hole drilling and cutting using femtosecond fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Liu, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Micro-hole drilling and cutting in ambient air are presented by using a femtosecond fiber laser. At first, the micro-hole drilling was investigated in both transparent (glasses) and nontransparent (metals and tissues) materials. The shape and morphology of the holes were characterized and evaluated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Debris-free micro-holes with good roundness and no thermal damage were demonstrated with the aspect ratio of 8∶1. Micro-hole drilling in hard and soft tissues with no crack or collateral thermal damage is also demonstrated. Then, trench micromachining and cutting were studied for different materials and the effect of the laser parameters on the trench properties was investigated. Straight and clean trench edges were obtained with no thermal damage.

  20. Black holes and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    Belief in the existence of black holes is the ultimate act of faith for a physicist. First suggested by the English clergyman John Michell in the year 1784, the gravitational pull of a black hole is so strong that nothing - not even light - can escape. Gravity might be the weakest of the fundamental forces but black-hole physics is not for the faint-hearted. Black holes present obvious problems for would-be observers because they cannot, by definition, be seen with conventional telescopes - although before the end of the decade gravitational-wave detectors should be able to study collisions between black holes. Until then astronomers can only infer the existence of a black hole from its gravitational influence on other matter, or from the X-rays emitted by gas and dust as they are dragged into the black hole. However, once this material passes through the 'event horizon' that surrounds the black hole, we will never see it again - not even with X-ray specs. Despite these observational problems, most physicists and astronomers believe that black holes do exist. Small black holes a few kilometres across are thought to form when stars weighing more than about two solar masses collapse under the weight of their own gravity, while supermassive black holes weighing millions of solar masses appear to be present at the centre of most galaxies. Moreover, some brave physicists have proposed ways to make black holes - or at least event horizons - in the laboratory. The basic idea behind these 'artificial black holes' is not to compress a large amount of mass into a small volume, but to reduce the speed of light in a moving medium to less than the speed of the medium and so create an event horizon. The parallels with real black holes are not exact but the experiments could shed new light on a variety of phenomena. The first challenge, however, is to get money for the research. One year on from a high-profile meeting on artificial black holes in London, for

  1. Iridium terpyridine complexes as functional assembling units in arrays for the conversion of light energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamigni, Lucia; Collin, Jean-Paul; Sauvage, Jean-Pierre

    2008-07-01

    In photosynthesis, sunlight energy is converted into a chemical potential by an electron transfer sequence that is started by an excited state and ultimately yields a long-lived charge-separated state. This process can be reproduced by carefully designed multicomponent artificial arrays of three or more components, and the stored energy can be used to oxidize or reduce molecules in solution, to inject electrons or holes, or to create an electron flow. Therefore, the process is important both for artificial-photosynthesis research and for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Molecular arrays for photoinduced charge separation often use chromophores that resemble the natural ones. However, new synthetic components, including transition metal complexes, have had some success. This Account discusses the use of bis-terpyridine (tpy) metal complexes as assembling and functional units of such multicomponent arrays. M(tpy)2(n+) complexes have the advantage of yielding linear arrays with unambiguous geometry. Originally, Ru(tpy)2(2+) and Os(tpy)2(2+) were used as photosensitizers in triads containing typical organic donors and acceptors. However, it soon became evident that the relatively low excited state of these complexes could act as an energy drain of the excited state of the photosensitizer and, thus, seriously compete with charge separation. A new metal complex that preserved the favorable tpy geometry and yet had a higher energy level was needed. We identified Ir(tpy)2(3+), which displayed a higher energy level, a more facile reduction that favored charge separation, a longer excited-state lifetime, and strong spectroscopic features that were useful for the identification of intermediates. Ir(tpy)2(3+) was used in arrays with electron-donating gold porphyrin and electron-accepting free-base porphyrins. A judicious change of the free-base porphyrin photosensitizer with zinc porphyrin allowed us to shape the photoreactivity and led to charge separation with

  2. σ-holes and π-holes: Similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politzer, Peter; Murray, Jane S

    2018-04-05

    σ-Holes and π-holes are regions of molecules with electronic densities lower than their surroundings. There are often positive electrostatic potentials associated with them. Through these potentials, the molecule can interact attractively with negative sites, such as lone pairs, π electrons, and anions. Such noncovalent interactions, "σ-hole bonding" and "π-hole bonding," are increasingly recognized as being important in a number of different areas. In this article, we discuss and compare the natures and characteristics of σ-holes and π-holes, and factors that influence the strengths and locations of the resulting electrostatic potentials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Merging Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as future. space-based detectors. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on.the resulting 'gold rush' of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics

  4. Black-hole astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Bloom, E. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cominsky, L. [Sonoma State Univ., Rohnert Park, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

  5. Black hole gravitohydromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Black hole gravitohydromagnetics (GHM) is developed from the rudiments to the frontiers of research in this book. GHM describes plasma interactions that combine the effects of gravity and a strong magnetic field, in the vicinity (ergosphere) of a rapidly rotating black hole. This topic was created in response to the astrophysical quest to understand the central engines of radio loud extragalactic radio sources. The theory describes a "torsional tug of war" between rotating ergospheric plasma and the distant asymptotic plasma that extracts the rotational inertia of the black hole. The recoil from the struggle between electromagnetic and gravitational forces near the event horizon is manifested as a powerful pair of magnetized particle beams (jets) that are ejected at nearly the speed of light. These bipolar jets feed large-scale magnetized plasmoids on scales as large as millions of light years (the radio lobes of extragalactic radio sources). This interaction can initiate jets that transport energy fluxes exc...

  6. Turbulent black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  7. Anyon black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei Abchouyeh, Maryam; Mirza, Behrouz; Karimi Takrami, Moein; Younesizadeh, Younes

    2018-05-01

    We propose a correspondence between an Anyon Van der Waals fluid and a (2 + 1) dimensional AdS black hole. Anyons are particles with intermediate statistics that interpolates between a Fermi-Dirac statistics and a Bose-Einstein one. A parameter α (0 quasi Fermi-Dirac statistics for α >αc, but a quasi Bose-Einstein statistics for α quasi Bose-Einstein statistics. For α >αc and a range of values of the cosmological constant, there is, however, no event horizon so there is no black hole solution. Thus, for these values of cosmological constants, the AdS Anyon Van der Waals black holes have only quasi Bose-Einstein statistics.

  8. Black holes go supersonic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    In modern physics, the unification of gravity and quantum mechanics remains a mystery. Gravity rules the macroscopic world of planets, stars and galaxies, while quantum mechanics governs the micro-cosmos of atoms, light quanta and elementary particles. However, cosmologists believe that these two disparate worlds may meet at the edges of black holes. Now Luis Garay, James Anglin, Ignacio Cirac and Peter Zoller at the University of Innsbruck in Austria have proposed a realistic way to make an artificial 'sonic' black hole in a tabletop experiment (L J Garay et al. 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 4643). In the February issue of Physics World, Ulf Leonhardt of the School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, UK, explains how the simulated black holes work. (U.K.)

  9. Black Hole Paradoxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    We propose here that the well-known black hole paradoxes such as the information loss and teleological nature of the event horizon are restricted to a particular idealized case, which is the homogeneous dust collapse model. In this case, the event horizon, which defines the boundary of the black hole, forms initially, and the singularity in the interior of the black hole at a later time. We show that, in contrast, gravitational collapse from physically more realistic initial conditions typically leads to the scenario in which the event horizon and space-time singularity form simultaneously. We point out that this apparently simple modification can mitigate the causality and teleological paradoxes, and also lends support to two recently suggested solutions to the information paradox, namely, the ‘firewall’ and ‘classical chaos’ proposals. (paper)

  10. Bringing Black Holes Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmann, John M.

    2003-03-01

    Black holes are difficult to study because they emit no light. To overcome this obstacle, scientists are trying to recreate a black hole in the laboratory. The article gives an overview of the theories of Einstein and Hawking as they pertain to the construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva, Switzerland, scheduled for completion in 2006. The LHC will create two beams of protons traveling in opposing directions that will collide and create a plethora of scattered elementary particles. Protons traveling in opposite directions at very high velocities may create particles that come close enough to each other to feel their compacted higher dimensions and create a mega force of gravity that can create tiny laboratory-sized black holes for fractions of a second. The experiments carried out with LHC will be used to test modern string theory and relativity.

  11. Surface modes at metallic an photonic crystal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Weitao [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A surface mode is an electromagnetic field distribution bounded at a surface. It decays exponentially with the distance from the surface on both sides of the surface and propagates at the surface. The surface mode exists at a metal-dielectric interface as surface plasmon (1) or at a photonic crystal surface terminated properly (34; 35; 36). Besides its prominent near-filed properties, it can connect structures at its propagation surface and results in far-field effects. Extraordinary transmission (EOT) and beaming are two examples and they are the subjects I am studying in this thesis. EOT means the transmission through holes in an opaque screen can be much larger than the geometrical optics limitation. Based on our everyday experience about shadows, the transmission equals the filling ratio of the holes in geometrical optics. The conventional diffraction theory also proved that the transmission through a subwavelength circular hole in an infinitely thin perfect electric conductor (PEC) film converges to zero when the hole's dimension is much smaller than the wavelength (40). Recently it is discovered that the transmission can be much larger than the the filling ratio of the holes at some special wavelengths (41). This cannot be explained by conventional theories, so it is called extraordinary transmission. It is generally believed that surface plasmons play an important role (43; 44) in the EOT through a periodic subwavelength hole array in a metallic film. The common theories in literatures are based on these arguments. The surface plasmons cannot be excited by incident plane waves directly because of momentum mismatch. The periodicity of the hole arrays will provide addition momentum. When the momentum-matching condition of surface plasmons is satisfied, the surface plasmons will be excited. Then these surface plasmons will collect the energy along the input surface and carry them to the holes. So the transmission can be bigger than the filling ratio. Based

  12. Slowly balding black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-01-01

    The 'no-hair' theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively ''frozen in'' the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes N B =eΦ ∞ /(πc(ℎ/2π)), where Φ ∞ ≅2π 2 B NS R NS 3 /(P NS c) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole's magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  13. Modeling black hole evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbri, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    The scope of this book is two-fold: the first part gives a fully detailed and pedagogical presentation of the Hawking effect and its physical implications, and the second discusses the backreaction problem, especially in connection with exactly solvable semiclassical models that describe analytically the black hole evaporation process. The book aims to establish a link between the general relativistic viewpoint on black hole evaporation and the new CFT-type approaches to the subject. The detailed discussion on backreaction effects is also extremely valuable.

  14. Characterizing Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Boggs, William Darian; Kelly, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are a promising source of gravitational waves for interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Recent advances in numerical relativity have revealed the predictions of General Relativity for the strong burst of radiation generated in the final moments of binary coalescence. We explore features in the merger radiation which characterize the final moments of merger and ringdown. Interpreting the waveforms in terms of an rotating implicit radiation source allows a unified phenomenological description of the system from inspiral through ringdown. Common features in the waveforms allow quantitative description of the merger signal which may provide insights for observations large-mass black hole binaries.

  15. Moulting Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Bena, Iosif; Chowdhury, Borun D.; de Boer, Jan; El-Showk, Sheer; Shigemori, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    We find a family of novel supersymmetric phases of the D1-D5 CFT, which in certain ranges of charges have more entropy than all known ensembles. We also find bulk BPS configurations that exist in the same range of parameters as these phases, and have more entropy than a BMPV black hole; they can be thought of as coming from a BMPV black hole shedding a "hair" condensate outside of the horizon. The entropy of the bulk configurations is smaller than that of the CFT phases, which indicates that ...

  16. Are black holes springlike?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Michael R. R.; Ong, Yen Chin

    2015-02-01

    A (3 +1 )-dimensional asymptotically flat Kerr black hole angular speed Ω+ can be used to define an effective spring constant, k =m Ω+2. Its maximum value is the Schwarzschild surface gravity, k =κ , which rapidly weakens as the black hole spins down and the temperature increases. The Hawking temperature is expressed in terms of the spring constant: 2 π T =κ -k . Hooke's law, in the extremal limit, provides the force F =1 /4 , which is consistent with the conjecture of maximum force in general relativity.

  17. Dancing with Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarseth, S. J.

    2008-05-01

    We describe efforts over the last six years to implement regularization methods suitable for studying one or more interacting black holes by direct N-body simulations. Three different methods have been adapted to large-N systems: (i) Time-Transformed Leapfrog, (ii) Wheel-Spoke, and (iii) Algorithmic Regularization. These methods have been tried out with some success on GRAPE-type computers. Special emphasis has also been devoted to including post-Newtonian terms, with application to moderately massive black holes in stellar clusters. Some examples of simulations leading to coalescence by gravitational radiation will be presented to illustrate the practical usefulness of such methods.

  18. Scattering from black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futterman, J.A.H.; Handler, F.A.; Matzner, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive treatment of the propagation of waves in the presence of black holes. While emphasizing intuitive physical thinking in their treatment of the techniques of analysis of scattering, the authors also include chapters on the rigorous mathematical development of the subject. Introducing the concepts of scattering by considering the simplest, scalar wave case of scattering by a spherical (Schwarzschild) black hole, the book then develops the formalism of spin weighted spheroidal harmonics and of plane wave representations for neutrino, electromagnetic, and gravitational scattering. Details and results of numerical computations are given. The techniques involved have important applications (references are given) in acoustical and radar imaging

  19. Virtual Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Hawking, Stephen W.

    1995-01-01

    One would expect spacetime to have a foam-like structure on the Planck scale with a very high topology. If spacetime is simply connected (which is assumed in this paper), the non-trivial homology occurs in dimension two, and spacetime can be regarded as being essentially the topological sum of $S^2\\times S^2$ and $K3$ bubbles. Comparison with the instantons for pair creation of black holes shows that the $S^2\\times S^2$ bubbles can be interpreted as closed loops of virtual black holes. It is ...

  20. Superfluid Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennigar, Robie A; Mann, Robert B; Tjoa, Erickson

    2017-01-13

    We present what we believe is the first example of a "λ-line" phase transition in black hole thermodynamics. This is a line of (continuous) second order phase transitions which in the case of liquid ^{4}He marks the onset of superfluidity. The phase transition occurs for a class of asymptotically anti-de Sitter hairy black holes in Lovelock gravity where a real scalar field is conformally coupled to gravity. We discuss the origin of this phase transition and outline the circumstances under which it (or generalizations of it) could occur.

  1. Partons and black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susskind, L.; Griffin, P.

    1994-01-01

    A light-front renormalization group analysis is applied to study matter which falls into massive black holes, and the related problem of matter with transplankian energies. One finds that the rate of matter spreading over the black hole's horizon unexpectedly saturates the causality bound. This is related to the transverse growth behavior of transplankian particles as their longitudinal momentum increases. This growth behavior suggests a natural mechanism to implement 't Hooft's scenario that the universe is an image of data stored on a 2 + 1 dimensional hologram-like projection

  2. Over spinning a black hole?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam; Cardoso, Vitor; Nerozzi, Andrea; Rocha, Jorge V, E-mail: mariam.bouhmadi@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: vitor.cardoso@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: andrea.nerozzi@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: jorge.v.rocha@ist.utl.pt [CENTRA, Department de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-09-22

    A possible process to destroy a black hole consists on throwing point particles with sufficiently large angular momentum into the black hole. In the case of Kerr black holes, it was shown by Wald that particles with dangerously large angular momentum are simply not captured by the hole, and thus the event horizon is not destroyed. Here we reconsider this gedanken experiment for black holes in higher dimensions. We show that this particular way of destroying a black hole does not succeed and that Cosmic Censorship is preserved.

  3. Solar array experiments on the Sphinx satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1973-01-01

    The Space Plasma, High Voltage Interaction Experiment (SPHINX) is the name given to an auxiliary payload satellite scheduled to be launched in January 1974. The principal experiments carried on this satellite are specifically designed to obtain the engineering data on the interaction of high voltage systems with the space plasma. The classes of experiments are solar array segments, insulators, insulators with pin holes and conductors. The satellite is also carrying experiments to obtain flight data on three new solar array configurations; the edge illuminated-multijunction cells, the Teflon encased cells and the violet cells.

  4. Microfabricated hollow microneedle array using ICP etcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jing; Tay, Francis E. H.; Miao, Jianmin

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a developed process for fabrication of hollow silicon microneedle arrays. The inner hollow hole and the fluidic reservoir are fabricated in deep reactive ion etching. The profile of outside needles is achieved by the developed fabrication process, which combined isotropic etching and anisotropic etching with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher. Using the combination of SF6/O2 isotropic etching chemistry and Bosch process, the high aspect ratio 3D and high density microneedle arrays are fabricated. The generated needle external geometry can be controlled by etching variables in the isotropic and anisotropic cases.

  5. Microfabricated hollow microneedle array using ICP etcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Jing; Tay, Francis E H; Miao Jianmin

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a developed process for fabrication of hollow silicon microneedle arrays. The inner hollow hole and the fluidic reservoir are fabricated in deep reactive ion etching. The profile of outside needles is achieved by the developed fabrication process, which combined isotropic etching and anisotropic etching with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher. Using the combination of SF 6 /O 2 isotropic etching chemistry and Bosch process, the high aspect ratio 3D and high density microneedle arrays are fabricated. The generated needle external geometry can be controlled by etching variables in the isotropic and anisotropic cases

  6. Microfabricated hollow microneedle array using ICP etcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji Jing [Mechanical Engineering National University of Singapore, 119260, Singapore (Singapore); Tay, Francis E H [Mechanical Engineering National University of Singapore, 119260, Singapore (Singapore); Miao Jianmin [MicroMachines Center, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a developed process for fabrication of hollow silicon microneedle arrays. The inner hollow hole and the fluidic reservoir are fabricated in deep reactive ion etching. The profile of outside needles is achieved by the developed fabrication process, which combined isotropic etching and anisotropic etching with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher. Using the combination of SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} isotropic etching chemistry and Bosch process, the high aspect ratio 3D and high density microneedle arrays are fabricated. The generated needle external geometry can be controlled by etching variables in the isotropic and anisotropic cases.

  7. Nonsingular black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamseddine, Ali H. [American University of Beirut, Physics Department, Beirut (Lebanon); I.H.E.S., Bures-sur-Yvette (France); Mukhanov, Viatcheslav [Niels Bohr Institute, Niels Bohr International Academy, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ludwig-Maximilians University, Theoretical Physics, Munich (Germany); MPI for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    We consider the Schwarzschild black hole and show how, in a theory with limiting curvature, the physical singularity ''inside it'' is removed. The resulting spacetime is geodesically complete. The internal structure of this nonsingular black hole is analogous to Russian nesting dolls. Namely, after falling into the black hole of radius r{sub g}, an observer, instead of being destroyed at the singularity, gets for a short time into the region with limiting curvature. After that he re-emerges in the near horizon region of a spacetime described by the Schwarzschild metric of a gravitational radius proportional to r{sub g}{sup 1/3}. In the next cycle, after passing the limiting curvature, the observer finds himself within a black hole of even smaller radius proportional to r{sub g}{sup 1/9}, and so on. Finally after a few cycles he will end up in the spacetime where he remains forever at limiting curvature. (orig.)

  8. When Black Holes Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  9. Black holes and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilczek, Frank

    1995-01-01

    1. Qualitative introduction to black holes : classical, quantum2. Model black holes and model collapse process: The Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstrom metrics, The Oppenheimer-Volkov collapse scenario3. Mode mixing4. From mode mixing to radiance.

  10. Quantum Mechanics of Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Giddings, Steven B.

    1994-01-01

    These lectures give a pedagogical review of dilaton gravity, Hawking radiation, the black hole information problem, and black hole pair creation. (Lectures presented at the 1994 Trieste Summer School in High Energy Physics and Cosmology)

  11. Quantum aspects of black holes

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Beginning with an overview of the theory of black holes by the editor, this book presents a collection of ten chapters by leading physicists dealing with the variety of quantum mechanical and quantum gravitational effects pertinent to black holes. The contributions address topics such as Hawking radiation, the thermodynamics of black holes, the information paradox and firewalls, Monsters, primordial black holes, self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates, the formation of small black holes in high energetic collisions of particles, minimal length effects in black holes and small black holes at the Large Hadron Collider. Viewed as a whole the collection provides stimulating reading for researchers and graduate students seeking a summary of the quantum features of black holes.

  12. Aspects of hairy black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anabalón, Andrés, E-mail: andres.anabalon-at@uai.cl [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberales y Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Viña del Mar (Chile); Astefanesei, Dumitru [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-03-26

    We review the existence of exact hairy black holes in asymptotically flat, anti-de Sitter and de Sitter space-times. We briefly discuss the issue of stability and the charging of the black holes with a Maxwell field.

  13. Neutrino constraints that transform black holes into grey holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruderfer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Existing black hole theory is found to be defective in its neglect of the physical properties of matter and radiation at superhigh densities. Nongravitational neutrino effects are shown to be physically relevant to the evolution of astronomical black holes and their equations of state. Gravitational collapse to supernovae combined with the Davis and Ray vacuum solution for neutrinos limit attainment of a singularity and require black holes to evolve into ''grey holes''. These allow a better justification than do black holes for explaining the unique existence of galactic masses. (Auth.)

  14. Warped products and black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Soon-Tae

    2005-01-01

    We apply the warped product space-time scheme to the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes and the Reissner-Nordstroem-anti-de Sitter black hole to investigate their interior solutions in terms of warped products. It is shown that there exist no discontinuities of the Ricci and Einstein curvatures across event horizons of these black holes

  15. Magnetohydrodynamics near a black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    A numerical computer study of hydromagnetic flow near a black hole is presented. First, the equations of motion are developed to a form suitable for numerical computations. Second, the results of calculations describing the magnetic torques exerted by a rotating black hole on a surrounding magnetic plasma and the electric charge that is induced on the surface of the black hole are presented. (auth)

  16. Aperture Array Photonic Metamaterials: Theoretical approaches, numerical techniques and a novel application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansey, Eli

    Optical or photonic metamaterials that operate in the infrared and visible frequency regimes show tremendous promise for solving problems in renewable energy, infrared imaging, and telecommunications. However, many of the theoretical and simulation techniques used at lower frequencies are not applicable to this higher-frequency regime. Furthermore, technological and financial limitations of photonic metamaterial fabrication increases the importance of reliable theoretical models and computational techniques for predicting the optical response of photonic metamaterials. This thesis focuses on aperture array metamaterials. That is, a rectangular, circular, or other shaped cavity or hole embedded in, or penetrating through a metal film. The research in the first portion of this dissertation reflects our interest in developing a fundamental, theoretical understanding of the behavior of light's interaction with these aperture arrays, specifically regarding enhanced optical transmission. We develop an approximate boundary condition for metals at optical frequencies, and a comprehensive, analytical explanation of the physics underlying this effect. These theoretical analyses are augmented by computational techniques in the second portion of this thesis, used both for verification of the theoretical work, and solving more complicated structures. Finally, the last portion of this thesis discusses the results from designing, fabricating and characterizing a light-splitting metamaterial.

  17. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    prominences, have a significantly higher rate of occurrence in the vicinity of coronal .... coronal holes due to the birth of new holes or the growth of existing holes. .... Statistics of newly formed coronal hole areas (NFOCHA) associated with ...

  18. Process Development of Gallium Nitride Phosphide Core-Shell Nanowire Array Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chen

    Dilute Nitride GaNP is a promising materials for opto-electronic applications due to its band gap tunability. The efficiency of GaNxP1-x /GaNyP1-y core-shell nanowire solar cell (NWSC) is expected to reach as high as 44% by 1% N and 9% N in the core and shell, respectively. By developing such high efficiency NWSCs on silicon substrate, a further reduction of the cost of solar photovoltaic can be further reduced to 61$/MWh, which is competitive to levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of fossil fuels. Therefore, a suitable NWSC structure and fabrication process need to be developed to achieve this promising NWSC. This thesis is devoted to the study on the development of fabrication process of GaNxP 1-x/GaNyP1-y core-shell Nanowire solar cell. The thesis is divided into two major parts. In the first parts, previously grown GaP/GaNyP1-y core-shell nanowire samples are used to develop the fabrication process of Gallium Nitride Phosphide nanowire solar cell. The design for nanowire arrays, passivation layer, polymeric filler spacer, transparent col- lecting layer and metal contact are discussed and fabricated. The property of these NWSCs are also characterized to point out the future development of Gal- lium Nitride Phosphide NWSC. In the second part, a nano-hole template made by nanosphere lithography is studied for selective area growth of nanowires to improve the structure of core-shell NWSC. The fabrication process of nano-hole templates and the results are presented. To have a consistent features of nano-hole tem- plate, the Taguchi Method is used to optimize the fabrication process of nano-hole templates.

  19. Extraordinary mid-infrared transmission of subwavelength holes in gold films

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Yang, Yang; Chen, Longqing; Syed, Ahad A.; Wang, Xianbin

    2014-01-01

    Gold (Au) nanoholes are fabricated with electron-beam lithography and used for the investigation of extraordinary transmission in mid-infrared regime. Transmission properties of the nanoholes are studied as the dependence on hole-size. Transmittance spectra are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and enhanced transmittance through the subwavelength holes is observed. The transmission spectra exhibit well-defined maximum and minimum of which the position are determined by the lattice of the hole array. The hole-size primarily influence the transmission intensity and bandwidth of the resonance peak. With an increase of hole-size, while keep lattice constant fixed, the intensity of the resonance peak and the bandwidth increases, which are due to the localized surface plasmons. Numerical simulation for the transmission through the subwavelength holes is performed and the simulated results agree with the experimental observations. Copyright © 2014 American Scientific Publishers.

  20. Extraordinary mid-infrared transmission of subwavelength holes in gold films

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2014-04-01

    Gold (Au) nanoholes are fabricated with electron-beam lithography and used for the investigation of extraordinary transmission in mid-infrared regime. Transmission properties of the nanoholes are studied as the dependence on hole-size. Transmittance spectra are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and enhanced transmittance through the subwavelength holes is observed. The transmission spectra exhibit well-defined maximum and minimum of which the position are determined by the lattice of the hole array. The hole-size primarily influence the transmission intensity and bandwidth of the resonance peak. With an increase of hole-size, while keep lattice constant fixed, the intensity of the resonance peak and the bandwidth increases, which are due to the localized surface plasmons. Numerical simulation for the transmission through the subwavelength holes is performed and the simulated results agree with the experimental observations. Copyright © 2014 American Scientific Publishers.

  1. From binary black hole simulation to triple black hole simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Shan; Cao Zhoujian; Han, Wen-Biao; Lin, Chun-Yu; Yo, Hwei-Jang; Yu, Jui-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Black hole systems are among the most promising sources for a gravitational wave detection project. Now, China is planning to construct a space-based laser interferometric detector as a follow-on mission of LISA in the near future. Aiming to provide some theoretical support to this detection project on the numerical relativity side, we focus on black hole systems simulation in this work. Considering the globular galaxy, multiple black hole systems also likely to exist in our universe and play a role as a source for the gravitational wave detector we are considering. We will give a progress report in this paper on our black hole system simulation. More specifically, we will present triple black hole simulation together with binary black hole simulation. On triple black hole simulations, one novel perturbational method is proposed.

  2. Black Hole Hunters Set New Distance Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    billion times as much as the Sun. So far, around 20 stellar-mass black holes have been found. [2] In astronomy, heavy chemical elements, or "metals", are any chemical elements heavier than helium. [3] Predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity, gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of space and time. Significant gravitational waves are generated whenever there are extreme variations of strong gravitational fields with time, such as during the merger of two black holes. The detection of gravitational waves, never directly observed to date, is one of the major challenges for the next few decades. [4] The LIGO and Virgo experiments have the goal of detecting gravitational waves using sensitive interferometers in Italy and the United States. More information This research was presented in a letter to appear in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (NGC 300 X-1 is a Wolf-Rayet/Black Hole binary, P.A. Crowther et al.). The team is composed of Paul Crowther and Vik Dhillon (University of Sheffield, UK), Robin Barnard and Simon Clark (The Open University, UK), and Stefania Carpano and Andy Pollock (ESAC, Madrid, Spain). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible

  3. Coupling in reflector arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1968-01-01

    In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present communic......In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present...

  4. Machining of the nuclear tube sheet with small hole diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lifeng

    2010-01-01

    Regarding the tube sheet for the heat exchanger of Qinshan Phase II extension project, its material is 00Cr19Ni10 forgings, the tube sheet thickness is 125 mm, requiring 178-φ10.35 0 +0.05 hole, the tube array shall take the shape of equilateral triangle, the center distance is 15 mm, and the tube hole roughness is Ra 3.2. The guide sleeve shall be adopted for positioning prior to machining of the high precision small hole of the thick tube sheet, and the gun drill and BTA drill shall be adopted for testing, finally BTA drilling with internal chip removal shall be adopted, this method shall overcome the disadvantage factor of BTA drilling and shall be the new approach for drilling. The diameter of BTA drill is φ10.34 mm. The machined hole diameter shall be φ10.375-φ10.355 mm. The ellipticity of the tube hole shall be less than 0.01 mm, the pipe bridge dimension shall be 4.6 mm, conforming to the requirement of the drawing. The paper presents the precautions during machining so as to provide the reference for the similar pipe hole machining in the future. (author)

  5. Statistical mechanics of black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, B.; Leblanc, Y.

    1992-01-01

    We analyze the statistical mechanics of a gas of neutral and charged black holes. The microcanonical ensemble is the only possible approach to this system, and the equilibrium configuration is the one for which most of the energy is carried by a single black hole. Schwarzschild black holes are found to obey the statistical bootstrap condition. In all cases, the microcanonical temperature is identical to the Hawking temperature of the most massive black hole in the gas. U(1) charges in general break the bootstrap property. The problems of black-hole decay and of quantum coherence are also addressed

  6. Black Holes and Firewalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Our modern understanding of space, time, matter, and even reality itself arose from the three great revolutions of the early twentieth century: special relativity, general relativity, and quantum mechanics. But a century later, this work is unfinished. Many deep connections have been discovered, but the full form of a unified theory incorporating all three principles is not known. Thought experiments and paradoxes have often played a key role in figuring out how to fit theories together. For the unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics, black holes have been an important arena. I will talk about the quantum mechanics of black holes, the information paradox, and the latest version of this paradox, the firewall. The firewall points to a conflict between our current theories of spacetime and of quantum mechanics. It may lead to a new understanding of how these are connected, perhaps based on quantum entanglement.

  7. Beyond the black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boslough, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book is about the life and work of Stephen Hawking. It traces the development of his theories about the universe and particularly black holes, in a biographical context. Hawking's lecture 'Is the end in sight for theoretical physics' is presented as an appendix. In this, he discusses the possibility of achieving a complete, consistent and unified theory of the physical interactions which would describe all possible observations. (U.K.)

  8. Bumpy black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Emparan, Roberto; Figueras, Pau; Martinez, Marina

    2014-01-01

    We study six-dimensional rotating black holes with bumpy horizons: these are topologically spherical, but the sizes of symmetric cycles on the horizon vary non-monotonically with the polar angle. We construct them numerically for the first three bumpy families, and follow them in solution space until they approach critical solutions with localized singularities on the horizon. We find strong evidence of the conical structures that have been conjectured to mediate the transitions to black ring...

  9. Exploring Jets from a Supermassive Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-06-01

    What are the feeding and burping habits of the supermassive black holes peppering the universe? In a new study, observations of one such monster reveal more about the behavior of its powerful jets.Beams from BehemothsAcross the universe, supermassive black holes of millions to billions of solar masses lie at the centers of galaxies, gobbling up surrounding material. But not all of the gas and dust that spirals in toward a black hole is ultimately swallowed! A large fraction of it can instead be flung out into space again, in the form of enormous, powerful jets that extend for thousands or even millions of light-years in opposite directions.M87, shown in this Hubble image, is a classic example of a nearby (55 million light-years distant) supermassive black hole with a visible, collimated jet. Its counter-jet isnt seen because relativistic effects make the receding jet appear less bright. [The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) and NASA/ESA]What causes these outflows to be tightly beamed collimated in the form of jets, rather than sprayed out in all directions? Does the pressure of the ambient medium the surrounding gas and dust that the jet is injected into play an important role? In what regions do these jets accelerate and decelerate? There are many open questions that scientists hope to understand by studying some of the active black holes with jets that live closest to us.Eyes on a Nearby GiantIn a new study led by Satomi Nakahara (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies in Japan), a team of scientists has used multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and Very Long Array (VLA) images to explore jets emitted from a galaxy just 100 million light-years away: NGC 4261.This galaxys (relatively) close distance as well as the fact that were viewing it largely from the side, so we can clearly see both of its polar jets allows us to observe in detail the structure and intensity of its jets as a function of their distance from the black hole. Nakahara and

  10. Internal structure of black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetic, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Full text: We review recent progress that sheds light on the internal structure of general black holes. We first summarize properties of general multi-charged rotating black holes both in four and five dimensions. We show that the asymptotic boundary conditions of these general asymptotically flat black holes can be modified such that a conformal symmetry emerges. These subtracted geometries preserve the thermodynamic properties of the original black holes and are of the Lifshitz type, thus describing 'a black hole in the asymptotically conical box'. Recent efforts employ solution generating techniques to construct interpolating geometries between the original black hole and their subtracted geometries. Upon lift to one dimension higher, these geometries lift to AdS 3 times a sphere, and thus provide a microscopic interpretation of the black hole entropy in terms of dual two-dimensional conformal field theory. (author)

  11. Black holes and holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Samir D

    2012-01-01

    The idea of holography in gravity arose from the fact that the entropy of black holes is given by their surface area. The holography encountered in gauge/gravity duality has no such relation however; the boundary surface can be placed at an arbitrary location in AdS space and its area does not give the entropy of the bulk. The essential issues are also different between the two cases: in black holes we get Hawking radiation from the 'holographic surface' which leads to the information issue, while in gauge/gravity duality there is no such radiation. To resolve the information paradox we need to show that there are real degrees of freedom at the horizon of the hole; this is achieved by the fuzzball construction. In gauge/gravity duality we have instead a field theory defined on an abstract dual space; there are no gravitational degrees of freedom at the holographic boundary. It is important to understand the relations and differences between these two notions of holography to get a full understanding of the lessons from the information paradox.

  12. Ordered Au Nanodisk and Nanohole Arrays: Fabrication and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yue Bing; Juluri, Bala Krishna; Kiraly, Brian; Huang, Tony Jun

    2010-01-01

    We have utilized nanosphere lithography (NSL) to fabricate ordered Au nanodisk and nanohole arrays on substrates and have studied the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the arrays. Through these investigations, we demonstrate that the angle- dependent behavior of the LSPR in the Au nanodisk arrays enables real-time observation of exciton-plasmon couplings. In addition, we show that the NSL-fabricated Au nanohole arrays can be applied as templates for patterning micro-/nanoparticles under capillary force. The unique structural and plasmonic characteristics of the Au nanodisk and nano- hole arrays, as well as the low-cost and high-throughput NSL-based nanofabrication technique, render these arrays excellent platforms for numerous engineering applications. © 2010 by ASME.

  13. Electroluminescence Efficiency Enhancement using Metal Nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soref, Richard A; Khurgin, J. B; Sun, G

    2008-01-01

    We apply the "effective mode volume" theory to evaluate enhancement of the electroluminescence efficiency of semiconductor emitters placed in the vicinity of isolated metal nanoparticles and their arrays...

  14. Statistical black-hole thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekenstein, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    Traditional methods from statistical thermodynamics, with appropriate modifications, are used to study several problems in black-hole thermodynamics. Jaynes's maximum-uncertainty method for computing probabilities is used to show that the earlier-formulated generalized second law is respected in statistically averaged form in the process of spontaneous radiation by a Kerr black hole discovered by Hawking, and also in the case of a Schwarzschild hole immersed in a bath of black-body radiation, however cold. The generalized second law is used to motivate a maximum-entropy principle for determining the equilibrium probability distribution for a system containing a black hole. As an application we derive the distribution for the radiation in equilibrium with a Kerr hole (it is found to agree with what would be expected from Hawking's results) and the form of the associated distribution among Kerr black-hole solution states of definite mass. The same results are shown to follow from a statistical interpretation of the concept of black-hole entropy as the natural logarithm of the number of possible interior configurations that are compatible with the given exterior black-hole state. We also formulate a Jaynes-type maximum-uncertainty principle for black holes, and apply it to obtain the probability distribution among Kerr solution states for an isolated radiating Kerr hole

  15. Reconstructing the massive black hole cosmic history through gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesana, Alberto; Gair, Jonathan; Berti, Emanuele; Volonteri, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The massive black holes we observe in galaxies today are the natural end-product of a complex evolutionary path, in which black holes seeded in proto-galaxies at high redshift grow through cosmic history via a sequence of mergers and accretion episodes. Electromagnetic observations probe a small subset of the population of massive black holes (namely, those that are active or those that are very close to us), but planned space-based gravitational wave observatories such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) can measure the parameters of 'electromagnetically invisible' massive black holes out to high redshift. In this paper we introduce a Bayesian framework to analyze the information that can be gathered from a set of such measurements. Our goal is to connect a set of massive black hole binary merger observations to the underlying model of massive black hole formation. In other words, given a set of observed massive black hole coalescences, we assess what information can be extracted about the underlying massive black hole population model. For concreteness we consider ten specific models of massive black hole formation, chosen to probe four important (and largely unconstrained) aspects of the input physics used in structure formation simulations: seed formation, metallicity ''feedback'', accretion efficiency and accretion geometry. For the first time we allow for the possibility of 'model mixing', by drawing the observed population from some combination of the 'pure' models that have been simulated. A Bayesian analysis allows us to recover a posterior probability distribution for the ''mixing parameters'' that characterize the fractions of each model represented in the observed distribution. Our work shows that LISA has enormous potential to probe the underlying physics of structure formation.

  16. Black Hole Area Quantization rule from Black Hole Mass Fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Schiffer, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the black hole mass distribution function that follows from the random emission of quanta by Hawking radiation and with this function we calculate the black hole mass fluctuation. From a complete different perspective we regard the black hole as quantum mechanical system with a quantized event horizon area and transition probabilities among the various energy levels and then calculate the mass dispersion. It turns out that there is a perfect agreement between the statistical and ...

  17. Direct growth of metal-organic frameworks thin film arrays on glassy carbon electrode based on rapid conversion step mediated by copper clusters and hydroxide nanotubes for fabrication of a high performance non-enzymatic glucose sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokhian, Saeed; Khaki Sanati, Elnaz; Hosseini, Hadi

    2018-07-30

    The direct growth of self-supported metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) thin film can be considered as an effective strategy for fabrication of the advanced modified electrodes in sensors and biosensor applications. However, most of the fabricated MOFs-based sensors suffer from some drawbacks such as time consuming for synthesis of MOF and electrode making, need of a binder or an additive layer, need of expensive equipment and use of hazardous solvents. Here, a novel free-standing MOFs-based modified electrode was fabricated by the rapid direct growth of MOFs on the surface of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). In this method, direct growth of MOFs was occurred by the formation of vertically aligned arrays of Cu clusters and Cu(OH) 2 nanotubes, which can act as both mediator and positioning fixing factor for the rapid formation of self-supported MOFs on GCE surface. The effect of both chemically and electrochemically formed Cu(OH) 2 nanotubes on the morphological and electrochemical performance of the prepared MOFs were investigated. Due to the unique properties of the prepared MOFs thin film electrode such as uniform and vertically aligned structure, excellent stability, high electroactive surface area, and good availability to analyte and electrolyte diffusion, it was directly used as the electrode material for non-enzymatic electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose. Moreover, the potential utility of this sensing platform for the analytical determination of glucose concentration was evaluated by the amperometry technique. The results proved that the self-supported MOFs thin film on GCE is a promising electrode material for fabricating and designing non-enzymatic glucose sensors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Linear Optical and SERS Study on Metallic Membranes with Subwavelength Complementary Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qingzhen; Zeng, Yong; Jensen, Lasse; Werner, Douglas; Crespi, Vincent; Huang, Tony Jun; Interdepartmental Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    An efficient technique is developed to fabricate optically thin metallic films with subwavelength patterns and their complements simultaneously. By comparing the spectra of the complementary films, we show that Babinet's principle nearly holds in the optical domain. A discrete-dipole approximation can qualitatively describe their spectral dependence on the geometry of the constituent particles and the illuminating polarization. Using pyridine as probe molecules, we studied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) from the complementary structure. Although the complementary structure posses closely related linear spectra, they have quite different near-field behaviors. For hole arrays, their averaged local field gains as well as the SERS enhancements are strongly correlated to their transmission spectra. We therefore can use cos 4 θ to approximately describe the dependence of the Raman intensity on the excitation polarization angle θ , while the complementary particle arrays present maximal local field gains at wavelengths generally much bigger than their localized surface plasmonic resonant wavelengths.

  19. Nano-pyramid arrays for nano-particle trapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Xingwu; Veltkamp, Henk-Willem; Berenschot, Johan W.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this paper we present the drastic miniaturization of nano-wire pyramids fabricated by corner lithography. A particle trapping device was fabricated in a well-defined and symmetrical array. The entrance and exit hole-size can be tuned by adjusting fabrication parameters. We describe here

  20. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  1. Black hole feedback on the first galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Myoungwon; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Greif, Thomas H.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Bromm, Volker; Milosavljević, Miloš; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-09-01

    We study how the first galaxies were assembled under feedback from the accretion onto a central black hole (BH) that is left behind by the first generation of metal-free stars through selfconsistent, cosmological simulations. X-ray radiation fromthe accretion of gas onto BH remnants of Population III (Pop III) stars, or from high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), again involving Pop III stars, influences the mode of second generation star formation. We track the evolution of the black hole accretion rate and the associated X-ray feedback startingwith the death of the Pop III progenitor star inside a minihalo and following the subsequent evolution of the black hole as the minihalo grows to become an atomically cooling galaxy. We find that X-ray photoionization heating from a stellar-mass BH is able to quench further star formation in the host halo at all times before the halo enters the atomic cooling phase. X-ray radiation from a HMXB, assuming a luminosity close to the Eddington value, exerts an even stronger, and more diverse, feedback on star formation. It photoheats the gas inside the host halo, but also promotes the formation of molecular hydrogen and cooling of gas in the intergalactic medium and in nearby minihalos, leading to a net increase in the number of stars formed at early times. Our simulations further show that the radiative feedback from the first BHs may strongly suppress early BH growth, thus constraining models for the formation of supermassive BHs.

  2. DNA electrophoresis through microlithographic arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevick, E.M.; Williams, D.R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophoresis is one of the most widely used techniques in biochemistry and genetics for size-separating charged molecular chains such as DNA or synthetic polyelectrolytes. The separation is achieved by driving the chains through a gel with an external electric field. As a result of the field and the obstacles that the medium provides, the chains have different mobilities and are physically separated after a given process time. The macroscopically observed mobility scales inversely with chain size: small molecules move through the medium quickly while larger molecules move more slowly. However, electrophoresis remains a tool that has yet to be optimised for most efficient size separation of polyelectrolytes, particularly large polyelectrolytes, e.g. DNA in excess of 30-50 kbp. Microlithographic arrays etched with an ordered pattern of obstacles provide an attractive alternative to gel media and provide wider avenues for size separation of polyelectrolytes and promote a better understanding of the separation process. Its advantages over gels are (1) the ordered array is durable and can be re-used, (2) the array morphology is ordered and can be standardized for specific separation, and (3) calibration with a marker polyelectrolyte is not required as the array is reproduced to high precision. Most importantly, the array geometry can be graduated along the chip so as to expand the size-dependent regime over larger chain lengths and postpone saturation. In order to predict the effect of obstacles upon the chain-length dependence in mobility and hence, size separation, we study the dynamics of single chains using theory and simulation. We present recent work describing: 1) the release kinetics of a single DNA molecule hooked around a point, frictionless obstacle and in both weak and strong field limits, 2) the mobility of a chain impinging upon point obstacles in an ordered array of obstacles, demonstrating the wide range of interactions possible between the chain and

  3. Artificial black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Visser, Matt; Volovik, Grigory E

    2009-01-01

    Physicists are pondering on the possibility of simulating black holes in the laboratory by means of various "analog models". These analog models, typically based on condensed matter physics, can be used to help us understand general relativity (Einstein's gravity); conversely, abstract techniques developed in general relativity can sometimes be used to help us understand certain aspects of condensed matter physics. This book contains 13 chapters - written by experts in general relativity, particle physics, and condensed matter physics - that explore various aspects of this two-way traffic.

  4. The Antarctic ozone hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Anna E

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For the historical perspective, the events leading up to the discovery of the 'hole' are presented, as well as the response from the international community and the measures taken to protect the ozone layer now and into the future

  5. Thermal BEC Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Casadio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We review some features of Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC models of black holes obtained by means of the horizon wave function formalism. We consider the Klein–Gordon equation for a toy graviton field coupled to a static matter current in a spherically-symmetric setup. The classical field reproduces the Newtonian potential generated by the matter source, while the corresponding quantum state is given by a coherent superposition of scalar modes with a continuous occupation number. An attractive self-interaction is needed for bound states to form, the case in which one finds that (approximately one mode is allowed, and the system of N bosons can be self-confined in a volume of the size of the Schwarzschild radius. The horizon wave function formalism is then used to show that the radius of such a system corresponds to a proper horizon. The uncertainty in the size of the horizon is related to the typical energy of Hawking modes: it decreases with the increasing of the black hole mass (larger number of gravitons, resulting in agreement with the semiclassical calculations and which does not hold for a single very massive particle. The spectrum of these systems has two components: a discrete ground state of energy m (the bosons forming the black hole and a continuous spectrum with energy ω > m (representing the Hawking radiation and modeled with a Planckian distribution at the expected Hawking temperature. Assuming the main effect of the internal scatterings is the Hawking radiation, the N-particle state can be collectively described by a single-particle wave-function given by a superposition of a total ground state with energy M = Nm and Entropy 2015, 17 6894 a Planckian distribution for E > M at the same Hawking temperature. This can be used to compute the partition function and to find the usual area law for the entropy, with a logarithmic correction related to the Hawking component. The backreaction of modes with ω > m is also shown to reduce

  6. Quantum effects in black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, V.P.

    1979-01-01

    A strict definition of black holes is presented and some properties with regard to their mass are enumerated. The Hawking quantum effect - the effect of vacuum instability in the black hole gravitational field, as a result of shich the black hole radiates as a heated body is analyzed. It is shown that in order to obtain results on the black hole radiation it is sufficient to predetermine the in-vacuum state at a time moment in the past, when the collapsing body has a large size, and its gravitational field can be neglected. The causes and the place of particle production by the black hole, and also the space-time inside the black hole, are considered

  7. Particle creation by black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawking, S.W.

    1975-01-01

    In the classical theory black holes can only absorb and not emit particles. However it is shown that quantum mechanical effects cause black holes to create and emit particles. This thermal emission leads to a slow decrease in the mass of the black hole and to its eventual disappearance: any primordial black hole of mass less than about 10 15 g would have evaporated by now. Although these quantum effects violate the classical law that the area of the event horizon of a black hole cannot decrease, there remains a Generalized Second Law: S + 1/4 A never decreases where S is the entropy of matter outside black holes and A is the sum of the surface areas of the event horizons. This shows that gravitational collapse converts the baryons and leptons in the collapsing body into entropy. It is tempting to speculate that this might be the reason why the Universe contains so much entropy per baryon. (orig.) [de

  8. Black Hole's 1/N Hair

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2013-01-01

    According to the standard view classically black holes carry no hair, whereas quantum hair is at best exponentially weak. We show that suppression of hair is an artifact of the semi-classical treatment and that in the quantum picture hair appears as an inverse mass-square effect. Such hair is predicted in the microscopic quantum description in which a black hole represents a self-sustained leaky Bose-condensate of N soft gravitons. In this picture the Hawking radiation is the quantum depletion of the condensate. Within this picture we show that quantum black hole physics is fully compatible with continuous global symmetries and that global hair appears with the strength B/N, where B is the global charge swallowed by the black hole. For large charge this hair has dramatic effect on black hole dynamics. Our findings can have interesting astrophysical consequences, such as existence of black holes with large detectable baryonic and leptonic numbers.

  9. Two-dimensional photonic crystal arrays for polymer:fullerene solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sungho; Han, Jiyoung; Do, Young Rag; Kim, Hwajeong; Yim, Sanggyu; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2011-11-18

    We report the application of two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) array substrates for polymer:fullerene solar cells of which the active layer is made with blended films of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The 2D PC array substrates were fabricated by employing a nanosphere lithography technique. Two different hole depths (200 and 300 nm) were introduced for the 2D PC arrays to examine the hole depth effect on the light harvesting (trapping). The optical effect by the 2D PC arrays was investigated by the measurement of optical transmittance either in the direction normal to the substrate (direct transmittance) or in all directions (integrated transmittance). The results showed that the integrated transmittance was higher for the 2D PC array substrates than the conventional planar substrate at the wavelengths of ca. 400 nm, even though the direct transmittance of 2D PC array substrates was much lower over the entire visible light range. The short circuit current density (J(SC)) was higher for the device with the 2D PC array (200 nm hole depth) than the reference device. However, the device with the 2D PC array (300 nm hole depth) showed a slightly lower J(SC) value at a high light intensity in spite of its light harvesting effect proven at a lower light intensity.

  10. Metal Oxides as Efficient Charge Transporters in Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Haque, Mohammed; Sheikh, Arif D.; Guan, Xinwei; Wu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    . In this comprehensive review, we focus on the synthesis and applications of metal oxides as electron and hole transporters in efficient PSCs with both mesoporous and planar architectures. Metal oxides and their doped variants with proper energy band alignment

  11. What is a black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipler, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    A definition of a black hole is proposed that should work in any stably causal space-time. This is that a black hole is the closure of the smaller future set that contains all noncosmological trapped surfaces and which has its boundary generated by null geodesic segments that are boundary generators of TIPs. This allows precise definitions of cosmic censorship and white holes. (UK)

  12. Black Holes in Higher Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reall Harvey S.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We review black-hole solutions of higher-dimensional vacuum gravity and higher-dimensional supergravity theories. The discussion of vacuum gravity is pedagogical, with detailed reviews of Myers–Perry solutions, black rings, and solution-generating techniques. We discuss black-hole solutions of maximal supergravity theories, including black holes in anti-de Sitter space. General results and open problems are discussed throughout.

  13. Direction-of-Arrival Estimation for Coprime Array Using Compressive Sensing Based Array Interpolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation using array interpolation is proposed in this paper to increase the number of resolvable sources and improve the DOA estimation performance for coprime array configuration with holes in its virtual array. The virtual symmetric nonuniform linear array (VSNLA of coprime array signal model is introduced, with the conventional MUSIC with spatial smoothing algorithm (SS-MUSIC applied on the continuous lags in the VSNLA; the degrees of freedom (DoFs for DOA estimation are obviously not fully exploited. To effectively utilize the extent of DoFs offered by the coarray configuration, a compressing sensing based array interpolation algorithm is proposed. The compressing sensing technique is used to obtain the coarse initial DOA estimation, and a modified iterative initial DOA estimation based interpolation algorithm (IMCA-AI is then utilized to obtain the final DOA estimation, which maps the sample covariance matrix of the VSNLA to the covariance matrix of a filled virtual symmetric uniform linear array (VSULA with the same aperture size. The proposed DOA estimation method can efficiently improve the DOA estimation performance. The numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Dancing around the Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    ISAAC Finds "Cool" Young Stellar Systems at the Centres of Active Galaxies Summary Supermassive Black Holes are present at the centres of many galaxies, some weighing hundreds of millions times more than the Sun. These extremely dense objects cannot be observed directly, but violently moving gas clouds and stars in their strong gravitational fields are responsible for the emission of energetic radiation from such "active galaxy nuclei" (AGN) . A heavy Black Hole feeds agressively on its surroundings . When the neighbouring gas and stars finally spiral into the Black Hole, a substantial fraction of the infalling mass is transformed into pure energy. However, it is not yet well understood how, long before this dramatic event takes place, all that material is moved from the outer regions of the galaxy towards the central region. So how is the food for the central Black Hole delivered to the table in the first place? To cast more light on this central question, a team of French and Swiss astronomers [1] has carried out a series of trailblazing observations with the VLT Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) on the VLT 8.2-m ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. The ISAAC instrument is particularly well suited to this type of observations. Visible light cannot penetrate the thick clouds of dust and gas in the innermost regions of active galaxies, but by recording the infrared light from the stars close to the Black Hole , their motions can be studied. By charting those motions in the central regions of three active galaxies (NGC 1097, NGC 1808 and NGC 5728), the astronomers were able to confirm the presence of "nuclear bars" in all three. These are dynamical structures that "open a road" for the flow of material towards the innermost region. Moreover, the team was surprised to discover signs of a young stellar population near the centres of these galaxies - stars that have apparently formed quite recently in a central gas disk. Such a system is unstable

  15. Acceleration of black hole universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. X.; Frederick, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Zhang slightly modified the standard big bang theory and developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain all observations of the universe. Previous studies accounted for the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This paper investigates acceleration of the black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the redshift and luminosity distance measurements of type Ia supernovae. The results indicate that the black hole universe accelerates its expansion when it accretes the ambient matter in an increasing rate. In other words, i.e., when the second-order derivative of the mass of the black hole universe with respect to the time is positive . For a constant deceleration parameter , we can perfectly explain the type Ia supernova measurements with the reduced chi-square to be very close to unity, χ red˜1.0012. The expansion and acceleration of black hole universe are driven by external energy.

  16. On black hole horizon fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuchin, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    A study of the high angular momentum particles 'atmosphere' near the Schwarzschild black hole horizon suggested that strong gravitational interactions occur at invariant distance of the order of 3 √M [2]. We present a generalization of this result to the Kerr-Newman black hole case. It is shown that the larger charge and angular momentum black hole bears, the larger invariant distance at which strong gravitational interactions occur becomes. This invariant distance is of order 3 √((r + 2 )/((r + - r - ))). This implies that the Planckian structure of the Hawking radiation of extreme black holes is completely broken

  17. Black holes and the multiverse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum bubbles may nucleate and expand during the inflationary epoch in the early universe. After inflation ends, the bubbles quickly dissipate their kinetic energy; they come to rest with respect to the Hubble flow and eventually form black holes. The fate of the bubble itself depends on the resulting black hole mass. If the mass is smaller than a certain critical value, the bubble collapses to a singularity. Otherwise, the bubble interior inflates, forming a baby universe, which is connected to the exterior FRW region by a wormhole. A similar black hole formation mechanism operates for spherical domain walls nucleating during inflation. As an illustrative example, we studied the black hole mass spectrum in the domain wall scenario, assuming that domain walls interact with matter only gravitationally. Our results indicate that, depending on the model parameters, black holes produced in this scenario can have significant astrophysical effects and can even serve as dark matter or as seeds for supermassive black holes. The mechanism of black hole formation described in this paper is very generic and has important implications for the global structure of the universe. Baby universes inside super-critical black holes inflate eternally and nucleate bubbles of all vacua allowed by the underlying particle physics. The resulting multiverse has a very non-trivial spacetime structure, with a multitude of eternally inflating regions connected by wormholes. If a black hole population with the predicted mass spectrum is discovered, it could be regarded as evidence for inflation and for the existence of a multiverse

  18. Black holes and the multiverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garriga, Jaume [Departament de Fisica Fonamental i Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, Barcelona, 08028 Spain (Spain); Vilenkin, Alexander; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: jaume.garriga@ub.edu, E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu, E-mail: jun.zhang@tufts.edu [Institute of Cosmology, Tufts University, 574 Boston Ave, Medford, MA, 02155 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Vacuum bubbles may nucleate and expand during the inflationary epoch in the early universe. After inflation ends, the bubbles quickly dissipate their kinetic energy; they come to rest with respect to the Hubble flow and eventually form black holes. The fate of the bubble itself depends on the resulting black hole mass. If the mass is smaller than a certain critical value, the bubble collapses to a singularity. Otherwise, the bubble interior inflates, forming a baby universe, which is connected to the exterior FRW region by a wormhole. A similar black hole formation mechanism operates for spherical domain walls nucleating during inflation. As an illustrative example, we studied the black hole mass spectrum in the domain wall scenario, assuming that domain walls interact with matter only gravitationally. Our results indicate that, depending on the model parameters, black holes produced in this scenario can have significant astrophysical effects and can even serve as dark matter or as seeds for supermassive black holes. The mechanism of black hole formation described in this paper is very generic and has important implications for the global structure of the universe. Baby universes inside super-critical black holes inflate eternally and nucleate bubbles of all vacua allowed by the underlying particle physics. The resulting multiverse has a very non-trivial spacetime structure, with a multitude of eternally inflating regions connected by wormholes. If a black hole population with the predicted mass spectrum is discovered, it could be regarded as evidence for inflation and for the existence of a multiverse.

  19. Black-hole driven winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punsly, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of the physical mechanism that allows a large scale magnetic field to torque a rapidly rotating, supermassive black hole. This is an interesting problem as it has been conjectured that rapidly rotating black holes are the central engines that power the observed extragalactic double radio sources. Axisymmetric solutions of the curved space-time version of Maxwell's equations in the vacuum do not torque black holes. Plasma must be introduced for the hole to mechanically couple to the field. The dynamical aspect of rotating black holes that couples the magnetic field to the hole is the following. A rotating black hole forces the external geometry of space-time to rotate (the dragging of inertial frames). Inside of the stationary limit surface, the ergosphere, all physical particle trajectories must appear to rotate in the same direction as the black hole as viewed by the stationary observers at asymptotic infinity. In the text, it is demonstrated how plasma that is created on field lines that thread both the ergosphere and the equatorial plane will be pulled by gravity toward the equator. By the aforementioned properties of the ergosphere, the disk must rotate. Consequently, the disk acts like a unipolar generator. It drives a global current system that supports the toroidal magnetic field in an outgoing, magnetically dominated wind. This wind carries energy (mainly in the form of Poynting flux) and angular momentum towards infinity. The spin down of the black hole is the ultimate source of this energy and angular momentum flux

  20. Statistical Hair on Black Holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The Bekenstein-Hawking entropy for certain BPS-saturated black holes in string theory has recently been derived by counting internal black hole microstates at weak coupling. We argue that the black hole microstate can be measured by interference experiments even in the strong coupling region where there is clearly an event horizon. Extracting information which is naively behind the event horizon is possible due to the existence of statistical quantum hair carried by the black hole. This quantum hair arises from the arbitrarily large number of discrete gauge symmetries present in string theory. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Thermodynamics of Accelerating Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appels, Michael; Gregory, Ruth; Kubizňák, David

    2016-09-23

    We address a long-standing problem of describing the thermodynamics of an accelerating black hole. We derive a standard first law of black hole thermodynamics, with the usual identification of entropy proportional to the area of the event horizon-even though the event horizon contains a conical singularity. This result not only extends the applicability of black hole thermodynamics to realms previously not anticipated, it also opens a possibility for studying novel properties of an important class of exact radiative solutions of Einstein equations describing accelerated objects. We discuss the thermodynamic volume, stability, and phase structure of these black holes.

  2. Black hole thermodynamical entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, Constantino; Cirto, Leonardo J.L.

    2013-01-01

    As early as 1902, Gibbs pointed out that systems whose partition function diverges, e.g. gravitation, lie outside the validity of the Boltzmann-Gibbs (BG) theory. Consistently, since the pioneering Bekenstein-Hawking results, physically meaningful evidence (e.g., the holographic principle) has accumulated that the BG entropy S BG of a (3+1) black hole is proportional to its area L 2 (L being a characteristic linear length), and not to its volume L 3 . Similarly it exists the area law, so named because, for a wide class of strongly quantum-entangled d-dimensional systems, S BG is proportional to lnL if d=1, and to L d-1 if d>1, instead of being proportional to L d (d ≥ 1). These results violate the extensivity of the thermodynamical entropy of a d-dimensional system. This thermodynamical inconsistency disappears if we realize that the thermodynamical entropy of such nonstandard systems is not to be identified with the BG additive entropy but with appropriately generalized nonadditive entropies. Indeed, the celebrated usefulness of the BG entropy is founded on hypothesis such as relatively weak probabilistic correlations (and their connections to ergodicity, which by no means can be assumed as a general rule of nature). Here we introduce a generalized entropy which, for the Schwarzschild black hole and the area law, can solve the thermodynamic puzzle. (orig.)

  3. Periodic Arrays of Phosphorene Nanopores as Antidot Lattices with Tunable Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupo, Andrew; Masih Das, Paul; Chien, Chen-Chi; Danda, Gopinath; Kharche, Neerav; Tristant, Damien; Drndić, Marija; Meunier, Vincent

    2017-07-25

    A tunable band gap in phosphorene extends its applicability in nanoelectronic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we propose to tune the band gap in phosphorene by patterning antidot lattices, which are periodic arrays of holes or nanopores etched in the material, and by exploiting quantum confinement in the corresponding nanoconstrictions. We fabricated antidot lattices with radii down to 13 nm in few-layer black phosphorus flakes protected by an oxide layer and observed suppression of the in-plane phonon modes relative to the unmodified material via Raman spectroscopy. In contrast to graphene antidots, the Raman peak positions in few-layer BP antidots are unchanged, in agreement with predicted power spectra. We also use DFT calculations to predict the electronic properties of phosphorene antidot lattices and observe a band gap scaling consistent with quantum confinement effects. Deviations are attributed primarily to self-passivating edge morphologies, where each phosphorus atom has the same number of bonds per atom as the pristine material so that no dopants can saturate dangling bonds. Quantum confinement is stronger for the zigzag edge nanoconstrictions between the holes as compared to those with armchair edges, resulting in a roughly bimodal band gap distribution. Interestingly, in two of the antidot structures an unreported self-passivating reconstruction of the zigzag edge endows the systems with a metallic component. The experimental demonstration of antidots and the theoretical results provide motivation to further scale down nanofabrication of antidots in the few-nanometer size regime, where quantum confinement is particularly important.

  4. Persistent hole-burning of perylene microcrystallites dispersed in PVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, K.; Matsubara, T.; Sugahara, K.; Aoki-Matsumoto, T.; Ichida, M.; Ando, H.; Itoh, T.

    2011-01-01

    A persistent hole-burning is observed in β-perylene microcrystallites, which were embedded in poly-vinyl alcohol. By laser light excitation at 22,535 cm -1 and at 10 K, the hole is found at the excitation photon energy. The mechanism of the persistent hole-burning is interpreted in terms of the resolution of microcrystallites into smaller microcrystallites. This is a novel observation of the persistent hole-burning in aromatic microcrystallites. When the specimen, which includes a hole, is annealed at high temperatures, the resolved microcrystallites restore back to the old position as had been. The β-perylene microcrystallite specimen that we have grown was as small as 1.5 nm in average diameter. They are one order smaller in number of molecules included, compared to those that have been reported on aromatic microcrystallites, anthracene for example. Due to this, we were able to observe the 0-0 transition energy, which varied according as the number of molecules involved in the microcrystallites. We also observed the 0-0 absorption (excitation) spectrum, which depends on the molecular arrays in the microcrystallites. The 0-0 transition of a single molecule in poly-vinyl alcohol matrix is anticipated to be located at 22,885 cm -1 .

  5. The Astrophysics of Merging Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    When two supermassive black holes (SMBHs) approach within 1-10 mpc, gravitational wave (GW) losses begin to dominate the evolution of the binary, pushing the system to merge in a relatively small time. During this final inspiral regime, the system will emit copious energy in GWs, which should be directly detectable by pulsar timing arrays and space-based interferometers. At the same time, any gas or stars in the immediate vicinity of the merging 5MBHs can get heated and produce bright electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to the GW signals. We present here a number of possible mechanisms by which simultaneous EM and GW signals will yield valuable new information about galaxy evolution, accretion disk dynamics, and fundamental physics in the most extreme gravitational fields.

  6. Transfer-less flexible and transparent high-κ/metal gate germanium devices on bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna M.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Flexible wearable electronics have been of great interest lately for the development of innovative future technology for various interactive applications in the field of consumer electronics and advanced healthcare, offering the promise of low-cost, lightweight, and multifunctionality. In the pursuit of this trend, high mobility channel materials need to be investigated on a flexible platform, for the development of flexible high performance devices. Germanium (Ge) is one of the most attractive alternatives for silicon (Si) for high-speed computational applications, due its higher hole and electron mobility. Thus, in this work we show a cost effective CMOS compatible process for transforming conventional rigid Ge metal oxide semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPS) into a mechanically flexible and semi-transparent platform. Devices exhibit outstanding bendability with a bending radius of 0.24 cm, and semi-transparency up to 30 %, varying with respect to the diameter size of the release holes array.

  7. Transfer-less flexible and transparent high-κ/metal gate germanium devices on bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna M.

    2014-08-01

    Flexible wearable electronics have been of great interest lately for the development of innovative future technology for various interactive applications in the field of consumer electronics and advanced healthcare, offering the promise of low-cost, lightweight, and multifunctionality. In the pursuit of this trend, high mobility channel materials need to be investigated on a flexible platform, for the development of flexible high performance devices. Germanium (Ge) is one of the most attractive alternatives for silicon (Si) for high-speed computational applications, due its higher hole and electron mobility. Thus, in this work we show a cost effective CMOS compatible process for transforming conventional rigid Ge metal oxide semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPS) into a mechanically flexible and semi-transparent platform. Devices exhibit outstanding bendability with a bending radius of 0.24 cm, and semi-transparency up to 30 %, varying with respect to the diameter size of the release holes array.

  8. Black Holes Lead Galaxy Growth, New Research Shows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Astronomers may have solved a cosmic chicken-and-egg problem -- the question of which formed first in the early Universe -- galaxies or the supermassive black holes seen at their cores. "It looks like the black holes came first. The evidence is piling up," said Chris Carilli, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). Carilli outlined the conclusions from recent research done by an international team studying conditions in the first billion years of the Universe's history in a lecture presented to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Long Beach, California. Gas in Distant Galaxy VLA image (right) of gas in young galaxy seen as it was when the Universe was only 870 million years old. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, SDSS Full-size JPEG, 323 KB PDF file, 180 KB Galaxy image, no annotation, JPEG 21 KB Earlier studies of galaxies and their central black holes in the nearby Universe revealed an intriguing linkage between the masses of the black holes and of the central "bulges" of stars and gas in the galaxies. The ratio of the black hole and the bulge mass is nearly the same for a wide range of galactic sizes and ages. For central black holes from a few million to many billions of times the mass of our Sun, the black hole's mass is about one one-thousandth of the mass of the surrounding galactic bulge. "This constant ratio indicates that the black hole and the bulge affect each others' growth in some sort of interactive relationship," said Dominik Riechers, of Caltech. "The big question has been whether one grows before the other or if they grow together, maintaining their mass ratio throughout the entire process." In the past few years, scientists have used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array radio telescope and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in France to peer far back in the 13.7 billion-year history of the Universe, to the dawn of the first galaxies. "We finally have been able to measure black-hole and bulge masses in several galaxies seen

  9. 30 CFR 57.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intersecting holes. 57.7055 Section 57.7055... Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7055 Intersecting holes. Holes shall not be drilled where there is a danger of intersecting a misfired hole or a hole containing explosives, blasting agents...

  10. 30 CFR 56.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intersecting holes. 56.7055 Section 56.7055... Piercing Drilling § 56.7055 Intersecting holes. Holes shall not be drilled where there is a danger of intersecting a misfired hole or a hole containing explosives blasting agents, or detonators. [56 FR 46508, Sept...

  11. LOW-MASS AGNs AND THEIR RELATION TO THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE OF BLACK HOLE ACCRETION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gültekin, Kayhan; King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Cackett, Edward M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 West Hancock Street, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Pinkney, Jason, E-mail: kayhan@umich.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio Northern University, 525 S. Main St., Ada, OH 45810 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    We put active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with low-mass black holes on the fundamental plane of black hole accretion—the plane that relates X-ray emission, radio emission, and mass of an accreting black hole—to test whether or not the relation is universal for both stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. We use new Chandra X-ray and Very Large Array radio observations of a sample of black holes with masses less than 10{sup 6.3} M {sub ☉}, which have the best leverage for determining whether supermassive black holes and stellar-mass black holes belong on the same plane. Our results suggest that the two different classes of black holes both belong on the same relation. These results allow us to conclude that the fundamental plane is suitable for use in estimating supermassive black hole masses smaller than ∼10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, in testing for intermediate-mass black holes, and in estimating masses at high accretion rates.

  12. Sub-electron transport in single-electron-tunneling arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel; Sverdlov, Viktor; Korotkov, Alexander; Likharev, Konstantin

    2002-03-01

    We have analyzed quasi-continuous charge transport in two-dimensional tunnel junction arrays with a special distribution of background charges, providing a complete suppression of Coulomb blockade thresholds of tunneling between any pair of islands. Numerical simulations show that at low currents the dc I-V curve is indeed linear, while the shot noise is strongly suppressed and approaches 1/N of the Schottky value (where N is the array length). Thus both conditions of quasi-continuous transport, formulated earlier by Matsuoka and Likharev (Phys. Rev. B, v57, 15613, 1998), are satisfied. At higher fields the electron-hole pair production begins, and shot noise grows sharply. At higher voltages still, the array enters the "plasma" regime (with nearly balanced number of electrons and holes) and the Fano factor drops to 1/N once again. We have studied the resulting shot noise peak in detail, and concluded that its physics is close to that of critical opalescence.

  13. Magnetically-coupled microcalorimeter arrays for x-ray astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandler, Simon

    The "X-ray Surveyor" has been listed by NASA as one of the four major large mission concepts to be studied in the next Astrophysics Decadal Review in its preliminary list of large concepts. One of the key instruments on such a mission would be a very large format X-ray microcalorimeter array, with an array size of greater than 100 thousand pixels. Magnetically-coupled microcalorimeters (MCC) are one of the technologies with the greatest potential to meet the requirements of this mission, and this proposal is one to carry out research specifically to reach the goals of this vision. The "X-ray Surveyor" is a concept for a future mission that will make X-ray observations that are instrumental to understanding the quickly emerging population of galaxies and supermassive black holes at z ~10. The observations will trace the formation of galaxies and their assembly into large-scale structures starting from the earliest possible epochs. This mission would be observing baryons and large-scale physical processes outside of the very densest regions in the local Universe. This can be achieved with an X-ray observatory with similar angular resolution as Chandra but with significantly improved optic area and detector sensitivity. Chandra-scale angular resolution (1" or better) is essential in building more powerful, higher throughput observatories to avoid source confusion and remain photon-limited rather than background-limited. A prime consideration for the microcalorimeter camera on this type of mission is maintaining ~ 1 arcsec spatial resolution over the largest possible field of view, even if this means a slight trade-off against the spectral resolution. A uniform array of 1" pixels covering at least 5'x5' field of view is desired. To reduce the number of sensors read out, in geometries where extremely fine pitch (~50 microns) is desired, the most promising technologies are those in which a thermal sensor such an MCC can read out a sub-array of 20-25 individual 1'

  14. Fiber Laser Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simpson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...., field-dependent, loss within the coupled laser array. During this program, Jaycor focused on the construction and use of an experimental apparatus that can be used to investigate the coherent combination of an array of fiber lasers...

  15. Black-Hole Mass Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    The applicability and apparent uncertainties of the techniques currently available for measuring or estimating black-hole masses in AGNs are briefly summarized.......The applicability and apparent uncertainties of the techniques currently available for measuring or estimating black-hole masses in AGNs are briefly summarized....

  16. ATLAS simulated black hole event

    CERN Multimedia

    Pequenão, J

    2008-01-01

    The simulated collision event shown is viewed along the beampipe. The event is one in which a microscopic-black-hole was produced in the collision of two protons (not shown). The microscopic-black-hole decayed immediately into many particles. The colors of the tracks show different types of particles emerging from the collision (at the center).

  17. Drilling miniature holes, Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1978-07-01

    Miniature components for precision electromechanical mechanisms such as switches, timers, and actuators typically require a number of small holes. Because of the precision required, the workpiece materials, and the geometry of the parts, most of these holes must be produced by conventional drilling techniques. The use of such techniques is tedious and often requires considerable trial and error to prevent drill breakage, minimize hole mislocation and variations in hole diameter. This study of eight commercial drill designs revealed that printed circuit board drills produced better locational and size repeatability than did other drills when centerdrilling was not used. Boring holes 1 mm in dia, or less, as a general rule did not improve hole location in brass or stainless steel. Hole locations of patterns of 0.66-mm holes can be maintained within 25.4-..mu..m diametral positional tolerance if setup misalignments can be eliminated. Size tolerances of +- 3.8 ..mu..m can be maintained under some conditions when drilling flat plates. While these levels of precision are possible with existing off-the-shelf drills, they may not be practical in many cases.

  18. Optical appearance of white holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, K.; Roeder, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    The detailed optical properties of white holes are examined within the framework of geometrical optics. It is shown that the appearance of the objects most likely to be observed at late times is in fact determined by their early histories. These ccalculations indicate that one cannot invoke the simple concept of a stable white hole as a ''natural'' explanation of highly energetic astrophysical phenomena

  19. Semiconductor@metal-organic framework core-shell heterostructures: a case of ZnO@ZIF-8 nanorods with selective photoelectrochemical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wen-wen; Kuang, Qin; Zhou, Jian-zhang; Kong, Xiang-jian; Xie, Zhao-xiong; Zheng, Lan-sun

    2013-02-06

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and related material classes are attracting considerable attention for their applications in gas storage/separation as well as catalysis. In contrast, research concerning potential uses in electronic devices (such as sensors) is in its infancy, which might be due to a great challenge in the fabrication of MOFs and semiconductor composites with well-designed structures. In this paper, we proposed a simple self-template strategy to fabricate metal oxide semiconductor@MOF core-shell heterostructures, and successfully obtained freestanding ZnO@ZIF-8 nanorods as well as vertically standing arrays (including nanorod arrays and nanotube arrays). In this synthetic process, ZnO nanorods not only act as the template but also provide Zn(2+) ions for the formation of ZIF-8. In addition, we have demonstrated that solvent composition and reaction temperature are two crucial factors for successfully fabricating well-defined ZnO@ZIF-8 heterostructures. As we expect, the as-prepared ZnO@ZIF-8 nanorod arrays display distinct photoelectrochemical response to hole scavengers with different molecule sizes (e.g., H(2)O(2) and ascorbic acid) owing to the limitation of the aperture of the ZIF-8 shell. Excitingly, such ZnO@ZIF-8 nanorod arrays were successfully applied to the detection of H(2)O(2) in the presence of serous buffer solution. Therefore, it is reasonable to believe that the semiconductor@MOFs heterostructure potentially has promising applications in many electronic devices including sensors.

  20. Black holes and everyday physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekenstein, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Black holes have piqued much curiosity. But thus far they have been important only in ''remote'' subjects like astrophysics and quantum gravity. It is shown that the situation can be improved. By a judicious application of black hole physics, one can obtain new results in ''everyday physics''. For example, black holes yield a quantum universal upper bound on the entropy-to-energy ratio for ordinary thermodynamical systems which was unknown earlier. It can be checked, albeit with much labor, by ordinary statistical methods. Black holes set a limitation on the number of species of elementary particles-quarks, leptons, neutrinos - which may exist. And black holes lead to a fundamental limitation on the rate at which information can be transferred for given message energy by any communication system. (author)

  1. The search for black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torn, K.

    1976-01-01

    Conceivable experimental investigations to prove the existence of black holes are discussed. Double system with a black hole turning around a star-satellite are in the spotlight. X-radiation emmited by such systems and resulting from accretion of the stellar gas by a black hole, and the gas heating when falling on the black hole might prove the model suggested. A source of strong X-radiation observed in the Cygnus star cluster and referred to as Cygnus X-1 may be thus identified as a black hole. Direct registration of short X-ray pulses with msec intervals might prove the suggestion. The lack of appropriate astrophysic facilities is pointed out to be the major difficulty on the way of experimental verifications

  2. Black hole final state conspiracies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2009-01-01

    The principle that unitarity must be preserved in all processes, no matter how exotic, has led to deep insights into boundary conditions in cosmology and black hole theory. In the case of black hole evaporation, Horowitz and Maldacena were led to propose that unitarity preservation can be understood in terms of a restriction imposed on the wave function at the singularity. Gottesman and Preskill showed that this natural idea only works if one postulates the presence of 'conspiracies' between systems just inside the event horizon and states at much later times, near the singularity. We argue that some AdS black holes have unusual internal thermodynamics, and that this may permit the required 'conspiracies' if real black holes are described by some kind of sum over all AdS black holes having the same entropy

  3. String-Corrected Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubeny, V.

    2005-01-12

    We investigate the geometry of four dimensional black hole solutions in the presence of stringy higher curvature corrections to the low energy effective action. For certain supersymmetric two charge black holes these corrections drastically alter the causal structure of the solution, converting seemingly pathological null singularities into timelike singularities hidden behind a finite area horizon. We establish, analytically and numerically, that the string-corrected two-charge black hole metric has the same Penrose diagram as the extremal four-charge black hole. The higher derivative terms lead to another dramatic effect--the gravitational force exerted by a black hole on an inertial observer is no longer purely attractive. The magnitude of this effect is related to the size of the compactification manifold.

  4. Compressibility of rotating black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Interpreting the cosmological constant as a pressure, whose thermodynamically conjugate variable is a volume, modifies the first law of black hole thermodynamics. Properties of the resulting thermodynamic volume are investigated: the compressibility and the speed of sound of the black hole are derived in the case of nonpositive cosmological constant. The adiabatic compressibility vanishes for a nonrotating black hole and is maximal in the extremal case--comparable with, but still less than, that of a cold neutron star. A speed of sound v s is associated with the adiabatic compressibility, which is equal to c for a nonrotating black hole and decreases as the angular momentum is increased. An extremal black hole has v s 2 =0.9 c 2 when the cosmological constant vanishes, and more generally v s is bounded below by c/√(2).

  5. THE BLACK HOLE FORMATION PROBABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D., E-mail: dclausen@tapir.caltech.edu [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Mailcode 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  6. THE BLACK HOLE FORMATION PROBABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P BH (M ZAMS ). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P BH (M ZAMS ) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P BH (M ZAMS ) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P BH (M ZAMS ) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment

  7. The Black Hole Formation Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-02-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P BH(M ZAMS). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P BH(M ZAMS) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P BH(M ZAMS) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P BH(M ZAMS) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  8. Liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuchkov, I.I.; Filonov, V.S.; Zaitsev, B.I.; Artemiev, L.N.; Rakhimov, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled reactor is described comprising two rotatable plugs, one of them, having at least one hole, being arranged internally of the other, a recharging mechanism with a guide tube adapted to be moved through the hole of the first plug by means of a drive, and a device for detecting stacks with leaky fuel elements, the recharging mechanism tube serving as a sampler

  9. Caged black holes: Black holes in compactified spacetimes. I. Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kol, Barak; Sorkin, Evgeny; Piran, Tsvi

    2004-01-01

    In backgrounds with compact dimensions there may exist several phases of black objects including a black hole and a black string. The phase transition between them raises questions and touches on fundamental issues such as topology change, uniqueness, and cosmic censorship. No analytic solution is known for the black hole, and moreover one can expect approximate solutions only for very small black holes, while phase transition physics happens when the black hole is large. Hence we turn to numerical solutions. Here some theoretical background to the numerical analysis is given, while the results will appear in a subsequent paper. The goals for a numerical analysis are set. The scalar charge and tension along the compact dimension are defined and used as improved order parameters which put both the black hole and the black string at finite values on the phase diagram. The predictions for small black holes are presented. The differential and the integrated forms of the first law are derived, and the latter (Smarr's formula) can be used to estimate the 'overall numerical error'. Field asymptotics and expressions for physical quantities in terms of the numerical values are supplied. The techniques include the 'method of equivalent charges', free energy, dimensional reduction, and analytic perturbation for small black holes

  10. Ordered arrays of nanoporous gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A combination of a “top-down” approach (substrate-conformal imprint lithography and two “bottom-up” approaches (dewetting and dealloying enables fabrication of perfectly ordered 2-dimensional arrays of nanoporous gold nanoparticles. The dewetting of Au/Ag bilayers on the periodically prepatterned substrates leads to the interdiffusion of Au and Ag and the formation of an array of Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles. The array of alloy nanoparticles is transformed into an array of nanoporous gold nanoparticles by a following dealloying step. Large areas of this new type of material arrangement can be realized with this technique. In addition, this technique allows for the control of particle size, particle spacing, and ligament size (or pore size by varying the period of the structure, total metal layer thickness, and the thickness ratio of the as-deposited bilayers.

  11. When Supermassive Black Holes Wander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-05-01

    Are supermassive black holes found only at the centers of galaxies? Definitely not, according to a new study in fact, galaxies like the Milky Way may harbor several such monsters wandering through their midst.Collecting Black Holes Through MergersIts generally believed that galaxies are built up hierarchically, growing in size through repeated mergers over time. Each galaxy in a major merger likely hosts a supermassive black hole a black hole of millions to billions of times the mass of the Sun at its center. When a pair of galaxies merges, their supermassive black holes will often sink to the center of the merger via a process known as dynamical friction. There the supermassive black holes themselves will eventually merge in a burst of gravitational waves.Spatial distribution and velocities of wandering supermassive black holes in three of the authors simulated galaxies, shown in edge-on (left) and face-on (right) views of the galaxy disks. Click for a closer look. [Tremmel et al. 2018]But if a galaxy the size of the Milky Way was built through a history of many major galactic mergers, are we sure that all its accumulated supermassive black holes eventually merged at the galactic center? A new study suggests that some of these giants might have escaped such a fate and they now wander unseen on wide orbits through their galaxies.Black Holes in an Evolving UniverseLed by Michael Tremmel (Yale Center for Astronomy Astrophysics), a team of scientists has used data from a large-scale cosmological simulation, Romulus25, to explore the possibility of wandering supermassive black holes. The Romulus simulations are uniquely suited to track the formation and subsequent orbital motion of supermassive black holes as galactic halos are built up through mergers over the history of the universe.From these simulations, Tremmel and collaborators find an end total of 316 supermassive black holes residing within the bounds of 26 Milky-Way-mass halos. Of these, roughly a third are

  12. Black holes and quantum processes in them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, V.P.

    1976-01-01

    The latest achievements in the physics of black holes are reviewed. The problem of quantum production in a strong gravitational field of black holes is considered. Another parallel discovered during investigation of interactions between black holes and between black holes and surrounding media, is also drawn with thermodynamics. A gravitational field of rotating black holes is considered. Some cosmological aspects of evaporation of small black holes are discussed as well as possibilities to observe them

  13. Black hole decay as geodesic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Kumar S.; Sen, Siddhartha

    2003-01-01

    We show that a formalism for analyzing the near-horizon conformal symmetry of Schwarzschild black holes using a scalar field probe is capable of describing black hole decay. The equation governing black hole decay can be identified as the geodesic equation in the space of black hole masses. This provides a novel geometric interpretation for the decay of black holes. Moreover, this approach predicts a precise correction term to the usual expression for the decay rate of black holes

  14. Flexible ultraviolet photodetectors based on ZnO-SnO2 heterojunction nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Zheng; Yang, Xiaoli; Chen, Haoran; Liang, Zhongzhu

    2018-02-01

    A ZnO-SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array, as a metal oxide semiconductor, was successfully synthesized by a near-field electrospinning method for the applications as high performance ultraviolet photodetectors. Ultraviolet photodetectors based on a single nanowire exhibited excellent photoresponse properties to 300 nm ultraviolet light illumination including ultrahigh I on/I off ratios (up to 103), good stability and reproducibility because of the separation between photo-generated electron-hole pairs. Moreover, the NWs array shows an enhanced photosensing performance. Flexible photodetectors on the PI substrates with similar tendency properties were also fabricated. In addition, under various bending curvatures and cycles, the as-fabricated flexible photodetectors revealed mechanical flexibility and good stable electrical properties, showing that they have the potential for applications in future flexible photoelectron devices. Project supported by the National Science Foundation of China (No. 61504136) and the State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Tubular fluoropolymer arrays with high piezoelectric response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Sergey; Eder-Goy, Dagmar; Biethan, Corinna; Fedosov, Sergey; Xu, Bai-Xiang; von Seggern, Heinz

    2018-01-01

    Polymers with electrically charged internal air cavities called ferroelectrets exhibit a pronounced piezoelectric effect and are regarded as soft functional materials suitable for sensor and actuator applications. In this work, a simple method for fabricating piezoelectret arrays with open-tubular channels is introduced. A set of individual fluoroethylenepropylene (FEP) tubes is compressed between two heated metal plates. The squeezed FEP tubes are melted together at +270 °C. The resulting structure is a uniform, multi-tubular, flat array that reveals a strong piezoelectric response after a poling step. The fabricated arrays have a high ratio between piezoelectrically active and non-active areas. The optimal charging voltage and stability of the piezoelectric coefficients with pressures and frequency were experimentally investigated for two specific array structures with wall thickness of 50 and 120 μm. The array fabricated from 50 μm thick FEP tubes reveals a stable and high piezoelectric coefficient of {d}33 = 120-160 pC N-1 with a flat frequency response between 0.1 Hz and 10 kHz for pressures between 1 and 100 kPa. An increase of wall thickness to 120 μm is accompanied by a more than twofold decrease in the piezoelectric coefficient as a result of a simultaneously higher effective array stiffness and lower remanent polarization. The obtained experimental results can be used to optimize the array design with regard to the electromechanical performance.

  16. Investigation of Spiral and Sweeping Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Douglas; Poinsatte, Philip; Ameri, Ali; Culley, Dennis; Raghu, Surya; Shyam, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Surface infrared thermography, hotwire anemometry, and thermocouple surveys were performed on two new film cooling hole geometries: spiral/rifled holes and fluidic sweeping holes. The spiral holes attempt to induce large-scale vorticity to the film cooling jet as it exits the hole to prevent the formation of the kidney shaped vortices commonly associated with film cooling jets. The fluidic sweeping hole uses a passive in-hole geometry to induce jet sweeping at frequencies that scale with blowing ratios. The spiral hole performance is compared to that of round holes with and without compound angles. The fluidic hole is of the diffusion class of holes and is therefore compared to a 777 hole and Square holes. A patent-pending spiral hole design showed the highest potential of the non-diffusion type hole configurations. Velocity contours and flow temperature were acquired at discreet cross-sections of the downstream flow field. The passive fluidic sweeping hole shows the most uniform cooling distribution but suffers from low span-averaged effectiveness levels due to enhanced mixing. The data was taken at a Reynolds number of 11,000 based on hole diameter and freestream velocity. Infrared thermography was taken for blowing rations of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 at a density ration of 1.05. The flow inside the fluidic sweeping hole was studied using 3D unsteady RANS.

  17. A nonsingular rotating black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2015-01-01

    The spacetime singularities in classical general relativity are inevitable, as predicated by the celebrated singularity theorems. However, it is a general belief that singularities do not exist in Nature and that they are the limitations of the general relativity. In the absence of a welldefined quantum gravity, models of regular black holes have been studied. We employ a probability distribution inspired mass function m(r) to replace the Kerr black hole mass M to represent a nonsingular rotating black hole that is identified asymptotically (r >> k, k > 0 constant) exactly as the Kerr-Newman black hole, and as the Kerr black hole when k = 0. The radiating counterpart renders a nonsingular generalization of Carmeli's spacetime as well as Vaidya's spacetime, in the appropriate limits. The exponential correction factor changing the geometry of the classical black hole to remove the curvature singularity can also be motivated by quantum arguments. The regular rotating spacetime can also be understood as a black hole of general relativity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics. (orig.)

  18. Black holes: the membrane paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, K.S.; Price, R.H.; Macdonald, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The physics of black holes is explored in terms of a membrane paradigm which treats the event horizon as a two-dimensional membrane embedded in three-dimensional space. A 3+1 formalism is used to split Schwarzschild space-time and the laws of physics outside a nonrotating hole, which permits treatment of the atmosphere in terms of the physical properties of thin slices. The model is applied to perturbed slowly or rapidly rotating and nonrotating holes, and to quantify the electric and magnetic fields and eddy currents passing through a membrane surface which represents a stretched horizon. Features of tidal gravitational fields in the vicinity of the horizon, quasars and active galalctic nuclei, the alignment of jets perpendicular to accretion disks, and the effects of black holes at the center of ellipsoidal star clusters are investigated. Attention is also given to a black hole in a binary system and the interactions of black holes with matter that is either near or very far from the event horizon. Finally, a statistical mechanics treatment is used to derive a second law of thermodynamics for a perfectly thermal atmosphere of a black hole

  19. Black Hole Grabs Starry Snack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version This artist's concept shows a supermassive black hole at the center of a remote galaxy digesting the remnants of a star. NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer had a 'ringside' seat for this feeding frenzy, using its ultraviolet eyes to study the process from beginning to end. The artist's concept chronicles the star being ripped apart and swallowed by the cosmic beast over time. First, the intact sun-like star (left) ventures too close to the black hole, and its own self-gravity is overwhelmed by the black hole's gravity. The star then stretches apart (middle yellow blob) and eventually breaks into stellar crumbs, some of which swirl into the black hole (cloudy ring at right). This doomed material heats up and radiates light, including ultraviolet light, before disappearing forever into the black hole. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer was able to watch this process unfold by observing changes in ultraviolet light. The area around the black hole appears warped because the gravity of the black hole acts like a lens, twisting and distorting light.

  20. Thermodynamic theory of black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, P C.W. [King' s Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Mathematics

    1977-04-21

    The thermodynamic theory underlying black hole processes is developed in detail and applied to model systems. It is found that Kerr-Newman black holes undergo a phase transition at a = 0.68M or Q = 0.86M, where the heat capacity has an infinite discontinuity. Above the transition values the specific heat is positive, permitting isothermal equilibrium with a surrounding heat bath. Simple processes and stability criteria for various black hole situations are investigated. The limits for entropically favoured black hole formation are found. The Nernst conditions for the third law of thermodynamics are not satisfied fully for black holes. There is no obvious thermodynamic reason why a black hole may not be cooled down below absolute zero and converted into a naked singularity. Quantum energy-momentum tensor calculations for uncharged black holes are extended to the Reissner-Nordstrom case, and found to be fully consistent with the thermodynamic picture for Q < M. For Q < M the model predicts that 'naked' collapse also produces radiation, with such intensity that the collapsing matter is entirely evaporated away before a naked singularity can form.

  1. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissbühler, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.geissbuehler@epfl.ch; Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Barraud, Loris; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain [CSEM PV-Center, Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Ballif, Christophe [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); CSEM PV-Center, Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2015-08-24

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  2. Unveiling the edge of time black holes, white holes, wormholes

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    1992-01-01

    Acclaimed science writer John Gribbin recounts dramatic stories that have led scientists to believe black holes and their more mysterious kin are not only real, but might actually provide a passage to other universes and travel through time.

  3. Black holes and Higgs stability

    CERN Document Server

    Tetradis, Nikolaos

    2016-09-20

    We study the effect of primordial black holes on the classical rate of nucleation of AdS regions within the standard electroweak vacuum. We find that the energy barrier for transitions to the new vacuum, which characterizes the exponential suppression of the nucleation rate, can be reduced significantly in the black-hole background. A precise analysis is required in order to determine whether the the existence of primordial black holes is compatible with the form of the Higgs potential at high temperature or density in the Standard Model or its extensions.

  4. Vacuum metastability with black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burda, Philipp [Centre for Particle Theory, Durham University,South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Gregory, Ruth [Centre for Particle Theory, Durham University,South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Perimeter Institute, 31 Caroline Street North,Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Moss, Ian G. annd [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University,Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-24

    We consider the possibility that small black holes can act as nucleation seeds for the decay of a metastable vacuum, focussing particularly on the Higgs potential. Using a thin-wall bubble approximation for the nucleation process, which is possible when generic quantum gravity corrections are added to the Higgs potential, we show that primordial black holes can stimulate vacuum decay. We demonstrate that for suitable parameter ranges, the vacuum decay process dominates over the Hawking evaporation process. Finally, we comment on the application of these results to vacuum decay seeded by black holes produced in particle collisions.

  5. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  6. Vacuum metastability with black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burda, Philipp; Gregory, Ruth; Moss, Ian G. annd

    2015-01-01

    We consider the possibility that small black holes can act as nucleation seeds for the decay of a metastable vacuum, focussing particularly on the Higgs potential. Using a thin-wall bubble approximation for the nucleation process, which is possible when generic quantum gravity corrections are added to the Higgs potential, we show that primordial black holes can stimulate vacuum decay. We demonstrate that for suitable parameter ranges, the vacuum decay process dominates over the Hawking evaporation process. Finally, we comment on the application of these results to vacuum decay seeded by black holes produced in particle collisions.

  7. Tunnelling from Goedel black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerner, Ryan; Mann, R. B.

    2007-01-01

    We consider the spacetime structure of Kerr-Goedel black holes, analyzing their parameter space in detail. We apply the tunnelling method to compute their temperature and compare the results to previous calculations obtained via other methods. We claim that it is not possible to have the closed timelike curve (CTC) horizon in between the two black hole horizons and include a discussion of issues that occur when the radius of the CTC horizon is smaller than the radius of both black hole horizons

  8. Quantum mechanics of black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Edward

    2012-08-03

    The popular conception of black holes reflects the behavior of the massive black holes found by astronomers and described by classical general relativity. These objects swallow up whatever comes near and emit nothing. Physicists who have tried to understand the behavior of black holes from a quantum mechanical point of view, however, have arrived at quite a different picture. The difference is analogous to the difference between thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. The thermodynamic description is a good approximation for a macroscopic system, but statistical mechanics describes what one will see if one looks more closely.

  9. Gravitational polarizability of black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damour, Thibault; Lecian, Orchidea Maria

    2009-01-01

    The gravitational polarizability properties of black holes are compared and contrasted with their electromagnetic polarizability properties. The 'shape' or 'height' multipolar Love numbers h l of a black hole are defined and computed. They are then compared to their electromagnetic analogs h l EM . The Love numbers h l give the height of the lth multipolar 'tidal bulge' raised on the horizon of a black hole by faraway masses. We also discuss the shape of the tidal bulge raised by a test-mass m, in the limit where m gets very close to the horizon.

  10. Black hole meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Herck, Walter; Wyder, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    The enumeration of BPS bound states in string theory needs refinement. Studying partition functions of particles made from D-branes wrapped on algebraic Calabi-Yau 3-folds, and classifying states using split attractor flow trees, we extend the method for computing a refined BPS index, [1]. For certain D-particles, a finite number of microstates, namely polar states, exclusively realized as bound states, determine an entire partition function (elliptic genus). This underlines their crucial importance: one might call them the ‘chromosomes’ of a D-particle or a black hole. As polar states also can be affected by our refinement, previous predictions on elliptic genera are modified. This can be metaphorically interpreted as ‘crossing-over in the meiosis of a D-particle’. Our results improve on [2], provide non-trivial evidence for a strong split attractor flow tree conjecture, and thus suggest that we indeed exhaust the BPS spectrum. In the D-brane description of a bound state, the necessity for refinement results from the fact that tachyonic strings split up constituent states into ‘generic’ and ‘special’ states. These are enumerated separately by topological invariants, which turn out to be partitions of Donaldson-Thomas invariants. As modular predictions provide a check on many of our results, we have compelling evidence that our computations are correct.

  11. Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have made a major advance in explaining how a special class of black holes may shut off the high-speed jets they produce. These results suggest that these black holes have a mechanism for regulating the rate at which they grow. Black holes come in many sizes: the supermassive ones, including those in quasars, which weigh in at millions to billions of times the mass of the Sun, and the much smaller stellar-mass black holes which have measured masses in the range of about 7 to 25 times the Sun's mass. Some stellar-mass black holes launch powerful jets of particles and radiation, like seen in quasars, and are called "micro-quasars". The new study looks at a famous micro-quasar in our own Galaxy, and regions close to its event horizon, or point of no return. This system, GRS 1915+105 (GRS 1915 for short), contains a black hole about 14 times the mass of the Sun that is feeding off material from a nearby companion star. As the material swirls toward the black hole, an accretion disk forms. This system shows remarkably unpredictable and complicated variability ranging from timescales of seconds to months, including 14 different patterns of variation. These variations are caused by a poorly understood connection between the disk and the radio jet seen in GRS 1915. Chandra, with its spectrograph, has observed GRS 1915 eleven times since its launch in 1999. These studies reveal that the jet in GRS 1915 may be periodically choked off when a hot wind, seen in X-rays, is driven off the accretion disk around the black hole. The wind is believed to shut down the jet by depriving it of matter that would have otherwise fueled it. Conversely, once the wind dies down, the jet can re-emerge. "We think the jet and wind around this black hole are in a sort of tug of war," said Joseph Neilsen, Harvard graduate student and lead author of the paper appearing in the journal Nature. "Sometimes one is winning and then, for reasons we don

  12. Hydrogen incorporation in high hole density GaN:Mg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvanut, M. E.; Uprety, Y.; Dashdorj, J.; Moseley, M.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2011-03-01

    We investigate hydrogen passivation in heavily doped p-type GaN using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Samples include both conventionally grown GaN (1019 cm-3 Mg, 1017 cm-3 holes) and films grown by metal modulation epitaxy (MME), which yielded higher Mg (1- 4 x 1020 cm-3) and hole (1- 40 x 1018 cm-3) densities than found in conventionally grown GaN. The Mg acceptor signal is monitored throughout 30 minute annealing steps in N2 :H2 (92%:7%)) and subsequently pure N2 . N2 :H2 heat treatments of the lower hole density films begin to reduce the Mg EPR intensity at 750 o C, but quench the signal in high hole density films at 600 o C. Revival of the signal by subsequent N2 annealing occurs at 800 o C for the low hole density material and 600 o C in MME GaN. The present work highlights chemical differences between heavily Mg doped and lower doped films; however, it is unclear whether the difference is due to changes in hydrogen-Mg complex formation or hydrogen diffusion. The work at UAB is supported by the NSF.

  13. Black hole evaporation: a paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Bojowald, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A paradigm describing black hole evaporation in non-perturbative quantum gravity is developed by combining two sets of detailed results: (i) resolution of the Schwarzschild singularity using quantum geometry methods and (ii) time evolution of black holes in the trapping and dynamical horizon frameworks. Quantum geometry effects introduce a major modification in the traditional spacetime diagram of black hole evaporation, providing a possible mechanism for recovery of information that is classically lost in the process of black hole formation. The paradigm is developed directly in the Lorentzian regime and necessary conditions for its viability are discussed. If these conditions are met, much of the tension between expectations based on spacetime geometry and structure of quantum theory would be resolved

  14. Axion-dilation black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallosh, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this talk some essential features of stringy black holes are described. The author considers charged U(1) and U(1) x U(1) four-dimensional axion-dilaton black holes. The Hawking temperature and the entropy of all solutions are shown to be simple functions of the squares of supercharges, defining the positivity bounds. Spherically symmetric and multi black hole solutions are presented. The extreme solutions with zero entropy (holons) represent a ground state of the theory and are characterized by elementary dilaton, axion, electric, and magnetic charges. The attractive gravitational and axion-dilaton force is balanced by the repulsive electromagnetic force. The author discusses the possibility of splitting of nearly extreme black holes. 11 refs

  15. Holes in magneto electrostatic traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.

    1996-01-01

    We observe that in magneto electrostatic confinement (MEC) devices the magnetic surfaces are not always equipotentials. The lack of symmetry in the equipotential surfaces can result in holes in MEC plasma traps. (author)

  16. Black holes by analytic continuation

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, Daniele

    1997-01-01

    In the context of a two-dimensional exactly solvable model, the dynamics of quantum black holes is obtained by analytically continuing the description of the regime where no black hole is formed. The resulting spectrum of outgoing radiation departs from the one predicted by the Hawking model in the region where the outgoing modes arise from the horizon with Planck-order frequencies. This occurs early in the evaporation process, and the resulting physical picture is unconventional. The theory predicts that black holes will only radiate out an energy of Planck mass order, stabilizing after a transitory period. The continuation from a regime without black hole formation --accessible in the 1+1 gravity theory considered-- is implicit in an S matrix approach and provides in this way a possible solution to the problem of information loss.

  17. Hole dephasing caused by hole-hole interaction in a multilayered black phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijun; Khan, Muhammad Atif; Lee, Yoontae; Lee, Inyeal; Yun, Sun Jin; Youn, Doo-Hyeb; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2017-11-01

    We study the magnetotransport of holes in a multilayered black phosphorus in a temperature range of 1.9 to 21.5 K. We observed a negative magnetoresistance at magnetic fields up to 1.5 T. This negative magetoresistance was analyzed by weak localization theory in diffusive regime. At the lowest temperature and the highest carrier density we found a phase coherence length of 48 nm. The linear temperature dependence of the dephasing rate shows that the hole-hole scattering processes with small energy transfer are the dominant contribution in breaking the carrier phase coherence.

  18. Analysis of Terminal Metallic Armor Plate Free-Surface Bulging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapacki, Jr, E. J

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of the bulge formed on the free-surface of the terminal metallic plate of an armor array is shown to lead to reasonable estimates of the armor array's remaining penetration/perforation resistance...

  19. New regular black hole solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we consider general relativity coupled to Maxwell's electromagnetism and charged matter. Under the assumption of spherical symmetry, there is a particular class of solutions that correspond to regular charged black holes whose interior region is de Sitter, the exterior region is Reissner-Nordstroem and there is a charged thin-layer in-between the two. The main physical and geometrical properties of such charged regular black holes are analyzed.

  20. Black holes from extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, S.D.H.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1990-01-01

    It is argued that models of extended inflation, in which modified Einstein gravity allows a graceful exit from the false vacuum, lead to copious production of black holes. The critical temperature of the inflationary phase transition must be >10 8 GeV in order to avoid severe cosmological problems in a universe dominated by black holes. We speculate on the possibility that the interiors of false vacuum regions evolve into baby universes. (orig.)

  1. Black holes and cosmic censorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiscock, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the complete gravitational collapse of a body always yields a black hole, and that naked singularities are never produced (the cosmic censorship hypothesis). The local (or strong) cosmic censorship hypothesis states that singularities which are even locally naked (e.g., to an observer inside a black hole) are never produced. This dissertation studies the validity of these two conjectures. The Kerr-Newman metrics describes the black holes only when M 2 greater than or equal to Q 2 + P 2 , where M is the mass of the black hole, a = J/M its specific angular momentum, Q its electric charge, and P its magnetic charge. In the first part of this dissertation, the possibility of converting an extreme Kerr-Newman black hole (M 2 = a 2 + Q 2 + P 2 ) into a naked singularity by the accretion of test particles is considered. The motion of test particles is studied with a large angular momentum to energy ratio, and also test particles with a large charge to energy ratio. The final state is always found to be a black hole if the angular momentum, electric charge, and magnetic charge of the black hole are all much greater than the corresponding angular momentum, electric charge, and magnetic charge of the test particle. In Part II of this dissertation possible black hole interior solutions are studied. The Cauchy horizons and locally naked timelike singularities of the charged (and/or rotating) solutions are contrasted with the spacelike all-encompassing singularity of the Schwarzschild solution. It is determined which portions of the analytic extension of the Reissner-Nordstroem solution are relevant to realistic gravitational collapse

  2. Are Black Holes Elementary Particles?

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Yuan K.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum black holes are the smallest and heaviest conceivable elementary particles. They have a microscopic size but a macroscopic mass. Several fundamental types have been constructed with some remarkable properties. Quantum black holes in the neighborhood of the Galaxy could resolve the paradox of ultra-high energy cosmic rays detected in Earth's atmosphere. They may also play a role as dark matter in cosmology.

  3. Superresolving Black Hole Images with Full-Closure Sparse Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Chelsea; Akiyama, Kazunori; Fish, Vincent

    2018-01-01

    It is believed that almost all galaxies have black holes at their centers. Imaging a black hole is a primary objective to answer scientific questions relating to relativistic accretion and jet formation. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is set to capture images of two nearby black holes, Sagittarius A* at the center of the Milky Way galaxy roughly 26,000 light years away and the other M87 which is in Virgo A, a large elliptical galaxy that is 50 million light years away. Sparse imaging techniques have shown great promise for reconstructing high-fidelity superresolved images of black holes from simulated data. Previous work has included the effects of atmospheric phase errors and thermal noise, but not systematic amplitude errors that arise due to miscalibration. We explore a full-closure imaging technique with sparse modeling that uses closure amplitudes and closure phases to improve the imaging process. This new technique can successfully handle data with systematic amplitude errors. Applying our technique to synthetic EHT data of M87, we find that full-closure sparse modeling can reconstruct images better than traditional methods and recover key structural information on the source, such as the shape and size of the predicted photon ring. These results suggest that our new approach will provide superior imaging performance for data from the EHT and other interferometric arrays.

  4. Magnetic stripes and holes: Complex domain patterns in perforated films with weak perpendicular anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Valdés-Bango

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal antidot arrays have been patterned on weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy NdCo films by e-beam lithography and lift off. Domain structure has been characterized by Magnetic Force Microscopy at remanence. On a local length scale, of the order of stripe pattern period, domain configuration is controlled by edge effects within the stripe pattern: stripe domains meet the hole boundary at either perpendicular or parallel orientation. On a longer length scale, in-plane magnetostatic effects dominate the system: clear superdomains are observed in the patterned film with average in-plane magnetization along the easy directions of the antidot array, correlated over several antidot array cells.

  5. Magnetic stripes and holes: Complex domain patterns in perforated films with weak perpendicular anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Bango, F.; Vélez, M.; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Alameda, J. M.; Martín, J. I.

    2017-05-01

    Hexagonal antidot arrays have been patterned on weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy NdCo films by e-beam lithography and lift off. Domain structure has been characterized by Magnetic Force Microscopy at remanence. On a local length scale, of the order of stripe pattern period, domain configuration is controlled by edge effects within the stripe pattern: stripe domains meet the hole boundary at either perpendicular or parallel orientation. On a longer length scale, in-plane magnetostatic effects dominate the system: clear superdomains are observed in the patterned film with average in-plane magnetization along the easy directions of the antidot array, correlated over several antidot array cells.

  6. Vapor trap for liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T

    1968-05-22

    In a pipe system which transfers liquid metal, inert gas (cover gas) is packed above the surface of the liquid metal to prevent oxidization of the liquid. If the metal vapor is contained in such cover gas, the circulating system of the cover gas is blocked due to condensation of liquid metal inside the system. The present invention relates to an improvement in vapor trap to remove the metal vapor from the cover gas. The trap consists of a cylindrical outer body, an inlet nozzle which is deeply inserted inside the outer body and has a number of holes to inject the cove gas into the body, metal mesh or steel wool which covers the exterior of the nozzle and on which the condensation of the metal gas takes place, and a heater wire hich is wound around the nozzle to prevent condensation of the metal vapor at the inner peripheral side of the mesh.

  7. Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Reid, M. T. Homer; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis.

  8. Black holes in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camenzind, M.

    2005-01-01

    While physicists have been grappling with the theory of black holes (BH), as shown by the many contributions to the Einstein year, astronomers have been successfully searching for real black holes in the Universe. Black hole astrophysics began in the 1960s with the discovery of quasars and other active galactic nuclei (AGN) in distant galaxies. Already in the 1960s it became clear that the most natural explanation for the quasar activity is the release of gravitational energy through accretion of gas onto supermassive black holes. The remnants of this activity have now been found in the centers of about 50 nearby galaxies. BH astrophysics received a new twist in the 1970s with the discovery of the X-ray binary (XRB) Cygnus X-1. The X-ray emitting compact object was too massive to be explained by a neutron star. Today, about 20 excellent BH candidates are known in XRBs. On the extragalactic scale, more than 100.000 quasars have been found in large galaxy surveys. At the redshift of the most distant ones, the Universe was younger than one billion year. The most enigmatic black hole candidates identified in the last years are the compact objects behind the Gamma-Ray Bursters. The formation of all these types of black holes is accompanied by extensive emission of gravitational waves. The detection of these strong gravity events is one of the biggest challenges for physicists in the near future. (author)

  9. Stationary black holes as holographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, Istvan [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01 (Japan); MTA KFKI, Reszecske- es Magfizikai Kutatointezet, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33 (Hungary)

    2007-11-21

    Smooth spacetimes possessing a (global) one-parameter group of isometries and an associated Killing horizon in Einstein's theory of gravity are investigated. No assumption concerning the asymptotic structure is made; thereby, the selected spacetimes may be considered as generic distorted stationary black holes. First, spacetimes of arbitrary dimension, n {>=} 3, with matter satisfying the dominant energy condition and allowing a non-zero cosmological constant are investigated. In this part, complete characterization of the topology of the event horizon of 'distorted' black holes is given. It is shown that the topology of the event horizon of 'distorted' black holes is allowed to possess a much larger variety than that of the isolated black hole configurations. In the second part, four-dimensional (non-degenerate) electrovac distorted black hole spacetimes are considered. It is shown that the spacetime geometry and the electromagnetic field are uniquely determined in the black hole region once the geometry of the bifurcation surface and one of the electromagnetic potentials are specified there. Conditions guaranteeing the same type of determinacy, in a neighbourhood of the event horizon, on the domain of outer communication side are also investigated. In particular, they are shown to be satisfied in the analytic case.

  10. Atomic structure in black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, Yukinori

    2006-01-01

    We propose that any black hole has atomic structure in its inside and has no horizon as a model of black holes. Our proposal is founded on a mean field approximation of gravity. The structure of our model consists of a (charged) singularity at the center and quantum fluctuations of fields around the singularity, namely, it is quite similar to that of atoms. Any properties of black holes, e.g. entropy, can be explained by the model. The model naturally quantizes black holes. In particular, we find the minimum black hole, whose structure is similar to that of the hydrogen atom and whose Schwarzschild radius is approximately 1.1287 times the Planck length. Our approach is conceptually similar to Bohr's model of the atomic structure, and the concept of the minimum Schwarzschild radius is similar to that of the Bohr radius. The model predicts that black holes carry baryon number, and the baryon number is rapidly violated. This baryon number violation can be used as verification of the model. (author)

  11. The 2002 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, P. A.; Nash, E. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million km2. This area is most strongly controlled by levels of inorganic chlorine and bromine oncentrations. In addition, dynamical variations modulate the size of the ozone hole by either cooling or warming the polar vortex collar region. We will review the size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. Using a simple trajectory model, we will demonstrate the sensitivity of the ozone hole to dynamical forcing, and we will use these observations to discuss the size of the ozone hole during the 2002 Austral spring. We will further show how the Cly decreases in the stratosphere will cause the ozone hole to decrease by 1-1.5% per year. We will also show results from a 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) that has been continuously run since 1999. These CTM results directly show how strong dynamics acts to reduce the size of the ozone hole.

  12. Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Coleman; Colbert, E. J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical simplicity of black holes, combined with their links to some of the most energetic events in the universe, means that black holes are key objects for fundamental physics and astrophysics. Until recently, it was generally believed that black holes in nature appear in two broad mass ranges: stellar-mass (M~3 20 M⊙), which are produced by the core collapse of massive stars, and supermassive (M~106 1010 M⊙), which are found in the centers of galaxies and are produced by a still uncertain combination of processes. In the last few years, however, evidence has accumulated for an intermediate-mass class of black holes, with M~102 104 M⊙. If such objects exist they have important implications for the dynamics of stellar clusters, the formation of supermassive black holes, and the production and detection of gravitational waves. We review the evidence for intermediate-mass black holes and discuss future observational and theoretical work that will help clarify numerous outstanding questions about these objects.

  13. The formation of stellar black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabel, Félix

    2017-08-01

    It is believed that stellar black holes (BHs) can be formed in two different ways: Either a massive star collapses directly into a BH without a supernova (SN) explosion, or an explosion occurs in a proto-neutron star, but the energy is too low to completely unbind the stellar envelope, and a large fraction of it falls back onto the short-lived neutron star (NS), leading to the delayed formation of a BH. Theoretical models set progenitor masses for BH formation by implosion, namely, by complete or almost complete collapse, but observational evidences have been elusive. Here are reviewed the observational insights on BHs formed by implosion without large natal kicks from: (1) the kinematics in three dimensions of space of five Galactic BH X-ray binaries (BH-XRBs), (2) the diversity of optical and infrared observations of massive stars that collapse in the dark, with no luminous SN explosions, possibly leading to the formation of BHs, and (3) the sources of gravitational waves (GWs) produced by mergers of stellar BHs so far detected with LIGO. Multiple indications of BH formation without ejection of a significant amount of matter and with no natal kicks obtained from these different areas of observational astrophysics, and the recent observational confirmation of the expected dependence of BH formation on metallicity and redshift, are qualitatively consistent with the high merger rates of binary black holes (BBHs) inferred from the first detections with LIGO.

  14. Black hole quantum spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corda, Christian [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Advanced Mathematics (IFM) Einstein-Galilei, Prato (Italy); Istituto Universitario di Ricerca ' ' Santa Rita' ' , Prato (Italy); International Institute for Applicable Mathematics and Information Sciences (IIAMIS), Hyderabad (India)

    2013-12-15

    Introducing a black hole (BH) effective temperature, which takes into account both the non-strictly thermal character of Hawking radiation and the countable behavior of emissions of subsequent Hawking quanta, we recently re-analysed BH quasi-normal modes (QNMs) and interpreted them naturally in terms of quantum levels. In this work we improve such an analysis removing some approximations that have been implicitly used in our previous works and obtaining the corrected expressions for the formulas of the horizon's area quantization and the number of quanta of area and hence also for Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, its subleading corrections and the number of micro-states, i.e. quantities which are fundamental to realize the underlying quantum gravity theory, like functions of the QNMs quantum ''overtone'' number n and, in turn, of the BH quantum excited level. An approximation concerning the maximum value of n is also corrected. On the other hand, our previous results were strictly corrected only for scalar and gravitational perturbations. Here we show that the discussion holds also for vector perturbations. The analysis is totally consistent with the general conviction that BHs result in highly excited states representing both the ''hydrogen atom'' and the ''quasi-thermal emission'' in quantum gravity. Our BH model is somewhat similar to the semi-classical Bohr's model of the structure of a hydrogen atom. The thermal approximation of previous results in the literature is consistent with the results in this paper. In principle, such results could also have important implications for the BH information paradox. (orig.)

  15. Black hole quantum spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corda, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Introducing a black hole (BH) effective temperature, which takes into account both the non-strictly thermal character of Hawking radiation and the countable behavior of emissions of subsequent Hawking quanta, we recently re-analysed BH quasi-normal modes (QNMs) and interpreted them naturally in terms of quantum levels. In this work we improve such an analysis removing some approximations that have been implicitly used in our previous works and obtaining the corrected expressions for the formulas of the horizon's area quantization and the number of quanta of area and hence also for Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, its subleading corrections and the number of micro-states, i.e. quantities which are fundamental to realize the underlying quantum gravity theory, like functions of the QNMs quantum "overtone" number n and, in turn, of the BH quantum excited level. An approximation concerning the maximum value of n is also corrected. On the other hand, our previous results were strictly corrected only for scalar and gravitational perturbations. Here we show that the discussion holds also for vector perturbations. The analysis is totally consistent with the general conviction that BHs result in highly excited states representing both the "hydrogen atom" and the "quasi-thermal emission" in quantum gravity. Our BH model is somewhat similar to the semi-classical Bohr's model of the structure of a hydrogen atom. The thermal approximation of previous results in the literature is consistent with the results in this paper. In principle, such results could also have important implications for the BH information paradox.

  16. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  17. Black Hole Complementary Principle and Noncommutative Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Ren

    2006-01-01

    In the spirit of black hole complementary principle, we have found the noncommutative membrane of Scharzchild black holes. In this paper we extend our results to Kerr black hole and see the same story. Also we make a conjecture that spacetimes are noncommutative on the stretched membrane of the more general Kerr-Newman black hole.

  18. 30 CFR 57.9360 - Shelter holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shelter holes. 57.9360 Section 57.9360 Mineral....9360 Shelter holes. (a) Shelter holes shall be— (1) Provided at intervals adequate to assure the safety... farthest projection of moving equipment. (b) Shelter holes shall not be used for storage unless a 40-inch...

  19. Formation and Coalescence of Electron Solitary Holes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeki, K.; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, H. L.

    1979-01-01

    Electron solitary holes were observed in a magnetized collisionless plasma. These holes were identified as Bernstein-Green-Kruskal equilibria, thus being purely kinetic phenomena. The electron hole does not damp even though its velocity is close to the electron thermal velocity. Two holes attract...

  20. 30 CFR 77.1010 - Collaring holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Collaring holes. 77.1010 Section 77.1010... Control § 77.1010 Collaring holes. (a) Starter steels shall be used when collaring holes with hand-held drills. (b) Men shall not hold the drill steel while collaring holes, or rest their hands on the chuck or...

  1. Accretion, primordial black holes and standard cosmology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Primordial black holes evaporate due to Hawking radiation. We find that the evaporation times of primordial black holes increase when accretion of radiation is included. Thus, depending on accretion efficiency, more primordial black holes are existing today, which strengthens the conjecture that the primordial black holes ...

  2. Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindslev Hansen, J.; Lindelof, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    In this review we intend to cover recent work involving arrays of Josephson junctions. The work on such arrays falls naturally into three main areas of interest: 1. Technical applications of Josephson junction arrays for high-frequency devices. 2. Experimental studies of 2-D model systems (Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition, commensurate-incommensurate transition in frustrated (flux) lattices). 3. Investigations of phenomena associated with non-equilibrium superconductivity in and around Josephson junctions (with high current density). (orig./BUD)

  3. Phased-array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  4. Improved piercing of microneedle arrays in dermatomed human skin by an impact insertion method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbaan, F.J.; Bal, S.M.; van den Berg, D.J.; Dijksman, J.A.; van Hecke, M.; Verpoorten, H.; van den Berg, Albert; Lüttge, Regina; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    An electrical applicator was designed, which can pierce short microneedles into the skin with a predefined velocity. Three different shapes of microneedles were used, namely 300 mu m assembled hollow metal microneedle arrays, 300 mu m solid metal microneedle arrays and 245 mu m hollow silicon

  5. Improved piercing of microneedle arrays in dermatomed human skin by an impact insertion method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbaan, F.J.; Bal, S.M.; Berg, van den D.J.; Dijksman, J.A.; Hecke, van M.; Verpoorten, H.; Berg, van den A.; Luttge, R.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    An electrical applicator was designed, which can pierce short microneedles into the skin with a predefined velocity. Three different shapes of microneedles were used, namely 300 µm assembled hollow metal microneedle arrays, 300 µm solid metal microneedle arrays and 245 µm hollow silicon microneedle

  6. Black Hole Caught Zapping Galaxy into Existence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    equivalent to about 350 Suns per year, one hundred times more than rates for typical galaxies in the local Universe. Earlier observations had shown that the companion galaxy is, in fact, under fire: the quasar is spewing a jet of highly energetic particles towards its companion, accompanied by a stream of fast-moving gas. The injection of matter and energy into the galaxy indicates that the quasar itself might be inducing the formation of stars and thereby creating its own host galaxy; in such a scenario, galaxies would have evolved from clouds of gas hit by the energetic jets emerging from quasars. "The two objects are bound to merge in the future: the quasar is moving at a speed of only a few tens of thousands of km/h with respect to the companion galaxy and their separation is only about 22 000 light-years," says Elbaz. "Although the quasar is still 'naked', it will eventually be 'dressed' when it merges with its star-rich companion. It will then finally reside inside a host galaxy like all other quasars." Hence, the team have identified black hole jets as a possible driver of galaxy formation, which may also represent the long-sought missing link to understanding why the mass of black holes is larger in galaxies that contain more stars [3]. "A natural extension of our work is to search for similar objects in other systems," says Jahnke. Future instruments, such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, the European Extremely Large Telescope and the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope will be able to search for such objects at even larger distances from us, probing the connection between black holes and the formation of galaxies in the more distant Universe. Notes [1] Supermassive black holes are found in the cores of most large galaxies; unlike the inactive and starving one sitting at the centre of the Milky Way, a fraction of them are said to be active, as they eat up enormous amounts of material. These frantic actions produce a copious release of energy

  7. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water reflected (i.e., surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established. When evaluating arrays, it has become more common for analysts to use calculations to demonstrate the safety of the array configuration. In performing these calculations, the analyst has considerable freedom concerning the assumptions made for modeling the reflection of the array. Considerations are given for the physical layout of the array with little or no discussion (or demonstration) of what conditions are bounded by the assumed reflection conditions. For example, an array may be generically evaluated by placing it in a corner of a room in which the opposing walls are far away. Typically, it is believed that complete flooding of the room is incredible, so the array is evaluated for various levels of water mist interspersed among array containers. This paper discusses some assumptions that are made regarding storage array reflection

  8. The EUROBALL array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi Alvarez, C.

    1998-01-01

    The quality of the multidetector array EUROBALL is described, with emphasis on the history and formal organization of the related European collaboration. The detector layout is presented together with the electronics and Data Acquisition capabilities. The status of the instrument, its performances and the main features of some recently developed ancillary detectors will also be described. The EUROBALL array is operational in Legnaro National Laboratory (Italy) since April 1997 and is expected to run up to November 1998. The array represents a significant improvement in detector efficiency and sensitivity with respect to the previous generation of multidetector arrays

  9. Rectenna array measurement results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The measured performance characteristics of a rectenna array are reviewed and compared to the performance of a single element. It is shown that the performance may be extrapolated from the individual element to that of the collection of elements. Techniques for current and voltage combining were demonstrated. The array performance as a function of various operating parameters is characterized and techniques for overvoltage protection and automatic fault clearing in the array demonstrated. A method for detecting failed elements also exists. Instrumentation for deriving performance effectiveness is described. Measured harmonic radiation patterns and fundamental frequency scattered patterns for a low level illumination rectenna array are presented.

  10. Arrayed waveguide Sagnac interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, José; Muñoz, Pascual; Sales, Salvador; Pastor, Daniel; Ortega, Beatriz; Martinez, Alfonso

    2003-02-01

    We present a novel device, an arrayed waveguide Sagnac interferometer, that combines the flexibility of arrayed waveguides and the wide application range of fiber or integrated optics Sagnac loops. We form the device by closing an array of wavelength-selective light paths provided by two arrayed waveguides with a single 2 x 2 coupler in a Sagnac configuration. The equations that describe the device's operation in general conditions are derived. A preliminary experimental demonstration is provided of a fiber prototype in passive operation that shows good agreement with the expected theoretical performance. Potential applications of the device in nonlinear operation are outlined and discussed.

  11. Thermophotovoltaic Arrays for Electrical Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarnoff Corporation

    2003-01-01

    Sarnoff has designed an integrated array of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells based on the In(Al)GaAsSb/GaSb materials system. These arrays will be used in a system to generate electrical power from a radioisotope heat source that radiates at temperatures from 700 to 1000 C. Two arrays sandwich the slab heat source and will be connected in series to build voltage. Between the arrays and the heat source is a spectral control filter that transmits above-bandgap radiation and reflects below-bandgap radiation. The goal is to generate 5 mW of electrical power at 3 V from a 700 C radiant source. Sarnoff is a leader in antimonide-based TPV cell development. InGaAsSb cells with a bandgap of 0.53 eV have operated at system conversion efficiencies greater than 17%. The system included a front-surface filter, and a 905 C radiation source. The cells were grown via organo-metallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Sarnoff will bring this experience to bear on the proposed project. The authors first describe array and cell architecture. They then present calculated results showing that about 80 mW of power can be obtained from a 700 C radiator. Using a conservative array design, a 5-V output is possible

  12. Si Wire-Array Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Shannon

    2010-03-01

    Micron-scale Si wire arrays are three-dimensional photovoltaic absorbers that enable orthogonalization of light absorption and carrier collection and hence allow for the utilization of relatively impure Si in efficient solar cell designs. The wire arrays are grown by a vapor-liquid-solid-catalyzed process on a crystalline (111) Si wafer lithographically patterned with an array of metal catalyst particles. Following growth, such arrays can be embedded in polymethyldisiloxane (PDMS) and then peeled from the template growth substrate. The result is an unusual photovoltaic material: a flexible, bendable, wafer-thickness crystalline Si absorber. In this paper I will describe: 1. the growth of high-quality Si wires with controllable doping and the evaluation of their photovoltaic energy-conversion performance using a test electrolyte that forms a rectifying conformal semiconductor-liquid contact 2. the observation of enhanced absorption in wire arrays exceeding the conventional light trapping limits for planar Si cells of equivalent material thickness and 3. single-wire and large-area solid-state Si wire-array solar cell results obtained to date with directions for future cell designs based on optical and device physics. In collaboration with Michael Kelzenberg, Morgan Putnam, Joshua Spurgeon, Daniel Turner-Evans, Emily Warren, Nathan Lewis, and Harry Atwater, California Institute of Technology.

  13. Alternate Explosions: Collapse and Accretion Events with Red Holes instead of Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Graber, James S.

    1999-01-01

    A red hole is "just like a black hole" except it lacks an event horizon and a singularity. As a result, a red hole emits much more energy than a black hole during a collapse or accretion event. We consider how a red hole solution can solve the "energy crisis" and power extremely energetic gamma ray bursts and hypernovae.

  14. VLBA Reveals Closest Pair of Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope have found the closest pair of supermassive black holes ever discovered in the Universe -- a duo of monsters that together are more than 150 million times more massive than the Sun and closer together than the Earth and the bright star Vega. The VLBA The VLBA CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF "These two giant black holes are only about 24 light-years apart, and that's more than 100 times closer than any pair found before," said Cristina Rodriguez, of the University of New Mexico (UNM) and Simon Bolivar University in Venezuela. Black holes are concentrations of mass with gravity so strong that not even light can escape them. The black hole pair is in the center of a galaxy called 0402+379, some 750 million light-years from Earth. Astronomers presume that each of the supermassive black holes was once at the core of a separate galaxy, then the two galaxies collided, leaving the black holes orbiting each other. The black holes orbit each other about once every 150,000 years, the scientists say. "If two black holes like these were to collide, that event would create the type of strong gravitational waves that physicists hope to detect with instruments now under construction," said Gregory Taylor, of UNM. The physicists will need to wait, though: the astronomers calculate that the black holes in 0402+379 won't collide for about a billion billion years. "There are some things that might speed that up a little bit," Taylor remarked. An earlier VLBA study of 0402+379, an elliptical galaxy, showed the pair of radio-wave-emitting objects near its core. Further studies using the VLBA and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope in Texas, revealed that the pair of objects is indeed a pair of supermassive black holes. "We needed the ultra-sharp radio 'vision' of the VLBA, particularly at the high radio frequencies of 22 and 43 GigaHertz, to get the detail needed to show that those objects are a pair of

  15. Regular black hole in three dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Yun Soo; Yoon, Myungseok

    2008-01-01

    We find a new black hole in three dimensional anti-de Sitter space by introducing an anisotropic perfect fluid inspired by the noncommutative black hole. This is a regular black hole with two horizons. We compare thermodynamics of this black hole with that of non-rotating BTZ black hole. The first-law of thermodynamics is not compatible with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  16. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  17. Rotating black holes which saturate a Bogomol close-quote nyi bound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, G.T.; Sen, A.

    1996-01-01

    We construct and study the electrically charged, rotating black hole solution in heterotic string theory compactified on a (10-D)-dimensional torus. This black hole is characterized by its mass, angular momentum, and a (36-2D)-dimensional electric charge vector. One of the features of this solution is that for D>5 its extremal limit saturates the Bogomol close-quote nyi bound. This is in contrast with the D=4 case where the rotating black hole solution develops a naked singularity before the Bogomol close-quote nyi bound is reached. The extremal black holes can be superposed, and by taking a periodic array in D>5, one obtains effectively four-dimensional solutions without naked singularities. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Etching holes in graphene supercapacitor electrodes for faster performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ervin, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is being widely investigated as a material to replace activated carbon in supercapacitor (electrochemical capacitor) electrodes. Supercapacitors have much higher energy density, but are typically slow devices (∼0.1 Hz) compared to other types of capacitors. Here, top-down semiconductor processing has been applied to graphene-based electrodes in order to fabricate ordered arrays of holes through the graphene electrodes. This is demonstrated to increase the speed of the electrodes by reducing the ionic impedance through the electrode thickness. This approach may also be applicable to speeding up other types of devices, such as batteries and sensors, that use porous electrodes. (special)

  19. Etching holes in graphene supercapacitor electrodes for faster performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Matthew H

    2015-06-12

    Graphene is being widely investigated as a material to replace activated carbon in supercapacitor (electrochemical capacitor) electrodes. Supercapacitors have much higher energy density, but are typically slow devices (∼0.1 Hz) compared to other types of capacitors. Here, top-down semiconductor processing has been applied to graphene-based electrodes in order to fabricate ordered arrays of holes through the graphene electrodes. This is demonstrated to increase the speed of the electrodes by reducing the ionic impedance through the electrode thickness. This approach may also be applicable to speeding up other types of devices, such as batteries and sensors, that use porous electrodes.

  20. Triggering the GRANDE array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.L.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, J.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description of the Gamma Ray And Neutrino Detector Experiment (GRANDE) is presented. The detector elements and electronics are described. The trigger logic for the array is then examined. The triggers for the Gamma Ray and the Neutrino portions of the array are treated separately. (orig.)