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Sample records for metal binding affinity

  1. Toxic metals (Ni2+, Pb2+, Hg2+) binding affinity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from different ages municipal landfill leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikta, S. Y.; Tareq, Shafi M.; Uddin, M. Khabir

    2018-03-01

    Solid waste production is rapidly increasing in Bangladesh and landfill leachate is the consequence of the decomposition of this waste. These leachates contain heavy metals and significant amount of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM is known to have considerable role in heavy metals speciation. Hence, it is important to characterize DOM/leachate and evaluate toxic metals binding affinity of DOM. The objectives of this study were to characterize the DOM in landfill leachate through physico-chemical and optical analyses and to investigate the toxic metals (Ni2+, Pb2+ and Hg2+) binding affinity of three different ages (fresh sample L-1, young sample L-2 and mature sample L-3) DOM samples. Results suggested that leachate is a potential pollutant which contained very high organic pollutant load. Conditional stability constant (Log K) and percentages of fluorophores that correspond to metal binding (% f) values indicated that young DOM sample (L-2) had the highest binding affinity to all the three metals ions. In general, DOM samples showed the following order affinity to the metal ions; Ni2+ binding affinity: L-2 > L-3 > L-1, Pb2+ binding affinity: L-2 > L-3 > L-1 and Hg2+ binding affinity: L-2 > L-1 > L-3.

  2. Occupancy of the Zinc-binding Site by Transition Metals Decreases the Substrate Affinity of the Human Dopamine Transporter by an Allosteric Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Mayer, Felix P; Hasenhuetl, Peter S; Burtscher, Verena; Schicker, Klaus; Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2017-03-10

    The human dopamine transporter (DAT) has a tetrahedral Zn 2+ -binding site. Zn 2+ -binding sites are also recognized by other first-row transition metals. Excessive accumulation of manganese or of copper can lead to parkinsonism because of dopamine deficiency. Accordingly, we examined the effect of Mn 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ , and Cu 2+ on transport-associated currents through DAT and DAT-H193K, a mutant with a disrupted Zn 2+ -binding site. All transition metals except Mn 2+ modulated the transport cycle of wild-type DAT with affinities in the low micromolar range. In this concentration range, they were devoid of any action on DAT-H193K. The active transition metals reduced the affinity of DAT for dopamine. The affinity shift was most pronounced for Cu 2+ , followed by Ni 2+ and Zn 2+ (= Co 2+ ). The extent of the affinity shift and the reciprocal effect of substrate on metal affinity accounted for the different modes of action: Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ uniformly stimulated and inhibited, respectively, the substrate-induced steady-state currents through DAT. In contrast, Zn 2+ elicited biphasic effects on transport, i.e. stimulation at 1 μm and inhibition at 10 μm A kinetic model that posited preferential binding of transition metal ions to the outward-facing apo state of DAT and a reciprocal interaction of dopamine and transition metals recapitulated all experimental findings. Allosteric activation of DAT via the Zn 2+ -binding site may be of interest to restore transport in loss-of-function mutants. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Occupancy of the Zinc-binding Site by Transition Metals Decreases the Substrate Affinity of the Human Dopamine Transporter by an Allosteric Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Mayer, Felix P.; Hasenhuetl, Peter S.; Burtscher, Verena; Schicker, Klaus; Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The human dopamine transporter (DAT) has a tetrahedral Zn2+-binding site. Zn2+-binding sites are also recognized by other first-row transition metals. Excessive accumulation of manganese or of copper can lead to parkinsonism because of dopamine deficiency. Accordingly, we examined the effect of Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cu2+ on transport-associated currents through DAT and DAT-H193K, a mutant with a disrupted Zn2+-binding site. All transition metals except Mn2+ modulated the transport cycle of wild-type DAT with affinities in the low micromolar range. In this concentration range, they were devoid of any action on DAT-H193K. The active transition metals reduced the affinity of DAT for dopamine. The affinity shift was most pronounced for Cu2+, followed by Ni2+ and Zn2+ (= Co2+). The extent of the affinity shift and the reciprocal effect of substrate on metal affinity accounted for the different modes of action: Ni2+ and Cu2+ uniformly stimulated and inhibited, respectively, the substrate-induced steady-state currents through DAT. In contrast, Zn2+ elicited biphasic effects on transport, i.e. stimulation at 1 μm and inhibition at 10 μm. A kinetic model that posited preferential binding of transition metal ions to the outward-facing apo state of DAT and a reciprocal interaction of dopamine and transition metals recapitulated all experimental findings. Allosteric activation of DAT via the Zn2+-binding site may be of interest to restore transport in loss-of-function mutants. PMID:28096460

  4. Enhanced binding affinity, remarkable selectivity, and high capacity of CO 2 by dual functionalization of a rht-type metal-organic framework

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baiyan

    2011-12-23

    Open and friendly: The smallest member of the rht-type metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, see picture) constructed by a hexacarboxylate ligand with a nitrogen-rich imino triazine backbone shows a significantly enhanced gas binding affinity relative to all other isoreticular rht-type MOFs. The high adsorption capacity and remarkable selectivity of CO 2 are attributed to the high density of open metal and Lewis basic sites in the framework. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Adsorption of peptides and small proteins with control access polymer permeation to affinity binding sites. Part I: Polymer permeation-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography separation adsorbents with polyethylene glycol and immobilized metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ortega, Omar; Porath, Jerker; Guzmán, Roberto

    2012-03-02

    Despite the many efforts to develop efficient protein purification techniques, the isolation of peptides and small proteins on a larger than analytical scale remains a significant challenge. Recovery of small biomolecules from diluted complex biological mixtures, such as human serum, employing porous adsorbents is a difficult task mainly due to the presence of concentrated large biomolecules that can add undesired effects in the system such as blocking of adsorbent pores, impairing diffusion of small molecules, or competition for adsorption sites. Adsorption and size exclusion chromatography (AdSEC) controlled access media, using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a semi-permeable barrier on a polysaccharide matrix, have been developed and explored in this work to overcome such effects and to preferentially adsorb small molecules while rejecting large ones. In the first part of this work, adsorption studies were performed with small peptides and proteins from synthetic mixtures using controlled access polymer permeation adsorption (CAPPA) media created by effectively grafting PEG on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) agarose resin, where chelating agents and immobilized metal ions were used as the primary affinity binding sites. Synthetic mixtures consisted of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with small proteins, peptides, amino acids (such as histidine or Val⁴-Angiotensin III), and small molecules-spiked human serum. The synthesized hybrid adsorbent consisted of agarose beads modified with iminodiacetic (IDA) groups, loaded with immobilized Cu(II) ions, and PEG. These CAPPA media with grafted PEG on the interior and exterior surfaces of the agarose matrix were effective in rejecting high molecular weight proteins. Different PEG grafting densities and PEG of different molecular weight were tested to determine their effect in rejecting and controlling adsorbent permeation properties. Low grafting density of high molecular weight PEG was found to be as

  6. Variation in one residue associated with the metal ion-dependent adhesion site regulates αIIbβ3 integrin ligand binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Raborn

    Full Text Available The Asp of the RGD motif of the ligand coordinates with the β I domain metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS divalent cation, emphasizing the importance of the MIDAS in ligand binding. There appears to be two distinct groups of integrins that differ in their ligand binding affinity and adhesion ability. These differences may be due to a specific residue associated with the MIDAS, particularly the β3 residue Ala(252 and corresponding Ala in the β1 integrin compared to the analogous Asp residue in the β2 and β7 integrins. Interestingly, mutations in the adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS of integrins α4β7 and αLβ2 increased the binding and adhesion abilities compared to the wild-type, while the same mutations in the α2β1, α5β1, αVβ3, and αIIbβ3 integrins demonstrated decreased ligand binding and adhesion. We introduced a mutation in the αIIbβ3 to convert this MIDAS associated Ala(252 to Asp. By combination of this mutant with mutations of one or two ADMIDAS residues, we studied the effects of this residue on ligand binding and adhesion. Then, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type and mutant αIIbβ3 integrin β I domains, and investigated the dynamics of metal ion binding sites in different integrin-RGD complexes. We found that the tendency of calculated binding free energies was in excellent agreement with the experimental results, suggesting that the variation in this MIDAS associated residue accounts for the differences in ligand binding and adhesion among different integrins, and it accounts for the conflicting results of ADMIDAS mutations within different integrins. This study sheds more light on the role of the MIDAS associated residue pertaining to ligand binding and adhesion and suggests that this residue may play a pivotal role in integrin-mediated cell rolling and firm adhesion.

  7. Synthesis and thermal studies of tetraaza macrocylic ligand and its transition metal complexes. DNA binding affinity of copper complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, M; Mashaly, Mahmoud M; Eid, Mohamed F; Fouad, R

    2011-09-01

    A Tetraaza Macrocylic Ligand (H2L) and its complexes, [Cd(H2L)(OH2)2](NO3)(2)·1/2OH2 (I), [Co(H2L)(OH2)](NO3)(2)·1/2OH2 (II), [Cu(H2L)(NO3)2]·3/2OH2 (III) and [Ni(H2L)(NO3)(OH2)]NO3·OH2 (IV), have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, molar conductivity, 1H NMR, UV-vis, FT-IR and mass spectroscopy. All results confirm that the prepared compounds have 1:1 metal-to-ligand stoichiometry, octahedral configuration and the ligand behaves as a neutral tetradendate towards the metal ions. [CdL(OH2)2] (V), [CoL(OH2)2] (VI), [CuL(OH2)2] (VII) and [Ni(H2L)(NO3)2] (VIII) were synthesized pyrolytically in solid state from corresponding compounds (I-IV). Analytical results of complexes (V-VIII) show that the ligand behaves either as a neutral tetradendate or dianionic tetradentate ligand towards the metal ions. The binding of H2L and its copper complex (III) to DNA has been investigated by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The experiments indicate that H2L and its copper complex (III) can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The H2L and its copper complex (III) exhibited anti-tumor activity against Ehrlich Acites Carcinoma (E.A.C) at the concentration of 100 μg/ml. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Immobilized Metal-Ion Affinity Chromatography and Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Recovery and Identification of Copper(II)-Binding Ligands in Seawater Using the Model Ligand 8-Hydroxyquinoline

    OpenAIRE

    Nixon, Richard L.; Ross, Andrew R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Complexation by organic ligands dominates the speciation of iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and other bioactive trace metals in seawater, controlling their bioavailability and distribution in the marine environment. Several classes of high-affinity Fe-binding ligands (siderophores) have been identified in seawater but the chemical structures of marine Cu-complexing ligands remain unknown. Immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) allows Cu ligands to be isolated from bulk dissolved organic...

  9. Specific capture of uranyl protein targets by metal affinity chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basset, C.; Dedieu, A.; Guerin, P.; Quemeneur, E.; Meyer, D.; Vidaud, C. [CEA Valrho, DSV, IBEB, Serv Biochim et Toxicol Nucl, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    To improve general understanding of biochemical mechanisms in the field of uranium toxicology, the identification of protein targets needs to be intensified. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely developed as a powerful tool for capturing metal binding proteins from biological extracts. However uranyl cations (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) have particular physico-chemical characteristics which prevent them from being immobilized on classical metal chelating supports. We report here on the first development of an immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography method, based on the cation-exchange properties of amino-phosphonate groups for uranyl binding. The cation distribution coefficient and loading capacity on the support were determined. Then the stability of the uranyl-bonded phase under our chromatographic conditions was optimized to promote affinity mechanisms. The successful enrichment of uranyl binding proteins from human serum was then proven using proteomic and mass spectral analysis. (authors)

  10. Phosphopeptide enrichment by immobilized metal affinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E.; Larsen, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively...

  11. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity and Sequence Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. Methods of increasing binding affinity and sequence specificity of peptide nucleic acids...

  12. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham S Baldwin

    Full Text Available The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antimicrobial activity of binuclear metal complexes of a new asymmetrical Schiff base ligand: DNA binding affinity of copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebl, Magdy

    2014-01-01

    The 1:1 condensation of o-acetoacetylphenol and 1,2-diaminopropane under condition of high dilution gives the mono-condensed Schiff base, (E)-3-(1-aminopropan-2-ylimino)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)butan-1-one. The mono-condensed Schiff base has been used for further condensation with isatin to obtain the new asymmetrical dicompartmental Schiff base ligand, (E)-3-(2-((E)-4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxobutan-2-ylideneamino) propylimino)indolin-2-one (H3L) with a N2O3 donor set. Reactions of the ligand with metal salts give a series of new binuclear complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as thermal analyses. The analytical and spectroscopic tools showed that the complexes can be formulated as: [(HL)(VO)2(SO4)(H2O)]·4H2O, [(HL)Fe2Cl4(H2O)3]·EtOH, [(HL)Fe2(ox)Cl2(H2O)3]·2H2O, [(L)M2(OAc)(H2O)m]·nH2O; M = Co, Ni or Cu, m = 4, 0 and n = 2, 3, [(HL)Cu2Cl]Cl·6H2O and [(L)(UO2)2(OAc)(H2O)3]·6H2O. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometrical arrangements except copper complexes that exhibited tetrahedral geometries and uranyl complex in which the metal ion is octa-coordinated. The Schiff base and its metal complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). The ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically active. The DNA-binding properties of the copper complexes (6 and 7) have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The results obtained indicate that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant, Kb of 1.34 × 104 and 2.5 × 104 M-1, respectively.

  14. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, S.M. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  15. Fatty acid and drug binding to a low-affinity component of human serum albumin, purified by affinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Pedersen, A O; Honoré, B

    1992-01-01

    and drug binding abilities of the low-affinity component. The fatty acids decanoate, laurate, myristate and palmitate were bound with higher affinity to the mixture than to the low-affinity component. Diazepam was bound with nearly the same affinity to the low-affinity component as to the albumin mixture...... of two albumin components about 40% of the albumin having high affinity and about 60% having low affinity. By affinity chromatography we succeeded in purifying the low-affinity component from the mixture. The high-affinity component, however, could not be isolated. We further analyzed the fatty acid...

  16. Surfactant-free Colloidal Particles with Specific Binding Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wel, Casper; Bossert, Nelli; Mank, Quinten J; Winter, Marcel G T; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J

    2017-09-26

    Colloidal particles with specific binding affinity are essential for in vivo and in vitro biosensing, targeted drug delivery, and micrometer-scale self-assembly. Key to these techniques are surface functionalizations that provide high affinities to specific target molecules. For stabilization in physiological environments, current particle coating methods rely on adsorbed surfactants. However, spontaneous desorption of these surfactants typically has an undesirable influence on lipid membranes. To address this issue and create particles for targeting molecules in lipid membranes, we present here a surfactant-free coating method that combines high binding affinity with stability at physiological conditions. After activating charge-stabilized polystyrene microparticles with EDC/Sulfo-NHS, we first coat the particles with a specific protein and subsequently covalently attach a dense layer of poly(ethyelene) glycol. This polymer layer provides colloidal stability at physiological conditions as well as antiadhesive properties, while the protein coating provides the specific affinity to the targeted molecule. We show that NeutrAvidin-functionalized particles bind specifically to biotinylated membranes and that Concanavalin A-functionalized particles bind specifically to the glycocortex of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. The affinity of the particles changes with protein density, which can be tuned during the coating procedure. The generic and surfactant-free coating method reported here transfers the high affinity and specificity of a protein onto colloidal polystyrene microparticles.

  17. Fatty acid and drug binding to a low-affinity component of human serum albumin, purified by affinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Pedersen, A O; Honoré, B

    1992-01-01

    Binding equilibria for decanoate to a defatted, commercially available human serum albumin preparation were investigated by dialysis exchange rate determinations. The binding isotherm could not be fitted by the general binding equation. It was necessary to assume that the preparation was a mixture...... of two albumin components about 40% of the albumin having high affinity and about 60% having low affinity. By affinity chromatography we succeeded in purifying the low-affinity component from the mixture. The high-affinity component, however, could not be isolated. We further analyzed the fatty acid...... and drug binding abilities of the low-affinity component. The fatty acids decanoate, laurate, myristate and palmitate were bound with higher affinity to the mixture than to the low-affinity component. Diazepam was bound with nearly the same affinity to the low-affinity component as to the albumin mixture...

  18. Evaluation of immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for recovery and identification of copper(II-binding ligands in seawater using the model ligand 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Nixon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Complexation by organic ligands dominates the speciation of iron (Fe, copper (Cu, and other bioactive trace metals in seawater, controlling their bioavailability and distribution in the marine environment. Several classes of high-affinity Fe-binding ligands (siderophores have been identified in seawater but the chemical structures of marine Cu-complexing ligands remain unknown. Immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC allows Cu ligands to be isolated from bulk dissolved organic matter (DOM in seawater and separated into fractions which can be characterized independently using electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques. Attempts have been made to combine IMAC with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS to characterize marine Cu ligands, but results have proven inconclusive due to the lack of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS data to confirm ligand recovery. We used 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ, a well-characterized model ligand that forms strong 1:2 metal:ligand complexes with Cu2+ at pH 8 (log β2 = 18.3, to evaluate Cu(II-IMAC and ESI-MS/MS for recovery and identification of copper(II-complexing ligands in seawater. One-litre samples of 0.45µm-filtered surface seawater were spiked with 8-HQ at low concentrations (up to 100 nM and fractionated by IMAC. Fractions eluted with acidified artificial seawater were desalted and re-suspended in methanol via solid-phase extraction (SPE to obtain extracts suitable for ESI-MS analysis. Recovery of 8-HQ by Cu(II-IMAC was confirmed unambiguously by MS/MS and found to average 81% based upon accurate quantitation via multiple reaction monitoring (MRM. Cu(II-IMAC fractionation of unspiked seawater using multiple UV detection wavelengths suggests an optimal fraction size of 2 mL for isolating and analyzing Cu ligands with similar properties.

  19. Accurate Evaluation Method of Molecular Binding Affinity from Fluctuation Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Tyuji; Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2008-05-01

    Exact estimation of the molecular binding affinity is significantly important for drug discovery. The energy calculation is a direct method to compute the strength of the interaction between two molecules. This energetic approach is, however, not accurate enough to evaluate a slight difference in binding affinity when distinguishing a prospective substance from dozens of candidates for medicine. Hence more accurate estimation of drug efficacy in a computer is currently demanded. Previously we proposed a concept of estimating molecular binding affinity, focusing on the fluctuation at an interface between two molecules. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the compatibility between the proposed computational technique and experimental measurements, through several examples for computer simulations of an association of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor (an example for a drug-enzyme binding), a complexation of an antigen and its antibody (an example for a protein-protein binding), and a combination of estrogen receptor and its ligand chemicals (an example for a ligand-receptor binding). The proposed affinity estimation has proven to be a promising technique in the advanced stage of the discovery and the design of drugs.

  20. Binding affinity of surface functionalized gold nanoparticles to hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ryan D; Roeder, Ryan K

    2011-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have been investigated for a number of biomedical applications, including drug and gene delivery vehicles, thermal ablation therapy, diagnostic sensors, and imaging contrast agents. Surface functionalization with molecular groups exhibiting calcium affinity can enable targeted delivery of Au NPs to calcified tissue, including damaged bone tissue. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the binding affinity of functionalized Au NPs for targeted delivery to bone mineral, using hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals as a synthetic analog in vitro. Au NPs were synthesized to a mean particle size of 10-15 nm and surface functionalized with either L-glutamic acid, 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid, or alendronate, which exhibit a primary amine for binding gold opposite carboxylate, phosphonate, or bisphosphonate groups, respectively, for targeting calcium. Bisphosphonate functionalized Au NPs exhibited the most rapid binding kinetics and greatest binding affinity to HA, followed by glutamic acid and phosphonic acid. All functional groups reached complete binding after 24 h. Equilibrium binding constants in de-ionized water, determined by nonlinear regression of Langmuir isotherms, were 3.40, 0.69, and 0.25 mg/L for bisphosphonate, carboxylate, and phosphonate functionalized Au NPs, respectively. Functionalized Au NPs exhibited lower overall binding in fetal bovine serum compared to de-ionized water, but relative differences between functional groups were similar. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Methods for quantifying T cell receptor binding affinities and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Gloor, Brian E.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide antigens bound and presented by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Recognition of a peptide/MHC complex is required for initiation and propagation of a cellular immune response, as well as the development and maintenance of the T cell repertoire. Here we discuss methods to quantify the affinities and thermodynamics of interactions between soluble ectodomains of TCRs and their peptide/MHC ligands, focusing on titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence anisotropy. As TCRs typically bind ligand with weak-to-moderate affinities, we focus the discussion on means to enhance the accuracy and precision of low affinity measurements. In addition to further elucidating the biology of the T cell mediated immune response, more reliable low affinity measurements will aid with more probing studies with mutants or altered peptides that can help illuminate the physical underpinnings of how TCRs achieve their remarkable recognition properties. PMID:21609868

  2. Defining carbohydrate binding of glucan phosphatases via Affinity gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auger, Kyle; Raththagala, Madushi; Wilkens, Casper

    2016-01-01

    was to determine a technique to measure carbohydrate binding quickly and efficiently. We established a protocol to reproducibly and quantitatively measure the binding of the enzymes to glucans utilizing Affinity Gel Electrophoresis (AGE). The results show that the various glucan phosphatases possess differing...... determined the x-ray crystal structures of both plant and human glucan phosphatases and their enzymatic mechanisms. Despite this progress, we lacked the techniques to quickly and efficiently quantify their glucan phosphatase affinities for different substrates. The main objective of this study...... and animal glucan phosphatases to determine which regions of the enzyme are most necessary for binding. Footnotes This abstract is from the Experimental Biology 2016 Meeting. There is no full text article associated with this abstract published in The FASEB Journal....

  3. APPLICATION OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN-BINDING PROTEINS A, G, L IN THE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Sviatenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteins A, G and L are native or recombinant proteins of microbial origin that bind to mammalian immunoglobulins. Preferably recombinant variants of proteins A, G, L are used in biotechnology for affinity sorbents production. Сomparative characteristics of proteins A, G, L and affinity sorbents on the basis of them, advantages and disadvantages of these proteins application as ligands in the affinity chromatography are done. Analysis of proteins A, G, L properties is presented. Binding specificities and affinities of these proteins differ between species and antibody subclass. Protein А has high affinity to human IgG1, IgG2, IgG4, mouse IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG3, goat and sheep IgG2, dog, cat, guinea pig, rabbit IgG. Protein G binds strongly to human, mouse, cow, goat, sheep and rabbit IgG. Protein L has ability of strong binding to immunoglobulin kappa-chains of human, mouse, rat and pig. Expediency of application of affinity chromatography with usage of sorbents on the basis of immobilized proteins A, G, L are shown for isolation and purification of antibodies different classes. Previously mentioned method is used as an alternative to conventional methods of protein purification, such as ion-exchange, hydrophobic interactions, metal affinity chromatography, ethanol precipitation due to simplicity in usage, possibility of one-step purification process, obtaining of proteins high level purity, multiuse at maintenance of proper storage and usage conditions. Affinity sorbents on the basis of immobilized proteins A, G, L are used not only for antibodies purification, but also for extraction of different antibodies fractions from blood serum.

  4. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Metal binding by food components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Ning

    For calcium binding: Electrochemical method (calcium ion selective electrode) combined with quantum mechanical calculations (density functional theory) were used to investigate the calcium binding affinity of the amino acids and small glycine peptides. The effects of the ionic strength and p......, synergistic effect in calcium binding was found for the small glycine peptide rather than amino acids mixtures with the enhanced driving force up to -6 kJ/mol. Such study provides useful information for the future development of calcium supplements. For zinc binding: Isothermal titration calorimetry...... titration calorimetry and quantum mechanical calculations. This is due to the zinc binding affinity of the relatively softer ligands (investigated food components) will become much stronger than citrate or phytate when they present together in aqueous solution. This mechanism indicates these food components...

  6. Cardiovascular receptor binding affinity of aqueous extracts from Allium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nencini, Cristina; Franchi, Gian Gabriele; Micheli, Lucia

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether the antihypertensive effect of garlic could to be associated to interactions with adrenergic and dopaminergic receptors involved in regulating blood pressure and to compare these data with those obtained from wild Allium species. The aqueous extracts of bulbs or leaves of Allium sativum L. (garlic), Allium neapolitanum Cyr., Allium subhirsutum L., and Allium roseum L. were tested for their in vitro affinity for the adrenergic (alpha(1), alpha(2), beta(1) and beta(2)) and dopaminergic (D(1) and D(2)) receptors by radioligand binding assays. Interesting results were shown by bulbs extracts of A. neapolitanum and A. subhirsutum with higher affinities for the beta(2) receptors and by bulbs extract of A. roseum for D(2) receptors. The known antihypertensive activity of Allium sativum cannot be correlated with binding to receptors involved in blood pressure regulation. However, aqueous extracts of the wild-type species of Allium show much higher affinities, warranting further explorations.

  7. Quantifying high-affinity binding of hydrophobic ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Georg; Broecker, Jana; Vargas, Carolyn; Fanghänel, Jörg; Keller, Sandro

    2012-12-18

    A fast and reliable quantification of the binding thermodynamics of hydrophobic high-affinity ligands employing a new calorimetric competition experiment is described. Although isothermal titration calorimetry is the method of choice for a quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions in solution, a reliable determination of a dissociation constant (K(D)) is typically limited to the range 100 μM > K(D) > 1 nM. Interactions displaying higher or lower K(D) values can be assessed indirectly, provided that a suitable competing ligand is available whose K(D) falls within the directly accessible affinity window. This established displacement assay, however, requires the high-affinity ligand to be soluble at high concentrations in aqueous buffer and, consequently, poses serious problems in the study of protein binding involving small-molecule ligands dissolved in organic solvents--a familiar case in many drug-discovery projects relying on compound libraries. The calorimetric competition assay introduced here overcomes this limitation, thus allowing for a detailed thermodynamic description of high-affinity receptor-ligand interactions involving poorly water-soluble compounds. Based on a single titration of receptor into a dilute mixture of the two competing ligands, this competition assay provides accurate and precise values for the dissociation constants and binding enthalpies of both high- and moderate-affinity ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation and high-affinity protein-inhibitor interactions, and explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses.

  8. Evaluation of galectin binding by frontal affinity chromatography (FAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Jun; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) is a simple and versatile procedure enabling quantitative determination of diverse biological interactions in terms of dissociation constants (K d), even though these interactions are relatively weak. The method is best applied to glycans and their binding proteins, with the analytical system operating on the basis of highly reproducible isocratic elution by liquid chromatography. Its application to galectins has been successfully developed to characterize their binding specificities in detail. As a result, their minimal requirements for recognition of disaccharides, i.e., β-galactosides, as well as characteristic features of individual galectins, have been elucidated. In this chapter, we describe standard procedures to determine the K d's for interactions between a series of standard glycans and various galectins.

  9. Metal-conjugated affinity labels: A new concept to create enantioselective artificial metalloenzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, Thomas

    2013-02-20

    How to train a protein: Metal-conjugated affinity labels were used to selectively position catalytically active metal centers in the binding pocket of proteases. The resulting artificial metalloenzymes achieve up to 82% e.r. in the hydrogenation of ketones. The modular setup enables a rapid generation of artificial metalloenzyme libraries, which can be adapted to a broad range of catalytic conditions. 2013 The Authors.

  10. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  11. Modulating uranium binding affinity in engineered Calmodulin EF-hand peptides: effect of phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Guilloreau, Luc; Berthomieu, Catherine; Delangle, Pascale; Adriano, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T 9 TKE 12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from K d =25±6 nM to K d =5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the sub-nanomolar range (K d = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phospho-threonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the ν as (P-O) and ν s (P-O) IR modes of phospho-threonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in ν as (UO 2 ) 2+ vibration (from 923 cm -1 to 908 cm -1 ) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. (authors)

  12. Modulating uranium binding affinity in engineered calmodulin EF-hand peptides: effect of phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Pardoux

    Full Text Available To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T(9TKE(12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from K(d = 25±6 nM to K(d = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (K(d = 0.25±0.06 nM. FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the ν(as(P-O and ν(s(P-O IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in ν(as(UO(2(2+ vibration (from 923 cm(-1 to 908 cm(-1 was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH.

  13. A protein engineered to bind uranyl selectively and with femtomolar affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Mike; Zhang, Changsheng; Özçubukçu, Salih; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Charles J.; Liu, Jianzhao; Jensen, Mark P.; Lai, Luhua; He, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Uranyl (UO22+), the predominant aerobic form of uranium, is present in the ocean at a concentration of ~3.2 parts per 109 (13.7 nM) however, the successful enrichment of uranyl from this vast resource has been limited by the high concentrations of metal ions of similar size and charge, which makes it difficult to design a binding motif that is selective for uranyl. Here we report the design and rational development of a uranyl-binding protein using a computational screening process in the initial search for potential uranyl-binding sites. The engineered protein is thermally stable and offers very high affinity and selectivity for uranyl with a Kd of 7.4 femtomolar (fM) and >10,000-fold selectivity over other metal ions. We also demonstrated that the uranyl-binding protein can repeatedly sequester 30-60% of the uranyl in synthetic sea water. The chemical strategy employed here may be applied to engineer other selective metal-binding proteins for biotechnology and remediation applications.

  14. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestwich, G.D.; Eng, W.S.; Robles, S.; Vogt, R.G.; Wisniewski, J.R.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural /sup 3/H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added /sup 125/I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  15. Profiling of Parkin-binding partners using tandem affinity purification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Zanon

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting approximately 1-2% of the general population over age 60. It is characterized by a rather selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of α-synuclein-enriched Lewy body inclusions. Mutations in the Parkin gene (PARK2 are the major cause of autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism. The Parkin protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase with various cellular functions, including the induction of mitophagy upon mitochondrial depolarizaton, but the full repertoire of Parkin-binding proteins remains poorly defined. Here we employed tandem affinity purification interaction screens with subsequent mass spectrometry to profile binding partners of Parkin. Using this approach for two different cell types (HEK293T and SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, we identified a total of 203 candidate Parkin-binding proteins. For the candidate proteins and the proteins known to cause heritable forms of parkinsonism, protein-protein interaction data were derived from public databases, and the associated biological processes and pathways were analyzed and compared. Functional similarity between the candidates and the proteins involved in monogenic parkinsonism was investigated, and additional confirmatory evidence was obtained using published genetic interaction data from Drosophila melanogaster. Based on the results of the different analyses, a prioritization score was assigned to each candidate Parkin-binding protein. Two of the top ranking candidates were tested by co-immunoprecipitation, and interaction to Parkin was confirmed for one of them. New candidates for involvement in cell death processes, protein folding, the fission/fusion machinery, and the mitophagy pathway were identified, which provide a resource for further elucidating Parkin function.

  16. Profiling of Parkin-Binding Partners Using Tandem Affinity Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenburg, Hagen; Doncheva, Nadezhda T.; Schwienbacher, Christine; Serafin, Alice; Alexa, Adrian; Weichenberger, Christian X.; Albrecht, Mario; Klein, Christine; Hicks, Andrew A.; Pramstaller, Peter P.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting approximately 1–2% of the general population over age 60. It is characterized by a rather selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of α-synuclein-enriched Lewy body inclusions. Mutations in the Parkin gene (PARK2) are the major cause of autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism. The Parkin protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase with various cellular functions, including the induction of mitophagy upon mitochondrial depolarizaton, but the full repertoire of Parkin-binding proteins remains poorly defined. Here we employed tandem affinity purification interaction screens with subsequent mass spectrometry to profile binding partners of Parkin. Using this approach for two different cell types (HEK293T and SH-SY5Y neuronal cells), we identified a total of 203 candidate Parkin-binding proteins. For the candidate proteins and the proteins known to cause heritable forms of parkinsonism, protein-protein interaction data were derived from public databases, and the associated biological processes and pathways were analyzed and compared. Functional similarity between the candidates and the proteins involved in monogenic parkinsonism was investigated, and additional confirmatory evidence was obtained using published genetic interaction data from Drosophila melanogaster. Based on the results of the different analyses, a prioritization score was assigned to each candidate Parkin-binding protein. Two of the top ranking candidates were tested by co-immunoprecipitation, and interaction to Parkin was confirmed for one of them. New candidates for involvement in cell death processes, protein folding, the fission/fusion machinery, and the mitophagy pathway were identified, which provide a resource for further elucidating Parkin function. PMID:24244333

  17. Discovery of a cobalt complex with high MEK1 binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyue; Zhou, Tongliang; Liu, Hui; Xu, Fengrong; Niu, Yan; Wang, Chao; Liang, Lei; Xu, Ping

    2017-05-15

    A series of Schiff base ligands (L 1 -L 5 ) and their cobalt(II) complexes (1-5) were designed and synthesized for MEK1 binding experiment. The biological evaluation results showed that Bis(N,N'-disalicylidene)-3,4-phenylenediamine-cobalt(II) 1 and Bis(N,N'-disalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediamine-cobalt(II) 2 are much more effective than the parent Schiff bases (L 1 and L 2 ). Importantly, 2 exhibited MEK1 binding affinity with IC 50 71nM, which is so far the best result for metal complexes and more potent than U0126 (7.02μM) and AZD6244 (2.20μM). Docking study was used to elucidate the binding modes of complex 2 with MEK1. Thus cobalt(II) complex 2 may be further developed as a novel MEK1 inhibitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Person Alexandra M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after

  19. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  20. Affinity capillary electrophoresis for the assessment of binding affinity of carbohydrate-based cholera toxin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Sastre Torano, Javier; Pukin, Aliaksei; Fu, Ou; Boons, Geert Jan; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Pieters, Roland J

    2018-01-01

    Developing tools for the study of protein carbohydrate interactions is an important goal in glycobiology. Cholera toxin inhibition is an interesting target in this context, as its inhibition may help to fight against cholera. For the study of novel ligands an affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method was optimized and applied. The method uses unlabeled cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) and unlabeled carbohydrate ligands based on ganglioside GM1-oligosaccharides (GM1os). In an optimized method at pH 4, adsorption of the protein to the capillary walls was prevented by a polybrene-dextran sulfate-polybrene coating. Different concentrations of the ligands were added to the BGE. CTB binding was observed by a mobility shift that could be used for dissociation constant (K d ) determination. The K d values of two GM1 derivatives differed by close to an order of magnitude (600 ± 20 nM and 90 ± 50 nM) which was in good agreement with the differences in their reported nanomolar IC 50 values of an ELISA-type assay. Moreover, the selectivity of GM1os towards CTB was demonstrated using Influenza hemagglutinin (H5) as a binding competitor. The developed method can be an important platform for preclinical development of drugs targeting pathogen-induced secretory diarrhea. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Protein kinase Calpha contains two activator binding sites that bind phorbol esters and diacylglycerols with opposite affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Ho, C; Kelly, M B; Larkin, J D; Taddeo, F J; Yeager, M D; Stubbs, C D

    1996-03-01

    Based on marked differences in the enzymatic properties of diacylglycerols compared with phorbol ester-activated protein kinase C (PKC), we recently proposed that activation induced by these compounds may not be equivalent (Slater, S. J., Kelly, M. B., Taddeo, F. J., Rubin, E., and Stubbs, C. D. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 17160-17165). In the present study, direct evidence is provided showing that phorbol esters and diacylglycerols bind simultaneously to PKC alpha. Using a novel binding assay employing the fluorescent phorbol ester, sapintoxin-D (SAPD), evidence for two sites of high and low affinity was obtained. Thus, both binding and activation dose-response curves for SAPD were double sigmoidal, which was also observed for dose-dependent activation by the commonly used phorbol ester, 4beta-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). TPA removed high affinity SAPD binding and also competed for the low affinity site. By contrast with TPA, low affinity binding of SAPD was inhibited by sn-1,2-dioleoylglycerol (DAG), while binding to the high affinity site was markedly enhanced. Again contrasting with both TPA and DAG, the potent PKC activator, bryostatin-I (B-I), inhibited SAPD binding to its high affinity site, while low affinity binding was unaffected. Based on these findings, a model for PKC activation is proposed in which binding of one activator to the low affinity site allosterically promotes binding of a second activator to the high affinity site, resulting in an enhanced level of activity. Overall, the results provide direct evidence that PKCalpha contains two distinct binding sites, with affinities that differ for each activator in the order: DAG > phorbol ester > B-I and B-I > phorbol ester > DAG, respectively.

  2. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  3. Complementary three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of binding affinity and functional potency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosco, Paolo; Ahring, Philip K; Dyhring, Tino

    2009-01-01

    Complementary 3D-QSAR modeling of binding affinity and functional potency is proposed as a tool to pinpoint the molecular features of the ligands, and the corresponding amino acids in the receptor, responsible for high affinity binding vs those driving agonist behavior and receptor activation...

  4. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  5. High affinity binding of [3H]cocaine to rat liver microsomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Maghrabi, E.A.; Calligaro, D.O.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    ] 3 H]cocaine bound reversible, with high affinity and stereospecificity to rat liver microsomes. Little binding was detected in the lysosomal, mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. The binding kinetics were slow and the kinetically calculated K/sub D/ was 2 nM. Induction of mixed function oxidases by phenobarbital did not produce significant change in [ 3 H]cocaine binding. On the other hand, chronic administration of cocaine reduced [ 3 H]cocaine binding drastically. Neither treatment affected the affinity of the liver binding protein for cocaine. Microsomes from mouse and human livers had less cocaine-binding protein and lower affinity for cocaine than those from rat liver. Binding of [ 3 H]cocaine to rat liver microsomes was insensitive to monovalent cations and > 10 fold less sensitive to biogenic amines than the cocaine receptor in rat striatum. However, the liver protein had higher affinity for cocaine and metabolites except for norcocaine. Amine uptake inhibitors displaced [ 3 H]cocaine binding to liver with a different rank order of potency than their displacement of [ 3 H]cocaine binding to striatum. This high affinity [ 3 H]cocaine binding protein in liver is not likely to be monooxygenase, but may have a role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity

  6. Activity of cefixime against Helicobacter pylori and affinities for the penicillin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, F; Yokota, Y; Mine, Y; Tatsuta, M

    1990-12-01

    Cefixime induced the formation of rounded cells from the spiral bacillary form of Helicobacter pylori at the MIC or less. Three main penicillin-binding proteins, called A, B and C, were separated from H. pylori. Cefixime had the strongest affinity to penicillin-binding protein B. The binding of cefixime to this protein may induce the formation of rounded H. pylori cells.

  7. Metal-Mediated Affinity and Orientation Specificity in a Computationally Designed Protein Homodimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Der, Bryan S.; Machius, Mischa; Miley, Michael J.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian (UNC); (Buffalo)

    2015-10-15

    Computationally designing protein-protein interactions with high affinity and desired orientation is a challenging task. Incorporating metal-binding sites at the target interface may be one approach for increasing affinity and specifying the binding mode, thereby improving robustness of designed interactions for use as tools in basic research as well as in applications from biotechnology to medicine. Here we describe a Rosetta-based approach for the rational design of a protein monomer to form a zinc-mediated, symmetric homodimer. Our metal interface design, named MID1 (NESG target ID OR37), forms a tight dimer in the presence of zinc (MID1-zinc) with a dissociation constant <30 nM. Without zinc the dissociation constant is 4 {micro}M. The crystal structure of MID1-zinc shows good overall agreement with the computational model, but only three out of four designed histidines coordinate zinc. However, a histidine-to-glutamate point mutation resulted in four-coordination of zinc, and the resulting metal binding site and dimer orientation closely matches the computational model (C{alpha} rmsd = 1.4 {angstrom}).

  8. Metal chelate affinity precipitation of RNA and purification of plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Sindhu; Murphy, Jason; Galaev, Igor; Kumar, Ashok; Fox, George E.; Mattiasson, Bo; Willson, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    The affinity of metal chelates for amino acids, such as histidine, is widely used in purifying proteins, most notably through six-histidine 'tails'. We have found that metal affinity interactions can also be applied to separation of single-stranded nucleic acids through interactions involving exposed purines. Here we describe a metal affinity precipitation method to resolve RNA from linear and plasmid DNA. A copper-charged copolymer of N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) and vinyl imidazole (VI) is used to purify plasmid from an alkaline lysate of E. coli. The NIPAM units confer reversible solubility on the copolymer while the imidazole chelates metal ions in a manner accessible to interaction with soluble ligands. RNA was separated from the plasmid by precipitation along with the polymer in the presence of 800 mM NaCl. Bound RNA could be recovered by elution with imidazole and separated from copolymer by a second precipitation step. RNA binding showed a strong dependence on temperature and on the type of buffer used.

  9. CYP 2D6 Binding Affinity Predictions Using Multiple Ligand and Protein Conformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovorka Perić-Hassler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of the large flexibility and malleability of Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs, in silico prediction of CYP binding affinities to drugs and other xenobiotic compounds is a true challenge. In the current work, we use an iterative linear interaction energy (LIE approach to compute CYP binding affinities from molecular dynamics (MD simulation. In order to improve sampling of conformational space, we combine results from simulations starting with different relevant protein-ligand geometries. For calculated binding free energies of a set of thiourea compounds binding to the flexible CYP 2D6 isoform, improved correlation with experiment was obtained by combining results of MD runs starting from distinct protein conformations and ligand-binding orientations. This accuracy was obtained from relatively short MD simulations, which makes our approach computationally attractive for automated calculations of ligand-binding affinities to flexible proteins such as CYPs.

  10. Relative binding affinity of steroids for the corticosterone receptor system in rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kloet, E R; Veldhuis, H D; Wagenaars, J L; Bergink, E W

    In cytosol of the hippocampus corticosterone displays highest affinity for the sites that remain available for binding in the presence of excess RU 26988, which is shown to be a "pure" glucocorticoid. A rather high affinity (greater than or equal to 25%) was found for 11 beta-hydroxyprogesterone,

  11. Calculation of Absolute Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity Using Path and Endpoint Approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Michael S; Olson, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    .... The results of this approach agree well with experimentally observed binding affinities. Also assessed is a commonly used approximate endpoint approach, which separately estimates enthalpy, solvation free energy, and entropy...

  12. The Binding of Biotin to Sepharose-Avidin Column: Demonstration of the Affinity Chromatography Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, A. D.; Landman, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a biochemistry experiment that illustrates the methodology of affinity chromatography by attaching avidin, a glycoprotein in egg white, to a Sepharose matrix in order to bind biotin-containing proteins. (MLH)

  13. Development of thermo-responsive hydrogels with immobilized metal affinity groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-Seo

    A Hydrogel is defined as a polymeric material which possesses the ability to swell in water and retain a significant fraction of water within its structure, but which will not dissolve in water. Hydrogels have been studied by many researchers because they have many useful applications in bio related fields such as drug delivery, bioseparation, and etc. In this thesis, a new hydrogel system that possesses the characteristics of thermo-responsive swelling property and immobilized metal affinity was developed. This affinity material consists of a hydrogel with stimuli responsive swelling characteristics to provide modulated diffusivity and size selectivity. Covalently bound ligands within hydrogels provide highly selective and tunable affinity-based separation. Swelling and affinity properties can be independently controlled by regulating the temperature or pH of the solution to provide a sequential separations scheme. The developed affinity hydrogels incorporate multiple modes of separations or recovery and concentrate specific solutes in chromatographic systems. Thermal sensitive affinity hydrogels were synthesized from a N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) monomer, a crosslinker (1,4-bismethylene acrylamide) and a ligand attachable co-monomer acrylamide (AAm), using free radical chemistry. The ligand of choice is the metal affinity iminodiacetic acid (IDA) which is bound to hydrogel backbone via a spacer arm. The challenge lay in incorporating affinity ligands without affecting the temperature induced swelling of the hydrogel. Thus, PNIPAAm-Am hydrogels are functionalized with a spacer arm (1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether), the chelating ligand IDA and a divalent metal ion (Cu2+). This ligand binds histidine groups at high pH and releases them upon protonation of histidine at low pH. This can be used to separate proteins based on the occurrence of surface histidine residues in them. The resulting affinity hydrogel was shown to adsorb the protein chicken egg white

  14. Quantitative Prediction of Multivalent Ligand-Receptor Binding Affinities for Influenza, Cholera, and Anthrax Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Susanne; Netz, Roland R

    2018-03-05

    Multivalency achieves strong, yet reversible binding by the simultaneous formation of multiple weak bonds. It is a key interaction principle in biology and promising for the synthesis of high-affinity inhibitors of pathogens. We present a molecular model for the binding affinity of synthetic multivalent ligands onto multivalent receptors consisting of n receptor units arranged on a regular polygon. Ligands consist of a geometrically matching rigid polygonal core to which monovalent ligand units are attached via flexible linker polymers, closely mimicking existing experimental designs. The calculated binding affinities quantitatively agree with experimental studies for cholera toxin ( n = 5) and anthrax receptor ( n = 7) and allow to predict optimal core size and optimal linker length. Maximal binding affinity is achieved for a core that matches the receptor size and for linkers that have an equilibrium end-to-end distance that is slightly longer than the geometric separation between ligand core and receptor sites. Linkers that are longer than optimal are greatly preferable compared to shorter linkers. The angular steric restriction between ligand unit and linker polymer is shown to be a key parameter. We construct an enhancement diagram that quantifies the multivalent binding affinity compared to monovalent ligands. We conclude that multivalent ligands against influenza viral hemagglutinin ( n = 3), cholera toxin ( n = 5), and anthrax receptor ( n = 7) can outperform monovalent ligands only for a monovalent ligand affinity that exceeds a core-size dependent threshold value. Thus, multivalent drug design needs to balance core size, linker length, as well as monovalent ligand unit affinity.

  15. Affinity capillary electrophoresis for the assessment of binding affinity of carbohydrate-based cholera toxin inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Sastre Torano, Javier; Pukin, Aliaksei; Fu, Ou; Boons, Geert Jan; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Pieters, Roland J

    2018-01-01

    Developing tools for the study of protein carbohydrate interactions is an important goal in glycobiology. Cholera toxin inhibition is an interesting target in this context, as its inhibition may help to fight against cholera. For the study of novel ligands an affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE)

  16. Determining ERβ Binding Affinity to Singly Mutant ERE Using Dual Polarization Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hong Yan; Su, Xiaodi

    In a classic mode of estrogen action, estrogen receptors (ERs) bind to estrogen responsive element (ERE) to activate gene transcription. A perfect ERE contains a 13-base pair sequence of a palindromic repeat separated by a three-base spacer, 5‧-GGTCAnnnTGACC-3‧. In addition to the consensus or wild-type ERE (wtERE), naturally occurring EREs often have one or two base pairs’ alternation. Based on the newly constructed Thermodynamic Modeling of ChIP-seq (TherMos) model, binding energy between ERβ and a series of 34-bp mutant EREs (mutERE) was simulated to predict the binding affinity between ERs and EREs with single base pair deviation at different sites of the 13-bp inverted sequence. Experimentally, dual polarization interferometry (DPI) method was developed to measure ERβ-mutEREs binding affinity. On a biotin-NeutrAvidin (NA)-biotin treated DPI chip, wtERE is immobilized. In a direct binding assay, ERβ-wtERE binding affinity is determined. In a competition assay, ERβ was preincubated with mutant EREs before being added for competitive binding to the immobilized wtERE. This competition strategy provided a successful platform to evaluate the binding affinity variation among large number of ERE with different base mutations. The experimental result correlates well with the mathematically predicted binding energy with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.97.

  17. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor.

  18. Purification of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins by affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, L A; Kadonaga, J T

    2001-05-01

    Affinity chromatography is a very effective and straightforward means of purifying a protein based on its sequence-specific DNA-binding properties. The affinity chromatography procedure described in this unit uses DNA containing specific recognition sites for the desired protein that has been covalently linked to a solid support. The first basic protocol describes preparation of a DNA affinity resin, including cyanogen bromide (CNBr) activation of the agarose support. An provides a method to couple DNA to commercially available CNBr-activated Sepharose, and a support protocol describes how to purify crude synthetic oligonucleotides by gel electrophoresis prior to preparation of the affinity resin. The second basic protocol outlines the affinity chromatography procedure. A second support protocol describes determination of the appropriate type and quantity of nonspecific competitor DNA that should be used in the procedure and its preparation. Parameters essential to the success of an affinity chromatography experiment are discussed in detail in the Commentary.

  19. One-dimensional and two-dimensional immobilized metal affinity electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Lasanthi, G D; Jayathilaka, P; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Gupta, Shalini

    2012-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity electrophoresis (IMAEP) is a straightforward method in which metal ions are embedded in a polyacrylamide gel strip with a negligible electrophoretic migration. Due to the preferential binding between metal ions and the phosphate group, this method uses immobilized metal ions like iron, manganese, aluminum, or titanium to capture phosphoproteins from a mixture of phosphoprotein and nonphosphoproteins. IMAEP has also been incorporated into a traditional two-dimensional (2D) sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) system (isoelectric focusing-PAGE) to increase its resolving power. In 2D IMAEP, the metal ions in polyacrylamide gel strip are overlaid on top of the second dimensional polyacrylamide gel to stop electrophoretic migration of phosphoproteins. Data shows that there is no detrimental effect of SDS in IMAEP on the extraction of phosphoproteins from a mixture of proteins. In addition, SDS exposes phosphate groups by unfolding the phosphoproteins to facilitate metal ion-phosphate binding while supplying the protein with negative charges.

  20. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J; Neuman, Keir C

    2015-04-20

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na + , Cl - and K + to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na + . Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na + and Cl - , the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na + binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl - . Cl - enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na + . At concentrations in the range of its K M for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na + -independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both [ 3 H]imipramine binding and [ 3 H]serotonin transport

  2. Regional distribution of high affinity binding of 3H-adenosine in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traversa, U.; Puppini, P.; de Angelis, L.; Vertua, R.

    1984-06-01

    The high and low affinity adenosine binding sites with Kd values ranging respectively from 0.8 to 1.65 microM and from 3.1 to 13.86 microM were demonstrated in the following rat brain areas: cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, diencephalon, and pons-medulla. Adenosine receptors involved in the high affinity binding seem to be mainly Ra-type. The analysis of the regional distribution of 3H-Adenosine showed the highest levels of specific binding in striatum and hippocampus; somewhat smaller values in cortex, cerebellum, and diencephalon, and even lower in pons-medulla.

  3. A model of high-affinity antibody binding to type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, M R; Muñoz, A; Kasper, D L

    1987-12-01

    We recently reported that the single repeating-unit pentasaccharide of type III group B Streptococcus (GBS) capsular polysaccharide is only weakly reactive with type III GBS antiserum. To further elucidate the relationship between antigen-chain length and antigenicity, tritiated oligosaccharides derived from type III capsular polysaccharide were used to generate detailed saturation binding curves with a fixed concentration of rabbit antiserum in a radioactive antigen-binding assay. A graded increase in affinity of antigen-antibody binding was seen as oligosaccharide size increased from 2.6 repeating units to 92 repeating units. These differences in affinity of antibody binding to oligosaccharides of different molecular size were confirmed by immunoprecipitation and competitive ELISA, two independent assays of antigen-antibody binding. Analysis of the saturation binding experiment indicated a difference of 300-fold in antibody-binding affinity for the largest versus the smallest tested oligosaccharides. Unexpectedly, the saturation binding values approached by the individual curves were inversely related to oligosaccharide chain length on a molar basis but equivalent on a weight basis. This observation is compatible with a model in which binding of an immunoglobulin molecule to an antigenic site on the polysaccharide facilitates subsequent binding of antibody to that antigen.

  4. Lewis base binding affinities and redox properties of plutonium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldham, Susan M.; Schake, Ann R.; Burns, Carol J.; Morgan, Arthur N. III; Schnabel, Richard C.; Warner, Benjamin P.; Costa, David A.; Smith, Wayne H.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the actinide molecular science competency development effort, the initial goal of this work is to synthesize and investigate several series of complexes, varying by actinide metal, ligand set, and oxidation state. We are examining the reactivity of plutonium and neptunium organometallic complexes to elucidate fundamental chemical parameters of the metals. These reactions will be compared to those of the known corresponding uranium complexes in order to recognize trends among the actinide elements and to document differences in chemical behavior

  5. Radioligand binding assays for high affinity binders in the presence of endogenous ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, H.B. III; McGahan, T.

    1986-01-01

    Endogenous ligands complicate radioligand-binding assays of high-affinity binding proteins by obscuring binding sites or by diluting the labeled ligand. They have developed a mathematical model for such systems where structurally identical radioligand and endogenous ligand can be equilibrated on the binding site and bound radioligand measured. A double-reciprocal plot of bound radioligand, *L/sub B/, versus sample volume, V, yields a straight line. Introduction of scaling factors for sample dilution, F, and total radioligand available, *L/sub T/, produces a plot in which the x-intercept yields the endogenous ligand concentration, [L/sub T/]; the slope is the reciprocal of the binding protein concentration, [P/sub T/] -1 ; and the y-intercept is the fractional saturation of the high-affinity binder, L/sub T//P/sub T/. This type of analysis has been applied to the assay of high-affinity biotin-binding proteins in egg yolk. Its use led to the detection of a second biotin-binding protein which is heat labile. The conceptual approach can be applied to the assay of other high-affinity binders

  6. A 3D-QSAR-driven approach to binding mode and affinity prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosco, Paolo; Balle, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A method for predicting the binding mode of a series of ligands is proposed. The procedure relies on three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) and does not require structural knowledge of the binding site. Candidate alignments are automatically built and ranked...... according to a consensus scoring function. 3D-QSAR analysis based on the selected binding mode enables affinity prediction of new drug candidates having less than 10 rotatable bonds....

  7. Sequence2Vec: A novel embedding approach for modeling transcription factor binding affinity landscape

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Hanjun

    2017-07-26

    Motivation: An accurate characterization of transcription factor (TF)-DNA affinity landscape is crucial to a quantitative understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning endogenous gene regulation. While recent advances in biotechnology have brought the opportunity for building binding affinity prediction methods, the accurate characterization of TF-DNA binding affinity landscape still remains a challenging problem. Results: Here we propose a novel sequence embedding approach for modeling the transcription factor binding affinity landscape. Our method represents DNA binding sequences as a hidden Markov model (HMM) which captures both position specific information and long-range dependency in the sequence. A cornerstone of our method is a novel message passing-like embedding algorithm, called Sequence2Vec, which maps these HMMs into a common nonlinear feature space and uses these embedded features to build a predictive model. Our method is a novel combination of the strength of probabilistic graphical models, feature space embedding and deep learning. We conducted comprehensive experiments on over 90 large-scale TF-DNA data sets which were measured by different high-throughput experimental technologies. Sequence2Vec outperforms alternative machine learning methods as well as the state-of-the-art binding affinity prediction methods.

  8. Sequence2Vec: a novel embedding approach for modeling transcription factor binding affinity landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hanjun; Umarov, Ramzan; Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Li, Yu; Song, Le; Gao, Xin

    2017-11-15

    An accurate characterization of transcription factor (TF)-DNA affinity landscape is crucial to a quantitative understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning endogenous gene regulation. While recent advances in biotechnology have brought the opportunity for building binding affinity prediction methods, the accurate characterization of TF-DNA binding affinity landscape still remains a challenging problem. Here we propose a novel sequence embedding approach for modeling the transcription factor binding affinity landscape. Our method represents DNA binding sequences as a hidden Markov model which captures both position specific information and long-range dependency in the sequence. A cornerstone of our method is a novel message passing-like embedding algorithm, called Sequence2Vec, which maps these hidden Markov models into a common nonlinear feature space and uses these embedded features to build a predictive model. Our method is a novel combination of the strength of probabilistic graphical models, feature space embedding and deep learning. We conducted comprehensive experiments on over 90 large-scale TF-DNA datasets which were measured by different high-throughput experimental technologies. Sequence2Vec outperforms alternative machine learning methods as well as the state-of-the-art binding affinity prediction methods. Our program is freely available at https://github.com/ramzan1990/sequence2vec. xin.gao@kaust.edu.sa or lsong@cc.gatech.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Determination of binding affinities of some approved drugs to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascaris MRFR was obtained as pdb file (3vra) from the Protein Data Bank and further prepared for docking simulations using both Chimera v. 1.8.1 and AutoDock tools v. 1.5.6. In order to validate the docking protocol, the binding of atpenin, an experimental anthelmintic compound, to MRFR was successfully reproduced in ...

  10. Reconstitution of high affinity α2 adrenergic agonist binding by fusion with a pertussis toxin substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.H.; Neubig, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    High affinity α 2 adrenergic agonist binding is thought to occur via a coupling of the α 2 receptor with N/sub i/, the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide binding protein. Human platelet membranes pretreated at pH 11.5 exhibit a selective inactivation of agonist binding and N/sub i/. To further study the mechanism of agonist binding, alkali treated membranes (ATM) were mixed with membranes pretreated with 10 μM phenoxybenzamine to block α 2 receptors (POB-M). The combined membrane pellet was incubated in 50% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote membrane-membrane fusion and assayed for binding to the α 2 agonist [ 3 H]UK 14,304 (UK) and the antagonist [ 3 H] yohimbine. PEG treatment resulted in a 2-4 fold enhancement of UK binding whereas yohimbine binding was unchanged. No enhancement of UK binding was observed in the absence of PEG treatment. The reconstitution was dependent on the addition of POB-M. They found that a 1:1 ratio of POB-M:ATM was optimal. Reconstituted binding was inhibited by GppNHp. Fusion of rat C6 glioma cell membranes, which do not contain α 2 receptors, also enhanced agonist binding to ATM. Fusion of C6 membranes from cells treated with pertussis toxin did not enhance [ 3 H] UK binding. These data show that a pertussis toxin sensitive membrane component, possibly N/sub i/, can reconstitute high affinity α 2 agonist binding

  11. Determination of High-affinity Antibody-antigen Binding Kinetics Using Four Biosensor Platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Danlin; Singh, Ajit; Wu, Helen; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Label-free optical biosensors are powerful tools in drug discovery for the characterization of biomolecular interactions. In this study, we describe the use of four routinely used biosensor platforms in our laboratory to evaluate the binding affinity and kinetics of ten high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9). While both Biacore T100 and ProteOn XPR36 are derived from the well-established Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) te...

  12. Identification of an adeno-associated virus binding epitope for AVB sepharose affinity resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    Full Text Available Recent successes of adeno-associated virus (AAV–based gene therapy have created a demand for large-scale AAV vector manufacturing and purification techniques for use in clinical trials and beyond. During the development of purification protocols for rh.10, hu.37, AAV8, rh.64R1, AAV3B, and AAV9 vectors, based on a widely used affinity resin, AVB sepharose (GE, we found that, under the same conditions, different serotypes have different affinities to the resin, with AAV3B binding the best and AAV9 the poorest. Further analysis revealed a surface-exposed residue (amino acid number 665 in AAV8 VP1 numbering differs between the high-affinity AAV serotypes (serine in AAV3B, rh.10, and hu.37 and the low-affinity ones (asparagine in AAV8, rh.64R1, and AAV9. The residue locates within a surface-exposed, variable epitope flanked by highly conserved residues. The substitution of the epitope in AAV8, rh.64R1, and AAV9 with the corresponding epitope of AAV3B (SPAKFA resulted in greatly increased affinity to AVB sepharose with no reduction in the vectors’ in vitro potency. The presence of the newly identified AVB-binding epitope will be useful for affinity resin selection for the purification of novel AAV serotypes. It also suggests the possibility of vector engineering to yield a universal affinity chromatography purification method for multiple AAV serotypes.

  13. QSAR modeling on dopamine D2 receptor binding affinity of 6-methoxy benzamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Soma; Debnath, Bikash; Gayen, Shovanlal; Ghosh, Balaram; Basu, Anindya; Srikanth, Kolluru; Jha, Tarun

    2005-10-01

    QSAR modeling was performed on 58 (S) N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) methyl]-6-methoxy benzamides as dopamine (DA) D2 receptor antagonists to identify the structural requirements for DA D2 receptor binding affinity. The study pointed out that the presence of hydrophobic substituents at R3 position and electron-donating groups at R5 position increased the biological activity. Substitutions at phenyl ring favored the binding affinity of these benzamides. Ethyl group and iodine at R3 position were advantageous to the activity whereas nitro group at phenyl ring hindered the antagonistic activity.

  14. Enrichment and characterization of phosphopeptides by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E; Jensen, Ole N

    2009-01-01

    The combination of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and mass spectrometry is a widely used technique for enrichment and sequencing of phosphopeptides. In the IMAC method, negatively charged phosphate groups interact with positively charged metal ions (Fe3+, Ga3+, and Al3......+) and this interaction makes it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from rather complex peptide samples. Phosphopeptide enrichment by IMAC is sensitive and specific for peptide mixtures derived from pure proteins or simple protein mixtures. The selectivity of the IMAC method is, however, limited when working...... with peptide mixtures derived from highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, where sample prefractionation is advisable. Furthermore, lowering the pH value of the sample loading buffer reduces nonspecific binding to the IMAC resin significantly, thereby improving the selectivity of IMAC...

  15. Immunoglobulin classes, metal binding proteins, and trace metals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , IgA and IgM), metal binding proteins (Transferrin, Caeruloplasmin, Alpha-2- Macroglobulin and Haptoglobin) and nutritionally essential trace metals/heavy metals (Zn, Fe, Se, Cu, Mg, Cd and Pb) in Nigerian cassava processors using single ...

  16. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. (Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  17. Mannosylerythritol lipid, a yeast extracellular glycolipid, shows high binding affinity towards human immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, J H; Nakane, T; Yanagishita, H; Ikegami, T; Kitamoto, D

    2001-01-01

    There have been many attempts to develop new materials with stability and high affinity towards immunoglobulins. Some of glycolipids such as gangliosides exhibit a high affinity toward immunoglobulins. However, it is considerably difficult to develop these glycolipids into the practical separation ligand due to their limited amounts. We thus focused our attention on the feasible use of "mannosylerythritol lipid A", a yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, as an alternative ligand for immunoglobulins, and undertook the investigation on the binding between mannosylerythritol lipid A (MEL-A) and human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). In ELISA assay, MEL-A showed nearly the same binding affinity towards HIgG as that of bovine ganglioside GM1. Fab of human IgG was considered to play a more important role than Fc in the binding of HIgG by MEL-A. The bound amount of HIgG increased depending on the attached amount of MEL-A onto poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (polyHEMA) beads, whereas the amount of human serum albumin slightly decreased. Binding-amount and -selectivity of HIgG towards MEL-A were influenced by salt species, salt concentration and pH in the buffer solution. The composite of MEL-A and polyHEMA, exhibited a significant binding constant of 1.43 x 10(6) (M(-1)) for HIgG, which is approximately 4-fold greater than that of protein A reported. MEL-A shows high binding-affinity towards HIgG, and this is considered to be due to "multivalent effect" based on the binding molar ratio. This is the first report on the binding of a natural human antibody towards a yeast glycolipid.

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity, Sequence Specificity and Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of naturally......-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain C1-C8 alkylamine side chains. Methods of enhancing the solubility, binding affinity and sequence specificity of PNAs are provided....

  19. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-01-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17β to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17α-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ERα subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17β, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17α-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the α subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  20. Routes to improve binding capacities of affinity resins demonstrated for Protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Egbert; Vajda, Judith

    2016-05-15

    Protein A chromatography is a well-established platform in downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies. Dynamic binding capacities are continuously increasing with almost every newly launched Protein A resin. Nevertheless, binding capacities of affinity chromatography resins cannot compete with binding capacities obtained with modern ion exchange media. Capacities of affinity resins are roughly 50% lower. High binding capacities of ion exchange media are supported by spacer technologies. In this article, we review existing spacer technologies of affinity chromatography resins. A yet known effective approach to increase the dynamic binding capacity of Protein A resins is oligomerization of the particular Protein A motifs. This resembles the tentacle technology used in ion exchange chromatography. Dynamic binding capacities of a hexameric ligand are roughly twice as high compared to capacities obtained with a tetrameric ligand. Further capacity increases up to 130mg/ml can be realized with the hexamer ligand, if the sodium phosphate buffer concentration is increased from 20 to 100mM. Equilibrium isotherms revealed a BET shape for the hexamer ligand at monoclonal antibody liquid phase concentrations higher than 9mg/ml. The apparent multilayer formation may be due to hydrophobic forces. Other quality attributes such as recovery, aggregate content, and overall purity of the captured monoclonal antibody are not affected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction of the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC using a regularized thermodynamic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittelmann Hans D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of peptide fragments of extracellular peptides to class II MHC is a crucial event in the adaptive immune response. Each MHC allotype generally binds a distinct subset of peptides and the enormous number of possible peptide epitopes prevents their complete experimental characterization. Computational methods can utilize the limited experimental data to predict the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC. Results We have developed the Regularized Thermodynamic Average, or RTA, method for predicting the affinities of peptides binding to class II MHC. RTA accounts for all possible peptide binding conformations using a thermodynamic average and includes a parameter constraint for regularization to improve accuracy on novel data. RTA was shown to achieve higher accuracy, as measured by AUC, than SMM-align on the same data for all 17 MHC allotypes examined. RTA also gave the highest accuracy on all but three allotypes when compared with results from 9 different prediction methods applied to the same data. In addition, the method correctly predicted the peptide binding register of 17 out of 18 peptide-MHC complexes. Finally, we found that suboptimal peptide binding registers, which are often ignored in other prediction methods, made significant contributions of at least 50% of the total binding energy for approximately 20% of the peptides. Conclusions The RTA method accurately predicts peptide binding affinities to class II MHC and accounts for multiple peptide binding registers while reducing overfitting through regularization. The method has potential applications in vaccine design and in understanding autoimmune disorders. A web server implementing the RTA prediction method is available at http://bordnerlab.org/RTA/.

  2. Affinity maturation generates greatly improved xyloglucan-specific carbohydrate binding modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicortas Gunnarsson Lavinia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular evolution of carbohydrate binding modules (CBM is a new approach for the generation of glycan-specific molecular probes. To date, the possibility of performing affinity maturation on CBM has not been investigated. In this study we show that binding characteristics such as affinity can be improved for CBM generated from the CBM4-2 scaffold by using random mutagenesis in combination with phage display technology. Results Two modified proteins with greatly improved affinity for xyloglucan, a key polysaccharide abundant in the plant kingdom crucial for providing plant support, were generated. Both improved modules differ from other existing xyloglucan probes by binding to galactose-decorated subunits of xyloglucan. The usefulness of the evolved binders was verified by staining of plant sections, where they performed better than the xyloglucan-binding module from which they had been derived. They discriminated non-fucosylated from fucosylated xyloglucan as shown by their ability to stain only the endosperm, rich in non-fucosylated xyloglucan, but not the integument rich in fucosylated xyloglucan, on tamarind seed sections. Conclusion We conclude that affinity maturation of CBM selected from molecular libraries based on the CBM4-2 scaffold is possible and has the potential to generate new analytical tools for detection of plant carbohydrates.

  3. Insulin analogues with modifications at position B26. Divergence of binding affinity and biological activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka; Kazdová, L.; Hančlová, Ivona; Protivínská, Eva; Šanda, Miloslav; Buděšínský, Miloš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 4 (2009), s. 341-341 ISSN 0006-3525. [American Peptide Symposium /21./. 07.06.2009-12.06.2009, Bloomington] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : insulin * binding affinity * N-methylation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  4. The interaction of human serum albumin with selected lanthanide and actinide ions: Binding affinities, protein unfolding and conformational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Mukesh; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant soluble protein in blood plays critical roles in transportation of biomolecules and maintenance of osmotic pressure. In view of increasing applications of lanthanides- and actinides-based materials in nuclear energy, space, industries and medical applications, the risk of exposure with these metal ions is a growing concern for human health. In present study, binding interaction of actinides/lanthanides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] with HSA and its structural consequences have been investigated. Ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform-infrared, Raman, Fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques were applied to study the site of metal ions interaction, binding affinity determination and the effect of metal ions on protein unfolding and HSA conformation. Results showed that these metal ions interacted with carbonyl (CO..:)/amide(N..-H) groups and induced exposure of aromatic residues of HSA. The fluorescence analysis indicated that the actinide binding altered the microenvironment around Trp214 in the subdomain IIA. Binding affinity of U(VI) to HSA was slightly higher than that of Th(IV). Actinides and Ce(IV) altered the secondary conformation of HSA with a significant decrease of α-helix and an increase of β-sheet, turn and random coil structures, indicating a partial unfolding of HSA. A correlation was observed between metal ion's ability to alter HSA conformation and protein unfolding. Both cationic effects and coordination ability of metal ions seemed to determine the consequences of their interaction with HSA. Present study improves our understanding about the protein interaction of these heavy ions and their impact on its secondary structure. In addition, binding characteristics may have important implications for the development of rational antidote for the medical management of health effects of actinides and lanthanides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  5. Total Binding Affinity Profiles of Regulatory Regions Predict Transcription Factor Binding and Gene Expression in Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grassi

    Full Text Available Transcription factors regulate gene expression by binding regulatory DNA. Understanding the rules governing such binding is an essential step in describing the network of regulatory interactions, and its pathological alterations. We show that describing regulatory regions in terms of their profile of total binding affinities for transcription factors leads to increased predictive power compared to methods based on the identification of discrete binding sites. This applies both to the prediction of transcription factor binding as revealed by ChIP-seq experiments and to the prediction of gene expression through RNA-seq. Further significant improvements in predictive power are obtained when regulatory regions are defined based on chromatin states inferred from histone modification data.

  6. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H

    2017-01-09

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehan Lee

    Full Text Available The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP of estrogen receptor α (ERα allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors.

  8. Characterization of a high affinity cocaine binding site in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calligaro, D.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Binding of [ 3 H]cocaine to synaptic membranes from whole rat brain was reversible and saturable. Nonlinear regression analysis of binding isotherms indicated two binding affinities: one with k/sub d/ = 16 nM, B/sub max/ = 0.65 pmoles/mg protein and the other with K/sub d/ = 660 nM, B/sub max/ = 5.1 pmoles/mg protein. The high-affinity binding of [ 3 H]cocaine was sensitive to the actions of trypsin and chymotrypsin but not carboxypeptidase, and was eliminated by exposure of the membranes to 95 0 C for 5 min. Specific binding at 2 nM was higher at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.0. Binding of [ 3 H]cocaine (15 nM) was inhibited by increasing concentrations of Na + ions. Several cocaine analogues, neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors and local anesthetics displaced specific [ 3 H]cocaine binding at 2 nM with various potencies. The cocaine analogue (-)-norcocaine was the most potent (IC 50 = 10 nM), while the local anesthetic tetracaine was the least potent in inhibiting [ 3 H]cocaine binding. Several biogenic amine uptake inhibitors, including tricyclic antidepressants and phencyclidine, had IC 50 values below μM concentrations

  9. Predicting the relative binding affinity of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists by density functional methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Katarina; Hogner, Anders; Ogg, Derek; Packer, Martin J.; Hansson, Eva; Granberg, Kenneth L.; Evertsson, Emma; Nordqvist, Anneli

    2015-12-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of binding affinity ahead of synthesis to aid compound prioritization is still hampered by the low throughput of the more accurate methods and the lack of general pertinence of one method that fits all systems. Here we show the applicability of a method based on density functional theory using core fragments and a protein model with only the first shell residues surrounding the core, to predict relative binding affinity of a matched series of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists. Antagonists of MR are used for treatment of chronic heart failure and hypertension. Marketed MR antagonists, spironolactone and eplerenone, are also believed to be highly efficacious in treatment of chronic kidney disease in diabetes patients, but is contra-indicated due to the increased risk for hyperkalemia. These findings and a significant unmet medical need among patients with chronic kidney disease continues to stimulate efforts in the discovery of new MR antagonist with maintained efficacy but low or no risk for hyperkalemia. Applied on a matched series of MR antagonists the quantum mechanical based method gave an R2 = 0.76 for the experimental lipophilic ligand efficiency versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional in gas phase and an R2 = 0.64 for experimental binding affinity versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional including an implicit solvation model. The quantum mechanical approach using core fragments was compared to free energy perturbation calculations using the full sized compound structures.

  10. Peptide Binding to HLA Class I Molecules: Homogenous, High-Throughput Screening, and Affinity Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl; Lamberth, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    The Human MHC Project aims at large-scale description of peptide-HLA binding to a wide range of HLA molecules covering all populations of the world and the accompanying generation of bioinformatics tools capable of predicting binding of any given peptide to any given HLA molecule. Here, the authors...... the luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassay technology (abbreviated LOCI and commercialized as AlphaScreen (TM)). Compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based peptide-HLA class I binding assay, the LOCI assay yields virtually identical affinity measurements, although having a broader dynamic range...

  11. Low affinity hypothalamic [3H]mazindol binding: a probe for hypothalamic body weight regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiter, C H; Linnoila, M; Nutt, D J

    1989-04-01

    It has been previously suggested that low affinity [3H]mazindol binding in the hypothalamus correlates with body weight and obesity. Low affinity [3H]mazindol binding in hypothalamic crude synaptosome preparations was carried out in normoglycemic obese mice (C57 B1/6J ob/ob) as well as in their lean littermates (C57 B1/6J +/?). NIH Swiss mice were used as additional controls. Furthermore the effect on this binding site of repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS), a treatment known to change body weight gain, was studied in rats. Neither Bmax nor Kd were altered in obese mice compared with their lean littermates or NIH Swiss mice. The obese mice had a significantly greater body weight and weight gain than either control group. Once-daily ECS over 10 days (which significantly reduced weight gain in rats) did not change binding parameters for [3H]mazindol in hypothalami. The present data do not appear to support the hypothesis that this low affinity binding site has a physiological function in the control of body weight and obesity, at least in the examined paradigm.

  12. Nucleotide-dependent structural fluctuations and regulation of microtubule-binding affinity of KIF1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Ryo; Takagi, Fumiko; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2015-05-01

    Molecular motors such as kinesin regulate affinity to a rail protein during the ATP hydrolysis cycle. The regulation mechanism, however, is yet to be determined. To understand this mechanism, we investigated the structural fluctuations of the motor head of the single-headed kinesin called KIF1A in different nucleotide states using molecular dynamics simulations of a Gō-like model. We found that the helix α4 at the microtubule (MT) binding site intermittently exhibits a large structural fluctuation when MT is absent. Frequency of this fluctuation changes systematically according to the nucleotide states and correlates strongly with the experimentally observed binding affinity to MT. We also showed that thermal fluctuation enhances the correlation and the interaction with the nucleotide suppresses the fluctuation of the helix α4. These results suggest that KIF1A regulates affinity to MT by changing the flexibility of the helix α4 during the ATP hydrolysis process: the binding site becomes more flexible in the strong binding state than in the weak binding state. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Ligand Binding Affinities of Arctigenin and Its Demethylated Metabolites to Estrogen Receptor Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Hattori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (−-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (−-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL by Eubacterium (E. sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (−-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (−-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC50 value of (2R,3R-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10−4 M.

  14. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-16

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M.

  15. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, [ 125 I]iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30 degree C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing [ 125 I]iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus

  16. Simulated electron affinity tuning in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Kissan; Yavuz, Mustafa; Musselman, Kevin P.

    2017-05-01

    Metal-insulator-metal diodes for rectification applications must exhibit high asymmetry, nonlinearity, and responsivity. Traditional methods of improving these figures of merit have consisted of increasing insulator thickness, adding multiple insulator layers, and utilizing a variety of metal contact combinations. However, these methods have come with the price of increasing the diode resistance and ultimately limiting the operating frequency to well below the terahertz regime. In this work, an Airy Function Transfer Matrix simulation method was used to observe the effect of tuning the electron affinity of the insulator as a technique to decrease the diode resistance. It was shown that a small increase in electron affinity can result in a resistance decrease in upwards of five orders of magnitude, corresponding to an increase in operating frequency on the same order. Electron affinity tuning has a minimal effect on the diode figures of merit, where asymmetry improves or remains unaffected and slight decreases in nonlinearity and responsivity are likely to be greatly outweighed by the improved operating frequency of the diode.

  17. Novel coumarin glycoside and phenethyl vanillate from Notopterygium forbesii and their binding affinities for opioid and dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongze; Xu, Wei; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Lee, David Y W

    2008-03-15

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of Notopterygium forbesii has resulted in the isolation of one new coumarin glycoside and one new phenethyl vanillate, together with seventeen known compounds. The structures of these compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods. These compounds were evaluated for their binding affinities to the opioid and dopamine receptors, and falcarindiol showed weak binding affinities to opioid receptors and moderate affinity for D1 receptor (K(i)=192+/-6 nM).

  18. Fc-Binding Ligands of Immunoglobulin G: An Overview of High Affinity Proteins and Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weonu Choe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly increasing application of antibodies has inspired the development of several novel methods to isolate and target antibodies using smart biomaterials that mimic the binding of Fc-receptors to antibodies. The Fc-binding domain of antibodies is the primary binding site for e.g., effector proteins and secondary antibodies, whereas antigens bind to the Fab region. Protein A, G, and L, surface proteins expressed by pathogenic bacteria, are well known to bind immunoglobulin and have been widely exploited in antibody purification strategies. Several difficulties are encountered when bacterial proteins are used in antibody research and application. One of the major obstacles hampering the use of bacterial proteins is sample contamination with trace amounts of these proteins, which can invoke an immune response in the host. Many research groups actively develop synthetic ligands that are able to selectively and strongly bind to antibodies. Among the reported ligands, peptides that bind to the Fc-domain of antibodies are attractive tools in antibody research. Besides their use as high affinity ligands in antibody purification chromatography, Fc-binding peptides are applied e.g., to localize antibodies on nanomaterials and to increase the half-life of proteins in serum. In this review, recent developments of Fc-binding peptides are presented and their binding characteristics and diverse applications are discussed.

  19. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briers, Yves [Division of Gene Technology, Department of Biosystems, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 21, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J. [Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, ETH Zuerich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, CH-8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Department of Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Volckaert, Guido [Division of Gene Technology, Department of Biosystems, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 21, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lavigne, Rob, E-mail: rob.lavigne@biw.kuleuven.be [Division of Gene Technology, Department of Biosystems, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 21, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  20. Molecular Weight, Protein Binding Affinity and Methane Mitigation of Condensed Tannins from Mangosteen-peel (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paengkoum

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the molecular weight of condensed tannins (CT extracted from mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L peel, its protein binding affinity and effects on fermentation parameters including total gas, methane (CH4 and volatile fatty acids (VFA production. The average molecular weight (Mw of the purified CT was 2,081 Da with a protein binding affinity of 0.69 (the amount needed to bind half the maximum bovine serum albumin. In vitro gas production declined by 0.409, 0.121, and 0.311, respectively, while CH4 production decreased by 0.211, 0.353, and 0.549, respectively, with addition of 10, 20, and 30 mg CT/500 mg dry matter (DM compared to the control (p<0.05. The effects of CT from mangosteen-peel on in vitro DM degradability (IVDMD and in vitro N degradability was negative and linear (p<0.01. Total VFA, concentrations of acetic, propionic, butyric and isovaleric acids decreased linearly with increasing amount of CT. The aforementioned results show that protein binding affinity of CT from mangosteen-peel is lower than those reported for Leucaena forages, however, the former has stronger negative effect on IVDMD. Therefore, the use of mangosteen-peel as protein source and CH4 mitigating agent in ruminant feed requires further investigations.

  1. Cholera toxin binding affinity and specificity for gangliosides determined by surface plasmon resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuziemko, G.M.; Stroh, M.; Stevens, R.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-21

    The present study determines the affinity of cholera toxin for the ganglioside series GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1A, GD1B, GT1B, asialo GM1, globotriosyl ceramide, and lactosyl ceramide using real time biospecific interaction analysis (surface plasmon resonance, SPR). SPR shows that cholera toxin preferably binds to gangliosides in the following sequence: GM1 > GM2 > GD1A > GM3 > GT1B > GD1B > asialo-GM1. The measured binding affinity of cholera toxin for the ganglioside sequence ranges from 4.61 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} M for GM1 to 1.88 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M for asialo GM1. The picomolar values obtained by surface plasmon resonance are similar to K{sub d} values determined with whole-cell binding assays. Both whole-cell assays ans SPR measurements on synthetic membranes are higher than free solution measurements by several orders of magnitude. This difference may be caused by the effects of avidity and charged lipid head-groups, which may play a major role in the binding between cholera toxin, the receptor, and the membrane surface. The primary difference between free solution binding studies and surface plasmon resonance studies is that the latter technique is performed on surfaces resembling the cell membrane. Surface plasmon resonance has the further advantage of measuring apparent kinetic association and dissociation rates in real time, providing direct information about binding events at the membrane surface. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding

    KAUST Repository

    Di Palma, Francesco

    2017-08-03

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody–antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation.

  3. Binding Affinity of a Highly Sensitive Au/Ag/Au/Chitosan-Graphene Oxide Sensor Based on Direct Detection of Pb2+ and Hg2+ Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Hasiba Kamaruddin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of binding affinity is essential in surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensing because it allows researchers to quantify the affinity between the analyte and immobilised ligands of an SPR sensor. In this study, we demonstrate the derivation of the binding affinity constant, K, for Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions according to their SPR response using a gold/silver/gold/chitosan–graphene oxide (Au/Ag/Au/CS–GO sensor for the concentration range of 0.1–5 ppm. The higher affinity of Pb2+ to binding with the CS–GO sensor explains the outstanding sensitivity of 2.05 °ppm−1 against 1.66 °ppm−1 of Hg2+. The maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR upon detection of Pb2+ is 1.53, and exceeds the suggested logical criterion of an SNR. The Au/Ag/Au/CS–GO SPR sensor also exhibits excellent repeatability in Pb2+ due to the strong bond between its functional groups and this cation. The adsorption data of Pb2+ and Hg2+ on the CS–GO sensor fits well with the Langmuir isotherm model where the affinity constant, K, of Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions is computed. The affinity of Pb2+ ions to the Au/Ag/Au/CS–GO sensor is significantly higher than that of Hg2+ based on the value of K, 7 × 105 M−1 and 4 × 105 M−1, respectively. The higher shift in SPR angles due to Pb2+ and Hg2+ compared to Cr3+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions also reveals the greater affinity of the CS–GO SPR sensor to them, thus supporting the rationale for obtaining K for these two heavy metals. This study provides a better understanding on the sensing performance of such sensors in detecting heavy metal ions.

  4. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  5. Metal binding is critical for the folding and function of laminin binding protein, Lmb of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Ragunathan

    Full Text Available Lmb is a 34 kDa laminin binding surface adhesin of Streptococcus agalactiae. The structure of Lmb reported by us recently has shown that it consists of a metal binding crevice, in which a zinc ion is coordinated to three highly conserved histidines. To elucidate the structural and functional significance of the metal ion in Lmb, these histidines have been mutated to alanine and single, double and triple mutants were generated. These mutations resulted in insolubility of the protein and revealed altered secondary and tertiary structures, as evidenced by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy studies. The mutations also significantly decreased the binding affinity of Lmb to laminin, implicating the role played by the metal binding residues in maintaining the correct conformation of the protein for its binding to laminin. A highly disordered loop, proposed to be crucial for metal acquisition in homologous structures, was deleted in Lmb by mutation (ΔLmb and its crystal structure was solved at 2.6 Å. The ΔLmb structure was identical to the native Lmb structure with a bound zinc ion and exhibited laminin binding activity similar to wild type protein, suggesting that the loop might not have an important role in metal acquisition or adhesion in Lmb. Targeted mutations of histidine residues confirmed the importance of the zinc binding crevice for the structure and function of the Lmb adhesin.

  6. Learning a peptide-protein binding affinity predictor with kernel ridge regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Sébastien; Marchand, Mario; Laviolette, François; Drouin, Alexandre; Corbeil, Jacques

    2013-03-05

    The cellular function of a vast majority of proteins is performed through physical interactions with other biomolecules, which, most of the time, are other proteins. Peptides represent templates of choice for mimicking a secondary structure in order to modulate protein-protein interaction. They are thus an interesting class of therapeutics since they also display strong activity, high selectivity, low toxicity and few drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, predicting peptides that would bind to a specific MHC alleles would be of tremendous benefit to improve vaccine based therapy and possibly generate antibodies with greater affinity. Modern computational methods have the potential to accelerate and lower the cost of drug and vaccine discovery by selecting potential compounds for testing in silico prior to biological validation. We propose a specialized string kernel for small bio-molecules, peptides and pseudo-sequences of binding interfaces. The kernel incorporates physico-chemical properties of amino acids and elegantly generalizes eight kernels, comprised of the Oligo, the Weighted Degree, the Blended Spectrum, and the Radial Basis Function. We provide a low complexity dynamic programming algorithm for the exact computation of the kernel and a linear time algorithm for it's approximation. Combined with kernel ridge regression and SupCK, a novel binding pocket kernel, the proposed kernel yields biologically relevant and good prediction accuracy on the PepX database. For the first time, a machine learning predictor is capable of predicting the binding affinity of any peptide to any protein with reasonable accuracy. The method was also applied to both single-target and pan-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex class II benchmark datasets and three Quantitative Structure Affinity Model benchmark datasets. On all benchmarks, our method significantly (p-value ≤ 0.057) outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods at predicting peptide-protein binding

  7. Preparation of a novel Zr(4+)-immobilized metal affinity membrane for selective adsorption of phosphoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Maofang; Wang, Chaozhan; Wei, Yinmao

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel phosphate-Zr(4+) immobilized metal affinity membrane (IMAM) was prepared based on the surface initiated-atom transfer radical polymerization technique for the selective adsorption of phosphoprotein. The adsorption capacity and selectivity of the phosphate-Zr(4+) IMAM were evaluated by using the mixture of standard phosphoproteins (β-casein, ovalbumin) and nonphosphoproteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) as model samples. The adsorption isotherms and competitive adsorption results demonstrated that the phosphate-Zr(4+) IMAM had higher binding capacity and selectivity for phosphoproteins over nonphosphoproteins. Moreover, the phosphate-Zr(4+) IMAM exhibited good re-usability and re-productivity. Finally, the phosphate-Zr(4+) IMAM was applied to separate phosphoprotein from real samples with high purity. Therefore, the as-prepared phosphate-Zr(4+) IMAM could be a promising affinity material for the efficient enrichment of phosphoprotein from complex bio-samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kržan, Mojca; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure.

  9. Quantification of transcription factor-DNA binding affinity in a living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Sergey; Berg, Otto G; Wrange, Örjan

    2016-04-20

    The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for specific binding of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR) to DNA was determined in vivo in Xenopus oocytes. The total nuclear receptor concentration was quantified as specifically retained [(3)H]-hormone in manually isolated oocyte nuclei. DNA was introduced by nuclear microinjection of single stranded phagemid DNA, chromatin is then formed during second strand synthesis. The fraction of DNA sites occupied by the expressed receptor was determined by dimethylsulphate in vivo footprinting and used for calculation of the receptor-DNA binding affinity. The forkhead transcription factor FoxA1 enhanced the DNA binding by GR with an apparent Kd of ∼1 μM and dramatically stimulated DNA binding by AR with an apparent Kd of ∼0.13 μM at a composite androgen responsive DNA element containing one FoxA1 binding site and one palindromic hormone receptor binding site known to bind one receptor homodimer. FoxA1 exerted a weak constitutive- and strongly cooperative DNA binding together with AR but had a less prominent effect with GR, the difference reflecting the licensing function of FoxA1 at this androgen responsive DNA element. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Immobilised metal-ion affinity chromatography purification of histidine-tagged recombinant proteins : a wash step with a low concentration of EDTA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, DF; Welling, GW; Koedijk, DGAM; Scheffer, AJ; The, TH; Welling-Wester, S

    2001-01-01

    Immobilised metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) is widely used for the purification of recombinant proteins in which a poly-histidine tag is introduced. However, other proteins may also bind to IMAC columns. We describe the use of a washing buffer with a low concentration of EDTA (0.5 mM) for

  11. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G.; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages’ pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages’ core and low non-specific binding to the cages’ outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage’s core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of

  12. Characterization of high affinity [3H]triazolam binding in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, M.; Concas, A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    The hypnotic Triazolam (TZ), a triazolo (1,4)-benzodiazepine, displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. Specific binding properties of this recently tritiated TZ were characterized. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the GABA effect on [ 3 H]TZ binding. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity at 37 0 C (K/sub d/ = 0.25 +/- 0.01 nM at O 0 C; K/sub d/ = 1.46 +/- 0.03 nM at 37 0 C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1003 +/- 37 fmoles/mg prot. at 0 0 C and 1001 +/- 43 fmoles/mg prot. at 37 0 C). Inhibition studies showed that [ 3 H]TZ binding displayed no GABA shift at 0 0 C(K/sub i/ 0.37 +/- 0.03 nM/- GABA and K/sub i/ = 0.55 +/- 0.13 nM/+GABA) but a nearly two-fold shift was apparent at 37 0 C (K/sub i/ = 2.92 +/- 0.2 nM/-GABA; K/sub i/ = 1.37 +/- 0.11 mM/+GABA). These results were also confirmed by saturation studies in the presence or absence of GABA showing a shift to higher affinity in the presence of GABA only at 37 0 C. In Ro 15-1788/[ 3 H]TZ competition experiments the presence of GABA did not affect the inhibitory potency of Ro 15-1788 on [ 3 H]TZ binding at both temperatures. In conclusion [ 3 H]TZ binding showed an extremely high affinity for benzodiazepine receptors. In contrast to reported literature, the findings suggest that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors similar to other benzodiazepine agonists

  13. Automated molecular simulation based binding affinity calculator for ligand-bound HIV-1 proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, S Kashif; Wright, David; Watson, Simon J; Zasada, Stefan J; Stoica, Ileana; Coveney, Peter V

    2008-09-01

    The successful application of high throughput molecular simulations to determine biochemical properties would be of great importance to the biomedical community if such simulations could be turned around in a clinically relevant timescale. An important example is the determination of antiretroviral inhibitor efficacy against varying strains of HIV through calculation of drug-protein binding affinities. We describe the Binding Affinity Calculator (BAC), a tool for the automated calculation of HIV-1 protease-ligand binding affinities. The tool employs fully atomistic molecular simulations alongside the well established molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann solvent accessible surface area (MMPBSA) free energy methodology to enable the calculation of the binding free energy of several ligand-protease complexes, including all nine FDA approved inhibitors of HIV-1 protease and seven of the natural substrates cleaved by the protease. This enables the efficacy of these inhibitors to be ranked across several mutant strains of the protease relative to the wildtype. BAC is a tool that utilizes the power provided by a computational grid to automate all of the stages required to compute free energies of binding: model preparation, equilibration, simulation, postprocessing, and data-marshaling around the generally widely distributed compute resources utilized. Such automation enables the molecular dynamics methodology to be used in a high throughput manner not achievable by manual methods. This paper describes the architecture and workflow management of BAC and the function of each of its components. Given adequate compute resources, BAC can yield quantitative information regarding drug resistance at the molecular level within 96 h. Such a timescale is of direct clinical relevance and can assist in decision support for the assessment of patient-specific optimal drug treatment and the subsequent response to therapy for any given genotype.

  14. Radiotracers for Cardiac Sympathetic Innervation: Transport Kinetics and Binding Affinities for the Human Norepinephrine Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffel, David M.; Chen, Wei; Jung, Yong-Woon; Jang, Keun Sam; Gu, Guie; Cozzi, Nicholas V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Most radiotracers for imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation are substrates of the norepinephrine transporter (NET). The goal of this study was to characterize the NET transport kinetics and binding affinities of several sympathetic nerve radiotracers, including [11C]-(−)-meta-hydroxyephedrine, [11C]-(−)-epinephrine, and a series of [11C]-labeled phenethylguanidines under development in our laboratory. For comparison, the NET transport kinetics and binding affinities of some [3H]-labeled biogenic amines were also determined. Methods Transport kinetics studies were performed using rat C6 glioma cells stably transfected with the human norepinephrine transporter (C6-hNET cells). For each radiolabeled NET substrate, saturation transport assays with C6-hNET cells measured the Michaelis-Menten transport constants Km and Vmax for NET transport. Competitive inhibition binding assays with homogenized C6-hNET cells and [3H]mazindol provided estimates of binding affinities (KI) for NET. Results Km, Vmax and KI values were determined for each NET substrate with a high degree of reproducibility. Interestingly, C6-hNET transport rates for ‘tracer concentrations’ of substrate, given by the ratio Vmax/Km, were found to be highly correlated with neuronal transport rates measured previously in isolated rat hearts (r2 = 0.96). This suggests that the transport constants Km and Vmax measured using the C6-hNET cells accurately reflect in vivo transport kinetics. Conclusion The results of these studies show how structural changes in NET substrates influence NET binding and transport constants, providing valuable insights that can be used in the design of new tracers with more optimal kinetics for quantifying regional sympathetic nerve density. PMID:23306137

  15. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramelle, David; Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of currently

  16. Determining the binding affinity of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies towards their native unpurified antigens in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Christine; Abdiche, Yasmina N; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a growing segment of therapeutics, yet their in vitro characterization remains challenging. While it is essential that a therapeutic mAb recognizes the native, physiologically occurring epitope, the generation and selection of mAbs often rely on the use of purified recombinant versions of the antigen that may display non-native epitopes. Here, we present a method to measure both, the binding affinity of a therapeutic mAb towards its native unpurified antigen in human serum, and the antigen's endogenous concentration, by combining the kinetic exclusion assay and Biacore's calibration free concentration analysis. To illustrate the broad utility of our method, we studied a panel of mAbs raised against three disparate soluble antigens that are abundant in the serum of healthy donors: proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), progranulin (PGRN), and fatty acid binding protein (FABP4). We also determined the affinity of each mAb towards its purified recombinant antigen and assessed whether the interactions were pH-dependent. Of the six mAbs studied, three did not appear to discriminate between the serum and recombinant forms of the antigen; one mAb bound serum antigen with a higher affinity than recombinant antigen; and two mAbs displayed a different affinity for serum antigen that could be explained by a pH-dependent interaction. Our results highlight the importance of taking pH into account when measuring the affinities of mAbs towards their serum antigens, since the pH of serum samples becomes increasingly alkaline upon aerobic handling.

  17. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner; Tumen, Fikret

    2009-01-01

    Sorption of Cd 2+ , Cr 3+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Pb 2+ and Zn 2+ onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni 2+ > Cd 2+ > Cu 2+ > Pb 2+ > Zn 2+ > Cr 3+ . The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb 2+ > Cu 2+ > Ni 2+ > Cd 2+ > Zn 2+ > Cr 3+ . The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol -1 for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The ΔG o and ΔH o values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low ΔH o values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  18. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner; Tumen, Fikret

    2009-05-30

    Sorption of Cd(2+), Cr(3+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni(2+)>Cd(2+)>Cu(2+)>Pb(2+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(3+). The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb(2+)>Cu(2+)>Ni(2+)>Cd(2+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(3+). The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol(-1) for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The DeltaG degrees and DeltaH degrees values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low DeltaH degrees values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  19. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner [Department of Chemical Engineering, Firat University, 23279 Elazig (Turkey); Tumen, Fikret, E-mail: ftumen@firat.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Firat University, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2009-05-30

    Sorption of Cd{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Pb{sup 2+} > Zn{sup 2+} > Cr{sup 3+}. The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Zn{sup 2+} > Cr{sup 3+}. The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol{sup -1} for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The {Delta}G{sup o} and {Delta}H{sup o} values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low {Delta}H{sup o} values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  20. Glutaraldehyde pretreatment blocks temperature-induced high-affinity [3H] tryptamine binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serikyaku, S.; Ishitani, R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of glutaraldehyde (and Azure A) on temperature-sensitive high-affinity [ 3 H] tryptamine binding was investigated in rat brain synaptic plasma membranes. In the 0.01-0.1 % concentration range, the glutaraldehyde pretreatment preferentially inhibited only the above-mentioned portion of the binding, whereas the posttreatment of this reagent had no effect. On the other hand, in cases of pretreatment or posttreatment, a concentration of glutaraldehyde as high as 0.1 % was inactive on the basal [ 3 H] ligand binding capacity of the membranes. Furthermore, it was revealed that the Scatchard plot of [ 3 H] tryptamine binding in membranes pretreated with glutaraldehyde conformed to a straight line, as did a similar plot of temperature-independent binding. And, it was interesting to find that the binding parameters (K/sub D/ and B/sub max/ values) of both samples corresponded closely to each other. On the contrary, in all concentrations, Azure A affected nonspecifically both the temperature-dependent and the independent [ 3 H] tryptamine binding to the same degree, regardless of whether or not there was pretreatment or posttreatment. 17 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  1. Identification of a High Affinity Nucleocapsid Protein Binding Element from The Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, F. Zehra; Babalola, Kathleen; Summers, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Retroviral genome recognition is mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the virally encoded Gag polyprotein and cognate RNA packaging elements that, for most retroviruses, appear to reside primarily within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the genome. Recent studies suggest that a major packaging determinant of Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV), a member of the human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)/BLV family and a non-primate animal model for HTLV-induced leukemogenesis, resides within the gag open reading frame. We have prepared and purified the recombinant BLV NC protein and conducted electrophoretic mobility shift and isothermal titration calorimetry studies with RNA fragments corresponding to these proposed packaging elements. The gag-derived RNAs did not exhibit significant affinity for NC, suggesting an alternate role in packaging. However, an 83-nucleotide fragment of the 5′-UTR that resides just upstream of the gag start codon binds NC stoichiometrically and with high affinity (Kd = 136 ± 21 nM). These nucleotides were predicted to form tandem hairpin structures, and studies with smaller fragments indicate that the NC binding site resides exclusively within the distal hairpin (residues G369- U399, Kd = 67 ± 8 nM at physiological ionic strength). Unlike all other structurally characterized retroviral NC binding RNAs, this fragment is not expected to contain exposed guanosines, suggesting that RNA binding may be mediated by a previously uncharacterized mechanism. PMID:22846919

  2. Comparison of different transition metal ions for immobilized metal affinity chromatography of selenoprotein P from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidenius, U; Farver, O; Jøns, O

    1999-01-01

    Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Co2+ and Cd2+ were evaluated in metal ion affinity chromatography for enrichment of selenoprotein P, and immobilized Co2+ affinity chromatography was found to be the most selective chromatographic method. The chromatography was performed by fast protein liquid chromatography...... and the fractionation was followed by analysis of the collected fractions for selenium by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. By the combination of immobilized Co2+ affinity chromatography and heparin affinity chromatography a simple method was developed yielding a 14,800-fold enrichment of selenoprotein P...

  3. Crucial Roles of Single Residues in Binding Affinity, Specificity, and Promiscuity in the Cellulosomal Cohesin-Dockerin Interface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutzki, Michal; Reshef, Dan; Barak, Yoav; Haimovitz, Rachel; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cohesin and dockerin modules play a crucial role in the assembly of multienzyme cellulosome complexes. Although intraspecies cohesin and dockerin modules bind in general with high affinity but indiscriminately, cross-species binding is rare. Here, we combined ELISA-based experiments with Rosetta-based computational design to evaluate the contribution of distinct residues at the Clostridium thermocellum cohesin-dockerin interface to binding affinity, specificity, and promiscuity. We found that single mutations can show distinct and significant effects on binding affinity and specificity. In particular, mutations at cohesin position Asn37 show dramatic variability in their effect on dockerin binding affinity and specificity: the N37A mutant binds promiscuously both to cognate (C. thermocellum) as well as to non-cognate Clostridium cellulolyticum dockerin. N37L in turn switches binding specificity: compared with the wild-type C. thermocellum cohesin, this mutant shows significantly increased preference for C. cellulolyticum dockerin combined with strongly reduced binding to its cognate C. thermocellum dockerin. The observation that a single mutation can overcome the naturally observed specificity barrier provides insights into the evolutionary dynamics of this system that allows rapid modulation of binding specificity within a high affinity background. PMID:25833947

  4. A dipeptide with enhanced anion binding affinity enables cell uptake and protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mao; Mosel, Stefanie; Knauer, Shirley K; Schmuck, Carsten

    2018-03-14

    Herein, we report a rather simple strategy to enhance the anion binding ability of a dipeptide to achieve cell uptake and also protein delivery. Peptide 1, composed of only two synthetic amino acids with an artificial anion binding site in the side chains, has an overall molecular weight of only 630 Da and demonstrated strong binding affinity (10 7 M -1 ) and clustering ability with heparin as a model for cell surface sugars. Furthermore, peptide 1 is also efficiently taken up by cells most likely via endocytosis. The uptake efficiency is dependent on the amount of glycosaminoglycans on the cell surface. Cells with reduced amounts of surface bound glycosaminoglycans show significantly less uptake of peptide 1. Moreover, 1 induced the uptake of a model protein (avidin, around 67 kDa) into cells, which makes 1 a highly attractive candidate for drug and protein delivery, especially as 1 has negligible cytotoxicity.

  5. PRODIGY: a web server for predicting the binding affinity of protein-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Li C; Rodrigues, João Pglm; Kastritis, Panagiotis L; Bonvin, Alexandre Mjj; Vangone, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Gaining insights into the structural determinants of protein-protein interactions holds the key for a deeper understanding of biological functions, diseases and development of therapeutics. An important aspect of this is the ability to accurately predict the binding strength for a given protein-protein complex. Here we present PROtein binDIng enerGY prediction (PRODIGY), a web server to predict the binding affinity of protein-protein complexes from their 3D structure. The PRODIGY server implements our simple but highly effective predictive model based on intermolecular contacts and properties derived from non-interface surface. PRODIGY is freely available at: http://milou.science.uu.nl/services/PRODIGY CONTACT: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl, a.vangone@uu.nl. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Prediction of trypsin/molecular fragment binding affinities by free energy decomposition and empirical scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Mark L.; Faver, John C.; Ucisik, Melek N.; Dashti, Danial S.; Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-05-01

    Two families of binding affinity estimation methodologies are described which were utilized in the SAMPL3 trypsin/fragment binding affinity challenge. The first is a free energy decomposition scheme based on a thermodynamic cycle, which included separate contributions from enthalpy and entropy of binding as well as a solvent contribution. Enthalpic contributions were estimated with PM6-DH2 semiempirical quantum mechanical interaction energies, which were modified with a statistical error correction procedure. Entropic contributions were estimated with the rigid-rotor harmonic approximation, and solvent contributions to the free energy were estimated with several different methods. The second general methodology is the empirical score LISA, which contains several physics-based terms trained with the large PDBBind database of protein/ligand complexes. Here we also introduce LISA+, an updated version of LISA which, prior to scoring, classifies systems into one of four classes based on a ligand's hydrophobicity and molecular weight. Each version of the two methodologies (a total of 11 methods) was trained against a compiled set of known trypsin binders available in the Protein Data Bank to yield scaling parameters for linear regression models. Both raw and scaled scores were submitted to SAMPL3. Variants of LISA showed relatively low absolute errors but also low correlation with experiment, while the free energy decomposition methods had modest success when scaling factors were included. Nonetheless, re-scaled LISA yielded the best predictions in the challenge in terms of RMS error, and six of these models placed in the top ten best predictions by RMS error. This work highlights some of the difficulties of predicting binding affinities of small molecular fragments to protein receptors as well as the benefit of using training data.

  7. Importin β-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. → Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. → The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. → Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. → The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin β family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of β-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of β-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  8. Selective retention of basic compounds by metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Eiichi; Asakawa, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    A novel metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography has been developed for the analysis of basic compounds using heat-treated silica gel containing hydrated metal cations (metal aquo-ions) as the packing material. The packing materials of the metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography were prepared by the immobilization of a single metal component such as Fe(III), Al(III), Ag(I), and Ni(II) on silica gel followed by extensive heat treatment. The immobilized metals form aquo-ions to present cation-exchange ability for basic analytes and the cation-exchange ability for basic analytes depends on pKa of the immobilized metal species. In the present study, to evaluate the retention characteristics of metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography, the on-line solid-phase extraction of drugs was investigated. Obtained data clearly evidence the selective retention capability of metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography for basic analytes with sufficient capacity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  10. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9 THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5'-Trimethylammonium-delta 8 THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta- 8 THC modified on the 5' carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of [ 3 H]-5'-trimethylammonium-delta- 8 THC ([ 3 H]TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. [ 3 H]TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of [ 3 H]TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight

  11. Enriching peptide libraries for binding affinity and specificity through computationally directed library design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T. Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E.

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model. PMID:28236241

  12. Metal binding spectrum and model structure of the Bacillus anthracis virulence determinant MntA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigonsky, Elena; Fish, Inbar; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Ovcharenko, Elena; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2015-10-01

    The potentially lethal human pathogen Bacillus anthracis expresses a putative metal import system, MntBCA, which belongs to the large family of ABC transporters. MntBCA is essential for virulence of Bacillus anthracis: deletion of MntA, the system's substrate binding protein, yields a completely non-virulent strain. Here we determined the metal binding spectrum of MntA. In contrast to what can be inferred from growth complementation studies we find no evidence that MntA binds Fe(2+) or Fe(3+). Rather, MntA binds a variety of other metal ions, including Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) with affinities ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-8) M. Binding of Zn(2+) and Co(2+) have a pronounced thermo-stabilizing effect on MntA, with Mn(2+) having a milder effect. The thermodynamic stability of MntA, competition experiments, and metal binding and release experiments all suggest that Mn(2+) is the metal that is likely transported by MntBCA and is therefore the limiting factor for virulence of Bacillus anthracis. A homology-model of MntA shows a single, highly conserved metal binding site, with four residues that participate in metal coordination: two histidines, a glutamate, and an aspartate. The metals bind to this site in a mutually exclusive manner, yet surprisingly, mutational analysis shows that for proper coordination each metal requires a different subset of these four residues. ConSurf evolutionary analysis and structural comparison of MntA and its homologues suggest that substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of metal ions use a pair of highly conserved prolines to interact with their cognate ABC transporters. This proline pair is found exclusively in ABC import systems of metal ions.

  13. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chih-Ming [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuarn-Jang [Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Ting [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chien-Ting [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Jing-Shin [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chien-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Ou, Keng-Liang [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  14. Inter-residue coupling contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective binding of α-bungarotoxin to nicotinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sine, Steven M.; Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; daCosta, Corrie J. B.; Chen, Lin

    2013-09-01

    The crystal structure of a pentameric α7 ligand-binding domain chimaera with bound α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) showed that of the five conserved aromatic residues in α7, only Tyr184 in loop C of the ligand-binding site was required for high-affinity binding. To determine whether the contribution of Tyr184 depends on local residues, we generated mutations in an α7/5HT3A (5-hydroxytryptamine type 3A) receptor chimaera, individually and in pairs, and measured 125I-labelled α-btx binding. The results show that mutations of individual residues near Tyr184 do not affect α-btx affinity, but pairwise mutations decrease affinity in an energetically coupled manner. Kinetic measurements show that the affinity decreases arise through increases in the α-btx dissociation rate with little change in the association rate. Replacing loop C in α7 with loop C from the α-btx-insensitive α2 or α3 subunits abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, but preserves acetylcholine-elicited single channel currents. However, in both the α2 and α3 construct, mutating either residue that flanks Tyr184 to its α7 counterpart restores high-affinity α-btx binding. Analogously, in α7, mutating both residues that flank Tyr184 to the α2 or α3 counterparts abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding. Thus interaction between Tyr184 and local residues contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective α-btx binding.

  15. Binding affinity of a small molecule to an amorphous polymer in a solvent. Part 1: free energy of binding to a binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunsrivirot, Surasak; Diao, Ying; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-10-18

    Crystallization is commonly used in a separation and purification process in the production of a wide range of materials in various industries. In industry, crystallization usually starts with heterogeneous nucleation on a foreign surface. The complicated mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood; however, we hypothesize that there might be a possible correlation between binding affinity to a surface and enhancement of nucleation. Recent studies show that amorphous polymers can be used to control crystallization, selectively produce pharmaceutical polymorphs, and discover novel pharmaceutical polymorphs. To investigate the possible correlation between the binding affinity of one molecule to key binding sites (local binding) and heterogeneous nucleation activity as well as the possibility of using this binding affinity to help guide the selection of polymers that promote heterogeneous nucleation, we computed the free energy of binding of aspirin to four nonporous cross-linked polymers in an ethanol-water 38 v% mixture. These cross-linked polymers are poly(4-acryloylmorpholine) (PAM), poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate) (PCEA), poly(4-hydroxylbutyl acrylate) (PHBA), and polystyrene (PS); all of them were cross-linked with divinylbenzene (DVB). These systems were used because their heterogeneous nucleation activities are available in literature, and the ranking is PAM > PCEA > PHBA ≈ PS. We generated three independent surfaces for each polymer and computed the free energy of binding of aspirin to the best binding site that we found on each surface. The average free energies of binding to the best sites of PAM, PCEA, PHBA, and PS are -20.4 ± 1.0, -16.7 ± 1.0, -14.4 ± 1.1, and -13.6 ± 1.1 kcal/mol, respectively. We found that the trend of the magnitudes of the average free energies of binding to the best sites is PAM > PCEA > PHBA ≈ PS. This trend is very similar to that of heterogeneous nucleation activity. Our results suggest the importance of the

  16. Searching for the low affinity ubiquinone binding site in cytochrome bo3from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sylvia K; Lin, Myat T; Ouyang, Hanlin; Gennis, Robert B

    2017-05-01

    The cytochrome bo 3 ubiquinol oxidase is one of three respiratory oxygen reductases in the aerobic respiratory chain of Escherichia coli. The generally accepted model of catalysis assumes that cyt bo 3 contains two distinct ubiquinol binding sites: (i) a low affinity (Q L ) site which is the traditional substrate binding site; and (ii) a high affinity (Q H ) site where a "permanently" bound quinone acts as a cofactor, taking two electrons from the substrate quinol and passing them one-by-one to the heme b component of the enzyme which, in turn, transfers them to the heme o 3 /Cu B active site. Whereas the residues at the Q H site are well defined, the location of the Q L site remains unknown. The published X-ray structure does not contain quinone, and substantial amounts of the protein are missing as well. A recent bioinformatics study by Bossis et al. [Biochem J. (2014) 461, 305-314] identified a sequence motif G 163 EFX 3 GWX 2 Y 173 as the likely Q L site in the family of related quinol oxidases. In the current work, this was tested by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that these residues are not important for catalytic function and do not define the Q L substrate binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cost Function Network-based Design of Protein-Protein Interactions: predicting changes in binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viricel, Clément; de Givry, Simon; Schiex, Thomas; Barbe, Sophie

    2018-02-20

    Accurate and economic methods to predict change in protein binding free energy upon mutation are imperative to accelerate the design of proteins for a wide range of applications. Free energy is defined by enthalpic and entropic contributions. Following the recent progresses of Artificial Intelligence-based algorithms for guaranteed NP-hard energy optimization and partition function computation, it becomes possible to quickly compute minimum energy conformations and to reliably estimate the entropic contribution of side-chains in the change of free energy of large protein interfaces. Using guaranteed Cost Function Network algorithms, Rosetta energy functions and Dunbrack's rotamer library, we developed and assessed EasyE and JayZ, two methods for binding affinity estimation that ignore or include conformational entropic contributions on a large benchmark of binding affinity experimental measures. If both approaches outperform most established tools, we observe that side-chain conformational entropy brings little or no improvement on most systems but becomes crucial in some rare cases. as open-source Python/C ++ code at sourcesup.renater.fr/projects/easy-jayz. thomas.schiex@inra.fr and sophie.barbe@insa-toulouse.fr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Ligand binding affinity and changes in the lateral diffusion of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Aleem; Zhu, Qiaochu; Smith, Emily A

    2016-12-01

    The effect of ligand on the lateral diffusion of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), a receptor involved in numerous pathological conditions, remains unknown. Single particle tracking experiments that use quantum dots specifically bound to hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged RAGE (HA-RAGE) are reported to elucidate the effect of ligand binding on HA-RAGE diffusion in GM07373 cell membranes. The ligand used in these studies is methylglyoxal modified-bovine serum albumin (MGO-BSA) containing advanced glycation end products modifications. The binding affinity between soluble RAGE and MGO-BSA increases by 1.8 to 9.7-fold as the percent primary amine modification increases from 24 to 74% and with increasing negative charge on the MGO-BSA. Ligand incubation affects the HA-RAGE diffusion coefficient, the radius of confinement, and duration of confinement. There is, however, no correlation between MGO-BSA ligand binding affinity with soluble RAGE and the extent of the changes in HA-RAGE lateral diffusion. The ligand induced changes to HA-RAGE lateral diffusion do not occur when cholesterol is depleted from the cell membrane, indicating the mechanism for ligand-induced changes to HA-RAGE diffusion is cholesterol dependent. The results presented here serve as a first step in unraveling how ligand influences RAGE lateral diffusion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Improved methods for predicting peptide binding affinity to MHC class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kamilla Kjaergaard; Andreatta, Massimo; Marcatili, Paolo; Buus, Søren; Greenbaum, Jason A; Yan, Zhen; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2018-01-06

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules are expressed on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells where they display peptides to T helper cells, which orchestrate the onset and outcome of many host immune responses. Understanding which peptides will be presented by the MHC-II molecule is therefore important for understanding the activation of T helper cells and can be used to identify T-cell epitopes. We here present updated versions of two MHC-II-peptide binding affinity prediction methods, NetMHCII and NetMHCIIpan. These were constructed using an extended data set of quantitative MHC-peptide binding affinity data obtained from the Immune Epitope Database covering HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, HLA-DP and H-2 mouse molecules. We show that training with this extended data set improved the performance for peptide binding predictions for both methods. Both methods are publicly available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCII-2.3 and www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.2. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Enhanced binding by dextran-grafting to Protein A affinity chromatographic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lan; Zhu, Kai; Huang, Yongdong; Li, Qiang; Li, Xiunan; Zhang, Rongyue; Su, Zhiguo; Wang, Qibao; Ma, Guanghui

    2017-04-01

    Dextran-grafted Protein A affinity chromatographic medium was prepared by grafting dextran to agarose-based matrix, followed by epoxy-activation and Protein A coupling site-directed to sulfhydryl groups of cysteine molecules. An enhancement of both the binding performance and the stability was achieved for this dextran-grafted Protein A chromatographic medium. Its dynamic binding capacity was 61 mg immunoglobulin G/mL suction-dried gel, increased by 24% compared with that of the non-grafted medium. The binding capacity of dextran-grafted medium decreased about 7% after 40 cleaning-in-place cycles, much lower than that of the non-grafted medium as decreased about 15%. Confocal laser scanning microscopy results showed that immunoglobulin G was bound to both the outside and the inside of dextran-grafted medium faster than that of non-grafted one. Atomic force microscopy showed that this dextran-grafted Protein A medium had much rougher surface with a vertical coordinate range of ±80 nm, while that of non-grafted one was ±10 nm. Grafted dextran provided a more stereo surface morphology and immunoglobulin G molecules were more easily to be bound. This high-performance dextran-grafted Protein A affinity chromatographic medium has promising applications in large-scale antibody purification. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  2. Isolation and characterization of iron chelators from turmeric (Curcuma longa): selective metal binding by curcuminoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Donald J; Surrago, Christine; Fiordalisi, Celia; Chung, Wing Yin; Kowdley, Kris V

    2017-10-01

    Iron overload disorders may be treated by chelation therapy. This study describes a novel method for isolating iron chelators from complex mixtures including plant extracts. We demonstrate the one-step isolation of curcuminoids from turmeric, the medicinal food spice derived from Curcuma longa. The method uses iron-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-agarose, to which curcumin binds rapidly, specifically, and reversibly. Curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin each bound iron-NTA-agarose with comparable affinities and a stoichiometry near 1. Analyses of binding efficiencies and purity demonstrated that curcuminoids comprise the primary iron binding compounds recovered from a crude turmeric extract. Competition of curcuminoid binding to the iron resin was used to characterize the metal binding site on curcumin and to detect iron binding by added chelators. Curcumin-Iron-NTA-agarose binding was inhibited by other metals with relative potency: (>90% inhibition) Cu 2+  ~ Al 3+  > Zn 2+  ≥ Ca 2+  ~ Mg 2+  ~ Mn 2+ (80% by addition of iron to the media; uptake was completely restored by desferoxamine. Ranking of metals by relative potencies for blocking curcumin uptake agreed with their relative potencies in blocking curcumin binding to iron-NTA-agarose. We conclude that curcumin can selectively bind toxic metals including iron in a physiological setting, and propose inhibition of curcumin binding to iron-NTA-agarose for iron chelator screening.

  3. Modeling the binding affinity of structurally diverse industrial chemicals to carbon using the artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Rai, Premanjali; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    Binding affinity of chemical to carbon is an important characteristic as it finds vast industrial applications. Experimental determination of the adsorption capacity of diverse chemicals onto carbon is both time and resource intensive, and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. In this study, artificial intelligence (AI)-based ten different qualitative and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (MLPN, RBFN, PNN/GRNN, CCN, SVM, GEP, GMDH, SDT, DTF, DTB) were established for the prediction of the adsorption capacity of structurally diverse chemicals to activated carbon following the OECD guidelines. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear dependence in the data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation procedures performed employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete dataset, the qualitative models rendered classification accuracies between 97.04 and 99.93%, while the quantitative models yielded correlation (R(2)) values of 0.877-0.977 between the measured and the predicted endpoint values. The quantitative prediction accuracies for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds (class 4) were relatively better than those for the low MW compounds. Both in the qualitative and quantitative models, the Polarizability was the most influential descriptor. Structural alerts responsible for the extreme adsorption behavior of the compounds were identified. Higher number of carbon and presence of higher halogens in a molecule rendered higher binding affinity. Proposed QSPR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. A relatively better performance of the ensemble learning models (DTF, DTB) may be attributed to the strengths of the bagging and boosting algorithms which enhance the predictive accuracies. The

  4. Serotonin receptor binding affinities of several hallucinogenic phenylalkylamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, R A; Liebowitz, S M; Mack, E C

    1978-08-01

    Hallucinogenic phenylalkylamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine analogues are known to affect serotonergic systems both in vivo and in vitro. Using a rat stomach fundus model, the 5-HT receptor binding affinities of several of these analogues were determined and compared. The most behaviorally potent analogues examined, DOB, DOM, and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, were found to possess rather high affirmities (pA2 = 7.35, 7.12, and 7.08, respectively) for the 5-HT receptors of the model system.

  5. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme

  6. Improved methods for predicting peptide binding affinity to MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kamilla Kjærgaard; Andreatta, Massimo; Marcatili, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules are expressed on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells where they display peptides to T helper cells, which orchestrate the onset and outcome of many host immune responses. Understanding which peptides will be presented...... by the MHC-II molecule is therefore important for understanding the activation of T helper cells and can be used to identify T-cell epitopes. We here present updated versions of two MHC class II peptide binding affinity prediction methods, NetMHCII and NetMHCIIpan. These were constructed using an extended...

  7. High-affinity small molecule-phospholipid complex formation: binding of siramesine to phosphatidicacid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu

    2008-01-01

    was in agreement with the above data. Taking into account the key role of PA as a signaling molecule promoting cell growth our results suggest a new paradigm for the development of anticancer drugs, viz. design of small molecules specifically scavenging phospholipids involved in the signaling cascades controlling......, comparable to the affinities for the binding of small molecule ligands to proteins, was measured for phosphatidic acid (PA, mole fraction of XPA ) 0.2 in phosphatidylcholine vesicles), yielding a molecular partition coefficient of 240 ( 80 × 106. An MD simulation on the siramesine:PA interaction...

  8. Engineered Bacterial Metal-binding Proteins for Nanoscale Self-assembly and heavy Metal Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Sedlak, Ruth Amanda

    Implementing biological principles in material synthesis and assembly is one way to expand our abilities to efficiently assemble nanoscale materials and devices. Specifically, recent advances in identifying peptides that bind inorganic materials with high affinity and specificity has spurred investigation of protein models for nanoscale inorganic assembly. This dissertation presents the results of my studies of several E. coli proteins engineered to bind inorganic materials through simple peptide motifs. I demonstrate that these proteins modulate the self-assembly of DNA-based nanostructures and can introduce heavy metal tolerance into metal-sensitive bacteria. Chapter 2 explores use of the engineered F plasmid DNA relaxase/helicase TraI for the self-assembly of complex DNA-protein-gold nanostructures. The full-length protein is engineered with a gold binding motif at an internal permissive site (TraI369GBP1-7x), while a truncated version of TraI is engineered with the same gold binding motif at the C-terminus (TraI361GBP1-7x). Both constructs bind gold nanoparticles while maintaining their DNA binding activity, and transmission electron microscopy reveals TraI369GBP1-7x utilizes its non-specific DNA binding activity to decorate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA with gold nanoparticles. The self assembly principles demonstrated in this work will be fundamental to constructing higher ordered hybrid nanostructures through DNA-protein-nanoparticle interactions. Chapter 3 studies the effects of expressing inorganic binding peptides within cells. I identified a silver binding peptide that, when fused to the periplasmic maltose binding protein, protects E. coli from silver toxicity in batch culture and reduces silver ions to silver nanoparticles within the bacterial periplasm. Engineered metal-ion tolerant microorganisms such as this E. coli could potentially be used in applications ranging from remediation to interrogation of biomolecule-metal interactions in vivo

  9. Differences in serotonin transporter binding affinity in patients with major depressive disorder and night eating syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, J D; Amsterdam, J; Newberg, A; Allison, K C; Wintering, N; Stunkard, A J

    2009-03-01

    We examined serotonin transporter (SERT) binding affinity using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and night eating syndrome (NES). There are similarities between MDD and NES in affective symptoms, appetite disturbance, nighttime awakenings, and, particularly, response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Six non-depressed patients with NES and seven patients with MDD underwent SPECT brain imaging with 123I-ADAM, a radiopharmaceutical agent selective for SERT sites. Uptake ratios of 123I-ADAM SERT binding were obtained for the midbrain, basal ganglia, and temporal lobe regions compared to the cerebellum reference region. Patients with NES had significantly greater SERT uptake ratios (effect size range 0.64-0.84) in the midbrain, right temporal lobe, and left temporal lobe regions than those with MDD whom we had previously studied. Pathophysiological differences in SERT uptake between patients with NES and MDD suggest these are distinct clinical syndromes.

  10. Ligand-receptor binding affinities from saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy: the binding isotherm of STD initial growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Jesús; Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Nieto, Pedro M

    2010-07-12

    The direct evaluation of dissociation constants (K(D)) from the variation of saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy values with the receptor-ligand ratio is not feasible due to the complex dependence of STD intensities on the spectral properties of the observed signals. Indirect evaluation, by competition experiments, allows the determination of K(D), as long as a ligand of known affinity is available for the protein under study. Herein, we present a novel protocol based on STD NMR spectroscopy for the direct measurements of receptor-ligand dissociation constants (K(D)) from single-ligand titration experiments. The influence of several experimental factors on STD values has been studied in detail, confirming the marked impact on standard determinations of protein-ligand affinities by STD NMR spectroscopy. These factors, namely, STD saturation time, ligand residence time in the complex, and the intensity of the signal, affect the accumulation of saturation in the free ligand by processes closely related to fast protein-ligand rebinding and longitudinal relaxation of the ligand signals. The proposed method avoids the dependence of the magnitudes of ligand STD signals at a given saturation time on spurious factors by constructing the binding isotherms using the initial growth rates of the STD amplification factors, in a similar way to the use of NOE growing rates to estimate cross relaxation rates for distance evaluations. Herein, it is demonstrated that the effects of these factors are cancelled out by analyzing the protein-ligand association curve using STD values at the limit of zero saturation time, when virtually no ligand rebinding or relaxation takes place. The approach is validated for two well-studied protein-ligand systems: the binding of the saccharides GlcNAc and GlcNAcbeta1,4GlcNAc (chitobiose) to the wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) lectin, and the interaction of the amino acid L-tryptophan to bovine serum albumin (BSA). In all cases, the

  11. Simple and Efficient Purification of Recombinant Proteins Using the Heparin-Binding Affinity Tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Srinivas; Gundampati, Ravi Kumar; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2017-11-01

    Heparin, a member of the glycosaminoglycan family, is known to interact with more than 400 different types of proteins. For the past few decades, significant progress has been made to understand the molecular details involved in heparin-protein interactions. Based on the structural knowledge available from the FGF1-heparin interaction studies, we have designed a novel heparin-binding peptide (HBP) affinity tag that can be used for the simple, efficient, and cost-effective purification of recombinant proteins of interest. HBP-tagged fusion proteins can be purified by heparin Sepharose affinity chromatography using a simple sodium chloride gradient to elute the bound fusion protein. In addition, owing to the high density of positive charges on the HBP tag, recombinant target proteins are preferably expressed in their soluble forms. The purification of HBP-fusion proteins can also be achieved in the presence of chemical denaturants, including urea. Additionally, polyclonal antibodies raised against the affinity tag can be used to detect HBP-fused target proteins with high sensitivity. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. High integrin αVβ6affinity reached by hybrid domain deletion slows ligand-binding on-rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xianchi; Zhao, Bo; Lin, Fu-Yang; Lu, Chafen; Rogers, Bruce N; Springer, Timothy A

    2018-02-13

    The role of the hybrid domain in integrin affinity regulation is unknown, as is whether the kinetics of ligand binding is modulated by integrin affinity state. Here, we compare cell surface and soluble integrin α V β 6 truncation mutants for ligand-binding affinity, kinetics, and thermodynamics. Removal of the integrin transmembrane/cytoplasmic domains or lower legs has little effect on α V β 6 affinity, in contrast to β 1 integrins. In integrin opening, rearrangement at the interface between the βI and hybrid domains is linked to remodeling at the ligand-binding site at the opposite end of the βI domain, which greatly increases in affinity in the open conformation. The larger size of the βI-hybrid interface in the closed state suggests that the hybrid domain stabilizes closing. In agreement, deletion of the hybrid domain raised affinity by 50-fold. Surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry gave similar results and the latter revealed tradeoffs between enthalpy and entropy not apparent from affinity. At extremely high affinity reached in Mn 2+ with hybrid domain truncation, α V β 6 on-rate for both pro-TGF-β1 and fibronectin declined. The results suggest that the open conformation of α V β 6 has lower on-rate than the closed conformation, correlate with constriction of the ligand-binding pocket in open α V β 6 structures, and suggest that the extended-closed conformation is kinetically selected for ligand binding. Subsequent transition to the extended-open conformation is stabilized by its much higher affinity for ligand and would also be stabilized by force exerted across ligand-bound integrins by the actin cytoskeleton.

  13. Bicarbonate increases binding affinity of Vibrio cholerae ToxT to virulence gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Joshua J; Withey, Jeffrey H

    2014-11-01

    The major Vibrio cholerae virulence gene transcription activator, ToxT, is responsible for the production of the diarrhea-inducing cholera toxin (CT) and the major colonization factor, toxin coregulated pilus (TCP). In addition to the two primary virulence factors mentioned, ToxT is responsible for the activation of accessory virulence genes, such as aldA, tagA, acfA, acfD, tcpI, and tarAB. ToxT activity is negatively modulated by bile and unsaturated fatty acids found in the upper small intestine. Conversely, previous work identified another intestinal signal, bicarbonate, which enhances the ability of ToxT to activate production of CT and TCP. The work presented here further elucidates the mechanism for the enhancement of ToxT activity by bicarbonate. Bicarbonate was found to increase the activation of ToxT-dependent accessory virulence promoters in addition to those that produce CT and TCP. Bicarbonate is taken up into the V. cholerae cell, where it positively affects ToxT activity by increasing DNA binding affinity for the virulence gene promoters that ToxT activates regardless of toxbox configuration. The increase in ToxT binding affinity in the presence of bicarbonate explains the elevated level of virulence gene transcription. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Acylated heptapeptide binds albumin with high affinity and application as tag furnishes long-acting peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Middendorp, Simon J; Wilbs, Jonas; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-07-17

    The rapid renal clearance of peptides in vivo limits this attractive platform for the treatment of a broad range of diseases that require prolonged drug half-lives. An intriguing approach for extending peptide circulation times works through a 'piggy-back' strategy in which peptides bind via a ligand to the long-lived serum protein albumin. In accordance with this strategy, we developed an easily synthesized albumin-binding ligand based on a peptide-fatty acid chimera that has a high affinity for human albumin (K d =39 nM). This ligand prolongs the elimination half-life of cyclic peptides in rats 25-fold to over seven hours. Conjugation to a peptide factor XII inhibitor developed for anti-thrombotic therapy extends the half-life from 13 minutes to over five hours, inhibiting coagulation for eight hours in rabbits. This high-affinity albumin ligand could potentially extend the half-life of peptides in human to several days, substantially broadening the application range of peptides as therapeutics.

  15. Acylated heptapeptide binds albumin with high affinity and application as tag furnishes long-acting peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Middendorp, Simon J.; Wilbs, Jonas; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-07-01

    The rapid renal clearance of peptides in vivo limits this attractive platform for the treatment of a broad range of diseases that require prolonged drug half-lives. An intriguing approach for extending peptide circulation times works through a `piggy-back' strategy in which peptides bind via a ligand to the long-lived serum protein albumin. In accordance with this strategy, we developed an easily synthesized albumin-binding ligand based on a peptide-fatty acid chimera that has a high affinity for human albumin (Kd=39 nM). This ligand prolongs the elimination half-life of cyclic peptides in rats 25-fold to over seven hours. Conjugation to a peptide factor XII inhibitor developed for anti-thrombotic therapy extends the half-life from 13 minutes to over five hours, inhibiting coagulation for eight hours in rabbits. This high-affinity albumin ligand could potentially extend the half-life of peptides in human to several days, substantially broadening the application range of peptides as therapeutics.

  16. Temperature-sensitive high affinity [3H]serotonin binding: characterization and effects of antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmeste, D.M.; Tang, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization of temperature-sensitive [ 3 H]serotonin (5-HT) binding sites (1 and 4 nM Kd sites) revealed complex inhibition by neuroleptics and serotonin antagonists. There was no simple correlation with affinities for S 1 and S 2 receptors. In vivo pretreatment (48 h before) with mianserin did not alter B/sub max/ or Kd for the 1 nM Kd [ 3 H]5-HT site, although [ 3 H]ketanserin (S 2 ) densities were decreased by 50%. This suggested that possible S 2 components of [ 3 H]5-HT binding must be negligible, even though ketanserin competed with high affinity (IC 50 = 3 nM) for a portion of the 1 nM Kd [ 3 H]5-HT site. Low concentrations of mianserin inhibited the 1 nM Kd [ 3 H]5-HT site in a non-competitive manner, as shown by a decrease in B/sub max/ with no change in Kd after in vitro incubation. The complex inhibition data may therefore represent indirect interactions through another site

  17. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  18. Deciphering the specific high-affinity binding of cucurbit[7]uril to amino acids in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Wha; Lee, Hyun Hee L; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Kim, Hugh I

    2015-04-02

    This work presents a systematic study on the host-guest interactions between the macrocyclic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and amino acids (AAs) including three basic AAs (Lys, Arg, and His) and three aromatic AAs (Phe, Tyr, and Trp) to elucidate the origin of the high selectivity of CB[7] toward AA residues in proteins. Complex formation between CB[7] and each AA was examined in solution (by isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR) as well as in the gas phase (by ion mobility mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation), and the results were further combined with computational investigations. Generally, the aromatic AAs show higher binding affinities than the basic AAs in buffer solutions with various pH values. On the contrary, the gas-phase stabilities of the basic AA complex ions are higher than those of the aromatic AA complex ions, suggesting that the direct ion-dipole interactions between the charged side chains of the basic AAs and the polar carbonyl groups of CB[7] predominate in the absence of water. The ion-dipole interactions are less significant in water, since the original interactions of the guests with water are lost upon complex formation. In contrast, the transfer of the hydrophobic groups from the bulk into the hydrophobic CB[7] cavity suffers less from the desolvation penalty, resulting in higher binding affinities in water. Therefore, initial guest solvation is another key factor which should be considered when designing high-affinity host-guest systems, in addition to the contribution from the release of high-energy water molecules from the CB[7] cavity (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 15318-15323).

  19. RNA/DNA hybrid binding affinity determines telomerase template-translocation efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaodong; Xie, Mingyi; Brown, Andrew F; Bley, Christopher J; Podlevsky, Joshua D; Chen, Julian J-L

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase synthesizes telomeric DNA repeats onto chromosome termini from an intrinsic RNA template. The processive synthesis of DNA repeats relies on a unique, yet poorly understood, mechanism whereby the telomerase RNA template translocates and realigns with the DNA primer after synthesizing each repeat. Here, we provide evidence that binding of the realigned RNA/DNA hybrid by the active site is an essential step for template translocation. Employing a template-free human telomerase system, we demonstrate that the telomerase active site directly binds to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates for DNA polymerization. In telomerase processivity mutants, the template-translocation efficiency correlates with the affinity for the RNA/DNA hybrid substrate. Furthermore, the active site is unoccupied during template translocation as a 5 bp extrinsic RNA/DNA hybrid effectively reduces the processivity of the template-containing telomerase. This suggests that strand separation and template realignment occur outside the active site, preceding the binding of realigned hybrid to the active site. Our results provide new insights into the ancient RNA/DNA hybrid binding ability of telomerase and its role in template translocation. PMID:21989387

  20. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Aleš; Bay, Tina; Wellendorph, Petrine; Kehler, Jan; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Frølund, Bente; Pedersen, Martin H.F.; Clausen, Rasmus P.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide. Screening of 1 against different CNS targets establishes a high selectivity and we demonstrate in vivo brain penetration. In vitro characterization of [3H]-1 binding shows high specificity to the high-affinity GHB binding sites. PMID:24053696

  1. Binding of TEM-1 beta-lactamase to beta-lactam antibiotics by frontal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiu; Li, Yuhua; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Jianting; Bian, Liujiao

    2017-04-15

    TEM-1 beta-lactamases can accurately catalyze the hydrolysis of the beta-lactam rings in beta-lactam antibiotics, which make beta-lactam antibiotics lose its activity, and the prerequisite for the hydrolysis procedure in the binding interaction of TEM-1 beta-lactamases with beta-lactam antibiotics is the beta-lactam rings in beta-lactam antibiotics. Therefore, the binding of TEM-1 beta-lactamase to three beta-lactam antibiotics including penicillin G, cefalexin as well as cefoxitin was explored here by frontal affinity chromatography in combination with fluorescence spectra, adsorption and thermodynamic data in the temperature range of 278-288K under simulated physiological conditions. The results showed that all the binding of TEM-1 beta-lactamase to the three antibiotics were spontaneously exothermic processes with the binding constants of 8.718×10 3 , 6.624×10 3 and 2.244×10 3 (mol/L), respectively at 288K. All the TEM-1 beta-lactamases were immobilized on the surface of the stationary phase in the mode of monolayer and there existed only one type of binding sites on them. Each TEM-1 beta-lactamase bound with only one beta-lactam antibiotic and hydrogen bond interaction and Van der Waals force were the main forces between them. This work provided an insight into the binding interactions between TEM-1 beta-lactamases and beta-lactam antibiotics, which may be beneficial for the designing and developing of new substrates resistant to TEM-1 beta-lactamases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A machine learning approach to predicting protein-ligand binding affinity with applications to molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Pedro J; Mitchell, John B O

    2010-05-01

    Accurately predicting the binding affinities of large sets of diverse protein-ligand complexes is an extremely challenging task. The scoring functions that attempt such computational prediction are essential for analysing the outputs of molecular docking, which in turn is an important technique for drug discovery, chemical biology and structural biology. Each scoring function assumes a predetermined theory-inspired functional form for the relationship between the variables that characterize the complex, which also include parameters fitted to experimental or simulation data and its predicted binding affinity. The inherent problem of this rigid approach is that it leads to poor predictivity for those complexes that do not conform to the modelling assumptions. Moreover, resampling strategies, such as cross-validation or bootstrapping, are still not systematically used to guard against the overfitting of calibration data in parameter estimation for scoring functions. We propose a novel scoring function (RF-Score) that circumvents the need for problematic modelling assumptions via non-parametric machine learning. In particular, Random Forest was used to implicitly capture binding effects that are hard to model explicitly. RF-Score is compared with the state of the art on the demanding PDBbind benchmark. Results show that RF-Score is a very competitive scoring function. Importantly, RF-Score's performance was shown to improve dramatically with training set size and hence the future availability of more high-quality structural and interaction data is expected to lead to improved versions of RF-Score. pedro.ballester@ebi.ac.uk; jbom@st-andrews.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Machine-learning scoring functions to improve structure-based binding affinity prediction and virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ain, Qurrat Ul; Aleksandrova, Antoniya; Roessler, Florian D; Ballester, Pedro J

    2015-01-01

    Docking tools to predict whether and how a small molecule binds to a target can be applied if a structural model of such target is available. The reliability of docking depends, however, on the accuracy of the adopted scoring function (SF). Despite intense research over the years, improving the accuracy of SFs for structure-based binding affinity prediction or virtual screening has proven to be a challenging task for any class of method. New SFs based on modern machine-learning regression models, which do not impose a predetermined functional form and thus are able to exploit effectively much larger amounts of experimental data, have recently been introduced. These machine-learning SFs have been shown to outperform a wide range of classical SFs at both binding affinity prediction and virtual screening. The emerging picture from these studies is that the classical approach of using linear regression with a small number of expert-selected structural features can be strongly improved by a machine-learning approach based on nonlinear regression allied with comprehensive data-driven feature selection. Furthermore, the performance of classical SFs does not grow with larger training datasets and hence this performance gap is expected to widen as more training data becomes available in the future. Other topics covered in this review include predicting the reliability of a SF on a particular target class, generating synthetic data to improve predictive performance and modeling guidelines for SF development. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:405-424. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1225 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  4. Convergence of Domain Architecture, Structure, and Ligand Affinity in Animal and Plant RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Raquel; Manny, Austin; Kolaczkowski, Oralia; Kolaczkowski, Bryan

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction of ancestral protein sequences using phylogenetic methods is a powerful technique for directly examining the evolution of molecular function. Although ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is itself very efficient, downstream functional, and structural studies necessary to characterize when and how changes in molecular function occurred are often costly and time-consuming, currently limiting ASR studies to examining a relatively small number of discrete functional shifts. As a result, we have very little direct information about how molecular function evolves across large protein families. Here we develop an approach combining ASR with structure and function prediction to efficiently examine the evolution of ligand affinity across a large family of double-stranded RNA binding proteins (DRBs) spanning animals and plants. We find that the characteristic domain architecture of DRBs-consisting of 2-3 tandem double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsrms)-arose independently in early animal and plant lineages. The affinity with which individual dsrms bind double-stranded RNA appears to have increased and decreased often across both animal and plant phylogenies, primarily through convergent structural mechanisms involving RNA-contact residues within the β1-β2 loop and a small region of α2. These studies provide some of the first direct information about how protein function evolves across large gene families and suggest that changes in molecular function may occur often and unassociated with major phylogenetic events, such as gene or domain duplications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Detecting and correcting the binding-affinity bias in ChIP-seq data using inter-species information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettling, Martin; Treutler, Hendrik; Cerquides, Jesus; Grosse, Ivo

    2016-05-10

    Transcriptional gene regulation is a fundamental process in nature, and the experimental and computational investigation of DNA binding motifs and their binding sites is a prerequisite for elucidating this process. ChIP-seq has become the major technology to uncover genomic regions containing those binding sites, but motifs predicted by traditional computational approaches using these data are distorted by a ubiquitous binding-affinity bias. Here, we present an approach for detecting and correcting this bias using inter-species information. We find that the binding-affinity bias caused by the ChIP-seq experiment in the reference species is stronger than the indirect binding-affinity bias in orthologous regions from phylogenetically related species. We use this difference to develop a phylogenetic footprinting model that is capable of detecting and correcting the binding-affinity bias. We find that this model improves motif prediction and that the corrected motifs are typically softer than those predicted by traditional approaches. These findings indicate that motifs published in databases and in the literature are artificially sharpened compared to the native motifs. These findings also indicate that our current understanding of transcriptional gene regulation might be blurred, but that it is possible to advance this understanding by taking into account inter-species information available today and even more in the future.

  6. Change in Allosteric Network Affects Binding Affinities of PDZ Domains: Analysis through Perturbation Response Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerek, Z. Nevin; Ozkan, S. Banu

    2011-01-01

    The allosteric mechanism plays a key role in cellular functions of several PDZ domain proteins (PDZs) and is directly linked to pharmaceutical applications; however, it is a challenge to elaborate the nature and extent of these allosteric interactions. One solution to this problem is to explore the dynamics of PDZs, which may provide insights about how intramolecular communication occurs within a single domain. Here, we develop an advancement of perturbation response scanning (PRS) that couples elastic network models with linear response theory (LRT) to predict key residues in allosteric transitions of the two most studied PDZs (PSD-95 PDZ3 domain and hPTP1E PDZ2 domain). With PRS, we first identify the residues that give the highest mean square fluctuation response upon perturbing the binding sites. Strikingly, we observe that the residues with the highest mean square fluctuation response agree with experimentally determined residues involved in allosteric transitions. Second, we construct the allosteric pathways by linking the residues giving the same directional response upon perturbation of the binding sites. The predicted intramolecular communication pathways reveal that PSD-95 and hPTP1E have different pathways through the dynamic coupling of different residue pairs. Moreover, our analysis provides a molecular understanding of experimentally observed hidden allostery of PSD-95. We show that removing the distal third alpha helix from the binding site alters the allosteric pathway and decreases the binding affinity. Overall, these results indicate that (i) dynamics plays a key role in allosteric regulations of PDZs, (ii) the local changes in the residue interactions can lead to significant changes in the dynamics of allosteric regulations, and (iii) this might be the mechanism that each PDZ uses to tailor their binding specificities regulation. PMID:21998559

  7. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 0 C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17β-[ 3 H]estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins

  8. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both /sup 3/(H)-dihydromorphine and /sup 3/(H)-ethylketocyclazocine (IC/sub 50/ = 14 ..mu..M and 320 ..mu..M, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation.

  9. Comparison of Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography Ni-NTA and Co-TALON for the Purification of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Rubiyana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purification of recombinant proteins is an important stage in biopharmaceutical research. A commonly used technique is immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC. One of the main advantages of this type of chromatography is that the column can easily be regenerated for subsequent purification work. The mechanism of IMAC is based on bonding between metal ions immobilized on a matrix with a specific amino acid. Because of the strong interactions of the electron donor group on the imidazole ring, histidine is often used in the IMAC purification system. Two types of commercial IMAC resin use a nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA matrix: a nickel-based (Ni-NTA and cobalt-based (Co-NTA, better known as TALON. This study was aim to investigate the effect of the metal ions Ni2+ and Co2+ to purify recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO expressed in yeast system Pichia pastoris. The results indicated that both Ni-NTA and Co-TALON gave almost the same level of protein purity; however, Ni-NTA has a higher binding affinity than Co-TALON might be due to the higher stability complex of Ni+. The average amount of protein bound by Ni-NTA and Co-TALON was 183.5 and 38.7 µg/mL, respectively.

  10. Structural analysis of dihydrofolate reductases enables rationalization of antifolate binding affinities and suggests repurposing possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosle, Amrisha; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2016-03-01

    Antifolates are competitive inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a conserved enzyme that is central to metabolism and widely targeted in pathogenic diseases, cancer and autoimmune disorders. Although most clinically used antifolates are known to be target specific, some display a fair degree of cross-reactivity with DHFRs from other species. A method that enables identification of determinants of affinity and specificity in target DHFRs from different species and provides guidelines for the design of antifolates is currently lacking. To address this, we first captured the potential druggable space of a DHFR in a substructure called the 'supersite' and classified supersites of DHFRs from 56 species into 16 'site-types' based on pairwise structural similarity. Analysis of supersites across these site-types revealed that DHFRs exhibit varying extents of dissimilarity at structurally equivalent positions in and around the binding site. We were able to explain the pattern of affinities towards chemically diverse antifolates exhibited by DHFRs of different site-types based on these structural differences. We then generated an antifolate-DHFR network by mapping known high-affinity antifolates to their respective supersites and used this to identify antifolates that can be repurposed based on similarity between supersites or antifolates. Thus, we identified 177 human-specific and 458 pathogen-specific antifolates, a large number of which are supported by available experimental data. Thus, in the light of the clinical importance of DHFR, we present a novel approach to identifying differences in the druggable space of DHFRs that can be utilized for rational design of antifolates. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M. (Centre de Biochimie, Nice (France))

    1989-07-05

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of {sup 125}I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity.

  12. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M.

    1989-01-01

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of 125 I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity

  13. High-throughput functional affinity purification of mannose binding proteins from Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andon, Nancy L; Eckert, Donna; Yates, John R; Haynes, Paul A

    2003-07-01

    We have used affinity chromatography in combination with mass spectrometry to isolate, identify, and assign a preliminary functional annotation to a large number of both known and novel proteins from rice. Rice (Oryza sativa) leaf, root, and seed tissue extracts were fractionated by column affinity chromatography using alpha-D-mannose as the ligand. Bound fractions were eluted and subjected to one-dimensional electrophoresis, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of separated proteins. This multiplexed technology resulted in the isolation and identification of 136 distinct mannose binding proteins from rice. A comparative analysis demonstrates very little overlap of identified proteins between the respective tissues, and confirms the correctly compartmentalized presence of a significant number of proteins from largely tissue-specific biochemical pathways. Over 30% of the identified proteins with a previously annotated function are directly involved in sugar metabolism, including several highly expressed known rice lectins. Direct comparison of the peptide sequences identified in this study to those peptides identified in the most comprehensive survey of the rice proteome to date indicates that our current data represents a significant enrichment of proteins unique to this dataset. Nearly 15% of the identified proteins, identified on the basis of exact peptide matching to sequences in the rice genomic database, represent proteins without a previously known functional annotation, indicating the potential of this combined chromatographic approach to assign a preliminary function to novel proteins in a high-throughput fashion.

  14. Synthesis and receptor binding affinity of new selective GluR5 ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, L; Johansen, T H; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Two hybrid analogues of the kainic acid receptor agonists, 2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ATPA) and (2S,4R)-4-methylglutamic acid ((2S,4R)-4-Me-Glu), were designed, synthesized, and characterized in radioligand binding assays using cloned ionotropic and metabotropic...... glutamic acid receptors. The (S)-enantiomers of E-4-(2,2-dimethylpropylidene)glutamic acid ((S)-1) and E-4-(3,3-dimethylbutylidene)glutamic acid ((S)-2) were shown to be selective and high affinity GluR5 ligands, with Ki values of 0.024 and 0.39 microM, respectively, compared to Ki values at GluR2 of 3...

  15. Epidermal transformation leads to increased perlecan synthesis with heparin-binding-growth-factor affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapanadechopone, P; Tumova, S; Jiang, X

    2001-01-01

    . Despite this, the heparan sulphate of RT101- and JB6-derived perlecan bound fibroblast growth factor-1, -2, -4 and -7 and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor with similar affinity. Therefore abundant tumour-derived perlecan may support the angiogenic responses seen in vivo and be a key player......Perlecan, a proteoglycan of basement membrane and extracellular matrices, has important roles in both normal biological and pathological processes. As a result of its ability to store and protect growth factors, perlecan may have crucial roles in tumour-cell growth and invasion. Since...... the biological functions of different types of glycosaminoglycan vary with cellular origin and structural modifications, we analysed the expression and biological functions of perlecan produced by a normal epidermal cell line (JB6) and its transformed counterpart (RT101). Expression of perlecan in tumorigenic...

  16. Comparison of different transition metal ions for immobilized metal affinity chromatography of selenoprotein P from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidenius, U; Farver, O; Jøns, O

    1999-01-01

    Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Co2+ and Cd2+ were evaluated in metal ion affinity chromatography for enrichment of selenoprotein P, and immobilized Co2+ affinity chromatography was found to be the most selective chromatographic method. The chromatography was performed by fast protein liquid chromatography...... and the fractionation was followed by analysis of the collected fractions for selenium by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. By the combination of immobilized Co2+ affinity chromatography and heparin affinity chromatography a simple method was developed yielding a 14,800-fold enrichment of selenoprotein P....... The purity of the protein was determined by SDS-PAGE and by sequencing from polyvinylidene difluoride blots of SDS-PAGE gels....

  17. Comprehensive and Reproducible Phosphopeptide Enrichment Using Iron Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography (Fe-IMAC) Columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruprecht, Benjamin; Koch, Heiner; Medard, Guillaume; Mundt, Max; Kuster, Bernhard; Lemeer, Simone

    Advances in phosphopeptide enrichment methods enable the identification of thousands of phosphopeptides from complex samples. Current offline enrichment approaches using TiO2, Ti, and Fe immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) material in batch or microtip format are widely used, but

  18. Alkali Metal Cation Affinities of Anionic Main Group-Element Hydrides Across the Periodic Table

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of gas-phase alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) of archetypal anionic bases across the periodic system using relativistic density functional theory at ZORA-BP86/QZ4P//ZORA-BP86/TZ2P. AMCA values of all bases were computed for the lithium, sodium,

  19. Profiling of drug binding proteins by monolithic affinity chromatography in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuepei; Wang, Tongdan; Zhang, Hanzhi; Han, Bing; Wang, Lishun; Kang, Jingwu

    2014-09-12

    A new approach for proteome-wide profiling drug binding proteins by using monolithic capillary affinity chromatography in combination with HPLC-MS/MS is reported. Two immunosuppresive drugs, namely FK506 and cyclosporin A, were utilized as the experimental models for proof-of-concept. The monolithic capillary affinity columns were prepared through a single-step copolymerization of the drug derivatives with glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate. The capillary chromatography with the affinity monolithic column facilitates the purification of the drug binding proteins from the cell lysate. By combining the capillary affinity column purification and the shot-gun proteomic analysis, totally 33 FK506- and 32 CsA-binding proteins including all the literature reported target proteins of these two drugs were identified. Among them, two proteins, namely voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 and serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5 were verified by using the recombinant proteins. The result supports that the monolithic capillary affinity chromatography is likely to become a valuable tool for profiling of binding proteins of small molecular drugs as well as bioactive compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Computation of the binding affinities of catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors: multisubstate relative free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, P Nuno; Bonifácio, Maria João; Loureiro, Ana Isabel; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2012-04-05

    Alchemical free energy simulations are amongst the most accurate techniques for the computation of the free energy changes associated with noncovalent protein-ligand interactions. A procedure is presented to estimate the relative binding free energies of several ligands to the same protein target where multiple, low-energy configurational substates might coexist, as opposed to one unique structure. The contributions of all individual substates were estimated, explicitly, with the free energy perturbation method, and combined in a rigorous fashion to compute the overall relative binding free energies and dissociation constants. It is shown that, unless the most stable bound forms are known a priori, inaccurate results may be obtained if the contributions of multiple substates are ignored. The method was applied to study the complex formed between human catechol-O-methyltransferase and BIA 9-1067, a newly developed tight-binding inhibitor that is currently under clinical evaluation for the therapy of Parkinson's disease. Our results reveal an exceptionally high-binding affinity (K(d) in subpicomolar range) and provide insightful clues on the interactions and mechanism of inhibition. The inhibitor is, itself, a slowly reacting substrate of the target enzyme and is released from the complex in the form of O-methylated product. By comparing the experimental catalytic rate (k(cat)) and the estimated dissociation rate (k(off)) constants of the enzyme-inhibitor complex, one can conclude that the observed inhibition potency (K(i)) is primarily dependent on the catalytic rate constant of the inhibitor's O-methylation, rather than the rate constant of dissociation of the complex. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Structure-based engineering to restore high affinity binding of an isoform-selective anti-TGFβ1 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Dana M; Bird, Julie J; Honey, Denise M; Best, Annie; Park, Anna; Wei, Ronnie R; Qiu, Huawei

    2018-01-15

    Metelimumab (CAT192) is a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody developed as a TGFβ1-specific antagonist. It was tested in clinical trials for the treatment of scleroderma but later terminated due to lack of efficacy. Subsequent characterization of CAT192 indicated that its TGFβ1 binding affinity was reduced by ∼50-fold upon conversion from the parental single-chain variable fragment (scFv) to IgG4. We hypothesized this result was due to decreased conformational flexibility of the IgG that could be altered via engineering. Therefore, we designed insertion mutants in the elbow region and screened for binding and potency. Our results indicated that increasing the elbow region linker length in each chain successfully restored the isoform-specific and high affinity binding of CAT192 to TGFβ1. The crystal structure of the high binding affinity mutant displays large conformational rearrangements of the variable domains compared to the wild-type antigen-binding fragment (Fab) and the low binding affinity mutants. Insertion of two glycines in both the heavy and light chain elbow regions provided sufficient flexibility for the variable domains to extend further apart than the wild-type Fab, and allow the CDR3s to make additional interactions not seen in the wild-type Fab structure. These interactions coupled with the dramatic conformational changes provide a possible explanation of how the scFv and elbow-engineered Fabs bind TGFβ1 with high affinity. This study demonstrates the benefits of re-examining both structure and function when converting scFv to IgG molecules, and highlights the potential of structure-based engineering to produce fully functional antibodies.

  2. Partitioning of metals in different binding phases of tropical estuarine sediments: importance of metal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Vudamala, Krushna; Sarkar, Arindam; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-02-01

    Distribution of metals in different binding phases of estuarine sediments provides chemically significant description of metal-sediment interactions. This study describes the influences of ligand field stabilization energy (LFSE), Jahn-Teller effect, and water exchange rate (k-w) on metal distribution in different binding phases of estuarine sediments. It was found that Cu had highest affinity for organic binding phases in the studied sediments followed by Ni and Pb. However, Pb showed strong association with Fe/Mn oxide phases followed by Ni and Cu. Faster k-w of Cu (II) (1 × 10(9) s(-1)) increased the rate of complex formation of Cu(2+) ion with ligand in the organic phases. The Cu-ligand (from organic phase) complexes gained extra stability by the Jahn-Teller effect. The combined effects of these two phenomena and high ionic potential increased the association of Cu with the organic phases of the sediments than Ni and Pb. The smaller ionic radii of Ni(2+) (0.72 Å) than Pb(2+) (1.20 Å) increase the stability of Ni-ligand complexes in the organic phase of the sediments. High LFSE of Ni(II) (compared with Pb(2+) ions) also make Ni-organic complexes increasingly stable than Pb. High k-w (7 × 10(9) s(-1)) of Pb did not help it to associate with organic phases in the sediments. The high concentration of Pb in the Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phase was probably due to co-precipitation of Pb(2+) and Fe(3+). High surface area or site availability for Pb(2+) ion on Fe oxyhydroxide phase was probably responsible for the high concentration of Pb in Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase. Increasing concentrations of Cu in organic phases with the increasing Cu loading suggest that enough binding sites were available for Cu in the organic binding phases of the sediments. This study also describes the influence of nature of sedimentary organic carbon (terrestrial and marine derived OC) in controlling these metal distribution and speciation in marine sediment.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus keratinocyte invasion is dependent upon multiple high-affinity fibronectin-binding repeats within FnBPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Edwards

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal organism and a frequent cause of skin and soft tissue infections, which can progress to serious invasive disease. This bacterium uses its fibronectin binding proteins (FnBPs to invade host cells and it has been hypothesised that this provides a protected niche from host antimicrobial defences, allows access to deeper tissues and provides a reservoir for persistent or recurring infections. FnBPs contain multiple tandem fibronectin-binding repeats (FnBRs which bind fibronectin with varying affinity but it is unclear what selects for this configuration. Since both colonisation and skin infection are dependent upon the interaction of S. aureus with keratinocytes we hypothesised that this might select for FnBP function and thus composition of the FnBR region. Initial experiments revealed that S. aureus attachment to keratinocytes is rapid but does not require FnBRs. By contrast, invasion of keratinocytes was dependent upon the FnBR region and occurred via similar cellular processes to those described for endothelial cells. Despite this, keratinocyte invasion was relatively inefficient and appeared to include a lag phase, most likely due to very weak expression of α(5β(1 integrins. Molecular dissection of the role of the FnBR region revealed that efficient invasion of keratinocytes was dependent on the presence of at least three high-affinity (but not low-affinity FnBRs. Over-expression of a single high-affinity or three low-affinity repeats promoted invasion but not to the same levels as S. aureus expressing an FnBPA variant containing three high-affinity repeats. In summary, invasion of keratinocytes by S. aureus requires multiple high-affinity FnBRs within FnBPA, and given the importance of the interaction between these cell types and S. aureus for both colonisation and infection, may have provided the selective pressure for the multiple binding repeats within FnBPA.

  4. The chromosomal high-affinity binding sites for the Drosophila dosage compensation complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Straub

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dosage compensation in male Drosophila relies on the X chromosome-specific recruitment of a chromatin-modifying machinery, the dosage compensation complex (DCC. The principles that assure selective targeting of the DCC are unknown. According to a prevalent model, X chromosome targeting is initiated by recruitment of the DCC core components, MSL1 and MSL2, to a limited number of so-called "high-affinity sites" (HAS. Only very few such sites are known at the DNA sequence level, which has precluded the definition of DCC targeting principles. Combining RNA interference against DCC subunits, limited crosslinking, and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to probing high-resolution DNA microarrays, we identified a set of 131 HAS for MSL1 and MSL2 and confirmed their properties by various means. The HAS sites are distributed all over the X chromosome and are functionally important, since the extent of dosage compensation of a given gene and its proximity to a HAS are positively correlated. The sites are mainly located on non-coding parts of genes and predominantly map to regions that are devoid of nucleosomes. In contrast, the bulk of DCC binding is in coding regions and is marked by histone H3K36 methylation. Within the HAS, repetitive DNA sequences mainly based on GA and CA dinucleotides are enriched. Interestingly, DCC subcomplexes bind a small number of autosomal locations with similar features.

  5. Affinity extraction of emerging contaminants from water based on bovine serum albumin as a binding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastavros, Efthimia; Remmers, Rachael A; Snow, Daniel D; Cassada, David A; Hage, David S

    2018-03-01

    Affinity sorbents using bovine serum albumin as a binding agent were developed and tested for the extraction of environmental contaminants from water. Computer simulations based on a countercurrent distribution model were also used to study the behavior of these sorbents. Several model drugs, pesticides, and hormones of interest as emerging contaminants were considered in this work, with carbamazepine being used as a representative analyte when coupling the albumin column on-line with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The albumin column was found to be capable of extracting carbamazepine from aqueous solutions that contained trace levels of this analyte. Further studies of the bovine serum albumin sorbent indicated that it had higher retention under aqueous conditions than a traditional C 18 support for most of the tested emerging contaminants. Potential advantages of using these protein-based sorbents included the low cost of bovine serum albumin and its ability to bind to a relatively wide range of drugs and related compounds. It was also shown how simulations could be used to describe the elution behavior of the model compounds on the bovine serum albumin sorbents as an aid in optimizing the retention and selectivity of these supports for use with liquid chromatography or methods such as liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Comparison of Performance of Docking, LIE, Metadynamics and QSAR in Predicting Binding Affinity of Benzenesulfonamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raškevičius, Vytautas; Kairys, Visvaldas

    2015-01-01

    The design of inhibitors specific for one relevant carbonic anhydrase isozyme is the major challenge in the new therapeutic agents development. Comparative computational chemical structure and biological activity relationship studies on a series of carbonic anhydrase II inhibitors, benzenesulfonamide derivatives, bearing pyrimidine moieties are reported in this paper using docking, Linear Interaction Energy (LIE), Metadynamics and Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) methods. The computed binding affinities were compared with the experimental data with the goal to explore strengths and weaknesses of various approaches applied to the investigated carbonic anhydrase/inhibitor system. From the tested methods initially only QSAR showed promising results (R2=0.83-0.89 between experimentally determined versus predicted pKd values.). Possible reasons for this performance were discussed. A modification of the LIE method was suggested which used an alternative LIE-like equation yielding significantly improved results (R2 between the experimentally determined versus the predicted ΔG(bind) improved from 0.24 to 0.50).

  7. Metals and Neuronal Metal Binding Proteins Implicated in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related dementia affecting millions of people worldwide. Its main pathological hallmark feature is the formation of insoluble protein deposits of amyloid-β and hyperphosphorylated tau protein into extracellular plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, respectively. Many of the mechanistic details of this process remain unknown, but a well-established consequence of protein aggregation is synapse dysfunction and neuronal loss in the AD brain. Different pathways including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, inflammation, and metal metabolism have been suggested to be implicated in this process. In particular, a body of evidence suggests that neuronal metal ions such as copper, zinc, and iron play important roles in brain function in health and disease states and altered homeostasis and distribution as a common feature across different neurodegenerative diseases and aging. In this focused review, we overview neuronal proteins that are involved in AD and whose metal binding properties may underlie important biochemical and regulatory processes occurring in the brain during the AD pathophysiological process. PMID:26881049

  8. Binding affinities of Schiff base Fe(II) complex with BSA and calf-thymus DNA: Spectroscopic investigations and molecular docking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Suparna; Dasmandal, Somnath; Patra, Chiranjit; Kundu, Arjama; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2016-09-05

    The binding interaction of a synthesized Schiff base Fe(II) complex with biological macromolecules viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and calf thymus(ct)-DNA have been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques coupled with viscosity measurements at physiological pH and 298K. Regular amendments in emission intensities of BSA upon the action of the complex indicate significant interaction between them, and the binding interaction have been characterized by Stern Volmer plots and thermodynamic binding parameters. On the basis of this quenching technique one binding site with binding constant (Kb=(7.6±0.21)×10(5)) between complex and protein have been obtained at 298K. Time-resolved fluorescence studies have also been encountered to understand the mechanism of quenching induced by the complex. Binding affinities of the complex to the fluorophores of BSA namely tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) have been judged by synchronous fluorescence studies. Secondary structural changes of BSA rooted by the complex has been revealed by CD spectra. On the other hand, hypochromicity of absorption spectra of the complex with the addition of ct-DNA and the gradual reduction in emission intensities of ethidium bromide bound ct-DNA in presence of the complex indicate noticeable interaction between ct-DNA and the complex with the binding constant (4.2±0.11)×10(6)M(-1). Life-time measurements have been studied to determine the relative amplitude of binding of the complex to ct-DNA base pairs. Mode of binding interaction of the complex with ct-DNA has been deciphered by viscosity measurements. CD spectra have also been used to understand the changes in ct-DNA structure upon binding with the metal complex. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular docking analysis have been employed in highlighting the interactive phenomenon and binding location of the complex with the macromolecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Immobilized metal affinity cryogel-based high-throughput platform for screening bioprocess and chromatographic parameters of His6-GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Joyita; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-04-01

    Among various tools of product monitoring, chromatography is of vital importance as it also extends to the purification of product. Immobilized metal affinity cryogel (Cu(II)-iminodiacetic acid- and Ni(II)-nitrilotriacetic acid-polyacrylamide) minicolumns (diameter 8 mm, height 4 mm, void volume 250 μl) were inserted in open-ended 96-well plate and different chromatographic parameters and bioprocess conditions were analysed. The platform was first validated with lysozyme. Optimum binding of lysozyme (∼90%) was achieved when 50 μg of protein in 20 mM Tris, pH 8.0 was applied to the minicolumns with maximum recovery (∼90%) upon elution with 300 mM imidazole. Thereafter, the platform was screened for chromatographic conditions of His 6 -GTPase. Since cryogels have large pore size, they can easily process non-clarified samples containing debris and particulate matters. The bound enzymes on the gel retain its activity and therefore can be assayed on-column by adding substrate and then displacing the product. Highest binding of His 6 -GTPase was achieved when 50 μl of non-clarified cell lysate was applied to the cryogel and subsequently washed with 50 mM Tris, 150 mM NaCl, 5 mM MgCl 2 , 10 mM imidazole, pH 8.0 with dynamic and static binding capacities of ∼1.5 and 3 activity units. Maximum recovery was obtained upon elution with 300 mM imidazole with a purification fold of ∼10; the purity was also analysed by SDS-PAGE. The platform showed reproducible results which were validated by Bland-Altman plot. The minicolumn was also scaled up for chromatographic capture and recovery of His 6 -GTPase. The bioprocess conditions were monitored which displayed that optimum production of His 6 -GTPase was attained by induction with 200 μM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside at 25 °C for 12 h. It was concluded that immobilized metal affinity cryogel-based platform can be successfully used as a high-throughput platform for screening of bioprocess and

  10. Benzodiazepines have high-affinity binding sites and induce melanogenesis in B16/C3 melanoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew, E; Laskin, J D; Zimmerman, E A; Weinstein, I B; Hsu, K C; Engelhardt, D L

    1981-01-01

    We found that two markers of differentiation, tyrosinase (monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.18.1) activity and melanin synthesis, are induced by diazepam in B16/C3 mouse melanoma cells. We also demonstrated high-affinity binding sites for [3H]diazepam in these cells by radioreceptor assay, and we visualized binding to the cell surface by fluorescence microscopy with a benzodiazepine analog conjugated to a fluorescein-labeled protein. Our studies also showed tha...

  11. Peptides in headlock ? a novel high-affinity and versatile peptide-binding nanobody for proteomics and microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Michael B.; Traenkle, Bjoern; Koch, Philipp A.; Emele, Felix; Weiss, Frederik; Poetz, Oliver; Stehle, Thilo; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Nanobodies are highly valuable tools for numerous bioanalytical and biotechnical applications. Here, we report the characterization of a nanobody that binds a short peptide epitope with extraordinary affinity. Structural analysis reveals an unusual binding mode where the extended peptide becomes part of a ?-sheet structure in the nanobody. This interaction relies on sequence-independent backbone interactions augmented by a small number of specificity-determining side chain contacts. Once boun...

  12. A Transition Metal-Binding, Trimeric βγ-Crystallin from Methane-Producing Thermophilic Archaea, Methanosaeta thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shanti Swaroop; Jamkhindikar, Aditya Anand; Raman, Rajeev; Jobby, Maroor K; Chadalawada, Swathi; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Sharma, Yogendra

    2017-03-07

    βγ-Crystallins are important constituents of the vertebrate eye lens, whereas in microbes, they are prevalent as Ca 2+ -binding proteins. In archaea, βγ-crystallins are conspicuously confined to two methanogens, viz., Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina. One of these, i.e., M-crystallin from Methanosarcina acetivorans, has been shown to be a typical Ca 2+ -binding βγ-crystallin. Here, with the aid of a high-resolution crystal structure and isothermal titration calorimetry, we report that "Methallin", a βγ-crystallin from Methanosaeta thermophila, is a trimeric, transition metal-binding protein. It binds Fe, Ni, Co, or Zn ion with nanomolar affinity, which is consistent even at 55 °C, the optimal temperature for the methanogen's growth. At the center of the protein trimer, the metal ion is coordinated by six histidines, two from each protomer, leading to an octahedral geometry. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis confirms that the trimer seen in the crystal lattice is a biological assembly; this assembly dissociates to monomers upon removal of the metal ion. The introduction of two histidines (S17H/S19H) into a homologous βγ-crystallin, Clostrillin, allows it to bind nickel at the introduced site, though with micromolar affinity. However, because of the lack of a compatible interface, nickel binding could not induce trimerization, affirming that Methallin is a naturally occurring trimer for high-affinity transition metal binding. While βγ-crystallins are known to bind Ca 2+ and form homodimers and oligomers, the transition metal-binding, trimeric Methallin is a new paradigm for βγ-crystallins. The distinct features of Methallin, such as nickel or iron binding, are also possible imprints of biogeochemical changes during the period of its origin.

  13. Identification of uranyl binding proteins from human kidney-2 cell extracts by immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedieu, A.; Berenguer, F.; Basset, Ch.; Prat, O.; Quemeneur, E.; Pible, O.; Vidaud, C. [CEA/IBEB/SBTN, F-30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2009-07-01

    To improve our knowledge on protein targets of uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}), we set up a proteomic strategy based on immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). The successful enrichment of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-interacting proteins from human kidney-2 (HK-2) soluble cell extracts was obtained using an ion-exchange chromatography followed by a dedicated IMAC process previously described and designed for the uranyl ion. By mass spectrometry analysis we identified 64 proteins displaying varied functions. The use of a computational screening algorithm along with the particular ligand-based properties of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ion allowed the analysis and categorization of the protein collection. This profitable approach demonstrated that most of these proteins fulfill criteria which could rationalize their binding to the UO{sub 2} {sup 2+}-loaded phase. The obtained results enable us to focus on some targets for more in-depth studies and open new insights on its toxicity mechanisms at molecular level. (authors)

  14. Substitution at the C-3 Position of Catechins Has an Influence on the Binding Affinities against Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ikeda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available It is known that catechins interact with the tryptophan (Trp residue at the drug-binding site of serum albumin. In this study, we used catechin derivatives to investigate which position of the catechin structure strongly influences the binding affinity against bovine serum albumin (BSA and human serum albumin (HSA. A docking simulation showed that (−-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg interacted with both Trp residues of BSA (one at drug-binding site I and the other on the molecular surface, mainly by π–π stacking. Fluorescence analysis showed that EGCg and substituted EGCg caused a red shift of the peak wavelength of Trp similarly to warfarin (a drug-binding site I-specific compound, while 3-O-acyl-catechins caused a blue shift. To evaluate the binding affinities, the quenching constants were determined by the Stern–Volmer equation. A gallate ester at the C-3 position increased the quenching constants of the catechins. Against BSA, acyl substitution increased the quenching constant proportionally to the carbon chain lengths of the acyl group, whereas methyl substitution decreased the quenching constant. Against HSA, neither acyl nor methyl substitution affected the quenching constant. In conclusion, substitution at the C-3 position of catechins has an important influence on the binding affinity against serum albumin.

  15. A computational method for designing diverse linear epitopes including citrullinated peptides with desired binding affinities to intravenous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Rob; Norel, Raquel; Prill, Robert J; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Lorenz, Peter; Steinbeck, Felix; Ziems, Bjoern; Luštrek, Mitja; Barbarini, Nicola; Tiengo, Alessandra; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-04-08

    Understanding the interactions between antibodies and the linear epitopes that they recognize is an important task in the study of immunological diseases. We present a novel computational method for the design of linear epitopes of specified binding affinity to Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIg). We show that the method, called Pythia-design can accurately design peptides with both high-binding affinity and low binding affinity to IVIg. To show this, we experimentally constructed and tested the computationally constructed designs. We further show experimentally that these designed peptides are more accurate that those produced by a recent method for the same task. Pythia-design is based on combining random walks with an ensemble of probabilistic support vector machines (SVM) classifiers, and we show that it produces a diverse set of designed peptides, an important property to develop robust sets of candidates for construction. We show that by combining Pythia-design and the method of (PloS ONE 6(8):23616, 2011), we are able to produce an even more accurate collection of designed peptides. Analysis of the experimental validation of Pythia-design peptides indicates that binding of IVIg is favored by epitopes that contain trypthophan and cysteine. Our method, Pythia-design, is able to generate a diverse set of binding and non-binding peptides, and its designs have been experimentally shown to be accurate.

  16. High Affinity Binding of Chp1 Chromodomain to K9 Methylated Histone H3 is Required to Establish Centromeric Hterochromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalch, T.; Job, G; Noffsinger, V; Shanker, S; Kuscu, C; Joshua-Tor, L; Partridge, J

    2009-01-01

    In fission yeast, assembly of centromeric heterochromatin requires the RITS complex, which consists of Ago1, Tas3, Chp1, and siRNAs derived from centromeric repeats. Recruitment of RITS to centromeres has been proposed to depend on siRNA-dependent targeting of Ago1 to centromeric sequences. Previously, we demonstrated that methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me) acts upstream of siRNAs during heterochromatin establishment. Our crystal structure of Chp1's chromodomain in complex with a trimethylated lysine 9 H3 peptide reveals extensive sites of contact that contribute to Chp1's high-affinity binding. We found that this high-affinity binding is critical for the efficient establishment of centromeric heterochromatin, but preassembled heterochromatin can be maintained when Chp1's affinity for H3K9me is greatly reduced.

  17. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-Affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Ales; Bay, Tina

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide. Screen...

  18. Novel cyclic gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) analogs with high affinity and stereoselectivity of binding to GHB sites in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Høg, Signe; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2005-01-01

    , the molecular cloning of which remains a challenge. Ligands with high affinity and specificity for the reported GHB binding site are needed for pharmacological dissection of the GHB and GABA(B) effects and for mapping the structural requirements of the GHB receptor-ligand interactions. For this purpose, we have...

  19. Metal ion binding with dehydroannulenes – Plausible two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. Theoretical investigations have been carried out at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory to study the binding interaction of various metal ions, Li+, Na+ and K+ with dehydroannulene systems. The present study reveals that alkali metal ions bind strongly to dehydroannulenes and the passage through the central.

  20. Identification of the magnesium-binding domain of the high affinity ATP binding-site of the Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli seca protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wolk, J.P.W.; Klose, M; de Wit, Janny; Blaauwen, T.den; Freudl, R; Driessen, A.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The homodimeric SecA protein is the peripheral subunit of the translocase, and couples the hydrolysis of ATP to the translocation of precursor proteins across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. The high affinity ATP binding activity of SecA resides in the amino-terminal domain of SecA. This domain

  1. Dansyl labeling to modulate the relative affinity of bile acids for the binding sites of human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohacova, Jana; Sastre, German; Marin, M Luisa; Miranda, Miguel A

    2011-09-08

    Binding of natural bile acids to human serum albumin (HSA) is an important step in enterohepatic circulation and provides a measure of liver function. In this article, we report on the use of four dansyl (Dns) derivatives of cholic acid (ChA) to demonstrate a regiodifferentiation in their relative affinity for the two binding sites of HSA. Using both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, formation of Dns-ChA@HSA complexes was confirmed; the corresponding binding constants were determined, and their distribution between bulk solution and HSA microenvironment was estimated. By means of energy transfer from Trp to the Dns moiety, donor-acceptor distances were estimated (21-25 Å) and found to be compatible with both site 1 and site 2 occupancies. Nevertheless, titration using warfarin and ibuprofen as specific displacement probes clearly indicated that 3α- and 3β-Dns-ChA bind to HSA at site 2, whereas their C-7 regioisomers bind to HSA at site 1. Furthermore, the C-3-labeled compounds are displaced by lithocholic acid, whereas they are insensitive to ChA, confirming the assumption that the former binds to HSA at site 2. Thus, Dns labeling provides a useful tool to modulate the relative affinity of ChA to the major binding sites of HSA and, in combination with other fluorescent ChA analogs, to mimic the binding behavior of natural bile acids.

  2. Characteristics of the brown hagfish Paramyxine atami transthyretin: Metal ion-dependent thyroid hormone binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Kasai, Kentaro; Nishiyama, Norihito; Ishihara, Akinori; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a vertebrate-specific protein involved in thyroid hormone distribution in plasma, and its gene is thought to have emerged by gene duplication from the gene for the ancient TTR-related protein, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, at some early stage of chordate evolution. We investigated the molecular and hormone-binding properties of the brown hagfish Paramyxine atami TTR. The amino acid sequence deduced from the cloned hagfish TTR cDNA shared 33-50% identities with those of other vertebrate TTRs but less than 24% identities with those of vertebrate and deuterostome invertebrate 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolases. Hagfish TTR, as well as lamprey and little skate TTRs, had an N-terminal histidine-rich segment, allowing purification by metal-affinity chromatography. The affinity of hagfish TTR for 3,3',5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) was 190 times higher than that for L-thyroxine, with a dissociation constant of 1.5-3.9nM at 4°C. The high-affinity binding sites were strongly sensitive to metal ions. Zn 2+ and Cu 2+ decreased the dissociation constant to one-order of magnitude, whereas a chelator, o-phenanthroline, increased it four times. The number of metal ions (mainly Zn 2+ and Cu 2+ ) was approximately 12/TTR (mol/mol). TTR was also a major T3-binding protein in adult hagfish sera and its serum concentration was approximately 8μM. These results suggest that metal ions and the acquisition of N-terminal histidine-rich segment may cooperatively contribute to the evolution toward an ancient TTR with high T3 binding activity from either 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase after gene duplication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl-X and [HCl-X](+) complexes for X(+)= H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+), using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl(-) and HCl for the various cations. The Cl-X bond becomes longer and weaker along X(+) = H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+). Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities.

  4. Earthworm Lumbricus rubellus MT-2: Metal Binding and Protein Folding of a True Cadmium-MT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R. Kowald

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthworms express, as most animals, metallothioneins (MTs—small, cysteine-rich proteins that bind d10 metal ions (Zn(II, Cd(II, or Cu(I in clusters. Three MT homologues are known for Lumbricus rubellus, the common red earthworm, one of which, wMT-2, is strongly induced by exposure of worms to cadmium. This study concerns composition, metal binding affinity and metal-dependent protein folding of wMT-2 expressed recombinantly and purified in the presence of Cd(II and Zn(II. Crucially, whilst a single Cd7wMT-2 species was isolated from wMT-2-expressing E. coli cultures supplemented with Cd(II, expressions in the presence of Zn(II yielded mixtures. The average affinities of wMT-2 determined for either Cd(II or Zn(II are both within normal ranges for MTs; hence, differential behaviour cannot be explained on the basis of overall affinity. Therefore, the protein folding properties of Cd- and Zn-wMT-2 were compared by 1H NMR spectroscopy. This comparison revealed that the protein fold is better defined in the presence of cadmium than in the presence of zinc. These differences in folding and dynamics may be at the root of the differential behaviour of the cadmium- and zinc-bound protein in vitro, and may ultimately also help in distinguishing zinc and cadmium in the earthworm in vivo.

  5. Studies with an immobilized metal affinity chromatography cassette system involving binuclear triazacyclononane-derived ligands: automation of batch adsorption measurements with tagged recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Martin; Coghlan, Campbell J; Hearn, Milton T W

    2014-07-18

    This study describes the determination of the adsorption isotherms and binding kinetics of tagged recombinant proteins using a recently developed IMAC cassette system and employing automated robotic liquid handling procedures for IMAC resin screening. These results confirm that these new IMAC resins, generated from a variety of different metal-charged binuclear 1,4,7-triaza-cyclononane (tacn) ligands, interact with recombinant proteins containing a novel N-terminal metal binding tag, NT1A, with static binding capacities similar to those obtained with conventional hexa-His tagged proteins, but with significantly increased association constants. In addition, higher kinetic binding rates were observed with these new IMAC systems, an attribute that can be positively exploited to increase process productivity. The results from this investigation demonstrate that enhancements in binding capacities and affinities were achieved with these new IMAC resins and chosen NT1A tagged protein. Further, differences in the binding performances of the bis(tacn) xylenyl-bridged ligands were consistent with the distance between the metal binding centres of the two tacn moieties, the flexibility of the ligand and the potential contribution from the aromatic ring of the xylenyl group to undergo π/π stacking interactions with the tagged proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cartilage Acidic Protein 2 a hyperthermostable, high affinity calcium-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Liliana; Gomes, Ana S; Melo, Eduardo P; Canário, Adelino V; Power, Deborah M

    2013-03-01

    Cartilage Acidic Protein 2 (CRTAC2) is a novel protein present from prokaryotes to vertebrates with abundant expression in the teleost fish pituitary gland and an isoform of CRTAC1, a chondrocyte marker in humans. The two proteins are non-integrins containing N-terminal integrin-like Ca(2+)-binding motifs and their structure and function remain to be assigned. Structural studies of recombinant sea bream (sb)CRTAC2 revealed it is composed of 8.8% α-helix, 33.4% β-sheet and 57.8% unordered protein. sbCRTAC2 bound Ca(2+) with high affinity (K(d)=1.46nM) and favourable Gibbs free energy (∆G=-12.4kcal/mol). The stoichiometry for Ca(2+) bound to sbCRTAC2 at saturation indicated six Ca(2+) ligand-binding sites exist per protein molecule. No conformational change in sbCRTAC2 occurred in the presence of Ca(2+). Fluorescence emission revealed that the tertiary structure of the protein is hyperthermostable between 25°C and 95°C and the fully unfolded state is only induced by chemical denaturing (4M GndCl). sbCRTAC has a widespread tissue distribution and is present as high molecular weight aggregates, although strong reducing conditions promote formation of the monomer. sbCRTAC2 promotes epithelial cell outgrowth in vitro suggesting it may share functional homology with mammalian CRTAC1, recently implicated in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis, estrogen receptor binding affinity and molecular docking of pyrimidine-piperazine-chromene and -quinoline conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Iram; Ahmed, Naseem; Idrees, Danish; Khan, Parvez; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2017-09-15

    Substituted 2-amino-7-((6-(4-(2-hydroxyethyl) piperazin-1-yl)-2-methylpyrimidin-4-yl)oxy)-4-phenyl-4H-chromene-3-carbonitriles and 2-amino-7-((6-(4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl)-2-methylpyrimidin-4-yl)oxy)-4-phenyl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitriles were synthesized via an efficient multi-component one pot synthesis under mild conditions. These compounds 1-20 were evaluated against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) for cytotoxic activities. Among them, compounds 6, 7, 15, 17 and 19 showed better anti-proliferative activities as (IC 50 value 48±1.70, 65±1.13, 92±1.18, 30±1.17 and 16±1.10µM) than curcumin drug (48±1.11µM). Molecular docking was also performed with active compounds 6, 7 and 15 against Bcl-2 protein which gave good binding affinity (ΔG=-9.08, -8.29 and -7.70kcal/mol) respectively. Furthermore, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis revealed that the chromene and quinoline moieties, when attached with pyrimide and piperazine moieties, enhanced anti-proliferative activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The tau positron-emission tomography tracer AV-1451 binds with similar affinities to tau fibrils and monoamine oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeiren, Céline; Motte, Philippe; Viot, Delphine; Mairet-Coello, Georges; Courade, Jean-Philippe; Citron, Martin; Mercier, Joël; Hannestad, Jonas; Gillard, Michel

    2018-02-01

    Lilly/Avid's AV-1451 is one of the most advanced tau PET tracers in the clinic. Although results obtained in Alzheimer's disease patients are compelling, discrimination of tracer uptake in healthy individuals and patients with supranuclear palsy (PSP) is less clear as there is substantial overlap of signal in multiple brain regions. Moreover, accurate quantification of [ 18 F]AV-1451 uptake in Alzheimer's disease may not be possible. The aim of the present study was to characterize the in vitro binding of AV-1451 to understand and identify potential off-target binding that could explain the poor discrimination observed in PSP patients. [ 3 H]AV-1451 and AV-1451 were characterized in in vitro binding assays using recombinant and native proteins/tissues from postmortem samples of controls and Alzheimer's disease and PSP patients. [ 3 H]AV-1451 binds to multiple sites with nanomolar affinities in brain homogenates and to tau fibrils isolated from Alzheimer's disease or PSP patients. [ 3 H]AV-1451 also binds with similarly high affinities in brain homogenates devoid of tau pathology. This unexpected binding was demonstrated to be because of nanomolar affinities of [ 3 H]AV-1451 for monoamine oxidase A and B enzymes. High affinity of AV-1451 for monoamine oxidase proteins may limit its utility as a tau PET tracer in PSP and Alzheimer's disease because of high levels of monoamine oxidase expression in brain regions also affected by tau deposition, especially if monoamine oxidase levels change over time or with a treatment intervention. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Sequence-specific DNA binding by MYC/MAX to low-affinity non-E-box motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allevato, Michael; Bolotin, Eugene; Grossman, Mark; Mane-Padros, Daniel; Sladek, Frances M.

    2017-01-01

    The MYC oncoprotein regulates transcription of a large fraction of the genome as an obligatory heterodimer with the transcription factor MAX. The MYC:MAX heterodimer and MAX:MAX homodimer (hereafter MYC/MAX) bind Enhancer box (E-box) DNA elements (CANNTG) and have the greatest affinity for the canonical MYC E-box (CME) CACGTG. However, MYC:MAX also recognizes E-box variants and was reported to bind DNA in a “non-specific” fashion in vitro and in vivo. Here, in order to identify potential additional non-canonical binding sites for MYC/MAX, we employed high throughput in vitro protein-binding microarrays, along with electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and bioinformatic analyses of MYC-bound genomic loci in vivo. We identified all hexameric motifs preferentially bound by MYC/MAX in vitro, which include the low-affinity non-E-box sequence AACGTT, and found that the vast majority (87%) of MYC-bound genomic sites in a human B cell line contain at least one of the top 21 motifs bound by MYC:MAX in vitro. We further show that high MYC/MAX concentrations are needed for specific binding to the low-affinity sequence AACGTT in vitro and that elevated MYC levels in vivo more markedly increase the occupancy of AACGTT sites relative to CME sites, especially at distal intergenic and intragenic loci. Hence, MYC binds diverse DNA motifs with a broad range of affinities in a sequence-specific and dose-dependent manner, suggesting that MYC overexpression has more selective effects on the tumor transcriptome than previously thought. PMID:28719624

  10. Wheat germ poly(A) binding protein enhances the binding affinity of eukaryotic initiation factor 4F and (iso)4F for cap analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, C C; Balasta, M L; Ren, J; Goss, D J

    1998-02-17

    Most eukaryotic mRNAs contain a 5' cap (m7GppX) and a 3' poly(A) tail to increase synergistically the translational efficiency. Recently, the poly(A) binding protein (PABP) and cap-binding protein, eIF-4F, were found to interact [Le et al. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 16247-16255; Tarun and Sachs (1996) EMBO J. 15, 7168-7177]. These data suggest that PABP may exert its effect on translational efficiency either by increasing the formation of initiation factor-mRNA complex or by enhancing ribosome recycling. To investigate the functional consequences of these interactions, the fluorescent cap analogue, ant-m7GTP, which is an environmentally sensitive fluorescent probe [Ren and Goss (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 3629-3634] was used to investigate the cap-binding affinity. Our data show that the binding of eIF-(iso)4F or eIF-4F to cap analogue enhanced their binding affinity toward PABP approximately 40-fold. Similarly, the eIF-4F/PABP or eIF-(iso)4F/PABP complexes show a 40-fold enhancement of cap analogue binding as compared to eIF-4F or eIF-(iso)4F alone. At least part of the enhancement of the translational initiation by PABP can be accounted for by direct changes in cap-binding affinity. The interactions of these components also suggest a mechanism whereby the poly(A) tail is brought into close proximity with m7G cap. This effect was examined by fluorescence energy transfer, and it was determined that the PABP/eIF-4F complex could bind both poly(A) and 5' cap simultaneously.

  11. High- and low-affinity binding of S-citalopram to the human serotonin transporter mutated at 20 putatively important amino acid positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Wiborg, Ove

    2005-01-01

    of presumed importance. Binding of S-citalopram, both to the high-affinity-binding site and to the allosteric binding site, was measured in these mutants with the purpose of investigating the connection between the two binding sites. The amino acid substitutions did not introduce large changes in the two...

  12. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antigen presenting cells (APCs) sample the extra cellular space and present peptides from here to T helper cells, which can be activated if the peptides are of foreign origin. The peptides are presented on the surface of the cells in complex with major histocompatibility class II (MHC...... II) molecules. Identification of peptides that bind MHC II molecules is thus a key step in rational vaccine design and developing methods for accurate prediction of the peptide:MHC interactions play a central role in epitope discovery. The MHC class II binding groove is open at both ends making...... the correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance...

  13. A yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid, shows high binding affinity towards lectins on a self-assembled monolayer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Masaaki; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Kitamoto, Dai

    2007-03-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL), which are glycolipid biosurfactants secreted by the Pseudozyma yeasts, show not only excellent surface-active properties but also versatile biochemical actions including antitumor and cell-differentiation activities. In order to address the biochemical actions, interactions between MEL-A, the major component of MEL, and different lectins were investigated using the surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. The monolayer of MEL-A showed high binding affinity to concanavalin A (ConA) and Maackia amurensis lectin-I (MAL-I). The observed affinity constants for ConA and MAL-I were estimated to be 9.48 +/- 1.31 x 10(6) and 3.13 +/- 0.274 x 10(6) M(-1), respectively; the value was comparable to that of Manalpha1-6(Manalpha1-3)Man, which is one of the most specific probe to ConA. Significantly, alpha-methyl-D-mannopyranoside (1 mM) exhibited no binding inhibition between MEL-A and ConA. MEL-A is thus likely to self-assemble to give a high affinity surface, where ConA binds to the hydrophilic headgroup in a different manner from that generally observed in lectin-saccharide interactions. The binding manner should be related with the biochemical actions of MEL toward mammalian cells via protein-carbohydrate interactions.

  14. Identification of 14-3-3 Proteins Phosphopeptide-Binding Specificity Using an Affinity-Based Computational Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Li

    Full Text Available The 14-3-3 proteins are a highly conserved family of homodimeric and heterodimeric molecules, expressed in all eukaryotic cells. In human cells, this family consists of seven distinct but highly homologous 14-3-3 isoforms. 14-3-3σ is the only isoform directly linked to cancer in epithelial cells, which is regulated by major tumor suppressor genes. For each 14-3-3 isoform, we have 1,000 peptide motifs with experimental binding affinity values. In this paper, we present a novel method for identifying peptide motifs binding to 14-3-3σ isoform. First, we propose a sampling criteria to build a predictor for each new peptide sequence. Then, we select nine physicochemical properties of amino acids to describe each peptide motif. We also use auto-cross covariance to extract correlative properties of amino acids in any two positions. Finally, we consider elastic net to predict affinity values of peptide motifs, based on ridge regression and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO. Our method tests on the 1,000 known peptide motifs binding to seven 14-3-3 isoforms. On the 14-3-3σ isoform, our method has overall pearson-product-moment correlation coefficient (PCC and root mean squared error (RMSE values of 0.84 and 252.31 for N-terminal sublibrary, and 0.77 and 269.13 for C-terminal sublibrary. We predict affinity values of 16,000 peptide sequences and relative binding ability across six permutated positions similar with experimental values. We identify phosphopeptides that preferentially bind to 14-3-3σ over other isoforms. Several positions on peptide motifs are in the same amino acid category with experimental substrate specificity of phosphopeptides binding to 14-3-3σ. Our method is fast and reliable and is a general computational method that can be used in peptide-protein binding identification in proteomics research.

  15. Bioinorganic Chemistry of Parkinson's Disease: Affinity and Structural Features of Cu(I) Binding to the Full-Length β-Synuclein Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Marco C; Pavese, Mayra D; Quintanar, Liliana; Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian; Fernández, Claudio O

    2017-09-05

    Alterations in the levels of copper in brain tissue and formation of α-synuclein (αS)-copper complexes might play a key role in the amyloid aggregation of αS and the onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, we demonstrated that formation of the high-affinity Cu(I) complex with the N-terminally acetylated form of the protein αS substantially increases and stabilizes local conformations with α-helical secondary structure and restricted motility. In this work, we performed a detailed NMR-based structural characterization of the Cu(I) complexes with the full-length acetylated form of its homologue β-synuclein (βS), which is colocalized with αS in vivo and can bind copper ions. Our results show that, similarly to αS, the N-terminal region of βS constitutes the preferential binding interface for Cu(I) ions, encompassing two independent and noninteractive Cu(I) binding sites. According to these results, βS binds the metal ion with higher affinity than αS, in a coordination environment that involves the participation of Met-1, Met-5, and Met-10 residues (site 1). Compared to αS, the shift of His from position 50 to 65 in the N-terminal region of βS does not change the Cu(I) affinity features at that site (site 2). Interestingly, the formation of the high-affinity βS-Cu(I) complex at site 1 in the N-terminus promotes a short α-helix conformation that is restricted to the 1-5 segment of the AcβS sequence, which differs with the substantial increase in α-helix conformations seen for N-terminally acetylated αS upon Cu(I) complexation. Our NMR data demonstrate conclusively that the differences observed in the conformational transitions triggered by Cu(I) binding to AcαS and AcβS find a correlation at the level of their backbone dynamic properties; added to the potential biological implications of these findings, this fact opens new avenues of investigations into the bioinorganic chemistry of PD.

  16. Mapping of barley alpha-amylases and outer subsite mutants reveals dynamic high-affinity subsites and barriers in the long substrate binding cleft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandra, L.; Abou Hachem, Maher; Gyemant, G.

    2006-01-01

    Subsite affinity maps of long substrate binding clefts in barley alpha-amylases, obtained using a series of maltooligosaccharides of degree of polymerization of 3-12, revealed unfavorable binding energies at the internal subsites -3 and -5 and at subsites -8 and +3/+4 defining these subsites...... as binding barriers. Barley a-amylase I mutants Y105A and T212Y at subsite -6 and +4 resulted in release or anchoring of bound substrate, thus modifying the affinities of other high-affinity subsites (-2 and +2) and barriers. The double mutant Y105A-T212Y displayed a hybrid subsite affinity profile......, converting barriers to binding areas. These findings highlight the dynamic binding energy distribution and the versatility of long maltooligosaccharide derivatives in mapping extended binding clefts in a-amylases....

  17. Chemical Affinity between Tannin Size and Salivary Protein Binding Abilities: Implications for Wine Astringency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ma

    Full Text Available Astringency perception, as an essential parameter for high-quality red wine, is principally elicited by condensed tannins in diversified chemical structures. Condensed tannins, which are also known as proanthocyanidins (PAs, belong to the flavonoid class of polyphenols and are incorporated by multiple flavan-3-ols units according to their degree of polymerization (DP. However, the influence of DP size of PAs on astringency perception remains unclear for decades. This controversy was mainly attributed to the lack of efficient strategies to isolate the PAs in non-galloylated forms and with individual degree size from grape/wine. In the present study, the astringency intensity of purified and identified grape oligomeric tannins (DP ranged from 1 to 5 was firstly explored. A novel non-solid phase strategy was used to rapidly exclude the galloylated PAs from the non-galloylated PAs and fractionate the latter according to their DP size. Then, a series of PAs with individual DP size and galloylation were purified by an approach of preparative hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Furthermore, purified compounds were identified by both normal phase HPLC-FLD and reverse phase UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF. Finally, the contribution of the astringency perception of the individual purified tannins was examined with a salivary protein binding ability test. The results were observed by HPLC-FLD and quantified by changes in PA concentration remaining in the filtrate. In summary, a new approach without a solid stationary phase was developed to isolate PAs according to their DP size. And a positive relationship between the DP of PAs and salivary protein affinity was revealed.

  18. Chemical Affinity between Tannin Size and Salivary Protein Binding Abilities: Implications for Wine Astringency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen; Waffo-Teguo, Pierre; Jourdes, Michael; Li, Hua; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Astringency perception, as an essential parameter for high-quality red wine, is principally elicited by condensed tannins in diversified chemical structures. Condensed tannins, which are also known as proanthocyanidins (PAs), belong to the flavonoid class of polyphenols and are incorporated by multiple flavan-3-ols units according to their degree of polymerization (DP). However, the influence of DP size of PAs on astringency perception remains unclear for decades. This controversy was mainly attributed to the lack of efficient strategies to isolate the PAs in non-galloylated forms and with individual degree size from grape/wine. In the present study, the astringency intensity of purified and identified grape oligomeric tannins (DP ranged from 1 to 5) was firstly explored. A novel non-solid phase strategy was used to rapidly exclude the galloylated PAs from the non-galloylated PAs and fractionate the latter according to their DP size. Then, a series of PAs with individual DP size and galloylation were purified by an approach of preparative hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Furthermore, purified compounds were identified by both normal phase HPLC-FLD and reverse phase UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF. Finally, the contribution of the astringency perception of the individual purified tannins was examined with a salivary protein binding ability test. The results were observed by HPLC-FLD and quantified by changes in PA concentration remaining in the filtrate. In summary, a new approach without a solid stationary phase was developed to isolate PAs according to their DP size. And a positive relationship between the DP of PAs and salivary protein affinity was revealed.

  19. Binding of noble metal clusters with rare gas atoms: theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Zahra; Far, Maryam Fakhraei; Maghari, Ali

    2012-12-27

    Binding of noble metal clusters (M(n), M = Cu, Ag, and Au; n = 2-4) with rare gas atoms (Rg = Kr, Xe, and Rn) has been investigated at the density functional (CAM-B3LYP) and ab initio (MP2) levels of theory. The calculation shows significant affinity of neutral metal clusters for interaction with rare gas atoms. The binding energies indicate that gold clusters have the highest and silver clusters have the lowest affinity for interaction with rare gas atoms, and for the same metal clusters, there is a continuous increase in E(b) from Kr to Rn. The M-Rg bonding mechanism have been interpreted by means of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), natural bond orbital (NBO), and energy decomposition analysis (EDA). According to these theories, the M-Rg bonds are found to be partially electrostatic and partially covalent. EDA results identify that these bonds have less than 40% covalent character and more than 60% electrostatic, and also NBO calculations predict the amount of charge transfer from the lone pair of rare gas to σ* and n*orbitals of metal clusters.

  20. Metal-loaded SBA-16-like silica – Correlation between basicity and affinity towards hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouargli-Saker, R. [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Science and Technology, El M’naouer, BP 1505, Oran (Algeria); Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C3P8 (Canada); Bouazizi, N. [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C3P8 (Canada); Unité de recherche, Electrochimie, Matériaux et Environnement, Faculté des Sciences de Gabès, Université de Gabès, Cité Erriadh, 6072 Gabès (Tunisia); Boukoussa, B. [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Science and Technology, El M’naouer, BP 1505, Oran (Algeria); Lqamb, Laboratório de Química Analítica Ambiental, Faculdade de Química, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Barrimo, Diana [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C3P8 (Canada); Paola-Nunes-Beltrao, Ana [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C3P8 (Canada); Laboratory of Materials Chemistry L.C.M, University of Oran1 Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El-Mnaouer, 31000 Oran (Algeria); Azzouz, A., E-mail: azzouz.a@uqam.ca [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C3P8 (Canada)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Metal dispersion in longitudinal channels confers adsorption properties to SBA-16. • Both Fe{sup 0}-NPs and Cu{sup 0}-NPs seem to be responsible of this effect. • Effect of the repetitive adsorption-desorption cycles on CO{sub 2} and water sorption. • Hydrogen storage on the functionalized materials. - Abstract: Nanoparticles of Cu{sup o} (CuNPs) and Fe{sup o} (FeNPs) were dispersed in SBA-16-like silica, resulting metal-loaded materials (Cu-SBA-16 and Fe-SBA-16) with improved affinity towards hydrogen. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that MNP dispersion occurs mainly inside SBA-16 channels. MNP incorporation was found to confer affinity to the silica surface, since higher CO{sub 2} retention capacity (CRC) was registered Cu/SBA-16 and Fe/SBA-16. This was accompanied by a significant improvement of the affinity towards hydrogen, as supported by hydrogen adsorption tests. This was explained in terms of strong hydrogen interaction with MNP and lattice oxygen atoms. The results reported herein open new prospects for SBA-16 as potential adsorbents for hydrogen storage.

  1. Evolution of Metal(Loid) Binding Sites in Transcriptional Regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, E.; Thiyagarajan, S.; Cook, J.D.; Stemmler, T.L.; Gil, J.A.; Mateos, L.M.; Rosen, B.P.

    2009-05-22

    Expression of the genes for resistance to heavy metals and metalloids is transcriptionally regulated by the toxic ions themselves. Members of the ArsR/SmtB family of small metalloregulatory proteins respond to transition metals, heavy metals, and metalloids, including As(III), Sb(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). These homodimeric repressors bind to DNA in the absence of inducing metal(loid) ion and dissociate from the DNA when inducer is bound. The regulatory sites are often three- or four-coordinate metal binding sites composed of cysteine thiolates. Surprisingly, in two different As(III)-responsive regulators, the metalloid binding sites were in different locations in the repressor, and the Cd(II) binding sites were in two different locations in two Cd(II)-responsive regulators. We hypothesize that ArsR/SmtB repressors have a common backbone structure, that of a winged helix DNA-binding protein, but have considerable plasticity in the location of inducer binding sites. Here we show that an As(III)-responsive member of the family, CgArsR1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, binds As(III) to a cysteine triad composed of Cys{sup 15}, Cys{sup 16}, and Cys{sup 55}. This binding site is clearly unrelated to the binding sites of other characterized ArsR/SmtB family members. This is consistent with our hypothesis that metal(loid) binding sites in DNA binding proteins evolve convergently in response to persistent environmental pressures.

  2. Metal-binding thermodynamics of the histidine-rich sequence from the metal-transport protein IRT1 of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, Nicholas E; Akilesh, Shreeram; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Wilcox, Dean E

    2006-10-16

    The widespread ZIP family of transmembrane metal-transporting proteins is characterized by a large intracellular loop that contains a histidine-rich sequence whose biological role is unknown. To provide a chemical basis for this role, we prepared and studied a peptide corresponding to this sequence from the first iron-regulated transporter (IRT1) of Arabidopsis thaliana, which transports Fe2+ as well as Mn2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements, which required novel experiments and data analysis, and supporting spectroscopic methods were used to quantify IRT1's metal-binding affinity and associated thermodynamics. The peptide, PHGHGHGHGP, binds metal ions with 1:1 stoichiometry and stabilities that are consistent with the Irving-Williams series. Comparison of the metal-binding thermodynamics of the peptide with those of trien provides new insight about enthalpic and entropic contributions to the stability of the metal-peptide complex. Although Fe2+ and other IRT1-transported metal ions do not bind very tightly, this His-rich sequence has a very high entropy-driven affinity for Fe3+, which may have biological significance.

  3. Supervised machine learning techniques to predict binding affinity. A study for cyclin-dependent kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ávila, Maurício Boff; Xavier, Mariana Morrone; Pintro, Val Oliveira; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2017-12-09

    Here we report the development of a machine-learning model to predict binding affinity based on the crystallographic structures of protein-ligand complexes. We used an ensemble of crystallographic structures (resolution better than 1.5 Å resolution) for which half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) data is available. Polynomial scoring functions were built using as explanatory variables the energy terms present in the MolDock and PLANTS scoring functions. Prediction performance was tested and the supervised machine learning models showed improvement in the prediction power, when compared with PLANTS and MolDock scoring functions. In addition, the machine-learning model was applied to predict binding affinity of CDK2, which showed a better performance when compared with AutoDock4, AutoDock Vina, MolDock, and PLANTS scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural basis for high substrate-binding affinity and enantioselectivity of 3-quinuclidinone reductase AtQR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Feng; Miyakawa, Takuya; Kataoka, Michihiko; Takeshita, Daijiro; Kumashiro, Shoko; Uzura, Atsuko; Urano, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Koji; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of AtQR has been determined at 1.72 Å. • NADH binding induces the formation of substrate binding site. • AtQR possesses a conserved hydrophobic wall for stereospecific binding of substrate. • Additional Glu197 residue is critical to the high binding affinity. - Abstract: (R)-3-Quinuclidinol, a useful compound for the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, can be enantioselectively produced from 3-quinuclidinone by 3-quinuclidinone reductase. Recently, a novel NADH-dependent 3-quinuclidionone reductase (AtQR) was isolated from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and showed much higher substrate-binding affinity (>100 fold) than the reported 3-quinuclidionone reductase (RrQR) from Rhodotorula rubra. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtQR at 1.72 Å. Three NADH-bound protomers and one NADH-free protomer form a tetrameric structure in an asymmetric unit of crystals. NADH not only acts as a proton donor, but also contributes to the stability of the α7 helix. This helix is a unique and functionally significant part of AtQR and is related to form a deep catalytic cavity. AtQR has all three catalytic residues of the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family and the hydrophobic wall for the enantioselective reduction of 3-quinuclidinone as well as RrQR. An additional residue on the α7 helix, Glu197, exists near the active site of AtQR. This acidic residue is considered to form a direct interaction with the amine part of 3-quinuclidinone, which contributes to substrate orientation and enhancement of substrate-binding affinity. Mutational analyses also support that Glu197 is an indispensable residue for the activity

  5. Structural basis for high substrate-binding affinity and enantioselectivity of 3-quinuclidinone reductase AtQR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Feng; Miyakawa, Takuya [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kataoka, Michihiko [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 559-8531 (Japan); Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takeshita, Daijiro [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kumashiro, Shoko [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Uzura, Atsuko [Research and Development Center, Nagase and Co., Ltd., 2-2-3 Muratani, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2241 (Japan); Urano, Nobuyuki [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 559-8531 (Japan); Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagata, Koji [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Shimizu, Sakayu [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Faculty of Bioenvironmental Science, Kyoto Gakuen University, Sogabe-cho, Kameoka 621-8555 (Japan); Tanokura, Masaru, E-mail: amtanok@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of AtQR has been determined at 1.72 Å. • NADH binding induces the formation of substrate binding site. • AtQR possesses a conserved hydrophobic wall for stereospecific binding of substrate. • Additional Glu197 residue is critical to the high binding affinity. - Abstract: (R)-3-Quinuclidinol, a useful compound for the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, can be enantioselectively produced from 3-quinuclidinone by 3-quinuclidinone reductase. Recently, a novel NADH-dependent 3-quinuclidionone reductase (AtQR) was isolated from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and showed much higher substrate-binding affinity (>100 fold) than the reported 3-quinuclidionone reductase (RrQR) from Rhodotorula rubra. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtQR at 1.72 Å. Three NADH-bound protomers and one NADH-free protomer form a tetrameric structure in an asymmetric unit of crystals. NADH not only acts as a proton donor, but also contributes to the stability of the α7 helix. This helix is a unique and functionally significant part of AtQR and is related to form a deep catalytic cavity. AtQR has all three catalytic residues of the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family and the hydrophobic wall for the enantioselective reduction of 3-quinuclidinone as well as RrQR. An additional residue on the α7 helix, Glu197, exists near the active site of AtQR. This acidic residue is considered to form a direct interaction with the amine part of 3-quinuclidinone, which contributes to substrate orientation and enhancement of substrate-binding affinity. Mutational analyses also support that Glu197 is an indispensable residue for the activity.

  6. Affinity enhancement of nanobody binding to EGFR: in silico site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farasat, Alireza; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Hosseinzadeh, Ghader; Sajjadi, Sharareh; Kamali, Mehdi; Keihan, Amir Homayoun

    2017-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a transmembrane glycoprotein, is overexpressed in many cancers such as head-neck, breast, prostate, and skin cancers for this reason it is a good target in cancer therapy and diagnosis. In nanobody-based cancer diagnosis and treatment, nanobodies with high affinity toward receptor (e.g. EGFR) results in effective treatment or diagnosis of cancer. In this regard, the main aim of this study is to develop a method based on molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for designing of 7D12 based nanobody with high affinity compared with wild-type nanobody. By surveying electrostatic and desolvation interactions between different residues of 7D12 and EGFR, the critical residues of 7D12 that play the main role in the binding of 7D12 to EGFR were elucidated and based on these residues, five logical variants were designed. Following the 50 ns MD simulations, pull and umbrella sampling simulation were performed for 7D12 and all its variants in complex with EGFR. Binding free energy of 7D12 (and all its variants) with EGFR was obtained by weighted histogram analysis method. According to binding free energy results, GLY101 to GLU mutation showed the highest binding affinity but this variant is unstable after 50 ns MD simulations. ALA100 to GLU mutation shows suitable binding enhancement with acceptable structural stability. Suitable position and orientation of GLU in residue 100 of 7D12 against related amino acids of EGFR formed some extra hydrogen and electrostatic interactions which resulted in binding enhancement.

  7. Estimation of apparent binding constant of complexes of selected acyclic nucleoside phosphonates with beta-cyclodextrin by affinity capillary electrophoresis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolínová, Veronika; Mikysková, Hana; Kaiser, Martin Maxmilian; Janeba, Zlatko; Holý, Antonín; Kašička, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2016), s. 239-247 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01948S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * affinity capillary electrophoresis * binding constant * nucleotide analogs * beta-cyclodextrin Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2016

  8. Substituting random forest for multiple linear regression improves binding affinity prediction of scoring functions: Cyscore as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjian; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Wong, Man-Hon; Ballester, Pedro J

    2014-08-27

    State-of-the-art protein-ligand docking methods are generally limited by the traditionally low accuracy of their scoring functions, which are used to predict binding affinity and thus vital for discriminating between active and inactive compounds. Despite intensive research over the years, classical scoring functions have reached a plateau in their predictive performance. These assume a predetermined additive functional form for some sophisticated numerical features, and use standard multivariate linear regression (MLR) on experimental data to derive the coefficients. In this study we show that such a simple functional form is detrimental for the prediction performance of a scoring function, and replacing linear regression by machine learning techniques like random forest (RF) can improve prediction performance. We investigate the conditions of applying RF under various contexts and find that given sufficient training samples RF manages to comprehensively capture the non-linearity between structural features and measured binding affinities. Incorporating more structural features and training with more samples can both boost RF performance. In addition, we analyze the importance of structural features to binding affinity prediction using the RF variable importance tool. Lastly, we use Cyscore, a top performing empirical scoring function, as a baseline for comparison study. Machine-learning scoring functions are fundamentally different from classical scoring functions because the former circumvents the fixed functional form relating structural features with binding affinities. RF, but not MLR, can effectively exploit more structural features and more training samples, leading to higher prediction performance. The future availability of more X-ray crystal structures will further widen the performance gap between RF-based and MLR-based scoring functions. This further stresses the importance of substituting RF for MLR in scoring function development.

  9. Chemical Editing of Macrocyclic Natural Products and Kinetic Profiling Reveal Slow, Tight-Binding Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Picomolar Affinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitir, Betül; Maolanon, Alex R.; Ohm, Ragnhild G.

    2017-01-01

    medicines. Therefore, detailed mechanistic information and precise characterization of the chemical probes used to investigate the effects of HDAC enzymes are vital. We interrogated Nature's arsenal of macrocyclic nonribosomal peptide HDAC inhibitors by chemical synthesis and evaluation of more than 30...... natural products and analogues. This furnished surprising trends in binding affinities for the various macrocycles, which were then exploited for the design of highly potent class I and IIb HDAC inhibitors. Furthermore, thorough kinetic investigation revealed unexpected inhibitory mechanisms of important...

  10. High-throughput bioscreening system utilizing high-performance affinity magnetic carriers exhibiting minimal non-specific protein binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Naohiro; Nishio, Kosuke; Hatakeyama, Mamoru; Yasuno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Tada, Masaru; Nakagawa, Takashi; Sandhu, Adarsh; Abe, Masanori; Handa, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    For affinity purification of drug target protein we have developed magnetic carriers, narrow in size distribution (184±9 nm), which exhibit minimal non-specific binding of unwanted proteins. The carriers were highly dispersed in aqueous solutions and highly resistant to organic solvents, which enabled immobilization of various hydrophobic chemicals as probes on the carrier surfaces. Utilizing the carriers we have automated the process of separation and purification of the target proteins that had been done by manual operation previously.

  11. 3D QSAR studies on binding affinities of coumarin natural products for glycosomal GAPDH of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Lopes, Julio C. D.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Oliva, Glaucius; Pavão, Fernando; Castilho, Marcelo S.; Vieira, Paulo C.; Pupo, M.^onica T.

    2003-05-01

    Drug design strategies based on Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) have been used to predict the activity of new compounds. The major advantage of this approach is that it permits the analysis of a large number of quantitative descriptors and uses chemometric methods such as partial least squares (PLS) to correlate changes in bioactivity with changes in chemical structure. Because it is often difficult to rationalize all variables affecting the binding affinity of compounds using CoMFA solely, the program GRID was used to describe ligands in terms of their molecular interaction fields, MIFs. The program VolSurf that is able to compress the relevant information present in 3D maps into a few descriptors can treat these GRID fields. The binding affinities of a new set of compounds consisting of 13 coumarins, for one of which the three-dimensional ligand-enzyme bound structure is known, were studied. A final model based on the mentioned programs was independently validated by synthesizing and testing new coumarin derivatives. By relying on our knowledge of the real physical data (i.e., combining crystallographic and binding affinity results), it is also shown that ligand-based design agrees with structure-based design. The compound with the highest binding affinity was the coumarin chalepin, isolated from Rutaceae species, with an IC50 value of 55.5 μM towards the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) from glycosomes of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. The proposed models from GRID MIFs have revealed the importance of lipophilic interactions in modulating the inhibition, but without excluding the dependence on stereo-electronic properties as found from CoMFA fields.

  12. Autoradiographic imaging and quantification of the high-affinity GHB binding sites in rodent brain using (3)H-HOCPCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, A B; Bay, T; Villumsen, I S

    2016-01-01

    analogue, 3-hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA) as a tritiated version ((3)H-HOCPCA) to radioactively label the specific GHB high-affinity binding site and gain further insight into the density, distribution and developmental profile of this protein. We show that, in low nanomolar concentrations...... brain development. Due to the high sensitivity of this radioligand, we were able to detect low levels of specific binding already at E15 in mouse brain, which increased progressively until adulthood. Collectively, we show that (3)H-HOCPCA is a highly sensitive radioligand, offering advantages over...

  13. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  14. Binding affinity and adhesion force of organophosphate hydrolase enzyme with soil particles related to the isoelectric point of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Shah Md Asraful; Yeasmin, Shabina; Islam, Md Saiful; Islam, Md Shariful

    2017-07-01

    The binding affinity of organophosphate hydrolase enzyme (OphB) with soil particles in relation to the isoelectric point (pI) was studied. Immobilization of OphB with soil particles was observed by confocal microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Atomic force microscopy (AFM). The calculated pI of OphB enzyme was increased from 8.69 to 8.89, 9.04 and 9.16 by the single, double and triple mutant of OphB enzyme, respectively through the replacement of negatively charged aspartate with positively charged histidine. Practically, the binding affinity was increased to 5.30%, 11.50%, and 16.80% for single, double and triple mutants, respectively. In contrast, enzyme activity of OphB did not change by the mutation of the enzyme. On the other hand, adhesion forces were gradually increased for wild type OphB enzyme (90 pN) to 96, 100 and 104 pN for single, double and triple mutants of OphB enzyme, respectively. There was an increasing trend of binding affinity and adhesion force by the increase of isoelectric point (pI) of OphB enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. BAD-lectins: boronic acid-decorated lectins with enhanced binding affinity for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Huang, Li-De; Chen, Chang-Yang; Wu, Sz-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-09-03

    The weak and variable binding affinities exhibited by lectin-carbohydrate interactions have often compromised the practical utility of lectin in capturing glycoproteins for glycoproteomic applications. We report here the development and applications of a new type of hybrid biomaterial, namely a boronic acid-decorated lectin (BAD-lectin), for efficient bifunctional glycoprotein labeling and enrichment. Our binding studies showed an enhanced affinity by BAD-lectin, likely to be mediated via the formation of boronate ester linkages between the lectin and glycan subsequent to the initial recognition process and thus preserving its glycan-specificity. Moreover, when attached to magnetic nanoparticles (BAD-lectin@MNPs), 2 to 60-fold improvement on detection sensitivity and enrichment efficiency for specific glycoproteins was observed over the independent use of either lectin or BA. Tested at the level of whole cell lysates for glycoproteomic applications, three different types of BAD-lectin@MNPs exhibited excellent specificities with only 6% overlapping among the 295 N-linked glycopeptides identified. As many as 236 N-linked glycopeptides (80%) were uniquely identified by one of the BAD-lectin@MNPs. These results indicated that the enhanced glycan-selective recognition and binding affinity of BAD-lectin@MNPs will facilitate a complementary identification of the under-explored glycoproteome.

  16. Characteristics of binding of a low affinity, noncooperative insulin [(LeuB25]insulin) to IM-9 lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, A.; Frank, B.H.; Rubenstein, A.; Tager, H.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    [Leu-B25]insulin is a low affinity insulin analog which does not increase the rate of dissociation of 125 I-insulin from insulin receptors (i.e. does not display negative cooperativity). We have studied the characteristics of binding of this analog to IM-9 cultured lymphocytes, in order to determine the contribution of negative cooperativity to the curvilinear nature of Scatchard plots typical of insulin binding data. The affinity of [LeuB25]insulin for receptors was approximately 1% that of insulin, as determined by its ability to inhibit 125 I-insulin binding. Monoiodinated preparations of insulin and of [LeuB25]insulin were produced, labeled in the tyrosine at position 14 of the A chain. These 125 I-TyrA14-labeled species were used in all studies. Both native insulin and a serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibodies were equally potent at inhibiting binding of 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin and 125 I-native insulin, suggesting that they bind to the same population of receptors. Native insulin (100 ng/ml) increased the rate of dissociation of both 125 I-insulin and 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin. However, [LeuB25]insulin (2.5 micrograms/ml) did not increase the rates of dissociation of either 125 I-insulin or 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin (i.e. it did not display negative cooperativity). Competition curves and Scatchard plots were constructed using 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin and unlabeled analog. Half-maximal inhibition of 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin binding was seen at a [LeuB25]insulin concentration of approximately 500 ng/ml. More importantly, the Scatchard plot of these binding data was markedly curvilinear, as is typical of insulin binding data

  17. Validating metal binding sites in macromolecule structures using the CheckMyMetal web server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chordia, Mahendra D.; Cooper, David R.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Müller, Peter; Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Metals play vital roles in both the mechanism and architecture of biological macromolecules. Yet structures of metal-containing macromolecules where metals are misidentified and/or suboptimally modeled are abundant in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This shows the need for a diagnostic tool to identify and correct such modeling problems with metal binding environments. The "CheckMyMetal" (CMM) web server (http://csgid.org/csgid/metal_sites/) is a sophisticated, user-friendly web-based method to evaluate metal binding sites in macromolecular structures in respect to 7350 metal binding sites observed in a benchmark dataset of 2304 high resolution crystal structures. The protocol outlines how the CMM server can be used to detect geometric and other irregularities in the structures of metal binding sites and alert researchers to potential errors in metal assignment. The protocol also gives practical guidelines for correcting problematic sites by modifying the metal binding environment and/or redefining metal identity in the PDB file. Several examples where this has led to meaningful results are described in the anticipated results section. CMM was designed for a broad audience—biomedical researchers studying metal-containing proteins and nucleic acids—but is equally well suited for structural biologists to validate new structures during modeling or refinement. The CMM server takes the coordinates of a metal-containing macromolecule structure in the PDB format as input and responds within a few seconds for a typical protein structure modeled with a few hundred amino acids. PMID:24356774

  18. Branchial cadmium and copper binding and intestinal cadmium uptake in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from clean and metal-contaminated lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinck, J S; Green, W W; Mirza, R S; Nadella, S R; Chowdhury, M J; Wood, C M; Pyle, G G

    2007-08-30

    Branchial binding kinetics and gastro-intestinal uptake of copper and cadmium where examined in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from a metal-contaminated lake (Hannah Lake, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada) and an uncontaminated lake (James Lake, North Bay, Ontario, Canada). An in vivo approach was taken for gill binding comparisons while an in vitro gut binding assay was employed for gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) uptake analysis. By investigating metal uptake at the gill and the gut we cover the two main routes of metal entry into fish. Comparisons of water and sediment chemistries, metal burdens in benthic invertebrate, and metal burdens in the livers of perch from the two study lakes clearly show that yellow perch from Hannah L. are chronically exposed to a highly metal-contaminated environment compared to a reference lake. We found that metal-contaminated yellow perch showed no significant difference in gill Cd binding compared to reference fish, but they did show significant decreases in new Cd binding and absorption in their GITs. The results show that gill Cd binding may involve low-capacity, high-affinity binding sites, while gastro-intestinal Cd uptake involves binding sites that are high-capacity, low-affinity. From this we infer that Cd may be more critically controlled at the gut rather than gills. Significant differences in branchial Cu binding (increased binding) were observed in metal-contaminated yellow perch. We suggest that chronic waterborne exposure to Cu (and/or other metals) may be the dominant influence in gill Cu binding rather than chronic exposure to high Cu diets. We give supporting evidence that Cd is taken up in the GIT, at least in part, by a similar pathway as Ca(2+), principally that elevated dietary Ca(2+) reduces Cd binding and uptake. Overall our study reveals that metal pre-exposure via water and diet can alter uptake kinetics of Cu and Cd at the gill and/or the gut.

  19. Identification of the β-Lactamase Inhibitor Protein-II (BLIP-II) Interface Residues Essential for Binding Affinity and Specificity for Class A β-Lactamases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicholas G.; Chow, Dar-Chone; Ruprecht, Kevin E.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between β-lactamase inhibitory proteins (BLIPs) and β-lactamases have been used as model systems to understand the principles of affinity and specificity in protein-protein interactions. The most extensively studied tight binding inhibitor, BLIP, has been characterized with respect to amino acid determinants of affinity and specificity for binding β-lactamases. BLIP-II, however, shares no sequence or structural homology to BLIP and is a femtomolar to picomolar potency inhibitor, and the amino acid determinants of binding affinity and specificity are unknown. In this study, alanine scanning mutagenesis was used in combination with determinations of on and off rates for each mutant to define the contribution of residues on the BLIP-II binding surface to both affinity and specificity toward four β-lactamases of diverse sequence. The residues making the largest contribution to binding energy are heavily biased toward aromatic amino acids near the center of the binding surface. In addition, substitutions that reduce binding energy do so by increasing off rates without impacting on rates. Also, residues with large contributions to binding energy generally exhibit low temperature factors in the structures of complexes. Finally, with the exception of D206A, BLIP-II alanine substitutions exhibit a similar trend of effect for all β-lactamases, i.e., a substitution that reduces affinity for one β-lactamase usually reduces affinity for all β-lactamases tested. PMID:23625930

  20. Interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with dopaminergic D3 binding sites in rat striatum. Evidence that [3H]dopamine can label a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leff, S.E.; Creese, I.

    1985-01-01

    The interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with 3 H-agonist labeled D3 dopaminergic binding sites of rat striatum have been characterized by radioligand-binding techniques. When the binding of [ 3 H]dopamine and [ 3 H]apomorphine to D2 dopamine receptors is blocked by the inclusion of D2 selective concentrations of unlabeled spiroperidol or domperidone, these ligands appear to label selectively the previously termed D3 binding site. Antagonist/[ 3 H]dopamine competition curves are of uniformly steep slope (nH . 1.0), suggesting the presence of a single D3 binding site. The relative potencies of antagonists to inhibit D3 specific [ 3 H]dopamine binding are significantly correlated with their potencies to block D1 dopamine receptors as measured by the inhibition of both dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase and [ 3 H]flupentixol-binding activities. The affinities of agonists to inhibit D3 specific [ 3 H]dopamine binding are also correlated with estimates of these agonists affinities for the high affinity binding component of agonist/[ 3 H]flupentixol competition curves. Both D3 specific [ 3 H] dopamine binding and the high affinity agonist-binding component of dopamine/[ 3 H]flupentixol competition curves show a similar sensitivity to guanine nucleotides. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the D3 binding site is related to a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor

  1. Alkali Metal Cation Affinities of Anionic Main Group-Element Hydrides Across the Periodic Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2017-10-05

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of gas-phase alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) of archetypal anionic bases across the periodic system using relativistic density functional theory at ZORA-BP86/QZ4P//ZORA-BP86/TZ2P. AMCA values of all bases were computed for the lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium cations and compared with the corresponding proton affinities (PA). One purpose of this work is to provide an intrinsically consistent set of values of the 298 K AMCAs of all anionic (XH n-1 - ) constituted by main group-element hydrides of groups 14-17 along the periods 2-6. In particular, we wish to establish the trend in affinity for a cation as the latter varies from proton to, and along, the alkali cations. Our main purpose is to understand these trends in terms of the underlying bonding mechanism using Kohn-Sham molecular orbital theory together with a quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Peptides in headlock – a novel high-affinity and versatile peptide-binding nanobody for proteomics and microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Michael B.; Traenkle, Bjoern; Koch, Philipp A.; Emele, Felix; Weiss, Frederik; Poetz, Oliver; Stehle, Thilo; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Nanobodies are highly valuable tools for numerous bioanalytical and biotechnical applications. Here, we report the characterization of a nanobody that binds a short peptide epitope with extraordinary affinity. Structural analysis reveals an unusual binding mode where the extended peptide becomes part of a β-sheet structure in the nanobody. This interaction relies on sequence-independent backbone interactions augmented by a small number of specificity-determining side chain contacts. Once bound, the peptide is fastened by two nanobody side chains that clamp it in a headlock fashion. Exploiting this unusual binding mode, we generated a novel nanobody-derived capture and detection system. Matrix-coupled nanobody enables the fast and efficient isolation of epitope-tagged proteins from prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems. Additionally, the fluorescently labeled nanobody visualizes subcellular structures in different cellular compartments. The high-affinity-binding and modifiable peptide tag of this system renders it a versatile and robust tool to combine biochemical analysis with microscopic studies. PMID:26791954

  3. Peptides in headlock--a novel high-affinity and versatile peptide-binding nanobody for proteomics and microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Michael B; Traenkle, Bjoern; Koch, Philipp A; Emele, Felix; Weiss, Frederik; Poetz, Oliver; Stehle, Thilo; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-21

    Nanobodies are highly valuable tools for numerous bioanalytical and biotechnical applications. Here, we report the characterization of a nanobody that binds a short peptide epitope with extraordinary affinity. Structural analysis reveals an unusual binding mode where the extended peptide becomes part of a β-sheet structure in the nanobody. This interaction relies on sequence-independent backbone interactions augmented by a small number of specificity-determining side chain contacts. Once bound, the peptide is fastened by two nanobody side chains that clamp it in a headlock fashion. Exploiting this unusual binding mode, we generated a novel nanobody-derived capture and detection system. Matrix-coupled nanobody enables the fast and efficient isolation of epitope-tagged proteins from prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems. Additionally, the fluorescently labeled nanobody visualizes subcellular structures in different cellular compartments. The high-affinity-binding and modifiable peptide tag of this system renders it a versatile and robust tool to combine biochemical analysis with microscopic studies.

  4. A soluble, high-affinity, interleukin-4-binding protein is present in the biological fluids of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Botran, R.; Vitetta, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    Cytokines such as interleukin 4 (IL-4) play a key role in the regulation of immune responses, but little is known about how their multiple activities are regulated in vivo. In this report, we demonstrate that an IL-4-binding protein (IL-4BP) is constitutively present in the biological fluids of mice (serum, ascites fluid, and urine). Binding of 125 I-labeled IL-4 to the IL-4BP is specific and saturable and can be inhibited by an excess of unlabeled IL-4 but not IL-2. The IL-4BP binds IL-4 with an affinity similar to that reported for the cellular IL-4 with an affinity similar to that reported for the cellular IL-4 receptor (K d ∼7 x 10 -11 M) and has a molecular mass of 30-40 kDa and pI values of 3.6-4.8. IL-4BP-containing biological fluids or purified IL-4BP competitively inhibit the binding of 125 I-labeled IL-4 to mouse T or B cells and inhibit the biological activity of IL-4 but not IL-2. The serum levels of IL-4BP in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice are lower than those of normal mice. The above findings suggest that IL-4BP plays an important immunoregulatory role in vivo

  5. Metal ion binding with dehydroannulenes – Plausible two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    has highest interaction energy of –50∙6 kcal/mol at. B3LYP/6-311++G** level and is 128∙0 kcal/mol more than 1′-K+ complex. Understandably, the binding energy of metal complexes decreases with increase in the size of the metal ion, in accordance with ear- lier results.16,21. Placement of the metal ions at the centroid of ...

  6. Functional analysis of the citrate activator CitO from Enterococcus faecalis implicates a divalent metal in ligand binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor S. Blancato

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The regulator of citrate metabolism, CitO, from Enterococcus faecalis belongs to the FCD family within the GntR superfamily. In the presence of citrate, CitO binds to cis-acting sequences located upstream of the cit promoters inducing the expression of genes involved in citrate utilization. The quantification of the molecular binding affinities, performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, indicated that CitO has a high affinity for citrate (KD= 1.2±0.2 µM, while it did not recognize other metabolic intermediates. Based on a structural model of CitO where a putative small molecule and a metal binding site were identified, it was hypothesized that the metal ion is required for citrate binding. In agreement with this model, citrate binding to CitO sharply decreased when the protein was incubated with EDTA. This effect was reverted by the addition of Ni2+, and Zn2+ to a lesser extent. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and it was found that changes to alanine in residues Arg97 and His191 resulted in decreased binding affinities for citrate, as determined by EMSA and ITC. Further assays using lacZ fusions confirmed that these residues in CitO are involved in sensing citrate in vivo. These results indicate that the molecular modifications induced by a ligand and a metal binding in the C-terminal domain of CitO are required for optimal DNA binding activity, and consequently, transcriptional activation.

  7. Computational prediction of binding affinity for CYP1A2-ligand complexes using empirical free energy calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Olsen, Lars; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2010-01-01

    , and methods based on statistical mechanics. In the present investigation, we started from an LIE model to predict the binding free energy of structurally diverse compounds of cytochrome P450 1A2 ligands, one of the important human metabolizing isoforms of the cytochrome P450 family. The data set includes both...... substrates and inhibitors. It appears that the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy becomes negligible in this particular protein and a simple empirical model was derived, based on a training set of eight compounds. The root mean square error for the training set was 3.7 kJ/mol. Subsequent......Predicting binding affinities for receptor-ligand complexes is still one of the challenging processes in computational structure-based ligand design. Many computational methods have been developed to achieve this goal, such as docking and scoring methods, the linear interaction energy (LIE) method...

  8. Relative binding affinity of carboxylate-, phosphonate-, and bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles targeted to damaged bone tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Ryan D. [Rush University Medical Center, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology (United States); Cole, Lisa E.; Roeder, Ryan K., E-mail: rroeder@nd.edu [University of Notre Dame, Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Bioengineering Graduate Program (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Functionalized Au NPs have received considerable recent interest for targeting and labeling cells and tissues. Damaged bone tissue can be targeted by functionalizing Au NPs with molecules exhibiting affinity for calcium. Therefore, the relative binding affinity of Au NPs surface functionalized with either carboxylate (l-glutamic acid), phosphonate (2-aminoethylphosphonic acid), or bisphosphonate (alendronate) was investigated for targeted labeling of damaged bone tissue in vitro. Targeted labeling of damaged bone tissue was qualitatively verified by visual observation and backscattered electron microscopy, and quantitatively measured by the surface density of Au NPs using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The surface density of functionalized Au NPs was significantly greater within damaged tissue compared to undamaged tissue for each functional group. Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au NPs exhibited a greater surface density labeling damaged tissue compared to glutamic acid- and phosphonic acid-functionalized Au NPs, which was consistent with the results of previous work comparing the binding affinity of the same functionalized Au NPs to synthetic hydroxyapatite crystals. Targeted labeling was enabled not only by the functional groups but also by the colloidal stability in solution. Functionalized Au NPs were stabilized by the presence of the functional groups, and were shown to remain well dispersed in ionic (phosphate buffered saline) and serum (fetal bovine serum) solutions for up to 1 week. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that bisphosphonate-functionalized Au NPs have potential for targeted delivery to damaged bone tissue in vitro and provide motivation for in vivo investigation.

  9. Affinity capillary electrophoresis and density functional theory employed for the characterization of hexaarylbenzene-based receptor complexation with alkali metal ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ehala, Sille; Toman, Petr; Rathore, R.; Makrlík, E.; Kašička, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 9 (2011), s. 981-987 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/0675; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/10/2280; GA AV ČR 1ET400500402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : affinity capillary electrophoresis * alkali metal ions * binding constant Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2011

  10. Adsorption of endotoxins on Ca2+ -iminodiacetic acid by metal ion affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, André Moreni; Romeu, Jorge Sánchez; Meireles, Rolando Páez; Perera, Gabriel Marquez; Morales, Rolando Perdomo; Pessoa, Adalberto; Cárdenas, Lourdes Zumalacárregui

    2012-11-01

    Endotoxins (also known as lipopolysaccharides (LPS)) are undesirable by-products of recombinant proteins, purified from Escherichia coli. LPS can be considered stable under a wide range of temperature and pH, making their removal one of the most difficult tasks in downstream processes during protein purification. The inherent toxicity of LPS makes their removal an important step for the application of these proteins in several biological assays and for a safe parenteral administration. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) enables the affinity interactions between the metal ions (immobilized on the support through the chelating compound) and the target molecules, thus enabling high-efficiency separation of the target molecules from other components present in a mixture. Affinity chromatography is applied with Ca2+ -iminodiacetic acid (IDA) to remove most of the LPS contaminants from the end product (more than 90%). In this study, the adsorption of LPS on an IDA-Ca2+ was investigated. The adsorption Freundlich isotherm of LPS-IDA-Ca2+ provides a theoretical basis for LPS removal. It was found that LPS is bound mainly by interactions between the phosphate group in LPS and Ca2+ ligands on the beads. The factors such as pH (4.0 or 5.5) and ionic strength (1.0 mol/L) are essential to obtain effective removal of LPS for contaminant levels between endotoxin' concentration values less than 100 EU/mL and 100 000 EU/mL. This new protocol represents a substantial advantage in time, effort, and production costs.

  11. Removal of PCR error products and unincorporated primers by metal-chelate affinity chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indhu Kanakaraj

    Full Text Available Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography (IMAC has been used for decades to purify proteins on the basis of amino acid content, especially surface-exposed histidines and "histidine tags" genetically added to recombinant proteins. We and others have extended the use of IMAC to purification of nucleic acids via interactions with the nucleotide bases, especially purines, of single-stranded RNA and DNA. We also have demonstrated the purification of plasmid DNA from contaminating genomic DNA by IMAC capture of selectively-denatured genomic DNA. Here we describe an efficient method of purifying PCR products by specifically removing error products, excess primers, and unincorporated dNTPs from PCR product mixtures using flow-through metal-chelate affinity adsorption. By flowing a PCR product mixture through a Cu(2+-iminodiacetic acid (IDA agarose spin column, 94-99% of the dNTPs and nearly all the primers can be removed. Many of the error products commonly formed by Taq polymerase also are removed. Sequencing of the IMAC-processed PCR product gave base-calling accuracy comparable to that obtained with a commercial PCR product purification method. The results show that IMAC matrices (specifically Cu(2+-IDA agarose can be used for the purification of PCR products. Due to the generality of the base-specific mechanism of adsorption, IMAC matrices may also be used in the purification of oligonucleotides, cDNA, mRNA and micro RNAs.

  12. Cyr61/CCN1 displays high-affinity binding to the somatomedin B(1-44 domain of vitronectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo M B Francischetti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyr61 is a member of the CCN (Cyr61, connective tissue growth, NOV family of extracellular-associated (matricellular proteins that present four distinct functional modules, namely insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP, von Willebrand factor type C (vWF, thrombospondin type 1 (TSP, and C-terminal growth factor cysteine knot (CT domain. While heparin sulphate proteoglycans reportedly mediate the interaction of Cyr61 with the matrix and cell surface, the role of other extracellular associated proteins has not been revealed.In this report, surface plasmon resonance (SPR experiments and solid-phase binding assays demonstrate that recombinant Cyr61 interacts with immobilized monomeric or multimeric vitronectin (VTNC with K(D in the nanomolar range. Notably, the binding site for Cyr61 was identified as the somatomedin B domain (SMTB(1-44 of VTNC, which mediates its interaction with PAI-1, uPAR, and integrin alphav beta3. Accordingly, PAI-1 outcompetes Cyr61 for binding to immobilized SMTB(1-44, and Cyr61 attenuates uPAR-mediated U937 adhesion to VTNC. In contrast, isothermal titration calorimetry shows that Cyr61 does not display high-affinity binding for SMTB(1-44 in solution. Nevertheless, competitive ELISA revealed that multimeric VTNC, heat-modified monomeric VTNC, or SMTB(1-44 at high concentrations attenuate Cyr61 binding to immobilized VTNC, while monomeric VTNC was ineffective. Therefore, immobilization of VTNC exposes cryptic epitopes that recognize Cyr61 with high affinity, as reported for a number of antibodies, beta-endorphin, and other molecules.The finding that Cyr61 interacts with the SMTB(1-44 domain suggests that VTNC represent a point of anchorage for CCN family members to the matrix. Results are discussed in the context of the role of CCN and VTNC in matrix biology and angiogenesis.

  13. Affinity and sequence specificity of DNA binding and site selection for primer synthesis by Escherichia coli primase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khopde, Sujata; Biswas, Esther E; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2002-12-17

    Primase is an essential DNA replication enzyme in Escherichia coli and responsible for primer synthesis during lagging strand DNA replication. Although the interaction of primase with single-stranded DNA plays an important role in primer RNA and Okazaki fragment synthesis, the mechanism of DNA binding and site selection for primer synthesis remains unknown. We have analyzed the energetics of DNA binding and the mechanism of site selection for the initiation of primer RNA synthesis on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Quantitative analysis of DNA binding by primase was carried out using a number of oligonucleotide sequences: oligo(dT)(25) and a 30 bp oligonucleotide derived from bacteriophage G4 origin (G4ori-wt). Primase bound both sequences with moderate affinity (K(d) = 1.2-1.4 x 10(-)(7) M); however, binding was stronger for G4ori-wt. G4ori-wt contained a CTG trinucleotide, which is a preferred site for initiation of primer synthesis. Analysis of DNA binding isotherms derived from primase binding to the oligonucleotide sequences by fluorescence anisotropy indicated that primase bound to DNA as a dimer, and this finding was further substantiated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and UV cross-linking of the primase-DNA complex. Dissection of the energetics involved in the primase-DNA interaction revealed a higher affinity of primase for DNA sequences containing the CTG triplet. This sequence preference of primase may likely be responsible for the initiation of primer synthesis in the CTG triplet sites in the E. coli lagging strand as well as in the origin of replication of bacteriophage G4.

  14. Accurate pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC class II binding affinity with improved binding core identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A key event in the generation of a cellular response against malicious organisms through the endocytic pathway is binding of peptidic antigens by major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC class II) molecules. The bound peptide is then presented on the cell surface where it can be recognized...... by T helper lymphocytes. NetMHCIIpan is a state-of-the-art method for the quantitative prediction of peptide binding to any human or mouse MHC class II molecule of known sequence. In this paper, we describe an updated version of the method with improved peptide binding register identification. Binding...... register prediction is concerned with determining the minimal core region of nine residues directly in contact with the MHC binding cleft, a crucial piece of information both for the identification and design of CD4+ T cell antigens. When applied to a set of 51 crystal structures of peptide-MHC complexes...

  15. Affinity of the enantiomers of. alpha. - and. beta. -cyclazocine for binding to the phencyclidine and. mu. opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, S.L.; Balster, R.L.; Martin, B.R. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The enantiomers in the {alpha} and {beta} series of cyclazocine were evaluated for their ability to bind to phencyclidine (PCP) and {mu}-opioid receptors in order to determine their receptor selectivity. The affinity of (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine for the PCP receptor was 1.5 greater than PCP itself. In contrast, (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine were 3-, 5- and 138-fold less potent than PCP, respectively. Scatchard analysis of saturable binding of ({sup 3}H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) also exhibited a homogeneous population of binding sites with an apparent K{sub D} of 1.9 nM and an estimated Bmax of 117 pM. (3H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) binding studies revealed that (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine (K{sub D} = 0.48 nM) was 31-, 1020- and 12,600-fold more potent than (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine, respectively, for binding to the {mu}-opioid receptor. These data show that, although (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine is a potent PCP receptor ligand consistent with its potent PCP-like discriminative stimulus effects, it shows little selectivity for PCP receptor since it also potently displaces {mu}-opioid binding. However, these cyclazocine isomers, due to their extraordinary degree of stereoselectivity, may be useful in characterizing the structural requirements for benzomorphans having activity at the PCP receptor.

  16. A Gly/Ala switch contributes to high affinity binding of benzoxazinone-based non-peptide oxytocin receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawtin, Stuart R; Ha, Sookhee N; Pettibone, Douglas J; Wheatley, Mark

    2005-01-17

    Non-peptide antagonists of the oxytocin receptor (OTR) have been developed to prevent pre-term labour. The benzoxazinone-based antagonists L-371,257 and L-372,662 display pronounced species-dependent pharmacology with respect to selectivity for the OTR over the V(1a) vasopressin receptor. Examination of receptor sequences from different species identified Ala(318) in helix 7 of the human OTR as a candidate discriminator required for high affinity binding. The mutant receptor [A318G]OTR was engineered and characterised using ligands representing many different chemical classes. Of all the ligands investigated, only the benzoxazinone-based antagonists had decreased affinity for [A318G]OTR. Molecular modelling revealed that Ala(318) provides a direct hydrophobic contact with a methoxy group of L-371,257 and L-372,662.

  17. High-affinity naloxone binding to filamin a prevents mu opioid receptor-Gs coupling underlying opioid tolerance and dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoau-Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists enhance opioid analgesia and reduce analgesic tolerance and dependence by preventing a G protein coupling switch (Gi/o to Gs by the mu opioid receptor (MOR, although the binding site of such ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists was previously unknown. Here we show that with approximately 200-fold higher affinity than for the mu opioid receptor, naloxone binds a pentapeptide segment of the scaffolding protein filamin A, known to interact with the mu opioid receptor, to disrupt its chronic opioid-induced Gs coupling. Naloxone binding to filamin A is demonstrated by the absence of [(3H]-and FITC-naloxone binding in the melanoma M2 cell line that does not contain filamin or MOR, contrasting with strong [(3H]naloxone binding to its filamin A-transfected subclone A7 or to immunopurified filamin A. Naloxone binding to A7 cells was displaced by naltrexone but not by morphine, indicating a target distinct from opioid receptors and perhaps unique to naloxone and its analogs. The intracellular location of this binding site was confirmed by FITC-NLX binding in intact A7 cells. Overlapping peptide fragments from c-terminal filamin A revealed filamin A(2561-2565 as the binding site, and an alanine scan of this pentapeptide revealed an essential mid-point lysine. Finally, in organotypic striatal slice cultures, peptide fragments containing filamin A(2561-2565 abolished the prevention by 10 pM naloxone of both the chronic morphine-induced mu opioid receptor-Gs coupling and the downstream cAMP excitatory signal. These results establish filamin A as the target for ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists previously shown to enhance opioid analgesia and to prevent opioid tolerance and dependence.

  18. High-Affinity Naloxone Binding to Filamin A Prevents Mu Opioid Receptor–Gs Coupling Underlying Opioid Tolerance and Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hoau-Yan; Frankfurt, Maya; Burns, Lindsay H.

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists enhance opioid analgesia and reduce analgesic tolerance and dependence by preventing a G protein coupling switch (Gi/o to Gs) by the mu opioid receptor (MOR), although the binding site of such ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists was previously unknown. Here we show that with approximately 200-fold higher affinity than for the mu opioid receptor, naloxone binds a pentapeptide segment of the scaffolding protein filamin A, known to interact with the mu opioid receptor, to disrupt its chronic opioid-induced Gs coupling. Naloxone binding to filamin A is demonstrated by the absence of [3H]-and FITC-naloxone binding in the melanoma M2 cell line that does not contain filamin or MOR, contrasting with strong [3H]naloxone binding to its filamin A-transfected subclone A7 or to immunopurified filamin A. Naloxone binding to A7 cells was displaced by naltrexone but not by morphine, indicating a target distinct from opioid receptors and perhaps unique to naloxone and its analogs. The intracellular location of this binding site was confirmed by FITC-NLX binding in intact A7 cells. Overlapping peptide fragments from c-terminal filamin A revealed filamin A2561-2565 as the binding site, and an alanine scan of this pentapeptide revealed an essential mid-point lysine. Finally, in organotypic striatal slice cultures, peptide fragments containing filamin A2561-2565 abolished the prevention by 10 pM naloxone of both the chronic morphine-induced mu opioid receptor–Gs coupling and the downstream cAMP excitatory signal. These results establish filamin A as the target for ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists previously shown to enhance opioid analgesia and to prevent opioid tolerance and dependence. PMID:18253501

  19. High-affinity naloxone binding to filamin a prevents mu opioid receptor-Gs coupling underlying opioid tolerance and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hoau-Yan; Frankfurt, Maya; Burns, Lindsay H

    2008-02-06

    Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists enhance opioid analgesia and reduce analgesic tolerance and dependence by preventing a G protein coupling switch (Gi/o to Gs) by the mu opioid receptor (MOR), although the binding site of such ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists was previously unknown. Here we show that with approximately 200-fold higher affinity than for the mu opioid receptor, naloxone binds a pentapeptide segment of the scaffolding protein filamin A, known to interact with the mu opioid receptor, to disrupt its chronic opioid-induced Gs coupling. Naloxone binding to filamin A is demonstrated by the absence of [(3)H]-and FITC-naloxone binding in the melanoma M2 cell line that does not contain filamin or MOR, contrasting with strong [(3)H]naloxone binding to its filamin A-transfected subclone A7 or to immunopurified filamin A. Naloxone binding to A7 cells was displaced by naltrexone but not by morphine, indicating a target distinct from opioid receptors and perhaps unique to naloxone and its analogs. The intracellular location of this binding site was confirmed by FITC-NLX binding in intact A7 cells. Overlapping peptide fragments from c-terminal filamin A revealed filamin A(2561-2565) as the binding site, and an alanine scan of this pentapeptide revealed an essential mid-point lysine. Finally, in organotypic striatal slice cultures, peptide fragments containing filamin A(2561-2565) abolished the prevention by 10 pM naloxone of both the chronic morphine-induced mu opioid receptor-Gs coupling and the downstream cAMP excitatory signal. These results establish filamin A as the target for ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists previously shown to enhance opioid analgesia and to prevent opioid tolerance and dependence.

  20. Development of Phage-Based Antibody Fragment Reagents for Affinity Enrichment of Bacterial Immunoglobulin G Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säll, Anna; Sjöholm, Kristoffer; Waldemarson, Sofia; Happonen, Lotta; Karlsson, Christofer; Persson, Helena; Malmström, Johan

    2015-11-06

    Disease and death caused by bacterial infections are global health problems. Effective bacterial strategies are required to promote survival and proliferation within a human host, and it is important to explore how this adaption occurs. However, the detection and quantification of bacterial virulence factors in complex biological samples are technically demanding challenges. These can be addressed by combining targeted affinity enrichment of antibodies with the sensitivity of liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-SRM MS). However, many virulence factors have evolved properties that make specific detection by conventional antibodies difficult. We here present an antibody format that is particularly well suited for detection and analysis of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-binding virulence factors. As proof of concept, we have generated single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies that specifically target the IgG-binding surface proteins M1 and H of Streptococcus pyogenes. The binding ability of the developed scFv is demonstrated against both recombinant soluble protein M1 and H as well as the intact surface proteins on a wild-type S. pyogenes strain. Additionally, the capacity of the developed scFv antibodies to enrich their target proteins from both simple and complex backgrounds, thereby allowing for detection and quantification with LC-SRM MS, was demonstrated. We have established a workflow that allows for affinity enrichment of bacterial virulence factors.

  1. A Novel Carbohydrate-binding Module from Sugar Cane Soil Metagenome Featuring Unique Structural and Carbohydrate Affinity Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Bruna Medeia; Alvarez, Thabata Maria; Zanphorlin, Letícia Maria; Ematsu, Gabriela Cristina; Barud, Hernane; Polikarpov, Igor; Ruller, Roberto; Gilbert, Harry J.; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Squina, Fabio Marcio

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are appended to glycoside hydrolases and can contribute to the degradation of complex recalcitrant substrates such as the plant cell wall. For application in bioethanol production, novel enzymes with high catalytic activity against recalcitrant lignocellulosic material are being explored and developed. In this work, we report the functional and structural study of CBM_E1, which was discovered through a metagenomics approach and is the founding member of a novel CBM family, CBM81. CBM_E1, which is linked to an endoglucanase, displayed affinity for mixed linked β1,3-β1,4-glucans, xyloglucan, Avicel, and cellooligosaccharides. The crystal structure of CBM_E1 in complex with cellopentaose displayed a canonical β-sandwich fold comprising two β-sheets. The planar ligand binding site, observed in a parallel orientation with the β-strands, is a typical feature of type A CBMs, although the expected affinity for bacterial crystalline cellulose was not detected. Conversely, the binding to soluble glucans was enthalpically driven, which is typical of type B modules. These unique properties of CBM_E1 are at the interface between type A and type B CBMs. PMID:27621314

  2. ZipA binds to FtsZ with high affinity and enhances the stability of FtsZ protofilaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Kuchibhatla

    Full Text Available A bacterial membrane protein ZipA that tethers FtsZ to the membrane is known to promote FtsZ assembly. In this study, the binding of ZipA to FtsZ was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy. ZipA was found to bind to FtsZ with high affinities at three different (6.0, 6.8 and 8.0 pHs, albeit the binding affinity decreased with increasing pH. Further, thick bundles of FtsZ protofilaments were observed in the presence of ZipA under the pH conditions used in this study indicating that ZipA can promote FtsZ assembly and stabilize FtsZ polymers under unfavorable conditions. Bis-ANS, a hydrophobic probe, decreased the interaction of FtsZ and ZipA indicating that the interaction between FtsZ and ZipA is hydrophobic in nature. ZipA prevented the dilution induced disassembly of FtsZ polymers suggesting that it stabilizes FtsZ protofilaments. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled ZipA was found to be uniformly distributed along the length of the FtsZ protofilaments indicating that ZipA stabilizes FtsZ protofilaments by cross-linking them.

  3. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Benedetti, M.F.; Ponthieu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to

  4. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: Focus on high-affinity binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura Friis; Klein, Anders Bue

    2014-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects...

  5. Synthesis of Sulochrin-125I and Its Binding Affinity as α-Glucosidase Inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lestari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of diabetics patients have type 2 diabetes mellitus or non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus can be done by inhibiting α-glucosidase enzyme which converts carbohydrates into glucose. Sulochrin is one of the potential compounds which can inhibit the function of α-glucosidase enzyme. This study was carried out to obtain data of sulochrin binding with α-glucosidase enzyme as α-glucosidase inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA method. Primary reagent required in RBA method is labeled radioactive ligand (radioligand. In this study, the radioligand was sulochrin-125I and prior to sulochrin-125I synthesis, the sulochrin-I was synthesized. Sulochrin-I and sulochrin-125I were synthesized and their bindings were studied using Radioligand Binding Assay method. Sulochrin-I was synthesized with molecular formula C17H15O7I and molecular weight 457.9940. Sulochrin-125I was synthesized from sulochrin-I by isotope exchange method. From the RBA method, dissociation constant (Kd and maximum binding (Bmax were obtained 26.316 nM and Bmax 9.302 nM respectively. This low Kd indicated that sulochrin was can bind to α-glucosidase

  6. Identification of novel DNA binding proteins using DNA affinity chromatography-pulldown

    OpenAIRE

    Jutras, Brandon L; Verma, Ashutosh; Stevenson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Methods are presented through which one may isolate and identify novel bacterial DNA-binding proteins. Briefly, the DNA sequence of interest is affixed to beads, then incubated with bacterial cytoplasmic extract. Washes with buffers containing non-specific DNA and low salt concentrations will remove non-adhering and low-specificity DNA-binding proteins, while subsequent washes with higher salt concentrations will elute more specific DNA-binding proteins. Eluted proteins may then be identified...

  7. Measurement of the relative binding affinity of zearalenone, alpha-zearalenol and beta-zearalenol for uterine and oviduct estrogen receptors in swine, rats and chickens: an indicator of estrogenic potencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, D W; Picken, C A; Murphy, L C; Buhr, M M

    1989-01-01

    1. The relative binding affinity of zearalenone, alpha-zearalenol, and beta-zearalenol for estrogen receptors was determined in the pig, rat and chicken. 2. Similar relative binding patterns were observed, with alpha-zearalenol exhibiting greater affinity than zearalenone and beta-zearalenol the least binding affinity in all species. 3. The relative binding affinity of alpha-zearalenol was greater in pig, than in rat and significantly greater than in chicken. 4. Interspecies differences in zearalenone sensitivity may be due to the binding affinity of alpha-zearalenol for estrogen receptors and differences in zearalenone metabolites formed.

  8. Affinity capillary electrophoresis and quantum mechanical calculations applied to the investigation of hexaarylbenzene-based receptor binding with lithium ion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ehala, Sille; Toman, Petr; Rathore, R.; Makrlík, E.; Kašička, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 18 (2011), s. 2433-2440 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/0675; GA AV ČR 1ET400500402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : affinity capillary electrophoresis * binding constant * hexaarylbenzene-based receptor Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2011

  9. Tuning affinity and reversibility for O2 binding in dinuclear Co(II) complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad, Mads Sørensen; Johansson, Frank Bartnik; Seidler-Egdal, Rune Kirk

    2013-01-01

    )]2+ and [Co2(bpbp)- (O2)(CCl3CO2)]2+. The O2 affinities can be qualitatively correlated with both the pKa value of the parent acetic or chloroacetic acid and the redox potential of the O2 2−/O2˙− couple measured for the peroxidebridged complexes. The redox potential varies between 510 mV (vs. Fc0...... qualitatively consistent with the expectation from the pKa of the parent 1-naphthoic acid. Introduction Reversible dioxygen binding is a life-supporting process for respiring organisms carried out by three classes of metalloproteins: hemoglobin, hemerythrin, and hemocyanin, the latter two...

  10. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across...... that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation...

  11. Evidence that the low-affinity folate-binding protein in erythrocyte hemolysate is identical to hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1981-01-01

    Gel filtration studies on erythrocyte hemolysate demonstrated the presence of a folate binding protein, apparently of the low-affinity type, that co-elutes with hemoglobin. Further, the folate binder eluted with a low salt concentration after DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B anion-exchange chromatography of erythrocyte hemolysate at pH 6.3. The chromatographic behavior of hemoglobin labeled with [3H]folate was so similar to that of the present binder as to suggest that the folate binder in erythrocytes is in fact hemoglobin

  12. Improving binding mode and binding affinity predictions of docking by ligand-based search of protein conformations: evaluation in D3R grand challenge 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianjin; Yan, Chengfei; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2017-08-01

    The growing number of protein-ligand complex structures, particularly the structures of proteins co-bound with different ligands, in the Protein Data Bank helps us tackle two major challenges in molecular docking studies: the protein flexibility and the scoring function. Here, we introduced a systematic strategy by using the information embedded in the known protein-ligand complex structures to improve both binding mode and binding affinity predictions. Specifically, a ligand similarity calculation method was employed to search a receptor structure with a bound ligand sharing high similarity with the query ligand for the docking use. The strategy was applied to the two datasets (HSP90 and MAP4K4) in recent D3R Grand Challenge 2015. In addition, for the HSP90 dataset, a system-specific scoring function (ITScore2_hsp90) was generated by recalibrating our statistical potential-based scoring function (ITScore2) using the known protein-ligand complex structures and the statistical mechanics-based iterative method. For the HSP90 dataset, better performances were achieved for both binding mode and binding affinity predictions comparing with the original ITScore2 and with ensemble docking. For the MAP4K4 dataset, although there were only eight known protein-ligand complex structures, our docking strategy achieved a comparable performance with ensemble docking. Our method for receptor conformational selection and iterative method for the development of system-specific statistical potential-based scoring functions can be easily applied to other protein targets that have a number of protein-ligand complex structures available to improve predictions on binding.

  13. THE USE OF DEDICATED PEPTIDE LIBRARIES PERMITS THE DISCOVERY OF HIGH-AFFINITY BINDING PEPTIDES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEKOSTER, HS; AMONS, R; BENCKHUIJSEN, WE; FEIJLBRIEF, M; SCHELLEKENS, GA; DRIJFHOUT, JW

    1995-01-01

    The motif for peptide binding to monoclonal antibody mAb A16, which is known to be directed against glycoprotein D of Herpes simplex virus type 1, was determined using two dedicated peptide libraries. As a starting point for this study we used an A-16 binding lead sequence, which had previously been

  14. Liposome-binding assays to assess specificity and affinity of phospholipid-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julkowska, M.M.; Rankenberg, J.M.; Testerink, C.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-lipid interactions play an important role in cellular protein relocation, activation and signal transduction. The liposome-binding assay is a simple and inexpensive method to examine protein-lipid binding in vitro. The phospholipids used for liposome production are dried and hydrated.

  15. Photocontrol of Anion Binding Affinity to a Bis-urea Receptor Derived from Stiff-Stilbene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Sander J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2017-01-01

    Toward the development of photoresponsive anion receptors, a stiff-stilbene photoswitch has been equipped' with two urea anion -binding motifs. Photoinduced E/Z isomerization has been studied in detail by UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy. Titration experiments (H-1 NMR) reveal strong binding of acetate

  16. Synthesis, structure, DNA/BSA binding and antibacterial studies of NNO tridentate Schiff base metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthi, Marimuthu; Ramu, Andy

    2017-12-01

    A new salicylaldehyde derived 2,4-diiodo-6-((2-phenylaminoethylimino)methyl)phenol Schiff base(L) and its transition metal complexes of the type MLCl where, M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized. The coordination mode of Schiff base holding NNO donor atoms with metal ions was well investigated by elemental analysis, ESI-mass as well as IR, UV-vis, CV and NMR spectral studies. The binding efficiency and mode of these complexes with biological macromolecules viz., herring sperm DNA (HS- DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been explored through various spectroscopic techniques. The characteristic changes in absorption, emission and, circular dichroism spectra of the complexes with DNA indicate the noticeable interaction between them. From the all spectral information complexes could interact with DNA via non-intercalation mode of binding. The hyperchromisim in absorption band and hypochromisim in emission intensity of BSA with different complex concentrations shown significant information, and the binding affinity value has been predicted from Stern-Volmer plots. Further, all the complexes could cleave the circular plasmid pUC19 DNA efficiently by using an activator H2O2. The ligand and all metal(II) complexes showed good antibacterial activities. The molecular docking studies of the complexes with DNA were performed in order to make a comparison and conclusion with spectral technic results.

  17. Analysis of the sugar-binding specificity of mannose-binding-type Jacalin-related lectins by frontal affinity chromatography--an approach to functional classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Uchiyama, Noboru; Peumans, Willy J; Van Damme, Els J M; Totani, Kiichiro; Ito, Yukishige; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-03-01

    The Jacalin-related lectin (JRL) family comprises galactose-binding-type (gJRLs) and mannose-binding-type (mJRLs) lectins. Although the documented occurrence of gJRLs is confined to the family Moraceae, mJRLs are widespread in the plant kingdom. A detailed comparison of sugar-binding specificity was made by frontal affinity chromatography to corroborate the structure-function relationships of the extended mJRL subfamily. Eight mJRLs covering a broad taxonomic range were used: Artocarpin from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit, Moraceae), BanLec from Musa acuminata (banana, Musaceae), Calsepa from Calystegia sepium (hedge bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CCA from Castanea crenata (Japanese chestnut, Fagaceae), Conarva from Convolvulus arvensis (bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CRLL from Cycas revoluta (King Sago palm tree, Cycadaceae), Heltuba from Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke, Asteraceae) and MornigaM from Morus nigra (black mulberry, Moraceae). The result using 103 pyridylaminated glycans clearly divided the mJRLs into two major groups, each of which was further divided into two subgroups based on the preference for high-mannose-type N-glycans. This criterion also applied to the binding preference for complex-type N-glycans. Notably, the result of cluster analysis of the amino acid sequences clearly corresponded to the above specificity classification. Thus, marked correlation between the sugar-binding specificity of mJRLs and their phylogeny should shed light on the functional significance of JRLs.

  18. Amyloid-beta binds catalase with high affinity and inhibits hydrogen peroxide breakdown.

    OpenAIRE

    Milton, N G

    1999-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) specifically bound purified catalase with high affinity and inhibited catalase breakdown of H(2)O(2). The Abeta-induced catalase inhibition involved formation of the inactive catalase Compound II and was reversible. CatalaseAbeta interactions provide rapid functional assays for the cytotoxic domain of Abeta and suggest a mechanism for some of the observed actions of Abeta plus catalase in vitro.

  19. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politi, Regina [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R{sup 2} = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R{sup 2} = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables

  20. Cooperative binding of copper(I) to the metal binding domains in Menkes disease protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P Y; Bonander, N; Møller, L B

    1999-01-01

    spectroscopy, and their copper(I) binding properties have been determined. Structure prediction derived from far-UV CD indicates that the secondary structure is similar in the three proteins and dominated by beta-sheet. The tryptophan fluorescence maximum is blue-shifted in the constructs containing two...... and six MBDs relative to the monomer, suggesting more structurally buried tryptophan(s), compared to the single MBD construct. Copper(I) binding has been studied by equilibrium dialysis under anaerobic conditions. We show that the copper(I) binding to constructs containing two and six domains...... is cooperative, with Hill coefficients of 1.5 and 4, respectively. The apparent affinities are described by K(0.5), determined to be 65 microM and 19 microM for constructs containing two and six domains, respectively. Our data reveal a unique regulation of Menkes protein upon a change in copper(I) concentration...

  1. Immobilized metal ion affinity hollow-fibre membranes obtained by the direct grafting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, Mariano; Navarro del Cañizo, Agustín. A.; Camperi, Silvia A.; Wolman, Federico J.; Smolko, Eduardo E.; Cascone, Osvaldo

    1999-06-01

    An immobilized metal ion affinity hollow fibre was prepared by radiation-induced direct grafting of glycidylmethacrylate (GMA) on hydrophilized polyethylene membranes. The epoxy group was converted into an iminodiacetate by iminodiacetic acid treatment. The effect of the radiation dose, salt inhibitors, methanol and GMA concentration, on the grafting degree was studied. The degree of grafting was closely related to the GMA concentration. Salt inhibitors failed in the production of a differential effect on the grafting and homopolymerization processes. Between 30 and 35% of methanol, there is a maximum yield, and no grafting was obtained with a methanol concentration above 50%. Water flux dropped exponentially with the increase in the grafting degree. Scanning-electron microscopy showed that the graft branches are formed on the pores. The pectinesterase adsorption capacity of the membranes was of the same order as of the commercial chelating soft gels.

  2. Immobilised Metal Affinity Chromatography (IMAC) Beads for Lysozyme Separation: Synthesis and Characterization Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatin Mohd Nasir; Sofiah Hamzah; Amirah Hamzah; Nora'aini Ali; Marinah Mohd Ariffin

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been established as a highly specific chromatographic technique for the production of enzymes and proteins including lysozyme. This study aimed to prepare and characterize the IMAC beads for lysozyme separation. Silica gel served as chromatographic matrix which has been coated with chitosan layer and crosslinked with glutaraldehyde (GTA-CTS-SiO 2 ) since it is very convenient to promote fixation. Various IMAC ligands were immobilized by chelating 1500 mg/ l Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , Fe 2+ , Fe 3+ and Al 3+ ions, respectively on GTA-CTS-SiO 2 . IMAC which was immobilized with 1200mg/ l Cu 2+ exhibited the maximal immobilization capacity (27.08mg/ g) of within 30 minutes incubation time. This fundamental study can be a momentous pathway to develop an efficient chromatographic system for lysozyme separation in the future. (author)

  3. Mutational analysis of the high-affinity zinc binding site validates a refined human dopamine transporter homology model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stockner

    Full Text Available The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT. Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22% and (iii the extracellular loop 2 (EL2 of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter's movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle.

  4. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure based modeling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R2=0.55 and CCR=0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R2=0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. PMID:25058446

  5. Immobilized metal-affinity chromatography protein-recovery screening is predictive of crystallographic structure success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ryan; Kelley, Angela; Leibly, David; Nakazawa Hewitt, Stephen; Napuli, Alberto; Van Voorhis, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    An overview of the methods used for high-throughput cloning and protein-expression screening of SSGCID hexahistidine recombinant proteins is provided. It is demonstrated that screening for recombinant proteins that are highly recoverable from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography improves the likelihood that a protein will produce a structure. The recombinant expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli continues to be a major bottleneck in structural genomics. The establishment of reliable protocols for the performance of small-scale expression and solubility testing is an essential component of structural genomic pipelines. The SSGCID Protein Production Group at the University of Washington (UW-PPG) has developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) protocol for the measurement of protein recovery from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) which predicts successful purification of hexahistidine-tagged proteins. The protocol is based on manual transfer of samples using multichannel pipettors and 96-well plates and does not depend on the use of robotic platforms. This protocol has been applied to evaluate the expression and solubility of more than 4000 proteins expressed in E. coli. The UW-PPG also screens large-scale preparations for recovery from IMAC prior to purification. Analysis of these results show that our low-cost non-automated approach is a reliable method for the HTS demands typical of large structural genomic projects. This paper provides a detailed description of these protocols and statistical analysis of the SSGCID screening results. The results demonstrate that screening for proteins that yield high recovery after IMAC, both after small-scale and large-scale expression, improves the selection of proteins that can be successfully purified and will yield a crystal structure

  6. Cellulose Nanocrystals Obtained from Rice By-Products and Their Binding Potential to Metallic Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Albernaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to develop and optimize a method to obtain cellulose nanocrystals from the agricultural by-products rice husk and straw and to evaluate their electrostructural modifications in the presence of metallic ions. First, different particle formation conditions and routes were tested and analyzed by spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and Zeta potential measurements. Then, electrostructural effects of ions Na(I, Cd(II, and Al(III on the optimized nanoparticles were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and electrical conductivity (EC assessments. The produced cellulose nanocrystals adopted a rod-like shape. AFM height distribution and EC data indicated that the nanocrystals have more affinity in binding with Na(I > Al(III > Cd(II. These data suggest that the use of these cellulose nanocrystals in the bioremediation field is promising, both in metal sorption from wastewater and as an alternative for water desalination.

  7. Relative binding affinity prediction of farnesoid X receptor in the D3R Grand Challenge 2 using FEP+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Christina; Rippmann, Friedrich; Kuhn, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Physics-based free energy simulations have increasingly become an important tool for predicting binding affinity and the recent introduction of automated protocols has also paved the way towards a more widespread use in the pharmaceutical industry. The D3R 2016 Grand Challenge 2 provided an opportunity to blindly test the commercial free energy calculation protocol FEP+ and assess its performance relative to other affinity prediction methods. The present D3R free energy prediction challenge was built around two experimental data sets involving inhibitors of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) which is a promising anticancer drug target. The FXR binding site is predominantly hydrophobic with few conserved interaction motifs and strong induced fit effects making it a challenging target for molecular modeling and drug design. For both data sets, we achieved reasonable prediction accuracy (RMSD ≈ 1.4 kcal/mol, rank 3-4 according to RMSD out of 20 submissions) comparable to that of state-of-the-art methods in the field. Our D3R results boosted our confidence in the method and strengthen our desire to expand its applications in future in-house drug design projects.

  8. Sequence-selective topoisomerase II inhibition by anthracycline derivatives in SV40 DNA: Relationship with DNA binding affinity and cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capranico, G.; Kohn, K.W.; Pommier, Y.; Zunino, F.

    1990-01-01

    Topoisomerase II mediated double-strand breaks produced by anthracycline analogues were studied in SV40 DNA. The compounds included doxorubicin, daunorubicin, two doxorubicin stereoisomers (4'-epimer and β-anomer), and five chromophore-modified derivatives, with a wide range of cytotoxic activity and DNA binding affinity. Cleavage of 32 P-end-labeled DNA fragments was visualized by autoradiography of agarose and polyacrylamide gels. Structure-activity relationships indicated that alterations in the chromophore structure greatly affected drug action on topoisomerase II. In particular, removal of substituents on position 4 of the D ring resulted in more active inducers of cleavage with lower DNA binding affinity. The stereochemistry between the sugar and the chromophore was also essential for activity. All the active anthracyclines induced a single region of prominent cleavage in the entire SV40 DNA, which resulted from a cluster of sites between nucleotides 4237 and 4294. DNA cleavage intensity patterns exhibited differences among analogues and were also dependent upon drug concentration. Intensity at a given site dependent on both stimulatory and suppressive effects depending upon drug concentration and DNA sequence. A good correlation was found between cytotoxicity and intensity of topoisomerase II mediated DNA breakage

  9. Isolation and partial characterization of gypsy moth BTR-270, an anionic brush border membrane glycoconjugate that binds Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxins with high affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algimantas P. Valaitis; Jeremy L. Jenkins; Mi Kyong Lee; Donald H. Dean; Karen J. Garner

    2001-01-01

    BTR-270, a gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) brush border membrane molecule that binds Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1A toxins with high affinity, was purified by preparative gel electrophoresis. Rabbit antibodies specific for the Bt toxin-binding molecule were raised. Attempts to label BTR-270 by protein-directed techniques were...

  10. DNA binding affinity of a macrocyclic copper(II) complex: Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hakimi, Mohammad; Morovati, Teimoor; Fatahi, Navid

    2017-08-03

    The interaction of a novel macrocyclic copper(II) complex, ([CuL(ClO 4 ) 2 ] that L is 1,3,6,10,12,15-hexaazatricyclo[13.3.1.1 6,10 ]eicosane) with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated by various physicochemical techniques and molecular docking at simulated physiological conditions (pH = 7.4). The absorption spectra of the Cu(II) complex with ct-DNA showed a marked hyperchroism with 10 nm blue shift. The intrinsic binding constant (K b ) was determined as 1.25 × 10 4 M -1 , which is more in keeping with the groove binding with DNA. Furthermore, competitive fluorimetric studies with Hoechst33258 have shown that Cu(II) complex exhibits the ability to displace the ct-DNA-bound Hoechst33258 indicating that it binds to ct-DNA in strong competition with Hoechst33258 for the groove binding. Also, no change in the relative viscosity of ct-DNA and fluorescence intensity of ct-DNA-MB complex in the present of Cu(II) complex is another evidence to groove binding. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the binding reaction. The experimental results were in agreement with the results obtained via molecular docking study.

  11. High-affinity single-domain binding proteins with a binary-code interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Akiko; Gilbreth, Ryan N; Esaki, Kaori; Tereshko, Valentina; Koide, Shohei

    2007-04-17

    High degrees of sequence and conformation complexity found in natural protein interaction interfaces are generally considered essential for achieving tight and specific interactions. However, it has been demonstrated that specific antibodies can be built by using an interface with a binary code consisting of only Tyr and Ser. This surprising result might be attributed to yet undefined properties of the antibody scaffold that uniquely enhance its capacity for target binding. In this work we tested the generality of the binary-code interface by engineering binding proteins based on a single-domain scaffold. We show that Tyr/Ser binary-code interfaces consisting of only 15-20 positions within a fibronectin type III domain (FN3; 95 residues) are capable of producing specific binding proteins (termed "monobodies") with a low-nanomolar K(d). A 2.35-A x-ray crystal structure of a monobody in complex with its target, maltose-binding protein, and mutation analysis revealed dominant contributions of Tyr residues to binding as well as striking molecular mimicry of a maltose-binding protein substrate, beta-cyclodextrin, by the Tyr/Ser binary interface. This work suggests that an interaction interface with low chemical diversity but with significant conformational diversity is generally sufficient for tight and specific molecular recognition, providing fundamental insights into factors governing protein-protein interactions.

  12. VP24-Karyopherin Alpha Binding Affinities Differ between Ebolavirus Species, Influencing Interferon Inhibition and VP24 Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Toni M.; Edwards, Megan R.; Diederichs, Audrey; Alinger, Joshua B.; Leung, Daisy W.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Basler, Christopher F.; Lyles, Douglas S.

    2016-12-14

    ABSTRACT

    Zaire ebolavirus(EBOV),Bundibugyo ebolavirus(BDBV), andReston ebolavirus(RESTV) belong to the same genus but exhibit different virulence properties. VP24 protein, a structural protein present in all family members, blocks interferon (IFN) signaling and likely contributes to virulence. Inhibition of IFN signaling by EBOV VP24 (eVP24) involves its interaction with the NPI-1 subfamily of karyopherin alpha (KPNA) nuclear transporters. Here, we evaluated eVP24, BDBV VP24 (bVP24), and RESTV VP24 (rVP24) interactions with three NPI-1 subfamily KPNAs (KPNA1, KPNA5, and KPNA6). Using purified proteins, we demonstrated that each VP24 binds to each of the three NPI-1 KPNAs. bVP24, however, exhibited approximately 10-fold-lower KPNA binding affinity than either eVP24 or rVP24. Cell-based assays also indicate that bVP24 exhibits decreased KPNA interaction, decreased suppression of IFN induced gene expression, and a decreased half-life in transfected cells compared to eVP24 or rVP24. Amino acid sequence alignments between bVP24 and eVP24 also identified residues within and surrounding the previously defined eVP24-KPNA5 binding interface that decrease eVP24-KPNA affinity or bVP24-KPNA affinity. VP24 mutations that lead to reduced KPNA binding affinity also decrease IFN inhibition and shorten VP24 half-lives. These data identify novel functional differences in VP24-KPNA interaction and reveal a novel impact of the VP24-KPNA interaction on VP24 stability.

    IMPORTANCEThe interaction of Ebola virus (EBOV) VP24 protein with host karyopherin alpha (KPNA) proteins blocks type I interferon (IFN) signaling, which is a central component of the host innate immune response to viral infection. Here, we quantitatively compared the

  13. Autoradiography: (/sup 125/I)SCH 23982 binds with picomolar affinity to D1 sites on striatonigral neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altar, C.A.; Marien, M.R.

    1986-03-01

    SCH 23390 is selective D1 antagonist. The authors show for the first time, with iodinated SCH 23390, (/sup 125/I)SCH 23982, D1 binding sites on striatonigral neurons. Rat brain sections were covered for 1 hr by a pH 7.6 TRIS buffer containing 2-770 pM (/sup 125/I)SCH 23982, rinsed 2 min at 4 /sup 0/C, dried, and exposed to film for 18 hr. (/sup 125/I)SCH 23982 was displaced by D1 (SCH 23390; IC50= 200 pM; cis-flupenthixol, 10 nM; SKF 38393, 90 nM) but not D2 (sulpiride, LY171555) ligands. Intermediate D1 binding was found in the internal capsule and entopeduncular nucleus. Striatal quinolinate (100 nmol) decreased nigral and striatal D1 binding. Intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6 ..mu..g) that destroyed > 90% of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons did not alter nigral or striatal D1 binding. Thus, (/sup 125/I)SCH 23982 labels with pM affinity D1 sites that reside on striatonigral neurons.

  14. Affinity partitioning of a Cellulomonas fimi beta-mannanase with a mannan-binding module in galactomannan/starch aqueous two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antov, Mirjana; Anderson, Lars; Andersson, Alexandra; Tjerneld, Folke; Stålbrand, Henrik

    2006-08-04

    A new approach in affinity separations was studied by partitioning of Cellulomonas fimi beta-mannanase (EC 3.2.1.78) containing a mannan-binding module in galactomannan/hydroxypropyl starch aqueous two-phase system. Comparison was made with a truncated version of C. fimi beta-mannanase which lacked the mannan-binding module. Results showed that affinity partitioning of the beta-mannanase was achieved due to biospecificity of the mannan-binding module towards the top phase containing galactomannan. Experiments were conducted at pH 8 to prevent enzyme degradation of the phase containing galactomannan. Removal of the top phase polymer was accomplished by beta-mannanase degradation allowed by shifting to the optimal pH 6. In the combination with the genetic fusion of any given protein to the mannan-binding module, the results envision a general procedure for primary affinity recovery of such fusion proteins.

  15. Microscale characterization of the binding specificity and affinity of a monoclonal antisulfotyrosyl IgG antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, K.S.; Bradbury, A.R.; Heegaard, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    complicated by the absence of specific immunoreagents (antibodies) for this modification as well as the chemical lability of the sulfate group. Here, we investigate the properties of a novel mAb against sulfated tyrosyl groups (anti-Tyr(SO(3)H) antibody) using CE and a panel of sulfated and nonsulfated...... peptides and proteins. The data show that the anti-Tyr(SO(3)H) antibody is completely specific for compounds containing sulfated tyrosyls. Affinity electrophoresis experiments allowed us to estimate dissociation constants for sulfated hirudin fragment (56-65), gastrin-17, and cholecystokinin octapeptide...

  16. Integrating in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide binding affinity to HLA-Cw*0102: a bioinformatic approach to the prediction of new epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A Walshe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Predictive models of peptide-Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC binding affinity are important components of modern computational immunovaccinology. Here, we describe the development and deployment of a reliable peptide-binding prediction method for a previously poorly-characterized human MHC class I allele, HLA-Cw*0102.Using an in-house, flow cytometry-based MHC stabilization assay we generated novel peptide binding data, from which we derived a precise two-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (2D-QSAR binding model. This allowed us to explore the peptide specificity of HLA-Cw*0102 molecule in detail. We used this model to design peptides optimized for HLA-Cw*0102-binding. Experimental analysis showed these peptides to have high binding affinities for the HLA-Cw*0102 molecule. As a functional validation of our approach, we also predicted HLA-Cw*0102-binding peptides within the HIV-1 genome, identifying a set of potent binding peptides. The most affine of these binding peptides was subsequently determined to be an epitope recognized in a subset of HLA-Cw*0102-positive individuals chronically infected with HIV-1.A functionally-validated in silico-in vitro approach to the reliable and efficient prediction of peptide binding to a previously uncharacterized human MHC allele HLA-Cw*0102 was developed. This technique is generally applicable to all T cell epitope identification problems in immunology and vaccinology.

  17. Na-K pump site density and ouabain binding affinity in cultured chick heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobaugh, L.A.; Lieberman, M.

    1987-01-01

    The possible existence of multiple [ 3 H]ouabain binding sites and the relationship between ouabain binding and Na-K pump inhibition in cardiac muscle were studied using cultured embryonic chick heart cells. [ 3 H]ouabain bound to a single class of sites in 0.5 mM K (0.5 Ko) with an association rate constant (k+1) of 3.4 X 10(4) M-1.s-1 and a dissociation rate constant (k-1) of 0.0095 s. Maximal specific [ 3 H]ouabain binding RT to myocyte-enriched cultures is 11.7 pmol/mg protein and Kd is 0.43 microM in 0.5 Ko, whereas Kd,apparent is 6.6 microM in 5.4 Ko. The number of binding sites per myocyte was calculated by correcting for the contribution of fibroblasts in myocyte-enriched cultures using data from homogeneous fibroblast cultures (RT = 3.3 pmol/mg protein; Kd = 0.19 microM in 0.5 Ko). Equivalence of [ 3 H]ouabain binding sites and Na-K pumps was implied by agreement between maximal specific binding of [ 3 H]ouabain and 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody directed against Na+-K+-ATPase (approximately 2 X 10(6) sites/cell). However, [ 3 H]ouabain binding occurred at lower concentrations than inhibition of ouabain-sensitive 42 K uptake in 0.5 Ko. Further studies in both 0.5 K and 5.4 Ko showed that ouabain caused cell Na content Nai to increase over the same range of concentrations that binding occurred, implying that increased Nai may stimulate unbound Na-K pumps and prevent a proportional decrease in 42 K uptake rate. The results show that Na-K pump inhibition occurs as a functional consequence of specific ouabain binding and indicate that the Na-K pump is the cardiac glycoside receptor in cultured heart cells

  18. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Korin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Mueller, Ryan [University of California, Berkeley; Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  19. Exploiting Diffusion Barrier and Chemical Affinity of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Efficient Hydrogen Isotope Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Balderas-Xicohténcatl, Rafael; Zhang, Linda; Kang, Sung Gu; Hirscher, Michael; Oh, Hyunchul; Moon, Hoi Ri

    2017-10-25

    Deuterium plays a pivotal role in industrial and scientific research, and is irreplaceable for various applications such as isotope tracing, neutron moderation, and neutron scattering. In addition, deuterium is a key energy source for fusion reactions. Thus, the isolation of deuterium from a physico-chemically almost identical isotopic mixture is a seminal challenge in modern separation technology. However, current commercial approaches suffer from extremely low separation efficiency (i.e., cryogenic distillation, selectivity of 1.5 at 24 K), requiring a cost-effective and large-scale separation technique. Herein, we report a highly effective hydrogen isotope separation system based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) having the highest reported separation factor as high as ∼26 at 77 K by maximizing synergistic effects of the chemical affinity quantum sieving (CAQS) and kinetic quantum sieving (KQS). For this purpose, the MOF-74 system having high hydrogen adsorption enthalpies due to strong open metal sites is chosen for CAQS functionality, and imidazole molecules (IM) are employed to the system for enhancing the KQS effect. To the best of our knowledge, this work is not only the first attempt to implement two quantum sieving effects, KQS and CAQS, in one system, but also provides experimental validation of the utility of this system for practical industrial usage by isolating high-purity D 2 through direct selective separation studies using 1:1 D 2 /H 2 mixtures.

  20. A binding-site barrier affects imaging efficiency of high affinity amyloid-reactive peptide radiotracers in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a complex pathology associated with a growing number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and myeloma. The distribution and extent of amyloid deposition in body organs establishes the prognosis and can define treatment options; therefore, determining the amyloid load by using non-invasive molecular imaging is clinically important. We have identified a heparin-binding peptide designated p5 that, when radioiodinated, was capable of selectively imaging systemic visceral AA amyloidosis in a murine model of the disease. The p5 peptide was posited to bind effectively to amyloid deposits, relative to similarly charged polybasic heparin-reactive peptides, because it adopted a polar α helix secondary structure. We have now synthesized a variant, p5R, in which the 8 lysine amino acids of p5 have been replaced with arginine residues predisposing the peptide toward the α helical conformation in an effort to enhance the reactivity of the peptide with the amyloid substrate. The p5R peptide had higher affinity for amyloid and visualized AA amyloid in mice by using SPECT/CT imaging; however, the microdistribution, as evidenced in micro-autoradiographs, was dramatically altered relative to the p5 peptide due to its increased affinity and a resultant "binding site barrier" effect. These data suggest that radioiodinated peptide p5R may be optimal for the in vivo detection of discreet, perivascular amyloid, as found in the brain and pancreatic vasculature, by using molecular imaging techniques; however, peptide p5, due to its increased penetration, may yield more quantitative imaging of expansive tissue amyloid deposits.

  1. ATP binding and hydrolysis disrupt the high-affinity interaction between the heme ABC transporter HmuUV and its cognate substrate-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasem-Abdullah, Hiba; Perach, Michal; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Lewinson, Oded

    2017-09-01

    Using the energy of ATP hydrolysis, ABC transporters catalyze the trans-membrane transport of molecules. In bacteria, these transporters partner with a high-affinity substrate-binding protein (SBP) to import essential micronutrients. ATP binding by Type I ABC transporters (importers of amino acids, sugars, peptides, and small ions) stabilizes the interaction between the transporter and the SBP, thus allowing transfer of the substrate from the latter to the former. In Type II ABC transporters (importers of trace elements, e.g. vitamin B 12 , heme, and iron-siderophores) the role of ATP remains debatable. Here we studied the interaction between the Yersinia pestis ABC heme importer (HmuUV) and its partner substrate-binding protein (HmuT). Using real-time surface plasmon resonance experiments and interaction studies in membrane vesicles, we find that in the absence of ATP the transporter and the SBP tightly bind. Substrate in excess inhibits this interaction, and ATP binding by the transporter completely abolishes it. To release the stable docked SBP from the transporter hydrolysis of ATP is required. Based on these results we propose a mechanism for heme acquisition by HmuUV-T where the substrate-loaded SBP docks to the nucleotide-free outward-facing conformation of the transporter. ATP binding leads to formation of an occluded state with the substrate trapped in the trans-membrane translocation cavity. Subsequent ATP hydrolysis leads to substrate delivery to the cytoplasm, release of the SBP, and resetting of the system. We propose that other Type II ABC transporters likely share the fundamentals of this mechanism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. A comparison of protein kinases inhibitor screening methods using both enzymatic activity and binding affinity determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Amalie Frederikke; Skovgaard, Tine; Knapp, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Binding assays are increasingly used as a screening method for protein kinase inhibitors; however, as yet only a weak correlation with enzymatic activity-based assays has been demonstrated. We show that the correlation between the two types of assays can be improved using more precise screening...

  3. PRODIGY : a web server for predicting the binding affinity of protein-protein complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Li; Garcia Lopes Maia Rodrigues, João; Kastritis, Panagiotis L; Bonvin, Alexandre Mjj; Vangone, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Gaining insights into the structural determinants of protein-protein interactions holds the key for a deeper understanding of biological functions, diseases and development of therapeutics. An important aspect of this is the ability to accurately predict the binding strength for a given

  4. Haptoglobin-related protein is a high-affinity hemoglobin-binding plasma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Petersen, Steen Vang; Jacobsen, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr) is a primate-specific plasma protein associated with apolipoprotein L-I (apoL-I)-containing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles shown to be a part of the innate immune defense. Despite the assumption hitherto that Hpr does not bind to hemoglobin, the present...

  5. Metal-coded affinity tag labeling: a demonstration of analytical robustness and suitability for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrends, Robert; Pieper, Stefan; Neumann, Boris; Scheler, Christian; Linscheid, Michael W

    2009-03-15

    Quantitative peptide and protein analysis is one of the most promising fields in modern life science. Besides stable isotope coded labeling, metal chelate complexes are an alternative tool for quantification. The development of metal-coded affinity tags (MeCAT) was aimed to provide a robust tool for the quantification of peptides and proteins by utilizing lanthanide-harboring metal tags. It was shown that MeCAT is suited for relative quantification of proteins via standard mass spectrometric methods. The approach of tagging biomolecules with MeCAT offers the unique advantage of absolute quantification via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), a well-established technique for assessing concentrations down to low attomole ranges. This work investigates the compatibility of MeCAT labeling to analysis workflows such as nano liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC/ESI-MS(n)). Focus was given toward the separation behavior of labeled peptides and the dynamic range of detection and peptide charge distribution. Furthermore, the stability of MeCAT under harsh analytical conditions was investigated. With the application of the MeCAT technique to a standard analysis scheme in proteomics, such as the investigation of changes in an Escherichia coli proteome, we successfully addressed the suitability to utilize MeCAT on biological samples. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MeCAT complexes are stable under a variety of conditions and that by applying LC/ESI-MS it is possible to cover a dynamic range of 2 orders of magnitude down to the low femtomole range with an average standard deviation below 15%. Therefore, this technique is suitable to common proteomic workflows and enables relative as well as absolute differential peptide quantification.

  6. Automated evaluation of protein binding affinity of anti-inflammatory choline based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rosa; Pinto, Paula C A G; Azevedo, Ana M O; Bica, Katharina; Ressmann, Anna K; Reis, Salette; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2016-04-01

    In this work, an automated system for the study of the interaction of drugs with human serum albumin (HSA) was developed. The methodology was based on the quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA by binding of the drug to one of its binding sites. The fluorescence quenching assay was implemented in a sequential injection analysis (SIA) system and the optimized assay was applied to ionic liquids based on the association of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with choline (IL-API). In each cycle, 100 µL of HSA and 100 µL of IL-API (variable concentration) were aspirated at a flow rate of 1 mL min(-1) and then sent through the reaction coil to the detector where the fluorescence intensity was measured. In the optimized conditions the effect of increasing concentrations of choline ketoprofenate and choline naproxenate (and respective starting materials: ketoprofen and naproxen) on the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA was studied and the dissociation constants (Kd) were calculated by means of models of drug-protein binding in the equilibrium. The calculated Kd showed that all the compounds bind strongly to HSA (Kd<100 µmol L(-1)) and that the use of the drugs in the IL format does not affect or can even improve their HSA binding. The obtained results were compared with those provided by a conventional batch assay and the relative errors were lower than 4.5%. The developed SIA methodology showed to be robust and exhibited good repeatability in all the assay conditions (rsd<6.5%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel strategy for the purification of a recombinant protein using ceramic fluorapatite-binding peptides as affinity tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tuhidul; Aguilar-Yañez, José Manuel; Simental-Martínez, Jesús; Ortiz-Alcaraz, Cesar Ivan; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2014-04-25

    In recent years, affinity fusion-tag systems have become a popular technique for the purification of recombinant proteins from crude extracts. However, several drawbacks including the high expense and low stability of ligands, their leakage during operation, and difficulties in immobilization, make it important to further develop the method. The present work is concerned with the utilization of a ceramic fluorapatite (CFT)-based chromatographic matrix to overcome these drawbacks. A heptapeptide library exhibiting a range of properties have been synthesized and subjected to ceramic fluorapatite (CFT) chromatography to characterize their retention behavior as a function of pH and composition of the binding buffer. The specific binding and elution behavior demonstrates the possible application of CFT-binding peptides as tags for enhancing the selective recovery of proteins by CFT chromatography. To materialize this strategy, a phage-derived CFT-specific sequence KPRSVSG (Tag1) with/without a consecutive hexalysine sequence, KKKKKKKPRSVSG (Tag2), were fused at the C-terminus of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). The resulting gene constructs H-eGFP, H-eGFP-Tag1 and H-eGFP-Tag2 were expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL-21, and the clarified cell lysate was applied to the CFT column equilibrated with binding buffer (20-50mM sodium phosphate, pH 6-8.4). Sodium phosphate (500mM) or 1M NaCl in the respective binding buffer was used to elute the fused proteins, and the chromatographic fractions were analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Both the yield and purity were over 90%, demonstrating the potential application of the present strategy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Dualistic Conformational Response to Substrate Binding in the Human Serotonin Transporter Reveals a High Affinity State for Serotonin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT. PMID:25614630

  9. Development of a novel affinity chromatography resin for platform purification of bispecific antibodies with modified protein a binding avidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustian, Andrew D; Laurin, Linus; Ihre, Henrik; Tran, Travis; Stairs, Robert; Bak, Hanne

    2018-02-21

    There is strong interest in the production of bispecific monoclonal antibodies that can simultaneously bind two distinct targets or epitopes to achieve novel mechanisms of action and efficacy. Regeneron's bispecific technology, based upon a standard IgG, consists of a heterodimer of two different heavy chains, and a common light chain. Co-expression of two heavy chains leads to the formation of two parental IgG impurities, the removal of which is facilitated by a dipeptide substitution in the Fc portion of one of the heavy chains that ablates Fc Protein A binding. Therefore the affinity capture (Protein A) step of the purification process must perform both bulk capture and high resolution of these mAb impurities, a task current commercially available resins are not designed for. Resolution can be further impaired by the ability of Protein A to bind some antibodies in the variable region of the heavy chain (V H ). This paper details development of a novel Protein A resin. This resin combines an alkali stable ligand with a base matrix exhibiting excellent mass transfer properties to allow high capacity single step capture and resolution of bispecific antibodies with high yields. The developed resin, named MabSelect SuRe™ pcc, is implemented in GMP production processes for several bispecific antibodies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. Synthesis, Characterization and DNA Binding Affinities of Water Soluble Benzoheterocycle Triosmium Clusters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rosenberg, E.; Spada, F.; Sugden, K.; Martin, B.; Milone, L.; Gobetto, R.; Viale, A.; Fiedler, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 668, 1/2 (2003), s. 51-58 ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D15.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : DNA * metal clusters * water soluble Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.042, year: 2003

  11. Synthesis and application of a macroporous boronate affinity monolithic column using a metal-organic gel as a porogenic template for the specific capture of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Lin, Zian; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-12-23

    A macroporous boronate affinity monolithic column was prepared and applied to specifically capture glycoproteins using metal-organic gels (MOGs) as a porogenic template. This newly explored application of MOGs has proven to be a more convenient method for the formation of macropores in contrast to traditional porogenic methods. The poly (3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic columns were synthesized in stainless columns by in situ polymerization. To fabricate the macroporous formation with a uniformed open-channel network, the preparation conditions, such as reaction temperature, the concentration of the MOGs and the ratio of monomers were systematically investigated. The prepared macroporous monoliths were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Furthermore, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and transferrin (TF) were chosen as test glycoproteins, and the chromatographic analysis demonstrated that the macroporous boronate affinity monoliths exhibited a higher selectivity and better dynamic binding capacity toward glycoproteins compared with non-glycoproteins. The resulted affinity monolithic column was successfully employed to specifically capture TF from a bovine serum sample. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The rice transcription factor IDEF1 directly binds to iron and other divalent metals for sensing cellular iron status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Aung, May Sann; Senoura, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential for most living organisms and its availability often determines survival and proliferation. The Oryza sativa (rice) transcription factor IDEF1 plays a crucial role in regulating iron deficiency-induced genes involved in iron homeostasis. In the present report, we found characteristic histidine-asparagine repeat and proline-rich regions in IDEF1 and its homolog in Hordeum vulgare (barley), HvIDEF1. An immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography assay revealed that IDEF1 and HvIDEF1 bind to various divalent metals, including Fe(2+) and Ni(2+) . Recombinant IDEF1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli contained mainly Fe and Zn. This metal-binding activity of IDEF1 was almost abolished by deletion of the histidine-asparagine and proline-rich regions, but DNA-binding and trans-activation functions were not impaired by the deletion. Transgenic rice plants constitutively overexpressing IDEF1 without these metal-binding domains failed to cause pleiotropic effects conferred by overexpression of full-length IDEF1, including a low germination rate, impaired seedling growth, tolerance to iron deficiency in hydroponic culture, and enhanced expression of various iron deficiency-inducible genes. Impairment of the transcriptional regulation of IDEF1 by deletion of the metal-binding domains occurred primarily at an early stage of iron deficiency. These results suggest that the histidine-asparagine and proline-rich regions in rice IDEF1 directly bind to divalent metals and sense the cellular metal ion balance caused by changes in iron availability. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Effects of urea, metal ions and surfactants on the binding of baicalein with bovine serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu Singha Roy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of baicalein with bovine serum albumin (BSA was investigated with the help of spectroscopic and molecular docking studies. The binding affinity of baicalein towards BSA was estimated to be in order of 105 M−1 from fluorescence quenching studies. Negative ΔH° (−5.66±0.14 kJ/mol and positive (ΔS° (+79.96±0.65 J/mol K indicate the presence of electrostatic interactions along with the hydrophobic forces that result in a positive ΔS°. The hydrophobic association of baicalein with BSA diminishes in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS due to probable hydrophobic association of baicalein with SDS, resulting in a negative ΔS° (−40.65±0.87 J/mol K. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight (MALDI--TOF experiments indicate a 1:1 complexation between baicalein and BSA. The unfolding and refolding phenomena of BSA were investigated in the absence and presence of baicalein using steady-state and fluorescence lifetime measurements. It was observed that the presence of urea ruptured the non-covalent interaction between baicalein and BSA. The presence of metal ions (Ag+, Mg2+, Ni2+, Mn2+, Co2+and Zn2+ increased the binding affinity of ligand towards BSA. The changes in conformational aspects of BSA after ligand binding were also investigated using circular dichroism (CD and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. Site selectivity studies following molecular docking analyses indicated the binding of baicalein to site 1 (subdomain IIA of BSA.

  14. An amperometric affinity penicillin-binding protein magnetosensor for the detection of β-lactam antibiotics in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamella, M; Campuzano, S; Conzuelo, F; Esteban-Torres, M; de las Rivas, B; Reviejo, A J; Muñoz, R; Pingarrón, J M

    2013-04-07

    The preparation, characterization and performance evaluation of an amperometric affinity disposable magnetosensor, based on the use of a recombinant penicillin-binding protein (PBP) and screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs), for the specific detection and quantification of β-lactam antibiotic residues in milk are reported. The PBP was immobilized onto His-Tag-Isolation-modified magnetic beads (His-Tag-Isolation-MBs), and a direct competitive assay using a tracer with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the enzymatic labeling was performed. The amperometric response obtained at -0.20 V vs. the Ag pseudo-reference electrode of the SPCE after the addition of H2O2 in the presence of hydroquinone (HQ) was used as the transduction signal. The developed methodology showed very low detection limits (in the low ppb level) for the 6 antibiotics tested in untreated milk samples, and a good selectivity against other antibiotic residues frequently detected in milk and dairy products. Due to the bioreceptor employed, this methodology was able to detect only the active form of β-lactam antibiotics with high affinities for both penicillins and cephalosporins. Moreover, the analysis took only 30 min.

  15. Separation of Binding Protein of Celangulin V from the Midgut of Mythimna separata Walker by Affinity Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Lu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Celangulin V, an insecticidal compound isolated from the root bark of Chinese bittersweet, can affect the digestive system of insects. However, the mechanism of how Celangulin V induces a series of symptoms is still unknown. In this study, affinity chromatography was conducted through coupling of Celangulin V-6-aminoacetic acid ester to the CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. SDS-PAGE was used to analyze the collected fraction eluted by Celangulin V. Eight binding proteins (Zinc finger protein, Thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx, Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, SUMO E3 ligase RanBP2, Transmembrane protein 1, Actin, APN and V-ATPase were obtained and identified by LC/Q-TOF-MS from the midgut of Mythimna separata larvae. The potential of these proteins to serve as target proteins involved in the insecticidal activity of Celangulin V is discussed.

  16. Affinities and densities of high-affinity [3H]muscimol (GABA-A) binding sites and of central benzodiazepine receptors are unchanged in autopsied brain tissue from cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, R.F.; Lavoie, J.; Giguere, J.F.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    1988-01-01

    The integrity of GABA-A receptors and of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated in membrane preparations from prefrontal cortex and caudate nuclei obtained at autopsy from nine cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and an equal number of age-matched control subjects. Histopathological studies revealed Alzheimer Type II astrocytosis in all cases in the cirrhotic group; controls were free from neurological, psychiatric or hepatic diseases. Binding to GABA-A receptors was studied using [ 3 H]muscimol as radioligand. The integrity of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated using [ 3 H]flunitrazepam and [ 3 H]Ro15-1788. Data from saturation binding assays was analyzed by Scatchard plot. No modifications of either affinities (Kd) or densities (Bmax) of [ 3 H]muscimol of central benzodiazepine binding sites were observed. These findings do not support recent suggestions that alterations of either high-affinity GABA or benzodiazepine receptors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy

  17. Binding pose and affinity prediction in the 2016 D3R Grand Challenge 2 using the Wilma-SIE method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogues, Hervé; Sulea, Traian; Gaudreault, Francis; Corbeil, Christopher R.; Purisima, Enrico O.

    2018-01-01

    The Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) exhibits significant backbone movement in response to the binding of various ligands and can be a challenge for pose prediction algorithms. As part of the D3R Grand Challenge 2, we tested Wilma-SIE, a rigid-protein docking method, on a set of 36 FXR ligands for which the crystal structures had originally been blinded. These ligands covered several classes of compounds. To overcome the rigid protein limitations of the method, we used an ensemble of publicly available structures for FXR from the PDB. The use of the ensemble allowed Wilma-SIE to predict poses with average and median RMSDs of 2.3 and 1.4 Å, respectively. It was quite clear, however, that had we used a single structure for the receptor the success rate would have been much lower. The most successful predictions were obtained on chemical classes for which one or more crystal structures of the receptor bound to a molecule of the same class was available. In the absence of a crystal structure for the class, observing a consensus binding mode for the ligands of the class using one or more receptor structures of other classes seemed to be indicative of a reasonable pose prediction. Affinity prediction proved to be more challenging with generally poor correlation with experimental IC50s (Kendall tau 0.3). Even when the 36 crystal structures were used the accuracy of the predicted affinities was not appreciably improved. A possible cause of difficulty is the internal energy strain arising from conformational differences in the receptor across complexes, which may need to be properly estimated and incorporated into the SIE scoring function.

  18. Affinity labeling of Escherichia coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase at the binding site for tRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hountondji, C.; Schmitter, J.M.; Beauvallet, C.; Blanquet, S.

    1987-01-01

    Periodate-oxidized tRNA/sup Phe/ (tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/) behaves as a specific affinity label of tetrameric Escherichia coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS). Reaction of the α 2 β 2 enzyme with tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/ results in the loss of tRNA/sup Phe/ aminoacylation activity with covalent attachment of 2 mol of tRNA dialdehyde/mol of enzyme, in agreement with the stoichiometry of tRNA binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the PheRS-[ 14 C]tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/ covalent complex indicates that the large (α, M/sub r/ 87K) subunit of the enzyme interacts with the 3'-adenosine of tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/. The [ 14 C]tRNA-labeled chymotryptic peptides of PheRS were purified by both gel filtration and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The radioactivity was almost equally distributed among three peptides: Met-Lys[Ado]-Phe, Ala-Asp-Lys[Ado]-Leu, and Lys-Ile-Lys[Ado]-Ala. These sequences correspond to residues 1-3, 59-62, and 104-107, respectively, in the N-terminal region of the 795 amino acid sequence of the α subunit. It is noticeable that the labeled peptide Ala-Asp-Lys-Leu is adjacent to residues 63-66 (Arg-Val-Thr-Lys). The latter sequence was just predicted to resemble the proposed consensus tRNA CCA binding region Lys-Met-Ser-Lys-Ser, as deduced from previous affinity labeling studies on E. coli methionyl- and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases

  19. Cofactor and substrate binding to vanadium chloroperoxidase determined by UV-VIS spectroscopy and evidence for high affinity for pervanadate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renirie, R; Hemrika, W; Piersma, S R; Wever, R

    2000-02-08

    The vanadate cofactor in vanadium chloroperoxidase has been studied using UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy. A band is present in the near-UV that is red-shifted as compared to free vanadate and shifts in both position and intensity upon change in pH. Mutation of vanadate binding residues has a clear effect on the spectrum. Substrate-induced spectral effects allow direct measurement of separate kinetics steps for the first time for vanadium haloperoxidases. A peroxo intermediate is formed upon addition of H(2)O(2), which causes a decrease in the absorption spectrum at 315 nm, as well as an increase at 384 nm. This peroxo form is very stable at pH 8.3, whereas it is less stable at pH 5.0, which is the optimal pH for activity. Upon addition of halides to the peroxo form, the native spectrum is re-formed as a result of halide oxidation. Stopped-flow experiments show that H(2)O(2) binding and Cl(-) oxidation occur on the millisecond to second time scale. These data suggest that the oxidation of Cl(-) to HOCl occurs in at least two steps. In the presence of H(2)O(2), the affinity for the vanadate cofactor was found to be much higher than previously reported for vanadate in the absence of H(2)O(2). This is attributed to the uptake of pervanadate by the apo-enzyme. Human glucose-6-phosphatase, which is evolutionarily related to vanadium chloroperoxidase, is also likely to have a higher affinity for pervanadate than vanadate. This could explain the enhanced insulin mimetic effect of pervanadate as compared to vanadate.

  20. Dynamic affinity chromatography in the separation of sulfated lignins binding to thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Aiye; Thakkar, Jay N.; Hindle, Michael; Desai, Umesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs), a mixture of chemo-enzymatically prepared oligomers, have been found to be potent antagonists of coagulation. However, structures that induce anticoagulation remain unidentified. The highly polar sulfate groups on these molecules and the thousands of different structures present in these mixtures make traditional chromatographic resolution of sulfated LMWLs difficult. We performed dynamic thrombin affinity chromatography monitored using chromogenic substrate hydrolysis assay to isolate sulfated LMWL fractions that differed significantly in their biophysical and biochemical properties. Three fractions, I35, I55 and Peak II, were isolated from the starting complex mixture. Independent plasma clotting assays suggested that I35 possessed good anticoagulation potential (APTT = 4.2 μM; PT = 6.8 μM), while I55 and Peak II were approximately 10- and 100-fold less potent. The ESI-MS spectrum of this oligomeric fraction showed multiple peaks at 684.8, 610.6, 557.4, 541.4, 536.5, and 519.4 m/z, which most probably arise from variably functionalized (β-O4—β-β-linked trimers and/or a β-O4—β-O4-linked dimers. The first direct observation of these structures in sulfated LMWLs will greatly assist in the discovery of more potent sulfated LMWL-based anticoagulants. PMID:23122400

  1. Metal binding ability of glutathione transferases conserved between two animal species, the vanadium-rich ascidian Ascidia sydneiensis samea and the schistosome Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Ueki, Tatsuya; Michibata, Hitoshi

    2007-09-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes found in many organisms. We recently identified vanadium-binding GSTs, designated AsGSTs, from the vanadium-rich ascidian, Ascidia sydneiensis samea. In this study, the metal-selectivity of AsGST-I was investigated. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) analysis revealed that AsGST-I binds to V(IV), Fe(III), and Cu(II) with high affinity in the following order Cu(II)>V(IV)>Fe(III), and to Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) with low affinity. The GST activity of AsGST-I was inhibited dose-dependently by not V(IV) but Cu(II). A competition experiment demonstrated that the binding of V(IV) to AsGST-I was not inhibited by Cu(II). These results suggest that AsGST-I has high V(IV)-selectivity, which can confer the specific vanadium accumulation of ascidians. Because there are few reports on the metal-binding ability of GSTs, we performed the same analysis on SjGST (GST from the schistosome, Schistosoma japonicum). SjGST also demonstrated metal-binding ability although the binding pattern differed from that of AsGST-I. The GST activity of SjGST was inhibited by Cu(II) only, as that of AsGST-I. Our results indicate a possibility that metal-binding abilities of GSTs are conserved among organisms, at least animals, which is suggestive of a new role for these enzymes in metal homeostasis or detoxification.

  2. RECOVERY OF CYCLODEXTRIN GLUCANOTRANSFERASE (CGTase USING IMMOBILIZED METAL CHELATING AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sivapragasam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC was chosen as a method of purification for the recovery of CGTase from E. coli homogenate. E. coli harbouring the Bacillus sp. G1 gene expressed extracellularly secreted CGTase into ampicillin supplied LB broth. Culture was pre-purified using SnakeSkin dialysis tubing (3.5 MWCO with an enzyme activity of 147.80 U/mL. Three strategies (A, B and C were employed for the purification of CGTase using column adsorption chromatography with Ni2+-Sepharose resin. Strategy A employed an elution buffer of 50 mM EDTA, pH 7, Strategy B used 0.1 M imidazole, pH 7 and Strategy C employed 45 mM imidazole pH 7 as the elution buffer. Strategy C was found to be most suitable yielding a total CGTase recovery of 87.04% from an initial activity of 147.80 U/mL.

  3. Immobilized metal-affinity chromatography protein-recovery screening is predictive of crystallographic structure success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ryan; Kelley, Angela; Leibly, David; Hewitt, Stephen Nakazawa; Napuli, Alberto; Van Voorhis, Wesley

    2011-09-01

    The recombinant expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli continues to be a major bottleneck in structural genomics. The establishment of reliable protocols for the performance of small-scale expression and solubility testing is an essential component of structural genomic pipelines. The SSGCID Protein Production Group at the University of Washington (UW-PPG) has developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) protocol for the measurement of protein recovery from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) which predicts successful purification of hexahistidine-tagged proteins. The protocol is based on manual transfer of samples using multichannel pipettors and 96-well plates and does not depend on the use of robotic platforms. This protocol has been applied to evaluate the expression and solubility of more than 4000 proteins expressed in E. coli. The UW-PPG also screens large-scale preparations for recovery from IMAC prior to purification. Analysis of these results show that our low-cost non-automated approach is a reliable method for the HTS demands typical of large structural genomic projects. This paper provides a detailed description of these protocols and statistical analysis of the SSGCID screening results. The results demonstrate that screening for proteins that yield high recovery after IMAC, both after small-scale and large-scale expression, improves the selection of proteins that can be successfully purified and will yield a crystal structure.

  4. Fragmentation behavior of metal-coded affinity tag (MeCAT)-labeled peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Stefan; Beck, Sebastian; Ahrends, Robert; Scheler, Christian; Linscheid, Michael W

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative proteomics has become an important method in modern life sciences. Besides protein identification, the aspect of quantification is of rapidly increasing relevance. MeCAT (metal-coded affinity tagging) is able to provide a tool that enables relative as well as absolute quantification. For structural elucidation, knowledge on the fragmentation behavior of MeCAT-modified peptides is highly beneficial. Therefore, the fragmentation behavior of MeCAT-labeled peptides under collision induced dissociation (CID), electron capture dissociation (ECD) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) conditions was studied. Application of CID and ECD allowed a straight-forward sequence elucidation of MeCAT-labeled peptides. During IRMPD all MeCAT-labeled peptides form characteristic fragments resulting from the fragmentational cleavage of the tagging group, thus, providing a screening method for the identification of labeled compounds. Furthermore, occurring side reactions during the labeling process were investigated. By-products were structurally characterized and reaction conditions were optimized in order to prevent the formation of these. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Statistical deconvolution of enthalpic energetic contributions to MHC-peptide binding affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Michael GB

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC Class I molecules present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells, which forms an integral part of the adaptive immune response. Peptides are bound within a groove formed by the MHC heavy chain. Previous approaches to MHC Class I-peptide binding prediction have largely concentrated on the peptide anchor residues located at the P2 and C-terminus positions. Results A large dataset comprising MHC-peptide structural complexes was created by re-modelling pre-determined x-ray crystallographic structures. Static energetic analysis, following energy minimisation, was performed on the dataset in order to characterise interactions between bound peptides and the MHC Class I molecule, partitioning the interactions within the groove into van der Waals, electrostatic and total non-bonded energy contributions. Conclusion The QSAR techniques of Genetic Function Approximation (GFA and Genetic Partial Least Squares (G/PLS algorithms were used to identify key interactions between the two molecules by comparing the calculated energy values with experimentally-determined BL50 data. Although the peptide termini binding interactions help ensure the stability of the MHC Class I-peptide complex, the central region of the peptide is also important in defining the specificity of the interaction. As thermodynamic studies indicate that peptide association and dissociation may be driven entropically, it may be necessary to incorporate entropic contributions into future calculations.

  6. Low-Quality Structural and Interaction Data Improves Binding Affinity Prediction via Random Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjian; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Wong, Man-Hon; Ballester, Pedro J

    2015-06-12

    Docking scoring functions can be used to predict the strength of protein-ligand binding. It is widely believed that training a scoring function with low-quality data is detrimental for its predictive performance. Nevertheless, there is a surprising lack of systematic validation experiments in support of this hypothesis. In this study, we investigated to which extent training a scoring function with data containing low-quality structural and binding data is detrimental for predictive performance. We actually found that low-quality data is not only non-detrimental, but beneficial for the predictive performance of machine-learning scoring functions, though the improvement is less important than that coming from high-quality data. Furthermore, we observed that classical scoring functions are not able to effectively exploit data beyond an early threshold, regardless of its quality. This demonstrates that exploiting a larger data volume is more important for the performance of machine-learning scoring functions than restricting to a smaller set of higher data quality.

  7. A Printed Equilibrium Dialysis Device with Integrated Membranes for Improved Binding Affinity Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinger, Cody W; Heller, Andrew A; Spence, Dana M

    2017-07-18

    Equilibrium dialysis is a simple and effective technique used for investigating the binding of small molecules and ions to proteins. A three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to create a device capable of measuring binding constants between a protein and a small ion based on equilibrium dialysis. Specifically, the technology described here enables the user to customize an equilibrium dialysis device to fit their own experiments by choosing membranes of various material and molecular-weight cutoff values. The device has dimensions similar to that of a standard 96-well plate, thus being amenable to automated sample handlers and multichannel pipettes. The device consists of a printed base that hosts multiple windows containing a porous regenerated-cellulose membrane with a molecular-weight cutoff of ∼3500 Da. A key step in the fabrication process is a print-pause-print approach for integrating membranes directly into the windows subsequently inserted into the base. The integrated membranes display no leaking upon placement into the base. After characterizing the system's requirements for reaching equilibrium, the device was used to successfully measure an equilibrium dissociation constant for Zn 2+ and human serum albumin (K d = (5.62 ± 0.93) × 10 -7 M) under physiological conditions that is statistically equal to the constants reported in the literature.

  8. Relative binding affinity-serum modified access (RBA-SMA) assay predicts the relative in vivo bioactivity of the xenoestrogens bisphenol A and octylphenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S C; vom Saal, F S; Thayer, K A; Dhar, M G; Boechler, M; Welshons, W V

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a relative binding affinity-serum modified access (RBA-SMA) assay to determine the effect of serum on the access of xenoestrogens to estrogen receptors within intact cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. We used this assay to predict low dose activity of two xenoestrogens in mice. In serum-free medium, bisphenol A, a component of polycarbonates and of resins used to line metal food cans, showed a lower relative binding affinity (RBA; 0.006%) than octylphenol (0.072%) and nonylphenol (0.026%), which are used as surfactants in many commercial products (all RBAs are relative to estradiol, which is equal to 100%). In 100% serum from adult men, bisphenol A showed a higher RBA (0.01%) than in serum-free medium and thus enhanced access to estrogen receptors relative to estradiol. In contrast, octylphenol showed a 22-fold decrease in RBA (0.0029%) and nonylphenol showed a 5-fold decrease in RBA (0.0039%) when measured in adult serum. This indicates that, relative to estradiol, serum had less of an inhibitory effect on the cell uptake and binding in MCF-7 cells of bisphenol A, while serum had a greater inhibitory effect on octylphenol and nonylphenol relative to estradiol. Extrapolation of these relative activities in adult serum predicted that the estrogenic bioactivity of bisphenol A would be over 500-fold greater than that of octylphenol in fetal mouse serum. Bisphenol A and octylphenol were fed to pregnant mice at 2 and 20 micrograms/kg/day. Exposure of male mouse fetuses to either dose of bisphenol A, but to neither dose of octylphenol, significantly increased their adult prostate weight relative to control males, which is consistent with the higher predicted bioactivity of bisphenol A than octylphenol in the RBA-SMA assay. In addition, our findings show for the first time that fetal exposure to environmentally relevant parts-per-billion (ppb) doses of bisphenol A, in the range currently being consumed by people, can alter the adult reproductive

  9. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase: high affinity tetrahydrophthalimide radioligand for the inhibitor/herbicide-binding site in mouse liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchfield, N B; Casida, J E

    1996-01-01

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox), the last common enzyme in heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis, is the target of several classes of herbicides acting as inhibitors in both plants and mammals. N-(4-Chloro-2-fluoro-5-(propargyloxy)phenyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro phthalimide (a potent protox inhibitor referred to as THP) was synthesized as a candidate radioligand ([3H]-THP) by selective catalytic reduction of 3,6-dihydrophthalic anhydride (DHPA) with tritium gas followed by condensation in 45% yield with 4-chloro-2-fluoro-5-(propargyloxy)aniline. Insertion of tritium at the 3 and 6 carbons of DHPA as well as the expected 4 and 5 carbons resulted in high specific activity [3H]THP (92 Ci/mmol). This radioligand undergoes rapid, specific, saturable, and reversible binding to the inhibitor/herbicide binding site of the protox component of cholate-solubilized mouse liver mitochondria with an apparent Kd of 0.41 nM and Bmax of 0.40 pmol/mg of protein. In the standard assay, mouse preparation (150 micrograms of protein) and [3H]THP (0.5 nM) are incubated in 500 microL of phosphate buffer at pH 7.2 for 15 min at 25 degrees C followed by addition of ammonium sulfate and filtration with glass fiber filters. The potencies of five nitrodiphenyl ethers and two other herbicides as inhibitors of [3H]THP binding correlate well with those for inhibition of protox activity (r2 = 0.97, n = 7), thus validating the binding assay as relevant to enzyme inhibition. It is also suitable to determine in vivo block as illustrated by an approximately 50% decrease in [3H]THP binding in liver mitochondria from mice treated ip with oxyfluorfen at 4 mg/kg. This is the first report of a binding assay for protox in mammals. The high affinity and specific activity of [3H]THP facilitate quantitation of protox and therefore research on a sensitive inhibition site for porphyrin biosynthesis.

  10. Ligand-induced conformational changes: Improved predictions of ligand binding conformations and affinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimurer, T.M.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Iversen, L.F.

    2003-01-01

    A computational docking strategy using multiple conformations of the target protein is discussed and evaluated. A series of low molecular weight, competitive, nonpeptide protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors are considered for which the x-ray crystallographic structures in complex with protein...... tyrosine phosphatase 1 B (PTP1B) are known. To obtain a quantitative measure of the impact of conformational changes induced by the inhibitors, these were docked to the active site region of various structures of PTP1B using the docking program FlexX. Firstly, the inhibitors were docked to a PTP1B crystal...... predicted binding energy and a correct docking mode. Thirdly, to improve the predictability of the docking procedure in the general case, where only a single target protein structure is known, we evaluate an approach which takes possible protein side-chain conformational changes into account. Here, side...

  11. Origin of broad polydispersion in functionalized dendrimers and its effects on cancer-cell binding affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Jack N.; Mullen, Douglas G.; Orr, Bradford G.; Banaszak Holl, Mark M.; Sander, Leonard M.

    2010-09-01

    Nanoparticles with multiple ligands have been proposed for use in nanomedicine. The multiple targeting ligands on each nanoparticle can bind to several locations on a cell surface facilitating both drug targeting and uptake. Experiments show that the distribution of conjugated ligands is unexpectedly broad, and the desorption rate appears to depend exponentially upon the mean number of attached ligands. These two findings are explained with a model in which ligands conjugate to the nanoparticle with a positive cooperativity of ≈4kT , and that nanoparticles bound to a surface by multiple bonds are permanently affixed. This drives new analysis of the data, which confirms that there is only one time constant for desorption, that of a nanoparticle bound to the surface by a single bond.

  12. Investigation of the binding affinity in vitamin B12-Bovine serum albumin system using various spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-09-01

    The binding affinity between vitamin B12 (VitB12) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated in aqueous solution at pH = 7.4, employing UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques. Representative effects noted for BSA intrinsic fluorescence resulting from the interactions with VitB12 confirm the formation of π-π stacked non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes in the system VitB12-BSA. All the determined parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants (of the order of 104 L mol- 1, 103 L mol- 1 and 1011 L mol- 1 s- 1, respectively), as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters validate the mechanism of static quenching. The interaction with VitB12 induces folding of the polypeptide chains around Trp residues of BSA, resulting in a more hydrophobic surrounding. Presented outcomes suggest that the addition of VitB12 can lead to the more organized BSA conformation and its more folded tertiary structure, what could influence the physiological functions of bovine serum albumin, notably in case of its overuse or abnormal metabolism.

  13. Efficient RNA pseudouridylation by eukaryotic H/ACA ribonucleoproteins requires high affinity binding and correct positioning of guide RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, Evan A; Kelly, Erin K; Kamalampeta, Rajashekhar

    2018-01-01

    Abstract H/ACA ribonucleoproteins (H/ACA RNPs) are responsible for introducing many pseudouridines into RNAs, but are also involved in other cellular functions. Utilizing a purified and reconstituted yeast H/ACA RNP system that is active in pseudouridine formation under physiological conditions, we describe here the quantitative characterization of H/ACA RNP formation and function. This analysis reveals a surprisingly tight interaction of H/ACA guide RNA with the Cbf5p–Nop10p–Gar1p trimeric protein complex whereas Nhp2p binds comparably weakly to H/ACA guide RNA. Substrate RNA is bound to H/ACA RNPs with nanomolar affinity which correlates with the GC content in the guide-substrate RNA base pairing. Both Nhp2p and the conserved Box ACA element in guide RNA are required for efficient pseudouridine formation, but not for guide RNA or substrate RNA binding. These results suggest that Nhp2p and the Box ACA motif indirectly facilitate loading of the substrate RNA in the catalytic site of Cbf5p by correctly positioning the upper and lower parts of the H/ACA guide RNA on the H/ACA proteins. In summary, this study provides detailed insight into the molecular mechanism of H/ACA RNPs. PMID:29177505

  14. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. The authors have studied the binding of 125 I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind =Ka[Ag total]/1 + Ka[Ag total]. Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10 8 M -1 are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging

  15. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. We have studied the binding of 125I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind (formula; see text). Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10(8) M-1 are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging.

  16. Radioiodinated ligands for the estrogen receptor: Effect of different 7-cyanoalkyl chains on the binding affinity of novel iodovinyl-6-dehydroestradiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, Carina; Oliveira, Maria Cristina; Gano, Lurdes; Marques, Fernanda; Santos, Isabel; Morais, Goreti Ribeiro; Yasuda, Takumi; Thiemann, Thies; Botelho, Filomena; Oliveira, Carlos F.

    2009-01-01

    Three novel 17α-ethynyl-Δ 6,7 -estra-3,17β-diols and their 17α-[ 125 I]-iodovinyl derivatives, containing different C7-cyanoalkyl chains, were studied as potential radioligands for the estrogen receptor. The influence of the chain length on the biological behaviour of the compounds was assessed through in vitro ER binding assays of the ethynyl derivatives and breast cancer cell uptake studies of the 17α-[ 125 I]-iodovinyl-Δ 6,7 -estra-3,17β-diols. A difference in alkyl chain induced a decrease in ER binding affinities of substances, however, the receptor-binding affinities (RBA) of all compounds were lower than that of estradiol itself. In addition, a non-specific cell binding was observed which is in accordance with the encountered ethynyl RBA values suggesting that the uptake is not ER mediated

  17. Radioiodinated ligands for the estrogen receptor: Effect of different 7-cyanoalkyl chains on the binding affinity of novel iodovinyl-6-dehydroestradiols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, Carina [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal); Oliveira, Maria Cristina [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal)], E-mail: cmelo@itn.pt; Gano, Lurdes; Marques, Fernanda; Santos, Isabel [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal); Morais, Goreti Ribeiro [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Yasuda, Takumi [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Thiemann, Thies [Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Botelho, Filomena [Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal); Instituto de Biofisica/Biomatematica, IBILI, FMUC, Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, Carlos F. [Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal); Clinica Ginecologica, FMUC, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2009-02-15

    Three novel 17{alpha}-ethynyl-{delta}{sup 6,7}-estra-3,17{beta}-diols and their 17{alpha}-[{sup 125}I]-iodovinyl derivatives, containing different C7-cyanoalkyl chains, were studied as potential radioligands for the estrogen receptor. The influence of the chain length on the biological behaviour of the compounds was assessed through in vitro ER binding assays of the ethynyl derivatives and breast cancer cell uptake studies of the 17{alpha}-[{sup 125}I]-iodovinyl-{delta}{sup 6,7}-estra-3,17{beta}-diols. A difference in alkyl chain induced a decrease in ER binding affinities of substances, however, the receptor-binding affinities (RBA) of all compounds were lower than that of estradiol itself. In addition, a non-specific cell binding was observed which is in accordance with the encountered ethynyl RBA values suggesting that the uptake is not ER mediated.

  18. A fluorescent protein scaffold for presenting structurally constrained peptides provides an effective screening system to identify high affinity target-binding peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Kadonosono

    Full Text Available Peptides that have high affinity for target molecules on the surface of cancer cells are crucial for the development of targeted cancer therapies. However, unstructured peptides often fail to bind their target molecules with high affinity. To efficiently identify high-affinity target-binding peptides, we have constructed a fluorescent protein scaffold, designated gFPS, in which structurally constrained peptides are integrated at residues K131-L137 of superfolder green fluorescent protein. Molecular dynamics simulation supported the suitability of this site for presentation of exogenous peptides with a constrained structure. gFPS can present 4 to 12 exogenous amino acids without a loss of fluorescence. When gFPSs presenting human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2-targeting peptides were added to the culture medium of HER2-expressing cells, we could easily identify the peptides with high HER2-affinity and -specificity based on gFPS fluorescence. In addition, gFPS could be expressed on the yeast cell surface and applied for a high-throughput screening. These results demonstrate that gFPS has the potential to serve as a powerful tool to improve screening of structurally constrained peptides that have a high target affinity, and suggest that it could expedite the one-step identification of clinically applicable cancer cell-binding peptides.

  19. Leaf-specific pathogenesis-related 10 homolog, PgPR-10.3, shows in silico binding affinity with several biologically important molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Haeng Han

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Although ginseng PR-10.3 gene is expressed in all organs of 3-wk-old plantlets, its expression is restricted to leaves in mature 2-yr-old ginseng plants. The putative binding property of PgPR-10.3 with Re is intriguing. Further verification of binding affinity with other biologically important molecules in the large hydrophobic cavity of PgPR-10.3 may provide an insight into the biological features of PR-10 proteins.

  20. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L. (GSKNC); (GSK)

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  1. Interdomain Linker Determines Primarily the Structural Stability of Dystrophin and Utrophin Tandem Calponin-Homology Domains Rather than Their Actin-Binding Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Swati; Singh, Surinder M; Mallela, Krishna M G

    2015-09-08

    Tandem calponin-homology (CH) domains are the most common actin-binding domains in proteins. However, structural principles underlying their function are poorly understood. These tandem domains exist in multiple conformations with varying degrees of inter-CH-domain interactions. Dystrophin and utrophin tandem CH domains share high sequence similarity (∼82%), yet differ in their structural stability and actin-binding affinity. We examined whether the conformational differences between the two tandem CH domains can explain differences in their stability and actin binding. Dystrophin tandem CH domain is more stable by ∼4 kcal/mol than that of utrophin. Individual CH domains of dystrophin and utrophin have identical structures but differ in their relative orientation around the interdomain linker. We swapped the linkers between dystrophin and utrophin tandem CH domains. Dystrophin tandem CH domain with utrophin linker (DUL) has similar stability as that of utrophin tandem CH domain. Utrophin tandem CH domain with dystrophin linker (UDL) has similar stability as that of dystrophin tandem CH domain. Dystrophin tandem CH domain binds to F-actin ∼30 times weaker than that of utrophin. After linker swapping, DUL has twice the binding affinity as that of dystrophin tandem CH domain. Similarly, UDL has half the binding affinity as that of utrophin tandem CH domain. However, changes in binding free energies due to linker swapping are much lower by an order of magnitude compared to the corresponding changes in unfolding free energies. These results indicate that the linker region determines primarily the structural stability of tandem CH domains rather than their actin-binding affinity.

  2. Evolutionary Implications of Metal Binding Features in Different Species’ Prion Protein: An Inorganic Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego La Mendola

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Prion disorders are a group of fatal neurodegenerative conditions of mammals. The key molecular event in the pathogenesis of such diseases is the conformational conversion of prion protein, PrPC, into a misfolded form rich in β-sheet structure, PrPSc, but the detailed mechanistic aspects of prion protein conversion remain enigmatic. There is uncertainty on the precise physiological function of PrPC in healthy individuals. Several evidences support the notion of its role in copper homeostasis. PrPC binds Cu2+ mainly through a domain composed by four to five repeats of eight amino acids. In addition to mammals, PrP homologues have also been identified in birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. The globular domain of protein is retained in the different species, suggesting that the protein carries out an essential common function. However, the comparison of amino acid sequences indicates that prion protein has evolved differently in each vertebrate class. The primary sequences are strongly conserved in each group, but these exhibit a low similarity with those of mammals. The N-terminal domain of different prions shows tandem amino acid repeats with an increasing amount of histidine residues going from amphibians to mammals. The difference in the sequence affects the number of copper binding sites, the affinity and the coordination environment of metal ions, suggesting that the involvement of prion in metal homeostasis may be a specific characteristic of mammalian prion protein. In this review, we describe the similarities and the differences in the metal binding of different species’ prion protein, as revealed by studies carried out on the entire protein and related peptide fragments.

  3. MHC-peptide binding: dimers of cysteine-containing nonapeptides bind with high affinity to HLA-A2.1 class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Modugno, F; Mammi, C; Rosanò, L; Rubiu, O; Nisticò, P; Chersi, A

    1997-11-01

    Small peptides, 8-10 amino acids long, derived from degradation of cytoplasmic proteins by a proteasome-proteinase complex, are usually presented and recognized by CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) associated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Recently synthetic peptides were used for the in vitro induction of tumor-specific CTLs, offering another strategy in the study of the immune-response repertoire and providing a new tool in cancer vaccination and immunotherapy. Peptides derived from otherwise normal proteins, overexpressed in many tumors as products of the protooncogene, may represent a target for an immune response. This is the case of HER-2/neu gene (also known as ErbB-2), encoding a cysteine-rich glycoprotein transmembrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity (gp185neu). Recent data, demonstrating that HLA-A2.1-related peptides are able to stimulate in vitro CD8+ lymphocytes, Prompted us to study the binding to HLA-A2.1 molecules of several gp185 synthetic peptides containing a cystein residue and to define the relevance of this amino acid residue in the reduced or oxidated form of the sulfhydryl group. We found that monomers and their homodimers, linked by a disulfide bridge, bind to HLA-A2.1 molecules with overlapping affinity. These results suggest that additional amino acids of the nonapeptide do not prevent the binding and the HLA refolding through chemical or sterical interactions. This might be of particular relevance for the in vivo processing of cysteine-rich proteins. Because ErbB-2 molecules, as tumor-differentiation antigens in melanoma, are cysteine-rich molecules, it may be relevant to evaluate the possible role of the cystine residues interacting with the T-cell receptor. The recognition of these heterodimers by CD8+ lymphocytes will require functional in vivo studies.

  4. Metal ions-binding T4 lysozyme as an intramolecular protein purification tag compatible with X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boura, Evzen; Baumlova, Adriana; Chalupska, Dominika; Dubankova, Anna; Klima, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Phage T4 lysozyme is a well folded and highly soluble protein that is widely used as an insertion tag to improve solubility and crystallization properties of poorly behaved recombinant proteins. It has been used in the fusion protein strategy to facilitate crystallization of various proteins including multiple G protein-coupled receptors, lipid kinases, or sterol binding proteins. Here, we present a structural and biochemical characterization of its novel, metal ions-binding mutant (mbT4L). We demonstrate that mbT4L can be used as a purification tag in the immobilized-metal affinity chromatography and that, in many respects, it is superior to the conventional hexahistidine tag. In addition, structural characterization of mbT4L suggests that mbT4L can be used as a purification tag compatible with X-ray crystallography. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  5. A novel matrix derivatized from hydrophilic gigaporous polystyrene-based microspheres for high-speed immobilized-metal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jian-Bo; Huang, Yong-Dong; Jing, Guang-Lun; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Wei-Qing; Zhu, Hu; Lu, Jian-Ren

    2011-05-01

    Agarose coated gigaporous polystyrene microspheres were evaluated as a novel matrix for immobilized-metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). With four steps, nickel ions were successfully immobilized on the microspheres. The gigaporous structure and chromatographic properties of IMAC medium were characterized. A column packed with the matrix showed low column backpressure and high column efficiency at high flow velocity. Furthermore, this matrix was used for purifying superoxide dismutase (SOD), which was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) in submerged fermentation, on an Äkta purifier 100 system under different flow velocities. The purity of the SOD from this one-step purification was 79% and the recovery yield was about 89.6% under the superficial flow velocity of 3251 cm/h. In conclusion, all the results suggested that the gigaporous matrix has considerable advantages for high-speed immobilized-metal affinity chromatography. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High-affinity binding of Chp1 chromodomain to K9 methylated histone H3 is required to establish centromeric heterochromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalch, Thomas; Job, Godwin; Noffsinger, Victoria J; Shanker, Sreenath; Kuscu, Canan; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Partridge, Janet F

    2009-04-10

    In fission yeast, assembly of centromeric heterochromatin requires the RITS complex, which consists of Ago1, Tas3, Chp1, and siRNAs derived from centromeric repeats. Recruitment of RITS to centromeres has been proposed to depend on siRNA-dependent targeting of Ago1 to centromeric sequences. Previously, we demonstrated that methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me) acts upstream of siRNAs during heterochromatin establishment. Our crystal structure of Chp1's chromodomain in complex with a trimethylated lysine 9 H3 peptide reveals extensive sites of contact that contribute to Chp1's high-affinity binding. We found that this high-affinity binding is critical for the efficient establishment of centromeric heterochromatin, but preassembled heterochromatin can be maintained when Chp1's affinity for H3K9me is greatly reduced.

  7. Performance of HADDOCK and a simple contact-based protein–ligand binding affinity predictor in the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurkcuoglu Soner, Zeynep; Koukos, Panos; Citro, Nevia; Trellet, Mikael E.; Garcia Lopes Maia Rodrigues, Joao; de Sousa Moreira, Irina; Roel-touris, Jorge; Melquiond, Adrien S. J.; Geng, Cunliang; Schaarschmidt, Jörg; Xue, Li C.; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, A. M. J. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present the performance of HADDOCK, our information-driven docking software, in the second edition of the D3R Grand Challenge. In this blind experiment, participants were requested to predict the structures and binding affinities of complexes between the Farnesoid X nuclear receptor and 102

  8. Evaluation of Cu(i) binding to the E2 domain of the amyloid precursor protein - a lesson in quantification of metal binding to proteins via ligand competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tessa R; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2018-01-24

    The extracellular domain E2 of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) features a His-rich metal-binding site (denoted as the M1 site). In conjunction with surrounding basic residues, the site participates in interactions with components of the extracellular matrix including heparins, a class of negatively charged polysaccharide molecules of varying length. This work studied the chemistry of Cu(i) binding to APP E2 with the probe ligands Bcs, Bca, Fz and Fs. APP E2 forms a stable Cu(i)-mediated ternary complex with each of these anionic ligands. The complex with Bca was selected for isolation and characterization and was demonstrated, by native ESI-MS analysis, to have the stoichiometry E2 : Cu(i) : Bca = 1 : 1 : 1. Formation of these ternary complexes is specific for the APP E2 domain and requires Cu(i) coordination to the M1 site. Mutation of the M1 site was consistent with the His ligands being part of the E2 ligand set. It is likely that interactions between the negatively charged probe ligands and a positively charged patch on the surface of APP E2 are one aspect of the generation of the stable ternary complexes. Their formation prevented meaningful quantification of the affinity of Cu(i) binding to the M1 site with these probe ligands. However, the ternary complexes are disrupted by heparin, allowing reliable determination of a picomolar Cu(i) affinity for the E2/heparin complex with the Fz or Bca probe ligands. This is the first documented example of the formation of stable ternary complexes between a Cu(i) binding protein and a probe ligand. The ready disruption of the complexes by heparin identified clear 'tell-tale' signs for diagnosis of ternary complex formation and allowed a systematic review of conditions and criteria for reliable determination of affinities for metal binding via ligand competition. This study also provides new insights into a potential correlation of APP functions regulated by copper binding and heparin interaction.

  9. QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Studies of Metal Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Vidossich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM simulations have strongly contributed to providing insights into the understanding of several structural and mechanistic aspects of biological molecules. They played a particularly important role in metal binding proteins, where the electronic effects of transition metals have to be explicitly taken into account for the correct representation of the underlying biochemical process. In this review, after a brief description of the basic concepts of the QM/MM method, we provide an overview of its capabilities using selected examples taken from our work. Specifically, we will focus on heme peroxidases, metallo-β-lactamases, α-synuclein and ligase ribozymes to show how this approach is capable of describing the catalytic and/or structural role played by transition (Fe, Zn or Cu and main group (Mg metals. Applications will reveal how metal ions influence the formation and reduction of high redox intermediates in catalytic cycles and enhance drug metabolism, amyloidogenic aggregate formation and nucleic acid synthesis. In turn, it will become manifest that the protein frame directs and modulates the properties and reactivity of the metal ions.

  10. The metal binding potential of a dairy isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ramyakrishna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Excess iron in water resources can lead to health hazards and problems. The ability of lactic acid bacteria to bind iron has not yet been widely studied. In the present study, sorption of iron ions from aqueous solutions onto lactic acid bacterium was determined. Elemental analyses were carried out by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The kinetics of Fe(III biosorption was investigated at different initial concentrations of metal ion. The highest uptake capacity was found to be 16 mg of Fe(III per gram of adsorbent with a contact time of 24 hr and at initial metal ion concentration of 34 mg/L. The uptake capacity of Fe(III ion varied from 83.2 to 46.7% across the range of initial metal ion concentrations. The equilibrium data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, and were found to fit better with the latter (R2 = 0.9999. The surface morphology of the biomass and percentage of metal was characterized by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The functional groups on the cell wall surface of biomass involved in biosorption of heavy metals were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum.

  11. Construction of a high affinity zinc binding site in the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Sheppard, P O; Jensen, L B

    2001-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) belong to family C of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The receptors are characterized by having unusually long amino-terminal domains (ATDs), to which agonist binding has been shown to take place. Previously, we have constructed...... created a Zn(2+) binding site in mGluR1b by mutating the residue Lys(260) to a histidine. Zinc acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of agonist-induced IP accumulation on the K260H mutant with an IC(50) value of 2 microm. Alanine mutations of three potential "zinc coligands" in proximity to the introduced...... of a "closed" conformation, and thus stabilizing a more or less inactive "open" form of the ATD. This study presents the first metal ion site constructed in a family C GPCR. Furthermore, it is the first time a metal ion site has been created in a region outside of the seven transmembrane regions of a GPCR...

  12. Neutron activation analysis of heavy metal binding by fungal cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crusberg, T.C.; Mayer, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Aqueous effluents are produced during nuclear power and nuclear weapons development activities which frequently contain low levels of dissolved radioactive nuclides. A number of laboratories are now focusing attention to renewable biological materials to provide traps for low concentrations of dissolved radioactive metal ions in wastewater effluents. The term BIOTRAP can be used to describe such materials, and in this laboratory cell wall preparations of the fungus Penicillium ochro-chloron have been employed to demonstrate their capacity and affinity to reversibly bind and remove copper(2). Since neutron activation analysis (NAA) was readily available, that method was one of several applied to this problem as a suitable analytical methodology to study heavy metal-to-BIOTRAP interactions. Copper and mercury provide good examples of metals which are capable of undergoing activation by thermal neutrons. In NAA, 63 Cu (69.1% natural abundance) is converted to 64 Cu which has a half live of 12.7 hr, and 202 Hg (29.7 % natural abundance) is converted to 203 Hg which has a half life of 46.,6 d

  13. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eghorn, Laura Friis; Høstgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann

    2014-01-01

    whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive...... allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced...... modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol...

  14. ‘maskBAD’ – a package to detect and remove Affymetrix probes with binding affinity differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannemann Michael

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hybridization differences caused by target sequence differences can be a confounding factor in analyzing gene expression on microarrays, lead to false positives and reduce power to detect real expression differences. We prepared an R Bioconductor compatible package to detect, characterize and remove such probes in Affymetrix 3’IVT and exon-based arrays on the basis of correlation of signal intensities from probes within probe sets. Results Using completely mouse genomes we determined type 1 (false negatives and type 2 (false positives errors with high accuracy and we show that our method routinely outperforms previous methods. When detecting 76.2% of known SNP/indels in mouse expression data, we obtain at most 5.5% false positives. At the same level of false positives, best previous method detected 72.6%. We also show that probes with differing binding affinity both hinder differential expression detection and introduce artifacts in cancer-healthy tissue comparison. Conclusions Detection and removal of such probes should be a routine step in Affymetrix data preprocessing. We prepared a user friendly R package, compatible with Bioconductor, that allows the filtering and improving of data from Affymetrix microarrays experiments.

  15. The binding affinity of a soluble TCR-Fc fusion protein is significantly improved by crosslinkage with an anti-C{beta} antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Kobayashi, Eiji [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Jin, Aishun [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150081 (China); Kishi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: immkishi@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Muraguchi, Atsushi [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel soluble TCR composed of TCR V and C regions with Ig Fc region is generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody bound to a p/MHC tetramer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding affinity of TCR-Fc was markedly increased by binding with anti-C{beta} antibody. -- Abstract: The identification and cloning of tumor antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) and the production of the soluble form of the TCR (sTCR) contributed to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for cancer. Recently, several groups have reported the development of technologies for the production of sTCRs. The native sTCR has a very low binding affinity for the antigenic peptide/MHC (p/MHC) complex. In this study, we established a technology to produce high affinity, functional sTCRs. We generated a novel sTCR-Fc fusion protein composed of the TCR V and C regions of the TCR linked to the immunoglobulin (Ig) Fc region. A Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the fusion protein was approximately 60 kDa under reducing conditions and approximately 100-200 kDa under non-reducing conditions. ELISAs using various antibodies showed that the structure of each domain of the TCR-Fc protein was intact. The TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody effectively bound to a p/MHC tetramer. An SPR analysis showed that the TCR-Fc protein had a low binding affinity (KD; 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M) to the p/MHC monomer. Interestingly, when the TCR-Fc protein was pre-incubated with an anti-C{beta} antibody, its binding affinity for p/MHC increased by 5-fold (2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M). We demonstrated a novel method for constructing a functional soluble TCR using the Ig Fc region and showed that the binding affinity of the functional sTCR-Fc was markedly increased by an anti-C{beta} antibody, which is probably due to the stabilization of the V

  16. Simple method for Shiga toxin 2e purification by affinity chromatography via binding to the divinyl sulfone group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Arimitsu

    Full Text Available Here we describe a simple affinity purification method for Shiga toxin 2e (Stx2e, a major causative factor of edema disease in swine. Escherichia coli strain MV1184 transformed with the expression plasmid pBSK-Stx2e produced Stx2e when cultivated in CAYE broth containing lincomycin. Stx2e bound to commercial D-galactose gel, containing α-D-galactose immobilized on agarose resin via a divinyl sulfone linker, and was eluted with phosphate-buffered saline containing 4.5 M MgCl2. A small amount of Stx2e bound to another commercial α-galactose-immobilized agarose resin, but not to β-galactose-immobilized resin. In addition, Stx2e bound to thiophilic adsorbent resin containing β-mercaptoethanol immobilized on agarose resin via a divinyl sulfone, and was purified in the same manner as from D-galactose gel, but the Stx2e sample contained some contamination. These results indicate that Stx2e bound to D-galactose gel mainly through the divinyl sulfone group on the resin and to a lesser extent through α-D-galactose. With these methods, the yields of Stx2e and attenuated mutant Stx2e (mStx2e from 1 L of culture were approximately 36 mg and 27.7 mg, respectively, and the binding capacity of the D-galactose gel and thiophilic adsorbent resin for Stx2e was at least 20 mg per 1 ml of resin. In addition, using chimeric toxins with prototype Stx2 which did not bind to thiophilic adsorbent resin and some types of mutant Stx2e and Stx2 which contained inserted mutations in the B subunits, we found that, at the least, asparagine (amino acid 17 of the B subunits was associated with Stx2e binding to the divinyl sulfone group. The mStx2e that was isolated exhibited vaccine effects in ICR mice, indicating that these methods are beneficial for large-scale preparation of Stx2e toxoid, which protects swine from edema disease.

  17. Thermodynamics of binding interactions between extracellular polymeric substances and heavy metals by isothermal titration microcalorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Peng; Xia, Jia-Shuai; Chen, You-Peng; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Guo, Jin-Song; Shen, Yu; Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play a crucial role in heavy metal bio-adsorption using activated sludge, but the interaction mechanism between heavy metals and EPS remains unclear. Isothermal titration calorimetry was employed to illuminate the mechanism in this study. The results indicate that binding between heavy metals and EPS is spontaneous and driven mainly by enthalpy change. Extracellular proteins in EPS are major participants in the binding process. Environmental conditions have significant impact on the adsorption performance. Divalent and trivalent cations severely impeded the binding of heavy metal ions to EPS. Electrostatic interaction mainly attributed to competition between divalent cations and heavy metal ions; trivalent cations directly competed with heavy metal ions for EPS binding sites. Trivalent cations were more competitive than divalent cations for heavy metal ion binding because they formed complexing bonds. This study facilitates a better understanding about the interaction between heavy metals and EPS in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Zhou J; Mortimer, Gysell; Minchin, Rodney F; Schiller, Tara; Musumeci, Anthony; Martin, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO 2 , the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO 2 and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  19. Engineered α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as models for measuring agonist binding and effect at the orthosteric low-affinity α4-α4 interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Pedersen, Martin H F; Rohde, Line A; Kastrup, Jette S; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Chebib, Mary; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 is important for normal mammalian brain function and is known to express in two different stoichiometries, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2. While these are similar in many aspects, the (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry differs by harboring a third orthosteric acetylcholine binding site located at the α4-α4 interface. Interestingly, the third binding site has, so far, only been documented using electrophysiological assays, actual binding affinities of nicotinic receptor ligands to this site are not known. The present study was therefore aimed at determining binding affinities of nicotinic ligands to the α4-α4 interface. Given that epibatidine shows large functional potency differences at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces, biphasic binding properties would be expected at (α4)3(β2)2 receptors. However, standard saturation binding experiments with [(3)H]epibatidine did not reveal biphasic binding under the conditions utilized. Therefore, an engineered β2 construct (β2(HQT)), which converts the β(-) face to resemble that of an α4(-) face, was utilized to create (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptors harboring three α4-α4 interfaces. With this receptor, low affinity binding of epibatidine with a Kd of ∼5 nM was observed in sharp contrast to a Kd value of ∼10 pM observed for wild-type receptors. A strong correlation between binding affinities at the (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptor and functional potencies at the wild-type receptor of a range of nicotinic ligands highlighted the validity of using the mutational approach. Finally, large differences in activities at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces were observed for structurally related agonists underscoring the need for establishing all binding parameters of compounds at α4β2 receptors. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Binding affinity of the L-742,001 inhibitor to the endonuclease domain of A/H1N1/PA influenza virus variants: Molecular simulation approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung; Nguyen, Hoang Linh; Linh, Huynh Quang; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2018-01-01

    The steered molecular dynamics (SMD), molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) and free energy perturbation (FEP) methods were used to determine the binding affinity of the L-742,001 inhibitor to the endonuclease domain of the A/H1N1/PA influenza viruses (including wild type (WT) and three mutations I79L, E119D and F105S for both pH1N1 PA and PR8 PA viruses). Calculated results showed that the L-742,001 inhibitor not only binds to the PR8 PAs (1934 A influenza virus) better than to the pH1N1 PAs (2009 A influenza virus) but also more strongly interacts with the WT endonuclease domain than with three mutant variants for both pH1N1 PA and PR8 PA viruses. The binding affinities obtained by the SMD, MM-PBSA and FEP methods attain high correlation with available experimental data. Here the FEP method appears to provide a more accurate determination of the binding affinity than the SMD and MM-PBSA counterparts.

  1. Design, Synthesis, and in Vitro Pharmacology of New Radiolabeled γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid Analogues Including Photolabile Analogues with Irreversible Binding to the High-Affinity γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabbatini, Paola; Wellendorph, Petrine; Høg, Signe

    2010-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a psychotropic compound endogenous to the brain. Despite its potential physiological significance, the complete molecular mechanisms of action remain unexplained. To facilitate the isolation and identification of the high-affinity GHB binding site, we herein report...

  2. Whole blood-oxygen binding properties of four cold-temperate marine fishes: blood affinity is independent of pH-dependent binding, routine swimming performance, and environmental hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert, Neill A; Skov, Peter V; Wells, Rufus M G

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between whole blood-oxygen affinity (P(50)) and pH-dependent binding (i.e., cooperativity and the Bohr [ Phi ] and Root effects) was examined statistically under standardized conditions (10.0 degrees Celsius) in four unrelated cold-temperate marine fishes that differ widely in th...

  3. Sourcing the affinity of flavonoids for the glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor site via crystallography, kinetics and QM/MM-PBSA binding studies: comparison of chrysin and flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsanou, Katerina E; Hayes, Joseph M; Keramioti, Maria; Mamais, Michalis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Kato, Atsushi; Leonidas, Demetres D; Zographos, Spyros E

    2013-11-01

    Flavonoids have been discovered as novel inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a target to control hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the GPb-chrysin complex at 1.9 Å resolution. Chrysin is accommodated at the inhibitor site intercalating between the aromatic side chains of Phe285 and Tyr613 through π-stacking interactions. Chrysin binds to GPb approximately 15 times weaker (Ki=19.01 μM) than flavopiridol (Ki=1.24 μM), exclusively at the inhibitor site, and both inhibitors display similar behavior with respect to AMP. To identify the source of flavopiridols' stronger affinity, molecular docking with Glide and postdocking binding free energy calculations using QM/MM-PBSA have been performed and compared. Whereas docking failed to correctly rank inhibitor binding conformations, the QM/MM-PBSA method employing M06-2X/6-31+G to model the π-stacking interactions correctly reproduced the experimental results. Flavopiridols' greater binding affinity is sourced to favorable interactions of the cationic 4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl substituent with GPb, with desolvation effects limited by the substituent conformation adopted in the crystallographic complex. Further successful predictions using QM/MM-PBSA for the flavonoid quercetagetin (which binds at the allosteric site) leads us to propose the methodology as a useful and inexpensive tool to predict flavonoid binding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxins is correlated with the presence of high-affinity binding sites in the brush border membrane of target insect midguts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, C.; Vanderbruggen, H.; Hoefte, H.; Van Rie, J.; Jansens, S.; Van Mellaert, H.

    1988-01-01

    Binding studies were performed with two 125 I-labeled Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxins on brush border membrane vesicles prepared from the larval midgut of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta or the cabbage butterfly Pieris brassicae. One δ-endotoxin, Bt2-protoxin, is a 130-kDa recombinant crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. berliner. It kills larvae of both insect species. The active Bt2-toxin is a 60-kDa proteolytic fragment of the Bt2-protoxin. It binds saturably and with high affinity to brush border membrane vesicles from the midgut of both species. The other δ-endotoxin, Bt4412-protoxin, is a 136-kDa crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis, which is highly toxic for P. brassicae, but not for M. sexta larvae. Bt4412-toxin, obtained after proteolytic activation of Bt4412-protoxin, shows high-affinity saturable binding to P. brassicae vesicles but not to M. sexta vesicles. The correlation between toxicity and specific binding is further strengthened by competition studies. Other B. thuringiensis δ-endotoxins active against M. sexta compete for binding of 125 I-labeled Bt2-toxin to M. sexta vesicles, whereas toxins active against dipteran or coleopteran larvae do not compete. Bt2-toxin and Bt4412-toxin bind to different sites on P. brassicae vesicles

  5. Dissociation and metal-binding characteristics of yellow lichen substances suggest a relationship with site preferences of lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Markus; Jürgens, Sascha-René; Willenbruch, Karen; Huneck, Siegfried; Leuschner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Many species of lichen-forming fungi contain yellow or orange extracellular pigments belonging to the dibenzofurans (usnic acid), anthraquinones (e.g. parietin) or pulvinic acid group. These pigments are all equally efficient light screens, leading us to question the potential ecological and evolutionary significance of diversity in yellow and orange lichen substances. Here the hypothesis is tested that the different pigments differ in metal-binding characteristics, which suggest that they may contribute to adaptation to sites differing in pH and metal availability. UV spectroscopy was used to study the dissociation and the pH dependence of the metal-binding behaviour of seven isolated lichen substances in methanol. Metals applied were selected macro- and micro-nutrients (Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+)). All the pigments studied are strong to moderate acids with pK(a1) values between 2.8 and 4.5. Metal complexation is common in the lichen substances studied. Complexation takes place under acidic conditions with usnic acid, but under alkaline conditions with parietin and most compounds of the pulvinic acid group. The pulvinic acid derivative rhizocarpic acid forms metal complexes both in the acidic and the alkaline range. Metal complexation by lichen substances could be a prerequisite for lichen substance-mediated control of metal uptake. Assuming such an effect at pH values where the affinity of the metal for the lichen substance is intermediate would explain the strong preference of lichens with usnic or rhizocarpic acids to acidic substrata. Moreover, it would explain the preference of lichens with parietin and some lichens with compounds of the pulvinic acid group either for nutrient-rich substrata at low pH or for calcareous substrata.

  6. Using physics-based pose predictions and free energy perturbation calculations to predict binding poses and relative binding affinities for FXR ligands in the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Christina; Vasilakaki, Sofia; Dellis, Dimitris; Cournia, Zoe

    2018-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design has become an integral part of drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, and is nowadays extensively used in the lead identification and lead optimization phases. The drug design data resource (D3R) organizes challenges against blinded experimental data to prospectively test computational methodologies as an opportunity for improved methods and algorithms to emerge. We participated in Grand Challenge 2 to predict the crystallographic poses of 36 Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR)-bound ligands and the relative binding affinities for two designated subsets of 18 and 15 FXR-bound ligands. Here, we present our methodology for pose and affinity predictions and its evaluation after the release of the experimental data. For predicting the crystallographic poses, we used docking and physics-based pose prediction methods guided by the binding poses of native ligands. For FXR ligands with known chemotypes in the PDB, we accurately predicted their binding modes, while for those with unknown chemotypes the predictions were more challenging. Our group ranked #1st (based on the median RMSD) out of 46 groups, which submitted complete entries for the binding pose prediction challenge. For the relative binding affinity prediction challenge, we performed free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. FEP/MD calculations displayed a high success rate in identifying compounds with better or worse binding affinity than the reference (parent) compound. Our studies suggest that when ligands with chemical precedent are available in the literature, binding pose predictions using docking and physics-based methods are reliable; however, predictions are challenging for ligands with completely unknown chemotypes. We also show that FEP/MD calculations hold predictive value and can nowadays be used in a high throughput mode in a lead optimization project provided that crystal structures of

  7. Using physics-based pose predictions and free energy perturbation calculations to predict binding poses and relative binding affinities for FXR ligands in the D3R Grand Challenge 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Christina; Vasilakaki, Sofia; Dellis, Dimitris; Cournia, Zoe

    2018-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design has become an integral part of drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, and is nowadays extensively used in the lead identification and lead optimization phases. The drug design data resource (D3R) organizes challenges against blinded experimental data to prospectively test computational methodologies as an opportunity for improved methods and algorithms to emerge. We participated in Grand Challenge 2 to predict the crystallographic poses of 36 Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR)-bound ligands and the relative binding affinities for two designated subsets of 18 and 15 FXR-bound ligands. Here, we present our methodology for pose and affinity predictions and its evaluation after the release of the experimental data. For predicting the crystallographic poses, we used docking and physics-based pose prediction methods guided by the binding poses of native ligands. For FXR ligands with known chemotypes in the PDB, we accurately predicted their binding modes, while for those with unknown chemotypes the predictions were more challenging. Our group ranked #1st (based on the median RMSD) out of 46 groups, which submitted complete entries for the binding pose prediction challenge. For the relative binding affinity prediction challenge, we performed free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. FEP/MD calculations displayed a high success rate in identifying compounds with better or worse binding affinity than the reference (parent) compound. Our studies suggest that when ligands with chemical precedent are available in the literature, binding pose predictions using docking and physics-based methods are reliable; however, predictions are challenging for ligands with completely unknown chemotypes. We also show that FEP/MD calculations hold predictive value and can nowadays be used in a high throughput mode in a lead optimization project provided that crystal structures of

  8. High-Resolution Longitudinal Study of HIV-1 Env Vaccine-Elicited B Cell Responses to the Virus Primary Receptor Binding Site Reveals Affinity Maturation and Clonal Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimeng; Sundling, Christopher; Wilson, Richard; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Yajing; Dai, Kaifan; Phad, Ganesh E; Zhu, Jiang; Xiao, Yongli; Mascola, John R; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Wyatt, Richard T; Li, Yuxing

    2016-05-01

    Because of the genetic variability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), the elicitation of neutralizing Abs to conserved neutralization determinants including the primary receptor binding site, CD4 binding site (CD4bs), is a major focus of vaccine development. To gain insight into the evolution of Env-elicited Ab responses, we used single B cell analysis to interrogate the memory B cell Ig repertoires from two rhesus macaques after five serial immunizations with Env/adjuvant. We observed that the CD4bs-specific repertoire displayed unique features in the third CDR of Ig H chains with minor alterations along the immunization course. Progressive affinity maturation occurred as evidenced by elevated levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in Ab sequences isolated at the late immunization time point compared with the early time point. Abs with higher SHM were associated with increased binding affinity and virus neutralization capacity. Moreover, a notable portion of the CD4bs-specific repertoire was maintained between early and late immunization time points, suggesting that persistent clonal lineages were induced by Env vaccination. Furthermore, we found that the predominant persistent CD4bs-specific clonal lineages had larger population sizes and higher affinities than that from the rest of the repertoires, underscoring the critical role of Ag affinity selection in Ab maturation and clonal expansion. Genetic and functional analyses revealed that the accumulation of SHM in both framework regions and CDRs contributed to the clonal affinity and antigenicity evolution. Our longitudinal study provides high-resolution understanding of the dynamically evolving CD4bs-specific B cell response after Env immunization in primates. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. High Resolution Longitudinal Study of HIV-1 Env Vaccine-elicited B Cell Responses to the Virus Primary Receptor Binding Site Reveals Affinity Maturation and Clonal Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimeng; Sundling, Christopher; Wilson, Richard; O’Dell, Sijy; Chen, Yajing; Dai, Kaifan; Phad, Ganesh E.; Zhu, Jiang; Xiao, Yongli; Mascola, John R.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Li, Yuxing

    2016-01-01

    Due to the genetic variability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), the elicitation of neutralizing antibodies to conserved neutralization determinants including the primary receptor binding site, CD4 binding site (CD4bs), is a major focus of vaccine development. To gain insight into the evolution of Env-elicited antibody responses, we utilized single B cell analysis to interrogate the memory B cell Ig repertoires from two rhesus macaques following five serial immunizations with Env/adjuvant. We observed that the CD4bs-specific repertoire displayed unique features in the third complementarity determining region (CDR3) of Ig heavy chains with minor alterations along the immunization course. Progressive affinity maturation occurred as evidenced by elevated levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in antibody sequences isolated at late immunization time point compared to the early time point. Antibodies with higher SHM were associated with increased binding affinity and virus neutralization capacity. Moreover, a notable portion of the CD4bs-specific repertoire was maintained between early and late immunization time points, suggesting that persistent clonal lineages were induced by Env vaccination. Furthermore, we found that the predominant persistent CD4bs-specific clonal lineages had larger population sizes and higher affinities than that from the rest of the repertoires, underscoring the critical role of antigen affinity selection in antibody maturation and clonal expansion. Genetic and functional analyses revealed that the accumulation of SHM in both framework regions and CDRs contributed to the clonal affinity and antigenicity evolution. Our longitudinal study provides high resolution understanding of the dynamically evolving CD4bs-specific B cell response following Env immunization in primates. PMID:27001953

  10. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boughlala, Z.; Guerra, C.F.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl X and [HCl X](+) complexes for X+ = H+, CH3+, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl- and HCl for the various

  11. A novel two-zone protein uptake model for affinity chromatography and its application to the description of elution band profiles of proteins fused to a family 9 cellulose binding module affinity tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavoosi, Mojgan; Sanaie, Nooshafarin; Dismer, Florian; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Kilburn, Douglas G; Haynes, Charles A

    2007-08-10

    A novel two-zone model (TZM) is presented to describe the rate of solute uptake by the stationary phase of a sorption-type chromatography column. The TZM divides the porous stationary-phase particle into an inner protein-free core and an outer protein-containing zone where intraparticle transport is limited by pore diffusion and binding follows Langmuir theory. The TZM and the classic pore-diffusion model (PDM) of chromatography are applied to the prediction of stationary-phase uptake and elution bands within a cellulose-based affinity chromatography column designed to selectively purify proteins genetically labelled with a CBM9 (family 9 cellulose binding module) affinity tag. Under both linear and nonlinear loading conditions, the TZM closely matches rates of protein uptake within the stationary phase particles as measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy, while the PDM deviates from experiment in the linear-binding region. As a result, the TZM is shown to provide improved predictions of product breakthrough, including elution behavior from a bacterial lysate feed.

  12. Exploiting Cancer Metal Metabolism using Anti-Cancer Metal-Binding Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlot, Angelica M; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Jansson, Patric J; Sahni, Sumit; Huang, Michael L; Lane, Darius L; Lok, Hiu; Richardson, Des R

    2017-07-05

    Metals are vital cellular elements necessary for multiple indispensable biological processes of living organisms, including energy transduction and cell proliferation. Interestingly, alterations in metal levels and also changes in the expression of proteins involved in metal metabolism have been demonstrated in a variety of cancers. Considering this and the important role of metals for cell growth, the development of drugs that sequester metals have become an attractive target for the development of novel anti-cancer agents. Interest in this field has surged with the design and development of new generations of chelators of the thiosemicarbazone class. These ligands have shown potent anti-cancer and anti-metastatic activity in vitro and in vivo. Due to their efficacy and safe toxicological assessment, some of these agents have recently entered multi-center clinical trials as therapeutics for advanced and resistant tumors. This review highlights the role, and changes in homeostasis, of metals in cancer and emphasizes the pre-clinical development and clinical assessment of metal ion-binding agents, namely, thiosemicarbazones, as anti-tumor agents. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Novel bis(5-methyltetrazolium)amine ligand-bonded stationary phase with reduced leakage of metal ions in immobilized metal affinity chromatography of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Chunmiao; Wang, Chaozhan; Wei, Yinmao

    2016-11-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely used for the specific separation of biopolymers. However, leakage of metal ions from IMAC adsorbents is of concern in IMAC. In this study, we designed a novel tridenate bis(5-methyltetrazolium)amine (BMTA) to reduce the leakage of metal ions by improving the affinity to immobilized metal ions. The ligand was bonded onto silica via three-step reaction to prepare a high-performance IMAC stationary phase. The chromatographic behaviors of ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, and lysozyme on the Cu(II)-, Ni(II)-, and Zn(II)-chelated stationary phase were investigated with respect to pH effect and elution with an imidazole gradient. The retention times of these three proteins increased by increasing the pH of the mobile phase but decreased by increasing the concentration of the competitive displacer. The retaining strength of the three proteins on the chelated stationary phase were in the order Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Zn(II). The behavior of these three proteins was consistent with the properties of a typical IMAC. The BMTA ligand exhibited a much stronger affinity for Cu(II) and Ni(II) than iminodiacetic acid (IDA), which is often regarded as a standard tridentate IMAC ligand. Quantum mechanical calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G level were used to image the coordination mode of the protein-metal ions-BMTA complex. In addition, a fused histidine-tagged cecropin b-human epidermal growth factor (CB-EGF) from Escherichia coli crude extract was purified by the Ni(II)-chelated stationary phase, and the purity of the CB-EGF was determined to be at least 90 %. These results suggest that the BMTA ligand may have potential applications in the preparation of therapeutics. Graphical Abstract A novel ligand of tridenate bis(5-methyltetrazolium)amine (BMTA) was designed to reduce the leakage of metal ions from the column in immobolized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC).

  14. Conformational destabilization of Immunoglobulin G increases the low pH-binding affinity with the Neonatal Fc Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walters, Benjamin T; Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Crystallographic evidence suggests that the pH-dependent affinity of IgG molecules for the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) receptor primarily arises from salt bridges involving IgG histidine residues, resulting in moderate affinity at mildly acidic conditions. However, this view does not explain the ...

  15. Binding properties of oxacalix[4]arenes derivatives toward metal cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellah, B.

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this work was to establish the binding properties of oxacalix[4]arene derivatives with different numbers of the oxa bridges, functional groups (ketones, pyridine, ester, amide and methoxy) and conformations. Their interactions with alkali and alkaline-earth, heavy and transition metal cations have been evaluated according to different approaches: (i) extraction of corresponding picrates from an aqueous phase into dichloromethane; (ii) determination of the thermodynamic parameters of complexation in methanol and/or acetonitrile by UV-spectrophotometry and micro-calorimetry; (iii) determination of the stoichiometry of the complexes by ESI-MS; (iv) 1 H-NMR titrations allowing to localize the metal ions in the ligand cavity. In a first part dealing on homo-oxacalix[4]arenes, selectivities for Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Pb 2+ and Mn 2+ of ketones derivatives was shown. The presence of oxa bridge in these derivatives increases their efficiency while decreasing their selectivity with respect to related calixarenes. The pyridine derivative prefers transition and heavy metal cations, in agreement with the presence of the soft nitrogen atoms. In the second part, di-oxacalix[4]arene ester and secondary amide derivatives were shown to be less effective than tertiary amide counterparts but to present high selectivities for Li + , Ba 2+ , Zn 2+ and Hg 2+ . A third part devoted to the octa-homo-tetra-oxacalix[4]arene tetra-methoxy shows that the 1:1 metal complexes formed are generally more stable than those of calixarenes, suggesting the participation of the oxygen atoms of the bridge in the complexation. Selectivity for Cs + , Ba 2+ , Cu 2+ and Hg 2+ were noted. (author)

  16. High-affinity cooperative Ca2+binding by MICU1-MICU2 serves as an on-off switch for the uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamer, Kimberli J; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2017-08-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter is a Ca 2+ -activated Ca 2+ channel that is essential for dynamic modulation of mitochondrial function in response to cellular Ca 2+ signals. It is regulated by two paralogous EF-hand proteins-MICU1 and MICU2, but the mechanism is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that both MICU1 and MICU2 are stabilized by Ca 2+ We reconstitute the MICU1-MICU2 heterodimer and demonstrate that it binds Ca 2+ cooperatively with high affinity. We discover that both MICU1 and MICU2 exhibit affinity for the mitochondria-specific lipid cardiolipin. We determine the minimum Ca 2+ concentration required for disinhibition of the uniporter in permeabilized cells and report a close match with the Ca 2+ -binding affinity of MICU1-MICU2. We conclude that cooperative, high-affinity interaction of the MICU1-MICU2 complex with Ca 2+ serves as an on-off switch, leading to a tightly controlled channel, capable of responding directly to cytosolic Ca 2+ signals. © 2017 The Authors.

  17. Molecular Structure-Affinity Relationship of Flavonoids in Lotus Leaf (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) on Binding to Human Serum Albumin and Bovine Serum Albumin by Spectroscopic Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaosheng; Tang, Ping; Liu, Liangliang

    2017-06-23

    Lotus leaf has gained growing popularity as an ingredient in herbal formulations due to its various activities. As main functional components of lotus leaf, the difference in structure of flavonoids affected their binding properties and activities. In this paper, the existence of 11 flavonoids in lotus leaf extract was confirmed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis and 11 flavonoids showed various contents in lotus leaf. The interactions between lotus leaf extract and two kinds of serum albumins (human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) were investigated by spectroscopic methods. Based on the fluorescence quenching, the interactions between these flavonoids and serum albumins were further checked in detail. The relationship between the molecular properties of flavonoids and their affinities for serum albumins were analyzed and compared. The hydroxylation on 3 and 3' position increased the affinities for serum albumins. Moreover, both of the methylation on 3' position of quercetin and the C₂=C₃ double bond of apigenin and quercetin decreased the affinities for HSA and BSA. The glycosylation lowered the affinities for HSA and BSA depending on the type of sugar moiety. It revealed that the hydrogen bond force played an important role in binding flavonoids to HSA and BSA.

  18. Parkinson disease protein DJ-1 binds metals and protects against metal-induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-08-02

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD.

  19. Parkinson Disease Protein DJ-1 Binds Metals and Protects against Metal-induced Cytotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-01-01

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD. PMID:23792957

  20. Comparison of metal-binding strength between methionine and cysteine residues: Implications for the design of metal-binding motifs in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Deepak, R N V; Chandrakar, Brijesh; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2017-05-01

    Metals play vital role in various physiological processes and are bound to biomolecules. Although cysteine sulfur is more frequently found as metal-binding ligand, methionine prefers to occur in copper-binding motifs of some proteins. To address methionine's lower preference in copper-binding sites in comparison to cysteine, we have considered copper-binding motifs (His-Cys-His-Met) from seven different high-resolution protein structures. We performed quantum chemical calculations to find out the strength of interactions between sulfur and metal ion in both Met and Cys residues. In the case of Cys, both neutral (CysH) and the deprotonated form (Cys - ) were considered. We used two different levels of theory (B3LYP and M06-2X) and the model compounds methyl propyl sulfide, ethanethiol and ethanethiolate were used to represent Met, CysH and Cys - respectively. To compare the metal-binding strength, we mutated Met in silico to CysH/Cys - and performed the calculations. We also carried out calculations with wild-type Cys present in the same metal-binding motif. On average, interactions of Met with copper ion are stronger by 13-35kcal/mol compared to CysH. However, Cys - interactions with copper is stronger than that of Met by ~250kcal/mol. We then considered the entire metal-binding motif with four residues and calculated the interaction energies with the copper ion. We also considered Met→Cys - mutation in the motif and repeated the calculations. Interaction of the wild-type motif with the copper ion is ~160kcal/mol weaker than that of mutated motif. Our studies suggest the factors that could explain why Met is not as frequently observed as Cys in the metal-binding motifs. Results of these studies will help in designing metal-binding motifs in proteins with varying interaction strengths. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Affinity crosslinking of /sup 125/I-human beta-endorphin to cell lines possessing either mu or delta type opioid binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keren, O.; Gioannini, T.L.; Hiller, J.M.; Simon, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Affinity crosslinking of human /sup 125/I-beta-Endorphin to cell lines possessing either mu or delta binding sites was carried out. Autoradiography of SDS-PAGE gels from these crosslinked cell lines revealed that these two sites contain major peptide subunits that differ in molecular size. This confirms our earlier finding in mammalian brain which demonstrated separate and distinct subunits for mu and delta opioid receptors.

  2. Performance of HADDOCK and a simple contact-based protein-ligand binding affinity predictor in the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Koukos, Panagiotis I.; Citro, Nevia; Trellet, Mikael E.; Rodrigues, J. P. G. L. M.; Moreira, Irina S.; Roel-Touris, Jorge; Melquiond, Adrien S. J.; Geng, Cunliang; Schaarschmidt, Jörg; Xue, Li C.; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, A. M. J. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present the performance of HADDOCK, our information-driven docking software, in the second edition of the D3R Grand Challenge. In this blind experiment, participants were requested to predict the structures and binding affinities of complexes between the Farnesoid X nuclear receptor and 102 different ligands. The models obtained in Stage1 with HADDOCK and ligand-specific protocol show an average ligand RMSD of 5.1 Å from the crystal structure. Only 6/35 targets were within 2.5 Å RMSD from the reference, which prompted us to investigate the limiting factors and revise our protocol for Stage2. The choice of the receptor conformation appeared to have the strongest influence on the results. Our Stage2 models were of higher quality (13 out of 35 were within 2.5 Å), with an average RMSD of 4.1 Å. The docking protocol was applied to all 102 ligands to generate poses for binding affinity prediction. We developed a modified version of our contact-based binding affinity predictor PRODIGY, using the number of interatomic contacts classified by their type and the intermolecular electrostatic energy. This simple structure-based binding affinity predictor shows a Kendall's Tau correlation of 0.37 in ranking the ligands (7th best out of 77 methods, 5th/25 groups). Those results were obtained from the average prediction over the top10 poses, irrespective of their similarity/correctness, underscoring the robustness of our simple predictor. This results in an enrichment factor of 2.5 compared to a random predictor for ranking ligands within the top 25%, making it a promising approach to identify lead compounds in virtual screening.

  3. A single-residue change in the HIV-1 V3 loop associated with maraviroc resistance impairs CCR5 binding affinity while increasing replicative capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Perez, Javier; Staropoli, Isabelle; Azoulay, Stéphane; Heinrich, Jean-Thomas; Cascajero, Almudena; Colin, Philippe; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Alcami, Jose; Kellenberger, Esther; Lagane, Bernard

    2015-06-18

    Maraviroc (MVC) is an allosteric CCR5 inhibitor used against HIV-1 infection. While MVC-resistant viruses have been identified in patients, it still remains incompletely known how they adjust their CD4 and CCR5 binding properties to resist MVC inhibition while preserving their replicative capacity. It is thought that they maintain high efficiency of receptor binding. To date however, information about the binding affinities to receptors for inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 remains limited. Here, we show by means of viral envelope (gp120) binding experiments and virus-cell fusion kinetics that a MVC-resistant virus (MVC-Res) that had emerged as a dominant viral quasispecies in a patient displays reduced affinities for CD4 and CCR5 either free or bound to MVC, as compared to its MVC-sensitive counterpart isolated before MVC therapy. An alanine insertion within the GPG motif (G310_P311insA) of the MVC-resistant gp120 V3 loop is responsible for the decreased CCR5 binding affinity, while impaired binding to CD4 is due to sequence changes outside V3. Molecular dynamics simulations of gp120 binding to CCR5 further emphasize that the Ala insertion alters the structure of the V3 tip and weakens interaction with CCR5 ECL2. Paradoxically, infection experiments on cells expressing high levels of CCR5 also showed that Ala allows MVC-Res to use CCR5 efficiently, thereby improving viral fusion and replication efficiencies. Actually, although we found that the V3 loop of MVC-Res is required for high levels of MVC resistance, other regions outside V3 are sufficient to confer a moderate level of resistance. These sequence changes outside V3, however, come with a replication cost, which is compensated for by the Ala insertion in V3. These results indicate that changes in the V3 loop of MVC-resistant viruses can augment the efficiency of CCR5-dependent steps of viral entry other than gp120 binding, thereby compensating for their decreased affinity for entry receptors and improving their

  4. High affinity and temperature sensitivity of blood oxygen binding in Pangasianodon hypophthalmus due to lack of chloride-hemoglobin allosteric interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Phuong, Le My; Huong, Do Thi Thanh

    2015-01-01

    , such as high temperature, affect O2 transport in air-breathing fishes, this study assessed the effects of temperature on O2 binding of blood and Hb in the economically important air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus. To determine blood O2 binding properties, blood was drawn from resting cannulated...... fishes and O2 binding curves made at 25°C and 35°C. To determine the allosteric regulation and thermodynamics of Hb O2 binding, Hb was purified, and O2 equilibria were recorded at five temperatures in the absence and presence of ATP and Cl-. Whole blood had a high O2 affinity (O2 tension at half...

  5. The Binding of Four Licorice Flavonoids to Bovine Serum Albumin by Multi-Spectroscopic and Molecular Docking Methods: Structure-Affinity Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J.; Liang, Q.; Shao, S.

    2017-03-01

    Flavanones are the main compound of licorice, and the C'-4 position substitution is a significant structural feature for their biological activity. The ability of three selected flavanones (liquiritigenin, liquiritin, and liquiritin apioside) bearing different substituents (hydroxyl groups, glucose, and glucose-apiose sugar moiety) at the C'-4 position and a chalcone ( isoliquiritigenin, an isomer of liquiritigenin) to bind bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by multispectroscopic and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. The binding mechanism of fl avonoids to BSA can be explained by the formation of a flavonoids-BSA complex, and the binding affinity is the strongest for isoliquiritigenin, followed by liquiritin apioside, liquiritin, and liquiritigenin. The thermodynamic analysis and the molecular docking indicated that the interaction between flavonoids and BSA was dominated by the hydrophobic force and hydrogen bonds. The competitive experiments as well as the molecular docking results suggested the most possible binding site of licorice flavonoids on BSA at subdomain IIA. These results revealed that the basic skeleton structure and the substituents at the C'-4 position of flavanones significantly affect the structure-affinity relationships of the licorice flavonoid binding to BSA.

  6. Screening method of carbohydrate-binding proteins in biological sources by capillary affinity electrophoresis and its application to determination of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin in tulip bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kazuki; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Oda, Yasuo; Masuko, Takashi; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2004-09-01

    We developed capillary affinity electrophoresis (CAE) to analyze the molecular interaction between carbohydrate chains and proteins in solution state. A mixture of oligosaccharides derived from a glycoprotein was labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (APTS), and used as glycan library without isolation. Interaction of a carbohydrate-binding protein with each oligosaccharide in the mixture could be simultaneously observed, and relative affinities of oligosaccharides toward the protein were accurately determined. In this study, we applied CAE to detect the presence of lectins in some plants (Japanese elderberry bark and tulip bulb). In the crude extract of the elderberry bark, binding activity toward sialo-carbohydrate chains could be easily detected. We also examined the presence of lectins in the crude extract of tulip bulbs and determined the detailed carbohydrate-binding specificity of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin (TGA), one of the lectins from tulip bulbs. Kinetic studies demonstrated that TGA showed novel carbohydrate-binding specificity and preferentially recognized triantennary oligosaccharides with Gal residues at nonreducing termini and a Fuc residue linked through alpha(1-6) linkage at chitobiose portion of the reducing termini but not tetraantennary carbohydrates. The results described here indicate that CAE will be a valuable method for both screening of lectins in natural sources and determination of their detailed carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  7. Identification by affinity chromatography of boar sperm membrane-associated proteins bound to immobilized porcine zona pellucida. Mapping of the phosphorylethanolamine-binding region of spermadhesin AWN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensslin, M; Calvete, J J; Thole, H H; Sierralta, W D; Adermann, K; Sanz, L; Töpfer-Petersen, E

    1995-12-01

    We have identified boar sperm membrane components recovered by affinity chromatography on a porcine zona pellucida affinity column. The major zona pellucida-bound proteins were spermadhesins AWN and AQN-3, the heparin-binding protein pAIF, and a homolog of the mouse milk fat globule membrane protein. All these proteins are phospholipid-binding proteins peripherally associated with the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that coating proteins tightly bound to the external lipid bilayer may act as major zona pellucida-binding molecules. Using a synthetic peptide approach we show that the regions of spermadhesin AWN comprising residues 6-12 and 104-108 possess affinity for phosphorylethanolamine. These two amino acid sequences are in close proximity in the predicted structural model for AWN, and in opposite location to its carbohydrate-recognition domain. Taken together, our data provide further evidence for the possible involvement of members of the porcine spermadhesin protein family in gamete interaction and suggest a model for the ultrastructural disposition of functional domains of spermadhesin AWN bound to the sperm surface.

  8. Multiple Modes of Binding Enhance the Affinity of DC-SIGN for High-Mannose N-Linked Glycans Found on Viral Glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinberg, H.; Castelli, R.; Drickamer, K.; Seeberger, P.H.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /Zurich, ETH /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-07-09

    The dendritic cell surface receptor DC-SIGN and the closely related endothelial cell receptor DC-SIGNR specifically recognize high mannose N-linked carbohydrates on viral pathogens. Previous studies have shown that these receptors bind the outer trimannose branch Man{alpha}1-3[Man{alpha}1-6]Man{alpha} present in high mannose structures. Although the trimannoside binds to DC-SIGN or DC-SIGNR more strongly than mannose, additional affinity enhancements are observed in the presence of one or more Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha} moieties on the nonreducing termini of oligomannose structures. The molecular basis of this enhancement has been investigated by determining crystal structures of DC-SIGN bound to a synthetic six-mannose fragment of a high mannose N-linked oligosaccharide, Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha}1-3[Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha}1-6]Man{alpha}1-6Man and to the disaccharide Man{alpha}1-2Man. The structures reveal mixtures of two binding modes in each case. Each mode features typical C-type lectin binding at the principal Ca{sup 2+}-binding site by one mannose residue. In addition, other sugar residues form contacts unique to each binding mode. These results suggest that the affinity enhancement displayed toward oligosaccharides decorated with the Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha} structure is due in part to multiple binding modes at the primary Ca{sup 2+} site, which provide both additional contacts and a statistical (entropic) enhancement of binding.

  9. Differential thermodynamic driving force of first- and second-generation antihistamines to determine their binding affinity for human H1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Sugawara, Kenta; Uesawa, Yoshihiro; Fukui, Hiroyuki; Shoji, Masaru

    2014-09-15

    Differential binding sites for first- and second-generation antihistamines were indicated on the basis of the crystal structure of human histamine H1 receptors. In this study, we evaluated differences between the thermodynamic driving forces of first- and second-generation antihistamines for human H1 receptors and their structural determinants. The binding enthalpy and entropy of 20 antihistamines were estimated with the van't Hoff equation using their dissociation constants obtained from their displacement curves against the binding of [(3)H]mepyramine to membrane preparations of Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human H1 receptors at various temperatures from 4°C to 37°C. Structural determinants of antihistamines for their thermodynamic binding properties were assessed by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses. We found that entropy-dependent binding was more evident in second- than first-generation antihistamines, resulting in enthalpy-entropy compensation between the binding forces of first- and second-generation antihistamines. QSAR analyses indicated that enthalpy-entropy compensation was determined by the sum of degrees, maximal electrostatic potentials, water-accessible surface area and hydrogen binding acceptor count of antihistamines to regulate their affinity for receptors. In conclusion, it was revealed that entropy-dependent hydrophobic interaction was more important in the binding of second-generation antihistamines, even though the hydrophilicity of second-generation antihistamines is generally increased. Furthermore, their structural determinants responsible for enthalpy-entropy compensation were explored by QSAR analyses. These findings may contribute to understanding the fundamental mechanisms of how the affinity of ligands for their receptors is regulated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Moran, Jeffery H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Arkansas Department of Public Health, Public Health Laboratory, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Prather, Paul L., E-mail: pratherpaull@uams.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  11. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB 1 Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB 2 Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB 2 Rs (hCB 2 Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB 2 Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB 2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB 2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB 2 Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB 2 Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9 -THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB 2 R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB 2 Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB 2 Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB 1 and CB 2 Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018 and JWH-073 are synthetic cannabinoids present in abused K2

  12. Analysis of multi-site drug-protein interactions by high-performance affinity chromatography: Binding by glimepiride to normal or glycated human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ryan; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2015-08-21

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used in a variety of formats to examine multi-site interactions between glimepiride, a third-generation sulfonylurea drug, and normal or in vitro glycated forms of the transport protein human serum albumin (HSA). Frontal analysis revealed that glimepiride interacts with normal HSA and glycated HSA at a group of high affinity sites (association equilibrium constant, or Ka, 9.2-11.8×10(5)M(-1) at pH 7.4 and 37°C) and a group of lower affinity regions (Ka, 5.9-16×10(3)M(-1)). Zonal elution competition studies were designed and carried out in both normal- and reversed-role formats to investigate the binding by this drug at specific sites. These experiments indicated that glimepiride was interacting at both Sudlow sites I and II. Allosteric effects were also noted with R-warfarin at Sudlow site I and with tamoxifen at the tamoxifen site on HSA. The binding at Sudlow site I had a 2.1- to 2.3-fold increase in affinity in going from normal HSA to the glycated samples of HSA. There was no significant change in the affinity for glimepiride at Sudlow site II in going from normal HSA to a moderately glycated sample of HSA, but a slight decrease in affinity was seen in going to a more highly glycated HSA sample. These results demonstrated how various HPAC-based methods can be used to profile and characterize multi-site binding by a drug such as glimepiride to a protein and its modified forms. The information obtained from this study should be useful in providing a better understanding of how drug-protein binding may be affected by glycation and of how separation and analysis methods based on HPAC can be employed to study systems with complex interactions or that involve modified proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and binding affinity of new 1,4-disubstituted triazoles as potential dopamine D(3) receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua, Ignacio; Alvarado, Mario; Masaguer, Christian F; Iglesias, Alba; Brea, José; Loza, María I; Carro, Laura

    2013-10-15

    A series of new 1,4-disubstituted triazoles was prepared from appropriate arylacetylenes and aminoalkylazides using click chemistry methodology. These compounds were evaluated as potential ligands on several subtypes of dopamine receptors in in vitro competition assays, showing high affinity for dopamine D3 receptors, lower affinity for D2 and D4, and no affinity for the D1 receptors. Compound 18 displayed the highest affinity at the D3 receptor with a Ki value of 2.7 nM, selectivity over D2 (70-fold) and D4 (200-fold), and behaviour as a competitive antagonist in the low nanomolar range. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Validation of metal-binding sites in macromolecular structures with the CheckMyMetal web server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chordia, Mahendra D; Cooper, David R; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Müller, Peter; Sheldrick, George M; Minor, Wladek

    2014-01-01

    Metals have vital roles in both the mechanism and architecture of biological macromolecules. Yet structures of metal-containing macromolecules in which metals are misidentified and/or suboptimally modeled are abundant in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This shows the need for a diagnostic tool to identify and correct such modeling problems with metal-binding environments. The CheckMyMetal (CMM) web server (http://csgid.org/csgid/metal_sites/) is a sophisticated, user-friendly web-based method to evaluate metal-binding sites in macromolecular structures using parameters derived from 7,350 metal-binding sites observed in a benchmark data set of 2,304 high-resolution crystal structures. The protocol outlines how the CMM server can be used to detect geometric and other irregularities in the structures of metal-binding sites, as well as how it can alert researchers to potential errors in metal assignment. The protocol also gives practical guidelines for correcting problematic sites by modifying the metal-binding environment and/or redefining metal identity in the PDB file. Several examples where this has led to meaningful results are described in the ANTICIPATED RESULTS section. CMM was designed for a broad audience--biomedical researchers studying metal-containing proteins and nucleic acids--but it is equally well suited for structural biologists validating new structures during modeling or refinement. The CMM server takes the coordinates of a metal-containing macromolecule structure in the PDB format as input and responds within a few seconds for a typical protein structure with 2-5 metal sites and a few hundred amino acids.

  15. FcRn affinity-pharmacokinetic relationship of five human IgG4 antibodies engineered for improved in vitro FcRn binding properties in cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta-Mannan, Amita; Chow, Chi-Kin; Dickinson, Craig; Driver, David; Lu, Jirong; Witcher, Derrick R; Wroblewski, Victor J

    2012-08-01

    The pH-dependent binding of IgGs to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays a critical role in regulating IgG homeostasis in vivo. Enhancing interactions between Fc and FcRn via protein engineering has been successfully used as an approach for improving the pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Although the quantitative translatability of the in vitro FcRn affinity enhancement to an in vivo pharmacokinetic benefit has been supported by several studies, there are also published reports indicating a disconnect in this relation. The body of literature suggests there are likely additional biochemical and biophysical properties of the mAbs along with their FcRn affinity that influence the in vivo pharmacokinetics. Herein, we more broadly evaluate the in vitro Fc-FcRn interactions and biochemical properties of five humanized IgG4 antibodies each with two Fc variant sequences (T250Q/M428L and V308P) and their corresponding pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys. Our findings indicate that the FcRn affinity-pharmacokinetic relationship does not show a direct correlation either across different IgGs or between the two variant sequences within a platform. Other parameters that have been suggested to contribute to mAb pharmacokinetic properties, such as the pH-dependent dissociation of the FcRn-IgG complexes, mAb biophysical properties, and nonspecific/charge binding characteristics of the mAbs, also did not independently explain the differing pharmacokinetic behaviors. Our results suggest that there is likely not a single in vitro parameter that readily predicts in vivo pharmacokinetics, but that the relative contribution and interplay of several factors along with the FcRn binding affinity are important determinants of mAb pharmacokinetic properties.

  16. Interrelationship among Fe-His Bond Strengths, Oxygen Affinities, and Intersubunit Hydrogen Bonding Changes upon Ligand Binding in the β Subunit of Human Hemoglobin: The Alkaline Bohr Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Shigenori; Okumura, Miki; Saito, Kazuya; Ogura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Teizo; Nagai, Masako

    2017-03-07

    Regulation of the oxygen affinity of human adult hemoglobin (Hb A) at high pH, known as the alkaline Bohr effect, is essential for its physiological function. In this study, structural mechanisms of the alkaline Bohr effect and pH-dependent O 2 affinity changes were investigated via 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance and visible and UV resonance Raman spectra of mutant Hbs, Hb M Iwate (αH87Y) and Hb M Boston (αH58Y). It was found that even though the binding of O 2 to the α subunits is forbidden in the mutant Hbs, the O 2 affinity was higher at alkaline pH than at neutral pH, and concomitantly, the Fe-His stretching frequency of the β subunits was shifted to higher values. Thus, it was confirmed for the β subunits that the stronger the Fe-His bond, the higher the O 2 affinity. It was found in this study that the quaternary structure of α(Fe 3+ )β(Fe 2+ -CO) of the mutant Hb is closer to T than to the ordinary R at neutral pH. The retained Aspβ94-Hisβ146 hydrogen bond makes the extent of proton release smaller upon ligand binding from Hisβ146, known as one of residues contributing to the alkaline Bohr effect. For these T structures, the Aspα94-Trpβ37 hydrogen bond in the hinge region and the Tyrα42-Aspβ99 hydrogen bond in the switch region of the α 1 -β 2 interface are maintained but elongated at alkaline pH. Thus, a decrease in tension in the Fe-His bond of the β subunits at alkaline pH causes a substantial increase in the change in global structure upon binding of CO to the β subunit.

  17. Chirality-induced conformational preferences in peptide-metal ion binding revealed by IR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R.C.; Steill, J.D.; Oomens, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chirality reversal of a residue in a peptide can change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by gas-phase IR spectroscopy of peptide−metal ion complexes. The binding conformations of Li+, Na+, and H+ with the ll and dl stereoisomers of PhePhe were compared through IR ion

  18. Chirality-Induced Conformational Preferences in Peptide-Metal Ion Binding Revealed by IR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R. C.; Steill, J. D.; Oomens, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chirality reversal of a residue in a peptide can change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by gas-phase IR spectroscopy of peptide metal ion complexes. The binding conformations of Li+, Na+, and H+ with the LL and DL stereoisomers of PhePhe were compared through IR ion

  19. Generic NICA-Donnan model parameters for metal-ion binding by humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, C.J.; Kinniburgh, D.G.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Tipping, E.

    2003-01-01

    A total of 171 datasets of literature and experimental data for metal-ion binding by fulvic and humic acids have been digitized and re-analyzed using the NICA-Donnan model. Generic parameter values have been derived that can be used for modeling in the absence of specific metal-ion binding

  20. Docking-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) predicts binding affinities to aryl hydrocarbon receptor for polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jintao; Pu, Yuepu; Yin, Lihong

    2013-07-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) cause toxic effects after binding to an intracellular cytosolic receptor called the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Thymic atrophy, weight loss, immunotoxicity, acute lethality, and induction of cytochrome P4501A1 have all been correlated with the binding affinity to AhR. To study the key molecular features for determining binding affinity to AhR, a homology model of AhR ligand-binding domains was developed, a molecular docking approach was employed to obtain docking-based conformations of all molecules in the whole set, and 3-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) methodology, namely, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), was applied. A partial least square analysis was performed, and QSAR models were generated for a training set of 59 compounds. The generated QSAR model showed good internal and external statistical reliability, and in a comparison with other reported CoMFA models using different alignment methods, the docking-based CoMFA model showed some advantages. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  1. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Boughlala, Z.; Guerra, C.F.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas?phase Cl?X and [HCl?X]+ complexes for X+=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl? and HCl for the various cations. The Cl?X bond becomes longer and weaker along X+?=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+. Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence ...

  2. Selectivity of externally facing ion-binding sites in the Na/K pump to alkali metals and organic cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratheal, Ian M; Virgin, Gail K; Yu, Haibo; Roux, Benoît; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2010-10-26

    The Na/K pump is a P-type ATPase that exchanges three intracellular Na(+) ions for two extracellular K(+) ions through the plasmalemma of nearly all animal cells. The mechanisms involved in cation selection by the pump's ion-binding sites (site I and site II bind either Na(+) or K(+); site III binds only Na(+)) are poorly understood. We studied cation selectivity by outward-facing sites (high K(+) affinity) of Na/K pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes, under voltage clamp. Guanidinium(+), methylguanidinium(+), and aminoguanidinium(+) produced two phenomena possibly reflecting actions at site III: (i) voltage-dependent inhibition (VDI) of outwardly directed pump current at saturating K(+), and (ii) induction of pump-mediated, guanidinium-derivative-carried inward current at negative potentials without Na(+) and K(+). In contrast, formamidinium(+) and acetamidinium(+) induced K(+)-like outward currents. Measurement of ouabain-sensitive ATPase activity and radiolabeled cation uptake confirmed that these cations are external K(+) congeners. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that bound organic cations induce minor distortion of the binding sites. Among tested metals, only Li(+) induced Na(+)-like VDI, whereas all metals tested except Na(+) induced K(+)-like outward currents. Pump-mediated K(+)-like organic cation transport challenges the concept of rigid structural models in which ion specificity at site I and site II arises from a precise and unique arrangement of coordinating ligands. Furthermore, actions by guanidinium(+) derivatives suggest that Na(+) binds to site III in a hydrated form and that the inward current observed without external Na(+) and K(+) represents cation transport when normal occlusion at sites I and II is impaired. These results provide insights on external ion selectivity at the three binding sites.

  3. Recognition of a 10 base pair sequence of DNA and stereochemical control of the binding affinity of chiral hairpin polyamide-Hoechst 33258 conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Putta Mallikarjuna; Toporowski, Joseph W; Kahane, Alexandra L; Bruice, Thomas C

    2005-12-15

    Chiral hairpin polyamides linked to a Hoechst 33258 analogue at the alpha-position of the hairpin turn amino acid (1,2) were synthesized on solid phase by adopting Fmoc and ivDde techniques. The DNA-binding properties of enantiomeric conjugates 1 and 2, and N-terminal linked conjugate 3 for 8-14bp sequences were determined by spectrofluorometric and thermal melting studies. Conjugates 1 and 2 recognize a 10bp sequence, while conjugate 3 recognizes a 9bp sequence. Interestingly, R-enantiomer 1 exhibited 10- to 30-fold higher binding affinities than S-enantiomer 2 for the DNA sequences studied. These binding differences were accounted for by molecular modeling studies, which revealed that the amide proton nearest to the chiral center in R-conjugate 1 is better positioned to form hydrogen bonds to the DNA bases, while S-conjugate 2 does not.

  4. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS FOR METAL BINDING CAPACITY OF CYSTEINE BY USING UV-VIS SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    OpenAIRE

    Shivendu Ranjan; Nandita Dasgupta; Gyanendra Gour; Rashmi Dubey; Kumari Amrita

    2012-01-01

    The metal binding capacity of cysteine with three different metals Nickel, Copper and Lead was studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometer for which absorbance values were taken after interaction of cysteine with metal salt solutions (10ppm and 100ppm). Before taking above absorbance dilution factor was set using cysteine stock. The increase in peak intensity was observed when metal salt solution and metal saltcysteine solution were compared. Based on peak shift and peak intensity finally it can b...

  5. Thermodynamic Studies of Cu(I) and Other d10 Metal Ions Binding to Proteins in the Copper Homeostasis Pathway and the Organomercurial Detoxification Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Michael James

    Copper(I) is the predominant oxidation state of this essential metal in living cells due to reducing intracellular conditions. Because of deleterious copper-mediated Fenton chemistry, intracellular copper trafficking pathways involve strict regulation by metallochaperone proteins. Previous studies of the 68-residue metallochaperone, HAH1, have shown that it coordinates Cu(I) with two cysteines for transport from Ctr1 in the cell membrane to ATPases in the Golgi network. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and methods to suppress oxidation and disproportionation of Cu(I), the thermodynamics of Cu(I), as well as other metal ions, binding to HAH1 have been accurately quantified. During the course of this study, the Cu(I) binding thermodynamics with the stabilizing ligand hexamethyltrien were determined in order to accurately quantify the Cu(I) binding thermodynamics with proteins, and revealed an unexpected Cu(I) coordination chemistry with this ligand. In addition, HAH1 binding the Cu(I) analogue Ag(I), the abundant cellular metal ion Zn(II), and the thiophilic toxic metal ion Hg(II), have been quantified. The binding thermodynamics of these metal ions were also determined in the presence of glutathione to more accurately model physiological conditions. HAH1 has a high affinity for Cu(I), which is both enthalpically and entropically favorable. It has a substantially lower affinity for Zn(II), which is entropically favored, suggesting that Zn(II) is not able to compete with Cu(I) for HAH1 in vivo. However, HAH1 has an exceptionally high affinity for Hg(II), with its larger thiophilicity, and it will displace Cu(I). Mercury(II) and particularly organomercurial compounds are very toxic, yet proteins from the bacterial mer operon provide resistance to this toxicity. In particular, the organomercurial lyase MerB, whose only known structural homologue is a putative copper metallochaperone, is responsible for cleavage of the carbon-mercury bond of MeHg(II) and

  6. Carcinogenic heavy metals, As3+ and Cr6+, increase affinity of nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 for DNA containing 8-oxo-guanosine, and promote translesion DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Aiko; Corcoran, George B; Hirata, Fusao

    2011-04-15

    To elucidate the biological roles of mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 in nuclei, we investigated the interaction of purified nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 with intact and oxidatively damaged DNA. We synthesized the 80mer 5'-GTCCACTATTAAAGAACGTGGACTCCAACGTCAAAGGGCGAAAAACCGTCTATCAGGGCGATGGCCCACTACGTGAACCA-3' (P0G), and four additional 80mers, each with a selected single G in position 14, 30, 37 or 48 replaced by 8-oxo-guanosine (8-oxo-G) to model DNA damaged at a specific site by oxidation. Nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 was able to bind oligonucleotides containing 8-oxo-G at specific positions, and able to anneal damaged oligonucleotide DNA to M13mp18 in the presence of Ca(2+) or heavy metals such as As(3+) and Cr(6+). M13mp18/8-oxo-G-oligonucleotide duplexes were unwound by nuclear annexin A1 in the presence of Mg(2+) and ATP. The binding affinity of nuclear annexin A1 for ssDNA was higher for oxidatively damaged oligonucleotides than for the undamaged oligonucleotide P0G, whereas the maximal binding was not significantly changed. The carcinogenic heavy metals, As(3+) and Cr(6+), increased the affinity of mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 for oxidatively damaged oligonucleotides. Nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 stimulated translesion DNA synthesis by Pol β. Nuclear extracts of L5178Y tk(+/-) lymphoma cells also promoted translesion DNA synthesis in the presence of the heavy metals As(3+) and Cr(6+). This DNA synthesis was inhibited by anti-annexin A1 antibody. These observations do not prove but provide strong evidence for the hypothesis that nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 is involved in heavy metal promoted translesion DNA synthesis, thereby exhibiting the capacity to increase the introduction of mutations into DNA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of pheromone components and their binding affinity to the odorant binding protein CcapOBP83a-2 of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siciliano, P.; He, X. L.; Woodcock, C.; Pickett, J. A.; Field, L. M.; Birkett, M. A.; Kalinová, Blanka; Gomulski, L. M.; Scolari, F.; Gasperi, G.; Malacrida, A. R.; Zhou, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 48, May (2014), s. 51-62 ISSN 0965-1748 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : medfly * Ceratitis capitata * olfaction * odorant binding protein * pheromone binding protein * pheromone * binding studies * protein expression * electroantennography * GC-EAG * fluorescence displacement Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.450, year: 2014

  8. Analysis of the EIAV Rev-responsive element (RRE reveals a conserved RNA motif required for high affinity Rev binding in both HIV-1 and EIAV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyung Lee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A cis-acting RNA regulatory element, the Rev-responsive element (RRE, has essential roles in replication of lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and equine infection anemia virus (EIAV. The RRE binds the viral trans-acting regulatory protein, Rev, to mediate nucleocytoplasmic transport of incompletely spliced mRNAs encoding viral structural genes and genomic RNA. Because of its potential as a clinical target, RRE-Rev interactions have been well studied in HIV-1; however, detailed molecular structures of Rev-RRE complexes in other lentiviruses are still lacking. In this study, we investigate the secondary structure of the EIAV RRE and interrogate regulatory protein-RNA interactions in EIAV Rev-RRE complexes. Computational prediction and detailed chemical probing and footprinting experiments were used to determine the RNA secondary structure of EIAV RRE-1, a 555 nt region that provides RRE function in vivo. Chemical probing experiments confirmed the presence of several predicted loop and stem-loop structures, which are conserved among 140 EIAV sequence variants. Footprinting experiments revealed that Rev binding induces significant structural rearrangement in two conserved domains characterized by stable stem-loop structures. Rev binding region-1 (RBR-1 corresponds to a genetically-defined Rev binding region that overlaps exon 1 of the EIAV rev gene and contains an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE. RBR-2, characterized for the first time in this study, is required for high affinity binding of EIAV Rev to the RRE. RBR-2 contains an RNA structural motif that is also found within the high affinity Rev binding site in HIV-1 (stem-loop IIB, and within or near mapped RRE regions of four additional lentiviruses. The powerful integration of computational and experimental approaches in this study has generated a validated RNA secondary structure for the EIAV RRE and provided provocative evidence that high affinity Rev binding sites of

  9. comets (Constrained Optimization of Multistate Energies by Tree Search): A Provable and Efficient Protein Design Algorithm to Optimize Binding Affinity and Specificity with Respect to Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen, Mark A; Donald, Bruce R

    2016-05-01

    Practical protein design problems require designing sequences with a combination of affinity, stability, and specificity requirements. Multistate protein design algorithms model multiple structural or binding "states" of a protein to address these requirements. comets provides a new level of versatile, efficient, and provable multistate design. It provably returns the minimum with respect to sequence of any desired linear combination of the energies of multiple protein states, subject to constraints on other linear combinations. Thus, it can target nearly any combination of affinity (to one or multiple ligands), specificity, and stability (for multiple states if needed). Empirical calculations on 52 protein design problems showed comets is far more efficient than the previous state of the art for provable multistate design (exhaustive search over sequences). comets can handle a very wide range of protein flexibility and can enumerate a gap-free list of the best constraint-satisfying sequences in order of objective function value.

  10. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with a small metal-binding protein from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli is still the preferred organism for large-scale production of recombinant proteins. The use of fusion proteins has helped considerably in enhancing the solubility of heterologous proteins and their purification with affinity chromatography. Here, the use of a small metal-binding protein (SmbP) from Nitrosomonas europaea is described as a new fusion protein for protein expression and purification in E. coli. Fluorescent proteins tagged at the N-terminal with SmbP showed high levels of solubility, compared with those of maltose-binding protein and glutathione S-transferase, and low formation of inclusion bodies. Using commercially available IMAC resins charged with Ni(II), highly pure recombinant proteins were obtained after just one chromatography step. Proteins may be purified from the periplasm of E. coli if SmbP contains the signal sequence at the N-terminal. After removal of the SmbP tag from the protein of interest, high-yields are obtained since SmbP is a protein of just 9.9 kDa. The results here obtained suggest that SmbP is a good alternative as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanistic Inferences from the Binding of Ligands to LpxC, A Metal-Dependent Deacetylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennadios,H.; Whittington, D.; Li, X.; Fierke, C.; Christianson, D.

    2006-01-01

    The metal-dependent deacetylase LpxC catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A biosynthesis in Gram-negative bacteria. Accordingly, LpxC is an attractive target for the development of inhibitors that may serve as potential new antibiotics for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. Here, we report the 2.7 Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with the substrate analogue inhibitor TU-514 and the 2.0 Angstroms resolution structure of LpxC complexed with imidazole. The X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with TU-514 allows for a detailed examination of the coordination geometry of the catalytic zinc ion and other enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the active site. The hydroxamate group of TU-514 forms a bidentate chelate complex with the zinc ion and makes hydrogen bond interactions with conserved active site residues E78, H265, and T191. The inhibitor C-4 hydroxyl group makes direct hydrogen bond interactions with E197 and H58. Finally, the C-3 myristate moiety of the inhibitor binds in the hydrophobic tunnel of the active site. These intermolecular interactions provide a foundation for understanding structural aspects of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor affinity. Comparison of the TU-514 complex with cacodylate and imidazole complexes suggests a possible substrate diphosphate binding site and highlights residues that may stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate and its flanking transition states in catalysis. Evidence of a catalytic zinc ion in the native zinc enzyme coordinated by H79, H238, D242, and two water molecules with square pyramidal geometry is also presented. These results suggest that the native state of this metallohydrolase may contain a pentacoordinate zinc ion, which contrasts with the native states of archetypical zinc hydrolases such as thermolysin and carboxypeptidase A.

  12. Mechanistic inferences from the binding of ligands to LpxC, a metal-dependent deacetylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennadios, Heather A; Whittington, Douglas A; Li, Xuechen; Fierke, Carol A; Christianson, David W

    2006-07-04

    The metal-dependent deacetylase LpxC catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A biosynthesis in Gram-negative bacteria. Accordingly, LpxC is an attractive target for the development of inhibitors that may serve as potential new antibiotics for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. Here, we report the 2.7 A resolution X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with the substrate analogue inhibitor TU-514 and the 2.0 A resolution structure of LpxC complexed with imidazole. The X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with TU-514 allows for a detailed examination of the coordination geometry of the catalytic zinc ion and other enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the active site. The hydroxamate group of TU-514 forms a bidentate chelate complex with the zinc ion and makes hydrogen bond interactions with conserved active site residues E78, H265, and T191. The inhibitor C-4 hydroxyl group makes direct hydrogen bond interactions with E197 and H58. Finally, the C-3 myristate moiety of the inhibitor binds in the hydrophobic tunnel of the active site. These intermolecular interactions provide a foundation for understanding structural aspects of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor affinity. Comparison of the TU-514 complex with cacodylate and imidazole complexes suggests a possible substrate diphosphate binding site and highlights residues that may stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate and its flanking transition states in catalysis. Evidence of a catalytic zinc ion in the native zinc enzyme coordinated by H79, H238, D242, and two water molecules with square pyramidal geometry is also presented. These results suggest that the native state of this metallohydrolase may contain a pentacoordinate zinc ion, which contrasts with the native states of archetypical zinc hydrolases such as thermolysin and carboxypeptidase A.

  13. Mechanistic Inferences from the Binding of Ligands to LpxC, A Metal-Dependent Deacetylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennadios, H.; Whittington, D.; Li, X.; Fierke, C.; Christianson, D.

    2006-01-01

    The metal-dependent deacetylase LpxC catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A biosynthesis in Gram-negative bacteria. Accordingly, LpxC is an attractive target for the development of inhibitors that may serve as potential new antibiotics for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. Here, we report the 2.7 Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with the substrate analogue inhibitor TU-514 and the 2.0 Angstroms resolution structure of LpxC complexed with imidazole. The X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with TU-514 allows for a detailed examination of the coordination geometry of the catalytic zinc ion and other enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the active site. The hydroxamate group of TU-514 forms a bidentate chelate complex with the zinc ion and makes hydrogen bond interactions with conserved active site residues E78, H265, and T191. The inhibitor C-4 hydroxyl group makes direct hydrogen bond interactions with E197 and H58. Finally, the C-3 myristate moiety of the inhibitor binds in the hydrophobic tunnel of the active site. These intermolecular interactions provide a foundation for understanding structural aspects of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor affinity. Comparison of the TU-514 complex with cacodylate and imidazole complexes suggests a possible substrate diphosphate binding site and highlights residues that may stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate and its flanking transition states in catalysis. Evidence of a catalytic zinc ion in the native zinc enzyme coordinated by H79, H238, D242, and two water molecules with square pyramidal geometry is also presented. These results suggest that the native state of this metallohydrolase may contain a pentacoordinate zinc ion, which contrasts with the native states of archetypical zinc hydrolases such as thermolysin and carboxypeptidase A

  14. Septide and neurokinin A are high-affinity ligands on the NK-1 receptor: evidence from homologous versus heterologous binding analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, H; Schwartz, T W

    1996-12-16

    The three main tachykinins, substance P, neurokinin A (NKA), and neurokinin B, are believed to be selective ligands for respectively the NK-1, NK-2 and NK-3 receptors. However, NKA also has actions which cannot be mediated through its normal NK-2 receptor and the synthetic peptide [pGlu6,Pro9]-Substance P9-11--called septide--is known to have tachykinin-like actions despite its apparent lack of binding to any known tachykinin receptor. In the cloned NK-1 receptor expressed in COS-7 cells NKA and septide as expected were poor competitors for radiolabeled substance P. However, by using radiolabeled NKA and septide directly, it was found that both peptides in homologous binding assays as well as in competition against each other in fact bound to the NK-1 receptor with high affinity: Kd values of 0.51 +/- 0.15 nM (NKA) and 0.55 +/- 0.03 nM (septide). It is concluded that NKA and septide are high-affinity ligands for the NK-1 receptor but that they are poor competitors for substance P, which in contrast competes very well for binding with both NKA and septide.

  15. N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosoureas covalently bound to nonionic and monocationic lexitropsin dipeptides. Synthesis, DNA affinity binding characteristics, and reactions with 32P-end-labeled DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, K.M.; Wurdeman, R.L.; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Faxian; Gold, B.

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a series of compounds that contain an N-alkyl-N-nitrosourea functionality linked to DNA minor groove binding bi- and tripeptides (lexitropsins or information-reading peptides) based on methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide subunits are described. The lexitropsins (lex) synthesized have either a 3-(dimethylamino)propyl or propyl substituent on the carboxyl terminus. The preferred DNA affinity binding sequences of these compounds were footprinted in 32 P-end-labeled restriction fragments with methidiumpropyl-EDTA·Fe(II), and in common with other structural analogues, e.g., distamycin and netropsin, these nitrosoureas recognize A-T-rich runs. The affinity binding of the compound with the dimethylamino terminus, which is ionized at near-neutral pH, appeared stronger than that observed for the neutral dipeptide. The sequence specificity for DNA alkylation by (2-chloroethyl)nitrosourea-lex dipeptides (Cl-ENU-lex), with neutral and charged carboxyl termini, using 32 P-end-labeled restriction fragments, was determined by the conversion of the adducted sites into single-strand breaks by sequential heating at neutral pH and exposure to base. The DNA cleavage sites were visualized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Linking the Cl-ENU moiety to minor groove binders is a viable strategy to qualitatively and quantitatively control the delivery and release of the ultimate DNA alkylating agent in a sequence-dependent fashion

  16. Assessment of binding affinity to 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT2A) receptor and inverse agonist activity of naftidrofuryl: comparison with those of sarpogrelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Saida Abdel Regal; Hossain, Murad; Bhuiyan, Mohiuddin Ahmed; Nakamura, Takashi; Nagatomo, Takafumi

    2009-08-01

    Naftidrofuryl is a peripheral vasodilator that has been clinically used in the treatment of intermittent claudication and dementia. It has 5-hydroxytryptamine 2 (5-HT(2)) antiserotonergic activity and selectively binds with the 5-HT(2) receptor. The purpose of the present study is to assess the binding affinity and functional potency of naftidrofuryl to the 5-HT(2A) receptor, to find out the inverse agonist activity of this compound at a constitutively active mutant of 5-HT(2A) receptor, and finally to compare the findings with those of sarpogrelate. The investigation showed that the binding affinity (pK(i)) of naftidrofuryl was decreased 25- or 50-fold compared to sarpogrelate in the wild-type 5-HT(2A) receptor or Cys322Lys mutant receptor, respectively. Moreover, the functional potency (pK(b)) of naftidrofuryl was much lower compared to sarpogrelate at the 5-HT(2A) receptor. In addition, inverse agonist activity of naftidrofuryl was lower compared with sarpogrelate at the constitutively active mutant receptor. Thus, the data of the present study would be very important for the clarification of interaction sites of naftidrofuryl to 5-HT(2A) receptors and also may help to understand the mechanism of inverse agonist activity at the constitutively active mutant receptor.

  17. Metal ion interaction of an oligopeptide fragment representing the regulatory metal binding site of a CueR protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jancsó, Attila; Szokolai, Hajnalka; Roszahegyi, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Metalloregulatory proteins of the MerR family are transcriptional activators that sense/control the concentration of various metal ions inside bacteria.1 The Cu+ efflux regulator CueR, similarly to other MerR proteins, possesses a short multiple Cys-containing metal binding loop close to the C......-terminus. CueR has a high selectivity for Cu+, Ag+ and Au+, but exhibits no transcriptional activity for the divalent ions Hg2+ and Zn2+.2 The two Cys- residues of the metal binding loop were shown to settle M+ ions into a linear coordination environment but other factors may also play a role in the recognition...... of cognate metal ions.2 Nevertheless, it is an interesting question whether the same sequence, when removed from the protein, shows a flexibility to adopt different coordination environments and may efficiently bind metal ions having preferences for larger coordination numbers....

  18. The effect of metal and substituent on DNA binding, cleavage activity, and cytotoxicity of new synthesized Schiff base ligands and Zn(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Zahra; Nasrollahi, Neda

    2017-11-01

    New water soluble Schiff base ligands [N,Nʹ-bis{5-[(triphenylphosphonium percholorate)-methyl]salicylidine}-1,3-diamino-2-propanol] (L1) and [N,Nʹ-bis(salicylidine)-1,3-diamino-2-propanol] (L2) and zinc (II) complex of L1: [N,Nʹ-bis{5-[(triphenylphosphonium percholorate)-methyl]salicylidine}-1,3-diamino-2-propanol]Zn(II) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1HNMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. In vitro DNA binding of the compounds were investigated by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, cyclic voltammetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and gel electrophoresis. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of metal and substituent on DNA binding, cleavage activity and cytotoxicity of new synthesized Schiff base ligands and Zn(II) complex. The order of DNA binding affinity (Kb) calculated from the absorption spectroscopy was: ZnL1 > L2 > L1. Molecular docking studies explore more details on the mode of binding and binding energies. Although the compounds revealed strong DNA binding affinity but electrophoresis studies don't show any effects on the DNA structure and single or double strand breaks. The cytotoxicity experiments against human Hepatoma (HepG2) showed the order: L1 > ZnL1 > L2.

  19. Dot-ELISA affinity test: an easy, low-cost method to estimate binding activity of monoclonal antibodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Z.; Jankovičová, B.; Horák, Daniel; Bílková, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2013), 1000168_1-1000168_5 ISSN 2155-9872 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E12053; GA MŠk 7E09109 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 246513 - NADINE; European Commission(XE) 228980 - CAMINEMS Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : dot- ELISA * affinity * monoclonal antibody Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  20. Affinity capillary electrophoresis and quantum mechanical calculations applied to investigation of [Gly(6)]-antamanide binding with sodium and potassium ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pangavhane, Sachin; Böhm, S.; Makrlík, E.; Ruzza, P.; Kašička, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 12 (2017), s. 1551-1559 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01948S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : affinity capillary electrophoresis * density functional theory * [Gly(6)]-antamanide * peptide complex * stability constant Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2016

  1. Evaluation of immobilized metal affinity chromatography kits for the purification of histidine-tagged recombinant CagA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Cebrail; Uslu, Merve; Yazici, Duygu; Salih, Barik A

    2016-05-15

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) technique is used for fast and reliable purification of histidine(His)-tagged recombinant proteins. The technique provides purification under native and denaturing conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate three commercially available IMAC kits (Thermo Scientific, GE Healthcare and Qiagen) for the purification of a 6xHis-tagged recombinant CagA (cytotoxin-associated gene A) protein from IPTG-induced Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) culture. The kits were tested according to the manufacturer instructions and the protein was purified with only GE Healthcare and Qiagen kits under denaturing conditions. 1% (w/v) SDS was used as denaturing agent in PBS instead of extraction reagent of Thermo Scientific kit to lyse bacterial cells from 100ml culture. The 6xHis-tagged recombinant protein was purified by the three kits equally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Large-scale analysis of in Vivo phosphorylated membrane proteins by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nühse, Thomas S; Stensballe, Allan; Jensen, Ole N

    2003-01-01

    Global analyses of protein phosphorylation require specific enrichment methods because of the typically low abundance of phosphoproteins. To date, immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) for phosphopeptides has shown great promise for large-scale studies, but has a reputation for poor...... specificity. We investigated the potential of IMAC in combination with capillary liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the identification of plasma membrane phosphoproteins of Arabidopsis. Without chemical modification of peptides, over 75% pure phosphopeptides were isolated from...... plasma membrane digests and detected and sequenced by mass spectrometry. We present a scheme for two-dimensional peptide separation using strong anion exchange chromatography prior to IMAC that both decreases the complexity of IMAC-purified phosphopeptides and yields a far greater coverage...

  3. Structural Basis of Low-Affinity Nickel Binding to the Nickel-Responsive Transcription Factor NikR from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.; Schreiter, E.; Stultz, C.; Drennan, C.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli NikR regulates cellular nickel uptake by binding to the nik operon in the presence of nickel and blocking transcription of genes encoding the nickel uptake transporter. NikR has two binding affinities for the nik operon: a nanomolar dissociation constant with stoichiometric nickel and a picomolar dissociation constant with excess nickel (Bloom, S. L., and Zamble, D. B. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 10029-10038; Chivers, P. T., and Sauer, R. T. (2002) Chem. Biol. 9, 1141-1148). While it is known that the stoichiometric nickel ions bind at the NikR tetrameric interface (Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 794-799; Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 13676-13681), the binding sites for excess nickel ions have not been fully described. Here we have determined the crystal structure of NikR in the presence of excess nickel to 2.6 (angstrom) resolution and have obtained nickel anomalous data (1.4845 (angstrom)) in the presence of excess nickel for both NikR alone and NikR cocrystallized with a 30-nucleotide piece of double-stranded DNA containing the nik operon. These anomalous data show that excess nickel ions do not bind to a single location on NikR but instead reveal a total of 22 possible low-affinity nickel sites on the NikR tetramer. These sites, for which there are six different types, are all on the surface of NikR, and most are found in both the NikR alone and NikR-DNA structures. Using a combination of crystallographic data and molecular dynamics simulations, the nickel sites can be described as preferring octahedral geometry, utilizing one to three protein ligands (typically histidine) and at least two water molecules.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoid-associated DNA-binding protein H-NS binds with high-affinity to the Holliday junction and inhibits strand exchange promoted by RecA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharadamma, N; Harshavardhana, Y; Singh, Pawan; Muniyappa, K

    2010-06-01

    A number of studies have shown that the structure and composition of bacterial nucleoid influences many a processes related to DNA metabolism. The nucleoid-associated proteins modulate not only the DNA conformation but also regulate the DNA metabolic processes such as replication, recombination, repair and transcription. Understanding of how these processes occur in the context of Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoid is of considerable medical importance because the nucleoid structure may be constantly remodeled in response to environmental signals and/or growth conditions. Many studies have concluded that Escherichia coli H-NS binds to DNA in a sequence-independent manner, with a preference for A-/T-rich tracts in curved DNA; however, recent studies have identified the existence of medium- and low-affinity binding sites in the vicinity of the curved DNA. Here, we show that the M. tuberculosis H-NS protein binds in a more structure-specific manner to DNA replication and repair intermediates, but displays lower affinity for double-stranded DNA with relatively higher GC content. Notably, M. tuberculosis H-NS was able to bind Holliday junction (HJ), the central recombination intermediate, with substantially higher affinity and inhibited the three-strand exchange promoted by its cognate RecA. Likewise, E. coli H-NS was able to bind the HJ and suppress DNA strand exchange promoted by E. coli RecA, although much less efficiently compared to M. tuberculosis H-NS. Our results provide new insights into a previously unrecognized function of H-NS protein, with implications for blocking the genome integration of horizontally transferred genes by homologous and/or homeologous recombination.

  5. Effects of metal ions on stability and activity of hyperthermophilic pyrolysin and further stabilization of this enzyme by modification of a Ca2+-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gao, Xiaowei; Dai, Zheng; Tang, Bing; Tang, Xiao-Feng

    2014-05-01

    Pyrolysin is an extracellular subtilase produced by the marine hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This enzyme functions at high temperatures in seawater, but little is known about the effects of metal ions on the properties of pyrolysin. Here, we report that the supplementation of Na(+), Ca(2+), or Mg(2+) salts at concentrations similar to those in seawater destabilizes recombinant pyrolysin but leads to an increase in enzyme activity. The destabilizing effect of metal ions on pyrolysin appears to be related to the disturbance of surface electrostatic interactions of the enzyme. In addition, mutational analysis of two predicted high-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites (Ca1 and Ca2) revealed that the binding of Ca(2+) is important for the stabilization of this enzyme. Interestingly, Asn substitutions at residues Asp818 and Asp820 of the Ca2 site, which is located in the C-terminal extension of pyrolysin, resulted in improvements in both enzyme thermostability and activity without affecting Ca(2+)-binding affinity. These effects were most likely due to the elimination of unfavorable electrostatic repulsion at the Ca2 site. Together, these results suggest that metal ions play important roles in modulating the stability and activity of pyrolysin.

  6. Effects of Metal Ions on Stability and Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrolysin and Further Stabilization of This Enzyme by Modification of a Ca2+-Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gao, Xiaowei; Dai, Zheng; Tang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Pyrolysin is an extracellular subtilase produced by the marine hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This enzyme functions at high temperatures in seawater, but little is known about the effects of metal ions on the properties of pyrolysin. Here, we report that the supplementation of Na+, Ca2+, or Mg2+ salts at concentrations similar to those in seawater destabilizes recombinant pyrolysin but leads to an increase in enzyme activity. The destabilizing effect of metal ions on pyrolysin appears to be related to the disturbance of surface electrostatic interactions of the enzyme. In addition, mutational analysis of two predicted high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites (Ca1 and Ca2) revealed that the binding of Ca2+ is important for the stabilization of this enzyme. Interestingly, Asn substitutions at residues Asp818 and Asp820 of the Ca2 site, which is located in the C-terminal extension of pyrolysin, resulted in improvements in both enzyme thermostability and activity without affecting Ca2+-binding affinity. These effects were most likely due to the elimination of unfavorable electrostatic repulsion at the Ca2 site. Together, these results suggest that metal ions play important roles in modulating the stability and activity of pyrolysin. PMID:24561589

  7. Affinity chromatography and binding studies on immobilized 5'-monophosphate and adenosine 2',5'-bisphosphate of nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höjeberg, B; Brodelius, P; Rydström, J; Mosbach, K

    1976-07-15

    1. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was purified to apparent homogeneity with an improved method employing affinity chromatography on N6-(6aminohexyl)-adenosine 2', 5'-bisphosphate-Sepharose 4B. 2. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified transhydrogenase carried out in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate, indicated a minimal molecular weight of 55000 +/- 2000. 3. The kinetic and regulatory properties of the purified transhydrogenase resembled those of the crude enzyme, i.e., NADPH, adenosine 2'-monophosphate and Ca2+ were activators whereas NADP+ was inhibitory. 4. Nicotinamide nucleotide-specific release of binding of the transhydrogenase to N6-(6-aminohexyl)-adenosine-2',5'-bisphosphate-Sepharose and N6-(-aminohexyl)-adenosine-5'-monophosphate-Sepharose suggests the presence of at least two separate binding sites for nicotinamide nucleotides, one that is specific for NADP(H) and one that binds both NAD(H) and NADP(H). 5. Binding of transhydrogenase to N6-)6-aminohexyl)-adenosine-2',5'-bisphosphate-Sepharose and activation of the enzyme by adenosine-2',5'-bisphophate showed a marked pH dependence. In contrast, inhibition of the Ca2+-activated enzyme by adenosine 2',5'-bisphosphate was virtually constant at various pH values. This descrepancy was interpreted to indicate the existence of separate nucleotide-binding effector and active sites.

  8. Curcumin binds in silico to anti-cancer drug target enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) with affinity comparable to two known inhibitors of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerah, Ahmed; Hobani, Yahya; Kumar, B Vinod; Bidwai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    In silico interaction of curcumin with the enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) was studied by molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 as the docking software application. AutoDock 4.2 software serves as a valid and acceptable docking application to study the interactions of small compounds with proteins. Interactions of curcumin with MMP-3 were compared to those of two known inhibitors of the enzyme, PBSA and MPPT. The calculated free energy of binding (ΔG binding) shows that curcumin binds with affinity comparable to or better than the two known inhibitors. Binding interactions of curcumin with active site residues of the enzyme are also predicted. Curcumin appears to bind in an extendended conformation making extensive VDW contacts in the active site of the enzyme. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions with key active site residues is also observed. Thus, curcumin can be considered as a good lead compound in the development of new inhibitors of MMP-3 which is a potential target of anticancer drugs. The results of these studies can serve as a starting point for further computational and experimental studies.

  9. Controlled formation of emissive silver nanoclusters using rationally designed metal-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Vasily A; Ogawa, Michael Y

    2013-08-19

    The metal-binding properties of rationally designed, synthetic proteins were used to prepare a series of emissive silver nanoclusters having predictable sizes and emission energies. Metal-binding α-helical coiled coils were designed to exist as peptide trimers, tetramers, and hexamers and found to uniquely bind 6, 8, and 12 Ag(+) ions, respectively. Subsequent treatment with a chemical reducing agent produced a series of peptide-bound Ag(0) nanoclusters that display a strong visible fluorescence whose emission energies depend on the number of bound metal ions in excellent agreement with theory.

  10. [PHEMA/PEI]–Cu(II) based immobilized metal affinity chromatography cryogels: Application on the separation of IgG from human plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhshpour, Monireh; Derazshamshir, Ali; Bereli, Nilay [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Elkak, Assem [Laboratory of “Valorisation des Ressources Naturelles et Produits de Santé (VRNPS)”, Doctoral School of Sciences and Technology, Lebanese University, Rafic Hariri University Campus, Hadath (Lebanon); Denizli, Adil, E-mail: denizli@hacettepe.edu [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-04-01

    The immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) has gained significant interest as a widespread separation and purification tool for therapeutic proteins, nucleic acids and other biological molecules. The enormous potential of IMAC for proteins with natural surface exposed-histidine residues and for recombinant proteins with histidine clusters. Cryogels as monolithic materials have recently been proposed as promising chromatographic adsorbents for the separation of biomolecules in downstream processing. In the present study, IMAC cryogels have been synthesized and utilized for the adsorption and separation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) from IgG solution and whole human plasma. For this purpose, Cu(II)-ions were coupled to poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) PHEMA using poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) as the chelating ligand. In this study the cryogels formation optimized by the varied proportion of PEI from 1% to 15% along with different amounts of Cu (II) as chelating metal. The prepared cryogels were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The [PHEMA/PEI]–Cu(II) cryogels were assayed for their capability to bind the human IgG from aqueous solutions. The IMAC cryogels were found to have high affinity toward human IgG. The adsorption of human IgG was investigated onto the PHEMA/PEI cryogels with (10% PEI) and the concentration of Cu (II) varied as 10, 50, 100 and 150 mg/L. The separation of human IgG was achieved in one purification step at pH 7.4. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed at the [PHEMA/PEI]–Cu(II) (10% PEI) with 72.28 mg/g of human IgG. The purification efficiency and human IgG purity were investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). - Highlights: • Cu(II)-ions were coupled to PHEMA using PEI as the chelating ligand. • Cu(II) chelated [PHEMA/PEI] cryogels for IgG separation were produced. • Maximum IgG adsorption capacity

  11. Affinity-based, biophysical methods to detect and analyze ligand binding to recombinant proteins: matching high information content with high throughput.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdgate, Geoff A; Anderson, Malcolm; Edfeldt, Fredrik; Geschwindner, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Affinity-based technologies have become impactful tools to detect, monitor and characterize molecular interactions using recombinant target proteins. This can aid the understanding of biological function by revealing mechanistic details, and even more importantly, enables the identification of new improved ligands that can modulate the biological activity of those targets in a desired fashion. The selection of the appropriate technology is a key step in that process, as each one of the currently available technologies offers a characteristic type of biophysical information about the ligand-binding event. Alongside the indisputable advantages of each of those technologies they naturally display diverse restrictions that are quite frequently related to the target system to be studied but also to the affinity, solubility and molecular size of the ligands. This paper discusses some of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the most common affinity-based methods, what type of information can be gained from each one of those approaches, and what requirements as well as limitations are expected from working with recombinant proteins on those platforms and how those can be optimally addressed.

  12. In silico and in vivo analysis of Toxoplasma gondii epitopes by correlating survival data with peptide-MHC-I binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Si-Yang; Jensen, Maria Risager; Rosenberg, Carina Agerbo; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Petersen, Eskild; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Protein antigens comprising peptide motifs with high binding affinity to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules are expected to induce a stronger cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and thus provide better protection against infection with microorganisms where cytotoxic T-cells are the main effector arm of the immune system. Data on cyst formation and survival were extracted from past studies on the DNA immunization of mice with plasmids coding for Toxoplasma gondii antigens. From in silico analyses of the vaccine antigens, the correlation was tested between the predicted affinity for MHC-I molecules of the vaccine peptides and the survival of immunized mice after challenge with T. gondii. ELISPOT analysis was used for the experimental testing of peptide immunogenicity. Predictions for the Db MHC-I molecule produced a strong, negative correlation between survival and the dissociation constant of vaccine-derived peptides. The in silico analyses of nine T. gondii antigens identified peptides with a predicted dissociation constant in the interval from 10nM to 40μM. ELISPOT assays with splenocytes from T. gondii-infected mice further supported the importance of the peptide affinity for MHC-I. In silico analysis clearly helped the search for protective vaccine antigens. The ELISPOT analysis confirmed that the predicted T-cell epitopes were immunogenic by their ability to release interferon gamma in spleen cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystal structure of the high-affinity Na+K+-ATPase-ouabain complex with Mg2+ bound in the cation binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Mette; Yatime, Laure; Nissen, Poul; Fedosova, Natalya U

    2013-07-02

    The Na(+),K(+)-ATPase maintains electrochemical gradients for Na(+) and K(+) that are critical for animal cells. Cardiotonic steroids (CTSs), widely used in the clinic and recently assigned a role as endogenous regulators of intracellular processes, are highly specific inhibitors of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Here we describe a crystal structure of the phosphorylated pig kidney Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in complex with the CTS representative ouabain, extending to 3.4 Å resolution. The structure provides key details on CTS binding, revealing an extensive hydrogen bonding network formed by the β-surface of the steroid core of ouabain and the side chains of αM1, αM2, and αM6. Furthermore, the structure reveals that cation transport site II is occupied by Mg(2+), and crystallographic studies indicate that Rb(+) and Mn(2+), but not Na(+), bind to this site. Comparison with the low-affinity [K2]E2-MgF(x)-ouabain structure [Ogawa et al. (2009) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106(33):13742-13747) shows that the CTS binding pocket of [Mg]E2P allows deep ouabain binding with possible long-range interactions between its polarized five-membered lactone ring and the Mg(2+). K(+) binding at the same site unwinds a turn of αM4, dragging residues Ile318-Val325 toward the cation site and thereby hindering deep ouabain binding. Thus, the structural data establish a basis for the interpretation of the biochemical evidence pointing at direct K(+)-Mg(2+) competition and explain the well-known antagonistic effect of K(+) on CTS binding.

  14. Analysis of drug-protein binding using on-line immunoextraction and high-performance affinity microcolumns: Studies with normal and glycated human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ryan; Jobe, Donald; Beyersdorf, Jared; Hage, David S

    2015-10-16

    A method combining on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was developed and tested for use in examining drug-protein interactions with normal or modified proteins. Normal human serum albumin (HSA) and glycated HSA were used as model proteins for this work. High-performance immunoextraction microcolumns with sizes of 1.0-2.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. and containing anti-HSA polyclonal antibodies were developed and tested for their ability to bind normal HSA or glycated HSA. These microcolumns were able to extract up to 82-93% for either type of protein at 0.05-0.10 mL/min and had a binding capacity of 0.34-0.42 nmol HSA for a 1.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. microcolumn. The immunoextraction microcolumns and their adsorbed proteins were tested for use in various approaches for drug binding studies. Frontal analysis was used with the adsorbed HSA/glycated HSA to measure the overall affinities of these proteins for the drugs warfarin and gliclazide, giving comparable values to those obtained previously using similar protein preparations that had been covalently immobilized within HPAC columns. Zonal elution competition studies with gliclazide were next performed to examine the specific interactions of this drug at Sudlow sites I and II of the adsorbed proteins. These results were also comparable to those noted in prior work with covalently immobilized samples of normal HSA or glycated HSA. These experiments indicated that drug-protein binding studies can be carried out by using on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with HPAC. The same method could be used in the future with clinical samples and other drugs or proteins of interest in pharmaceutical studies or biomedical research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic Background Influences the Effects of Withdrawal from Chronic Nicotine on Learning and High-Affinity Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in the Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Derek S.; Turner, Jill R.; Blendy, Julie A.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The effects of nicotine on cognitive processes may play an important role in nicotine addiction. Nicotine withdrawal impairs hippocampus-dependent learning and genetic factors influence this effect. However, the neural changes that contribute to these impairments are unknown. Chronic nicotine upregulates hippocampal nicotinic acetycholine receptors (nAChRs), which may contribute to cognitive deficits when nicotine administration ceases. If nAChR upregulation underlies withdrawal-deficits in learning, then strains of mice exhibiting withdrawal-deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning should also show upregulation of hippocampal nAChRs. Objectives Here, we examined the effects of nicotine withdrawal on fear conditioning and [3H]epibatidine binding in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in two inbred mouse strains and their F1 hybrids. Methods Male C57BL/6NTac, 129S6/SvEvTac, and B6129SF1/Tac mice were administered chronic nicotine (18 mg/kg/d) for 12 days through osmotic pumps and then were trained and tested in fear conditioning 24 hours after cessation of nicotine treatment. Results Nicotine withdrawal impaired hippocampus-dependent contextual conditioning in C57BL/6NTac mice but not 129S6/SvEvTac or B6129SF1/Tac mice; no changes were observed in hippocampus-independent cued fear conditioning. Upregulated [3H]epibatidine binding was found in the dorsal, but not ventral, hippocampus of C57BL/6NTac mice and in the ventral hippocampus of B6129SF1/Tac mice after chronic nicotine. Conclusions Upregulation of high-affinity binding sites in the dorsal hippocampus of C57BL/6NTac mice, the only strain that exhibited nAChR upregulation in this region and withdrawal-deficits in contextual conditioning, suggests that upregulation of high-affinity binding sites in the dorsal hippocampus mediates, in part, nicotine withdrawal-deficits in contextual conditioning and genetic background modulates these effects. PMID:22836371

  16. High-affinity binding of [3H]estradiol-17 beta by an estrogen receptor in the liver of the turtle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S.M.; Fehrer, S.; Yu, M.; Liang, L.C.; Press, D.

    1988-01-01

    Specific [3H]estradiol-17 beta ([3H]E2) binding activity (EBA) with characteristics of an estrogen receptor (ER) was demonstrated in cytosols and nuclear extracts of the female turtle, Chrysemys picta. Three different receptor assays (dextran-coated charcoal assay, hydroxylapatite batch procedure, and DNA-cellulose chromatography) were evaluated in terms of their applicability in analyzing large numbers of samples. For the measurement of cytosolic EBA, the hydroxylapatite batch procedure was found to be the most reliable assay. On the other hand, the dextran-coated charcoal assay was found to be the most appropriate method for the measurement of nuclear EBA. Turtle hepatic EBA binds [3H]E2 with high affinity (cytosolic, 17.4 +/- 2.8 X 10(9) M-1; nuclear, 17.7 +/- 1.9 X 10(9) M-1), limited capacity (cytosolic, 133.7 +/- 4.6 fmol/g tissue; nuclear, 81.1 +/- 9.0 fmol/g tissue), and strict steroid specificity. The EBA bound natural estrogens (E2, estrone, estriol) as well as the nonsteroidal estrogen, diethylstilbestrol, but exhibited little affinity for androgens, progesterone, or corticosterone. The turtle hepatic EBA resembled mammalian and avian ERs in terms of binding characteristics; however, unlike mammalian and avian ERs it was shown to be heat-labile. Incubation at 30 degrees caused rapid loss of [3H]E2 binding activity in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions. The exchange between [3H]E2 and the endogenously bound estrogen was slow at 4 and 15 degrees, but the exchange process was facilitated in the presence of the chaotropic salt, NaSCN. Establishment of quantitation methods for both cytosolic and nuclear forms of EBA will enable future investigation of the mechanism and regulation of estrogen action in the liver of this turtle species

  17. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

  18. Characterization of vanadium-binding sites of the vanadium-binding protein Vanabin2 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Tatsuya; Kawakami, Norifumi; Toshishige, Masaaki; Matsuo, Koichi; Gekko, Kunihiko; Michibata, Hitoshi

    2009-10-01

    Vanabins are a unique protein family of vanadium-binding proteins with nine disulfide bonds. Possible binding sites for VO2+ in Vanabin2 from a vanadium-rich ascidian Ascidia sydneiensis samea have been detected by nuclear magnetic resonance study, but the metal selectivity and metal-binding ability of each site was not examined. In order to reveal functional contribution of each binding site, we prepared several mutants of Vanabin2 by in vitro site-directed mutagenesis and analyzed their metal selectivity and affinity by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and Hummel Dreyer method. Mutation at K10/R60 (site 1) markedly reduced the affinity for VO2+. Mutation at K24/K38/R41/R42 (site 2) decreased the maximum binding number, but only slightly increased the overall affinity for VO2+. Secondary structure of both mutants was the same as that of the wild type as assessed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Mutation in disulfide bonds near the site 1 did not affect its high affinity binding capacity, while those near the site 2 decreased the overall affinity for VO2+. These results suggested that the site 1 is a high affinity binding site for VO2+, while the site 2 composes a moderate affinity site for multiple VO2+.

  19. Epac and the high affinity rolipram binding conformer of PDE4 modulate neurite outgrowth and myelination using an in vitro spinal cord injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomkamp, S D; McGrath, M A; Houslay, M D; Barnett, S C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose cAMP and pharmacological inhibition of PDE4, which degrades it, are promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Using our previously described in vitro SCI model, we studied the mechanisms by which cAMP modulators promote neurite outgrowth and myelination using enantiomers of the PDE4-specific inhibitor rolipram and other modulators of downstream signalling effectors. Experimental Approach Rat mixed neural cell myelinating cultures were cut with a scalpel and treated with enantiomers of the PDE4-specific inhibitor rolipram, Epac agonists and PKA antagonists. Neurite outgrowth, density and myelination were assessed by immunocytochemistry and cytokine levels analysed by qPCR. Key Results Inhibition of the high-affinity rolipram-binding state (HARBS), rather than the low-affinity rolipram binding state (LARBS) PDE4 conformer promoted neurite outgrowth and myelination. These effects were mediated through the activation of Epac and not through PKA. Expression of the chemokine CXCL10, known to inhibit myelination, was markedly elevated in astrocytes after Rho inhibition and this was blocked by inhibition of Rho kinase or PDE4. Conclusions and Implications PDE4 inhibitors targeted at the HARBS conformer or Epac agonists may provide promising novel targets for the treatment of SCI. Our study demonstrates the differential mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as the benefit of a combined pharmacological approach and highlighting potential promising targets for the treatment of SCI. These findings need to be confirmed in vivo. PMID:24467222

  20. Chiroptical properties, binding affinity, and photostability of a conjugated zinc porphyrin dimer complexed with left-handed Z-DNA and right-handed B-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Kyu; Reed, Aisha; Balaz, Milan

    2014-01-14

    We have studied the UV-vis absorption and chiroptical properties, binding affinity and photostability of a conjugated positively charged butadiyne-linked Zn(ii) porphyrin dimer bound to DNA sequence poly(dG-dC)2. Right-handed B-DNA, spermine-induced Z-DNA and Co(iii)-induced Z-DNA have been explored. Resonance light scattering (RLS) spectra showed formation of porphyrin aggregates in the presence of all DNA forms with the largest aggregates formed with B-DNA. The porphyrin dimer gave rise to induced bisignate circular dichroism (CD) signals in the presence of the left-handed Z-DNA conformations. On the other hand, the dimer stayed nearly chiroptically silent when complexed with the B-form of poly(dG-dC)2. Our results indicated that the conjugated Zn(ii) porphyrin dimer can be used as a sensor for the chiroptical detection of Z-DNA in the visible (400-500 nm) and near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum (700-800 nm). The helicity of DNA had little effect on the dimer binding affinities. The photostability of the porphyrin dimer complexed with any form of DNA was higher than that of the free molecule. The porphyrin dimer bound to Z-DNA exhibited slower photobleaching than the B-DNA dimer complex.

  1. Assessing high affinity binding to HLA-DQ2.5 by a novel peptide library based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jüse, Ulrike; Arntzen, Magnus; Højrup, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on a novel peptide library based method for HLA class II binding motif identification. The approach is based on water soluble HLA class II molecules and soluble dedicated peptide libraries. A high number of different synthetic peptides are competing to interact with a limited amount...... library. The eluted sequences fit very well with the previously described HLA-DQ2.5 peptide binding motif. This novel method, limited by library complexity and sensitivity of mass spectrometry, allows the analysis of several thousand synthetic sequences concomitantly in a simple water soluble format....... of HLA molecules, giving a selective force in the binding. The peptide libraries can be designed so that the sequence length, the alignment of binding registers, the numbers and composition of random positions are controlled, and also modified amino acids can be included. Selected library peptides bound...

  2. Sedimentation properties in density gradients correspond with levels of sperm DNA fragmentation, chromatin compaction and binding affinity to hyaluronic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Torabi, F; Binduraihem, A; Miller, D

    2017-01-01

    Mature spermatozoa bind hyaluronic acid in the extracellular matrix via hyaladherins. Immature spermatozoa may be unable to interact because they do not express the appropriate hyaladherins on their surface. Fresh human semen samples were fractionated using differential density gradient centrifugation (DDGC) and the ability of these fractions to bind hyaluronic acid was evaluated. The presence of sperm hyaladherins was also assessed. CD44 was located mainly on the acrosome and equatorial segm...

  3. Relationship between neutrophil-binding affinity and suitability for infection imaging: comparison of (99m)Tc-labeled NAP-2 (CXCL-7) and 3 C-terminally truncated isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rennen, Huub J. J. M.; Frielink, Cathelijne; Brandt, Ernst; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Corstens, Frans H. M.

    2004-01-01

    The CXC chemokines are a family of closely related chemoattractant cytokines that bind to, attract, and activate neutrophils to variable degrees. In this study, the relationship between neutrophil-binding affinity and suitability for infection imaging was investigated in a selected group of CXC

  4. Relationship between neutrophil-binding affinity and suitability for infection imaging: comparison of (99m)Tc-labeled NAP-2 (CXCL-7) and 3 C-terminally truncated isoforms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rennen, H.J.J.M.; Frielink, C.; Brandt, E.; Zaat, S.A.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Corstens, F.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    The CXC chemokines are a family of closely related chemoattractant cytokines that bind to, attract, and activate neutrophils to variable degrees. In this study, the relationship between neutrophil-binding affinity and suitability for infection imaging was investigated in a selected group of CXC

  5. Synthesis and metal binding properties of salicylate-, catecholate-, and hydroxypyridinonate-functionalized dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S M; Petoud, S; Raymond, K N

    2001-01-05

    The synthesis, characterization, and metal-binding studies of chelate-functionalized dendrimers is reported. Salicylate, catecholate, and hydroxypyridinonate bidentate chelators have been coupled to the surface of both poly(propyleneimine) (Astramol) and poly(amidoamine) (Starburst, PAMAM) dendrimers up to the fifth generation (64 endgroups). A general method has been developed for the facile and high quality chromatographic purification of poly(propyleneimine) and poly(amidoamine) dendrimer derivatives. One- and two-dimensional (TOCSY) 1H NMR experiments and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) have confirmed the exhaustive coupling of these chelators to the primary amine functionalities of the dendrimers. Spectrophotometric titrations were used to investigate the metal binding ability of these macrochelates. Spectral analysis shows that ferric iron binding to these ligands is localized to the chelating endgroups. The ability of these dendritic polymers to bind large numbers of metal ions may lead to applications as metal sequestering agents for waste remediation technologies.

  6. Tentacle-type immobilized metal affinity cryogel for invertase purification from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Kemal; Perçin, Işık; Denizli, Fatma; Denizli, Adil

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the usability of cryogel columns for the purification of invertase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) monolithic columns were produced via cryogelation. Ester groups of the poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) structure were then converted to imine groups by the reaction with poly(ethylene imine) in the presence of NaHCO 3 . Transition metal ions, Cu(II), Co(II), and Ni(II), were chelated on the PEI-modified cryogel columns. Purification of invertase from natural source namely S. cerevisiae was also studied, and the purification fold values were obtained as 41.350, 44.714, and 30.302 for Cu(II)-chelated, Co(II)-chelated, and Ni(II)-chelated PHEMA/PEI columns, respectively.

  7. Conversion of the low affinity ouabain-binding site of non-gastric H,K-ATPase into a high affinity binding site by substitution of only five amino acids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, L.Y.; Swarts, H.G.P.; Tonk, E.C.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koenderink, J.B.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de

    2006-01-01

    P-type ATPases of the IIC subfamily exhibit large differences in sensitivity toward ouabain. This allows a strategy in which ouabain-insensitive members of this subfamily are used as template for mutational elucidation of the ouabain-binding site. With this strategy, we recently identified seven

  8. Aromatic amino acids in the cellulose binding domain of Penicillium crustosum endoglucanase EGL1 differentially contribute to the cellulose affinity of the enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Ke Yang

    Full Text Available The cellulose binding domain (CBD of cellulase binding to cellulosic materials is the initiation of a synergistic action on the enzymatic hydrolysis of the most abundant renewable biomass resources in nature. The binding of the CBD domain to cellulosic substrates generally relies on the interaction between the aromatic amino acids structurally located on the flat face of the CBD domain and the glucose rings of cellulose. In this study, we found the CBD domain of a newly cloned Penicillium crustosum endoglucanase EGL1, which was phylogenetically related to Aspergillus, Fusarium and Rhizopus, and divergent from the well-characterized Trichoderma reeseis cellulase CBD domain, contain two conserved aromatic amino acid-rich regions, Y451-Y452 and Y477-Y478-Y479, among which three amino acids Y451, Y477, and Y478 structurally sited on a flat face of this domain. Cellulose binding assays with green fluorescence protein as the marker, adsorption isotherm assays and an isothermal titration calorimetry assays revealed that although these three amino acids participated in this process, the Y451-Y452 appears to contribute more to the cellulose binding than Y477-Y478-Y479. Further glycine scanning mutagenesis and structural modelling revealed that the binding between CBD domain and cellulosic materials might be multi-amino-acids that participated in this process. The flexible poly-glucose molecule could contact Y451, Y477, and Y478 which form the contacting flat face of CBD domain as the typical model, some other amino acids in or outside the flat face might also participate in the interaction. Thus, it is possible that the conserved Y451-Y452 of CBD might have a higher chance of contacting the cellulosic substrates, contributing more to the affinity of CBD than the other amino acids.

  9. Binding of heavy metals to derivatives of cholesterol and sodium dodecyl sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, S.; Batchelor, B.; Koseoglu, S.S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Huang, Y.C.

    1995-09-01

    The binding behaviors of five metals (cadmium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc), individually at pH 6 and collectively at pHs 6 and 3, to deoxycholic acid (DCA) and taurocholic acid (TCA) were compared with those of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) using a continuous diafiltration method. DCA and SDS have been successfully applied in micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration (MEUF) for metal removal from water. In this study, SDS exhibits the strongest binding in the single-component experiments while DCA binds the most in the multicomponent trials. TCA does not show any significant biding compared with DCA and SDS. Overall the molar binding ratios of the mixture at pH 3 were well below those of the other two solutions. This diafiltration technique quantifies the binding characteristics of a surfactant by generating sorption isotherms and determining the intrinsic association constraints with corresponding number of binding sites. These parameters can be useful in designing an efficient MEUF system.

  10. Methionine oxidation in human IgG2 Fc decreases binding affinities to protein A and FcRn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hai; Chen, Kenneth; Chu, Liping; Kinderman, Francis; Apostol, Izydor; Huang, Gang

    2009-01-01

    Susceptibility of methionine residues to oxidation is a significant issue of protein therapeutics. Methionine oxidation may limit the product's clinical efficacy or stability. We have studied kinetics of methionine oxidation in the Fc portion of the human IgG2 and its impact on the interaction with FcRn and Protein A. Our results confirm previously published observations for IgG1 that two analogous solvent-exposed methionine residues in IgG2, Met 252 and Met 428, oxidize more readily than the other methionine residue, Met 358, which is buried inside the Fc. Met 397, which is not present in IgG1 but in IgG2, oxidizes at similar rate as Met 358. Oxidation of two labile methionines, Met 252 and Met 428, weakens the binding of the intact antibody with Protein A and FcRn, two natural protein binding partners. Both of these binding partners share the same binding site on the Fc. Additionally, our results shows that Protein A may serve as a convenient and inexpensive surrogate for FcRn binding measurements. PMID:19165723

  11. Synthesis, structure information, DNA/BSA binding affinity and in vitro cytotoxic studies of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes containing a phenylalanine derivative and diimine co-ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaraj, B; Balakrishnan, C; Neelakantan, M A

    2016-07-01

    Binary [Cu(PAIC)(H2O)2]·H2O (1) and mixed ligand [Cu(PAIC)(L)]·2H2O complexes, where PAIC=phenylalanine imidazole carboxylic acid, L=diimine coligands [2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (2) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3)] have been synthesized and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. The X-ray structure of [Cu(PAIC)(phen)]·2H2O (3) shows a N4O coordination with square pyramidal geometry around the copper (II) atom. The spin Hamiltonian parameters calculated for the complexes account for the distorted square planar structure and rules out the possibility of a trigonal bipyramidal structure. Interaction of the complexes (1-3) with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) was studied by using different techniques (absorption titration, fluorescence quenching and thermal melting) and the studies suggest that these complexes bind to CT DNA through intercalation. The DNA-binding affinity of the complexes has further been explained by DFT computational results. Binding activity of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) reveals that the complexes can strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching mechanism. DNA cleavage experiments using plasmid DNA pUC 19 show that the complexes exhibit efficient chemical nuclease activity even in the absence of any external additives. The cytotoxicity of the complexes against human normal cell line (HBL 100) and human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) shows that metal complexation of the ligands results in a significant enhancement in the cell death of MCF-7. Finally, docking studies on DNA and protein binding interactions were performed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. D3R Grand Challenge 2: blind prediction of protein-ligand poses, affinity rankings, and relative binding free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieb, Zied; Liu, Shuai; Gathiaka, Symon; Chiu, Michael; Yang, Huanwang; Shao, Chenghua; Feher, Victoria A.; Walters, W. Patrick; Kuhn, Bernd; Rudolph, Markus G.; Burley, Stephen K.; Gilson, Michael K.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2018-01-01

    The Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) ran Grand Challenge 2 (GC2) from September 2016 through February 2017. This challenge was based on a dataset of structures and affinities for the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), contributed by F. Hoffmann-La Roche. The dataset contained 102 IC50 values, spanning six orders of magnitude, and 36 high-resolution co-crystal structures with representatives of four major ligand classes. Strong global participation was evident, with 49 participants submitting 262 prediction submission packages in total. Procedurally, GC2 mimicked Grand Challenge 2015 (GC2015), with a Stage 1 subchallenge testing ligand pose prediction methods and ranking and scoring methods, and a Stage 2 subchallenge testing only ligand ranking and scoring methods after the release of all blinded co-crystal structures. Two smaller curated sets of 18 and 15 ligands were developed to test alchemical free energy methods. This overview summarizes all aspects of GC2, including the dataset details, challenge procedures, and participant results. We also consider implications for progress in the field, while highlighting methodological areas that merit continued development. Similar to GC2015, the outcome of GC2 underscores the pressing need for methods development in pose prediction, particularly for ligand scaffolds not currently represented in the Protein Data Bank (http://www.pdb.org), and in affinity ranking and scoring of bound ligands.

  13. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Veerabasappa T

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2, present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS. The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors.

  14. Affinity labeling of the carbohydrate binding site of the lectin discoidin I using a photoactivatable radioiodinated monosaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohnken, R.E.; Berger, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    N-(4-Azidosalicyl) galactosamine (GalNASA), a photoactivatable, radioiodinatable analog of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), has been prepared and characterized. The authors have used this reagent for labeling of the carbohydrate binding site of discoidin I, an endogenous lectin produced by Dictyostelium discoideum. GalNASA behaved as a ligand for discoidin I, as judged by its ability to compete in an assay measuring the carbohydrate binding activity of discoidin I. In this assay, it exhibited a K/sub i,app/ of 800 μM, comparable to that of GalNAc. The K/sub i,app/ of GalNASA decreased to 40 μm upon prior photolysis with ultraviolet light. In contrast, N-(4-azidosalicyl) ethanolamine produced no inhibition of carbohydrate binding regardless of photolysis. Covalent labeling of discoidin I with 125 I-GalNASA was entirely dependent upon ultraviolet light. A portion of labeling, representing 40-60% of the total, was sensitive to reagents which were known to inhibit carbohydrate binding by discoidin I, including GalNAc, asialofetuin, and ethyl-enediaminetetraacetic acid. The carbohydrate-sensitive fraction of discoidin I photolabeling with 125 I-GalNASA exhibited a K/sub d/ of 15-40 μM, in agreement with the K/sub i,app/ of prephotolyzed GalNASA observed in the carbohydrate binding assay. Partial proteolytic digestion of photolabeled discoidin I revealed specific fragments whose labeling was completely blocked by GalNAc. This indicated that the location of carbohydrate-sensitive labeling within the structure of discoidin I was restricted. One particular tryptic fragment, Tr1, was examined in detail. These data suggest that Tr1 is derived from the carbohydrate binding site of discoidin I

  15. Motif III in superfamily 2 "helicases" helps convert the binding energy of ATP into a high-affinity RNA binding site in the yeast DEAD-box protein Ded1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banroques, Josette; Doère, Monique; Dreyfus, Marc; Linder, Patrick; Tanner, N Kyle

    2010-03-05

    Motif III in the putative helicases of superfamily 2 is highly conserved in both its sequence and its structural context. It typically consists of the sequence alcohol-alanine-alcohol (S/T-A-S/T). Historically, it was thought to link ATPase activity with a "helicase" strand displacement activity that disrupts RNA or DNA duplexes. DEAD-box proteins constitute the largest family of superfamily 2; they are RNA-dependent ATPases and ATP-dependent RNA binding proteins that, in some cases, are able to disrupt short RNA duplexes. We made mutations of motif III (S-A-T) in the yeast DEAD-box protein Ded1 and analyzed in vivo phenotypes and in vitro properties. Moreover, we made a tertiary model of Ded1 based on the solved structure of Vasa. We used Ded1 because it has relatively high ATPase and RNA binding activities; it is able to displace moderately stable duplexes at a large excess of substrate. We find that the alanine and the threonine in the second and third positions of motif III are more important than the serine, but that mutations of all three residues have strong phenotypes. We purified the wild-type and various mutants expressed in Escherichia coli. We found that motif III mutations affect the RNA-dependent hydrolysis of ATP (k(cat)), but not the affinity for ATP (K(m)). Moreover, mutations alter and reduce the affinity for single-stranded RNA and subsequently reduce the ability to disrupt duplexes. We obtained intragenic suppressors of the S-A-C mutant that compensate for the mutation by enhancing the affinity for ATP and RNA. We conclude that motif III and the binding energy of gamma-PO(4) of ATP are used to coordinate motifs I, II, and VI and the two RecA-like domains to create a high-affinity single-stranded RNA binding site. It also may help activate the beta,gamma-phosphoanhydride bond of ATP. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of the metal binding site in methionine aminopeptidase by density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne Techau; Norrby, Per-Ola; Liljefors, Tommy

    2002-01-01

    All methionine aminopeptidases exhibit the same conserved metal binding site. The structure of this site with either Co2+ ions or Zn2+ ions was investigated using density functional theory. The calculations showed that the structure of the site was not influenced by the identity of the metal ions...

  17. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Predicting binding affinities of protein ligands from three-dimensional models: application to peptide binding to class I major histocompatibility proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Lauemoller, S L; Holm, A

    1999-01-01

    A simple and fast free energy scoring function (Fresno) has been developed to predict the binding free energy of peptides to class I major histocompatibility (MHC) proteins. It differs from existing scoring functions mainly by the explicit treatment of ligand desolvation and of unfavorable protein...... coordinates of the MHC-bound peptide have first been determined with an accuracy of about 1-1.5 A. Furthermore, it may be easily recalibrated for any protein-ligand complex.......) and of a series of 16 peptides to H-2K(k). Predictions were more accurate for HLA-A2-binding peptides as the training set had been built from experimentally determined structures. The average error in predicting the binding free energy of the test peptides was 3.1 kJ/mol. For the homology model-derived equation...

  19. ACE applied to the quantitative characterization of benzo-18-crown-6-ether binding with alkali metal ions in a methanol-water solvent system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ehala, Sille; Makrlík, E.; Toman, Petr; Kašička, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2010), s. 702-708 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/0675; GA AV ČR 1ET400500402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : affinity capillary electrophoresis * alkali metal ions * binding constant Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation Impact factor: 3.569, year: 2010

  20. Cofactor and substrate binding to vanadium chloroperoxidase determined by UV-VIS spectroscopy and evidence for high affinity for pervanadate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renirie, R.; Hemrika, W.; Piersma, S.R.; Wever, R.

    2000-01-01

    The vanadate cofactor in vanadium chloroperoxidase has been studied using UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy. A band is present in the near-UV that is red-shifted as compared to free vanadate and shifts in both position and intensity upon change in pH. Mutation of vanadate binding residues has a clear

  1. CC12, a high-affinity ligand for [3H]cimetidine binding, is an improgan antagonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hough, L.H.; Nalwalk, J.B.; Phillips, J.R.; Kern, B.; Shan, Z.; Wentland, M.; de Esch, I.J.P.; Janssen, EA; Barr, T.; Stadel, R.

    2007-01-01

    Improgan, a chemical congener of cimetidine, is a highly effective non-opioid analgesic when injected into the CNS. Despite extensive characterization, neither the improgan receptor, nor a pharmacological antagonist of improgan has been previously described. Presently, the specific binding of [

  2. Genetically encoded photocrosslinkers locate the high-affinity binding site of antidepressant drugs in the human serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Hall, Lena Sørensen

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode...

  3. [3H]idazoxan and some other alpha 2-adrenergic drugs also bind with high affinity to a nonadrenergic site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Brodde, O. E.; Schnepel, B.; Behrendt, J.; Tschada, R.; Motulsky, H. J.; Insel, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    We compared the pharmacological properties of the alpha 2-adrenergic radioligand [3H]idazoxan with those of [3H]rauwolscine in rat and [3H]yohimbine in human renal cortical membranes. The density of "specific" [3H]idazoxan binding sites (defined by 100 microM tolazoline) was twice as high as that of

  4. Characterization of SynCAM surface trafficking using a SynCAM derived ligand with high homophilic binding affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breillat, Christelle; Thoumine, Olivier; Choquet, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    In order to better probe SynCAM function in neurons, we produced a fusion protein between the extracellular domain of SynCAM1 and the constant fragment of human IgG (SynCAM-Fc). Whether in soluble form or immobilized on latex microspheres, the chimera bound specifically to the surface of hippocampal neurons and recruited endogenous SynCAM molecules. SynCAM-Fc was also used in combination with Quantum Dots to follow the mobility of transfected SynCAM receptors at the neuronal surface. Both immobile and highly mobile SynCAM were found. Thus, SynCAM-Fc behaves as a high affinity ligand that can be used to study the function of SynCAM at the neuronal membrane

  5. Purification of a 76-kDa iron-binding protein from human seminal plasma by affinity chromatography specific for ribonuclease: structural and functional identity with milk lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, S; D'Alessandro, A M; Maras, B; Di Ciccio, L; D'Andrea, G; De Prisco, R; Bossa, F; Libonati, M; Oratore, A

    1999-02-10

    A pink-colored iron-binding protein has been found in large amount in human seminal plasma and identified as a lactoferrin isoform. Its purification, by a modification of a three-step chromatography procedure developed in an attempt to purify a ribonuclease from the same fluid, provided about 15-18 mg of pure pro