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Sample records for metabolically active bacteria

  1. Effect of tributyltin (TBT) in the metabolic activity of TBT-resistant and sensitive estuarine bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andreia; Oliveira, Vanessa; Baptista, Inês; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Angela; Suzuki, Satoru; Mendo, Sónia

    2012-01-01

    The effect of tributyltin (TBT) on growth and metabolic activity of three estuarine bacteria with different TBT resistance profiles was investigated in an organic-rich culture medium (TSB) and in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) buffer. Exposure to TBT was assessed by determining its effect on growth (OD(600 nm) measurement), bacterial productivity (leucine incorporation), viability (CFU counts), aggregation and cell size (from Live/Dead analysis), ATP and NADH concentrations. TBT exposure resulted in decrease of bacterial density, cell size, and metabolic activity. In addition, cell aggregates were observed in the TBT-treated cultures. TBT strongly affected bacterial cell metabolism and seemed to exert an effect on its equilibrium, interfering with cell activity. Also, TBT toxicity was lower when cells were grown in TSB than in PBS, suggesting that a nutrient-rich growth medium can protect cells from TBT toxicity. This study contributes to our understanding of the TBT-resistant cell behavior reflected in its physiology and metabolic activity. This information is of utmost importance for further studies of TBT bioremediation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Metabolic potential and in situ activity of marine Marinimicrobia bacteria in an anoxic water column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolli, Anthony D; Padilla, Cory C; Glass, Jennifer B; Thamdrup, Bo; Stewart, Frank J

    2017-11-01

    Marinimicrobia bacteria are widespread in subeuphotic areas of the oceans and particularly abundant in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Information on Marinimicrobia metabolism is sparse, making the biogeochemical influence of this group challenging to predict. Here, metagenome-assembled genomes representing Marinimicrobia subgroups PN262000N21 and ARCTIC96B-7 were retrieved to near completion (97% and 94%) from OMZ metagenomes, with contamination (14.1%) observed only in ARCTIC96B-7. Genes for aerobic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation, polysulfide metabolism and hydrogen utilization were identified only in PN262000N21, while genes for partial denitrification occurred in both genomes. Transcripts mapping to these genomes increased from utilizing proteins, including sulfur transferases, were enriched at sulfidic depths. PN262000N21 transcripts encoding a protein with fibronectin domains similar to those in cellulosome-producing bacteria were also abundant, suggesting a potential for high molecular weight carbon cycling. These data provide omic-level descriptions of metabolic potential and activity in OMZ-associated Marinimicrobia, suggesting differentiation between subgroups with roles in carbon and dissimilatory inorganic nitrogen and sulfur cycling. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Effect of Culture Medium on Metabolic and Antibacterial Activities of Probiotic Bacteria

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    Mirdavoudi F

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Probiotic bacteria is added directly to food components and it has beneficial effect on function and the health of organisms. The bifidogenic factors enter the colon where they contribute to an increase lactic acid bacteria population including Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria and they inhibit enteric pathogenic bacterial growth. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of culture medium on metabolic and antibacterial of probiotic bacteria.Methods: In this study, the probiotics bacterial and intestine pathogenic are to be used. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium were identified by plating samples on MRS medium, Gram Staining and standard biochemical methods. The effect of antagonistic probiotics was investigated in the presence of growth factor in the method well diffusion Ager on the Shigella flexneri (PTCC 1234, Escherichia coli (PTCC 1552, Salmonella typhi ( PTCC 1609 and the culture medium pH was measured.Results: The probiotics bacterial growth in MRS and lactose1%, sorbitol, raffinose, riboflavin were shown the effect antibacterial. The results of the study show the most antagonistic activity in commercial strain Lactobacillus acidophilus on Shigella flexneri and lower activity was in Lactobacillus casei (PTCC 1608, and Salmonella typhimurium (PTCC 1609, and also in Bbifidobacterium bifidum, it showed the most decrease pH value.Conclusion: According to the result of the study, adding growth factors to MRS medium base and lactose 1%, probiotic growth was increased and which also increased antagonistic activity.

  4. Metabolic activity of uncultivated magnetotactic bacteria revealed by NanoSIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, M.; Zhang, W.; Gu, L.; Pan, Y.; Lin, W.

    2017-12-01

    Microorganisms that exhibit magnetotaxis behavior, collectively known as the magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), are those whose motility is influenced by the Earth's magnetic field. MTB are a physiologically diverse group of bacteria with a unique feature of intracellular biomineralization of magnetosomes (Fe3O4 and/or Fe3S4) (Bazylinski et al., 2013). However, the ecophysiology of uncultivated MTB, especially those within the Nitrospirae phylum forming hundreds of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes per cell, is still not well characterized (Lin et al., 2014). Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) is a powerful tool for revealing element distribution in nanometer-scale resolution, which opens exciting possibilities for the study of interactions between microorganisms and environments (Gao et al., 2016; Musat et al., 2016). Here we applied NanoSIMS to investigate the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen assimilations in two magnetotactic Nitrospirae populations at single cell level. Our NanoSIMS results confirmed the metabolic potential of Nitrospirae MTB proposed by genomic and metagenomic analysis and provided additional insights into the ecophysiology of uncultivated MTB. This study suggests that NanoSIMS-based analyses are powerful approaches for investigating and characterizing the ecological function of environmental microorganisms. References: Bazylinski D A., Lefèvre, C T., Schüler D., 2013. Magnetotactic Bacteria. 453-494.Lin W, Bazylinski DA, Xiao T, Wu L- F, Pan Y., 2014. Life with compass: diversity and biogeography of magnetotactic bacteria. Environ Microbiol, 16: 1462-2920.Gao D., Huang X., Tao Y., 2016. A critical review of NanoSIMS in analysis of microbial metabolic activities at single-cell level. Crit Rev Biotechnol, 36: 884-890.Musat N., Musat F., Weber PK., Pett-Ridge J., 2016. Tracking microbial interactions with NanoSIMS. Curr Opin Biotechnol, 41: 114-121.

  5. Distribution of Metabolically Active Prokaryotes (Archaea and Bacteria) throughout the Profiles of Chernozem and Brown Semidesert Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, M. V.; Manucharova, N. A.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    The distribution of metabolically active cells of archaea and bacteria in the profiles of typical chernozems (Voronezh oblast) and brown semidesert soils (Astrakhan oblast) of natural and agricultural ecosystems was studied using the method of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The studied soils differed sharply in the microbial biomass and in the numbers of metabolically active cells of archaea and bacteria. The number of active bacterial cells was 3.5-7.0 times greater than that of archaea. In the arable chernozem, the numbers of active cells of archaea and bacteria were 2.6 and 1.5 times, respectively, lower than those in the chernozem under the shelterbelt. The agricultural use of the brown semidesert soil had little effect on the abundances of bacteria and archaea. The soil organic carbon content was the major factor controlling the numbers of metabolically active cells of both domains. However, the dependence of the abundance of bacteria on the organic matter content was more pronounced. The decrease in the organic carbon and total nitrogen contents down the soil profiles was accompanied by the decrease in the bacteria: archaea ratio attesting to a better adaptation of archaea to the permanent deficiency of carbon and nitrogen. The bacteria: archaea ratio can serve as an ecotrophic indicator of the state of soil microbial communities.

  6. Diversity of Metabolically Active Bacteria in Water-Flooded High-Temperature Heavy Oil Reservoir

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    Tamara N. Nazina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to study the overall genomic diversity of microorganisms of the Dagang high-temperature oilfield (PRC and to characterize the metabolically active fraction of these populations. At this water-flooded oilfield, the microbial community of formation water from the near-bottom zone of an injection well where the most active microbial processes of oil degradation occur was investigated using molecular, cultural, radiotracer, and physicochemical techniques. The samples of microbial DNA and RNA from back-flushed water were used to obtain the clone libraries for the 16S rRNA gene and cDNA of 16S rRNA, respectively. The DNA-derived clone libraries were found to contain bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the alkB genes encoding alkane monooxygenases similar to those encoded by alkB-geo1 and alkB-geo6 of geobacilli. The 16S rRNA genes of methanogens (Methanomethylovorans, Methanoculleus, Methanolinea, Methanothrix, and Methanocalculus were predominant in the DNA-derived library of Archaea cloned sequences; among the bacterial sequences, the 16S rRNA genes of members of the genus Geobacillus were the most numerous. The RNA-derived library contained only bacterial cDNA of the 16S rRNA sequences belonging to metabolically active aerobic organotrophic bacteria (Tepidimonas, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, as well as of denitrifying (Azoarcus, Tepidiphilus, Calditerrivibrio, fermenting (Bellilinea, iron-reducing (Geobacter, and sulfate- and sulfur-reducing bacteria (Desulfomicrobium, Desulfuromonas. The presence of the microorganisms of the main functional groups revealed by molecular techniques was confirmed by the results of cultural, radioisotope, and geochemical research. Functioning of the mesophilic and thermophilic branches was shown for the microbial food chain of the near-bottom zone of the injection well, which included the microorganisms of the carbon, sulfur, iron, and nitrogen cycles.

  7. Assessment of active bacteria metabolizing phenolic acids in the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinguang; Wang, Xingxiang; Zhang, Taolin; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-12-01

    Phenolic acids can enhance the mycotoxin production and activities of hydrolytic enzymes related to pathogenicity of soilborne fungus Fusarium oxysporum. However, characteristics of phenolic acid-degrading bacteria have not been investigated. The objectives of this study were to isolate and characterize bacteria capable of growth on benzoic and vanillic acids as the sole carbon source in the peanut rhizosphere. Twenty-four bacteria were isolated, and the identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that pre-exposure to phenolic acids before sowing shifted the dominant culturable bacterial degraders from Arthrobacter to Burkholderia stabilis-like isolates. Both Arthrobacter and B. stabilis-like isolates catalysed the aromatic ring cleavage via the ortho pathway, and Arthrobacter isolates did not exhibit higher C12O enzyme activity than B. stabilis-like isolates. The culture filtrate of Fusarium sp. ACCC36194 caused a strong inhibition of Arthrobacter growth but not B. stabilis-like isolates. Additionally, Arthrobacter isolates responded differently to the culture filtrates of B. stabilis-like isolates. The Arthrobacter isolates produced higher indole acetic acid (IAA) levels than B. stabilis-like isolates, but B. stabilis-like isolates were also able to produce siderophores, solubilize mineral phosphate, and exert an antagonistic activity against peanut root rot pathogen Fusarium sp. ACCC36194. Results indicate that phenolic acids can shift their dominant culturable bacterial degraders from Arthrobacter to Burkholderia species in the peanut rhizosphere, and microbial interactions might lead to the reduction of culturable Arthrobacter. Furthermore, increasing bacterial populations metabolizing phenolic acids in monoculture fields might be a control strategy for soilborne diseases caused by Fusarium spp. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effect of Culture Medium on Metabolic and Antibacterial Activities of Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    f Mirdavoudi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Probiotic bacteria is added directly to food components and it has beneficial effect on function and the health of organisms. The bifidogenic factors enter the colon where they contribute to an increase lactic acid bacteria population including Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria and they inhibit enteric pathogenic bacterial growth. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of culture medium on metabolic and antibacterial of probiotic bacteria.

     

    Methods: In this study, the probiotics bacterial and intestine pathogenic are to be used. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium were identified by plating samples on MRS medium, Gram Staining and standard biochemical methods. The effect of antagonistic probiotics was investigated in the presence of growth factor in the method well diffusion Ager on the Shigella flexneri (PTCC 1234, Escherichia coli (PTCC 1552, Salmonella typhi ( PTCC 1609 and the culture medium pH was measured.

     

    Results: The probiotics bacterial growth in MRS and lactose1%, sorbitol, raffinose, riboflavin were shown the effect antibacterial. The results of the study show the most antagonistic activity in commercial strain Lactobacillus acidophilus on Shigella flexneri and lower activity was in Lactobacillus casei (PTCC 1608, and Salmonella typhimurium (PTCC 1609, and also in Bbifidobacterium bifidum, it showed the most decrease pH value.

     

    Conclusion: According to the result of the study, adding growth factors to MRS medium base and lactose 1%, probiotic growth was increased and which also increased antagonistic activity.

     

  9. Spatial localization of the first and last enzymes effectively connects active metabolic pathways in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pablo; Cecchi, Guillermo; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-12-14

    Although much is understood about the enzymatic cascades that underlie cellular biosynthesis, comparatively little is known about the rules that determine their cellular organization. We performed a detailed analysis of the localization of E.coli GFP-tagged enzymes for cells growing exponentially. We found that out of 857 globular enzymes, at least 219 have a discrete punctuate localization in the cytoplasm and catalyze the first or the last reaction in 60% of biosynthetic pathways. A graph-theoretic analysis of E.coli's metabolic network shows that localized enzymes, in contrast to non-localized ones, form a tree-like hierarchical structure, have a higher within-group connectivity, and are traversed by a higher number of feed-forward and feedback loops than their non-localized counterparts. A Gene Ontology analysis of these enzymes reveals an enrichment of terms related to essential metabolic functions in growing cells. Given that these findings suggest a distinct metabolic role for localization, we studied the dynamics of cellular localization of the cell wall synthesizing enzymes in B. subtilis and found that enzymes localize during exponential growth but not during stationary growth. We conclude that active biochemical pathways inside the cytoplasm are organized spatially following a rule where their first or their last enzymes localize to effectively connect the different active pathways and thus could reflect the activity state of the cell's metabolic network.

  10. Improved strength and durability of concrete through metabolic activity of ureolytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Maria Jose Castro; Ortiz, Carlos Eloir Lopez; Perez, Sixto Omar Garcia; Narayanasamy, Rajeswari; Fajardo San Miguel, Gerardo Del Jesús; Hernández, Héctor Herrera; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2017-06-07

    In recent years, biomineralization process is being employed in development of bioconcrete, which is emerging as a sustainable method to enhance the durability of concrete by way of increasing compressive strength and reducing the chloride permeability. In this study, different bacterial strains isolated from the soils of the Laguna Region of Mexico were selected for further study. ACRN5 strain demonstrated higher urease activity than other strains, and the optimum substrate concentration, pH, and temperature were 120 mM, pH 8, and 25 °C, respectively. Further, Km and Vmax of urease activity of ACRN5 were 21.38 mM and 0.212 mM min -1 , respectively. It was observed that addition of ACRN5 at 10 5  cells ml -1 to cement-water mixture significantly increased (14.94%) in compressive strength after 36 days of curing and reduced chloride penetration. Deposition of calcite in bio-mortars was observed in scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction spectrometry analyses. Results of this study demonstrated the role of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation in improving the physico-mechanical properties of bio-mortars.

  11. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...... in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative...

  12. Metabolic engineering in methanotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyuzhnaya, MG; Puri, AW; Lidstrom, ME

    2015-05-01

    Methane, as natural gas or biogas, is the least expensive source of carbon for (bio)chemical synthesis. Scalable biological upgrading of this simple alkane to chemicals and fuels can bring new sustainable solutions to a number of industries with large environmental footprints, such as natural gas/petroleum production, landfills, wastewater treatment, and livestock. Microbial biocatalysis with methane as a feedstock has been pursued off and on for almost a half century, with little enduring success. Today, biological engineering and systems biology provide new opportunities for metabolic system modulation and give new optimism to the concept of a methane-based bio-industry. Here we present an overview of the most recent advances pertaining to metabolic engineering of microbial methane utilization. Some ideas concerning metabolic improvements for production of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, two main precursors for bioconversion, are presented. We also discuss main gaps in the current knowledge of aerobic methane utilization, which must be solved in order to release the full potential of methane-based biosystems. (C) 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of metabolically active bacteria in the gut of the generalist Spodoptera littoralis via DNA stable isotope probing using 13C-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yongqi; Arias-Cordero, Erika M; Boland, Wilhelm

    2013-11-13

    Guts of most insects are inhabited by complex communities of symbiotic nonpathogenic bacteria. Within such microbial communities it is possible to identify commensal or mutualistic bacteria species. The latter ones, have been observed to serve multiple functions to the insect, i.e. helping in insect reproduction(1), boosting the immune response(2), pheromone production(3), as well as nutrition, including the synthesis of essential amino acids(4,) among others.     Due to the importance of these associations, many efforts have been made to characterize the communities down to the individual members. However, most of these efforts were either based on cultivation methods or relied on the generation of 16S rRNA gene fragments which were sequenced for final identification. Unfortunately, these approaches only identified the bacterial species present in the gut and provided no information on the metabolic activity of the microorganisms. To characterize the metabolically active bacterial species in the gut of an insect, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) in vivo employing (13)C-glucose as a universal substrate. This is a promising culture-free technique that allows the linkage of microbial phylogenies to their particular metabolic activity. This is possible by tracking stable, isotope labeled atoms from substrates into microbial biomarkers, such as DNA and RNA(5). The incorporation of (13)C isotopes into DNA increases the density of the labeled DNA compared to the unlabeled ((12)C) one. In the end, the (13)C-labeled DNA or RNA is separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation from the (12)C-unlabeled similar one(6). Subsequent molecular analysis of the separated nucleic acid isotopomers provides the connection between metabolic activity and identity of the species. Here, we present the protocol used to characterize the metabolically active bacteria in the gut of a generalist insect (our model system), Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae). The

  14. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

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    C. Jeanthon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a, the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 54 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94 % was affiliated to the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies

  15. Metabolic plasticity for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gil, Jordi; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2013-05-15

    Isoprenoids are a large family of compounds synthesized by all free-living organisms. In most bacteria, the common precursors of all isoprenoids are produced by the MEP (methylerythritol 4-phosphate) pathway. The MEP pathway is absent from archaea, fungi and animals (including humans), which synthesize their isoprenoid precursors using the completely unrelated MVA (mevalonate) pathway. Because the MEP pathway is essential in most bacterial pathogens (as well as in the malaria parasites), it has been proposed as a promising new target for the development of novel anti-infective agents. However, bacteria show a remarkable plasticity for isoprenoid biosynthesis that should be taken into account when targeting this metabolic pathway for the development of new antibiotics. For example, a few bacteria use the MVA pathway instead of the MEP pathway, whereas others possess the two full pathways, and some parasitic strains lack both the MVA and the MEP pathways (probably because they obtain their isoprenoids from host cells). Moreover, alternative enzymes and metabolic intermediates to those of the canonical MVA or MEP pathways exist in some organisms. Recent work has also shown that resistance to a block of the first steps of the MEP pathway can easily be developed because several enzymes unrelated to isoprenoid biosynthesis can produce pathway intermediates upon spontaneous mutations. In the present review, we discuss the major advances in our knowledge of the biochemical toolbox exploited by bacteria to synthesize the universal precursors for their essential isoprenoids.

  16. Metabolism of polychlorinated biphenyls by marine bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, A.E.; Harvey, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    There have been no reports of laboratory studies of PCB metabolism by marine organisms. A few workers have analyzed marine animals for products of PCB metabolism. A search for hydroxylated PCBs in marine fish proved inconclusive. Phenolic metabolites of PCBs have been identified in seals and guillemot. PCBs that had been hydroxylated and excreted by marine organisms would most likely be found in the sediments, so in our laboratory we conducted a search for these compounds in marine sediments. Two kilograms of organic-rich surface sediment from Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, were extracted. The phenolic fraction was isolated and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Neither wide mass scans nor selected mass searches produced any evidence of hydroxylated PCB derivatives. It was felt that if any marine organisms were capable of metabolism of PCBs, some marine bacteria should have that capability. Thus a series of laboratory experiments was conducted to test this possibility. Reported here is the finding of PCB metabolism by marine bacteria in batch culture

  17. Exogenous fatty acid metabolism in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) is a target for novel antibiotic development. All bacteria encode for mechanisms to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and some bacteria can use exogenous fatty acids to bypass FASII inhibition. Bacteria encode three different mechanisms for activating exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipid synthesis. Exogenous fatty acids are converted into acyl-CoA in Gammaproteobacteria such as E. coli. Acyl-CoA molecules constitute a separate pool from endogenously synthesized acyl-ACP. Acyl-CoA can be used for phospholipid synthesis or broken down by β-oxidation, but cannot be used for lipopolysaccharide synthesis. Exogenous fatty acids are converted into acyl-ACP in some Gram-negative bacteria. The resulting acyl-ACP undergoes the same fates as endogenously synthesized acyl-ACP. Exogenous fatty acids are converted into acyl-phosphates in Gram-positive bacteria, and can be used for phospholipid synthesis or become acyl-ACP. Only the order Lactobacillales can use exogenous fatty acids to bypass FASII inhibition. FASII shuts down completely in presence of exogenous fatty acids in Lactobacillales, allowing Lactobacillales to synthesize phospholipids entirely from exogenous fatty acids. Inhibition of FASII cannot be bypassed in other bacteria because FASII is only partially down-regulated in presence of exogenous fatty acid or FASII is required to synthesize essential metabolites such as β-hydroxyacyl-ACP. Certain selective pressures such as FASII inhibition or growth in biofilms can select for naturally occurring one step mutations that attenuate endogenous fatty acid synthesis. Although attempts have been made to estimate the natural prevalence of these mutants, culture-independent metagenomic methods would provide a better estimate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. Prebiotic potential of L-sorbose and xylitol in promoting the growth and metabolic activity of specific butyrate-producing bacteria in human fecal culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tadashi; Kusuhara, Shiro; Yokoi, Wakae; Ito, Masahiko; Miyazaki, Kouji

    2017-01-01

    Dietary low-digestible carbohydrates (LDCs) affect gut microbial metabolism, including the production of short-chain fatty acids. The ability of various LDCs to promote butyrate production was evaluated in in vitro human fecal cultures. Fecal suspensions from five healthy males were anaerobically incubated with various LDCs. L-Sorbose and xylitol markedly promoted butyrate formation in cultures. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses of these fecal cultures revealed a marked increase in the abundance of bacteria closely related to the species Anaerostipes hadrus or A. caccae or both, during enhanced butyrate formation from L-sorbose or xylitol. By using an agar plate culture, two strains of A. hadrus that produced butyrate from each substrate were isolated from the feces of two donors. Furthermore, of 12 species of representative colonic butyrate producers, only A. hadrus and A. caccae demonstrated augmented butyrate production from L-sorbose or xylitol. These findings suggest that L-sorbose and xylitol cause prebiotic stimulation of the growth and metabolic activity of Anaerostipes spp. in the human colon. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Metabolic Flexibility of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

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    Caroline M. Plugge

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRB are a very diverse group of anaerobic bacteria that are omnipresent in nature and play an imperative role in the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. In anoxic marine sediments sulfate reduction accounts for up to 50% of the entire organic mineralization in coastal and shelf ecosystems where sulfate diffuses several meters deep into the sediment. As a consequence, SRB would be expected in the sulfate-containing upper sediment layers, whereas methanogenic Archaea would be expected to succeed in the deeper sulfate-depleted layers of the sediment. Where sediments are high in organic matter, sulfate is depleted at shallow sediment depths, and biogenic methane production will occur. In the absence of sulfate, many SRB ferment organic acids and alcohols, producing hydrogen, acetate, and carbon dioxide, and may even rely on hydrogen- and acetate-scavenging methanogens to convert organic compounds to methane. SRB can establish two different life styles, and these can be termed as sulfidogenic and acetogenic, hydrogenogenic metabolism. The advantage of having different metabolic capabilities is that it raises the chance of survival in environments when electron acceptors become depleted. In marine sediments, SRB and methanogens do not compete but rather complement each other in the degradation of organic matter.Also in freshwater ecosystems with sulfate concentrations of only 10-200 μM, sulfate is consumed efficiently within the top several cm of the sediments. Here, many of the δ-Proteobacteria present have the genetic machinery to perform dissimilatory sulfate reduction, yet they have an acetogenic, hydrogenogenic way of life.In this review we evaluate the physiology and metabolic mode of SRB in relation with their environment.

  20. Production of L-carnitine by secondary metabolism of bacteria

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    Iborra José L

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The increasing commercial demand for L-carnitine has led to a multiplication of efforts to improve its production with bacteria. The use of different cell environments, such as growing, resting, permeabilized, dried, osmotically stressed, freely suspended and immobilized cells, to maintain enzymes sufficiently active for L-carnitine production is discussed in the text. The different cell states of enterobacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Proteus sp., which can be used to produce L-carnitine from crotonobetaine or D-carnitine as substrate, are analyzed. Moreover, the combined application of both bioprocess and metabolic engineering has allowed a deeper understanding of the main factors controlling the production process, such as energy depletion and the alteration of the acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio which are coupled to the end of the biotransformation. Furthermore, the profiles of key central metabolic activities such as the TCA cycle, the glyoxylate shunt and the acetate metabolism are seen to be closely interrelated and affect the biotransformation efficiency. Although genetically modified strains have been obtained, new strain improvement strategies are still needed, especially in Escherichia coli as a model organism for molecular biology studies. This review aims to summarize and update the state of the art in L-carnitine production using E. coli and Proteus sp, emphasizing the importance of proper reactor design and operation strategies, together with metabolic engineering aspects and the need for feed-back between wet and in silico work to optimize this biotransformation.

  1. Systems biology and metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for improved fermented foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flahaut, N.A.L.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have long been used in industrial dairy and other food fermentations that make use of their metabolic activities leading to products with specific organoleptic properties. Metabolic engineering is a rational approach to steer fermentations toward the production of desired

  2. Distribution of hydrogen-metabolizing bacteria in alfalfa field soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, S.D.; Kapulnik, Y.; Phillips, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    H 2 evolved by alfalfa root nodules during the process of N 2 fixation may be an important factor influencing the distribution of soil bacteria. To test this hypothesis under field conditions, over 700 bacterial isolates were obtained from fallow soil or from the 3-mm layer of soil surrounding alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) root nodules, alfalfa roots, or bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis L.) roots. Bacteria were isolated under either aerobic or microaerophilic conditions and were tested for their capacity to metabolize H 2 . Isolates showing net H 2 uptake and 3 H 2 incorporation activity under laboratory conditions were assigned a Hup + phenotype, whereas organisms with significant H 2 output capacity were designated as a Hout + phenotype. Under aerobic isolation conditions two Hup + isolates were obtained, whereas under microaerophilic conditions five Hup + and two Hout + isolates were found. The nine isolates differed on the basis of 24 standard bacteriological characteristics or fatty acid composition. Five of the nine organisms were isolated from soil around root nodules, whereas the other four were found distributed among the other three soil environments. On the basis of the microaerophilic isolations, 4.8% of the total procaryotic isolates from soil around root nodules were capable of oxidizing H 2 , and 1.2% could produce H 2 . Two of the Hup + isolates were identified as Rhizobium meliloti by root nodulation tests, but the fact that none of the isolates reduced C 2 H 2 under the assay conditions suggested that the H 2 metabolism traits were associated with various hydrogenase systems rather than with nitrogenase activity

  3. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including...... the interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods...... for manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  4. VISCOSITY DICTATES METABOLIC ACTIVITY of Vibrio ruber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja eBoric

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment.

  5. Programmed Evolution for Optimization of Orthogonal Metabolic Output in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckdahl, Todd T.; Campbell, A. Malcolm; Heyer, Laurie J.; Poet, Jeffrey L.; Blauch, David N.; Snyder, Nicole L.; Atchley, Dustin T.; Baker, Erich J.; Brown, Micah; Brunner, Elizabeth C.; Callen, Sean A.; Campbell, Jesse S.; Carr, Caleb J.; Carr, David R.; Chadinha, Spencer A.; Chester, Grace I.; Chester, Josh; Clarkson, Ben R.; Cochran, Kelly E.; Doherty, Shannon E.; Doyle, Catherine; Dwyer, Sarah; Edlin, Linnea M.; Evans, Rebecca A.; Fluharty, Taylor; Frederick, Janna; Galeota-Sprung, Jonah; Gammon, Betsy L.; Grieshaber, Brandon; Gronniger, Jessica; Gutteridge, Katelyn; Henningsen, Joel; Isom, Bradley; Itell, Hannah L.; Keffeler, Erica C.; Lantz, Andrew J.; Lim, Jonathan N.; McGuire, Erin P.; Moore, Alexander K.; Morton, Jerrad; Nakano, Meredith; Pearson, Sara A.; Perkins, Virginia; Parrish, Phoebe; Pierson, Claire E.; Polpityaarachchige, Sachith; Quaney, Michael J.; Slattery, Abagael; Smith, Kathryn E.; Spell, Jackson; Spencer, Morgan; Taye, Telavive; Trueblood, Kamay; Vrana, Caroline J.; Whitesides, E. Tucker

    2015-01-01

    Current use of microbes for metabolic engineering suffers from loss of metabolic output due to natural selection. Rather than combat the evolution of bacterial populations, we chose to embrace what makes biological engineering unique among engineering fields – evolving materials. We harnessed bacteria to compute solutions to the biological problem of metabolic pathway optimization. Our approach is called Programmed Evolution to capture two concepts. First, a population of cells is programmed with DNA code to enable it to compute solutions to a chosen optimization problem. As analog computers, bacteria process known and unknown inputs and direct the output of their biochemical hardware. Second, the system employs the evolution of bacteria toward an optimal metabolic solution by imposing fitness defined by metabolic output. The current study is a proof-of-concept for Programmed Evolution applied to the optimization of a metabolic pathway for the conversion of caffeine to theophylline in E. coli. Introduced genotype variations included strength of the promoter and ribosome binding site, plasmid copy number, and chaperone proteins. We constructed 24 strains using all combinations of the genetic variables. We used a theophylline riboswitch and a tetracycline resistance gene to link theophylline production to fitness. After subjecting the mixed population to selection, we measured a change in the distribution of genotypes in the population and an increased conversion of caffeine to theophylline among the most fit strains, demonstrating Programmed Evolution. Programmed Evolution inverts the standard paradigm in metabolic engineering by harnessing evolution instead of fighting it. Our modular system enables researchers to program bacteria and use evolution to determine the combination of genetic control elements that optimizes catabolic or anabolic output and to maintain it in a population of cells. Programmed Evolution could be used for applications in energy

  6. Programmed evolution for optimization of orthogonal metabolic output in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd T Eckdahl

    Full Text Available Current use of microbes for metabolic engineering suffers from loss of metabolic output due to natural selection. Rather than combat the evolution of bacterial populations, we chose to embrace what makes biological engineering unique among engineering fields - evolving materials. We harnessed bacteria to compute solutions to the biological problem of metabolic pathway optimization. Our approach is called Programmed Evolution to capture two concepts. First, a population of cells is programmed with DNA code to enable it to compute solutions to a chosen optimization problem. As analog computers, bacteria process known and unknown inputs and direct the output of their biochemical hardware. Second, the system employs the evolution of bacteria toward an optimal metabolic solution by imposing fitness defined by metabolic output. The current study is a proof-of-concept for Programmed Evolution applied to the optimization of a metabolic pathway for the conversion of caffeine to theophylline in E. coli. Introduced genotype variations included strength of the promoter and ribosome binding site, plasmid copy number, and chaperone proteins. We constructed 24 strains using all combinations of the genetic variables. We used a theophylline riboswitch and a tetracycline resistance gene to link theophylline production to fitness. After subjecting the mixed population to selection, we measured a change in the distribution of genotypes in the population and an increased conversion of caffeine to theophylline among the most fit strains, demonstrating Programmed Evolution. Programmed Evolution inverts the standard paradigm in metabolic engineering by harnessing evolution instead of fighting it. Our modular system enables researchers to program bacteria and use evolution to determine the combination of genetic control elements that optimizes catabolic or anabolic output and to maintain it in a population of cells. Programmed Evolution could be used for applications in

  7. Interventions on Metabolism: Making Antibiotic-Susceptible Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Baquero

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics act on bacterial metabolism, and antibiotic resistance involves changes in this metabolism. Interventions on metabolism with drugs might therefore modify drug susceptibility and drug resistance. In their recent article, Martin Vestergaard et al. (mBio 8:e01114-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01114-17 illustrate the possibility of converting intrinsically resistant bacteria into susceptible ones. They reported that inhibition of a central metabolic enzyme, ATP synthase, allows otherwise ineffective polymyxin antibiotics to act on Staphylococcus aureus. The study of the intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens has shown that several metabolic genes, including multigene transcriptional regulators, contribute to antibiotic resistance. In some cases, these genes only marginally increase antibiotic resistance, but reduced levels of susceptibility might be critical in the evolution or resistance under low antibiotic concentrations or in the clinical response of highly resistant bacteria. Drug interventions on bacterial metabolism might constitute a critical adjuvant therapy in combination with antibiotics to ensure susceptibility of pathogens with intrinsic or acquired antimicrobial resistance.

  8. Metabolism of gentiopicroside (gentiopicrin) by human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sedawy, A I; Hattori, M; Kobashi, K; Namba, T

    1989-09-01

    As a part of our studies on the metabolism of crude drug components by intestinal bacteria, gentiopicroside (a secoiridoid glucoside isolated from Gentiana lutea), was anaerobically incubated with various defined strains of human intestinal bacteria. Many species had ability to transform it to a series of metabolites. Among them, Veillonella parvula ss parvula produced five metabolites, which were identified as erythrocentaurin, gentiopicral, 5-hydroxymethylisochroman-1-one,5-hydroxymethylisochromen-1- one and trans-5,6-dihydro-5-hydroxymethyl-6-methyl-1H,3H-pyrano[3,4-c]pyra n-1-one.

  9. Prokaryote metabolism activity

    OpenAIRE

    Biederman, Lori

    2017-01-01

    I wrote this activity to emphasize that prokaryotic organisms can carry out 6 different types of metabolisms (as presented in Freeman’s Biological Science textbook) and this contrasts to eukaryotes, which can only use 2 metabolism pathways (photoautotroph and heterotroph).    For in class materials I remove the  red box (upper right corner) and print slides 3-10, place them back-to-back and laminate them.  The students get a key (slide 2) and a two-sided organism sheet...

  10. Cholesterol-Lowering Potentials of Lactic Acid Bacteria Based on Bile-Salt Hydrolase Activity and Effect of Potent Strains on Cholesterol Metabolism In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chih Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study collected different probiotic isolates from animal and plant sources to evaluate the bile-salt hydrolase activity of probiotics in vitro. The deconjugation potential of bile acid was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 cells were cultured with probiotic strains with high BSH activity. The triglyceride (TG and apolipoprotein B (apo B secretion by HepG2 cells were evaluated. Our results show that the BSH activity and bile-acid deconjugation abilities of Pediococcus acidilactici NBHK002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis NBHK006, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NBHK007, and Lactobacillus acidophilus NBHK008 were higher than those of the other probiotic strains. The cholesterol concentration in cholesterol micelles was reduced within 24 h. NBHK007 reduced the TG secretion by 100% after 48 h of incubation. NBHK002, NBHK006, and NBHK007 could reduce apo B secretion by 33%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The product PROBIO S-23 produced a greater decrease in the total concentration of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, TG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance in the serum or livers of hamsters with hypercholesterolemia compared with that of hamsters fed with a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. These results show that the three probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria are better candidates for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  11. Recent insight into oligosaccharide uptake and metabolism in probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou Hachem, Maher; Andersen, Joakim Mark; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a plethora of studies have demonstrated the paramount physiological importance of the gut microbiota on various aspects of human health and development. Particular focus has been set on probiotic members of this community, the best studied of which are assigned into the Lactobaci......In recent years, a plethora of studies have demonstrated the paramount physiological importance of the gut microbiota on various aspects of human health and development. Particular focus has been set on probiotic members of this community, the best studied of which are assigned...... into the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium genera. Effects such as pathogen exclusion, alleviation of inflammation and allergies, colon cancer, and other bowel disorders are attributed to the activity of probiotic bacteria, which selectively ferment prebiotics comprising mainly non-digestible oligosaccharides. Thus......, glycan metabolism is an important attribute of probiotic action and a factor influencing the composition of the gut microbiota. In the quest to understand the molecular mechanism of this selectivity for certain glycans, we have explored the routes of uptake and utilization of a variety...

  12. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-04

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis.

  13. Enhancing flora balance in the gastrointestinal tract of mice by lactic acid bacteria from Chinese sourdough and enzyme activities indicative of metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate by the flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Yu, Xiaomin; Wu, Yaoping; Chen, Xingxing; Wei, Hua; Shah, Nagendra P; Xu, Feng

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of administration of 5 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from traditional Chinese sourdough on the flora balance of gastrointestinal tract of mice. We specifically measured Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Bacteroides, and Lactobacillus by plate count and real-time PCR methods, and α-glucosidase, lactate dehydrogenase, esterase, and aminopeptidase activities as indicative of metabolism of sugar, fat, and protein from LAB isolated from feces of mice in vitro. The results showed that administration of Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201 and Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 lowered the uricacid index of serum. Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201, L. fermentum LFE0302, as well as Lactobacillus curvatus LCU0401 administration resulted in a reduction in the opportunistic pathogens (i.e., Enterococcus and Enterobacter), meanwhile, administration of L. fermentum LFE0302 and Lactobacillus sp. ULA0104 resulted in an increase in the counts of Lactobacillus. Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 administration increased starch digestion of intestinal flora after 4wk of feeding and also resulted in increased α-glucosidase activity in the intestinal flora after 3wk of feeding. We found a similar trend in esterase activity after administration of L. acidophilus LAC0201 for 3wk. Hence, our study suggested that LAB from Chinese sourdough might be used as potential probiotics to strengthen the flora balance in gastrointestinal tract and positively change the metabolism of nutrients through bacterial enzyme activities. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The logics of metabolic regulation in bacteria challenges biosensor-based metabolic engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Jules

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Biology (SB aims at the rational design and engineering of novel biological functions and systems. By facilitating the engineering of living organisms, SB promises to facilitate the development of many new applications for health, biomanufacturing, and the environment. Over the last decade, SB promoted the construction of libraries of components enabling the fine-tuning of genetic circuits expression and the development of novel genome engineering methodologies for many organisms of interest. SB thus opened new perspectives in the field of metabolic engineering, which was until then mainly limited to (overproducing naturally synthesized metabolic compounds. To engineer efficient cell factories, it is key to precisely reroute cellular resources from the central carbon metabolism (CCM to the synthetic circuitry. This task is however difficult as there is still significant lack of knowledge regarding both the function of several metabolic components and the regulation of the CCM fluxes for many industrially important bacteria. Pyruvate is a pivotal metabolite at the heart of the CCM and a key precursor for the synthesis of several commodity compounds and fine chemicals. Numerous bacterial species can also use it as a carbon source when present in the environment but bacterial, pyruvate-specific uptake systems were to be discovered. This is an issue for metabolic engineering as one can imagine to make use of pyruvate transport systems to replenish synthetic metabolic pathways towards the synthesis of chemicals of interest. Here we describe a recent study (MBio 8(5: e00976-17, which identified and characterized a pyruvate transport system in the Gram-positive (G+ve bacterium Bacillus subtilis, a well-established biotechnological workhorse for the production of enzymes, fine chemicals and antibiotics. This study also revealed that the activity of the two-component system (TCS responsible for its induction is retro-inhibited by the level of

  15. Indigenous bacteria and bacterial metabolic products in the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Habib Ur; Vahjen, Wilfried; Awad, Wageha A; Zentek, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a dynamic ecosystem containing a complex microbial community. In this paper, the indigenous intestinal bacteria and the microbial fermentation profile particularly short chain fatty acids (SCFA), lactate, and ammonia concentrations are reviewed. The intestinal bacterial composition changes with age. The bacterial density of the small intestine increases with age and comprises of lactobacilli, streptococci, enterobacteria, fusobacteria and eubacteria. Strict anaerobes (anaerobic gram-positive cocci, Eubacterium spp., Clostridium spp., Lactobacillus spp., Fusobacterium spp. and Bacteroides) are predominating caecal bacteria in young broilers. Data from culture-based studies showed that bifidobacteria could not be isolated from young birds, but were recovered from four-week-old broilers. Caecal lactobacilli accounted for 1.5-24% of the caecal bacteria. Gene sequencing of caecal DNA extracts showed that the majority of bacteria belonged to Clostridiaceae. Intestinal bacterial community is influenced by the dietary ingredients, nutrient levels and physical structure of feed. SCFA and other metabolic products are affected by diet formulation and age. Additional studies are required to know the bacterial metabolic activities together with the community analysis of the intestinal bacteria. Feed composition and processing have great potential to influence the activities of intestinal bacteria towards a desired direction in order to support animal health, well-being and microbial safety of broiler meat.

  16. Silver enhances antibiotic activity against gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morones-Ramirez, J Ruben; Winkler, Jonathan A; Spina, Catherine S; Collins, James J

    2013-06-19

    A declining pipeline of clinically useful antibiotics has made it imperative to develop more effective antimicrobial therapies, particularly against difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogens. Silver has been used as an antimicrobial since antiquity, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. We show that silver disrupts multiple bacterial cellular processes, including disulfide bond formation, metabolism, and iron homeostasis. These changes lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased membrane permeability of Gram-negative bacteria that can potentiate the activity of a broad range of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria in different metabolic states, as well as restore antibiotic susceptibility to a resistant bacterial strain. We show both in vitro and in a mouse model of urinary tract infection that the ability of silver to induce oxidative stress can be harnessed to potentiate antibiotic activity. Additionally, we demonstrate in vitro and in two different mouse models of peritonitis that silver sensitizes Gram-negative bacteria to the Gram-positive-specific antibiotic vancomycin, thereby expanding the antibacterial spectrum of this drug. Finally, we used silver and antibiotic combinations in vitro to eradicate bacterial persister cells, and show both in vitro and in a mouse biofilm infection model that silver can enhance antibacterial action against bacteria that produce biofilms. This work shows that silver can be used to enhance the action of existing antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria, thus strengthening the antibiotic arsenal for fighting bacterial infections.

  17. Pu sorption to activated conglomerate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Kudo, Akira

    2001-01-01

    The sorption of Pu to the anaerobic bacteria activated under specific conditions of temperature, pH and depleted nutrients after long dormant period was investigated. After 4 h at neutral pH, the distribution coefficient (K d ) between bacteria and aqueous phase at 308 and 278 K had around 10 3 to 10 4 . After over 5 days, however, the K d at only 308 K had increased to over 10 5 . Sterilized (dead) and dormant anaerobic bacteria adsorbed Pu to the same extent. (author)

  18. Ecophysiology of terminal carbon metabolizing bacteria in anoxic sedimentary environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical, radiotracer, and microbiological experiments were used to understand the transformation of simple carbon compounds by anaerobic bacteria in diverse aquatic sediments and laboratory cultures. The mildly acidic sediments of Knack Lake (pH 6.2), displayed low rates of organic decomposition, and methane formation occurred almost exclusively from acetate. Low pH inhibited methanogenesis and organic decomposition. Fall turnover in Lake Mendota sediments was associated with dramatic changes in environmental parameters including: elevated concentrations of sulfate and carbon metabolites, increased rates of sulfate reduction, decreased levels of methanogenesis, increased ratio (by viable counts) of sulfate reducing to methanogenic bacteria, and higher 14 CO 2 / 14 C 4 + 14 CO 2 gas ratios produced during the biodegradation of 14 C-carbon substrates (e.g., acetate and methanol). Hydrogen consumption by sulfate reducers in Lake Mendota sediments and in co-cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanosarcina barkeri led to an alteration in the carbon and electron flow pathway resulting in increased CO 2 , sulfide production, and decreased methanogenesis. These data agreed with the environmental observations in Lake Mendota that high sulfate concentrations resulted in higher ratios of CO 2 /CH 4 produced from the degradation of organic matter. A new glycine-metabolizing acetogenic species was isolated and characterized from Knaack Lake which further extended the known diversity of anaerobic bacteria in nature

  19. The Role of Colonic Bacteria in the Metabolism of the Natural Isoflavone Daidzin to Equol

    OpenAIRE

    Rafii, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavones are found in leguminous plants, especially soybeans. They have a structural similarity to natural estrogens, which enables them to bind to estrogen receptors and elicit biological activities similar to natural estrogens. They have been suggested to be beneficial for the prevention and therapy of hormone-dependent diseases. After soy products are consumed, the bacteria of the intestinal microflora metabolize isoflavones to metabolites with altered absorption, bioavailability, and e...

  20. The Role of Colonic Bacteria in the Metabolism of the Natural Isoflavone Daidzin to Equol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rafii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavones are found in leguminous plants, especially soybeans. They have a structural similarity to natural estrogens, which enables them to bind to estrogen receptors and elicit biological activities similar to natural estrogens. They have been suggested to be beneficial for the prevention and therapy of hormone-dependent diseases. After soy products are consumed, the bacteria of the intestinal microflora metabolize isoflavones to metabolites with altered absorption, bioavailability, and estrogenic characteristics. Variations in the effect of soy products have been correlated with the isoflavone metabolites found in plasma and urine samples of the individuals consuming soy products. The beneficial effects of the soy isoflavone daidzin, the glycoside of daidzein, have been reported in individuals producing equol, a reduction product of daidzein produced by specific colonic bacteria in individuals called equol producers. These individuals comprise 30% and 60% of populations consuming Western and soy-rich Asian diets, respectively. Since the higher percentage of equol producers in populations consuming soy-rich diets is correlated with a lower incidence of hormone-dependent diseases, considerable efforts have been made to detect the specific colonic bacteria involved in the metabolism of daidzein to the more estrogenic compound, equol, which should facilitate the investigation of the metabolic activities related to this compound.

  1. A metabolic pathway for catabolizing levulinic acid in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, Jacqueline M.; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Clark, Ryan L.; Thiede, Joshua M.; Mehrer, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms can catabolize a wide range of organic compounds and therefore have the potential to perform many industrially relevant bioconversions. One barrier to realizing the potential of biorefining strategies lies in our incomplete knowledge of metabolic pathways, including those that can be used to assimilate naturally abundant or easily generated feedstocks. For instance, levulinic acid (LA) is a carbon source that is readily obtainable as a dehydration product of lignocellulosic biomass and can serve as the sole carbon source for some bacteria. Yet, the genetics and structure of LA catabolism have remained unknown. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a seven-gene operon that enables LA catabolism in Pseudomonas putida KT2440. When the pathway was reconstituted with purified proteins, we observed the formation of four acyl-CoA intermediates, including a unique 4-phosphovaleryl-CoA and the previously observed 3-hydroxyvaleryl-CoA product. Using adaptive evolution, we obtained a mutant of Escherichia coli LS5218 with functional deletions of fadE and atoC that was capable of robust growth on LA when it expressed the five enzymes from the P. putida operon. Here, this discovery will enable more efficient use of biomass hydrolysates and metabolic engineering to develop bioconversions using LA as a feedstock.

  2. Activation of Acetone and Other Simple Ketones in Anaerobic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Johann; Schühle, Karola; Frey, Jasmin; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Acetone and other ketones are activated for subsequent degradation through carboxylation by many nitrate-reducing, phototrophic, and obligately aerobic bacteria. Acetone carboxylation leads to acetoacetate, which is subsequently activated to a thioester and degraded via thiolysis. Two different types of acetone carboxylases have been described, which require either 2 or 4 ATP equivalents as an energy supply for the carboxylation reaction. Both enzymes appear to combine acetone enolphosphate with carbonic phosphate to form acetoacetate. A similar but more complex enzyme is known to carboxylate the aromatic ketone acetophenone, a metabolic intermediate in anaerobic ethylbenzene metabolism in denitrifying bacteria, with simultaneous hydrolysis of 2 ATP to 2 ADP. Obligately anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria activate acetone to a four-carbon compound as well, but via a different process than bicarbonate- or CO2-dependent carboxylation. The present evidence indicates that either carbon monoxide or a formyl residue is used as a cosubstrate, and that the overall ATP expenditure of this pathway is substantially lower than in the known acetone carboxylase reactions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Analysis of metabolic activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeast in model kefirs made from goat’s milk and mixtures of goat’s milk with mare’s milk based on changes in electrical conductivity and impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Cais-Sokolińska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the metabolic activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeast based of changes in electrical conductivity and electrical impedance during fermentation of goat milk and mixtures of goat’s milk and mare’s milk (1:1, 1:2. As a result of fermentation, conductivity increased 1.4-fold. The conductivity of kefir prepared from goat and mare milk mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (6.210 Ω-3∙cm-1 was lower than that of the 1:1 mixture or of goat milk alone (7.242 Ω-3∙cm-1. A significant dependence of electrical conductivity and pH (0.970 ≤ r ≤ 0.993 was recorded during fermentation. The addition of mare milk to goat milk significantly slowed down the growth of LAB (Δλ = 0.8 h and yeasts during kefir production.

  4. ACTION OF SYNTHETIC DETERGENTS ON THE METABOLISM OF BACTERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Z; Harrison, R W; Miller, B F

    1941-01-31

    A study of the effects of synthetic detergents and wetting agents on respiration and glycolysis of Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms has led to the following conclusions. 1. All the cationic detergents studied are very effective inhibitors of bacterial metabolism at 1:3000 concentration, and several are equally active at 1:30,000. Few of the anionic detergents inhibit as effectively as the cationic compounds. 2. Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms are equally sensitive to the action of the cationic detergents. On the other hand, all the anionic detergents included in our studies selectively inhibit the metabolism of Gram-positive microorganisms. 3. The inhibitory action of both types of detergents is influenced markedly by hydrogen ion concentration. Cationic detergents exhibit their maximum activity in the alkaline pH range, and the anionic, in the acid range. 4. Studies of homologous series of straight chain alkyl sulfates and sulfoacetates (C(8) to C(18)) demonstrate that maximum inhibition is exerted by the 12, 14, and 16 carbon compounds (lauryl, myristyl, and cetyl). 5. It has been observed that three lauryl esters of amino acids are powerful inhibitors of bacterial metabolism. To our knowledge, the effects on bacterial metabolism of such cationic detergents (without the quaternary ammonium structure) have not been studied previously. Our results demonstrate that other cationic detergents can exhibit an inhibitory activity comparable to quaternary ammonium compounds. 6. Certain detergents stimulate bacterial metabolism at concentrations lower than the inhibiting values. This effect has been found more frequently among the anionic detergents.

  5. Comparison of cell-specific activity between free-living and attached bacteria using isolates and natural assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, H.P.; Tang, K.W.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Marine snow aggregates are microbial hotspots that support high bacterial abundance and activities. We conducted laboratory experiments to compare cell-specific bacterial protein production (BPP) and protease activity between free-living and attached bacteria. Natural bacterial assemblages attached...... bacteria increasing their metabolism upon attachment to surfaces. In subsequent experiments, we used four strains of marine snow bacteria isolates to test the hypothesis that bacteria could up- and down-regulate their metabolism while on and off an aggregate. The protease activity of attached bacteria...... to model aggregates (agar spheres) had threefold higher BPP and two orders of magnitude higher protease activity than their free-living counterpart. These observations could be explained by preferential colonization of the agar spheres by bacteria with inherently higher metabolic activity and/or individual...

  6. Metabolic and process engineering for biodesulfurization in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, I; El-Said Mohamed, M; Santos, V E; García, J L; García-Ochoa, F; Díaz, E

    2017-11-20

    Microbial desulfurization or biodesulfurization (BDS) is an attractive low-cost and environmentally friendly complementary technology to the hydrotreating chemical process based on the potential of certain bacteria to specifically remove sulfur from S-heterocyclic compounds of crude fuels that are recalcitrant to the chemical treatments. The 4S or Dsz sulfur specific pathway for dibenzothiophene (DBT) and alkyl-substituted DBTs, widely used as model S-heterocyclic compounds, has been extensively studied at the physiological, biochemical and genetic levels mainly in Gram-positive bacteria. Nevertheless, several Gram-negative bacteria have been also used in BDS because they are endowed with some properties, e.g., broad metabolic versatility and easy genetic and genomic manipulation, that make them suitable chassis for systems metabolic engineering strategies. A high number of recombinant bacteria, many of which are Pseudomonas strains, have been constructed to overcome the major bottlenecks of the desulfurization process, i.e., expression of the dsz operon, activity of the Dsz enzymes, retro-inhibition of the Dsz pathway, availability of reducing power, uptake-secretion of substrate and intermediates, tolerance to organic solvents and metals, and other host-specific limitations. However, to attain a BDS process with industrial applicability, it is necessary to apply all the knowledge and advances achieved at the genetic and metabolic levels to the process engineering level, i.e., kinetic modelling, scale-up of biphasic systems, enhancing mass transfer rates, biocatalyst separation, etc. The production of high-added value products derived from the organosulfur material present in oil can be regarded also as an economically viable process that has barely begun to be explored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for the production of nutraceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, J.; Sybesma, W.; Groot, M.N.; Wisselink, W.; Ladero, V.; Burgess, K.; Sinderen, van D.; Piard, J.C.; Eggink, G.; Smid, E.J.; Savoy, G.; Sesma, F.; Jansen, T.; Hols, P.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria display a relatively simple and well-described metabolism where the sugar source is converted mainly to lactic acid. Here we will shortly describe metabolic engineering strategies on the level of sugar metabolism, that lead to either the efficient re-routing of the lactococcal

  8. A comparative cytotoxicity study of isomeric alkylphthalates to metabolically variant bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandy, Edward H. [Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Education and School of Environmental Studies and Sino-Hungarian Joint Laboratory of Environmental Science and Health, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chemistry Department, Fourah Bay College, University of Sierra Leone, Freetown (Sierra Leone); Yao Jun, E-mail: yaojun@cug.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Education and School of Environmental Studies and Sino-Hungarian Joint Laboratory of Environmental Science and Health, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zheng Shixue [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Gogra, Alhaji B.; Chen Huilun [Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Education and School of Environmental Studies and Sino-Hungarian Joint Laboratory of Environmental Science and Health, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zheng Hui [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yormah, Thomas B.R. [Chemistry Department, Fourah Bay College, University of Sierra Leone, Freetown (Sierra Leone); Zhang Xin [Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, 195 Prospect St., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Zaray, Gyula [Department of Chemical Technology and Environmental Chemistry, Eoetvoes University, H-1518 Budapest, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary); Ceccanti, Brunello [Institute of Ecosystem Studies (ISE)-Italian National Research Council (ICT-CNR) (Italy); Choi, Martin M.F., E-mail: mfchoi@hkbu.edu.hk [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, 224 Waterloo Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2010-10-15

    This work investigated the toxicity of two isomeric alkylphthalates, i.e., di-n-octyl phthalate (DOP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) to two model bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), which have been previously used to study the toxicity of environmental pollutants. Microcalorimetry was used as the key analytical tool alongside scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and traditional microbiology techniques. The thermokinetic parameters from microcalorimetry showed that the phthalates had a biphasic effect on the metabolic activities of the bacteria; serving as energy sources for the bacteria thereby stimulating their growth at low dosages ({<=}150 {mu}g/mL), but displaying inhibitory effects at higher dosages ({>=}300 {mu}g/mL), indicated by a sharp decrease in growth rate constants at 450 {mu}g/mL. The SEM revealed that the bacterial cells were morphological deformed, with shrunk cells and elongated strands at 600 {mu}g/mL of both phthalates. The elongated strands inferred that the phthalates inhibited the reproductive processes of the bacteria by possibly impeding some stages of cell division. The half inhibitory concentrations of the phthalates showed that DEHP was more toxic than DOP. Additionally, E. coli, a facultative anaerobe, was more susceptible to the toxic effects of phthalates than B. subtilis, an obligate aerobe capable of forming endospores crucial for tolerating extreme environmental conditions.

  9. A comparative cytotoxicity study of isomeric alkylphthalates to metabolically variant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandy, Edward H.; Yao Jun; Zheng Shixue; Gogra, Alhaji B.; Chen Huilun; Zheng Hui; Yormah, Thomas B.R.; Zhang Xin; Zaray, Gyula; Ceccanti, Brunello; Choi, Martin M.F.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigated the toxicity of two isomeric alkylphthalates, i.e., di-n-octyl phthalate (DOP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) to two model bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), which have been previously used to study the toxicity of environmental pollutants. Microcalorimetry was used as the key analytical tool alongside scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and traditional microbiology techniques. The thermokinetic parameters from microcalorimetry showed that the phthalates had a biphasic effect on the metabolic activities of the bacteria; serving as energy sources for the bacteria thereby stimulating their growth at low dosages (≤150 μg/mL), but displaying inhibitory effects at higher dosages (≥300 μg/mL), indicated by a sharp decrease in growth rate constants at 450 μg/mL. The SEM revealed that the bacterial cells were morphological deformed, with shrunk cells and elongated strands at 600 μg/mL of both phthalates. The elongated strands inferred that the phthalates inhibited the reproductive processes of the bacteria by possibly impeding some stages of cell division. The half inhibitory concentrations of the phthalates showed that DEHP was more toxic than DOP. Additionally, E. coli, a facultative anaerobe, was more susceptible to the toxic effects of phthalates than B. subtilis, an obligate aerobe capable of forming endospores crucial for tolerating extreme environmental conditions.

  10. Metabolism of Hydrocarbons in n-Alkane-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Heinz; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The glycyl radical enzyme-catalyzed addition of n-alkanes to fumarate creates a C-C-bond between two concomitantly formed stereogenic carbon centers. The configurations of the two diastereoisomers of the product resulting from n-hexane activation by the n-alkane-utilizing denitrifying bacterium strain HxN1, i.e. (1-methylpentyl)succinate, were assigned as (2S,1'R) and (2R,1'R). Experiments with stereospecifically deuterated n-(2,5-2H2)hexanes revealed that exclusively the pro-S hydrogen atom is abstracted from C2 of the n-alkane by the enzyme and later transferred back to C3 of the alkylsuccinate formed. These results indicate that the alkylsuccinate-forming reaction proceeds with an inversion of configuration at the carbon atom (C2) of the n-alkane forming the new C-C-bond, and thus stereochemically resembles a SN2-type reaction. Therefore, the reaction may occur in a concerted manner, which may avoid the highly energetic hex-2-yl radical as an intermediate. The reaction is associated with a significant primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ≥3) for hydrogen, indicating that the homolytic C-H-bond cleavage is involved in the first irreversible step of the reaction mechanism. The (1-methylalkyl)succinate synthases of n-alkane-utilizing anaerobic bacteria apparently have very broad substrate ranges enabling them to activate not only aliphatic but also alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, two denitrifiers and one sulfate reducer were shown to convert the nongrowth substrate toluene to benzylsuccinate and further to the dead-end product benzoyl-CoA. For this purpose, however, the modified β-oxidation pathway known from alkylbenzene-utilizing bacteria was not employed, but rather the pathway used for n-alkane degradation involving CoA ligation, carbon skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Furthermore, various n-alkane- and alkylbenzene-utilizing denitrifiers and sulfate reducers were found to be capable of forming benzyl alcohols from diverse alkylbenzenes

  11. Metabolic and spatio-taxonomic response of uncultivated seafloor bacteria following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, K. M.; Piceno, Y. M.; Hu, P.; Tom, L. M.; Mason, O. U.; Andersen, G. L.; Jansson, J. K.; Gilbert, J. A.

    2017-08-04

    The release of 700 million liters of oil into the Gulf of Mexico over a few months in 2010 produced dramatic changes in the microbial ecology of the water and sediment. Here, we reconstructed the genomes of 57 widespread uncultivated bacteria from post-spill deep-sea sediments, and recovered their gene expression pattern across the seafloor. These genomes comprised a common collection of bacteria that were enriched in heavily affected sediments around the wellhead. Although rare in distal sediments, some members were still detectable at sites up to 60 km away. Many of these genomes exhibited phylogenetic clustering indicative of common trait selection by the environment, and within half we identified 264 genes associated with hydrocarbon degradation. Alkane degradation ability was near ubiquitous among candidate hydrocarbon degraders, whereas just three harbored elaborate gene inventories for the degradation of alkanes and aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Differential gene expression profiles revealed a spill-promoted microbial sulfur cycle alongside gene upregulation associated with PAH degradation. Gene expression associated with alkane degradation was widespread, although active alkane degrader identities changed along the pollution gradient. Analyses suggest that a broad metabolic capacity to respond to oil inputs exists across a large array of usually rare indigenous deep-sea bacteria.

  12. [Effect of the medium redox potential on the growth and metabolism of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilian, A; Trchunian, A

    2008-01-01

    Based on the available literature data on a decrease in the redox potential of medium to low negative values and a decrease in pH during the growth of sugar-fermenting anaerobic bacteria, it was concluded that these processes cannot be described by the theory of redox potential. A theory was developed according to which the regulation of bacterial metabolism is accomplished through changes in the redox potential. The theory considers the redox potential as a factor determining the growth of anaerobic bacteria, which is regulated by oxidizers and reducers. The assumption is put forward that, under anaerobic conditions, bacteria are sensitive to changes in the redox potential and have a redox taxis. The effect of the redox potential on the transport of protons and other substances through membranes and the activity of membrane-bound enzymes, including the proton F1-F0-ATPase, whose mechanisms of action involve changes in the proton conductance of the membrane, the generation of proton-driving force, and dithiol-disulfide transitions in proteins was studied.

  13. Predictive Genomic Analyses Inform the Basis for Vitamin Metabolism and Provisioning in Bacteria-Arthropod Endosymbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbus, Laura R; Rodriguez, Brian Garcia; Sharmin, Zinat; Momtaz, A J M Zehadee; Christensen, Steen

    2017-06-07

    The requirement of vitamins for core metabolic processes creates a unique set of pressures for arthropods subsisting on nutrient-limited diets. While endosymbiotic bacteria carried by arthropods have been widely implicated in vitamin provisioning, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. To address this issue, standardized predictive assessment of vitamin metabolism was performed in 50 endosymbionts of insects and arachnids. The results predicted that arthropod endosymbionts overall have little capacity for complete de novo biosynthesis of conventional or active vitamin forms. Partial biosynthesis pathways were commonly predicted, suggesting a substantial role in vitamin provisioning. Neither taxonomic relationships between host and symbiont, nor the mode of host-symbiont interaction were clear predictors of endosymbiont vitamin pathway capacity. Endosymbiont genome size and the synthetic capacity of nonsymbiont taxonomic relatives were more reliable predictors. We developed a new software application that also predicted that last-step conversion of intermediates into active vitamin forms may contribute further to vitamin biosynthesis by endosymbionts. Most instances of predicted vitamin conversion were paralleled by predictions of vitamin use. This is consistent with achievement of provisioning in some cases through upregulation of pathways that were retained for endosymbiont benefit. The predicted absence of other enzyme classes further suggests a baseline of vitamin requirement by the majority of endosymbionts, as well as some instances of putative mutualism. Adaptation of this workflow to analysis of other organisms and metabolic pathways will provide new routes for considering the molecular basis for symbiosis on a comprehensive scale. Copyright © 2017 Serbus et al.

  14. Predictive Genomic Analyses Inform the Basis for Vitamin Metabolism and Provisioning in Bacteria-Arthropod Endosymbioses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R. Serbus

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of vitamins for core metabolic processes creates a unique set of pressures for arthropods subsisting on nutrient-limited diets. While endosymbiotic bacteria carried by arthropods have been widely implicated in vitamin provisioning, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. To address this issue, standardized predictive assessment of vitamin metabolism was performed in 50 endosymbionts of insects and arachnids. The results predicted that arthropod endosymbionts overall have little capacity for complete de novo biosynthesis of conventional or active vitamin forms. Partial biosynthesis pathways were commonly predicted, suggesting a substantial role in vitamin provisioning. Neither taxonomic relationships between host and symbiont, nor the mode of host-symbiont interaction were clear predictors of endosymbiont vitamin pathway capacity. Endosymbiont genome size and the synthetic capacity of nonsymbiont taxonomic relatives were more reliable predictors. We developed a new software application that also predicted that last-step conversion of intermediates into active vitamin forms may contribute further to vitamin biosynthesis by endosymbionts. Most instances of predicted vitamin conversion were paralleled by predictions of vitamin use. This is consistent with achievement of provisioning in some cases through upregulation of pathways that were retained for endosymbiont benefit. The predicted absence of other enzyme classes further suggests a baseline of vitamin requirement by the majority of endosymbionts, as well as some instances of putative mutualism. Adaptation of this workflow to analysis of other organisms and metabolic pathways will provide new routes for considering the molecular basis for symbiosis on a comprehensive scale.

  15. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  16. Oscillospira and related bacteria - from metagenomics species to metabolic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gophna, Uri; Konikoff, Tom; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    and manual metabolic pathway curation to decipher key metabolic features of this intriguing bacterial genus. We infer that Oscillospira species are butyrate producers, and at least some of them have the ability to utilize glucuronate, a common animal-derived sugar that is both produced by the human host...

  17. P-Ser-HPr-a link between carbon metabolism and the virulence of some pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    HPr kinase/phosphorylase phosphorylates HPr, a phosphocarrier protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system, at serine-46. P-Ser-HPr is the central regulator of carbon metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria, but also plays a role in virulence development of certain...... pathogens. In Listeria monocytogenes, several virulence genes, which depend on the transcription activator PrfA, are repressed by glucose, fructose, etc., in a catabolite repressor (CcpA)-independent mechanism. However, the catabolite co-repressor P-Ser-HPr was found to inhibit the activity of Prf...... is preceded by an operator site, which serves as target for the CcpA/P-Ser-HPr complex. Numerous Gram-negative pathogens also contain hprK, which is often organised in an operon with transcription regulators necessary for the development of virulence, indicating that in these organisms P-Ser-HPr also plays...

  18. Pulmonary metabolism of foreign compounds: Its role in metabolic activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The lung has the potential of metabolizing many foreign chemicals to a vast array of metabolites with different pharmacological and toxicological properties. Because many chemicals require metabolic activation in order to exert their toxicity, the cellular distribution of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in a heterogeneous tissue, such as the lung, and the balance of metabolic activation and deactivation pathways in any particular cell are key factors in determining the cellular specificity of many pulmonary toxins. Environmental factors such as air pollution, cigarette smoking, and diet markedly affect the pulmonary metabolism of some chemicals and, thereby, possibly affect their toxicity

  19. Mutagenicity of vinyl chloride after metabolic activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rannug, U; Johansson, A; Ramel, C; Wachtmeister, C A

    1974-01-01

    Vinyl chloride has recently been shown to cause a malignant liver tumor disease in man after occupational exposure in PVC plants. This actualizes the problem of whether such hazards could be avoided or at least diminished in the future by a screening for mutagenicity of chemicals used in industries. The basis for such a screening procedure is the close correlation between carcinogenic and mutagenic effects of chemicals. Experiments with Salmonella bacteria showed that the carcinogenic hazard of vinyl chloride could have been traced by means of mutagenicity tests. The data indicate that vinyl chloride is not mutagenic per se but becomes mutagenic after a metabolic activation in the liver. 24 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  20. Effect of radiation on activity of sulphate reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agaev, N.M.; Smorodin, A.E.; Gusejnov, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of γ-radiation on activity of sulphate reducing bacteria has been studied. Concentration of biogenic hydrogen, generated in the medium, is the main criterion, characterizing corrosion activity of the bacteria studied. The developed method of suppression of active development of sulfate reducing bacteria considerably reduces, and at lethal doses of γ-radiation eliminates altogether the bacteria activity and formation of the main corrosion agent-hydrogen sulphide-in the medium and that, in its turn, liquidates hydrogen sulphide corrosion

  1. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  2. Metabolic Interactions between Bacteria and Fungi in Commensal Oral Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Lof, Marloes; Janus, Marleen M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    2017-01-01

    Oral health is more than just the absence of disease. The key to oral health is a diverse microbiome in an ecological balance. The oral microbiota is one of the most complex and diverse microbial communities in the human body. To maintain oral health, balance between the human host and the intrinsic microorganisms is essential. The healthy oral cavity is represented by a great microbial diversity, including both bacteria and fungi. The bacterial microbiome is very well studied. In contrast, f...

  3. Surface display for metabolic engineering of industrially important acetic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshal Blank

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid bacteria have unique metabolic characteristics that suit them for a variety of biotechnological applications. They possess an arsenal of membrane-bound dehydrogenases in the periplasmic space that are capable of regiospecific and enantioselective partial oxidations of sugars, alcohols, and polyols. The resulting products are deposited directly into the medium where they are easily recovered for use as pharmaceutical precursors, industrial chemicals, food additives, and consumer products. Expression of extracytoplasmic enzymes to augment the oxidative capabilities of acetic acid bacteria is desired but is challenging due to the already crowded inner membrane. To this end, an original surface display system was developed to express recombinant enzymes at the outer membrane of the model acetic acid bacterium Gluconobacter oxydans. Outer membrane porin F (OprF was used to deliver alkaline phosphatase (PhoA to the cell surface. Constitutive high-strength p264 and moderate-strength p452 promoters were used to direct expression of the surface display system. This system was demonstrated for biocatalysis in whole-cell assays with the p264 promoter having a twofold increase in PhoA activity compared to the p452 promoter. Proteolytic cleavage of PhoA from the cell surface confirmed proper delivery to the outer membrane. Furthermore, a linker library was constructed to optimize surface display. A rigid (EAAAK1 linker led to the greatest improvement, increasing PhoA activity by 69%. This surface display system could be used both to extend the capabilities of acetic acid bacteria in current biotechnological processes, and to broaden the potential of these microbes in the production of value-added products.

  4. Metabolic Engineering and Modeling of Metabolic Pathways to Improve Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Navid, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-19

    Rising energy demands and the imperative to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are driving research on biofuels development. Hydrogen gas (H2) is one of the most promising biofuels and is seen as a future energy carrier by virtue of the fact that 1) it is renewable, 2) does not evolve the “greenhouse gas” CO2 in combustion, 3) liberates large amounts of energy per unit weight in combustion (having about 3 times the energy content of gasoline), and 4) is easily converted to electricity by fuel cells. Among the various bioenergy strategies, environmental groups and others say that the concept of the direct manufacture of alternative fuels, such as H2, by photosynthetic organisms is the only biofuel alternative without significant negative criticism [1]. Biological H2 production by photosynthetic microorganisms requires the use of a simple solar reactor such as a transparent closed box, with low energy requirements, and is considered as an attractive system to develop as a biocatalyst for H2 production [2]. Various purple bacteria including Rhodopseudomonas palustris, can utilize organic substrates as electron donors to produce H2 at the expense of solar energy. Because of the elimination of energy cost used for H2O oxidation and the prevention of the production of O2 that inhibits the H2-producing enzymes, the efficiency of light energy conversion to H2 by anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria is in principle much higher than that by green algae or cyanobacteria, and is regarded as one of the most promising cultures for biological H2 production [3]. Here implemented a simple and relatively straightforward strategy for hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms using sunlight, sulfur- or iron-based inorganic substrates, and CO2 as the feedstock. Carefully selected microorganisms with bioengineered beneficial

  5. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...... consortia. Despite the potentially adverse effects, only few inorganic electron acceptors potentially utilizable for anaerobic respiration have been investigated with respect to negative interactions in anaerobic digesters. In this chapter we review competitive and inhibitory interactions between anaerobic...... respiring populations and methanogenic consortia in bioreactors. Due to the few studies in anaerobic digesters, many of our discussions are based upon studies of defined cultures or natural ecosystems...

  6. Influence of different anoxic time exposures on active biomass, protozoa and filamentous bacteria in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Perez, S; Fermoso, F G; Arnaiz, C

    Medium-sized wastewater treatment plants are considered too small to implement anaerobic digestion technologies and too large for extensive treatments. A promising option as a sewage sludge reduction method is the inclusion of anoxic time exposures. In the present study, three different anoxic time exposures of 12, 6 and 4 hours have been studied to reduce sewage sludge production. The best anoxic time exposure was observed under anoxic/oxic cycles of 6 hours, which reduced 29.63% of the biomass production compared with the oxic control conditions. The sludge under different anoxic time exposures, even with a lower active biomass concentration than the oxic control conditions, showed a much higher metabolic activity than the oxic control conditions. Microbiological results suggested that both protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria decrease under anoxic time exposures compared to oxic control conditions. The anoxic time exposures 6/6 showed the highest reduction in both protozoa density, 37.5%, and abundance of filamentous bacteria, 41.1%, in comparison to the oxic control conditions. The groups of crawling ciliates, carnivorous ciliates and filamentous bacteria were highly influenced by the anoxic time exposures. Protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria have been shown as promising bioindicators of biomass production reduction.

  7. Why Do Fast-Growing Bacteria Enter Overflow Metabolism? Testing the Membrane Real Estate Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szenk, Mariola; Dill, Ken A; de Graff, Adam M R

    2017-08-23

    Bacteria and other cells show a puzzling behavior. At high growth rates, E. coli switch from respiration (which is ATP-efficient) to using fermentation for additional ATP (which is inefficient). This overflow metabolism results in a several-fold decrease in ATP produced per glucose molecule provided as food. By integrating diverse types of experimental data into a simple biophysical model, we give evidence that this onset is the result of the membrane real estate hypothesis: Fast growth drives cells to be bigger, reducing their surface-to-volume ratios. This decreases the membrane area available for respiratory proteins despite growing demand, causing increased crowding. Only when respiratory proteins reach their crowding limit does the cell activate fermentation, since fermentation allows faster ATP production per unit membrane area. Surface limitation thus creates a Pareto trade-off between membrane efficiency and ATP yield that links metabolic choice to the size and shape of a bacterial cell. By exploring the predictions that emerge from this trade-off, we show how consideration of molecular structures, energetics, rates, and equilibria can provide important insight into cellular behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermodynamic and Probabilistic Metabolic Control Analysis of Riboflavin (Vitamin B₂) Biosynthesis in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenmeier, Markus; Mack, Matthias; Röder, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we applied a coupled in silico thermodynamic and probabilistic metabolic control analysis methodology to investigate the control mechanisms of the commercially relevant riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in bacteria. Under the investigated steady-state conditions, we found that several enzyme reactions of the pathway operate far from thermodynamic equilibrium (transformed Gibbs energies of reaction below about -17 kJ mol(-1)). Using the obtained thermodynamic information and applying enzyme elasticity sampling, we calculated the distributions of the scaled concentration control coefficients (CCCs) and scaled flux control coefficients (FCCs). From the statistical analysis of the calculated distributions, we inferred that the control over the riboflavin producing flux is shared among several enzyme activities and mostly resides in the initial reactions of the pathway. More precisely, the guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase II activity, and therefore the bifunctional RibA protein of Bacillus subtilis because it catalyzes this activity, appears to mainly control the riboflavin producing flux (mean FCCs = 0.45 and 0.55, respectively). The GTP cyclohydrolase II activity and RibA also exert a high positive control over the riboflavin concentration (mean CCCs = 2.43 and 2.91, respectively). This prediction is consistent with previous findings for microbial riboflavin overproducing strains.

  9. Diversity, metabolic properties and arsenic mobilization potential of indigenous bacteria in arsenic contaminated groundwater of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Gupta, Ashok K; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) mobilization in alluvial aquifers is caused by a complex interplay of hydro-geo-microbiological activities. Nevertheless, diversity and biogeochemical significance of indigenous bacteria in Bengal Delta Plain are not well documented. We have deciphered bacterial community compositions and metabolic properties in As contaminated groundwater of West Bengal to define their role in As mobilization. Groundwater samples showed characteristic high As, low organic carbon and reducing property. Culture-independent and -dependent analyses revealed presence of diverse, yet near consistent community composition mostly represented by genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Brevundimonas, Polaromonas, Rhodococcus, Methyloversatilis and Methylotenera. Along with As-resistance and -reductase activities, abilities to metabolize a wide range carbon substrates including long chain and polyaromatic hydrocarbons and HCO3, As3+ as electron donor and As5+/Fe3+ as terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic growth were frequently observed within the cultivable bacteria. Genes encoding cytosolic As5+ reductase (arsC) and As3+ efflux/transporter [arsB and acr3(2)] were found to be more abundant than the dissimilatory As5+ reductase gene arrA. The observed metabolic characteristics showed a good agreement with the same derived from phylogenetic lineages of constituent populations. Selected bacterial strains incubated anaerobically over 300 days using natural orange sand of Pleistocene aquifer showed release of soluble As mostly as As3+ along with several other elements (Al, Fe, Mn, K, etc.). Together with the production of oxalic acid within the biotic microcosms, change in sediment composition and mineralogy indicated dissolution of orange sand coupled with As/Fe reduction. Presence of arsC gene, As5+ reductase activity and oxalic acid production by the bacteria were found to be closely related to their ability to mobilize sediment bound As. Overall observations suggest that

  10. One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT

    One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Life on earth is sustained by the constant cycling of six essential elements: oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen,

  11. Manganese effect over the bacteria activity on the active mires process; Efecto del Manganeso sobre la actividad bacteriana en procesos de fangos activos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon Andreu, P. J.; Lardin Mifsud, C.; Martinez Muro, M. A.; Vicente Gonzalez, J. A.; Sanchez Beltran, A. V.; Gonzalez Herrero, R.; Llosa Llacer, C.

    2009-07-01

    With this assay, it has been determined the incidence of manganese (Mn (II) in the metabolic activity of bacteria involved in biological processes in a WWTP. It has been observed the function of Mn (II) as an enzymatic co-factor and its influence on the increase of bacteria oxidative capacity. Besides, it has been studied the effect of Mn (II) as a metabolic uncoupler and its influence on biomass production decreases. (Author)

  12. Fungi, bacteria and soil pH: the oxalate-carbonate pathway as a model for metabolic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gaëtan; Guggiari, Matteo; Bravo, Daniel; Zopfi, Jakob; Cailleau, Guillaume; Aragno, Michel; Job, Daniel; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2012-11-01

    The oxalate-carbonate pathway involves the oxidation of calcium oxalate to low-magnesium calcite and represents a potential long-term terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO(2). In this pathway, bacterial oxalate degradation is associated with a strong local alkalinization and subsequent carbonate precipitation. In order to test whether this process occurs in soil, the role of bacteria, fungi and calcium oxalate amendments was studied using microcosms. In a model system with sterile soil amended with laboratory cultures of oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi, the addition of calcium oxalate induced a distinct pH shift and led to the final precipitation of calcite. However, the simultaneous presence of bacteria and fungi was essential to drive this pH shift. Growth of both oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi was confirmed by qPCR on the frc (oxalotrophic bacteria) and 16S rRNA genes, and the quantification of ergosterol (active fungal biomass) respectively. The experiment was replicated in microcosms with non-sterilized soil. In this case, the bacterial and fungal contribution to oxalate degradation was evaluated by treatments with specific biocides (cycloheximide and bronopol). Results showed that the autochthonous microflora oxidized calcium oxalate and induced a significant soil alkalinization. Moreover, data confirmed the results from the model soil showing that bacteria are essentially responsible for the pH shift, but require the presence of fungi for their oxalotrophic activity. The combined results highlight that the interaction between bacteria and fungi is essential to drive metabolic processes in complex environments such as soil. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. One carbon metabolism in SAR11 pelagic marine bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    Full Text Available The SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria are the most abundant heterotrophs in the oceans and are believed to play a major role in mineralizing marine dissolved organic carbon. Their genomes are among the smallest known for free-living heterotrophic cells, raising questions about how they successfully utilize complex organic matter with a limited metabolic repertoire. Here we show that conserved genes in SAR11 subgroup Ia (Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique genomes encode pathways for the oxidation of a variety of one-carbon compounds and methyl functional groups from methylated compounds. These pathways were predicted to produce energy by tetrahydrofolate (THF-mediated oxidation, but not to support the net assimilation of biomass from C1 compounds. Measurements of cellular ATP content and the oxidation of (14C-labeled compounds to (14CO(2 indicated that methanol, formaldehyde, methylamine, and methyl groups from glycine betaine (GBT, trimethylamine (TMA, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO, and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP were oxidized by axenic cultures of the SAR11 strain Ca. P. ubique HTCC1062. Analyses of metagenomic data showed that genes for C1 metabolism occur at a high frequency in natural SAR11 populations. In short term incubations, natural communities of Sargasso Sea microbial plankton expressed a potential for the oxidation of (14C-labeled formate, formaldehyde, methanol and TMAO that was similar to cultured SAR11 cells and, like cultured SAR11 cells, incorporated a much larger percentage of pyruvate and glucose (27-35% than of C1 compounds (2-6% into biomass. Collectively, these genomic, cellular and environmental data show a surprising capacity for demethylation and C1 oxidation in SAR11 cultures and in natural microbial communities dominated by SAR11, and support the conclusion that C1 oxidation might be a significant conduit by which dissolved organic carbon is recycled to CO(2 in the upper ocean.

  14. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims...

  15. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan

    2015-09-11

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6oC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μat the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 106 cells mL-1 and generally covaried with μbut, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μand K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. © FEMS 2015.

  16. Sedentary activity associated with metabolic syndrome independent of physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bankoski, Andrea; Harris, Tamara B; McClain, James J

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the association between objectively measured sedentary activity and metabolic syndrome among older adults.......This study examined the association between objectively measured sedentary activity and metabolic syndrome among older adults....

  17. Simultaneous fluorescent gram staining and activity assessment of activated sludge bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Scott; Snape, Jason R; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M; Porter, Jonathan

    2002-10-01

    Wastewater treatment is one of the most important commercial biotechnological processes, and yet the component bacterial populations and their associated metabolic activities are poorly understood. The novel fluorescent dye hexidium iodide allows assessment of Gram status by differential absorption through bacterial cell walls. Differentiation between gram-positive and gram-negative wastewater bacteria was achieved after flow cytometric analysis. This study shows that the relative proportions of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells identified by traditional microscopy and hexidium iodide staining were not significantly different. Dual staining of cells for Gram status and activity proved effective in analyzing mixtures of cultured bacteria and wastewater populations. Levels of highly active organisms at two wastewater treatment plants, both gram positive and gram negative, ranged from 1.5% in activated sludge flocs to 16% in the activated sludge fluid. Gram-positive organisms comprised Gram status and activity within activated sludge samples over a 4-day period showed significant differences over time. This method provides a rapid, quantitative measure of Gram status linked with in situ activity within wastewater systems.

  18. Alkaline phosphatase activity of rumen bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K J; Costerton, J W

    1977-11-01

    Of the 54 strains of rumen bacteria examined for alkaline phosphatase (APase) production, 9 of 33 gram-negative strains and none of 21 gram-positive strains produced the enzyme. The APase of the cells of the three strains of Bacteroides ruminicola that produced significant amounts of the enzyme was located in the periplasmic area of the cell envelope, whereas the enzyme was located in the strains of Selenomonas ruminantium and Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens was associated with the outer membrane. The localization of APase production in the cells of natural populations of rumen bacteria from hay-fed sheep was accomplished by reaction product deposition, and both the proportion of APase-producing bacteria and the location of the enzyme in the cell envelope of the producing cells could be determined. We suggest that this procedure is useful in detecting shifts in the bacterial population and the release of cell-bound APase that accompany feedlot bloat and other sequelae of dietary manipulation in ruminants.

  19. Antimicrobial activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from akamu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The partially purified inhibitory compounds were screened by agar spot assay method for antagonistic ... The partially purified compounds exhibited strong activity against ... Keywords: Bacteriocins, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), target organisms, ...

  20. Metabolism of Fructophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from the Apis mellifera L. Bee Gut: Phenolic Acids as External Electron Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Addante, Rocco; Pontonio, Erica; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) are strongly associated with the gastrointestinal tracts (GITs) of Apis mellifera L. worker bees due to the consumption of fructose as a major carbohydrate. Seventy-seven presumptive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from GITs of healthy A. mellifera L. adults, which were collected from 5 different geographical locations of the Apulia region of Italy. Almost all of the isolates showed fructophilic tendencies: these isolates were identified as Lactobacillus kunkeei (69%) or Fructobacillus fructosus (31%). A high-throughput phenotypic microarray targeting 190 carbon sources was used to determine that 83 compounds were differentially consumed. Phenotyping grouped the strains into two clusters, reflecting growth performance. The utilization of phenolic acids, such as p-coumaric, caffeic, syringic, or gallic acids, as electron acceptors was investigated in fructose-based medium. Almost all FLAB strains showed tolerance to high phenolic acid concentrations. p-Coumaric acid and caffeic acid were consumed by all FLAB strains through reductases or decarboxylases. Syringic and gallic acids were partially metabolized. The data collected suggest that FLAB require external electron acceptors to regenerate NADH. The use of phenolic acids as external electron acceptors by the 4 FLAB showing the highest phenolic acid reductase activity was investigated in glucose-based medium supplemented with p-coumaric acid. Metabolic responses observed through a phenotypic microarray suggested that FLAB may use p-coumaric acid as an external electron acceptor, enhancing glucose dissimilation but less efficiently than other external acceptors such as fructose or pyruvic acid. IMPORTANCE Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) remain to be fully explored. This study intends to link unique biochemical features of FLAB with their habitat. The quite unique FLAB phenome within the group lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may have practical relevance

  1. Sulfur metabolism in Escherichia coli and related bacteria: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekowska, A; Kung, H F; Danchin, A

    2000-04-01

    Living organisms are composed of macromolecules made of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur. Much work has been devoted to the metabolism of the first five elements, but much remains to be understood about sulfur metabolism. We review here the situation in Escherichia coli and related bacteria, where more than one hundred genes involved in sulfur metabolism have already been discovered in this organism. Examination of the genome suggests that many more will be found, especially genes involved in regulation, scavenging of sulfur containing molecules and synthesis of coenzymes or prosthetic groups. Furthermore, the involvement of methionine as the universal start of proteins as well as that of its derivative S-adenosylmethionine in a vast variety of cell processes argue in favour of a major importance of sulfur metabolism in all organisms.

  2. Disinfection of bacteria attached to granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeChevallier, M W; Hassenauer, T S; Camper, A K; McFeters, G A

    1984-01-01

    Heterotrophic plate count bacteria, coliform organisms, and pathogenic microorganisms attached to granular activated carbon particles were examined for their susceptibility to chlorine disinfection. When these bacteria were grown on carbon particles and then disinfected with 2.0 mg of chlorine per liter (1.4 to 1.6 mg of free chlorine residual per liter after 1 h) for 1 h, no significant decrease in viable counts was observed. Washed cells attached to the surface of granular activated carbon particles showed similar resistance to chlorine, but a progressive increase in sublethal injury was found. Observations made by scanning electron microscope indicated that granular activated carbon was colonized by bacteria which grow in cracks and crevices and are coated by an extracellular slime layer. These data suggest a possible mechanism by which treatment and disinfection barriers can be penetrated and pathogenic bacteria may enter drinking water supplies. Images PMID:6508306

  3. Exploring photosynthesis evolution by comparative analysis of metabolic networks between chloroplasts and photosynthetic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Jing

    2006-04-01

    findings are consistent with the notion that since the light energy absorption, transfer and conversion is highly efficient even in photosynthetic bacteria, the further improvements in photosynthetic efficiency in higher plants may rely on changes in metabolic network properties.

  4. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boopathy, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kulpa, C.F. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1994-06-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO{sub 2}. Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions.

  5. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO 2 . Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions

  6. Tetrazolium Reduction-Malachite Green Method for Assessing the Viability of Filamentous Bacteria in Activated Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Gabriel; Koopman, Ben

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed to assess the activity of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge. It involves the incubation of activated sludge with 2(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride followed by staining with malachite green. Both cells and 2(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride-formazan crystals can be observed in prepared specimens by using bright-field microscopy. This procedure allowed us to distinguish between inactive and actively metabolizing filaments after chlorine application to control the bulking of activated sludge. Images PMID:16345999

  7. Dissimilatory metabolism of nitrogen oxides in bacteria: comparative reconstruction of transcriptional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR, and NnrR; two-component systems NarXL and NarQP; NO-responsive activator NorR; and nitrite-sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches, we predict DNA-binding motifs for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA recognition motif. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria, including Clostridia, Thermotogales, and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides' metabolism, not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species such as Escherichia coli, but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding motif. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon also includes two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr and nipC (dnrN, thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e. nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include

  8. Dissimilatory Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Bacteria:Comparative Reconstruction of Transcriptional Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, EricJ.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2005-09-01

    Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO) is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR and NnrR, two-component systems NarXL and NarQP, NO-responsive activator NorR, and nitrite sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches we predict DNA-binding signals for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA signal. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria including Clostridia, Thermotogales and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides metabolism not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species like Escherichia coli), but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding signal. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon includes also two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr) and nipC(dnrN), thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e., nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include denitrification genes. As the

  9. Acute toxicity testing of some herbicides-, alkaloids-, and antibiotics-metabolizing soil bacteria in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Classen, H G; Eberspächer, J; Lingens, F

    1981-01-01

    Seven strains of soil bacteria with the ability to metabolize herbicides, alkaloids or antibiotics were tested in rats for acute toxicity. 1. Upon oral administration of 9.0 x 10(8) to 6.6 x 10(10) cells daily during 7 d no adverse reactions were observed. 2. Exposure by air did not lead to specific pulmonary changes. 3. Intracutaneous injection of 7.5 x 10(6) to 1.4 x 10(8) cells did not lead to adverse skin reactions. 4. Intraperitoneal injections up to 10(8) cells per animal did not kill rats although bacteria entered blood. At higher concentrations some mortality occurred partly due to unspecific stress reactions. 5. Animal data and observations on 20 humans being exposed to these strains for 2 months up to 15 years support the view that the bacteria tested are essentially harmless for health.

  10. Bacteria from wheat and cucurbit plant roots metabolize PAHs and aromatic root exudates: Implications for rhizodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Cairn S; Smets, Barth F

    2017-10-03

    The chemical interaction between plants and bacteria in the root zone can lead to soil decontamination. Bacteria that degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been isolated from the rhizospheres of plant species with varied biological traits; however, it is not known what phytochemicals promote contaminant degradation. One monocot and two dicotyledon plants were grown in PAH-contaminated soil from a manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. A phytotoxicity assay confirmed greater soil decontamination in rhizospheres when compared to bulk soil controls. Bacteria were isolated from plant roots (rhizobacteria) and selected for growth on anthracene and chrysene on PAH-amended plates. Rhizosphere isolates metabolized 3- and 4-ring PAHs and PAH catabolic intermediates in liquid incubations. Aromatic root exudate compounds, namely flavonoids and simple phenols, were also substrates for isolated rhizobacteria. In particular, the phenolic compounds-morin, caffeic acid, and protocatechuic acid-appear to be linked to bacterial degradation of 3- and 4-ring PAHs in the rhizosphere.

  11. Functional and structural characterization of a β-glucosidase involved in saponin metabolism from intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shan; Wei, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Qiao; Chen, Xin; Wang, Shi-Cheng; Li, Jia-Ru; Gao, Chuan

    2018-02-19

    Saponins are natural glycosides widely used in medicine and the food industry. Although saponin metabolism in human is dependent on intestinal microbes, few involving bacteria enzymes have been identified. We cloned BlBG3, a GH3 β-glucosidase from Bifidobacterium longum, from human stool. We found that BlBG3 catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycoside furostanol and ginsenoside Rb1 at higher efficiency than other microbial β-glucosidases. Structural analysis of BlBG3 in complex with d-glucose revealed its three unique loops, which form a deep pocket and participate in substrate binding. To understand how substrate is bound to the pocket, molecular docking was performed and the binding interactions of protobioside with BlBG3 were revealed. Mutational study suggested that R484 and H642 are critical for enzymatic activity. Our study presents the first structural and functional analysis of a saponin-processing enzyme from human microbiota. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic Activity Interferometer: A Powerful Tool for Testing Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel R. P. Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is demonstrated that the efficiency of antibiotics can be tested using an interferometric method. Two antibiotics were used as models to show that an interferometric method to monitor the metabolic activity of slowly growing bacteria can be a safer method to judge antimicrobial properties of substances than conventional methods. The susceptibility of Mycobacterium bovis to hexane extract of Pterodon emarginatus and to the well-known antibiotic rifampicin was tested with the interferometric method and with the conventional microplate method. The microplate method revealed a potential activity of hexane extract against M. bovis. However, the interferometric method showed that the action of this substance is rather limited. Also in the case of rifampicin, the interferometric method was able to detect resistant bacteria.

  13. Evaluation of the ability to metabolize 1,2-propanediol by heterofermentative bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Zielińska

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: All tested isolates showed the ability to effectively metabolize 1,2-PD (in the presence of cobalamin and its conversion to propionic acid, which reveals that investigated bacteria meet the essential requirements of microorganisms with a potential application.

  14. Carbon metabolic pathways in phototrophic bacteria and their broader evolutionary implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsiang eTang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is the biological process that converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. It is the only major natural solar energy storage mechanism on Earth. To satisfy the increased demand for sustainable energy sources and identify the mechanism of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, which is one of the bottlenecks in photosynthesis, it is essential to understand the process of solar energy storage and associated carbon metabolism in photosynthetic organisms. Researchers have employed physiological studies, microbiological chemistry, enzyme assays, genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and 13C-based metabolomics/fluxomics to investigate central carbon metabolism and enzymes that operate in phototrophs. In this report, we review diverse CO2 assimilation pathways, acetate assimilation, carbohydrate catabolism, the TCA cycle and some key and/or unconventional enzymes in central carbon metabolism of phototrophic microorganisms. We also discuss the reducing equivalent flow during photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic growth, evolutionary links in the central carbon metabolic network, and correlations between photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organisms. Considering the metabolic versatility in these fascinating and diverse photosynthetic bacteria, many essential questions in their central carbon metabolism still remain to be addressed.

  15. Comparative genomics of metabolic capacities of regulons controlled by cis-regulatory RNA motifs in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Eric I; Leyn, Semen A; Kazanov, Marat D; Saier, Milton H; Novichkov, Pavel S; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-09-02

    In silico comparative genomics approaches have been efficiently used for functional prediction and reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks. Riboswitches are metabolite-sensing structures often found in bacterial mRNA leaders controlling gene expression on transcriptional or translational levels.An increasing number of riboswitches and other cis-regulatory RNAs have been recently classified into numerous RNA families in the Rfam database. High conservation of these RNA motifs provides a unique advantage for their genomic identification and comparative analysis. A comparative genomics approach implemented in the RegPredict tool was used for reconstruction and functional annotation of regulons controlled by RNAs from 43 Rfam families in diverse taxonomic groups of Bacteria. The inferred regulons include ~5200 cis-regulatory RNAs and more than 12000 target genes in 255 microbial genomes. All predicted RNA-regulated genes were classified into specific and overall functional categories. Analysis of taxonomic distribution of these categories allowed us to establish major functional preferences for each analyzed cis-regulatory RNA motif family. Overall, most RNA motif regulons showed predictable functional content in accordance with their experimentally established effector ligands. Our results suggest that some RNA motifs (including thiamin pyrophosphate and cobalamin riboswitches that control the cofactor metabolism) are widespread and likely originated from the last common ancestor of all bacteria. However, many more analyzed RNA motifs are restricted to a narrow taxonomic group of bacteria and likely represent more recent evolutionary innovations. The reconstructed regulatory networks for major known RNA motifs substantially expand the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in bacteria. The inferred regulons can be used for genetic experiments, functional annotations of genes, metabolic reconstruction and evolutionary analysis. The obtained genome

  16. Potency of Amylase-producing Bacteria and Optimization Amylase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indriati, G.; Megahati, R. R. P.; Rosba, E.

    2018-04-01

    Enzymes are capable to act as biocatalyst for a wide variety of chemical reactions. Amylase have potential biotechnological applications in a wide range of industrial processes and account for nearly 30% of the world’s enzyme market. Amylase are extracellular enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of internal α-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch to dextrin, and other small carbohydrate molecules constituted of glucose units. Although enzymes are produced from animal and plant sources, the microbial sources are generally the most suitable for commercial applications. Bacteria from hot springs is widely used as a source of various enzymes, such as amylase. But the amount of amylase-producing bacteria is still very limited. Therefore it is necessary to search sources of amylase-producing bacteria new, such as from hot springs Pariangan. The purpose of this study was to isolation of amylase-producing bacteria from Pariangan hot spring, West Sumatera and amylase activity optimization. The results were obtained 12 isolates of thermophilic bacteria and 5 isolates of amyalse-producing bacteria with the largest amylolytic index of 3.38 mm. The highest amylase activity was obtained at 50°C and pH 7.5.

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Garlic Extract Against some Pathogenic Animal Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Safithri

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of garlic extract against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial isolates was well studied. However, reports on antibacterial activity of garlic extract against some pathogenic bacteria in animals in Indonesia, are still limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of water and ethanol extracts of garlic against Salmonella typhimurium in chickens, and Streptococcus agalactie, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus causing mastitis in dairy cows in Indonesia. A filtrate of fresh garlic was used to determine the antibacterial activity against S. typhimurium at concentrations of 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% w/v, whereas, the antibacterial activity of water and ethanol extracts was determined against S. agalactie, E. coli, and S. aureus at concentrations of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% w/v. Results showed that antibacterial activity of 30% garlic filtrate was equivalent to 10% tetracycline. Meanwhile, antibacterial activity of garlic aqueous extract on mastitis bacteria was better than that of the garlic ethanol extract. Aqueous extract of garlic at 20% had the same antibacterial activity as 0.01% ampicillin on mastitis bacteria. Filtrates of fresh garlic can be used to inhibit growth of S. typhimurium and mastitis bacteria.

  18. Antibacterial Activities of Endophytic Bacteria Isolated from Taxus brevifolia Against Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nurul; Choi, Jaehyuk; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2018-05-01

    Endophytes are a potential source of novel bioactive compounds with medicinal properties. In this study, 41 endophytic bacteria (EB) were isolated from tissues of a medicinally important plant Taxus brevifolia (Pacific yew). The objective was to screen all the EB isolates for their antibacterial effects against five foodborne pathogenic bacteria: Bacillus cereus ATCC10876, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC12600, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC19115, Escherichia coli ATCC43890, and Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC19585. Among the EB isolates, T. brevifolia seed (TbS)-8, T. brevifolia fleshy part of fruit (TbFl)-10, T. brevifolia leaf (TbL)-22, TbS-29, and TbL-34 exerted significant antibacterial activity against the tested foodborne pathogens. Especially TbFl-10 showed the highest antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria and was identified as Paenibacillus kribbensis (Pk). Furthermore, an ethyl acetate extract of Pk-TbFl-10 possessed antibacterial activities against the tested five foodborne pathogenic bacteria, with zones of inhibition from 15.71 ± 2.85 to 13.01 ± 2.12 mm. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed ruptured, lysed, shrunk, and swollen cells of all the tested foodborne pathogens treated with the ethyl acetate extract of Pk-TbFl-10, suggesting that a metabolite(s) of Pk-TbFl-10 penetrates the cell membrane and causes cell lysis leading to cell death. Our results indicate that Pk-TbFl-10 isolated from T. brevifolia can serve as a novel source of natural antibacterial agents against foodborne pathogenic bacteria, with potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

  19. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E

    2004-01-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines

  20. Industry as a metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, B

    1992-02-01

    The concept of "industrial economic metabolism" can provide a bridge to better understanding between environmentalists and industry. In nature each individual or species reacts to natural stimuli, competing with others for resources, extending its domain until it loses comparative advantage and comes to equilibrium with an adjacent competitor. Those species that succeed over time flourish; those that do not, diminish or disappear. Nature's rule book has no moral or ethical ingredient beyond self-interest. Corporate metabolisms are remarkably similar to those of nature. They too react to stimuli, collect and use resources, and grow or perish based on how effectively they compete. Corporate management recognizes and responds naturally and efficiently to cost and price signals. Through them it selects resources and converts them into useful products. The efficiency with which this is done is measured by profit, the lifeblood of the corporation and its means of growth. Profit thus provides a discipline on corporate behavior, encouraging efficient performers, and, by its absence, weeding out others. Unfettered by influences other than economics, the path to corporate success is unlikely to be a compassionate one. The dilemma of the manager is that to do what is socially "right" often conflicts with what must be done to survive and prosper. Fortunately, corporations' behavior can be altered by society when their purely economic role comes into conflict with other human values. The environment and the economy are not separate systems but intertwined to form a complex natural and social setting. The human-designed economic system depends on natural resource inputs, and in turn its metabolic wastes can overload the ecological system, threatening the long-term survivability of both. Increasing concern for the environment now gives the farsighted manager new latitude. There are competitive benefits in some pollution prevention. But there are not sufficiently strong forces to

  1. Activity of endodontic antibacterial agents against selected anaerobic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Cláudio Maniglia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of substances used as antibacterial agents (solutions of 10% calcium hydroxide, camphorated paramonochlorophenol - PMCC, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate and 10% castor oil plant detergent on anaerobic bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586, Prevotella nigrescens ATCC 33563, Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124 and Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285, using a broth dilution technique, was evaluated in vitro. For determination of minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericide concentrations (MIC and MBC, two culture broths, Reinforced Clostridial Medium (RCM and supplemented Brucella, standardized inoculum and serially diluted solutions were used. All antibacterial agents presented antimicrobial activity that varied for different bacteria. There were no differences in the performance of the two broths. Chlorhexidine digluconate was the most effective, with the lowest MICs, followed by castor oil detergent, PMCC and calcium hydroxide. C. perfringens and B. fragilis were the most resistant bacteria to all agents.

  2. The aerobic activity of metronidazole against anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dione, Niokhor; Khelaifia, Saber; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacteria was demonstrated using antioxidants. Metronidazole is frequently used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria; however, to date its antibacterial activity was only tested in anaerobic conditions. Here we aerobically tested using antioxidants the in vitro activities of metronidazole, gentamicin, doxycycline and imipenem against 10 common anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. Aerobic culture of the bacteria was performed at 37°C using Schaedler agar medium supplemented with 1mg/mL ascorbic acid and 0.1mg/mL glutathione; the pH was adjusted to 7.2 by 10M KOH. Growth of anaerobic bacteria cultured aerobically using antioxidants was inhibited by metronidazole after 72h of incubation at 37°C, with a mean inhibition diameter of 37.76mm and an MIC of 1μg/mL; however, strains remained non-sensitive to gentamicin. No growth inhibition of aerobic bacteria was observed after 24h of incubation at 37°C with metronidazole; however, inhibition was observed with doxycycline and imipenem used as controls. These results indicate that bacterial sensitivity to metronidazole is not related to the oxygen tension but is a result of the sensitivity of the micro-organism. In future, both culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing of strictly anaerobic bacteria will be performed in an aerobic atmosphere using antioxidants in clinical microbiology laboratories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Porphyrin metabolisms in human skin commensal Propionibacterium acnes bacteria: potential application to monitor human radiation risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, M; Kuo, S; Wang, Y; Jiang, Y; Liu, Y-T; Gallo, R L; Huang, C-M

    2013-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, is a commensal organism in human skin. Like human cells, the bacteria produce porphyrins, which exhibit fluorescence properties and make bacteria visible with a Wood's lamp. In this review, we compare the porphyrin biosynthesis in humans and P. acnes. Also, since P. acnes living on the surface of skin receive the same radiation exposure as humans, we envision that the changes in porphyrin profiles (the absorption spectra and/or metabolism) of P. acnes by radiation may mirror the response of human cells to radiation. The porphyrin profiles of P. acnes may be a more accurate reflection of radiation risk to the patient than other biodosimeters/biomarkers such as gene up-/down-regulation, which may be non-specific due to patient related factors such as autoimmune diseases. Lastly, we discuss the challenges and possible solutions for using the P. acnes response to predict the radiation risk.

  4. Relationship between serologic markers of periodontal bacteria and metabolic syndrome and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deepika; Choi, Youn-Hee; Zhang, Jiajia; Hazlett, Linda J; Merchant, Anwar T

    2015-03-01

    Periodontitis is a result of a complex biologic alteration of the periodontal microenvironment and a distributional shift of key periodontal pathogens. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a complex cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, has been linked to periodontal diseases; however, the contribution of periodontal bacteria to systemic conditions remains unclear. The study population comprised 7,848 United States adults who participated in an interview, underwent a clinical oral-health examination, and had serum immunoglobulin G titers measured against 19 periodontal bacteria as part of the third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey. The z-score antibody titers were clustered into four mutually exclusive groups and named after Socransky's classification of periodontal bacteria (Orange-Red, Red-Green, Yellow-Orange, and Orange-Blue). Survey logistic regression was used to investigate the independent associations between the cluster scores, and MetS and each component, including hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, central obesity, and elevated fasting glucose. The Orange-Red cluster score (that included Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella spp.) was positively associated (odds ratio [OR] = 1.067, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.12) and the Orange-Blue cluster score (which included Actinomyces naeslundii and Eubacterium nodatum) was inversely associated (OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.88 to 0.97) with elevated fasting glucose (≥ 110 mg/dL) after adjustment for clusters and potential confounders. Neither MetS nor its other remaining MetS components were associated with a particular cluster score. The associations between specific antibody clusters (Orange-Red and Orange-Blue) against periodontal bacteria and elevated plasma glucose were in qualitatively opposite directions after multivariable adjustment in a large, adult population. The periodontal bacterial profile was not found to be associated with metabolic

  5. [Activity of doripenem against anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, L; Neut, C; Mahieux, S; Muller-Serieys, C; Jean-Pierre, H; Marchandin, H; Soussy, C J; Miara, A

    2011-04-01

    This study examines the activity of doripenem, a new carbapenem compound compared with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, piperacillin+tazobactam, imipenem, clindamycin and metronidazole against 316 anaerobes. Inoculum preparation and agar dilution method were performed according to the CLSI method for anaerobes (M11A7). At a concentration of 4μg/ml doripenem and imipenem (IMP) inhibited 122 (96 %) and 126 (99 %) strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group, respectively. In contrast, doripenem appeared more potent than IMP against Gram-positive anaerobes inhibiting at the same concentration of 4μg/ml 145/145 strains (100 %) versus 115/145 for IMP (79.3 %). Against 316 anaerobic strains, the carbapenem doripenem had an MIC(50) of 0.25μg/ml and an MIC(90) of 2μg/ml. Results were similar to those for imipenem (MIC(50) of 0.125μg/ml and MIC(90) of 4μg/ml). If we consider the resistant breakpoints of the two carbapenems as defined by EUCAST, the resistance rate for doripenem (MIC>4μg/ml) 1.6 % is similar to that of imipenem (MIC>8μg/ml) 1.3 %. Thus independently of the PK/PD parameters the two carbapenems demonstrated very close activity; doripenem was more potent on Gram-positive anaerobes and slightly less potent against Gram-negative anaerobes mainly the B. fragilis group. Further clinical studies are needed to assess its usefulness in patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Low salinity and high-level UV-B radiation reduce single-cell activity in antarctic sea ice bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew; Hall, Julie; Ryan, Ken

    2009-12-01

    Experiments simulating the sea ice cycle were conducted by exposing microbes from Antarctic fast ice to saline and irradiance regimens associated with the freeze-thaw process. In contrast to hypersaline conditions (ice formation), the simulated release of bacteria into hyposaline seawater combined with rapid exposure to increased UV-B radiation significantly reduced metabolic activity.

  7. Community size and metabolic rates of psychrophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria in Arctic marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB; Harder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The numbers of sulfate reducers in two Arctic sediments within situ temperatures of 2.6 and -1.7 degrees C were determined. Most-probable-number counts were higher at 10 degrees C than at 20 degrees C, indicating the predominance of a psychrophilic community. Mean specific sulfate reduction rates...... of 19 isolated psychrophiles were compared to corresponding rates of 9 marine, mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. The results indicate that, as a physiological adaptation to the permanently cold Arctic environment, psychrophilic sulfate reducers have considerably higher specific metabolic rates than...... their mesophilic counterparts at similarly low temperatures....

  8. In vitro metabolism of radiolabeled carbohydrates by protective cecal anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, M E; Beier, R C; Hinton, A; Scanlan, C M; Corrier, D E; Peterson, D V; DeLoach, J R

    1993-12-01

    Cecal anaerobic bacteria from adult broilers were cultured in media containing .25% glucose or .25% lactose. Media also contained either [14C]-labeled lactose, glucose, galactose, or lactic acid as metabolic tracers. Cultures were analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 h for pH, radiolabeled and unlabeled volatile fatty acids, and lactic acid. The pH values of cultures containing .25% lactose were significantly (P galactose, lactose > glucose. The volatile fatty acids in which radiolabel was most concentrated were acetic acid, propionic acid, or butyric acid.

  9. Antimicrobial Activities of Bacteria Associated with the Brown Alga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, A.; Ktari, L.; Bolhuis, H.; Ahmed, M.; Boudabbous, A.; Stal, L.J.; Cretoiu, M.S.; El Bour, M.

    2016-01-01

    Macroalgae belonging to the genus Padina are known to produce antibacterial compounds that may inhibit growth of human- and animal pathogens. Hitherto, it was unclear whether this antibacterial activity is produced by the macroalga itself or by secondary metabolite producing epiphytic bacteria. Here

  10. Antibacterial activity of soaps against daily encountered bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aims to check the antibacterial activity of various branded soaps against bacteria that are normally present in the environment. The proposed study includes selection of most common bacterial strains from the environment. Identification of bacterial strains was done by standard microbiological techniques, which ...

  11. Screening of bacteria for antagonistic activity against phytopathogens of avocados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteria and fungi were isolated from the bark of the avocado tree (Persea americana) located in southern Florida. The bacterial strains were subsequently assayed for antagonism activity against Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt in avocados. The screen identified no isolates that ...

  12. AMPK Activation Affects Glutamate Metabolism in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Caroline Marie; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    acid (TCA) cycle was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis supplemented with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technology. It was found that AMPK activation had profound effects on the pathways involved in glutamate metabolism since the entrance of the glutamate carbon...... on glutamate metabolism in astrocytes was studied using primary cultures of these cells from mouse cerebral cortex during incubation in media containing 2.5 mM glucose and 100 µM [U-(13)C]glutamate. The metabolism of glutamate including a detailed analysis of its metabolic pathways involving the tricarboxylic...... skeleton into the TCA cycle was reduced. On the other hand, glutamate uptake into the astrocytes as well as its conversion to glutamine catalyzed by glutamine synthetase was not affected by AMPK activation. Interestingly, synthesis and release of citrate, which are hallmarks of astrocytic function, were...

  13. Development of Rare Bacterial Monosaccharide Analogs for Metabolic Glycan Labeling in Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Emily L; Emmadi, Madhu; Krupp, Katharine L; Podilapu, Ananda R; Helble, Jennifer D; Kulkarni, Suvarn S; Dube, Danielle H

    2016-12-16

    Bacterial glycans contain rare, exclusively bacterial monosaccharides that are frequently linked to pathogenesis and essentially absent from human cells. Therefore, bacterial glycans are intriguing molecular targets. However, systematic discovery of bacterial glycoproteins is hampered by the presence of rare deoxy amino sugars, which are refractory to traditional glycan-binding reagents. Thus, the development of chemical tools that label bacterial glycans is a crucial step toward discovering and targeting these biomolecules. Here, we explore the extent to which metabolic glycan labeling facilitates the studying and targeting of glycoproteins in a range of pathogenic and symbiotic bacterial strains. We began with an azide-containing analog of the naturally abundant monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine and discovered that it is not broadly incorporated into bacterial glycans, thus revealing a need for additional azidosugar substrates to broaden the utility of metabolic glycan labeling in bacteria. Therefore, we designed and synthesized analogs of the rare deoxy amino d-sugars N-acetylfucosamine, bacillosamine, and 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxygalactose and established that these analogs are differentially incorporated into glycan-containing structures in a range of pathogenic and symbiotic bacterial species. Further application of these analogs will refine our knowledge of the glycan repertoire in diverse bacteria and may find utility in treating a variety of infectious diseases with selectivity.

  14. The metabolic and ecological interactions of oxalate-degrading bacteria in the Mammalian gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron W; Dearing, Denise

    2013-12-06

    Oxalate-degrading bacteria comprise a functional group of microorganisms, commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Oxalate is a plant secondary compound (PSC) widely produced by all major taxa of plants and as a terminal metabolite by the mammalian liver. As a toxin, oxalate can have a significant impact on the health of mammals, including humans. Mammals do not have the enzymes required to metabolize oxalate and rely on their gut microbiota for this function. Thus, significant metabolic interactions between the mammalian host and a complex gut microbiota maintain the balance of oxalate in the body. Over a dozen species of gut bacteria are now known to degrade oxalate. This review focuses on the host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions that regulate the degradation of oxalate by the gut microbiota. We discuss the pathways of oxalate throughout the body and the mammalian gut as a series of differentiated ecosystems that facilitate oxalate degradation. We also explore the mechanisms and functions of microbial oxalate degradation along with the implications for the ecological and evolutionary interactions within the microbiota and for mammalian hosts. Throughout, we consider questions that remain, as well as recent technological advances that can be employed to answer them.

  15. Diversity, metabolism and microbial ecology of butyrate-producing bacteria from the human large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2009-05-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria play a key role in colonic health in humans. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the diversity, metabolism and microbial ecology of this functionally important group of bacteria. Human colonic butyrate producers are Gram-positive firmicutes, but are phylogenetically diverse, with the two most abundant groups related to Eubacterium rectale/Roseburia spp. and to Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Five different arrangements have been identified for the genes of the central pathway involved in butyrate synthesis, while in most cases butyryl-CoA : acetate CoA-transferase, rather than butyrate kinase, appears to perform the final step in butyrate synthesis. Mechanisms have been proposed recently in non-gut Clostridium spp. whereby butyrate synthesis can result in energy generation via both substrate-level phosphorylation and proton gradients. Here we suggest that these mechanisms also apply to the majority of butyrate producers from the human colon. The roles of these bacteria in the gut community and their influence on health are now being uncovered, taking advantage of the availability of cultured isolates and molecular methodologies. Populations of F. prausnitzii are reported to be decreased in Crohn's disease, for example, while populations of Roseburia relatives appear to be particularly sensitive to the diet composition in human volunteer studies.

  16. Regulation of Metabolic Activity by p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Flöter

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells is controlled by the activation of multiple oncogenic signalling pathways in order to promote macromolecule biosynthesis during rapid proliferation. Cancer cells also need to adapt their metabolism to survive and multiply under the metabolically compromised conditions provided by the tumour microenvironment. The tumour suppressor p53 interacts with the metabolic network at multiple nodes, mostly to reduce anabolic metabolism and promote preservation of cellular energy under conditions of nutrient restriction. Inactivation of this tumour suppressor by deletion or mutation is a frequent event in human cancer. While loss of p53 function lifts an important barrier to cancer development by deleting cell cycle and apoptosis checkpoints, it also removes a crucial regulatory mechanism and can render cancer cells highly sensitive to metabolic perturbation. In this review, we will summarise the major concepts of metabolic regulation by p53 and explore how this knowledge can be used to selectively target p53 deficient cancer cells in the context of the tumour microenvironment.

  17. Subversion of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa D Cunha

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to a notably high number of pathogenic microbes and is a broad innate immune response that effectively contributes to restriction of pathogen replication and generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of these platforms leads to caspase-1- and/or caspase-11-dependent secretion of proteins, including cytokines, and induction of a specific form of cell death called pyroptosis, which directly or indirectly contribute for restriction of pathogen replication. Not surprisingly, bona fide intracellular pathogens developed strategies for manipulation of cell death to guarantee intracellular replication. In this sense, the remarkable advances in the knowledge of the inflammasome field have been accompanied by several reports characterizing the inhibition of this platform by several pathogenic bacteria. Herein, we review some processes used by pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Francisella tularensis, Shigella flexneri, Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii to evade the activation of the inflammasome and the induction of pyroptosis.

  18. Metabolic benefits of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Volčanšek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is the most beneficial intervention in prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. Life style, which has become mostly sedentary, leads to growing incidence in obesity, what could cause the first so far reduction in life expectancy in developed countries.Physical activity reduces the chronic low-grade inflammation, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer. Regular physical activity exerts two anti-inflammatory effects: reduction of visceral fat, which produces the majority of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and production of myokines. It has been proposed that cytokines and other peptides that are produced by muscle fibers should be classified as myokines that exert autocrine, paracrine and endocrine effects. Myokines induce muscle hypertrophy and myogenesis, stimulate fat oxidation, improve insulin sensitivity and have an anti-inflammatory effect.  Therefore, skeletal muscle has been identified as a secretory organ and this provides the basis for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs, such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, gut, bones and brain. Physical inactivity leads to an altered myokine profile, associating sedentary life style with some chronic diseases.Physical activity is recommended as a tool for weight management and prevention of weight gain, for weight loss and for prevention of weight regain. High quality studies have confirmed the important impact of exercise on improving blood glucose control in diabetic patients, and on preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in predisposed populations. Prescribing specific exercise tailored to individual's needs is an intervention strategy for health improvement. Physical fitness counteracts the detrimental effects of obesity reducing morbidity and mortality.

  19. Passive and active response of bacteria under mechanical compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Renata; Miller, Samantha; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Byophysics Team; Institute of Medical Sciences Collaboration

    Bacteria display simple but fascinating cellular structures and geometries. Their shapes are the result of the interplay between osmotic pressure and cell wall construction. Typically, bacteria maintain a high difference of osmotic pressure (on the order of 1 atm) to the environment. This pressure difference (turgor pressure) is supported by the cell envelope, a composite of lipid membranes and a rigid cell wall. The response of the cell envelope to mechanical perturbations such as geometrical confinements is important for the cells survival. Another key property of bacteria is the ability to regulate turgor pressure after abrupt changes of external osmotic conditions. This response relies on the activity of mechanosensitive (MS) channels: membrane proteins that release solutes in response to excessive stress in the cell envelope. We here present experimental data on the mechanical response of the cell envelope and on turgor regulation of bacteria subjected to compressive forces. We indent living cells with micron-sized beads attached to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). This approach ensures global deformation of the cell. We show that such mechanical loading is sufficient to gate mechanosensitive channels in isosmotic conditions.

  20. In vitro activity of mecillinam against anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinkraus, G E; McCarthy, L R

    1980-01-01

    A microtiter broth dilution method was employed to determine the in vitro activity of mecillinam against 201 recent clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. Both the anerobic gram-positive and anaerobic gram-negative bacilli displayed a wide range of minimal inhibitory concentrations of mecillinam; most strains were resistant to the antibiotic. The anaerobic cocci exhibited a narrower range of minimal inhibitory concentrations than were observed with other anaerobes, but also exhibited mecill...

  1. Endo- and exoglucanase activities in bacteria from mangrove sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares Júnior, Fábio Lino; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Fasanella, Cristiane Cipola; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; de Souza Lima, André Oliveira; Melo, Itamar Soares; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2013-01-01

    The mangrove ecosystem is an unexplored source for biotechnological applications. In this unique environment, endemic bacteria have the ability to thrive in the harsh environmental conditions (salinity and anaerobiosis), and act in the degradation of organic matter, promoting nutrient cycles. Thus, this study aimed to assess the cellulolytic activities of bacterial groups present in the sediment from a mangrove located in Ilha do Cardoso (SP, Brazil). To optimize the isolation of cellulolytic bacteria, enrichments in two types of culture media (tryptone broth and minimum salt medium), both supplemented with 5% NaCl and 1% of cellulose, were performed. Tests conducted with the obtained colonies showed a higher occurrence of endoglycolytic activity (33 isolates) than exoglycolytic (19 isolates), and the degradation activity was shown to be modulated by the presence of NaCl. The isolated bacteria were clustered by BOX-PCR and further classified on the basis of partial 16S rRNA sequences as Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes or Bacteroidetes. Therefore, this study highlights the importance of studies focusing on the endemic species found in mangroves to exploit them as novel biotechnological tools for the degradation of cellulose.

  2. SCREENING OF PLANT EXTRACTS FOR ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AGAINST BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vatľák

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was antimicrobial action of the methanolic extracts of Equisetum arvense L. and Urtica dioica L. against gramnegative and grampositive bacteria. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts against gramnegative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Listeria ivanovii CCM 5884, Listeria innocua CCM 4030, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCM 1960, Serratia rubidaea CCM 4684 and grampositive bacteria: Brochothrix thermosphacta CCM 4769, Enterococcus raffinosus CCM 4216, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCM 1828, Paenobacillus larvae CCM 4483 and Staphylococcus epidermis CCM 4418 were determined by the disc diffusion method and the microbroth dilution method according to CLSI. Probit analysis was used in this experiment. Of the 2 plant extracts tested, all extracts showed antimicrobial activity against one or more species of microorganisms. The most antimicrobial activity showed methanolic plant extract of E. arvense against S. epidermis with disc diffusion method and with microbroth dilution method against S. rubidaea and plant extract Urtica dioica with disc diffusion method against P. aeruginosa and with microbroth dilution method against S. rubidaea and E. coli.

  3. [Metabolism of carbohydrates in the cells of green sulphur bacteria Chlorobium limicola Ya-2002].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horishnyĭ, M B; Hudz', S P; Hnatush, S O

    2009-01-01

    The nature of carbohydrates that accumulate in the cells of photosynthetic green sulphur bacteria of Chlorobium limicola Ya-2002 has been investigated. It is shown by infra-red spectrometry, that carbohydrates accumulated in the cells of bacteria are identical (by 90-95%) to glycogen of the bull liver. Exogenous glucose, saccharose, maltose, did not stimulate formation of glycogen. Growth of glycogen level in the cells of bacteria was observed at addition of acetate or piruvate in the conditions of bacteria cultivation in the light and in the presence CO2 and H2S in the environment. Washed cells of C. limicola Ya-2002 did not use glucose of the environment neither in the conditions of illumination nor in darkness, however acetate and piruvate are actively used in the light. During incubation of the washed cells in darkness the level of glycogen fell down approximately three times. Its amount during cells incubation in the light did not change. The decline of glycogen level in cells during their incubation in darkness was accompanied by piling up of carbonic acids in the environment acetate prevailing among them.

  4. Phytase-active lactic acid bacteria from sourdoughs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuobariene, Lina; Cizeikiene, Dalia; Gradzeviciute, Egle

    2015-01-01

    Whole-grain foods play an important role in human diet as they are relatively rich in minerals, however, the absorption of those minerals in human gut can be very low due to high content of the mineral binding phytate. Therefore, the object of this study was to identify phytase-active lactic acid...... bacteria (LAB) which could be used as a starter to increase mineral bioavailability in whole-meal bread. Hence, LAB isolates were isolated from Lithuanian sourdoughs, tested for phytase activity, and phytase active isolates were identified. Studies of phytase activity of the isolates were carried out...... at conditions optimal for leavening of bread dough (pH 5.5 and 30°C). The phytase active isolates belonged to the species Lactobacillus panis, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Pediococcus pentosaceus. Phytase activities of the tested LAB isolates were both extra- and intra...

  5. Metabolic primers for detection of (Per)chlorate-reducing bacteria in the environment and phylogenetic analysis of cld gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kelly S; Rice, Melissa R; Fugate, William H; Coates, John D; Achenbach, Laurie A

    2004-09-01

    Natural attenuation of the environmental contaminant perchlorate is a cost-effective alternative to current removal methods. The success of natural perchlorate remediation is dependent on the presence and activity of dissimilatory (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria (DPRB) within a target site. To detect DPRB in the environment, two degenerate primer sets targeting the chlorite dismutase (cld) gene were developed and optimized. A nested PCR approach was used in conjunction with these primer sets to increase the sensitivity of the molecular detection method. Screening of environmental samples indicated that all products amplified by this method were cld gene sequences. These sequences were obtained from pristine sites as well as contaminated sites from which DPRB were isolated. More than one cld phylotype was also identified from some samples, indicating the presence of more than one DPRB strain at those sites. The use of these primer sets represents a direct and sensitive molecular method for the qualitative detection of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria in the environment, thus offering another tool for monitoring natural attenuation. Sequences of cld genes isolated in the course of this project were also generated from various DPRB and provided the first opportunity for a phylogenetic treatment of this metabolic gene. Comparisons of the cld and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene trees indicated that the cld gene does not track 16S rDNA phylogeny, further implicating the possible role of horizontal transfer in the evolution of (per)chlorate respiration.

  6. [Antibacterial activity of rare Streptomyces species against clinical resistant bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughachiche, Faiza; Reghioua, Sihem; Zerizer, Habiba; Boulahrouf, Abderrahmane

    2012-01-01

    In the search for new antibiotics from Steptomyces, investigating extremes habitats enhances the probability of isolating novel producers. In this context, the antibacterial activity of four Streptomyces strains isolated from Ezzmoul saltpans was studied. Two of them showed antibacterial activity against antibiotic's resistant bacteria (Bacillus cereus: β-lactamines and sulfamides resistant, Streptococcus faecalis: penicillin, tetracycline and cotrimoxazole resistant, and Staphylococcus aureus Mu 50: vancomycine resistant). The most active Streptomyces strain produces one type of polar bioactive molecules that resists to temperature variation and light exposition. Its activity appears in the first culture day and reaches its maximal value in the fourth day. The second strain presents themoresistant activity that reaches its maximal value in the first culture day. It produces two types of bioactive molecules, one is polar and the second is non polar (according to thin layer chromatography technique results).

  7. Antibacterial activity of caffeine against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledz, Wojciech; Los, Emilia; Paczek, Agnieszka; Rischka, Jacek; Motyka, Agata; Zoledowska, Sabina; Piosik, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of a plant secondary metabolite - caffeine. Caffeine is present in over 100 plant species. Antibacterial activity of caffeine was examined against the following plant-pathogenic bacteria: Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsol), Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), Dickeya solani (Dsol), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc), Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), and Xanthomonas campestris subsp. campestris (Xcc). MIC and MBC values ranged from 5 to 20 mM and from 43 to 100 mM, respectively. Caffeine increased the bacterial generation time of all tested species and caused changes in cell morphology. The influence of caffeine on the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins was investigated in cultures of plant pathogenic bacteria with labelled precursors: [(3)H]thymidine, [(3)H]uridine or (14)C leucine, respectively. RNA biosynthesis was more affected than DNA or protein biosynthesis in bacterial cells treated with caffeine. Treatment of Pba with caffeine for 336 h did not induce resistance to this compound. Caffeine application reduced disease symptoms caused by Dsol on chicory leaves, potato slices, and whole potato tubers. The data presented indicate caffeine as a potential tool for the control of diseases caused by plant-pathogenic bacteria, especially under storage conditions.

  8. The Key to Acetate: Metabolic Fluxes of Acetic Acid Bacteria under Cocoa Pulp Fermentation-Simulating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Philipp; Frey, Lasse Jannis; Berger, Antje; Bolten, Christoph Josef; Hansen, Carl Erik

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role during cocoa fermentation, as their main product, acetate, is a major driver for the development of the desired cocoa flavors. Here, we investigated the specialized metabolism of these bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions. A carefully designed combination of parallel 13C isotope labeling experiments allowed the elucidation of intracellular fluxes in the complex environment of cocoa pulp, when lactate and ethanol were included as primary substrates among undefined ingredients. We demonstrate that AAB exhibit a functionally separated metabolism during coconsumption of two-carbon and three-carbon substrates. Acetate is almost exclusively derived from ethanol, while lactate serves for the formation of acetoin and biomass building blocks. Although this is suboptimal for cellular energetics, this allows maximized growth and conversion rates. The functional separation results from a lack of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzymes, typically present in bacteria to interconnect metabolism. In fact, gluconeogenesis is driven by pyruvate phosphate dikinase. Consequently, a balanced ratio of lactate and ethanol is important for the optimum performance of AAB. As lactate and ethanol are individually supplied by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the initial phase of cocoa fermentation, respectively, this underlines the importance of a well-balanced microbial consortium for a successful fermentation process. Indeed, AAB performed the best and produced the largest amounts of acetate in mixed culture experiments when lactic acid bacteria and yeasts were both present. PMID:24837393

  9. Evaluating Antimutagenic Activity of Probiotic Bacteria Isolated from Probiotic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kazemi Darsanki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Probiotic bacteria are microbial nutrition supplements which have useful effects on human health by maintaining of bowel microbial balance. There are many studies that have been suggested the use of probiotic products as cancer risk reducer. The aim of this study, is isolation and detection of probiotic agents from yoghurt and probiotical tablet and evaluation of their abilities to decrease some effects of mutagenic and carcinogenic agents.

     

    Methods: In this study, probiotic bacteria were isolated from yogurt and probiotic tablet by using MRS in anaerobic condition (5% Co2 and gas peck and temperature of 37°c. Then, they were detected by using biochemical tests. Their anti mutagenic effects of supernatant culture were evaluated against mutagenic agents of azid Sodium and Potassium Permanganate by ames test (Salmonella typhimurium TA100 in presence and absence of S9.

     

    Results: Six probiotic bacteria were isolated from yogurt and probiotic tablet. Their anti mutagenic activity results based on ames test showed they can inhibit mutagenic agents more than 40% in some species, which is considered as a good result.

     

    Conclusion: The results of this study show that the use of probiotic bacteria found in different products such as yogurt and probiotic tablets, have proper anti mutagenic and anti carcinogenic effects. They change the micro flora of bowel and, as a result, reduce absorption of mutagenic and carcinogenic agents and help to maintain human health.

     

  10. Beneficial effects on host energy metabolism of short-chain fatty acids and vitamins produced by commensal and probiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Chain, Florian; Martín, Rebeca; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Courau, Stéphanie; Langella, Philippe

    2017-05-08

    The aim of this review is to summarize the effect in host energy metabolism of the production of B group vitamins and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) by commensal, food-grade and probiotic bacteria, which are also actors of the mammalian nutrition. The mechanisms of how these microbial end products, produced by these bacterial strains, act on energy metabolism will be discussed. We will show that these vitamins and SCFA producing bacteria could be used as tools to recover energy intakes by either optimizing ATP production from foods or by the fermentation of certain fibers in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Original data are also presented in this work where SCFA (acetate, butyrate and propionate) and B group vitamins (riboflavin, folate and thiamine) production was determined for selected probiotic bacteria.

  11. Inter-Kingdom Modification of Metabolic Behavior: [GAR+] Prion Induction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mediated by Wine Ecosystem Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda F Bisson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has evolved to dominate grape juice fermentation. A suite of cellular properties, rapid nutrient depletion, production of inhibitory compounds and the metabolic narrowing of the niche, all enable a minor resident of the initial population to dramatically increase its relative biomass in the ecosystem. This dominance of the grape juice environment is fueled by a rapid launch of glycolysis and energy generation mediated by transport of hexoses and an efficient coupling of transport and catabolism. Fermentation occurs in the presence of molecular oxygen as the choice between respiratory or fermentative growth is regulated by the availability of sugar a phenomenon known as glucose or catabolite repression. Induction of the GAR+ prion alters the expression of the major hexose transporter active under these conditions, Hxt3, reducing glycolytic capacity. Bacteria present in the grape juice ecosystem were able to induce the GAR+ prion in wine strains of S. cerevisiae. This induction reduced fermentation capacity but did not block it entirely. However, dominance factors such as the rapid depletion of amino acids and other nitrogen sources from the environment were impeded enabling greater access to these substrates for the bacteria. Bacteria associated with arrested commercial wine fermentations were able to induce the prion state, and yeast cells isolated from arrested commercial fermentations were found to be GAR+ thus confirming the ecological relevance of prion induction. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the presence of environmental acetic acid could lead to GAR+ induction in yeast strains under certain conditions. The induction of the prion enabled yeast growth on non-preferred substrates, oxidation and reduction products of glucose and fructose, present as a consequence of bacterial energy production. In native ecosystems prion induction never exceeded roughly 50-60% of the population of yeast cells

  12. Cell lysis and superoxide dismutase activities of highly radioresistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaka, Taeko; Yano, Keiji; Yamaguchi, Hikoyuki

    1976-01-01

    The highly radioresistant bacterium, Arthrobacter radiotolerans, has been isolated from the radioactive hot spring of Misasa, and it does not sporulate, it is Gram-positive, and its color is pink to red. This bacterium shows the highest resistance to gamma-ray among Gram-positive resistants, but the lytic enzyme capable of lysing the cells of strong radioresistants and the surface structure of the cells are little known except those about Micrococcus radiodurans. The cells of the M. radiodurans can be lysed by Achramobacter lyticus enzyme, and electron microscopic observation and chemical analysis revealed the mutilayered surface structure of the cells consisting of an inner membrane, a mucopeptide wall layer and a very outer layer. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was studied, and the relatively high SOD activity of the M. radiodurans was found. The SOD function acts against the threat posed by the reactive superoxide radical being generated biologically, photochemically and radiochemically in the presence of molecular oxygen. In this paper, it is reported that the lytic enzyme No.2 obtained from Cytophaga sp., containing N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, peptidase and endopeptidase, and showing broad lytic spectra, was able to lyse the cells of A. radiotolerans and four radioresistant micrococci, and the radioresistant bacteria showed relatively high SOD activity except M. sp. 248. It is well known that superoxide anions are generated by aerobic irradiation, and are toxic to microbial cells. (Kako, I.)

  13. Cell lysis and superoxide dismutase activities of highly radioresistant bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaka, T; Yano, K; Yamaguchi, H [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    1976-01-01

    The highly radioresistant bacterium, Arthrobacter radiotolerans, has been isolated from the radioactive hot spring of Misasa, and it does not sporulate, it is Gram-positive, and its color is pink to red. This bacterium shows the highest resistance to gamma-ray among Gram-positive resistants, but the lytic enzyme capable of lysing the cells of strong radioresistants and the surface structure of the cells are little known except those about Micrococcus radiodurans. The cells of the M. radiodurans can be lysed by Achramobacter lyticus enzyme, and electron microscopic observation and chemical analysis revealed the mutilayered surface structure of the cells consisting of an inner membrane, a mucopeptide wall layer and a very outer layer. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was studied, and the relatively high SOD activity of the M. radiodurans was found. The SOD function acts against the threat posed by the reactive superoxide radical being generated biologically, photochemically and radiochemically in the presence of molecular oxygen. In this paper, it is reported that the lytic enzyme No.2 obtained from Cytophaga sp., containing N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, peptidase and endopeptidase, and showing broad lytic spectra, was able to lyse the cells of A. radiotolerans and four radioresistant micrococci, and the radioresistant bacteria showedrelatively high SOD activity except M. sp. 248. It is well known that superoxide anions are generated by aerobic irradiation, and are toxic to microbial cells.

  14. The Effects of Allium sativum Extracts on Biofilm Formation and Activities of Six Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenipour, Zeinab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    Garlic is considered a rich source of many compounds, which shows antimicrobial effects. The ability of microorganisms to adhere to both biotic and abiotic surfaces and to form biofilm is responsible for a number of diseases of chronic nature, demonstrating extremely high resistance to antibiotics. Bacterial biofilms are complex communities of sessile microorganisms, embedded in an extracellular matrix and irreversibly attached to various surfaces. The present study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of Allium sativum extract against the biofilms of six pathogenic bacteria and their free-living forms. The clinical isolates in this study had not been studied in any other studies, especially in regard to biofilm disruption and inhibition of biofilm cell metabolic activity. Antimicrobial activities of A. sativum L. extracts (methanol and ethanol extracts) against planktonic forms of bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were evaluated by a macrobroth dilution technique. The anti-biofilm effects were assessed by microtiter plate method. The results showed that the A. sativum L. extract discs did not have any zone of inhibition for the tested bacteria. However, The MIC values of A. sativum L. extracts (0.078 - 2.5 mg/mL) confirmed the high ability of these extracts for inhibition of planktonic bacteria. A. sativum L. extracts were efficient to inhibit biofilm structures and the concentration of each extract had a direct relation with the inhibitory effect. Finally, it can be suggested that the extracts of this plant be applied as antimicrobial agents against these pathogens, particularly in biofilm forms.

  15. Granzyme B Disrupts Central Metabolism and Protein Synthesis in Bacteria to Promote an Immune Cell Death Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotiwala, Farokh; Sen Santara, Sumit; Binker-Cosen, Andres Ariel; Li, Bo; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Lieberman, Judy

    2017-11-16

    Human cytotoxic lymphocytes kill intracellular microbes. The cytotoxic granule granzyme proteases released by cytotoxic lymphocytes trigger oxidative bacterial death by disrupting electron transport, generating superoxide anion and inactivating bacterial oxidative defenses. However, they also cause non-oxidative cell death because anaerobic bacteria are also killed. Here, we use differential proteomics to identify granzyme B substrates in three unrelated bacteria: Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Mycobacteria tuberculosis. Granzyme B cleaves a highly conserved set of proteins in all three bacteria, which function in vital biosynthetic and metabolic pathways that are critical for bacterial survival under diverse environmental conditions. Key proteins required for protein synthesis, folding, and degradation are also substrates, including multiple aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, ribosomal proteins, protein chaperones, and the Clp system. Because killer cells use a multipronged strategy to target vital pathways, bacteria may not easily become resistant to killer cell attack. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  17. Relation between presence-absence of a visible nucleoid and metabolic activity in bacterioplankton cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon, W.; Sherr, E.B.; Sherr, B.F. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1996-09-01

    We investigated the report of Zweifel and Hagstroem that only a portion of marine bacteria contain nucleoids--the DNA-containing regions of procaryotic cells-- and that such bacteria correspond to the active or viable fraction of bacterioplankton. In Oregon coastal waters, 21-64% of bacteria had visible nucleoids; number of nucleoid-visible (NV) bacteria were greater than numbers of metabolically active bacteria, based on cells with active electron transport systems (ETS) and intact cell membranes. During log growth of a marine isolate, proportions of NV and ETS-active cells approached 100%. In stationary growth phase, the fraction of ETS-active cells decreased rapidly, while that of NV cells remained high for 7 d. When starved cells of the isolate were resupplied with nutrient (50 mg liter{sup -1} peptone), total cell number did not increase during the initial 6 h, but the proportion of NV cells increased from 27 to 100%, and that of ETS-active cells from 6 to 75%. In an analogous experiment with a bacterioplankton assemblage, a similar trend was observed: the number of NV cells double during the initial 6 h prior to an increase in total cell counts. These results show that some bacteria without visible nucleoids are capable of becoming NV cells, and thus have DNa in a nucleoid region not detectable with the method used here. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. An active principle of Nigella sativa L., thymoquinone, showing significant antimicrobial activity against anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Mohammad Akram; Alenazy, Awwad Khalaf; Alrowaili, Majed Gorayan; Basha, Jamith

    2017-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is the major active principle of Nigella sativa seed (black seed) and is known to control many fungi, bacteria, and some viruses. However, the activity of TQ against anaerobic bacteria is not well demonstrated. Anaerobic bacteria can cause severe infections, including diarrhea, aspiration pneumonia, and brain abscess, particularly in immunodeficient individuals. The present study aimed to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of TQ against some anaerobic pathogens in comparison to metronidazole. Standard, ATCC, strains of four anaerobic bacteria ( Clostridium difficile , Clostridium perfringens , Bacteroides fragilis , and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ), were initially isolated on special Brucella agar base (with hemin and vitamin K). Then, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of TQ and metronidazole were determined against these anaerobes when grown in Brucella agar, using serial agar dilution method according to the recommended guidelines for anaerobic organisms instructed by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. TQ showed a significant antimicrobial activity against anaerobic bacteria although much weaker than metronidazole. MICs of TQ and metronidazole against various anaerobic human pathogens tested were found to be between 10-160 mg/L and 0.19-6.25 mg/L, respectively. TQ controlled the anaerobic human pathogenic bacteria, which supports the use of N. sativa in the treatment of diarrhea in folk medicine. Further investigations are in need for determination of the synergistic effect of TQ in combination with metronidazole and the activity of derivatives of TQ against anaerobic infections.

  19. Effect of communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria on degradation of 17-alpha-ethynylestradiol by nitrifying activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limpiyakorn, T.; Sermwaraphan, P.; Kurisu, F.

    2009-07-01

    An endocrine disrupting compound, 17-alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), is a synthetic estrogen used as a key ingredient in oral contraceptives pill. this persistent organic pollutant, no biodegradable by most microorganisms, is discharged via municipal waste streams to natural receiving waters. Recently, it was found that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) enriched with high ammonium loads can degrade EE2 via co-metabolism during ammonia oxidation. (Author)

  20. Azoreductase activity of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, F; Franklin, W; Cerniglia, C E

    1990-01-01

    A plate assay was developed for the detection of anaerobic bacteria that produce azoreductases. With this plate assay, 10 strains of anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing azo dyes were isolated from human feces and identified as Eubacterium hadrum (2 strains), Eubacterium spp. (2 species), Clostridium clostridiiforme, a Butyrivibrio sp., a Bacteroides sp., Clostridium paraputrificum, Clostridium nexile, and a Clostridium sp. The average rate of reduction of Direct Blue 15 dye (a dimethoxybenzidine-based dye) in these strains ranged from 16 to 135 nmol of dye per min per mg of protein. The enzymes were inactivated by oxygen. In seven isolates, a flavin compound (riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, or flavin mononucleotide) was required for azoreductase activity. In the other three isolates and in Clostridium perfringens, no added flavin was required for activity. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that each bacterium expressed only one azoreductase isozyme. At least three types of azoreductase enzyme were produced by the different isolates. All of the azoreductases were produced constitutively and released extracellularly. Images PMID:2202258

  1. Azoreductase activity of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, F; Franklin, W; Cerniglia, C E

    1990-07-01

    A plate assay was developed for the detection of anaerobic bacteria that produce azoreductases. With this plate assay, 10 strains of anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing azo dyes were isolated from human feces and identified as Eubacterium hadrum (2 strains), Eubacterium spp. (2 species), Clostridium clostridiiforme, a Butyrivibrio sp., a Bacteroides sp., Clostridium paraputrificum, Clostridium nexile, and a Clostridium sp. The average rate of reduction of Direct Blue 15 dye (a dimethoxybenzidine-based dye) in these strains ranged from 16 to 135 nmol of dye per min per mg of protein. The enzymes were inactivated by oxygen. In seven isolates, a flavin compound (riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, or flavin mononucleotide) was required for azoreductase activity. In the other three isolates and in Clostridium perfringens, no added flavin was required for activity. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that each bacterium expressed only one azoreductase isozyme. At least three types of azoreductase enzyme were produced by the different isolates. All of the azoreductases were produced constitutively and released extracellularly.

  2. Metabolic assessments during extra-vehicular activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Yu. Yu.; Spichkov, A. N.; Filipenkov, S. N.

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) has a significant role during extended space flights. It demonstrates that humans can survive and perform useful work outside the Orbital Space Stations (OSS) while wearing protective space suits (SS). When the International Space Station 'Alpha'(ISSA) is fully operational, EVA assembly, installation, maintenance and repair operations will become an everyday repetitive work activity in space. It needs new ergonomic evaluation of the work/rest schedule for an increasing of the labor amount per EVA hour. The metabolism assessment is a helpful method to control the productivity of the EVA astronaut and to optimize the work/rest regime. Three following methods were used in Russia to estimate real-time metabolic rates during EVA: 1. Oxygen consumption, computed from the pressure drop in a high pressure bottle per unit time (with actual thermodynamic oxygen properties under high pressure and oxygen leakage taken into account). 2. Carbon dioxide production, computed from CO 2 concentration at the contaminant control cartridge and gas flow rate in the life support subsystem closed loop (nominal mode) or gas leakage in the SS open loop (emergency mode). 3. Heat removal, computed from the difference between the temperatures of coolant water or gas and its flow rate in a unit of time (with assumed humidity and wet oxygen state taken into account). Comparison of heat removal values with metabolic rates enables us to determine the thermal balance during an operative medical control of EVA at "Salyut-6", "Salyut-7" and "Mir" OSS. Complex analysis of metabolism, body temperature and heat rate supports a differential diagnosis between emotional and thermal components of stress during EVA. It gives a prognosis of human homeostasis during EVA. Available information has been acquired into an EVA data base which is an effective tool for ergonomical optimization.

  3. Electronic Nose Technology to Measure Soil Microbial Activity and Classify Soil Metabolic Status

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio De Cesare; Elena Di Mattia; Simone Pantalei; Emiliano Zampetti; Vittorio Vinciguerra; Antonella Macagnano

    2011-01-01

    The electronic nose (E-nose) is a sensing technology that has been widely used to monitor environments in the last decade. In the present study, the capability of an E-nose, in combination with biochemical and microbiological techniques, of both detecting the microbial activity and estimating the metabolic status of soil ecosystems, was tested by measuring on one side respiration, enzyme activities and growth of bacteria in natural but simplified soil ecosystems over 23 days of incubation thr...

  4. Anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients of siraitia grosvenorii on the spoilage bacteria isolated from sauced pork head meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Xu, L. Y.; Cui, Y. Q.; Pang, M. X.; Wang, F.; Qi, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    Extraction and anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients of Siraitia grosvenorii were studied in this paper. Extraction combined with ultrasonic was adopted. The optimum extraction condition was determined by single factor test; the anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were valued by Oxford-cup method. The results indicated that optimum extraction condition of active ingredients extracted from Siraitia grosvenorii were described as follows: ethanol concentrations of sixty-five percent and twenty minutes with ultrasonic assisted extraction; the active ingredients of Siraitia grosvenorii had anti-bacteria effect on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus sp, Serratia sp and MIC was 0.125g/mL, 0.0625g/mL, 0.125g/mL and 0.125g/mL. The active constituent of Siraitia grosvenorii has obvious anti-bacteria effect on the spoilage bacteria isolated from Sauced pork head meat and can be used as a new natural food preservation to prolong the shelf-life of Low-temperature meat products.

  5. Differentiation in the microbial ecology and activity of suspended and attached bacteria in a nitritation-anammox process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hongkeun; Sundar, Suneethi; Ma, Yiwei; Chandran, Kartik

    2015-02-01

    A directed differentiation between the biofilm and suspension was observed in the molecular microbial ecology and gene expression of different bacteria in a biofilm nitritation-anammox process operated at varying hydraulic residence times (HRT) and nitrogen loading rates (NLR). The highest degree of enrichment observed in the biofilm was of anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AMX) followed by that of Nitrospira spp. related nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). For AMX, a major shift from Candidatus "Brocadia fulgida" to Candidatus "Kuenenia stuttgartiensis" in both suspension and biofilm was observed with progressively shorter HRT, using discriminatory biomarkers targeting the hydrazine synthase (hzsA) gene. In parallel, expression of the hydrazine oxidoreductase gene (hzo), a functional biomarker for AMX energy metabolism, became progressively prominent in the biofilm. A marginal but statistically significant enrichment in the biofilm was observed for Nitrosomonas europaea related ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In direct contrast to AMX, the gene expression of ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA), a functional biomarker for AOB energy metabolism, progressively increased in suspension. Using gene expression and biomass concentration measures in conjunction, it was determined that signatures of AOB metabolism were primarily present in the biofilm throughout the study. On the other hand, AMX metabolism gradually shifted from being uniformly distributed in both the biofilm and suspension to primarily the biofilm at shorter HRTs and higher NLRs. These results therefore highlight the complexity and key differences in the microbial ecology, gene expression and activity between the biofilm and suspension of a nitritation-anammox process and the biokinetic and metabolic drivers for such niche segregation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Nucleons II: cryopreservation and metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R; Flores-Alonso, J C; Rodríguez-Hernández, H M; Merchant-Larios, H M; Delgado, N M

    2001-01-01

    The establishment of intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) as a routine procedure in assisted fertilization has been used in the treatment of male infertility. The major technical problem that has arisen with the use of immotile sperm for ICSI has been differentiating between live and dead cells. Nucleons from human, pig, hamster, mouse, rat, and bull have been able to induce their chromatin decondensation by the action of heparin/GSH. Cryopreservation is deleterious to sperm function, killing more than 50% of the spermatozoa during the process. Nucleon cryostorage was performed at 5 and -5 degrees C and analyzed for total area (mu2), perimeter (mu), width (mu), and length (mu), using Metamorph Imaging System software. On the other hand, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) is hydrolyzed by intracellular estereases to produce fluorescein, which exhibits green fluorescence when excited by blue light. This fact is a striking result since the presence of this metabolic activity opens the possibility to select the nucleons for ICSI. In the present study, the authors decided to search for a suitable metabolic test, which might reflect the metabolism and viability of these chromatin structures. This is a simple cryostorage technique that after months of cryopreservation, allow the use of nucleons for ICSI with suitable fertilization and pregnancies rates.

  7. Physical activity as a metabolic stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, E F

    2000-08-01

    Both physical activity and diet stimulate processes that, over time, alter the morphologic composition and biochemical function of the body. Physical activity provides stimuli that promote very specific and varied adaptations according to the type, intensity, and duration of exercise performed. There is further interest in the extent to which diet or supplementation can enhance the positive stimuli. Prolonged walking at low intensity presents little metabolic, hormonal, or cardiovascular stress, and the greatest perturbation from rest appears to be from increased fat oxidation and plasma free fatty acid mobilization resulting from a combination of increased lipolysis and decreased reesterification. More intense jogging or running largely stimulates increased oxidation of glycogen and triacylglycerol, both of which are stored directly within the muscle fibers. Furthermore, these intramuscular stores of carbohydrate and fat appear to be the primary substrates for the enhanced oxidative and performance ability derived from endurance training-induced increases in muscle mitochondrial density. Weightlifting that produces fatigue in brief periods (ie, in 15-90 s and after 15 repetitive contractions) elicits a high degree of motor unit recruitment and muscle fiber stimulation. This is a remarkably potent stimulus for altering protein synthesis in muscle and increasing neuromuscular function. The metabolic stress of physical activity can be measured by substrate turnover and depletion, cardiovascular response, hormonal perturbation, accumulation of metabolites, or even the extent to which the synthesis and degradation of specific proteins are altered, either acutely or by chronic exercise training.

  8. Distribution and activity of petroleum hydrocarbon degrading bacteria in the North Sea and Baltic Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, K.; Dahlmann, G.; Gunkel, W.

    1993-01-01

    Data were collected in 1988 and 1989 on the distribution and activity of petroleum hydrocarbon degrading bacteria in the North Sea and Baltic Sea. Crude oil degrading bacteria and the number of bacteria which in particular degrade naphthalene were quantified using a modified dilution method (MPN). Crude oil degrading bacteria were present in all of about 100 water samples, with as many as 10 3 ml -1 in some samples. Numbers of naphthalene degrading bacteria were at least tenfold lower. There is obviously a greater connection between this bacteria group and petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contamination than between the more nonspecific group of crude oil degrading bacteria and PHC contamination. Data from the North Sea show an extremely high abundance of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, even in winter, while in the southern Baltic Sea low numbers of bacteria were found and slower crude oil degradation was observed. (orig.)

  9. Metabolic Environments and Genomic Features Associated with Pathogenic and Mutualistic Interactions between Bacteria and Plants is accepted for publication in MPMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Park, Byung H [ORNL; Syed, Mustafa H [ORNL; Klotz, Martin G [University of North Carolina, Charlotte; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Most bacterial symbionts of plants are phenotypically characterized by their parasitic or matualistic relationship with the host; however, the genomic characteristics that likely discriminate mutualistic symbionts from pathogens of plants are poorly understood. This study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 54 plant-symbiontic bacteria, 27 mutualists and 27 pathogens, to discover genomic determinants of their parasitic and mutualistic nature in terms of protein family domains, KEGG orthologous groups, metabolic pathways and families of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). We further used all bacteria with sequenced genomesl, published microarrays and transcriptomics experimental datasets, and literature to validate and to explore results of the comparison. The analysis revealed that genomes of mutualists are larger in size and higher in GC content and encode greater molecular, functional and metabolic diversity than the investigated genomes of pathogens. This enriched molecular and functional enzyme diversity included constructive biosynthetic signatures of CAZymes and metabolic pathways in genomes of mutualists compared with catabolic signatures dominant in the genomes of pathogens. Another discriminative characteristic of mutualists is the co-occurence of gene clusters required for the expression and function of nitrogenase and RuBisCO. Analysis of previously published experimental data indicate that nitrogen-fixing mutualists may employ Rubisco to fix CO2 not in the canonical Calvin-Benson-Basham cycle but in a novel metabolic pathway, here called Rubisco-based glycolysis , to increase efficiency of sugar utilization during the symbiosis with plants. An important discriminative characteristic of plant pathogenic bacteria is two groups of genes likely encoding effector proteins involved in host invasion and a genomic locus encoding a putative secretion system that includes a DUF1525 domain protein conserved in pathogens of plants and of other organisms. The

  10. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases activate nucleoside antibiotics in severely pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Shannon, O.; Clausen, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Common bacterial pathogens are becoming progressively more resistant to traditional antibiotics, representing a major public-health crisis. Therefore, there is a need for a variety of antibiotics with alternative modes of action. In our study, several nucleoside analogs were tested against pathog...... alternative for combating pathogenic bacteria.......Common bacterial pathogens are becoming progressively more resistant to traditional antibiotics, representing a major public-health crisis. Therefore, there is a need for a variety of antibiotics with alternative modes of action. In our study, several nucleoside analogs were tested against...... pathogenic staphylococci and streptococci. We show that pyrimidine-based nucleoside analogs, like 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) and 2',2'-difluoro-2'deoxycytidine (gemcitabine), are specifically activated by the endogenous bacterial deoxyribonucleoside kinases, leading to cell death. Deoxyribonucleoside...

  11. Antimicrobial activity of Antrodia camphorata extracts against oral bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Man Lien

    Full Text Available Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata is a unique, endemic and extremely rare mushroom species native to Taiwan, and both crude extracts of and purified chemical compounds from A. camphorata have been reported to have a variety of significant beneficial effects, such as anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory activity. However, reports on the effects of A. camphorata against dental pathogens have been limited. Oral health is now recognized as important for overall general health, including conditions such as dental caries, periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis are the most common bacteria associated with dental plaque and periodontopathic diseases, respectively. Thus, our study examined the ability of five various crude extracts of A. camphorata to inhibit the growth of dental bacteria and anti-adherence in vitro. Among the extracts, the ethanol, ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts exhibited the lowest MICs against P. gingivalis and S. mutans (MIC = 4∼16 µg/mL. The MIC of the aqueous extract was greater than 2048 µg/mL against both P. gingivalis and S. mutans. In vitro adherence of S. mutans was significantly inhibited by the addition of either the ethyl acetate extract or chloroform extract (MIC = 16∼24 µg/mL, while the ethanol extract (MIC = 32∼64 µg/mL exhibited moderate inhibitory activity. Based on the result of this study, the ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts of A. camphorata may be good candidates for oral hygiene agents to control dental caries and periodontopathic conditions.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of medicinal plant leaf extracts against pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atikya Farjana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine antibacterial activity of water, oil and methanol extracts of guava (Psidium guajava, green tea (Camellia sinensis, neem (Azadirachta indica and marigold (Calendula officinalis against different species of bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus, Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. Methods: Antibacterial activity of plant extracts was measured by agar well diffusion method. Results: Boiled water extracts of guava leaf showed the largest zone of inhibition (22 mm against V. parahaemolyticus. Water extracts of green tea leaf at boiling and room temperature showed 17.5 mm and 19 mm zone of inhibitions against V. parahaemolyticus and S. aureus, respectively. Boiled water extract of neem leaf showed moderate zone of inhibition against Escherichia coli (10 mm and Klebsiella spp. (11 mm. Water and oil extracts of marigold leaf at both boiling and room temperature did not show any zone of inhibition against any of the tested microorganisms. Methanol extracts of both guava and green tea leaves showed same zone of inhibition against Pseudomonus spp. (18 mm. Methanol extract of neem leaf showed antibacterial acitivity against Klebsiella spp. (16 mm and Vibrio cholerae (14 mm and that of marigold leaf showed antimicrobial activity against S. aureus (18 mm and Klebsiella spp. (12 mm. Conclusions: The results from the study suggest that the leaves of guava, green tea, neem and marigold show anibacterial activity against different bacterial species. They could be used as alternatives to common antimicrobial agents for treatment of bacterial infections.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of yeasts against some pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Younis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to isolate and identify yeast species from milk and meat products, and to test their antimicrobial activity against some bacterial species. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 milk and meat products samples were collected from random sellers and super markets in New Damietta city, Damietta, Egypt. Samples were subjected to yeast isolation procedures and tested for its antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. In addition, all yeast species isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR for detection of khs (kievitone hydratase and pelA (pectate degrading enzyme genes. Results: The recovery rate of yeasts from sausage was 20% (2/10 followed by kareish cheese, processed cheese, and butter 10% (1/10 each as well as raw milk 9% (9/100, and fruit yoghurt 30% (6/20. Different yeast species were recovered, namely, Candida kefyr (5 isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4 isolates, Candida intermedia (3 isolates, Candida tropicalis (2 isolates, Candida lusitaniae (2 isolates, and Candida krusei (1 isolate. khs gene was detected in all S. cerevisiae isolates, however, pelA gene was not detected in all identified yeast species. Antimicrobial activity of recovered yeasts against the selected bacterial species showed high activity with C. intermedia against S. aureus and E. coli, C. kefyr against E. coli, and C. lusitaniae against S. aureus. Moderate activities were obtained with C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and S. cerevisiae against E. coli; meanwhile, all the tested yeasts revealed a very low antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: The obtained results confirmed that some kinds of yeasts have the ability to produce antimicrobial compounds that could inhibit some pathogenic and spoilage bacteria and these antimicrobial activity of yeasts enables them to be one of the novel agents in controlling spoilage of food.

  14. Regulators of nonsulfur purple phototrophic bacteria and the interactive control of CO2 assimilation, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism and energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbs, James M; Tabita, F Robert

    2004-06-01

    For the metabolically diverse nonsulfur purple phototrophic bacteria, maintaining redox homeostasis requires balancing the activities of energy supplying and energy-utilizing pathways, often in the face of drastic changes in environmental conditions. These organisms, members of the class Alphaproteobacteria, primarily use CO2 as an electron sink to achieve redox homeostasis. After noting the consequences of inactivating the capacity for CO2 reduction through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) pathway, it was shown that the molecular control of many additional important biological processes catalyzed by nonsulfur purple bacteria is linked to expression of the CBB genes. Several regulator proteins are involved, with the two component Reg/Prr regulatory system playing a major role in maintaining redox poise in these organisms. Reg/Prr was shown to be a global regulator involved in the coordinate control of a number of metabolic processes including CO2 assimilation, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism and energy-generation pathways. Accumulating evidence suggests that the Reg/Prr system senses the oxidation/reduction state of the cell by monitoring a signal associated with electron transport. The response regulator RegA/PrrA activates or represses gene expression through direct interaction with target gene promoters where it often works in concert with other regulators that can be either global or specific. For the key CO2 reduction pathway, which clearly triggers whether other redox balancing mechanisms are employed, the ability to activate or inactivate the specific regulator CbbR is of paramount importance. From these studies, it is apparent that a detailed understanding of how diverse regulatory elements integrate and control metabolism will eventually be achieved.

  15. Anti-bacteria Effect of Active Ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi on the Spoilage Bacteria of Sauced Pork Head Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Xu, Lingyi; Cui, Yuqian; Pang, Meixia; Wang, Fang; Qi, Jinghua

    2017-12-01

    Extraction and anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi were studied in this paper. Extraction combined with ultrasonic was adopted. The optimum extraction condition was determined by single factor test; the anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients and minimum inhibitory concentration(MIC) were valued by Oxford-cup method. The results indicated that kaempferol was the active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi whose optimum extraction condition for ethanol concentrations were sixty-five percent and twenty minutes with ultrasonic assisted extraction.; the active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi had anti-bacteria effect on Staphylococcus, Proteus, Bacillus, Serratia and MIC was 0.5 g/mL,0.5 g/mL,0.0313 g/mL and 0.0625 g/mL. The active constituent of Cacumen Platycladi is kaempferol which has obvious anti-bacteria effect and can be used to prolong the shelf-life of Low-temperature meat products.

  16. BACTERICIDAL COATINGS ON TEXTILES FOR REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY (BaCTeRIA) SUMMARY REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    TEXTILES FOR REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY (BaCTeRIA) SUMMARY REPORT by Tobyn A. Branck Courtney M. Cowell Jennifer M. Rego and...October 2011 – September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BACTERICIDAL COATINGS ON TEXTILES FOR REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY (BaCTeRIA) SUMMARY REPORT... REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY (BaCTeRIA) SUMMARY REPORT Introduction The Biological Sciences and Technology Team (BSTT), Warfighter

  17. Antagonistic Activity Of Endophytic Bacteria Isolated From Mentha Rotundifolia L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhartiti Abla

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study is implemented for the isolation purification and identification of endophytic bacteria which produces antifungal substances from the roots of Mentha rotundifolia L. The 59 obtained bacterial isolates were tested for their antagonistic activity by the dual confrontation against the phytopathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum Aspergillus Niger and Botrytis cinerea. Eight bacterial strains were selected for their strong antifungal activity. These are strains M21 M23 M3a M4 M14d and M3c which belong to the family Bacillaceae M12 and M3b which belongs to the family of Pseudomonadaceae. Among these three bacterial strains namely M21 M23 and M12 induce 70 of inhibition of mycelial growth of phytopathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Aspergillus Niger while the five bacterial strains M3a M3c M3b M4 and M14d have proved to be effective in inhibiting more than 60 of mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea.

  18. Exploring the Behavior and Metabolic Transformations of SeNPs in Exposed Lactic Acid Bacteria. Effect of Nanoparticles Coating Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Palomo-Siguero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The behavior and transformation of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs in living systems such as microorganisms is largely unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we examined the effect of three types of SeNP suspensions toward Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LB-12 using a variety of techniques. SeNPs were synthesized using three types of coating agents (chitosan (CS-SeNPs, hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC-SeNPs and a non-ionic surfactant, surfynol (ethoxylated-SeNPs. Morphologies of SeNPs were all spherical. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to locate SeNPs in the bacteria. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC on line coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was applied to evaluate SeNP transformation by bacteria. Finally, flow cytometry employing the live/dead test and optical density measurements at 600 nm (OD600 were used for evaluating the percentages of bacteria viability when supplementing with SeNPs. Negligible damage was detected by flow cytometry when bacteria were exposed to HEC-SeNPs or CS-SeNPs at a level of 10 μg Se mL−1. In contrast, ethoxylated-SeNPs were found to be the most harmful nanoparticles toward bacteria. CS-SeNPs passed through the membrane without causing damage. Once inside, SeNPs were metabolically transformed to organic selenium compounds. Results evidenced the importance of capping agents when establishing the true behavior of NPs.

  19. Antibacterial Activities of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Members of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known probiotics and have been reported to have antimicrobial properties. Although various researchers have documented the isolation of these bacteria from fruits and vegetables, studies on LAB associated with lettuce, cucumber and cabbage are limited and non-existing in ...

  20. Metabolism of pure sulfate-reducing bacteria in the presence of ferrous ions and environmental chages of the medium; Tetsu ion sonzaika ni okeru junsuina ryusan`en kangenkin no taisha to baichi no kankyo henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, F.; Suzuki, T. [Ajinomoto Co. Inc., Kawasaki (Japan). Technology and Engineering Lab.; Seo, M. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    1996-10-15

    In this study, the pure sulfate-reducing bacteria were cultured in the medium with different Fe{sup 2+} concentration; shape and activity of the bacteria, the evolution amount of hydrogen sulfide directly related to the breath of the sulfuric acid and the change of the pH value in the medium were investigated during every time interval; and influence on the metabolism of the sulfate-reducing bacteria with Fe{sup 2+} was examined. As a result, the conclusions were obtained as follows: in the case of a medium with high Fe{sup 2+} concentration containing Fe{sup 2+} of 1.0{times}10{sup -2} molkg{sup -1}, the colloidal substance in which the main composition was considered as Fe(OH)2 were present, and they provided a comfortable place for the bacteria to grow. Correspondingly, in the case of a medium with low Fe{sup 2+} concentration containing Fe{sup 2+} of 3.6{times}10{sup -4} molkg{sup -1}, the colloidal substance was small and the number of bacteria was also few. The four kinds of shape of bacteria coexisted in the medium with increasing the culturing time. The hydrogen sulfide was mainly evolved by the bacteria with the comma like shape. During a period that this comma like bacteria actively moved, the hydrogen sulfide evolution increased. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A high-throughput method for quantifying metabolically active yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Rosenkjær, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    By redesigning the established methylene blue reduction test for bacteria and yeast, we present a cheap and efficient methodology for quantitative physiology of eukaryotic cells applicable for high-throughput systems. Validation of themethod in fermenters and highthroughput systems proved....... The drop in metabolic activity associated with the diauxic shift in yeast proved more pronounced for the MBRT-derived curve compared with OD curves, consistent with a dramatic shift in the ratio between live and dead cells at this metabolic event. This method provides a tool with numerous applications, e.......g. characterizing the death phase of stationary phase cultures, or in drug screens with pathogenic yeasts....

  2. Activity of Antarctic fungi extracts against phytopathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purić, J; Vieira, G; Cavalca, L B; Sette, L D; Ferreira, H; Vieira, M L C; Sass, D C

    2018-06-01

    This study aims to obtain secondary metabolites extracts from filamentous fungi isolated from soil and marine sediments from Antarctic ecosystems and to assess its potential antibacterial activity on Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. passiflorae (phytopathogenic bacteria causing diseases in pepper and tomato and passionfruit, respectively). Among the 66 crude intracellular and extracellular extracts obtained from fungi recovered from soil and 79 obtained from marine sediment samples, 25 showed the ability to prevent the growth of X. euvesicatoria in vitro and 28 showed the ability to prevent the growth of X. axonopodis pv. passiflorae in vitro. Intracellular and extracellular extracts from soil fungi inhibited around 97% of X. euvesicatoria and 98% of X. axonopodis pv. passiflorae at 2·1 mg ml -1 . The average inhibition rates against X. euvesicatoria and X. axonopodis pv. passiflorae for intracellular and extracellular extracts from marine sediments fungi were around 96 and 97%, respectively, at 3·0 mg ml -1 . Extracts containing secondary metabolites with antimicrobial activity against X. euvesicatoria and X. axonopodis pv. passiflorae were obtained, containing possible substitutes for the products currently used to control these phytopathogens. Micro-organisms from extreme ecosystems, such as the Antarctic ecosystem, need to survive in harsh conditions with low temperatures, low nutrients and high UV radiation. Micro-organisms adapt to these conditions evolving diverse biochemical and physiological adaptations essential for survival. All this makes these micro-organisms a rich source of novel natural products based on unique chemical scaffolds. Discovering novel bioactive compounds is essential because of the rise in antibiotic-resistant micro-organisms and the emergence of new infections. Fungi from Antarctic environments have been proven to produce bioactive secondary metabolites against various micro-organisms, but few studies

  3. Bacteria from Wheat and Cucurbit Plant Roots Metabolize PAHs and Aromatic Root Exudates: Implications for Rhizodegradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ely, Cairn S; Smets, Barth F.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical interaction between plants and bacteria in the root zone can lead to soil decontamination. Bacteria which degrade PAHs have been isolated from the rhizospheres of plant species with varied biological traits, however, it is not known what phytochemicals promote contaminant degradation...

  4. Antioxidant activity of probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from Mongolian airag

    OpenAIRE

    E Uugantsetseg; B Batjargal

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from airag. In this study, 42 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from Mongolian airag. All isolates were identified by using morphological, biochemical and physiological methods. The isolated bacteria were studied for antagonistic effects on Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, 22 strains showed antibacterial activity. When we examined thei...

  5. Exploring Anopheles gut bacteria for Plasmodium blocking activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia, Ana C; Dong, Yuemei; Blumberg, Benjamin J; Mlambo, Godfree; Tripathi, Abhai; BenMarzouk-Hidalgo, Omar J; Chandra, Ramesh; Dimopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Malaria parasite transmission requires the successful development of Plasmodium gametocytes into flagellated microgametes upon mosquito blood ingestion, and the subsequent fertilization of microgametes and macrogametes for the development of motile zygotes, called ookinetes, which invade and transverse the Anopheles vector mosquito midgut at around 18-36 h after blood ingestion. Within the mosquito midgut, the malaria parasite has to withstand the mosquito's innate immune response and the detrimental effect of its commensal bacterial flora. We have assessed the midgut colonization capacity of 5 gut bacterial isolates from field-derived, and 2 from laboratory colony, mosquitoes and their effect on Plasmodium development in vivo and in vitro, along with their impact on mosquito survival. Some bacterial isolates activated the mosquito's immune system, affected the mosquito's life span, and were capable of blocking Plasmodium development. We have also shown that the ability of these bacteria to inhibit the parasites is likely to involve different mechanisms and factors. A Serratia marcescens isolate was particularly efficient in colonizing the mosquitoes’ gut, compromising mosquito survival, and inhibiting both sexual- and asexual-stage Plasmodium through secreted factors, thereby rendering it a potential candidate for the development of a malaria transmission intervention strategy. PMID:24428613

  6. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inactivation and changes in metabolic profile of selected foodborne bacteria by 460 nm LED illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Ghate, Vinayak; Kim, Min-Jeong; Zhou, Weibiao; Khoo, Gek Hoon; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 460 nm light-emitting diode (LED) on the inactivation of foodborne bacteria. Additionally, the change in the endogenous metabolic profile of LED illuminated cells was analyzed to understand the bacterial response to the LED illumination. Six different species of bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella Typhimurium) were illuminated with 460 nm LED to a maximum dose of 4080 J/cm 2 at 4, 10 and 25 °C. Inactivation curves were modeled using Hom model. Metabolic profiling of the non-illuminated and illuminated cells was performed using a Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Results indicate that the 460 nm LED significantly (p illuminated cells indicated that several metabolites e.g. 11-deoxycortisol, actinonin, coformycin, tyramine, chitobiose etc. were regulated during LED illumination. These results elucidate the effectiveness of 460 nm LED against foodborne bacteria and hence, its suitability as a novel antimicrobial control method to ensure food safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Salad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the inhibitory capacity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) due to the action of antagonistic substances, 8 members of the LAB group namely, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus cellebiosuis, Lactobacillus delbruesckii, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides ...

  9. Aerobic dehalogenation activities of two petroleum degrading bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Full Length Research Paper. Aerobic ... these compounds are good carbon sources for bacteria capable of ... Degradation of 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid using soil .... Such toxic effects of chlorinated aromatic compound.

  10. Transcription factor levels enable metabolic diversification of single cells of environmental bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guantes, Raúl; Benedetti, Ilaria; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-05-01

    Transcriptional noise is a necessary consequence of the molecular events that drive gene expression in prokaryotes. However, some environmental microorganisms that inhabit polluted sites, for example, the m-xylene degrading soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida mt-2 seem to have co-opted evolutionarily such a noise for deploying a metabolic diversification strategy that allows a cautious exploration of new chemical landscapes. We have examined this phenomenon under the light of deterministic and stochastic models for activation of the main promoter of the master m-xylene responsive promoter of the system (Pu) by its cognate transcriptional factor (XylR). These analyses consider the role of co-factors for Pu activation and determinants of xylR mRNA translation. The model traces the onset and eventual disappearance of the bimodal distribution of Pu activity along time to the growth-phase dependent abundance of XylR itself, that is, very low in exponentially growing cells and high in stationary. This tenet was validated by examining the behaviour of a Pu-GFP fusion in a P. putida strain in which xylR expression was engineered under the control of an IPTG-inducible system. This work shows how a relatively simple regulatory scenario (for example, growth-phase dependent expression of a limiting transcription factor) originates a regime of phenotypic diversity likely to be advantageous in competitive environmental settings.

  11. Genomic and Evolutionary Perspectives on Sulfur Metabolism in Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are anaerobic photoautotrophs that oxidize sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, ferrous iron, and hydrogen for growth. We present here an analysis of the distribution and evolution of enzymes involved in oxidation of sulfur compounds in GSB based on genome sequence......, in combination with phylogenetic analyses, suggests that the Dsr system in GSB could be a recent acquisition, which was obtained by lateral gene transfer in part from sulfideoxidizing bacteria and in part from sulfate-reducing bacteria. All thiosulfate-utilizing GSB strains have an identical sox gene cluster...

  12. Bacteria from Wheat and Cucurbit Plant Roots Metabolize PAHs and Aromatic Root Exudates: Implications for Rhizodegradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ely, Cairn S; Smets, Barth F.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical interaction between plants and bacteria in the root zone can lead to soil decontamination. Bacteria which degrade PAHs have been isolated from the rhizospheres of plant species with varied biological traits, however, it is not known what phytochemicals promote contaminant degradation....... One monocot and two dicotyledon plants were grown in PAH-contaminated soil from a manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. A phytotoxicity assay confirmed greater soil decontamination in rhizospheres when compared to bulk soil controls. Bacteria were isolated from plant roots (rhizobacteria) and selected...

  13. Total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, and acceptance of synbiotic yoghurt with red ginger extract (Zingiberofficinale var. rubrum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larasati, B. A.; Panunggal, B.; Afifah, D. N.; Anjani, G.; Rustanti, N.

    2018-02-01

    Antioxidant related to oxidative stress can caused the metabolic disorders. A functional food that high in antioxidant can be use as the alternative prevention. The addition of red ginger extract in yoghurt could form a functional food, that high in antioxidant, synbiotic and fiber. The influence of red ginger extract on yoghurt synbiotic against lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity and acceptance were analyzed. This was an experimental research with one factor complete randomized design, specifically the addition of red ginger extract 0%; 0,1%; 0,3% and 0,5% into synbiotic yoghurt. Total plate count method used to analyze the lactic acid bacteria, 1-1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method for antioxidant activity, and acceptance analyzed with hedonic test. The higher the dose of extract added to synbiotic yoghurt, the antioxidant activity got significantly increased (ρ=0,0001), while the lactic acid bacteria got insignificantly decreased (ρ=0,085). The addition of 0,5% red ginger extract obtained the antioxidant activity of 71% and 4,86 × 1013 CFU/ml on lactic acid bacteria, which the requirement for probiotic on National Standard of Indonesia is >107 CFU/ml. The addition of extract had a significant effect on acceptance (ρ=0,0001) in flavor, color, and texture, but not aroma (ρ=0,266). The optimal product in this research was the yoghurt synbiotic with addition of 0,1% red ginger extract. To summarize, the addition of red ginger extract in synbiotic yoghurt had significant effect on antioxidant activity, flavor, color, and texture, but no significant effect on lactic acid bacteria and aroma.

  14. Emerging principles of inorganic nitrogen metabolism in Paracoccus denitrificans and related bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthamer, A.H.; de Boer, A P; van der Oost, J.; van Spanning, R J

    The taxonomy of Paracoccus denitrificans and related bacteria is discussed. Evidence is given which shows that the physiological differences between P. denitrificans and Thiosphaera pantotropha are less fundamental than previously thought. A proposal to consider a species P. pantotropha is

  15. Mechanisms and evolution of oxidative sulfur metabolism in green sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea Haarup; Bryant, Donald A.; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) constitute a closely related group of photoautotrophic and thiotrophic bacteria with limited phenotypic variation. They typically oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with sulfur globules as an intermediate. Based on genome sequence information from 15 strains...... product is further oxidized to sulfite by the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) system. This system consists of components horizontally acquired partly from sulfide-oxidizing and partly from sulfate-reducing bacteria. Depending on the strain, the sulfite is probably oxidized to sulfate by one of two...... in sulfate formation in other bacteria has been replaced by the DSR system in GSB. Sequence analyses suggested that the conserved soxJXYZAKBW gene cluster was horizontally acquired by Chlorobium phaeovibrioides DSM 265 from the Chlorobaculum lineage and that this acquisition was mediated by a mobile genetic...

  16. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lin), which signals cells to increase their anabolic activities. Metabolism is a complicated chemical process, so it's not ... how those enzymes or hormones work. When the metabolism of body chemicals is ... Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism ...

  17. Size-dependent antibacterial activities of silver nanoparticles against oral anaerobic pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Rong, Kaifeng; Li, Ju; Yang, Hao; Chen, Rong

    2013-06-01

    Dental caries and periodontal disease are widespread diseases for which microorganism infections have been identified as the main etiology. Silver nanoparticles (Ag Nps) were considered as potential control oral bacteria infection agent due to its excellent antimicrobial activity and non acute toxic effects on human cells. In this work, stable Ag Nps with different sizes (~5, 15 and 55 nm mean values) were synthesized by using a simple reduction method or hydrothermal method. The Nps were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The antibacterial activities were evaluated by colony counting assay and growth inhibition curve method, and corresponding minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against five anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria and aerobic bacteria E. coli were determined. The results showed that Ag Nps had apparent antibacterial effects against the anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria and aerobic bacteria. The MIC values of 5-nm Ag against anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria A. actinomycetemcomitans, F. nuceatum, S. mitis, S. mutans and S. sanguis were 25, 25, 25, 50 and 50 μg/mL, respectively. The aerobic bacteria were more susceptible to Ag NPs than the anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria. In the mean time, Ag NPs displayed an obvious size-dependent antibacterial activity against the anaerobic bacteria. The 5-nm Ag presents the highest antibacterial activity. The results of this work indicated a potential application of Ag Nps in the inhibition of oral microorganism infections.

  18. Extracellular enzyme activities of aquatic bacteria in polluted environment: 2. Amylolytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbaciauskiene, V.

    2003-01-01

    Water samples were taken from Lake Drukshiai tributaries (Ricanka); Gulbinele Stream affected by urban rain sewerage from Visaginas; Gulbinele Stream into which municipal sewage from Visaginas (MS) and industrial rain sewerage from the Ignalina NPP and their mouth, and Lake Dringis. Lake Dringis, in Aukstaitija National Park, was selected as an ecosystem pattern of a weak anthropogenic influence, while Lake Drukshiai was chosen as a regularly polluted water body. Lake Drukshiai, the cooling basin of the Ignalina NPP (IRS-1.2), is being polluted with industrial and municipal sewage through its tributaries. The amylolytic activity (AA) of heterotrophic aquatic bacteria was tested. The highest total mean AA of aquatic bacteria was calculated in Lake Dringis. Here, the results were significantly higher than in Lake Drukshiai tributaries and their mouths, excepting the mouths of the Ricanka and MS. The lowest mean of AA in Lake Drukshiai was characteristic of the IRS-1.2 tributary. A comparison of the mean AA of active isolates showed that certain bacterial strains from the sites of varying degrees of pollution could be noted for a relatively high level of enzymatic activity. Thus, anthropogenic pollution exerts a negative effect on the total mean AA, although certain strains of bacteria are able to adapt to the stressful environment and remain active. (author)

  19. Experimental investigation of activities and tolerance of denitrifying bacteria under alkaline and reducing condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mine, Tatsuya; Mihara, Morihiro; Ooi, Takao

    2000-07-01

    In the geological disposal system of TRU wastes, nitrogen generation by denitrifying bacteria could provide significant impact on the assessment of this system, because nitrate contained in process concentrated liquid waste might be electron acceptor for denitrifying bacteria. In this study, the activities and tolerance of denitrifying under disposal condition were investigated. Pseudomonas denitrificans as denitrifying bacteria was used. The results showed that Pseudomonas denitrificans had activity under reducing condition, but under high pH condition (pH>9.5), the activity of Pseudomonas denitrificans was not detected. It is possible that the activity of Pseudomonas denitrificans would be low under disposal condition. (author)

  20. Versatile transformations of hydrocarbons in anaerobic bacteria: substrate ranges and regio- and stereo-chemistry of activation reactions†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarling, René; Kühner, Simon; Basílio Janke, Eline; Gruner, Andrea; Drozdowska, Marta; Golding, Bernard T.; Rabus, Ralf; Wilkes, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons proceeds either via addition to fumarate or by hydroxylation in various microorganisms, e.g., sulfate-reducing or denitrifying bacteria, which are specialized in utilizing n-alkanes or alkylbenzenes as growth substrates. General pathways for carbon assimilation and energy gain have been elucidated for a limited number of possible substrates. In this work the metabolic activity of 11 bacterial strains during anaerobic growth with crude oil was investigated and compared with the metabolite patterns appearing during anaerobic growth with more than 40 different hydrocarbons supplied as binary mixtures. We show that the range of co-metabolically formed alkyl- and arylalkyl-succinates is much broader in n-alkane than in alkylbenzene utilizers. The structures and stereochemistry of these products are resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that anaerobic hydroxylation of alkylbenzenes does not only occur in denitrifiers but also in sulfate reducers. We propose that these processes play a role in detoxification under conditions of solvent stress. The thermophilic sulfate-reducing strain TD3 is shown to produce n-alkylsuccinates, which are suggested not to derive from terminal activation of n-alkanes, but rather to represent intermediates of a metabolic pathway short-cutting fumarate regeneration by reverse action of succinate synthase. The outcomes of this study provide a basis for geochemically tracing such processes in natural habitats and contribute to an improved understanding of microbial activity in hydrocarbon-rich anoxic environments. PMID:26441848

  1. Amylase activity of a starch degrading bacteria isolated from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Starch degrading bacteria are most important for industries such as food, fermentation, textile and paper. Thus isolating and manipulating pure culture from various waste materials has manifold importance for various biotechnology industries. In the present investigation a bacterial strain was isolated from soil sample ...

  2. Antibacterial Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), namely, Lactobacillus acidophilus 1, Lactobacillus acidophilus 2, Lactobacillus brevis 1, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 1, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 2, Lactococcus raffinolactis 1, Pediococcus acidilactici 1, Pediococcus pentosaceus 1, and Pediococcus ...

  3. Impact of interspecific interactions on antimicrobial activity among soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, O.; Berg, van den M.; Gerards, S.; Veen, van J.A.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Boer, de W.; Garbeva, P.

    2014-01-01

    Certain bacterial species produce antimicrobial compounds only in the presence of a competing species. However, little is known on the frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antibiotic compound production in natural communities of soil bacteria. Here we developed a high-throughput method to

  4. The interplay between intestinal bacteria and host metabolism in health and disease: lessons from Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. N. Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available All higher organisms negotiate a truce with their commensal microbes and battle pathogenic microbes on a daily basis. Much attention has been given to the role of the innate immune system in controlling intestinal microbes and to the strategies used by intestinal microbes to overcome the host immune response. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the metabolisms of intestinal microbes and their hosts are linked and that this interaction is equally important for host health and well-being. For instance, an individual's array of commensal microbes can influence their predisposition to chronic metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. A better understanding of host–microbe metabolic interactions is important in defining the molecular bases of these disorders and could potentially lead to new therapeutic avenues. Key advances in this area have been made using Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we review studies that have explored the impact of both commensal and pathogenic intestinal microbes on Drosophila carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These studies have helped to elucidate the metabolites produced by intestinal microbes, the intestinal receptors that sense these metabolites, and the signaling pathways through which these metabolites manipulate host metabolism. Furthermore, they suggest that targeting microbial metabolism could represent an effective therapeutic strategy for human metabolic diseases and intestinal infection.

  5. Influence of bacteria and bacterial activity on the evolution of the free corrosion potentials of stainless steels in natural seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, I.

    1996-10-01

    The free corrosion potential of a stainless steel under seawater increases. This increase depends of a lot of parameters, among them is found in particular: the temperature, the presence of molecular oxygen and the microorganisms. The aim of this work is to describe the role of the sea bacteria and of their activities on the increase of this potential. Stainless steel test-pieces have been put in natural seawater at different temperatures and their corrosion potential determined. It has been shown that the potential increases at 20 C but not at 40 C. The marine bacteria, present in seawater and fixed on the test-pieces at 20 and 40 C have been quantified by epi-fluorescence microscopy. The number of bacteria fixed at these two temperatures are similar. A sample of bacteria has been cut off on test-pieces and in seawater at 20 and 40 C. Their phenotypic analysis has allowed to classify them by numerical taxonomy in different phenons and by their metabolic spectra, it has been possible to distinguish the bacteria fixed at 20 C and those fixed at 40 C. The presence of an important bio-film at 40 C in the absence of a change of potential shows that the fixation of bacteria on stainless steel, if it is necessary, is not a sufficient condition for the starting of this phenomenon. The addition of a microbial enzyme in sterile seawater, the glucose oxidase, catalyzing the oxygen reduction in presence of glucose leads to an increase of the potential. The formation of hydrogen peroxide and the decrease of the pH of the medium seem responsible of this phenomenon. All these results have led us to propose a mechanism clarifying the increase of the potential of stainless steel in natural seawater. (O.M.)

  6. Synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy to assess the activity of vancomycin against endocarditis vegetation bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batard, Eric; Jamme, Frédéric; Montassier, Emmanuel; Bertrand, Dominique; Caillon, Jocelyne; Potel, Gilles; Dumas, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy was used to show that vancomycin alters infrared spectra of endocarditis vegetation bacteria, and that vancomycin effects on bacterial biochemical contents are unevenly distributed between peripheral and central areas of bacterial masses. Infrared microspectroscopy is useful to study the activity of antibacterial agents against bacteria in tissues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Activity of capryloyl collagenic acid against bacteria involved in acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourniat, J; Bourlioux, P

    1989-12-01

    Synopsis Capryloyl collagenic acid (Lipacide C8Co) has similar bacteriostatic activity in vitro to that of benzoyl peroxide towards the bacteria found in acne lesions (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes) (MIC between 1 and 4 mg ml(-1) for C8Co, and between 0.5 and 5 mg ml(-1) for benzoyl peroxide). The presence of Emulgine M8 did not affect the bacteriostatic activity of C8Co. A 4% w/v solution of C8Co (incorporating Emulgine M8) fulfilled the criteria for an antiseptic preparation as laid down by the French Pharmacopoeia (10th Edition), and had a spectrum 5 bactericidal activity according to the French Standard AFNOR NF T 72-151. The excellent cutaneous tolerance of capryloyl collagenic acid would indicate that an aqueous solution might be of value for topical treatment of the bacterial component of acne. Résumé Activité antibactérienne de l'acide capryloyl-collagénique vis à vis des bactéries impliquées dans l'etiologie de l'acné L'acide capryloyl-collagénique (Lipacide C8Co) et le peroxyde de benzoyle présentent une activité bactériostatique in-vitroéquivalente vis à vis des espèces bactériennes retrouvées au niveau des lésions acnéiques (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis et Propionibacterium acnes) (CMI comprise entre 1 et 4 mg ml(-1) pour le lipoaminoacide, et 0,5 et 5 mg ml(-1) pour le peroxyde de benzoyle). La mise en solution aqueuse de l'acide capryloyl-collagénique en présence d'Emulgine M8 ne modifie pas son activité bactériostatique. Une telle solution, à 4% m/V d'acide capryloyl-collagénique et 5% m/V d'Emulgine M8, satisfait à l'essai d'activité des préparations antiseptiques décrit à la Pharmacopée Française (Xème Ed.) (concentration minimale antiseptique: 10% v/V, pour un temps de contact de 5 min à 32 degrees C entre les germes tests et la solution diluée en eau distillée), et posséde une activité bactéricide antiseptique spectre 5 conforme à la norme AFNOR NF T

  8. Evaluating death and activity decay of Anammox bacteria during anaerobic and aerobic starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qilin; Song, Kang; Hao, Xiaodi; Wei, Jing; Pijuan, Maite; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Zhao, Huijun

    2018-06-01

    The decreased activity (i.e. decay) of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) bacteria during starvation can be attributed to death (i.e. decrease in the amount of viable bacteria) and activity decay (i.e. decrease in the specific activity of viable bacteria). Although they are crucial for the operation of the Anammox process, they have never been comprehensively investigated. This study for the first time experimentally assessed death and activity decay of the Anammox bacteria during 84 days' starvation stress based on ammonium removal rate, Live/Dead staining and fluorescence in-situ hybridization. The anaerobic and aerobic decay rates of Anammox bacteria were determined as 0.015 ± 0.001 d -1 and 0.028 ± 0.001 d -1 , respectively, indicating Anammox bacteria would lose their activity more quickly in the aerobic starvation than in the anaerobic starvation. The anaerobic and aerobic death rates of Anammox bacteria were measured at 0.011 ± 0.001 d -1 and 0.025 ± 0.001 d -1 , respectively, while their anaerobic and aerobic activity decay rates were determined at 0.004 ± 0.001 d -1 and 0.003 ± 0.001 d -1 , respectively. Further analysis revealed that death accounted for 73 ± 4% and 89 ± 5% of the decreased activity of Anammox bacteria during anaerobic and aerobic starvations, and activity decay was only responsible for 27 ± 4% and 11 ± 5% of the decreased Anammox activity, respectively, over the same starvation periods. These deeply shed light on the response of Anammox bacteria to the starvation stress, which would facilitate operation and optimization of the Anammox process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Göbel, Britta; Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Chung, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Background Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regul...

  10. Antibacterial activity of the sponge Ircinia ramosa: Importance of its surface-associated bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thakur, N.L.; Anil, A.C.

    , and concentrated under reduced pressure in a rotary evap- orator. A flow chart of extraction of sponge and its associated bacteria and anti- bacterial bioassays is given in Figure 1. Fractionation of Crude Extracts. The crude methanol extracts collected during... activity, and (3) whether there is a role for sponge surface-associated bacteria in antibacterial activity of the host? ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SPONGE 59 METHODS AND MATERIALS Specimen Collection and Preparation of Crude Extracts. Specimens of Ircinia...

  11. Are pathogenic bacteria just looking for food? Metabolism and microbial pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Laurence; Hocquet, Didier; Miller, Samuel I.

    2011-01-01

    It is interesting to speculate that the evolutionary drive of microbes to develop pathogenic characteristics was to access the nutrient resources that animals provided. Environments in animals that pathogens colonize have also driven the evolution of new bacterial characteristics to maximize these new nutritional opportunities. This review focuses on genomic and functional aspects of pathogen metabolism that allow efficient utilization of nutrient resources provided by animals. Similar to genes encoding specific virulence traits, some genes encoding metabolic functions have been horizontally acquired by pathogens to provide a selective advantage in host tissues. Selective advantage in host tissues can also be gained in some circumstances by loss of function due to mutations that alter metabolic capabilities. Greater understanding of bacterial metabolism within host tissues should be important for increased understanding of host-pathogen interactions and the development of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:21600774

  12. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Dí az-Pé rez, Laura; Moran, Xose Anxelu G.

    2015-01-01

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We

  13. Enzyme activity screening of thermophilic bacteria isolated from Dusun Tua Hot Spring, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msarah, Marwan; Ibrahim, Izyanti; Aqma, Wan Syaidatul

    2018-04-01

    Thermophilic bacteria have biotechnological importance due to the availability of unique enzymes which are stable in extreme circumstances. The aim of this study includes to isolate thermophilic bacteria from hot spring and screen for important enzyme activities. Water samples from the Dusun Tua Hot Spring were collected and the physiochemical characterisation of water was measured. Eight thermophilic bacteria were isolated and determined to have at least three strong enzyme activity including protease, lipase, amylase, cellulase, pectinase and xylanase. The results showed that HuluC2 displayed all the enzyme activities and can be further studied.

  14. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production: Progress report, February 1, 1987-February 1, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeikus, J.G.; Shen, Gwo-Jenn.

    1988-01-01

    These studies concern the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that control carbon and electron flow in anaerobic bacteria that conserve energy when coupling hydrogen consumption to the production of acetic, propionic, or butyric acids. Two acidogens, Propionispira arboris and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum were chosen as model systems to understand the function of oxidoreductases and electron carriers in the regulation of hydrogen metabolism and single carbon metabolism. In P. arboris, H 2 consumption was linked to the inhibition of CO 2 production and an increase in the propionate/acetate rate; whereas, H 2 consumption was linked to a stimulation of CO 2 consumption and an increase in the butyrate/acetate ratio in B. methylotrophicum. We report studies on the enzymes involved in the regulation of singe carbon metabolism, the enzyme activities and pathways responsible for conversion of multicarbon components to acetate and propionate or butyrate, and how low pH inhibits H 2 and acetic acid production in Sarcina ventriculi as a consequence of hydrogenase regulation. 9 refs

  15. Effects of bacterially produced precipitates on the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria during the bio-treatment process of copper-containing wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A large volume of bacterially produced precipitates are generated during the bio-treatment of heavy metal wastewater.The composition of the bacterially produced precipitates and its effects on sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in copper-containing waste stream were evaluated in this study.The elemental composition of the microbial precipitate was studied using electrodispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX),and it was found that the ratio of S:Cu was 1.12.Combining with the results of copper distribution in the SRB metabolism culture,which was analyzed by the sequential extraction procedure,copper in the precipitates was determined as covellite (CuS).The bacterially produced precipitates caused a decrease of the sulfate reduction rate,and the more precipitates were generated,the lower the sulfate reduction rate was.The particle sizes of bacterially generated covellite were ranging from 0.03 to 2 m by particles size distribution (PSD) analysis,which was smaller than that of the SRB cells.Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed that the microbial covellite was deposited on the surface of the cell.The effects of the microbial precipitate on SRB metabolism were found to be weakened by increasing the precipitation time and adding microbial polymeric substances in later experiments.These results provided direct evidence that the SRB activity was inhibited by the bacterially produced covellite,which enveloped the bacterium and thus affected the metabolism of SRB on mass transfer.

  16. Effect of Condensed Tannins on Bacterial Diversity and Metabolic Activity in the Rat Gastrointestinal Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexandra H.; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of dietary condensed tannins (proanthocyanidins) on rat fecal bacterial populations was ascertained in order to determine whether the proportion on tannin-resistant bacteria increased and if there was a change in the predominant bacterial populations. After 3 weeks of tannin diets the proportion of tannin-resistant bacteria increased significantly (P tannin diet and to 47.2% ± 5.1% with a 2% tannin diet. The proportion of tannin-resistant bacteria returned to preexposure levels in the absence of dietary tannins. A shift in bacterial populations was confirmed by molecular fingerprinting of fecal bacterial populations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Posttreatment samples were generally still distinguishable from controls after 3.5 weeks. Sequence analysis of DGGE bands and characterization of tannin-resistant isolates indicated that tannins selected for Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroides species. Dot blot quantification confirmed that these gram-negative bacterial groups predominated in the presence of dietary tannins and that there was a corresponding decrease in the gram-positive Clostridium leptum group and other groups. Metabolic fingerprint patterns revealed that functional activities of culturable fecal bacteria were affected by the presence of tannins. Condensed tannins of Acacia angustissima altered fecal bacterial populations in the rat gastrointestinal tract, resulting in a shift in the predominant bacteria towards tannin-resistant gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroides species. PMID:14766594

  17. Anaerobic hydrocarbon and fatty acid metabolism by syntrophic bacteria and their impact on carbon steel corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Neil Lyles

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbial metabolism of hydrocarbons is increasingly associated with the corrosion of carbon steel in sulfate-rich marine waters. However, how such transformations influence metal biocorrosion in the absence of an electron acceptor is not fully recognized. We grew a marine alkane-utilizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens, with either sulfate or Methanospirillum hungatei as electron acceptors, and tested the ability of the cultures to catalyze metal corrosion. Axenically, D. alkanexedens had a higher instantaneous corrosion rate and produced more pits in carbon steel coupons than when the same organism was grown in syntrophic co-culture with the methanogen. Since anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways converge on fatty acid intermediates, the corrosive ability of a known fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus aciditrophicus was compared when grown in pure culture or in co-culture with a H2-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp., strain G11 or a methanogen (M. hungatei. The instantaneous corrosion rates in the cultures were not substantially different, but the syntrophic, sulfate-reducing co-culture produced more pits in coupons than other combinations of microorganisms. Lactate-grown cultures of strain G11 had higher instantaneous corrosion rates and coupon pitting compared to the same organism cultured with hydrogen as an electron donor. Thus, if sulfate is available as an electron acceptor, the same microbial assemblages produce sulfide and low molecular weight organic acids that exacerbated biocorrosion. Despite these trends, a surprisingly high degree of variation was encountered with the corrosion assessments. Differences in biomass, initial substrate concentration, rates of microbial activity or the degree of end product formation did not account for the variations. We are forced to ascribe such differences to the metallurgical properties of the coupons.

  18. Anaerobic hydrocarbon and fatty acid metabolism by syntrophic bacteria and their impact on carbon steel corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Christopher N; Le, Huynh M; Beasley, William Howard; McInerney, Michael J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    The microbial metabolism of hydrocarbons is increasingly associated with the corrosion of carbon steel in sulfate-rich marine waters. However, how such transformations influence metal biocorrosion in the absence of an electron acceptor is not fully recognized. We grew a marine alkane-utilizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens, with either sulfate or Methanospirillum hungatei as electron acceptors, and tested the ability of the cultures to catalyze metal corrosion. Axenically, D. alkanexedens had a higher instantaneous corrosion rate and produced more pits in carbon steel coupons than when the same organism was grown in syntrophic co-culture with the methanogen. Since anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways converge on fatty acid intermediates, the corrosive ability of a known fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus aciditrophicus was compared when grown in pure culture or in co-culture with a H2-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp., strain G11) or a methanogen (M. hungatei). The instantaneous corrosion rates in the cultures were not substantially different, but the syntrophic, sulfate-reducing co-culture produced more pits in coupons than other combinations of microorganisms. Lactate-grown cultures of strain G11 had higher instantaneous corrosion rates and coupon pitting compared to the same organism cultured with hydrogen as an electron donor. Thus, if sulfate is available as an electron acceptor, the same microbial assemblages produce sulfide and low molecular weight organic acids that exacerbated biocorrosion. Despite these trends, a surprisingly high degree of variation was encountered with the corrosion assessments. Differences in biomass, initial substrate concentration, rates of microbial activity or the degree of end product formation did not account for the variations. We are forced to ascribe such differences to the metallurgical properties of the coupons.

  19. Impact of Seasonal Hypoxia on Activity and Community Structure of Chemolithoautotrophic Bacteria in a Coastal Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsewers, Yvonne A; Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Seitaj, Dorina; Schauer, Regina; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Meysman, Filip J R; Villanueva, Laura; Boschker, Henricus T S

    2017-05-15

    Seasonal hypoxia in coastal systems drastically changes the availability of electron acceptors in bottom water, which alters the sedimentary reoxidation of reduced compounds. However, the effect of seasonal hypoxia on the chemolithoautotrophic community that catalyzes these reoxidation reactions is rarely studied. Here, we examine the changes in activity and structure of the sedimentary chemolithoautotrophic bacterial community of a seasonally hypoxic saline basin under oxic (spring) and hypoxic (summer) conditions. Combined 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and analysis of phospholipid-derived fatty acids indicated a major temporal shift in community structure. Aerobic sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria ( Thiotrichales ) and Epsilonproteobacteria ( Campylobacterales ) were prevalent during spring, whereas Deltaproteobacteria ( Desulfobacterales ) related to sulfate-reducing bacteria prevailed during summer hypoxia. Chemolithoautotrophy rates in the surface sediment were three times higher in spring than in summer. The depth distribution of chemolithoautotrophy was linked to the distinct sulfur oxidation mechanisms identified through microsensor profiling, i.e., canonical sulfur oxidation, electrogenic sulfur oxidation by cable bacteria, and sulfide oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction by Beggiatoaceae The metabolic diversity of the sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community suggests a complex niche partitioning within the sediment, probably driven by the availability of reduced sulfur compounds (H 2 S, S 0 , and S 2 O 3 2- ) and electron acceptors (O 2 and NO 3 - ) regulated by seasonal hypoxia. IMPORTANCE Chemolithoautotrophic microbes in the seafloor are dependent on electron acceptors, like oxygen and nitrate, that diffuse from the overlying water. Seasonal hypoxia, however, drastically changes the availability of these electron acceptors in the bottom water; hence, one expects a strong impact of seasonal hypoxia on sedimentary chemolithoautotrophy. A

  20. Metabolism features in the active rheumatoid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossermelli, W; Carvalho, N; Papaleo Netto, M [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Centro de Medicina Nuclear

    1974-02-01

    The /sup 131/I-labelled albumin metabolism was studied in fourteen female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The half-life of distribution was increased while the turnover half-life and turnover rate was within normal limits. These results led to assume that synthesis and catabolism may not change this disease, not being the responsible mechanism of hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemia would appear as compensatory mechanism in view of other protein alterations, as hypergammaglobulinemia, without changes of stabilizing and metabolic properties of albumin, perhaps due to albumin molecular alterations.

  1. Metabolism features in the active rheumatoid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossermelli, W.; Carvalho, N.; Papaleo Netto, M.

    1974-01-01

    It was studied the 131 I-labelled albumin metabolism in fourteen female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The half-life of distribution was increased while the turnover half-life and turnover rate was within normal limits. These results led to assume that synthesis and catabolism may not change this disease, not being the responsible mechanism of hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemia would appear as compensatory mechanism in view of other protein alterations, as hypergammaglobulinemia, without changes of stabilizing and metabolic properties of albumin, perhaps due to albumin molecular alterations [pt

  2. Metabolism of sulfate-reducing bacteria and corrosion behavior of carbon steel in the continuous culturing medium; Renzoku baiyo baichichu ni okeru ryusan`en kangen no taisha to tansoko no fushoku kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, F.; Suzuki, T. [Ajinomoto Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Seo, M. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1997-08-25

    Investigations were made on metabolism of sulfate-reducing bacteria and corrosion behavior of carbon steel in the continuous culturing medium. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were cultured for 50 days by supplying the culturing medium prepared to a prescribed chemical composition (containing Fe {sup 2+} at 0.01 mol/kg) at a rate of 10 cm {sup 3}/h, and drawing them out at the same rate. Test carbon steel pieces were immersed into this culturing medium. As a result, the following matters were clarified: the number of bacteria is maintained at more than 10 {sup 10}/cm{sup 3} after several days since inauguration of the immersion, with the bacteria stably producing H2S and FeS until the culturing is finished; comma-shaped bacteria which move actively and rod-shaped bacteria which do not move very actively exist in the culturing medium; a black film has been produced on surface of the test pieces throughout the culturing period, and satin-like corrosion was found underneath the surface; and weight increase of this film and weight decrease of the lower layer progress as the time lapses (the weight decrease of the lower layer has reached 40 mg/cm{sup 2} in 50 days). 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The metabolically active bacterial microbiome of tonsils and mandibular lymph nodes of slaughter pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne eMann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of microbiomes in lymphatic organs is relevant for basic and applied research into explaining microbial translocation processes and understanding cross-contamination during slaughter. This study aimed to investigate whether metabolically active bacteria (MAB could be detected within tonsils and mandibular lymph nodes (MLNs of pigs. The hypervariable V1-V2 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes was amplified from cDNA from tonsils and MLNs of eight clinically healthy slaughter pigs. Pyrosequencing yielded 82,857 quality-controlled sequences, clustering into 576 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, which were assigned to 230 genera and 16 phyla. The actual number of detected OTUs per sample varied highly (23-171 OTUs. Prevotella zoogleoformans and Serratia proteamaculans (best type strain hits were most abundant (10.6% and 41.8% respectively in tonsils and MLNs, respectively. To explore bacterial correlation patterns between samples of each tissue, pairwise Spearman correlations (rs were calculated. In total, 194 strong positive and negative correlations |rs| ≥ 0.6 were found. We conclude that (i lymphatic organs harbor a high diversity of metabolically active bacteria, (ii the occurrence of viable bacteria in lymph nodes is not restricted to pathological processes and (iii lymphatic tissues may serve as a contamination source in pig slaughterhouses. This study confirms the necessity of the EFSA regulation with regard to a meat inspection based on visual examinations to foster a minimization of microbial contamination.

  4. Epithermal neutron activation analysis of CR(VI)-reducer basalt-inhabiting bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsibakhashvili, N.Ya.; Kalabegishvili, T.L.; Murusidze, I.G.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Kirkesali, E.I.; Aksenova, N.G.; Holman, H.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) has been applied to studying elemental composition of Cr(VI)-reducer bacteria isolated from polluted basalts from the Republic of Georgia. Cr(VI)-reducing ability of the bacteria was examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) demonstrating that the bacteria differ in the rates of Cr(VI) reduction. A well-pronounced correlation between the ability of the bacteria to accumulate Cr(VI) and their ability to reduce Cr(V) to Cr(III) observed in our experiments is discussed. Elemental analysis of these bacteria also revealed that basalt-inhabiting bacteria are distinguished by relative contents of essential elements such as K, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Co. A high rate of Cr(III) formation correlates with a high concentration of Co in the bacterium. ENAA detected some similarity in the elemental composition of the bacteria. The relatively high contents of Fe detected in the bacteria (140-340 μg/g of dry weight) indicate bacterial adaptation to the environmental conditions typical of the basalts. The concentrations of at least 12-19 different elements ranging from major- to ultratrace ones were determined in each type of bacteria simultaneously. The range of concentrations spans over 8 orders of magnitude

  5. Correlation of Metabolic Variables with the Number of ORFs in Human Pathogenic and Phylogenetically Related Non- or Less-Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Poot-Hernández, Augusto Cesar; Garcia-Guevara, Jose Fernando; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya

    2016-06-01

    To date, a few works have performed a correlation of metabolic variables in bacteria; however specific correlations with these variables have not been reported. In this work, we included 36 human pathogenic bacteria and 18 non- or less-pathogenic-related bacteria and obtained all metabolic variables, including enzymes, metabolic pathways, enzymatic steps and specific metabolic pathways, and enzymatic steps of particular metabolic processes, from a reliable metabolic database (KEGG). Then, we correlated the number of the open reading frames (ORF) with these variables and with the proportions of these variables, and we observed a negative correlation with the proportion of enzymes (r = -0.506, p < 0.0001), metabolic pathways (r = -0.871, p < 00.0001), enzymatic reactions (r = -0.749, p < 00.0001), and with the proportions of central metabolism variables as well as a positive correlation with the proportions of multistep reactions (r = 0.650, p < 00.0001) and secondary metabolism variables. The proportion of multifunctional reactions (r: -0.114, p = 0.41) and the proportion of enzymatic steps (r: -0.205, p = 0.14) did not present a significant correlation. These correlations indicate that as the size of a genome (measured in the number of ORFs) increases, the proportion of genes that encode enzymes significantly diminishes (especially those related to central metabolism), suggesting that when essential metabolic pathways are complete, an increase in the number of ORFs does not require a similar increase in the metabolic pathways and enzymes, but only a slight increase is sufficient to cope with a large genome.

  6. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that

  7. Nitrate and sulfate reducers-retrievable number of bacteria and their activities in Indian waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    Culturable heterotrophic, nitrate reducing and sulfate reducing bacteria (HB, NRB and SRB) were enumerated from 25, 50, 100 and 200 m depths at 15 stations and their potential activities viz. Nitrate reducing (NRA) and Sulfate reducing (SRA) were...

  8. Isolation, Characterization, and Genetic Diversity of Ice Nucleation Active Bacteria on Various Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA ELIZABETH WATURANGI

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation active (INA bacteria is a group of bacteria with the ability to catalyze the ice formation at temperature above -10 °C and causing frost injury in plants. Since, most of the literature on INA bacteria were from subtropical area, studies of INA bacteria from tropical area are needed. We sampled eight fruits and 36 leaves of 21 plant species, and then identified through biochemical and genetic analysis. INA bacteria were characterized for INA protein classification, pH stability, and optimization of heat endurance. We discovered 15 INA bacteria from seven plants species. Most of bacteria are oxidase and H2S negative, catalase and citrate positive, gram negative, and cocoid formed. These INA bacteria were classified in to three classes based on their freezing temperature. Most of the isolates were active in heat and pH stability assay. Some isolates were analysed for 16S rRNA gene. We observed that isolates from Morinda citrifolia shared 97% similiarity with Pseudomonas sp. Isolate from Piper betle shared 93% similarity with P. pseudoalcaligenes. Isolate from Carica papaya shared 94% similarity with Pseudomonas sp. While isolate from Fragaria vesca shared 90% similarity with Sphingomonas sp.

  9. Isolation, Characterization, and Genetic Diversity of Ice Nucleation Active Bacteria on Various Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA ELIZABETH WATURANGI

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation active (INA bacteria is a group of bacteria with the ability to catalyze the ice formation at temperature above -10 oC and causing frost injury in plants. Since, most of the literature on INA bacteria were from subtropical area, studies of INA bacteria from tropical area are needed. We sampled eight fruits and 36 leaves of 21 plant species, and then identified through biochemical and genetic analysis. INA bacteria were characterized for INA protein classification, pH stability, and optimization of heat endurance. We discovered 15 INA bacteria from seven plants species. Most of bacteria are oxidase and H2S negative, catalase and citrate positive, gram negative, and cocoid formed. These INA bacteria were classified in to three classes based on their freezing temperature. Most of the isolates were active in heat and pH stability assay. Some isolates were analysed for 16S rRNA gene. We observed that isolates from Morinda citrifolia shared 97% similiarity with Pseudomonas sp. Isolate from Piper betle shared 93% similarity with P. pseudoalcaligenes. Isolate from Carica papaya shared 94% similarity with Pseudomonas sp. While isolate from Fragaria vesca shared 90% similarity with Sphingomonas sp.

  10. Antimicrobial Activity – The Most Important Property of Probiotic and Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaženka Kos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of industrially important lactic acid bacteria as starter cultures and probiotic bacteria is the main subject of this review. This activity has been attributed to the production of metabolites such as organic acids (lactic and acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, diacetyl, acetaldehyde, acetoine, carbon dioxide, reuterin, reutericyclin and bacteriocins. The potential of using bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria, primarily used as biopreservatives, represents a perspective, alternative antimicrobial strategy for continuously increasing problem with antibiotic resistance. Another strategy in resolving this problem is an application of probiotics for different gastrointestinal and urogenital infection therapies.

  11. Redox-Active Antibiotics Control Gene Expression and Community Behavior in Divergent Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Teal, Tracy K.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Newman, Dianne K.

    2008-01-01

    It is thought that bacteria excrete redox-active pigments as antibiotics to inhibit competitors. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the endogenous antibiotic pyocyanin activates SoxR, a transcription factor conserved in Proteo- and Actinobacteria. In Escherichia coli, SoxR regulates the superoxide stress response. Bioinformatic analysis coupled with gene expression studies in P. aeruginosa and Streptomyces coelicolor revealed that the majority of SoxR regulons in bacteria lack the genes required for ...

  12. Antibacterial and anticancer activity of seaweeds and bacteria associated with their surface

    OpenAIRE

    Villarreal-Gómez, Luis J; Soria-Mercado, Irma E; Guerra-Rivas, Graciela; Ayala-Sánchez, Nahara E

    2010-01-01

    Marine algae and bacteria are an inexhaustible source of chemical compounds that produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. Marine bacteria have become an important target for the biotechnology industry because of the large number of bioactive compounds recently discovered from them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial and anticancer activities of extracts from the seaweeds Egregia menziesii, Codium fragile, Sargassum muticum, Endarachne binghamia...

  13. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tgoto@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Ohue, Ryuji [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Nomura, Wataru [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Sugawara, Tatsuya [Laboratory of Marine Bioproducts Technology, Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yu, Rina [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kitamura, Nahoko [Laboratory of Fermentation Physiology and Applied Microbiology, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  14. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis

  15. Adhesive ability and biofilm metabolic activity of Listeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SWEET

    2012-07-31

    Jul 31, 2012 ... monocytogenes strains were able to adhere to abiotic materials with different degrees. In fact, cold stressed strains ... packaging. Biofilms allow .... reduction of a tetrazolium salt by metabolically active cells to a colored water ...

  16. the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among active sportsmen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT. This study sought to establish the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) among active .... Table 1: General characteristic of the studied population stratified by exercise. Parameters ..... Prolonged adaptation to fat- rich diet ...

  17. From physiology to systems metabolic engineering for the production of biochemicals by lactic acid bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Paula; Carvalho, Ana L.; Vinga, Susana

    2013-01-01

    of comprehensive data on their metabolism and genetics was generated throughout the years. This knowledge has been instrumental in the implementation of successful applications in the food industry, such as the selection of robust starter cultures with desired phenotypic traits. The advent of genomics, functional...

  18. Isolation of dextran-hydrolyzing intestinal bacteria and characterization of their dextranolytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Kyoung; Shin, So-Yeon; Moon, Jin Seok; Li, Ling; Cho, Seung Kee; Kim, Tae-Jip; Han, Nam Soo

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate dextran-hydrolyzing bacteria from the human intestines and to identify their dextranolytic enzymes. For this, dextranase-producing microorganisms were screened from fecal samples by using blue dextran-containing media. Colonies producing a decolorized zone were isolated and they were grouped using RAPD-PCR. 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed the isolates were Bacteroides (B.) thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus, B. vulgatus, B. dorei, B. xylanisolvens, B. uniformis, and Veillonella (V.) rogosae. Thin layer chromatography analysis showed that the dextranases exhibit mainly endo-type activity and produce various oligosaccharides including isomaltose and isomaltotriose. Zymogram analysis demonstrated that enzymes localized mainly in the cell membrane fraction and the molecular weight was 50-70 kDa. When cultured in a dextran-containing medium, all strains isolated in this study produced short-chain fatty acids, with butyric acid as the major compound. This is the first study to report that human intestinal B. xylanisolvens, B. dorei, and V. rogosae metabolize dextran utilizing dextranolytic enzymes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Differentiation between activity of digestive enzymes of Brachionus calyciflorus and extracellular enzymes of its epizooic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilko H. AHLRICHS

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM for surface-attached, i.e. epizootic, bacteria to ascertain their specific localization and thus find out if we could discern between rotifer and bacterial enzyme activity. The lorica of B. calyciflorus was colonized by one distinct type of bacteria, which originated from the algal culture used for rotifer feeding. The corona, posterior epidermis and foot of all inspected individuals were always without attached bacteria. The density of the attached bacteria was higher with the increasing age of B. calyciflorus: while young individuals were colonized by ~ tens of bacterial cells, older ones had on average hundreds to thousands of attached bacteria. We hypothesize that epizooic bacteria may produce the ectoenzymes phosphatases and β-N-acetylhexosaminidases on the lorica, but not on the corona of B. calyciflorus. Since enzyme activities of epizooic bacteria may influence the values and interpretation of bulk rotifer enzyme activities, we should take the bacterial contribution into account.

  20. [Diversity and enzyme-producing activity of culturable halophilic bacteria in Daishan Saltern of East China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan-Dan; Li, Qian; Huang, Jing-Jing; Chen, Min

    2012-11-01

    Soil and saline water samples were collected from the Daishan Saltern of East China, and the halophilic bacteria were isolated and cultured by using selective media, aimed to investigate the diversity and enzyme-producing activity of culturable halophilic bacteria in saltern environment. A total of 181 strains were isolated by culture-dependent method. Specific primers were used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria and archaea. The operation taxonomy units (OTUs) were determined by ARDRA method, and the representative strain of each OTU was sequenced. The phylogenetic position of all the isolated strains was determined by 16S rRNA sequencing. The results showed that the isolated 181 strains displayed 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), of which, 12 OTUs belonged to halophilic bacteria, and the others belonged to halophilic archaea. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that there were 7 genera presented among the halophilic bacteria group, and 4 genera presented among the halophilic archaea group. The dominant halophilic strains were of Halomonas and Haloarcula, with 46.8% in halophilic bacteria and 49.1% in halophilic archaea group, respectively. Enzyme-producing analysis indicated that most strains displayed enzyme-producing activity, including the activities of producing amylase, proteinase and lipase, and the dominant strains capable of enzyme-producing were of Haloarcula. Our results showed that in the environment of Daishan Saltern, there existed a higher diversity of halophilic bacteria, being a source sink for screening enzyme-producing bacterial strains.

  1. Lactic acid bacteria: promising supplements for enhancing the biological activities of kombucha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Khoi; Dong, Ngan Thi Ngoc; Nguyen, Huong Thuy; Le, Phu Hong

    2015-01-01

    Kombucha is sweetened black tea that is fermented by a symbiosis of bacteria and yeast embedded within a cellulose membrane. It is considered a health drink in many countries because it is a rich source of vitamins and may have other health benefits. It has previously been reported that adding lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus) strains to kombucha can enhance its biological functions, but in that study only lactic acid bacteria isolated from kefir grains were tested. There are many other natural sources of lactic acid bacteria. In this study, we examined the effects of lactic acid bacteria from various fermented Vietnamese food sources (pickled cabbage, kefir and kombucha) on kombucha's three main biological functions: glucuronic acid production, antibacterial activity and antioxidant ability. Glucuronic acid production was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, antibacterial activity was assessed by the agar-well diffusion method and antioxidant ability was evaluated by determining the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity. Four strains of food-borne pathogenic bacteria were used in our antibacterial experiments: Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19111, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 and Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778. Our findings showed that lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from kefir are superior to those from other sources for improving glucuronic acid production and enhancing the antibacterial and antioxidant activities of kombucha. This study illustrates the potential of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from kefir as biosupplements for enhancing the bioactivities of kombucha.

  2. Metabolic Features of Protochlamydia amoebophila Elementary Bodies – A Link between Activity and Infectivity in Chlamydiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzka, Margarete; Wultsch, Anna; Tziotis, Dimitrios; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Richter, Andreas; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Horn, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The Chlamydiae are a highly successful group of obligate intracellular bacteria, whose members are remarkably diverse, ranging from major pathogens of humans and animals to symbionts of ubiquitous protozoa. While their infective developmental stage, the elementary body (EB), has long been accepted to be completely metabolically inert, it has recently been shown to sustain some activities, including uptake of amino acids and protein biosynthesis. In the current study, we performed an in-depth characterization of the metabolic capabilities of EBs of the amoeba symbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila. A combined metabolomics approach, including fluorescence microscopy-based assays, isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ICR/FT-MS), and ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) was conducted, with a particular focus on the central carbon metabolism. In addition, the effect of nutrient deprivation on chlamydial infectivity was analyzed. Our investigations revealed that host-free P. amoebophila EBs maintain respiratory activity and metabolize D-glucose, including substrate uptake as well as host-free synthesis of labeled metabolites and release of labeled CO2 from 13C-labeled D-glucose. The pentose phosphate pathway was identified as major route of D-glucose catabolism and host-independent activity of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was observed. Our data strongly suggest anabolic reactions in P. amoebophila EBs and demonstrate that under the applied conditions D-glucose availability is essential to sustain metabolic activity. Replacement of this substrate by L-glucose, a non-metabolizable sugar, led to a rapid decline in the number of infectious particles. Likewise, infectivity of Chlamydia trachomatis, a major human pathogen, also declined more rapidly in the absence of nutrients. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that D-glucose is utilized by P. amoebophila EBs and provide

  3. Metabolic features of Protochlamydia amoebophila elementary bodies--a link between activity and infectivity in Chlamydiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara S Sixt

    Full Text Available The Chlamydiae are a highly successful group of obligate intracellular bacteria, whose members are remarkably diverse, ranging from major pathogens of humans and animals to symbionts of ubiquitous protozoa. While their infective developmental stage, the elementary body (EB, has long been accepted to be completely metabolically inert, it has recently been shown to sustain some activities, including uptake of amino acids and protein biosynthesis. In the current study, we performed an in-depth characterization of the metabolic capabilities of EBs of the amoeba symbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila. A combined metabolomics approach, including fluorescence microscopy-based assays, isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS, ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ICR/FT-MS, and ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS was conducted, with a particular focus on the central carbon metabolism. In addition, the effect of nutrient deprivation on chlamydial infectivity was analyzed. Our investigations revealed that host-free P. amoebophila EBs maintain respiratory activity and metabolize D-glucose, including substrate uptake as well as host-free synthesis of labeled metabolites and release of labeled CO2 from (13C-labeled D-glucose. The pentose phosphate pathway was identified as major route of D-glucose catabolism and host-independent activity of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle was observed. Our data strongly suggest anabolic reactions in P. amoebophila EBs and demonstrate that under the applied conditions D-glucose availability is essential to sustain metabolic activity. Replacement of this substrate by L-glucose, a non-metabolizable sugar, led to a rapid decline in the number of infectious particles. Likewise, infectivity of Chlamydia trachomatis, a major human pathogen, also declined more rapidly in the absence of nutrients. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that D-glucose is utilized by P. amoebophila

  4. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis (ENAA) of Cr(VI)-reducer Basalt-inhabiting Bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Tsibakhashvili, N Ya; Kirkesali, E I; Aksenova, N G; Kalabegishvili, T L; Murusidze, I G; Mosulishvili, L M; Holman, H Y N

    2005-01-01

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) has been applied to studying elemental composition of Cr(VI)-reducer bacteria isolated from polluted basalts from the Republic of Georgia. Cr(VI)-reducing ability of the bacteria was examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) demonstrating that the bacteria differ in the rates of Cr(VI) reduction. A well-pronounced correlation between the ability of the bacteria to accumulate Cr(V) and their ability to reduce Cr(V) to Cr(III) observed in our experiments is discussed. Elemental analysis of these bacteria also revealed that basalt-inhabiting bacteria are distinguished by relative contents of essential elements such as K, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Co. A high rate of Cr(III) formation correlates with a high concentration of Co in the bacterium. ENAA detected some similarity in the elemental composition of the bacteria. The relatively high contents of Fe detected in the bacteria (140-340 $\\mu $g/g of dry weight) indicate bacterial adaptation to the environmental condition...

  5. Phylloplane bacteria of Jatropha curcas: diversity, metabolic characteristics, and growth-promoting attributes towards vigor of maize seedling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Garima; Kollah, Bharati; Ahirwar, Usha; Mandal, Asit; Thakur, Jyoti Kumar; Patra, Ashok Kumar; Mohanty, Santosh Ranjan

    2017-10-01

    The complex role of phylloplane microorganisms is less understood than that of rhizospheric microorganisms in lieu of their pivotal role in plant's sustainability. This experiment aims to study the diversity of the culturable phylloplane bacteria of Jatropha curcas and evaluate their growth-promoting activities towards maize seedling vigor. Heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from the phylloplane of J. curcas and their 16S rRNA genes were sequenced. Sequences of the 16S rRNA gene were very similar to those of species belonging to the classes Bacillales (50%), Gammaproteobacteria (21.8%), Betaproteobacteria (15.6%), and Alphaproteobacteria (12.5%). The phylloplane bacteria preferred to utilize alcohol rather than monosaccharides and polysaccharides as a carbon source. Isolates exhibited ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) deaminase, phosphatase, potassium solubilization, and indole acetic acid (IAA) production activities. The phosphate-solubilizing capacity (mg of PO 4 solubilized by 10 8 cells) varied from 0.04 to 0.21. The IAA production potential (μg IAA produced by 10 8 cells in 48 h) of the isolates varied from 0.41 to 9.29. Inoculation of the isolates to maize seed significantly increased shoot and root lengths of maize seedlings. A linear regression model of the plant-growth-promoting activities significantly correlated (p < 0.01) with the growth parameters. Similarly, a correspondence analysis categorized ACC deaminase and IAA production as the major factors contributing 41% and 13.8% variation, respectively, to the growth of maize seedlings.

  6. Activation of multiple chemotherapeutic prodrugs by the natural enzymolome of tumour-localised probiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehouritis, Panos; Stanton, Michael; McCarthy, Florence O; Jeavons, Matthieu; Tangney, Mark

    2016-01-28

    Some chemotherapeutic drugs (prodrugs) require activation by an enzyme for efficacy. We and others have demonstrated the ability of probiotic bacteria to grow specifically within solid tumours following systemic administration, and we hypothesised that the natural enzymatic activity of these tumour-localised bacteria may be suitable for activation of certain such chemotherapeutic drugs. Several wild-type probiotic bacteria; Escherichia coli Nissle, Bifidobacterium breve, Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus species, were screened against a panel of popular prodrugs. All strains were capable of activating at least one prodrug. E. coli Nissle 1917 was selected for further studies because of its ability to activate numerous prodrugs and its resistance to prodrug toxicity. HPLC data confirmed biochemical transformation of prodrugs to their toxic counterparts. Further analysis demonstrated that different enzymes can complement prodrug activation, while simultaneous activation of multiple prodrugs (CB1954, 5-FC, AQ4N and Fludarabine phosphate) by E. coli was confirmed, resulting in significant efficacy improvement. Experiments in mice harbouring murine tumours validated in vitro findings, with significant reduction in tumour growth and increase in survival of mice treated with probiotic bacteria and a combination of prodrugs. These findings demonstrate the ability of probiotic bacteria, without the requirement for genetic modification, to enable high-level activation of multiple prodrugs specifically at the site of action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Activating transcription factor 3 regulates immune and metabolic homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek; Uhlirova, Mirka

    2012-10-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins.

  8. Genomic Insights into the Sulfur Metabolism of Phototrophic Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, ferrous iron, and hydrogen for anaerobic photoautotrophic growth. Genome sequence data is currently available for 12 strains of GSB. We present here a genome-based survey of the distribution...... and phylogenies of genes involved in oxidation of sulfur compounds in these strains. Sulfide:quinone reductase, encoded by sqr, is the only known sulfur-oxidizing enzyme found in all strains. All sulfide-utilizing strains contain the dissimilatory sulfite reductase dsrABCEFHLNMKJOPT genes, which appear...... to be involved in elemental sulfur utilization. All thiosulfate-utilizing strains have an identical sox gene cluster (soxJXYZAKBW). The soxCD genes found in certain other thiosulfate-utilizing organisms like Paracoccus pantotrophus are absent from GSB. Genes encoding flavocytochrome c (fccAB), adenosine-5...

  9. Metabolic response induced by endophytic fungi and bacteria in H. marrubioides Epling in vitro micro plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitorino, Luciana Cristina; Silva, Fabiano Guimaraes, E-mail: fabianocefetrv@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia Goiano, Rio Verde, GO (Brazil); Lima, William Cardoso; Soares, Marcos Antonio [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Dept. de Botanica e Ecologia; Pedroso, Rita Cassia Nascimento; Silva, Maroli Rodrigues; Dias, Herbert Junior; Crotti, Antonio Eduardo Miller; Silva, Marcio Luis Andrade e; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Pauletti, Patricia Mendonca; Januario, Ana Helena [Universidade de Franca, SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisa em Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas

    2013-10-01

    Hyptis marrubioides Epling is a native plant from Brazilian Cerrado. In this paper, the response of in vitro micro plants of this species to inoculation with bacterial and fungal endophytic isolates is evaluated. HPLC-DAD analysis showed the presence of 3,4-O-(Z)-dicaffeoylquinic acid and quercetin-7-O-glucoside as the main components. GC/MS analysis demonstrated that the sesquiterpenes Greek-Small-Letter-Tau -cadinol and caryophyllene oxide were only produced in micro plants inoculated with endophytic bacteria, while methyl hexadecanoate, methyl heptadecanoate and methyl (Z,Z,Z) 9,12,15-octadecatrienoate and the triterpene methyl 3{beta}-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oate were over expressed only when the micro plant was treated with endophytic fungi. (author)

  10. Metabolic response induced by endophytic fungi and bacteria in H. marrubioides Epling in vitro micro plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitorino, Luciana Cristina; Silva, Fabiano Guimaraes; Lima, William Cardoso; Soares, Marcos Antonio; Pedroso, Rita Cassia Nascimento; Silva, Maroli Rodrigues; Dias, Herbert Junior; Crotti, Antonio Eduardo Miller; Silva, Marcio Luis Andrade e; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Pauletti, Patricia Mendonca; Januario, Ana Helena

    2013-01-01

    Hyptis marrubioides Epling is a native plant from Brazilian Cerrado. In this paper, the response of in vitro micro plants of this species to inoculation with bacterial and fungal endophytic isolates is evaluated. HPLC-DAD analysis showed the presence of 3,4-O-(Z)-dicaffeoylquinic acid and quercetin-7-O-glucoside as the main components. GC/MS analysis demonstrated that the sesquiterpenes τ-cadinol and caryophyllene oxide were only produced in micro plants inoculated with endophytic bacteria, while methyl hexadecanoate, methyl heptadecanoate and methyl (Z,Z,Z) 9,12,15-octadecatrienoate and the triterpene methyl 3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oate were over expressed only when the micro plant was treated with endophytic fungi. (author)

  11. Nitrous Oxide Metabolism in Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria: Physiology and Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M J; Simon, J; Rowley, G; Bedmar, E J; Richardson, D J; Gates, A J; Delgado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas (GHG) with substantial global warming potential and also contributes to ozone depletion through photochemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. The negative effects of N2O on climate and stratospheric ozone make N2O mitigation an international challenge. More than 60% of global N2O emissions are emitted from agricultural soils mainly due to the application of synthetic nitrogen-containing fertilizers. Thus, mitigation strategies must be developed which increase (or at least do not negatively impact) on agricultural efficiency whilst decrease the levels of N2O released. This aim is particularly important in the context of the ever expanding population and subsequent increased burden on the food chain. More than two-thirds of N2O emissions from soils can be attributed to bacterial and fungal denitrification and nitrification processes. In ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, N2O is formed through the oxidation of hydroxylamine to nitrite. In denitrifiers, nitrate is reduced to N2 via nitrite, NO and N2O production. In addition to denitrification, respiratory nitrate ammonification (also termed dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium) is another important nitrate-reducing mechanism in soil, responsible for the loss of nitrate and production of N2O from reduction of NO that is formed as a by-product of the reduction process. This review will synthesize our current understanding of the environmental, regulatory and biochemical control of N2O emissions by nitrate-reducing bacteria and point to new solutions for agricultural GHG mitigation. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. ;Every dogma has its day': a personal look at carbon metabolism in photosynthetic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, John

    2003-01-01

    Dogmas are unscientific. What is perhaps the greatest biological dogma of all time, the 'unity of biochemistry' is, in the main, still having its day. According to present knowledge, the exceptions to this dogma are mere details when seen in relation to the biosystem as a whole. Nevertheless the exceptions are scientifically interesting and the understanding of them has led to a better comprehension of photosynthesis and ecology. Until the discovery of (14)C, photosynthetic CO(2) fixation was like a slightly opened black box. With (14)C in hand scientists mapped out the path of carbon in green plant photosynthesis in the course of a few years. The impressive reductive pentose phosphate cycle was almost immediately assumed to be universal in autotrophs, including anoxygenic phototrophs, in spite of the odd observation to the contrary. A new dogma was born and held the field for about two decades. Events began to turn when green sulfur bacteria were found to contain ferredoxin-coupled ketoacid-oxidoreductases. This led to the formulation of a novel CO(2)-fixing pathway, the reductive citric acid cycle, but its general acceptance required much work by many investigators. However, the ice had now been broken and after some years a third mechanism of CO(2) fixation was discovered, this time in Chloroflexus,and then a fourth in the same genus. One consequence of these discoveries is that it has become apparent that oxygen is an important factor that determines the kind of CO(2)-fixing mechanism an organism uses. With the prospect of the characterization of hordes of novel bacteria forecast by molecular ecologists we can expect further distinctive CO(2) fixation mechanisms to turn up.

  13. Isolation and characterization of styrene metabolism genes from styrene-assimilating soil bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    Styrene metabolism genes were isolated from styrene-assimilating bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10. Strain ST-5 had a gene cluster containing four open reading frames which encoded styrene degradation enzymes. The genes showed high similarity to styABCD of Pseudomonas sp. Y2. On the other hand, strain ST-10 had only two genes which encoded styrene monooxygenase and flavin oxidoreductase (styAB). Escherichia coli transformants possessing the sty genes of strains ST-5 and ST-10 produced (S)-styrene oxide from styrene, indicating that these genes function as styrene degradation enzymes. Metabolite analysis by resting-cell reaction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that strain ST-5 converts styrene to phenylacetaldehyde via styrene oxide by styrene oxide isomerase (styC) reaction. On the other hand, strain ST-10 lacked this enzyme, and thus accumulated styrene oxide as an intermediate. HPLC analysis showed that styrene oxide was spontaneously isomerized to phenylacetaldehyde by chemical reaction. The produced phenylacetaldehyde was converted to phenylacetic acid (PAA) in strain ST-10 as well as in strain ST-5. Furthermore, phenylacetic acid was converted to phenylacetyl-CoA by the catalysis of phenylacetate-CoA ligase in strains ST-5 and ST-10. This study proposes possible styrene metabolism pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strains ST-5 and ST-10. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferators-Activated Receptor (PPAR Modulators and Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Chul Cho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity lead to an increased risk for metabolic disorders such as impaired glucose regulation/insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Several molecular drug targets with potential to prevent or treat metabolic disorders have been revealed. Interestingly, the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR, which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has many beneficial clinical effects. PPAR directly modulates gene expression by binding to a specific ligand. All PPAR subtypes (α,γ, and σ are involved in glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and energy balance. PPAR agonists play an important role in therapeutic aspects of metabolic disorders. However, undesired effects of the existing PPAR agonists have been reported. A great deal of recent research has focused on the discovery of new PPAR modulators with more beneficial effects and more safety without producing undesired side effects. Herein, we briefly review the roles of PPAR in metabolic disorders, the effects of PPAR modulators in metabolic disorders, and the technologies with which to discover new PPAR modulators.

  15. Bactericidal activity of bio-synthesized silver nanoparticles against human pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abalkhil, Tarad Abdulaziz; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Salmen, Saleh Hussein; Wainwright, Milton

    2017-01-01

    Green synthesis is an attractive and eco-friendly approach to generate potent antibacterial silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). Such particles have long been used to fight bacteria and represent a promising tool to overcome the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. In this study, green synthesis of Ag-NPs was attempted using plant extracts of Aloe vera, Portulaca oleracea and Cynodon dactylon. The identity and size of Ag-NPs was characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscopy. Monodispersed Ag-NPs were produced with a range of different sizes based on the plant extract used. The bactericidal activity of Ag-NPs against a number of human pathogenic bacteria was determined using the disc diffusion method. The results showed that Gram positive bacteria were more susceptible than Gram negative ones to these antibacterial agents. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined using the 96- well plate method. Finally, the mechanism by which Ag-NPs affect bacteria was investigated by SEM analysis. Bacteria treated with Ag-NPs were seen to undergo shrinkage and to lose their viability. This study provides evidence for a cheap and effective method for synthesizing potent bactericidal Ag-NPs and demonstrates their effectiveness against human pathogenic bacteria

  16. Active oil-water interfaces: buckling and deformation of oil drops by bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria are unicellular organisms that seek nutrients and energy for growth, division, and self-propulsion. Bacteria are also natural colloidal particles that attach and self-assemble at liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present experimental results on active oil-water interfaces that spontaneously form when bacteria accumulate or grow on the interface. Using phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, we simultaneously observed the dynamics of adsorbed Alcanivorax bacteria and the oil-water interface within microfluidic devices. We find that, by growing and dividing, adsorbed bacteria form a jammed monolayer of cells that encapsulates the entire oil drop. As bacteria continue to grow at the interface, the drop buckles and the interface undergoes strong deformations. The bacteria act to stabilize non-equilibrium shapes of the oil-phase such wrinkling and tubulation. In addition to presenting a natural example of a living interface, these findings shape our understanding of microbial degradation of oil and may have important repercussions on engineering interventions for oil bioremediation.

  17. Viewing marine bacteria, their activity and response to environmental drivers from orbit: satellite remote sensing of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, D Jay; Ford, Tim E; Colwell, Rita R; Baker-Austin, Craig; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Subramaniam, Ajit; Capone, Douglas G

    2014-04-01

    Satellite-based remote sensing of marine microorganisms has become a useful tool in predicting human health risks associated with these microscopic targets. Early applications were focused on harmful algal blooms, but more recently methods have been developed to interrogate the ocean for bacteria. As satellite-based sensors have become more sophisticated and our ability to interpret information derived from these sensors has advanced, we have progressed from merely making fascinating pictures from space to developing process models with predictive capability. Our understanding of the role of marine microorganisms in primary production and global elemental cycles has been vastly improved as has our ability to use the combination of remote sensing data and models to provide early warning systems for disease outbreaks. This manuscript will discuss current approaches to monitoring cyanobacteria and vibrios, their activity and response to environmental drivers, and will also suggest future directions.

  18. Biphenyl-metabolizing bacteria in the rhizosphere of horseradish and bulk soil contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls as revealed by stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Mackova, Martina; Vlcek, Cestmir; Hroudova, Miluse; Demnerova, Katerina; Paces, Vaclav; Macek, Tomas

    2009-10-01

    DNA-based stable isotope probing in combination with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was used in order to identify members of the microbial community that metabolize biphenyl in the rhizosphere of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) cultivated in soil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) compared to members of the microbial community in initial, uncultivated bulk soil. On the basis of early and recurrent detection of their 16S rRNA genes in clone libraries constructed from [(13)C]DNA, Hydrogenophaga spp. appeared to dominate biphenyl catabolism in the horseradish rhizosphere soil, whereas Paenibacillus spp. were the predominant biphenyl-utilizing bacteria in the initial bulk soil. Other bacteria found to derive carbon from biphenyl in this nutrient-amended microcosm-based study belonged mostly to the class Betaproteobacteria and were identified as Achromobacter spp., Variovorax spp., Methylovorus spp., or Methylophilus spp. Some bacteria that were unclassified at the genus level were also detected, and these bacteria may be members of undescribed genera. The deduced amino acid sequences of the biphenyl dioxygenase alpha subunits (BphA) from bacteria that incorporated [(13)C]into DNA in 3-day incubations of the soils with [(13)C]biphenyl are almost identical to that of Pseudomonas alcaligenes B-357. This suggests that the spectrum of the PCB congeners that can be degraded by these enzymes may be similar to that of strain B-357. These results demonstrate that altering the soil environment can result in the participation of different bacteria in the metabolism of biphenyl.

  19. Multifarious activities of cellulose degrading bacteria from Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surender; Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose degrading bacteria from koala faeces were isolated using caboxymethylcellulose-Congo red agar, screened in vitro for different hydrolytic enzyme activities and phylogenetically characterized using molecular tools. Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were the most prominent bacteria from koala faeces. The isolates demonstrated good xylanase, amylase, lipase, protease, tannase and lignin peroxidase activities apart from endoglucanase activity. Furthermore many isolates grew in the presence of phenanthrene, indicating their probable application for bioremediation. Potential isolates can be exploited further for industrial enzyme production or in bioremediation of contaminated sites.

  20. Co-metabolic formation of substituted phenylacetic acids by styrene-degrading bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Oelschlägel

    2015-06-01

    The styrene-degrading strains Rhodococcus opacus 1CP, Pseudomonas fluorescens ST, and the novel isolates Sphingopyxis sp. Kp5.2 and Gordonia sp. CWB2 were investigated with respect to their applicability to co-metabolically produce substituted phenylacetic acids. Isolates were found to differ significantly in substrate tolerance and biotransformation yields. Especially, P. fluorescens ST was identified as a promising candidate for the production of several phenylacetic acids. The biotransformation of 4-chlorostyrene with cells of strain ST was shown to be stable over a period of more than 200 days and yielded about 38 mmolproduct gcelldryweight−1 after nearly 350 days. Moreover, 4-chloro-α-methylstyrene was predominantly converted to the (S-enantiomer of the acid with 40% enantiomeric excess.

  1. Enhanced sulfamethoxazole degradation through ammonia oxidizing bacteria co-metabolism and fate of transformation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotaki, Elissavet; Buttiglieri, Gianluigi; Ferrando-Climent, Laura; Rodriguez-Roda, Ignasi; Pijuan, Maite

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of the widely-used antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SFX) in wastewaters and surface waters has been reported in a large number of studies. However, the results obtained up-to-date have pointed out disparities in its removal. This manuscript explores the enhanced biodegradation potential of an enriched culture of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) towards SFX. Several sets of batch tests were conducted to establish a link between SFX degradation and specific ammonia oxidation rate. The occurrence, degradation and generation of SFX and some of its transformation products (4-Nitro SFX, Desamino-SFX and N(4)-Acetyl-SFX) was also monitored. A clear link between the degradation of SFX and the nitrification rate was found, resulting in an increased SFX removal at higher specific ammonia oxidation rates. Moreover, experiments conducted under the presence of allylthiourea (ATU) did not present any removal of SFX, suggesting a connection between the AMO enzyme and SFX degradation. Long term experiments (up to 10 weeks) were also conducted adding two different concentrations (10 and 100 μg/L) of SFX in the influent of a partial nitrification sequencing batch reactor, resulting in up to 98% removal. Finally, the formation of transformation products during SFX degradation represented up to 32%, being 4-Nitro-SFX the most abundant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of food preservatives on growth and metabolism of plaque bacteria in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leikanger, S.; Bjertness, E.; Aamdal Scheie, A.

    1992-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the consumption of food preservatives during the last decades, and to study the effect of the preservatives, sorbic and benzoic acid, on growth and glycolysis of oral bacteria in vitro, and on acid formation by dental plaque in vivo. Five consumption reports from the Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway were used to estimate alterations in consumption of staple food containing the two preservatives. A modified broth dilution method was used to determine the MIC values of the preservatives against Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguis. Extracellular 14 C-glycolytic metabolites were studied by HPLC analyses. Plaque-pH measurements were used to assess possible effects on acid production. The consumption reports were used to assess possible effects on acid production. The consumption reports indicated increased consumption of preservatives. The in vitro testing suggested that legal concentrations of preservatives may inhibit the growth of oral streptococci. However, the preservatives did not inhibit in vitro glycolysis at tested concentrations. In vivo testing with similar concentrations (0.4% w/v) showed a significant effect. A higher concentration (2% w/v potassium sorbate) had a tendency to inhibit acid-formation by dental plaque even more. (au)

  3. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Britta; Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Chung, Matthias

    2013-08-29

    Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regulatory elements of the human brain in the whole body energy homeostasis. First, we introduce a general mathematical model describing the human whole body energy metabolism. It takes into account the two central roles of the brain in terms of energy metabolism. The brain is considered as energy consumer as well as regulatory instance. Secondly, we validate our mathematical model by experimental data. Cerebral high-energy phosphate content and peripheral glucose metabolism are measured in healthy men upon neuronal activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham stimulation. By parameter estimation we identify model parameters that provide insight into underlying neurophysiological processes. Identified parameters reveal effects of neuronal activity on regulatory mechanisms of systemic glucose metabolism. Our examinations support the view that the brain increases its glucose supply upon neuronal activation. The results indicate that the brain supplies itself with energy according to its needs, and preeminence of cerebral energy supply is reflected. This mechanism ensures balanced cerebral energy homeostasis. The hypothesis of the central role of the brain in whole body energy homeostasis as active controller is supported.

  4. In vivo assay to identify bacteria with β-glucosidase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Strahsburger

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: This in vivo β-glucosidase assay can be used as an enzymatic test on living cells without cell disruption. The method is simple, quantitative, and recommended, especially in studies screening for bacteria not only with β-glucosidase activity but also with high β-glucosidase activity.

  5. Antimicrobial activities of epiphytic bacteria associated of the brown alga Padina pavonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Ben Ali Ismail

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Macroalgae belonging to the genus Padina are known to produce antibacterial compounds that may inhibit growth of human- and animal pathogens. Hitherto, it was unclear whether this antibacterial activity is produced by the macroalga itself or by secondary metabolite producing epiphytic bacteria. Here we report antibacterial activities of epiphytic bacteria isolated from Padina pavonica (Peacocks tail located on northern coast of Tunisia. Eighteen isolates were obtained in pure culture and tested for antimicrobial activities. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences the isolates were closely related to Proteobacteria (12 isolates; 2 Alpha- and 10 Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes (4 isolates and Actinobacteria (2 isolates. The antimicrobial activity was assessed as inhibition of growth of twelve species of pathogenic bacteria (Aeromonas salmonicida, A. hydrophila, Enterobacter xiangfangensis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus sp., Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp., Vibrio alginoliticus, V. proteolyticus, V. vulnificus and one pathogenic yeast (Candida albicans. Among the Firmicutes, isolate P8, which is closely related to Bacillus pumilus, displayed the largest spectrum of growth inhibition of the pathogenic bacteria tested. The results emphasize the potential use of P. pavonica associated antagonistic bacteria as producers of novel antibacterial compounds.

  6. Carnobacterium species: Effect of metabolic activity and interaction with Brochothrix thermosphacta on sensory characteristics of modified atmosphere packed shrimp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Birgit Groth; Leisner, J.J.; Dalgaard, Paw

    2006-01-01

    of Carnobacterium divergens, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, and Carnobacterium mobile. Metabolic activity was studied in cooked and peeled modified atmosphere packed (MAP) shrimp at 5 degrees C as carnobacteria has been anticipated to contribute to spoilage of shrimp products. C. divergens and C. maltaromaticum...... caused sensory spoilage of shrimps and generated ammonia, tyramine, and various alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. The effects of Carnobacterium species on the growth and metabolism of Brochothrix thermosphacta were also evaluated, but metabiosis between the two groups of bacteria was not observed. C...

  7. STAT3 Activities and Energy Metabolism: Dangerous Liaisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camporeale, Annalisa, E-mail: annalisa.camporeale@unito.it [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy); Demaria, Marco [Buck Institute for Research on Aging, 8001 Redwood Blvd, Novato, CA 94945 (United States); Monteleone, Emanuele [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy); Giorgi, Carlotta [Department of Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Section of General Pathology, Laboratory for Technologies of Advances Therapies (LTTA), University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 70, Ferrara 44121 (Italy); Wieckowski, Mariusz R. [Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Department of Biochemistry, Pasteur Str. 3, Warsaw 02-093 (Poland); Pinton, Paolo [Department of Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Section of General Pathology, Laboratory for Technologies of Advances Therapies (LTTA), University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 70, Ferrara 44121 (Italy); Poli, Valeria, E-mail: annalisa.camporeale@unito.it [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy)

    2014-07-31

    STAT3 mediates cytokine and growth factor receptor signalling, becoming transcriptionally active upon tyrosine 705 phosphorylation (Y-P). Constitutively Y-P STAT3 is observed in many tumors that become addicted to its activity, and STAT3 transcriptional activation is required for tumor transformation downstream of several oncogenes. We have recently demonstrated that constitutively active STAT3 drives a metabolic switch towards aerobic glycolysis through the transcriptional induction of Hif-1α and the down-regulation of mitochondrial activity, in both MEF cells expressing constitutively active STAT3 (Stat3{sup C/C}) and STAT3-addicted tumor cells. This novel metabolic function is likely involved in mediating pre-oncogenic features in the primary Stat3{sup C/C} MEFs such as resistance to apoptosis and senescence and rapid proliferation. Moreover, it strongly contributes to the ability of primary Stat3{sup C/C} MEFs to undergo malignant transformation upon spontaneous immortalization, a feature that may explain the well known causative link between STAT3 constitutive activity and tumor transformation under chronic inflammatory conditions. Taken together with the recently uncovered role of STAT3 in regulating energy metabolism from within the mitochondrion when phosphorylated on Ser 727, these data place STAT3 at the center of a hub regulating energy metabolism under different conditions, in most cases promoting cell survival, proliferation and malignant transformation even though with distinct mechanisms.

  8. STAT3 Activities and Energy Metabolism: Dangerous Liaisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camporeale, Annalisa; Demaria, Marco; Monteleone, Emanuele; Giorgi, Carlotta; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Pinton, Paolo; Poli, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    STAT3 mediates cytokine and growth factor receptor signalling, becoming transcriptionally active upon tyrosine 705 phosphorylation (Y-P). Constitutively Y-P STAT3 is observed in many tumors that become addicted to its activity, and STAT3 transcriptional activation is required for tumor transformation downstream of several oncogenes. We have recently demonstrated that constitutively active STAT3 drives a metabolic switch towards aerobic glycolysis through the transcriptional induction of Hif-1α and the down-regulation of mitochondrial activity, in both MEF cells expressing constitutively active STAT3 (Stat3 C/C ) and STAT3-addicted tumor cells. This novel metabolic function is likely involved in mediating pre-oncogenic features in the primary Stat3 C/C MEFs such as resistance to apoptosis and senescence and rapid proliferation. Moreover, it strongly contributes to the ability of primary Stat3 C/C MEFs to undergo malignant transformation upon spontaneous immortalization, a feature that may explain the well known causative link between STAT3 constitutive activity and tumor transformation under chronic inflammatory conditions. Taken together with the recently uncovered role of STAT3 in regulating energy metabolism from within the mitochondrion when phosphorylated on Ser 727, these data place STAT3 at the center of a hub regulating energy metabolism under different conditions, in most cases promoting cell survival, proliferation and malignant transformation even though with distinct mechanisms

  9. Antibacterial activity of different honeys against pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voidarou, C; Alexopoulos, A; Plessas, S; Karapanou, A; Mantzourani, I; Stavropoulou, E; Fotou, K; Tzora, A; Skoufos, I; Bezirtzoglou, E

    2011-12-01

    To study the antimicrobial activity of honey, 60 samples of various botanical origin were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against 16 clinical pathogens and their respective reference strains. The microbiological quality of honeys and the antibiotic susceptibility of the various isolates were also examined. The bioassay applied for determining the antimicrobial effect employs the well-agar diffusion method and the estimation of minimum active dilution which produces a 1mm diameter inhibition zone. All honey samples, despite their origin (coniferous, citrus, thyme or polyfloral), showed antibacterial activity against the pathogenic and their respective reference strains at variable levels. Coniferous and thyme honeys showed the highest activity with an average minimum dilution of 17.4 and 19.2% (w/v) followed by citrus and polyfloral honeys with 20.8 and 23.8% respectively. Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis were proven to be up to 60% more resistant than their equal reference strains thus emphasizing the variability in the antibacterial effect of honey and the need for further research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical activity effects on bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E L; Gilligan, C

    1991-01-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic fractures rises exponentially with age and is increasing faster than the demographic increase in the aging population. Physical activity has great potential to reduce the risk for osteoporotic fractures. Three independent but interactive factors contribute to the risk of fractures: bone strength, the risk of falling, and the effectiveness of neuromuscular response that protects the skeleton from injury. Exercise can reduce fracture risk not only by preventing bone loss, but by decreasing the risk of falling and the force of impact by improving strength, flexibility, balance, and reaction time. Extreme inactivity causes rapid bone loss of up to 40%, while athletic activity results in bone hypertrophy of up to 40%. Exercise intervention programs have reduced bone loss or increased bone mass in both men and women of various ages and initial bone status. These benefits have been shown for arm bone mineral content, total body calcium, spine, calcium bone index, tibia, and calcaneus. In both middle-aged and elderly women, physical activity intervention reduced bone loss or increased bone mass. The mechanisms for maintenance of skeletal integrity rely on a cellular response to hormonal and mechanical load stimuli. Studies in animal models show that training affects cellular activity. In osteoporotics, cellular erosion is increased and mineral apposition rate (MAR) decreased compared with normal age-matched controls. In contrast to this, sows trained on a treadmill 20 min per day for 20 weeks had greater active periosteal surface, periosteal MAR, and osteonal MAR than untrained sows.

  11. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Judy D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2014-12-23

    The degradation of our environment and the depletion of fossil fuels make the exploration of alternative fuels evermore imperative. Among the alternatives is biohydrogen which has high energy content by weight and produces only water when combusted. Considerable effort is being expended to develop photosynthetic systems -- algae, cyanobacteria, and anaerobic phototrophs -- for sustainable H2 production. While promising, this approach also has hurdles such as the harvesting of light in densely pigmented cultures that requires costly constant mixing and large areas for exposure to sunlight. Little attention is given to fermentative H2 generation. Thus understanding the microbial pathways to H2 evolution and metabolic processes competing for electrons is an essential foundation that may expand the variety of fuels that can be generated or provide alternative substrates for fine chemical production. We studied a widely found soil anaerobe of the class Deltaproteobacteria, a sulfate-reducing bacterium to determine the electron pathways used during the oxidation of substrates and the potential for hydrogen production.

  12. FORMALDEHYDE DISMUTASE ACTIVITIES IN GRAM-POSITIVE BACTERIA OXIDIZING METHANOL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BYSTRYKH, LV; GOVORUKHINA, NI; VANOPHEM, PW; HEKTOR, HJ; DIJKHUIZEN, L; DUINE, JA; Govorukhina, Natalya; Ophem, Peter W. van; Duine, Johannis A.

    Extracts of methanol-grown cells of Amycolatopsis methanolica and Mycobacterium gastri oxidized methanol and ethanol with concomitant reduction of N,N'-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline (NDMA). Anion-exchange chromatography revealed the presence of a single enzyme able to catalyse this activity in methanol-

  13. Biochemical activities of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) degrading bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five indigenous DCA degrading bacterial isolates capable of completely degrading DCA under aerobic conditions recently isolated from South African waste water treatment facilities, were found to belong to the genus Ancylobacter. The specific activities of the enzymes in DCA catabolism were compared with previously ...

  14. Antimicrobial activity of Mucuna pruriens on selected bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-19

    Sep 19, 2007 ... Manyam BV, Dhanasekaran M, Hare TA (1995). An Alternative. Medicine Treatment for Parkinson's diease: Results of a Multicenter. Clinical Trial, J. Altern. Complement Med., 1(3): 249-255. Russell AD, Furr JR (1977). Antibacterial activity of a new chloroxylenol preparation containing ethylenediamine ...

  15. Natural Killer Cell Activity and Interleukin-12 in Metabolically Healthy versus Metabolically Unhealthy Overweight Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Minkyung; Yoo, Hye Jin; Lee, Jong Ho

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the immune system is involved in the different metabolic circumstances in healthy and unhealthy overweight individuals. We examined the metabolic and immune characteristics of 117 overweight individuals. Subjects were classified as metabolically healthy overweight (MHO, n = 72) or metabolically unhealthy overweight (MUO, n = 45). The immune response was measured by circulating levels of natural killer (NK) cell activity and cytokines. Both groups were comparable with regards to age, sex distribution, smoking and drinking status, and body mass index. When compared to the MHO group, the MUO group showed higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum levels of triglyceride, glucose, glucose-related markers, and lower levels of HDL cholesterol. Compared to the MHO group, the MUO group showed 39% lower interferon-γ levels (not significant) and 41% lower interleukin (IL)-12 levels (significant). The MUO group also showed lower NK cell activity at E:T ratios of 10:1, 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1 (all Ps < 0.05) than the MHO group. This study indicates that individuals displaying the MUO phenotype present an unfavorable immune system with lower NK cell activities under all assay conditions and lower serum levels of IL-12 than the activities and levels in similarly overweight MHO individuals. This result suggests that the immune system may be altered in overweight individuals who are at risk for overweight/obesity-related comorbidities. PMID:29238351

  16. Natural Killer Cell Activity and Interleukin-12 in Metabolically Healthy versus Metabolically Unhealthy Overweight Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjoo Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the immune system is involved in the different metabolic circumstances in healthy and unhealthy overweight individuals. We examined the metabolic and immune characteristics of 117 overweight individuals. Subjects were classified as metabolically healthy overweight (MHO, n = 72 or metabolically unhealthy overweight (MUO, n = 45. The immune response was measured by circulating levels of natural killer (NK cell activity and cytokines. Both groups were comparable with regards to age, sex distribution, smoking and drinking status, and body mass index. When compared to the MHO group, the MUO group showed higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum levels of triglyceride, glucose, glucose-related markers, and lower levels of HDL cholesterol. Compared to the MHO group, the MUO group showed 39% lower interferon-γ levels (not significant and 41% lower interleukin (IL-12 levels (significant. The MUO group also showed lower NK cell activity at E:T ratios of 10:1, 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1 (all Ps < 0.05 than the MHO group. This study indicates that individuals displaying the MUO phenotype present an unfavorable immune system with lower NK cell activities under all assay conditions and lower serum levels of IL-12 than the activities and levels in similarly overweight MHO individuals. This result suggests that the immune system may be altered in overweight individuals who are at risk for overweight/obesity-related comorbidities.

  17. [Number of bacteria and features of their activity in hypersaline reservoirs of the Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrynin, E G

    1979-01-01

    The incidence of bacteria, their biomass production, and heterotrophic assimilation of CO2 by bacterioplankton were studied in the Crimean hypersaline water reservoirs from May to October of 1974. The total incidence of bacteria in the natural brine of these reservoirs varied from 20 to 70 x 10(6) cells per 1 ml. Such a high bacterial number may be caused by the combined action of water evaporation which increased the concentration of bacterial cells and active growth of microflora. Low values of bacterial production and heterotrophic CO2 assimilation should be attributed to weak activity of microflora in the reservoirs.

  18. Antibacterial activity of Pinus elliottii against anaerobic bacteria present in primary endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano da Silva, Sandro Donizete; Mendes de Souza, Maria Gorete; Oliveira Cardoso, Miguel Jorge; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Sola Veneziani, Rodrigo Cássio; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2014-12-01

    Endodontic infections have a polymicrobial nature, but anaerobic bacteria prevail among the infectious microbes. Considering that it is easy to eliminate planktonic bacteria, biofilm-forming bacteria still challenge clinicians during the fight against endodontic diseases. The chemical constituents of the oleoresin of Pinus elliottii, a plant belonging to the family Pinaceae, stand out in the search for biologically active compounds based on natural products with potential application in the treatment of endodontic infections. Indeed, plant oleoresins are an abundant natural source of diterpenes that display significant and well-defined biological activities as well as potential antimicrobial action. In this context, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the oleoresin, fractions, and subfractions of P. elliottii as well as the action of dehydroabietic acid against 11 anaerobic bacteria that cause endodontic infection in both their planktonic and biofilm forms and (2) assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the same group of bacteria. The broth microdilution technique helped to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the oleoresin and fractions. This same technique aided determination of the MIC values of nine subfractions of Fraction 1, the most active fraction. The MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration, and antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the tested anaerobic bacteria were also examined. The oleoresin and fractions, especially fraction PE1, afforded promising MIC values, which ranged from 0.4 to 50 μg/mL. Concerning the nine evaluated subfractions, PE1.3 and PE1.4 furnished the most noteworthy MIC values, between 6.2 and 100 μg/mL. Dehydroabietic acid displayed antibacterial activity, with MIC values lying from 6.2 to 50 μg/mL, as well as bactericidal effect for all the investigated bacteria, except for Prevotella nigrescens. Assessment of the antibiofilm

  19. Metabolic-epigenetic crosstalk in macrophage activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baardman, Jeroen; Licht, Iris; de Winther, Menno P. J.; van den Bossche, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic enzymes are emerging as crucial controllers of macrophages, innate immune cells that determine the outcome of many inflammatory diseases. Recent studies demonstrate that the activity of particular chromatin-modifying enzymes is regulated by the availability of specific metabolites like

  20. Screening of plant extracts for antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckesser, S; Engel, K; Simon-Haarhaus, B; Wittmer, A; Pelz, K; Schempp, C M

    2007-08-01

    There is cumulative resistance against antibiotics of many bacteria. Therefore, the development of new antiseptics and antimicrobial agents for the treatment of skin infections is of increasing interest. We have screened six plant extracts and isolated compounds for antimicrobial effects on bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance. The following plant extracts have been tested: Gentiana lutea, Harpagophytum procumbens, Boswellia serrata (dry extracts), Usnea barbata, Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis (supercritical carbon dioxide [CO2] extracts). Additionally, the following characteristic plant substances were tested: usnic acid, carnosol, carnosic acid, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, harpagoside, boswellic acid and gentiopicroside. The extracts and compounds were tested against 29 aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and yeasts in the agar dilution test. U. barbata-extract and usnic acid were the most active compounds, especially in anaerobic bacteria. Usnea CO2-extract effectively inhibited the growth of several Gram-positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant strains - MRSA), Propionibacterium acnes and Corynebacterium species. Growth of the dimorphic yeast Malassezia furfur was also inhibited by Usnea-extract. Besides the Usnea-extract, Rosmarinus-, Salvia-, Boswellia- and Harpagophytum-extracts proved to be effective against a panel of bacteria. It is concluded that due to their antimicrobial effects some of the plant extracts may be used for the topical treatment of skin disorders like acne vulgaris and seborrhoic eczema.

  1. Effects of activation of endocannabinoid system on myocardial metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Polak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids exert their effect on the regulation of energy homeostasis via activation of specific receptors. They control food intake, secretion of insulin, lipids and glucose metabolism, lipid storage. Long chain fatty acids are the main myocardial energy substrate. However, the heart exerts enormous metabolic flexibility emphasized by its ability to utilzation not only fatty acids, but also glucose, lactate and ketone bodies. Endocannabinoids can directly act on the cardiomyocytes through the CB1 and CB2 receptors present in cardiomyocytes. It appears that direct activation of CB1 receptors promotes increased lipogenesis, pericardial steatosis and bioelectrical dysfunction of the heart. In contrast, stimulation of CB2 receptors exhibits cardioprotective properties, helping to maintain appropriate amount of ATP in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the effects of endocannabinoids at both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, such as liver, pancreas, or adipose tissue, resulting indirectly in plasma availability of energy substrates and affects myocardial metabolism. To date, there is little evidence that describes effects of activation of the endocannabinoid system in the cardiovascular system under physiological conditions. In the present paper the impact of metabolic diseases, i. e. obesity and diabetes, as well as the cardiovascular diseases - hypertension, myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction on the deregulation of the endocannabinoid system and its effect on the metabolism are described.

  2. Glucose metabolism regulates T cell activation, differentiation and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Steve Palmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune system is equipped to eliminate both tumors and pathogenic microorganisms. It requires a series of complex and coordinated signals to drive the activation, proliferation and differentiation of appropriate T cell subsets. It is now established that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, emerging evidence now suggest that specific metabolic alterations associated with distinct T cell subsets may be ancillary to their differentiation and influential in their immune functions. The Warburg effect originally used to describe a phenomenon in which most cancer cells relied on aerobic glycolysis for their growth is a key process that sustain T cell activation and differentiation. Here we review how different aspects of metabolism in T cells influence their functions, focusing on the emerging role of key regulators of glucose metabolism such as HIF-1α. A thorough understanding of the role of metabolism in T cell function could provide insights into mechanisms involved in inflammatory-mediated conditions, with the potential for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat these diseases.

  3. Antifungal Activity of Lactobacillus sp. Bacteria in the Presence of Xylitol and Galactosyl-Xylitol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Lipińska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid fermentation is a natural method of antimicrobial food protection. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus sp. bacteria, taking part in this process, is directed mainly against the same or other microorganisms. In this work we determine the impact of the presence of xylitol and galactosyl-xylitol on the antagonistic activity of 60 Lactobacillus sp. strains against indicator molds (Alternaria alternata, Alternaria brassicicola, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium latenicum, Geotrichum candidum, and Mucor hiemalis and yeasts (Candida vini. We used double-layer method to select antifungal strains of Lactobacillus bacteria and poisoned medium method to confirm their fungistatic properties. Additionally, we examined the inhibition of Alternaria brassicicola by Lactobacillus paracasei ŁOCK 0921 cultivated with xylitol or galactosyl-xylitol directly on wild cherries. The presence of xylitol and its galactosyl derivative led to increase of spectrum of antifungal activity in most of the studied plant-associated lactobacilli strains. However, no single strain exhibited activity against all the indicator microorganisms. The antifungal activity of Lactobacillus bacteria against molds varied considerably and depended on both the indicator strain and the composition of the medium. The presence of xylitol and galactosyl-xylitol in the growth medium is correlated with the antifungal activity of the studied Lactobacillus sp. bacteria against selected indicator molds.

  4. Antifungal Activity of Lactobacillus sp. Bacteria in the Presence of Xylitol and Galactosyl-Xylitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipińska, Lidia; Klewicki, Robert; Klewicka, Elżbieta; Kołodziejczyk, Krzysztof; Sójka, Michał; Nowak, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid fermentation is a natural method of antimicrobial food protection. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus sp. bacteria, taking part in this process, is directed mainly against the same or other microorganisms. In this work we determine the impact of the presence of xylitol and galactosyl-xylitol on the antagonistic activity of 60 Lactobacillus sp. strains against indicator molds (Alternaria alternata, Alternaria brassicicola, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium latenicum, Geotrichum candidum, and Mucor hiemalis) and yeasts (Candida vini). We used double-layer method to select antifungal strains of Lactobacillus bacteria and poisoned medium method to confirm their fungistatic properties. Additionally, we examined the inhibition of Alternaria brassicicola by Lactobacillus paracasei ŁOCK 0921 cultivated with xylitol or galactosyl-xylitol directly on wild cherries. The presence of xylitol and its galactosyl derivative led to increase of spectrum of antifungal activity in most of the studied plant-associated lactobacilli strains. However, no single strain exhibited activity against all the indicator microorganisms. The antifungal activity of Lactobacillus bacteria against molds varied considerably and depended on both the indicator strain and the composition of the medium. The presence of xylitol and galactosyl-xylitol in the growth medium is correlated with the antifungal activity of the studied Lactobacillus sp. bacteria against selected indicator molds.

  5. Antifungal Activity of Lactobacillus sp. Bacteria in the Presence of Xylitol and Galactosyl-Xylitol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipińska, Lidia; Klewicki, Robert; Klewicka, Elżbieta; Kołodziejczyk, Krzysztof; Sójka, Michał; Nowak, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid fermentation is a natural method of antimicrobial food protection. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus sp. bacteria, taking part in this process, is directed mainly against the same or other microorganisms. In this work we determine the impact of the presence of xylitol and galactosyl-xylitol on the antagonistic activity of 60 Lactobacillus sp. strains against indicator molds (Alternaria alternata, Alternaria brassicicola, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium latenicum, Geotrichum candidum, and Mucor hiemalis) and yeasts (Candida vini). We used double-layer method to select antifungal strains of Lactobacillus bacteria and poisoned medium method to confirm their fungistatic properties. Additionally, we examined the inhibition of Alternaria brassicicola by Lactobacillus paracasei ŁOCK 0921 cultivated with xylitol or galactosyl-xylitol directly on wild cherries. The presence of xylitol and its galactosyl derivative led to increase of spectrum of antifungal activity in most of the studied plant-associated lactobacilli strains. However, no single strain exhibited activity against all the indicator microorganisms. The antifungal activity of Lactobacillus bacteria against molds varied considerably and depended on both the indicator strain and the composition of the medium. The presence of xylitol and galactosyl-xylitol in the growth medium is correlated with the antifungal activity of the studied Lactobacillus sp. bacteria against selected indicator molds. PMID:27294124

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Diterpenes from Viguiera arenaria against Endodontic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H. G. Martins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Six pimarane-type diterpenes isolated from Viguiera arenaria Baker and two semi-synthetic derivatives were evaluated in vitro against a panel of representative microorganisms responsible for dental root canal infections. The microdilution method was used for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC against Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella buccae, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces viscosus, Peptostreptococcus micros, Enterococcus faecalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The compounds ent-pimara-8(14,15-dien-19-oic acid, its sodium salt and ent-8(14,15-pimaradien-3β-ol were the most active, displaying MIC values ranging from 1 to 10 μg mL-1. The results also allow us to conclude that minor structural differences among these diterpenes significantly influence their antimicrobial activity, bringing new perspectives to the discovery of new chemicals for use as a complement to instrumental endodontic procedures.

  7. Effect of electromagnetic fields on the bacteria bioluminescent activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzhanskaya, L.Yu.; Berzhanskij, V.N.; Beloplotova, O.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of electromagnetic field with frequency from 36.2 to 55.9 GHz on bioluminescence activity of bacterium were investigated. Electromagnetic field results in decrease of bioluminescence, which depends from frequency. The electromagnetic field adaptation time is higher of intrinsic time parameters of bioluminescence system. The effect has nonthermal nature. It is suggested that electromagnetic field influence connects with structure rearrangements near cell emitter. 8 refs.; 3 figs

  8. Lipolytic activity from bacteria prospected in polluted portuary sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Levy Fonseca

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates that these TBT resistant isolates have, at the same time, the capacity to produce enzymes with a large biotechnological potential but, nevertheless, their relationship is not well understood, representing a novel approach. It is expected for these organisms to produce highly biotechnological relevant biocatalysts, due to their severe adaptations (Suehiro et al., 2007. The fully characterization of these lipases, mostly for F3 with elevated lipolytic activity exhibited, presents also a future challenge.

  9. [Bactericidal activity of colloidal silver against grampositive and gramnegative bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonina, I A; Kraeva, L A; Tseneva, G Ia

    2010-01-01

    It was shown that colloidal silver solution prepared in cooperation with the A. F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, had significant bactericidal activity. Stable bactericidal effect on gramnegative microorganisms was observed after their 2-hour exposition in the solution of colloidal silver at a concentration of 10 ppm. Grampositive capsule-forming microorganisms were less susceptible to the colloidal silver solution: their death was observed after the 4-hour exposition in the solution.

  10. Community structure, cellular rRNA content, and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in marine Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravenschlag, K.; Sahm, K.; Knoblauch, C.

    2000-01-01

    The community structure of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) of a marine Arctic sediment (Smeerenburg-fjorden, Svalbard) a-as characterized by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and rRNA slot blot hybridization by using group- and genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes...... that FISH and rRNA slot blot hybridization gave comparable results. Furthermore, a combination of the two methods allowed us to calculate specific cellular rRNA contents with respect to localization in the sediment profile. The rRNA contents of Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cells were highest in the first 5...... mm of the sediment (0.9 and 1.4 fg, respectively) and decreased steeply with depth, indicating that maximal metabolic activity occurred close to the surface, Based on SRB cell numbers, cellular sulfate reduction rates were calculated. The rates were highest in the surface layer (0.14 fmol cell(-1...

  11. Effects of the inoculations using bacteria producing ACC deaminase on ethylene metabolism and growth of wheat grown under different soil water contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guozhuang; Sun, Yonglin; Sheng, Hao; Li, Haichao; Liu, Xiping

    2018-04-01

    Crop growth and productivity are often impacted by the increased ethylene content induced by adverse environmental conditions such drought. Inoculations with bacteria producing ACC deaminase is considered as a potential biological approach to improve the growth and tolerance of stressed plants by lowering endogenous ethylene level. In this study, germinated wheat seeds were inoculated using three species of the rhizobacteria, which were isolated from the rhizosphere of wheat growing in dryland, and sown in pots. After three weeks, wheat seedlings were exposed to non-limiting water condition, medium drought and severe drought, respectively, for six weeks. The results showed that, irrespective of rhizobacterial inoculations, decreased soil water contents stimulated wheat ethylene metabolism, which was reflected by the significantly increased activity of ACC synthetase and ACC oxidase, besides an increased content of ACC both in the roots and leaves, and an enhanced capacity of leaves to release ethylene, concomitant with a significant decline in shoot and roots biomass. The inoculations of all three rhizobacterial species under each water condition reduced ACC content in wheat leaves, but effects of the inoculations on ACC synthase and ACC oxidase activity in the leaves and roots, ACC content in the roots, the capacity of leaves to release ethylene, and wheat growth varied with water conditions and bacterial species. Hence, both soil water conditions and rhizobacterial inoculations acted on all the processes of ethylene metabolism, with the former being dominant. The inoculations under non-limiting water condition and medium drought promoted shoot and root growth of wheat plants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Ice nucleation active bacteria in precipitation are genetically diverse and nucleate ice by employing different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failor, K C; Schmale, D G; Vinatzer, B A; Monteil, C L

    2017-12-01

    A growing body of circumstantial evidence suggests that ice nucleation active (Ice + ) bacteria contribute to the initiation of precipitation by heterologous freezing of super-cooled water in clouds. However, little is known about the concentration of Ice + bacteria in precipitation, their genetic and phenotypic diversity, and their relationship to air mass trajectories and precipitation chemistry. In this study, 23 precipitation events were collected over 15 months in Virginia, USA. Air mass trajectories and water chemistry were determined and 33 134 isolates were screened for ice nucleation activity (INA) at -8 °C. Of 1144 isolates that tested positive during initial screening, 593 had confirmed INA at -8 °C in repeated tests. Concentrations of Ice + strains in precipitation were found to range from 0 to 13 219 colony forming units per liter, with a mean of 384±147. Most Ice + bacteria were identified as members of known and unknown Ice + species in the Pseudomonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and Xanthomonadaceae families, which nucleate ice employing the well-characterized membrane-bound INA protein. Two Ice + strains, however, were identified as Lysinibacillus, a Gram-positive genus not previously known to include Ice + bacteria. INA of the Lysinibacillus strains is due to a nanometer-sized molecule that is heat resistant, lysozyme and proteinase resistant, and secreted. Ice + bacteria and the INA mechanisms they employ are thus more diverse than expected. We discuss to what extent the concentration of culturable Ice + bacteria in precipitation and the identification of a new heat-resistant biological INA mechanism support a role for Ice + bacteria in the initiation of precipitation.

  13. Transplant experiments uncover Baltic Sea basin-specific responses in bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Markus V; Figueroa, Daniela; Sjöstedt, Johanna; Baltar, Federico; Lundin, Daniel; Andersson, Agneta; Legrand, Catherine; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenically induced changes in precipitation are projected to generate increased river runoff to semi-enclosed seas, increasing loads of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and decreasing salinity. To determine how bacterial community structure and functioning adjust to such changes, we designed microcosm transplant experiments with Baltic Proper (salinity 7.2) and Bothnian Sea (salinity 3.6) water. Baltic Proper bacteria generally reached higher abundances than Bothnian Sea bacteria in both Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea water, indicating higher adaptability. Moreover, Baltic Proper bacteria growing in Bothnian Sea water consistently showed highest bacterial production and beta-glucosidase activity. These metabolic responses were accompanied by basin-specific changes in bacterial community structure. For example, Baltic Proper Pseudomonas and Limnobacter populations increased markedly in relative abundance in Bothnian Sea water, indicating a replacement effect. In contrast, Roseobacter and Rheinheimera populations were stable or increased in abundance when challenged by either of the waters, indicating an adjustment effect. Transplants to Bothnian Sea water triggered the initial emergence of particular Burkholderiaceae populations, and transplants to Baltic Proper water triggered Alteromonadaceae populations. Notably, in the subsequent re-transplant experiment, a priming effect resulted in further increases to dominance of these populations. Correlated changes in community composition and metabolic activity were observed only in the transplant experiment and only at relatively high phylogenetic resolution. This suggested an importance of successional progression for interpreting relationships between bacterial community composition and functioning. We infer that priming effects on bacterial community structure by natural episodic events or climate change induced forcing could translate into long-term changes in bacterial ecosystem process rates.

  14. Transplant experiments uncover Baltic Sea basin-specific responses in bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus V Lindh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenically induced changes in precipitation are projected to generate increased river runoff to semi-enclosed seas, intensifying loads of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and decreasing salinity. To determine how bacterial community structure and functioning adjust to such changes, we designed microcosm transplant experiments with Baltic Proper (salinity 7.2 and Bothnian Sea (salinity 3.6 water. Baltic Proper bacteria generally reached higher abundance than Bothnian Sea bacteria in both Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea water, indicating a higher adaptability. Moreover, Baltic Proper bacteria growing in Bothnian Sea water consistently showed highest bacterial production and beta-glucosidase activity. These metabolic responses were accompanied by basin-specific changes in bacterial community structure. For example, Baltic Proper Pseudomonas and Limnobacter populations increased markedly in relative abundance in Bothnian Sea water, indicating replacement. In contrast, Roseobacter and Rheinheimera populations were stable or increased in abundance when challenged by either of the waters, indicating adjustment. Transplants to Bothnian Sea water triggered the initial emergence of particular Burkholderiaceae populations, and transplants to Baltic Proper water triggered Alteromonadaceae populations. Notably, in the subsequent re-transplant experiment, the original triggering, or priming effect, resulted in further increases to dominance of these populations. Correlated changes in community composition and metabolic activity were observed only in the transplant experiment, and only at relatively high phylogenetic resolution. This suggested an importance of successional progression for interpreting relationships between bacterial community composition and functioning. We infer that priming effects on bacterial community structure by natural episodic events or climate change induced forcing could translate into long-term changes in bacterial

  15. Multiresistant Bacteria Isolated from Activated Sludge in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Galler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater contains different kinds of contaminants, including antibiotics and bacterial isolates with human-generated antibiotic resistances. In industrialized countries most of the wastewater is processed in wastewater treatment plants which do not only include commercial wastewater, but also wastewater from hospitals. Three multiresistant pathogens—extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-harbouring Enterobacteriaceae (Gram negative bacilli, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE—were chosen for screening in a state of the art wastewater treatment plant in Austria. Over an investigation period of six months all three multiresistant pathogens could be isolated from activated sludge. ESBL was the most common resistance mechanism, which was found in different species of Enterobacteriaceae, and in one Aeromonas spp. Sequencing of ESBL genes revealed the dominance of genes encoding members of CTX-M β-lactamases family and a gene encoding for PER-1 ESBL was detected for the first time in Austria. MRSA and VRE could be isolated sporadically, including one EMRSA-15 isolate. Whereas ESBL is well documented as a surface water contaminant, reports of MRSA and VRE are rare. The results of this study show that these three multiresistant phenotypes were present in activated sludge, as well as species and genes which were not reported before in the region. The ESBL-harbouring Gram negative bacilli were most common.

  16. Multiresistant Bacteria Isolated from Activated Sludge in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feierl, Gebhard; Petternel, Christian; Reinthaler, Franz F.; Haas, Doris; Habib, Juliana; Kittinger, Clemens; Luxner, Josefa

    2018-01-01

    Wastewater contains different kinds of contaminants, including antibiotics and bacterial isolates with human-generated antibiotic resistances. In industrialized countries most of the wastewater is processed in wastewater treatment plants which do not only include commercial wastewater, but also wastewater from hospitals. Three multiresistant pathogens—extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-harbouring Enterobacteriaceae (Gram negative bacilli), methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE)—were chosen for screening in a state of the art wastewater treatment plant in Austria. Over an investigation period of six months all three multiresistant pathogens could be isolated from activated sludge. ESBL was the most common resistance mechanism, which was found in different species of Enterobacteriaceae, and in one Aeromonas spp. Sequencing of ESBL genes revealed the dominance of genes encoding members of CTX-M β-lactamases family and a gene encoding for PER-1 ESBL was detected for the first time in Austria. MRSA and VRE could be isolated sporadically, including one EMRSA-15 isolate. Whereas ESBL is well documented as a surface water contaminant, reports of MRSA and VRE are rare. The results of this study show that these three multiresistant phenotypes were present in activated sludge, as well as species and genes which were not reported before in the region. The ESBL-harbouring Gram negative bacilli were most common. PMID:29522474

  17. Phytochemicals Screening and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Elaeis guineensis Leaves Extracts Against Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorshilawati Abdul Aziz; Umi Nadhirah Halim; Nur Suraya Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Chloroform and methanol extracts of Elaeis guineensis leaves were investigated for in vitro antibacterial activity against the human pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Four different concentrations of both extracts consists of 50, 100, 200 and 300 mg/ ml were prepared for antibacterial activity using disc diffusion method. The results revealed that chloroform and methonal extract showed high toxicity against all bacterial strain tested. However, both extracts is more effective and exhibit better inhibiting activity against gram positive bacteria, S. aureus compared to gram negative bacteria (E. coli and P. aeruginosa). Methanol extract of Elaeis guineensis leaves shows greater inhibition zone compared to chloroform extract as phyto chemical screening revealed that this extracts contain terpenoids, tannins and saponin. The highest antibacterial activity was exhibited by 300 mg/ ml methanolic extracts against S. aureus which inhibited 10.67 ± 0.33 mm of the diameter zone. Followed by 200 mg/ ml methanolic extracts and 300 mg/ ml chloroform extracts against S. aureus which inhibited 9.17 ± 0.17 mm and 8.33 ± 1.67 mm respectively. This result revealed the potentials of Elaeis guineensis as antibacterial agent in combating infections from human pathogenic bacteria. However, further studies, including identification and purification of the active compounds, will need to be pursued. (author)

  18. Metabolic profiling of two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines inoculated with the nitrogen fixing plant-interacting bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusamarello-Santos, Liziane Cristina; Gilard, Françoise; Brulé, Lenaïg; Quilleré, Isabelle; Gourion, Benjamin; Ratet, Pascal; Maltempi de Souza, Emanuel; Lea, Peter J.; Hirel, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Maize roots can be colonized by free-living atmospheric nitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs). However, the agronomic potential of non-symbiotic N2-fixation in such an economically important species as maize, has still not been fully exploited. A preliminary approach to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the establishment of such N2-fixing associations has been developed, using two maize inbred lines exhibiting different physiological characteristics. The bacterial-plant interaction has been characterized by means of a metabolomic approach. Two established model strains of Nif+ diazotrophic bacteria, Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense and their Nif- couterparts defficient in nitrogenase activity, were used to evaluate the impact of the bacterial inoculation and of N2 fixation on the root and leaf metabolic profiles. The two N2-fixing bacteria have been used to inoculate two genetically distant maize lines (FV252 and FV2), already characterized for their contrasting physiological properties. Using a well-controlled gnotobiotic experimental system that allows inoculation of maize plants with the two diazotrophs in a N-free medium, we demonstrated that both maize lines were efficiently colonized by the two bacterial species. We also showed that in the early stages of plant development, both bacterial strains were able to reduce acetylene, suggesting that they contain functional nitrogenase activity and are able to efficiently fix atmospheric N2 (Fix+). The metabolomic approach allowed the identification of metabolites in the two maize lines that were representative of the N2 fixing plant-bacterial interaction, these included mannitol and to a lesser extend trehalose and isocitrate. Whilst other metabolites such as asparagine, although only exhibiting a small increase in maize roots following bacterial infection, were specific for the two Fix+ bacterial strains, in comparison to their Fix- counterparts. Moreover, a number

  19. Metabolic profiling of two maize (Zea mays L. inbred lines inoculated with the nitrogen fixing plant-interacting bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liziane Cristina Brusamarello-Santos

    Full Text Available Maize roots can be colonized by free-living atmospheric nitrogen (N2-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs. However, the agronomic potential of non-symbiotic N2-fixation in such an economically important species as maize, has still not been fully exploited. A preliminary approach to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the establishment of such N2-fixing associations has been developed, using two maize inbred lines exhibiting different physiological characteristics. The bacterial-plant interaction has been characterized by means of a metabolomic approach. Two established model strains of Nif+ diazotrophic bacteria, Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense and their Nif- couterparts defficient in nitrogenase activity, were used to evaluate the impact of the bacterial inoculation and of N2 fixation on the root and leaf metabolic profiles. The two N2-fixing bacteria have been used to inoculate two genetically distant maize lines (FV252 and FV2, already characterized for their contrasting physiological properties. Using a well-controlled gnotobiotic experimental system that allows inoculation of maize plants with the two diazotrophs in a N-free medium, we demonstrated that both maize lines were efficiently colonized by the two bacterial species. We also showed that in the early stages of plant development, both bacterial strains were able to reduce acetylene, suggesting that they contain functional nitrogenase activity and are able to efficiently fix atmospheric N2 (Fix+. The metabolomic approach allowed the identification of metabolites in the two maize lines that were representative of the N2 fixing plant-bacterial interaction, these included mannitol and to a lesser extend trehalose and isocitrate. Whilst other metabolites such as asparagine, although only exhibiting a small increase in maize roots following bacterial infection, were specific for the two Fix+ bacterial strains, in comparison to their Fix- counterparts

  20. Metabolic profiling of two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines inoculated with the nitrogen fixing plant-interacting bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusamarello-Santos, Liziane Cristina; Gilard, Françoise; Brulé, Lenaïg; Quilleré, Isabelle; Gourion, Benjamin; Ratet, Pascal; Maltempi de Souza, Emanuel; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Maize roots can be colonized by free-living atmospheric nitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs). However, the agronomic potential of non-symbiotic N2-fixation in such an economically important species as maize, has still not been fully exploited. A preliminary approach to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the establishment of such N2-fixing associations has been developed, using two maize inbred lines exhibiting different physiological characteristics. The bacterial-plant interaction has been characterized by means of a metabolomic approach. Two established model strains of Nif+ diazotrophic bacteria, Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense and their Nif- couterparts defficient in nitrogenase activity, were used to evaluate the impact of the bacterial inoculation and of N2 fixation on the root and leaf metabolic profiles. The two N2-fixing bacteria have been used to inoculate two genetically distant maize lines (FV252 and FV2), already characterized for their contrasting physiological properties. Using a well-controlled gnotobiotic experimental system that allows inoculation of maize plants with the two diazotrophs in a N-free medium, we demonstrated that both maize lines were efficiently colonized by the two bacterial species. We also showed that in the early stages of plant development, both bacterial strains were able to reduce acetylene, suggesting that they contain functional nitrogenase activity and are able to efficiently fix atmospheric N2 (Fix+). The metabolomic approach allowed the identification of metabolites in the two maize lines that were representative of the N2 fixing plant-bacterial interaction, these included mannitol and to a lesser extend trehalose and isocitrate. Whilst other metabolites such as asparagine, although only exhibiting a small increase in maize roots following bacterial infection, were specific for the two Fix+ bacterial strains, in comparison to their Fix- counterparts. Moreover, a number

  1. Phylogeography, salinity adaptations and metabolic potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria based on a partial single cell genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Nigro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that has been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome (SAG of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis – previously developed based on 14C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source.

  2. In vivo imaging and tracking of host-microbiota interactions via metabolic labeling of gut anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Alvarez, David; Hudak, Jason E.; Reading, Nicola C.; Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is densely populated by anaerobic commensal bacteria. These microorganisms shape immune system development, but our understanding of host–commensal interactions is hampered by a lack of tools for studying the anaerobic intestinal environment. We applied metabolic oligosaccharide engineering and bioorthogonal click-chemistry to label various commensal anaerobes, including Bacteroides fragilis, a common and immunologically important commensal. We studied the dissemination of B. fragilis following acute peritonitis, and characterized the interactions of the intact microbe and its polysaccharide components in myeloid and B cell lineages. The distribution and colonization of labeled B. fragilis along the intestine can be assessed, as well as niche competition following coadministration of multiple species of the microbiota. Nine additional anaerobic commensals (both gram-negative and gram-positive) from three phyla common in the gut—Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria—and five families and one aerobic pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus) were also fluorescently labeled. This strategy permits visualization of the anaerobic microbial niche by various methods, including intravital two-photon microscopy and non-invasive whole-body imaging, and an approach to study microbial colonization and host–microbe interactions in real-time. PMID:26280120

  3. Radioassay for hydrogenase activity in viable cells and documentation of aerobic hydrogen-consuming bacteria living in extreme environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schink, B.; Lupton, F.S.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    An isotopic tracer assay based on the hydrogenase-dependent formation of tritiated water from tritium gas was developed for in life analysis of microbial hydrogen transformation. This method allowed detection of bacterial hydrogen metabolism in pure cultures or in natural samples obtained from aquatic ecosystems. A differentiation between chemical-biological and aerobic-anaerobic hydrogen metabolism was established by variation of the experimental incubation temperature or by addition of selective inhibitors. Hydrogenase activity was shown to be proportional to the consumption or production of hydrogen by cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Methanosarcina barkeri. This method was applied, in connection with measurements of free hydrogen and most-probable-number enumerations, in aerobic natural source waters to establish the activity and document the ecology of hydrogen-consuming bacteria in extreme acid, thermal, or saline environments. The utility of the assay is based in part on the ability to quantify bacterial hydrogen transformation at natural hydrogen partial pressures, without the use of artificial electron acceptors

  4. Isolation of Lactic Acid Bacteria with High Biological Activity from Local Fermented Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Munkhtsetseg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The thirty-two strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from the Mongolian traditional fermented dairy products, among them 25 strains show antimicrobial activity against test microorganisms including Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , Enterococcus faecalis , Pseudom о nas aeruginosa . Protease sensitivity assay demonstrated that the antimicrobial substances produced by isolates А 23, Т 2 are bacteriocins as their antibacterial activities were eliminated completely after treatment with protease. Identi fi cation of bacteria is being carried out. Among the isolates 22 strains show protease enzyme producing activity. The selected strains isolated from mare’s fermented milk (airag or kumis and yoghurt (tarag show the speci fi c protease activity from 7.9 μ g/ml to 11.9 μ g/ml. The strain T2, isolated from yoghurt exhibited the highest proteolytic activity.

  5. Antibacterial activities of ethanol extracts of Philippine medicinal plants against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrio L. Valle Jr.

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: P. betle had the greatest potential value against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive multidrug-resistant bacteria. Favorable antagonistic activities were also exhibited by the ethanol extracts of Psidium guajava, Phyllanthus niruri and Ehretia microphylla.

  6. Antibacterial Activity of Probiotic Bacteria Isolated From Broiler Feces and Commercial Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Darabi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The extensive use of antibiotics in animal farms to promote the growth rate and prevent the enteric pathogen has led to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and drug residues in the birds body. In the recent years, probiotics have been constantly studied for their inhibitory effects on pathogenic bacteria. Objectives: The current study aimed to assess the effect of magnesium oxide on controlling serum phosphorus levels and evaluate its side effects. Materials and Methods: Antibacterial activity of local and commercial probiotic bacteria was investigated using colony overlay assay. Then antibacterial activity of local and commercial probiotics against each pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were compared. Results: Local strain of lactic acid bacteria had significantly higher antibacterial activity compared to those of the commercial probiotics. Local probiotics showed a significantly stronger activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli compared to all commercial probiotics. Conclusions: Administration of mono strain of Lactobacillus salivarius ES1, or co-administration of ES1 and L. salivarius ES6, is not only more effective than commercial probiotics against Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus spp. and E.coli, but also, will have no negative effects on micro flora balance of local birds.

  7. Lactic acid bacteria active during the fermentation of wheat silage in small scale silos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, N.J.; Parker, J.A.; Moon, L.C.; Ely, L.O.

    1981-01-01

    Wheat was ensiled and periodically analyzed for lactic acid bacteria present. Initially Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and Streptococcus lactis predominated. After two to four days enterococci including S. faecium and S. bovis were present in high populations as well as Lactobacillus plantarum. It was concluded that mixed populations of enterococci and L. plantarum are active in the successful fermentation of wheat silage.

  8. Thermostable 𝜶-Amylase Activity from Thermophilic Bacteria Isolated from Bora Hot Spring, Central Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazali, F. M.; Suwastika, I. N.

    2018-03-01

    α-Amylase is one of the most important enzyme in biotechnology field, especially in industrial application. Thermostability of α-Amylase produced by thermophilic bacteria improves industrial process of starch degradation in starch industry. The present study were concerned to the characterization of α-Amylase activity from indigenous thermophilic bacteria isolated from Bora hot spring, Central Sulawesi. There were 18 isolates which had successfully isolated from 90°C sediment samples of Bora hot spring and 13 of them showed amylolytic activity. The α-Amylase activity was measured qualitatively at starch agar and quantitatively based on DNS (3,5-Dinitrosalicylic acid) methods, using maltose as standard solution. Two isolates (out of 13 amylolytic bacteria), BR 002 and BR 015 showed amylolytic index of 0.8 mm and 0.5 mm respectively, after being incubated at 55°C in the 0.002% Starch Agar Medium. The α-Amylase activity was further characterized quantitatively which includes the optimum condition of pH and temperature of α-Amylase crude enzyme from each isolate. To our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation and characterization of a thermostable α-Amylase from thermophilic bacteria isolated from Central Sulawesi particularly from Bora hot spring.

  9. Structure and activity of lacustrine sediment bacteria involved in nutrient and iron cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Martins, Gilberto Jorge; Terada, Akihiko; Ribeiro, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the bacterial community structure in sediments is essential to better design restoration strategies for eutrophied lakes. In this regard, the aim of this study was to quantify the abundance and activity of bacteria involved in nutrient and iron cycling in sediments from four Azorean...

  10. Isolation of Lactic Acid Bacteria with High Biological Activity from Local Fermented Dairy Products

    OpenAIRE

    B. Munkhtsetseg; M. Margad-Erdene; B. Batjargal

    2009-01-01

    The thirty-two strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from the Mongolian traditional fermented dairy products, among them 25 strains show antimicrobial activity against test microorganisms including Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , Enterococcus faecalis , Pseudom о nas aeruginosa . Protease sensitivity assay demonstrated that the antimicrobial substances produced by isolates А 23, Т 2 are bacterio...

  11. Expanded metabolic versatility of ubiquitous nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Albertsen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    , we identified ecophysiological traits that contribute to the ecological success of Nitrospira. Unexpectedly, N. moscoviensis possesses genes coding for a urease and cleaves urea to ammonia and CO2. Ureolysis was not observed yet in nitrite oxidizers and enables N. moscoviensis to supply ammonia...... oxidizers lacking urease with ammonia from urea, which is fully nitrified by this consortium through reciprocal feeding. The presence of highly similar urease genes in Nitrospira lenta from activated sludge, in metagenomes from soils and freshwater habitats, and of other ureases in marine nitrite oxidizers...

  12. use of gamma irradiation for enhancing antibacterial activity of chitosan against pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, S.M.A.; Swailam, H.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    the effect of chitosan on growth of food poisoning bacteria including gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium) and gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) was investigated at ph 6.0 and 7.0 also, the effect of irradiation on the antibacterial activity of chitosan was studied . it was found that chitosan was more effective on the growth of gram-negative bacteria at ph 6 than ph 7 . addition of chitosan affected the growth of the tested pathogens in varying degrees compared to the control. as the concentration of chitosan increased, its effectiveness against these pathogens also increased. the growth for gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial isolates was completely inhibited at 0.6% chitosan after 72 hours of incubation. inactivation of these pathogens needs only 24 hour with 1.0% of chitosan. irradiation of chitosan at 50 kGy slightly increased the antimicrobial activity whereas at 100 kGy increased the antimicrobial activity and at 150 kGy the growth of these pathogens was completely inhibited . irradiation of chitosan at 50 kGy increased the flow index, whereas consistency index markedly decreased by increasing dose. the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of unirradiated chitosan ranged from 0.35% to 0.50%, whereas the MIC of irradiated chitosan ranged from 0.1% to 0.45% depending on the bacteria and the irradiation dose used. these results demonstrate that irradiated chitosan was more effective to decontaminate pathogenic bacteria and can be easily used in different foods for enhancing health quality and ensuring safety

  13. Structure, function, and regulation of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism of bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Takeo

    2017-11-01

    Amino acids are essential components in all organisms because they are building blocks of proteins. They are also produced industrially and used for various purposes. For example, L-glutamate is used as the component of "umami" taste and lysine has been used as livestock feed. Recently, many kinds of amino acids have attracted attention as biological regulators and are used for a healthy life. Thus, to clarify the mechanism of how amino acids are biosynthesized and how they work as biological regulators will lead to further effective utilization of them. Here, I review the leucine-induced-allosteric activation of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from Thermus thermophilus and the relationship with the allosteric regulation of GDH from mammals. Next, I describe structural insights into the efficient production of L-glutamate by GDH from an excellent L-glutamate producer, Corynebacterium glutamicum. Finally, I review the structural biology of lysine biosynthesis of thermophilic bacterium and archaea.

  14. Metabolic activation of the bladder carcinogen 4-nitrobiphenyl (NBP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, S.

    1986-01-01

    The metabolism of NBP, a dog bladder carcinogen, was examined in vitro using rat liver tissues. NBP was metabolized by enzymes localized both in the microsomes and cytosol. The microsomal enzyme activity was inducible by Aroclor 1254 and phenobarbital. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis of the ethyl acetate extract of the reaction mixture, following incubation of [ 3 H]NBP with NADPH and microsomes, revealed four radioactive and UV absorbing peaks with retention times of 5, 8, 14 and 28 min. The peaks at 8, 14 and 28 min corresponded with 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), NBP and azoxy biphenyl, respectively. The early eluting component with a retention time of 5 min has been tentatively identified as a ring hydroxylated derivative. In contrast to microsomal metabolism, cytosol-mediated metabolism yielded only one major metabolite identified as ABP. Cytosol-mediate reduction was inhibited by the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol. In vitro incubation of NBP with NADH and commercial preparations of xanthine oxidase also yielded ABP and the formation of the latter was blocked by allopurinol. Xanthine oxidase catalyzed also the binding of [ 3 H]NBP to DNA and proteins; the binding was inhibited by allopurinol. These data support the hypothesis that the nitro reduction step is involved in the activation of the bladder carcinogen NBP, and that the nitroreductases occur in both the microsomes and cytosol. The cytosolic activity is primarily due to xanthine oxidase

  15. Tannins and extracts of fruit byproducts: antibacterial activity against foodborne bacteria and antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widsten, Petri; Cruz, Cristina D; Fletcher, Graham C; Pajak, Marta A; McGhie, Tony K

    2014-11-19

    The shelf life of fresh fish and meat transported over long distances could be extended by using plant-based extracts to control spoilage bacteria. The goals of the present study were to identify plant-based extracts that effectively suppress the main spoilage bacteria of chilled fish and lamb and to assess their antioxidant capacity. The phenolic compounds in wood-based tannins and extracts isolated from byproducts of the fruit processing industry were identified and/or quantified. The total phenol content, but not the flavonoid to total phenol ratio, was strongly associated with higher antibacterial activity against several fish and lamb spoilage bacteria in zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration assays as well as greater antioxidant capacity in the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical assay. The most promising compounds in both cases, and thus good candidates for antibacterial packaging or antioxidant dietary supplements, were mango seed extract and tannic acid containing mostly polygalloyl glucose type phenols.

  16. In vitro activity of daptomycin against clinical isolates of Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Kerryl E; Steckelberg, James M; Patel, Robin

    2005-08-01

    We determined the activity of daptomycin, a recently FDA-approved antimicrobial agent, against clinical isolates of Gram-positive bacteria, including viridans group streptococci (16 Streptococcus mitis species group, 12 S. mutans species group, 9 S. anginosus species group, 8 S. sanguinis species group, 5 S. salivarius species group) from patients with infective endocarditis, 32 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 32 high-level penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, 38 vancomycin-resistant enterococci (including 1 linezolid-resistant isolate), and the following unusual Gram-positive bacteria: 3 Listeria monocytogenes, 4 Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, 9 Corynebacterium species, 10 Abiotrophia/Granulicatella species, 2 Rothia (Stomatococcus) mucilaginosus, and 4 Gemella morbillorum. Daptomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)(90) values for the viridans group streptococci, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, and Enterococcus species were 0.5, 0.5, endocarditis as well as against several types of unusual Gram-positive bacteria that can cause endocarditis.

  17. The Antibacterial Activity of Chitosan Products Blended with Monoterpenes and Their Biofilms against Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. I. Badawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the biological activities of eleven chitosan products with a viscosity-average molecular weight ranging from 22 to 846 kDa in combination with the most active monoterpenes (geraniol and thymol, out of 10 tested, against four plant pathogenic bacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia carotovora, Corynebacterium fascians, and Pseudomonas solanacearum. The antibacterial activity was evaluated in vitro by the agar dilution technique as a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC that was found to be dependent on the type of the microorganism tested. The most active product of chitosan was used for biofilm production enriched with geraniol and thymol (0.1 and 0.5% and the films were also evaluated against the tested bacteria. The biological bioactivities summarized here may provide novel insights into the functions of chitosan and some monoterpenes and potentially allow their use for food protection from microbial attack.

  18. Redox-active antibiotics control gene expression and community behavior in divergent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Lars E P; Teal, Tracy K; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Newman, Dianne K

    2008-08-29

    It is thought that bacteria excrete redox-active pigments as antibiotics to inhibit competitors. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the endogenous antibiotic pyocyanin activates SoxR, a transcription factor conserved in Proteo- and Actinobacteria. In Escherichia coli, SoxR regulates the superoxide stress response. Bioinformatic analysis coupled with gene expression studies in P. aeruginosa and Streptomyces coelicolor revealed that the majority of SoxR regulons in bacteria lack the genes required for stress responses, despite the fact that many of these organisms still produce redox-active small molecules, which indicates that redox-active pigments play a role independent of oxidative stress. These compounds had profound effects on the structural organization of colony biofilms in both P. aeruginosa and S. coelicolor, which shows that "secondary metabolites" play important conserved roles in gene expression and development.

  19. Phytase Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Dairy and Pharmaceutical Probiotic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Khodaii

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytate, the major storage form of phosphorus in plant seeds, can form insoluble complexes with minerals such as iron, zinc and calcium thus reducing their bioavailability. Phytase enzymes are often used to upgrade the nutritional quality of phytate-rich foods and feeds such as grains. The phytate-degrading activity of 43 lactic acid bacteria including isolates from commercial probiotic preparations, dairy products and type strains were measured. The phytate-degrading activity of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus isolates from pharmaceutical probiotics, dairy products and type strains were determined. The enzyme activity of probotic bacteria ranged between 1.1-5.4 mU and was strain not species specific. Phytase activity may thus be a useful additional attribute of probiotics to be used as food supplements.

  20. Batch experiment on H2S degradation by bacteria immobilised on activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, R; Ng, Y L; Chen, X G; Geng, A L; Gould, W D; Duan, H Q; Liang, D T; Koe, L C C

    2004-01-01

    Biological treatments of odorous compounds, as compared to chemical or physical technologies, are in general ecologically and environmentally favourable. However, there are some inefficiencies relative to the media used in biofiltration processes, such as the need for an adequate residence time; the limited lifetime, and pore blockage of media, which at present render the technology economically non-viable. The aim of the study is to develop novel active media to be used in performance-enhanced biofiltration processes, by achieving an optimum balance and combination of the media adsorption capacity with the biodegradation of H2S through the bacteria immobilised on the media. An enrichment culture was obtained from activated sludges in order to metabolise thiosulphate. Batch-wise experiments were conducted to optimise the bacteria immobilisation on activated carbon, so as to develop a novel "biocarbon". Biofilm was mostly developed through culturing the bacteria with the presence of carbons in mineral media. SEM and BET tests of the carbon along with the culturing process were used to identify, respectively, the biofilm development and biocarbon porosity. Breakthrough tests evaluated the biocarbon performance with varying gas resistance time, inlet H2S concentration, and type of support materials. Fundamental issues were discussed, including type of support material, mode of bacteria immobilisation, pore blockages, and biodegradation kinetics, etc. This batch-wise study provides a basis for our future research on optimisation of the biofiltration process using a bio-trickling reactor.

  1. Antagonistic activity of antibiotic producing Streptomyces sp. against fish and human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmul Hossain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to isolate Streptomyces sp. from soil samples of two different regions of Bangladesh and evaluate their antagonistic activity against fish and human pathogenic bacteria. A total of 10 isolates were identified as Streptomyces sp. based on several morphological, physiological and biochemical tests. Cross streak method was used to observe the antagonistic activity of the Streptomyces sp. isolates against different fish pathogens belonging to the genus Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Edwardsiella and human clinical isolates belonging to the genus Klebsiella, Salmonella and Streptococcus. Seven Streptomyces sp. isolates showed antagonism against both fish and human pathogenic bacteria. Four isolates viz., N24, N26, N28 and N47 showed broad spectrum of antagonistic activity (80-100% against all genera of fish and human pathogenic bacteria. The isolate N49 exhibited highest spectrum of antagonism against all fish pathogens (90-100% but comparatively lower degree of antagonism against human pathogens (50-60%. Rest of the two isolates (N21 and N23 showed variability in their antagonism. Results showed that broad spectrum antibiotic(s could be developed from the isolates N24, N26, N28 and N47against several human and fish pathogens. The isolate N49 could be a potential source of antibiotic, especially for fish pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Regulates Immune and Metabolic Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D.; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins. PMID:22851689

  3. Metabolic activation of 2-methylfuran by rat microsomal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindranath, V.; Boyd, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    2-Methylfuran (2-MF), a constituent of cigarette smoke and coffee, causes necrosis of liver, lungs, and kidneys in rodents. 2-MF is metabolically activated by mixed-function oxidases to acetylacrolein, a reactive metabolite that binds covalently to microsomal protein. The hepatic microsomal metabolism of 2-MF to reactive metabolite required the presence of NADPH and oxygen and was dependent on incubation time and substrate concentration. The microsomal metabolism of 2-MF was inducible by pretreatment of rats with phenobarbital and was inhibited by piperonyl butoxide and N-octyl imidazole, which indicates that the metabolism of 2-MF may be mediated by cytochrome P-450. Acetylacrolein was a potent inhibitor of mixed-function oxidase and completely inhibited the microsomal metabolism of 2-MF, indicating that 2-MF is a suicide substrate for the enzyme. The sulfhydryl nucleophile cysteine was a better trapping agent of the reactive metabolite of 2-MF than N-acetylcysteine or glutathione. Lysine decreased the covalent binding of 2-MF metabolites, presumably by reacting with the aldehyde group of acetylacrolein. In addition, in the presence of NADPH, 2-MF was bioactivated by both pulmonary and renal cortical microsomes to reactive metabolites that were covalently bound to microsomal proteins

  4. Acid base activity of live bacteria: Implications for quantifying cell wall charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Jacqueline; van Lith, Yvonne; Laverman, Anniet M.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    To distinguish the buffering capacity associated with functional groups in the cell wall from that resulting from metabolic processes, base or acid consumption by live and dead cells of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens was measured in a pH stat system. Live cells exhibited fast consumption of acid (pH 4) or base (pH 7, 8, 9, and 10) during the first few minutes of the experiments. At pH 5.5, no acid or base was required to maintain the initial pH constant. The initial amounts of acid or base consumed by the live cells at pH 4, 8, and 10 were of comparable magnitudes as those neutralized at the same pHs by intact cells killed by exposure to gamma radiation or ethanol. Cells disrupted in a French press required higher amounts of acid or base, due to additional buffering by intracellular constituents. At pH 4, acid neutralization by suspensions of live cells stopped after 50 min, because of loss of viability. In contrast, under neutral and alkaline conditions, base consumption continued for the entire duration of the experiments (5 h). This long-term base neutralization was, at least partly, due to active respiration by the cells, as indicated by the build-up of succinate in solution. Qualitatively, the acid-base activity of live cells of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis resembled that of S. putrefaciens. The pH-dependent charging of ionizable functional groups in the cell walls of the live bacteria was estimated from the initial amounts of acid or base consumed in the pH stat experiments. From pH 4 to 10, the cell wall charge increased from near-zero values to about -4 × 10 -16 mol cell -1 and -6.5 × 10 -16 mol cell -1 for S. putrefaciens and B. subtilis, respectively. The similar cell wall charging of the two bacterial strains is consistent with the inferred low contribution of lipopolysaccharides to the buffering capacity of the Gram-negative cell wall (of the order of 10%).

  5. Antifungal Activity of Lactobacillus sp. Bacteria in the Presence of Xylitol and Galactosyl-Xylitol

    OpenAIRE

    Lipi?ska, Lidia; Klewicki, Robert; Klewicka, El?bieta; Ko?odziejczyk, Krzysztof; S?jka, Micha?; Nowak, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid fermentation is a natural method of antimicrobial food protection. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus sp. bacteria, taking part in this process, is directed mainly against the same or other microorganisms. In this work we determine the impact of the presence of xylitol and galactosyl-xylitol on the antagonistic activity of 60 Lactobacillus sp. strains against indicator molds (Alternaria alternata, Alternaria brassicicola, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium latenicum, Geotrichum candi...

  6. Biological and structure-activity evaluation of chalcone derivatives against bacteria and fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Wender A.; Andrade, Carlos Kleber Z.; Napolitano, Hamilton B., E-mail: wender@unb.br, E-mail: ckleber@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (LaQMOS/UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Vencato, Ivo; Castro, Miriam R.C. de; Camargo, Ademir J. [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Anapolis, GO (Brazil). Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Lariucci, Carlito [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2013-01-15

    The present work describes the antibacterial and antifungal activities of several chalcones obtained by a straight Claisen-Schmidt aldol condensation determined by the minimal inhibitory concentration against different microorganisms (Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi). Solid state crystal structures of seven chalcones were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Chemometric studies were carried out in order to identify a potential structure activity relationship. (author)

  7. Effects of ferrous ions on the metabolism of sulfate-reducing bacteria; Ryusan`en kangenkin no taisha ni oyobosu tetsu ion no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, F.; Suzuki, T. [Ajinomoto Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan). Technology and Engineering Lab.]: Seo, M. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School

    1995-11-15

    The grave damages due to microorganisms occur occasionally to the ironic piping and the like when river water is used as industrial water. In the present researches, the effects of Fe{sup 2+} on the amount and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the culture medium with the concentration of Fe{sup 2+} changed by stages from 3.6{times}10{sup -4} M to 0.7M are examined. Further, the relations between the activity of the bacteria and the amount of FeS generated in the medium are investigated as an in-site means to observe the activity of the bacteria in the medium wherein the produced S{sup 2-} is converted into FeS once it is generated. The following conclusions are drawn therefrom. In the initial medium with the Fe{sup 2+} concentration from 3.6{times}10{sup -4} M to 0.7M, the growth of the bacteria is maximum at the concentration of 1.0{times}10{sup -2}. Over this concentration the growth is weakened due to the osmotic pressure, lowering of nutriment and the deposit of waste, and the bacteria are extirpated due to the direct effect of osmotic press when the concentration is 0.7M. The total amount of FeS produced due to the bacteria is in conformity with the tendency of growth of bacteria till 30 hours of culture. 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Pathogenic and Ice-Nucleation Active (INA) Bacteria causing Dieback of Willows in Short Rotation Forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, Pajand

    2005-03-01

    To find out whether bacteria isolated from diseased plant parts can be the main causal agent for the dieback appearing in Salix energy forestry plantations in Sweden during the last few years, and if the joint effects of bacteria and frost injury are synergistic, extensive sampling of shoots from diseased Salix plants was performed. We performed several laboratory and greenhouse investigations and used evaluation techniques on the functions of the Ice-Nucleation Active (INA) bacteria. We carried out a comparison between spring and autumn bacterial communities isolated from within (endophytically) and surface (epiphytically) plant tissues of Salix viminalis. Seasonal variation of bacteria in willow clones with different levels of frost sensitivity and symptoms of bacterial damage was also investigated. We further focussed on possible effect of fertilisation and nutrient availability on the bacterial community in relation to plant dieback in Estonian willow plantations. The identification and detection of INA bacteria which cause damage in combination with frost to willow (Salix spp) plants in late fall, winter and spring was performed using BIOLOG MicroPlate, biochemical tests, selective INA primers and 16S rDNA analysis. To distinguish the character for differentiation between these bacteria morphologically and with respect to growing ability different culture media were used. We studied the temperature, at which ice nucleation occurred for individual bacteria, estimated the population of INA bacteria, effect of growth limiting factors, and evaluated the effect of chemical and physical agents for disruption and possible inhibition of INA among individual bacterial strains. The concentration of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus on INA is discussed. We demonstrate that among the bacterial isolates recovered from the willow plantations, there were many that were capable of ice nucleation at temperatures between -2 and -10 deg C, many that were capable of inducing a

  9. Characterization of the microbial community composition and the distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria in a creek contaminated by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weimin; Xiao, Enzong; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Qingxiang

    2016-10-01

    A small watershed heavily contaminated by long-term acid mine drainage (AMD) from an upstream abandoned coal mine was selected to study the microbial community developed in such extreme system. The watershed consists of AMD-contaminated creek, adjacent contaminated soils, and a small cascade aeration unit constructed downstream, which provide an excellent contaminated site to study the microbial response in diverse extreme AMD-polluted environments. The results showed that the innate microbial communities were dominated by acidophilic bacteria, especially acidophilic Fe-metabolizing bacteria, suggesting that Fe and pH are the primary environmental factors in governing the indigenous microbial communities. The distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria showed distinct site-specific patterns. A pronounced shift from diverse communities in the upstream to Proteobacteria-dominated communities in the downstream was observed in the ecosystem. This location-specific trend was more apparent at genus level. In the upstream samples (sampling sites just below the coal mining adit), a number of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria such as Alicyclobacillus spp., Metallibacterium spp., and Acidithrix spp. were dominant, while Halomonas spp. were the major Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria observed in downstream samples. Additionally, Acidiphilium, an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, was enriched in the upstream samples, while Shewanella spp. were the dominant Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in downstream samples. Further investigation using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) clustering confirmed the difference of microbial communities between upstream and downstream samples. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and Spearman's rank correlation indicate that total organic carbon (TOC) content is the primary environmental parameter in structuring the indigenous microbial communities

  10. Biphenyl-Metabolizing Bacteria in the Rhizosphere of Horseradish and Bulk Soil Contaminated by Polychlorinated Biphenyls as Revealed by Stable Isotope Probing▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Mackova, Martina; Vlcek, Cestmir; Hroudova, Miluse; Demnerova, Katerina; Paces, Vaclav; Macek, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based stable isotope probing in combination with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was used in order to identify members of the microbial community that metabolize biphenyl in the rhizosphere of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) cultivated in soil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) compared to members of the microbial community in initial, uncultivated bulk soil. On the basis of early and recurrent detection of their 16S rRNA genes in clone libraries constructed from [13C]DNA, Hydrogenophaga spp. appeared to dominate biphenyl catabolism in the horseradish rhizosphere soil, whereas Paenibacillus spp. were the predominant biphenyl-utilizing bacteria in the initial bulk soil. Other bacteria found to derive carbon from biphenyl in this nutrient-amended microcosm-based study belonged mostly to the class Betaproteobacteria and were identified as Achromobacter spp., Variovorax spp., Methylovorus spp., or Methylophilus spp. Some bacteria that were unclassified at the genus level were also detected, and these bacteria may be members of undescribed genera. The deduced amino acid sequences of the biphenyl dioxygenase α subunits (BphA) from bacteria that incorporated [13C]into DNA in 3-day incubations of the soils with [13C]biphenyl are almost identical to that of Pseudomonas alcaligenes B-357. This suggests that the spectrum of the PCB congeners that can be degraded by these enzymes may be similar to that of strain B-357. These results demonstrate that altering the soil environment can result in the participation of different bacteria in the metabolism of biphenyl. PMID:19700551

  11. Antibacterial activity of crude extracts of prasaprohyai formula and its components against pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattaponpan, Chisanucha; Kondo, Sumalee

    2011-12-01

    Prasaprohyai formula is a Thai Traditional Medicine which has been used for reducing feverish in child. Fever is a symptom resulting from various infections and diseases. The major cause of fever is bacterial and viral infections. The Prasaprohyai formula and its components potentially have biological activities including antipyretic and antimicrobial activities. It is in a hope to develop the formula and its components for an alternative medicine of infectious diseases. To study antibacterial activity of Prasaprohyai formula and its components against pathogenic bacteria. Prasaprohyai formula and its components were extracted by different methods, A: maceration with 95% ethanol followed by evaporation (ET), B: ET followed by freeze drying (EF) and C: water distillation (VO). All extracts were tested against clinical isolates from Thammasat University Hospital, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. Disk diffusion and broth dilution methods were performed. Crude extracts of ET had higher yield of extraction than other methods. The results showed that the crude extract from different methods of Syzygium aromaticum (Linn) Merr & Perry (Flower) was effective against all bacterial strains with the inhibition zone ranging from 9 to 19 mm. The VO extract of Prasaprohyai formula showed antibacterial activity against most of the pathogenic bacteria in the present study. The activity against Streptococcus pyogenes was found in the VO extract of some components. The ET extracts of Lepidium sativum Linn, Myristica fragrans Houtt (seed) and Myristica fragrans Houtt (aril) had no antibacterial activity against all microorganism. However the EF extracts of this formula and some components were able to mostly inhibit Gram positive bacteria. The results indicated that Prasaprohyai formula and its components were able to inhibit the growth of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria including multiresistant strains. The volatile oil extracts seemed

  12. Bactericidal activities of GM flax seedcake extract on pathogenic bacteria clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Magdalena; Dorotkiewicz-Jach, Agata; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Arendt, Malgorzata; Kulma, Anna; Szopa, Jan

    2014-07-29

    The antibiotic resistance of pathogenic microorganisms is a worldwide problem. Each year several million people across the world acquire infections with bacteria that are antibiotic-resistant, which is costly in terms of human health. New antibiotics are extremely needed to overcome the current resistance problem. Transgenic flax plants overproducing compounds from phenylpropanoid pathway accumulate phenolic derivatives of potential antioxidative, and thus, antimicrobial activity. Alkali hydrolyzed seedcake extract containing coumaric acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, and lignan in high quantities was used as an assayed against pathogenic bacteria (commonly used model organisms and clinical strains). It was shown that the extract components had antibacterial activity, which might be useful as a prophylactic against bacterial infection. Bacteria topoisomerase II (gyrase) inhibition and genomic DNA disintegration are suggested to be the main reason for rendering antibacterial action. The data obtained strongly suggest that the seedcake extract preparation is a suitable candidate for antimicrobial action with a broad spectrum and partial selectivity. Such preparation can be applied in cases where there is a risk of multibacterial infection and excellent answer on global increase in multidrug resistance in pathogenic bacteria.

  13. The inhibitory activity of Lactic acid bacteria isolated from fresh cow cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevijo Zdolec

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria are the constituent part of milk microbial flora that could influence the safety of dairy products due production of organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, carbon dioxide and bacteriocins. Taking this in consideration, the objective of this study was to investigate the composition of lactic acid bacteria population in fresh cow cheeses taken from local markets, as well as their antimicrobial capacity. Lactic acid bacteria counts were determined according to ISO 1524:1998 method, biochemical determination using API 50 CHL system, and inhibitory activity against L. monocytogenes NCTC 10527 by agar well diffusion assay. Lactic acid bacteria count in fresh cow cheeses (n=10 ranged from 5.87 to 8.38 log10 CFU g-1. Among 52 MRS isolates collected, 61.54 % were assigned to the Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis species, 23.07 % Lactobacillus helveticus, 11.54 % Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and 3.85 % Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides. Antilisterial activity was found in 18 isolates.

  14. Distribution and activity of anaerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria in natural freshwater wetland soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-dong; Wu, Hong-sheng; Gao, Zhi-qiu; Cheng, Hai-xiang; Li, Ji; Liu, Xu; Ren, Qian-qi

    2016-04-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process plays a significant role in the marine nitrogen cycle. However, the quantitative importance of this process in nitrogen removal in wetland systems, particularly in natural freshwater wetlands, is still not determined. In the present study, we provided the evidence of the distribution and activity of anammox bacteria in a natural freshwater wetland, located in southeastern China, by using (15)N stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. The potential anammox rates measured in this wetland system ranged between 2.5 and 25.5 nmol N2 g(-1) soil day(-1), and up to 20% soil dinitrogen gas production could be attributed to the anammox process. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that anammox bacteria related to Candidatus Brocadia, Candidatus Kuenenia, Candidatus Anammoxoglobus and two novel anammox clusters coexisted in the collected soil cores, with Candidatus Brocadia and Candidatus Kuenenia being the dominant anammox genera. Quantitative PCR of hydrazine synthase genes showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria varied from 2.3 × 10(5) to 2.2 × 10(6) copies g(-1) soil in the examined soil cores. Correlation analyses suggested that the soil ammonium concentration had significant influence on the activity of anammox bacteria. On the basis of (15)N tracing technology, it is estimated that a total loss of 31.1 g N m(-2) per year could be linked the anammox process in the examined wetland.

  15. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Lavandula coronopifolia essential oil against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Said, L; Zahlane, K; Ghalbane, I; El Messoussi, S; Romane, A; Cavaleiro, C; Salgueiro, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the composition of the essential oil (EO) of Lavandula coronopifolia from Morocco and to evaluate its in vitro antibacterial activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from clinical infections. The antimicrobial activity was assessed by a broth micro-well dilution method using multiresistant clinical isolates of 11 pathogenic bacteria: Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae, Klebsiella ornithinolytica, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Providencia rettgeri, Citrobacter freundii, Hafnia alvei, Salmonella spp., Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The main compounds of the oil were carvacrol (48.9%), E-caryophyllene (10.8%) and caryophyllene oxide (7.7%). The oil showed activity against all tested strains with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging between 1% and 4%. For most of the strains, the MIC value was equivalent to the minimal bactericidal concentration value, indicating a clear bactericidal effect of L. coronopifolia EO.

  16. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäuerlein, A.; Ackermann, S.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to clarify whether commercially available probiotics induce greater trans-epithelial activation of human leukocytes than do commensal, food-derived and pathogenic bacteria and to identify the compounds responsible for this activation. Eleven different bacterial...... Escherichia coli K12, probiotic E. coli Nissle, EPEC) induced basolateral production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL 6, 8, and 10. Gram-positive probiotics (Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp.) had virtually no effect. In addition, commensals (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacteroides vulgatus) and food...... (polymyxin, colistin) completely abrogated transepithelial activation of leukocytes. Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin is a crucial factor in transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes, regardless of whether it is produced by probiotics or other bacteria. Hence, transepithelial stimulation ofleukocytes...

  17. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: Role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baeuerlein, Annette; Ackermann, Stefanie; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to clarify whether commercially available probiotics induce greater trans-epithelial activation of human leukocytes than do commensal, food-derived and pathogenic bacteria and to identify the compounds responsible for this activation. Eleven different bacterial...... Escherichia coli K12, probiotic E. coli Nissle, EPEC) induced basolateral production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL 6, 8, and 10. Gram-positive probiotics (Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp.) had virtually no effect. In addition, commensals (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacteroides vulgatus) and food...... (polymyxin, colistin) completely abrogated transepithelial activation of leukocytes. Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin is a crucial factor in transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes, regardless of whether it is produced by probiotics or other bacteria. Hence, transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes...

  18. 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, metabolism and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbach, William G; Sakamoto, Kei; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2004-01-01

    The 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a member of a metabolite-sensing protein kinase family that functions as a metabolic 'fuel gauge' in skeletal muscle. AMPK is a ubiquitous heterotrimeric protein, consisting of an alpha catalytic, and beta and gamma regulatory subunits that exist in multiple isoforms and are all required for full enzymatic activity. During exercise, AMPK becomes activated in skeletal muscle in response to changes in cellular energy status (e.g. increased adenosine monophosphate [AMP]/adenosine triphosphate [ATP] and creatine/phosphocreatine ratios) in an intensity-dependent manner, and serves to inhibit ATP-consuming pathways, and activate pathways involved in carbohydrate and fatty-acid metabolism to restore ATP levels. Recent evidence shows that although AMPK plays this key metabolic role during acute bouts of exercise, it is also an important component of the adaptive response of skeletal muscles to endurance exercise training because of its ability to alter muscle fuel reserves and expression of several exercise-responsive genes. This review discusses the putative roles of AMPK in acute and chronic exercise responses, and suggests avenues for future AMPK research in exercise physiology and biochemistry.

  19. Alteration In Bones Metabolism In Active Rheumatoid Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    The strength and integrity of the human skeleton depends on a delicate equilibrium between bone resorption and bone formation. Osteocalcin (OC) is synthesized by osteoblasts and is considered to be a marker of bone formation and helps in corporating calcium into bone tissue. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory joint disease characterized by bone complication including bone pain, erosion and osteoporosis. The aim of the present study is to evaluate some factors responsible in bone metabolism termed OC, vitamin D (vit. D), oncostatin M (OSM), ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase. Fifty pre-menopausal female patients with active RA and twenty healthy controls of the same age were included in the present study. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to estimate serum OC and active vitamin D. The quantitative determination of ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase were carried out colorimetrically. OSM was measured by ELISA and serum levels of OC and active vitamin D were significantly decreased in RA patients as compared to those of the control group. On the other hand, the levels of serum OSM, ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase were significantly increased in the RA patients as compared to their healthy control subjects. The results of this study indicated that early investigation and therapy of disturbances of bone metabolism in active RA are necessary for better prognosis and exhibited the importance of OC as a diagnostic tool of alterations of bone metabolism in RA patients.

  20. Antioxidant activity of probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from Mongolian airag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Uugantsetseg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from airag. In this study, 42 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from Mongolian airag. All isolates were identified by using morphological, biochemical and physiological methods. The isolated bacteria were studied for antagonistic effects on Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, 22 strains showed antibacterial activity. When we examined their probiotic properties such as bile acid tolerance and gastric acid tolerance, it is shown that only 6 bacterial strains can survive up to 3  hours in a pH 3.0 acid environment  and up to 8 hours in  0.3% bile acid environment. Selected probiotic strains were further identified to species by API 50CHL system. Antioxidant activity of  probiotic  strains were determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay. While the antioxidant activity in cell free supernatant fluctuated between the range of 26.1-38.4%,  the antioxidant activity after 72 hours of fermentation in the whey fraction was between 17.23-55.12%. DOI: http://doi.dx.org/10.5564/mjc.v15i0.327 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 15 (41, 2014, p73-78

  1. The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in isogenous bacteria strains with different radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.I.; Goncharenko, E.N.; Yudz, T.I.; Samojlenko, I.I.

    1984-01-01

    The catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in isogenous bacterial strains with various radiosensitivity is investigated. In micrococcus radiodurans mutants with defects in the DNA repair systems the superoxide dismutase activity is lower than in the wild type cells. In investigated Escherichia coli strains differing in radiosensitivity, no alteration in catalase and superoxide dismutase activity is found. The conclusion is drawn that viability of bacteria subjected to the effect of ionizing radiations is determined by the efficiency of DNA repair systems whose functional reliability is sometimes connected with the catalase and suferoxide dismutase activity

  2. Physical activity, BMI and metabolic risk in Portuguese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Karina dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2016v18n1p103   It has been reported, in the last decades, a significant decrease in physical activity (PA levels, with a consequent increase in obesity and metabolic risk factors among youth. The aims of this study were to describe PA levels, the prevalence of overweight/obesity and metabolic risk factors, and to examine the association between PA and body mass index (BMI with metabolic risk among Portuguese youth. The sample comprises 212 Portuguese adolescents (12-16 years old. Height and weight were measured. PA was estimated with the Bouchard questionnaire (3 days recall, as well as with the use of a pedometer (used for 5 consecutive days. Metabolic risk factors comprised fasting glucose, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and waist circumference. Subjects were classified as normal weight, overweight or obese according to BMI; the maturational status was indirectly estimated with the maturity offset procedure. A continuous metabolic risk score was computed (zMR and PA values were divided into tertiles. Qui-square test, t-test and ANOVA were used in statistical analyses. SPSS 18.0 and WinPepi softwares were used and p<0.05. A moderate to high prevalence of overweight/obesity and HDL-cholesterol was found, as well as a high prevalence of high blood pressure and low to moderate PA levels among Portuguese youth. The relationship between BMI and zMR showed that obese adolescents have higher zMR when compared to normal weight or overweight adolescents. This finding suggests that increased levels of PA and reduction in the prevalence of overweight/obesity may have a positive role against the development of metabolic risk factors.

  3. Metabolic syndrome and cognitive decline: the role of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rinaldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MetS is a cluster of conditions, each of which represents a risk factor for cardiovascular disease: central obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Any of these conditions and MetS itself have been associated to Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia. In recent years there is a growing evidence for the role of physical activity in preventing metabolic diseases and cognitive decline. In our research we assessed the prevalence of MetS in a sample of 154 elderly people. Furthermore, we evaluated cognition (with Mini Mental State Examination, MMSE  and the physical activity level in every patient. We found a significant association between MetS, borderline cognitive impairment and sedentary lifestyle.

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Pharbitin, Isolated from the Seeds of Pharbitis nil, against Various Plant Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa Thi; Yu, Nan Hee; Park, Ae Ran; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, In Seon; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2017-10-28

    This study aimed to isolate and characterize antibacterial metabolites from Pharbitis nil seeds and investigate their antibacterial activity against various plant pathogenic bacteria. The methanol extract of P. nil seeds showed the strongest activity against Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni (Xap) with a minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) value of 250 μg/ml. Among the three solvent layers obtained from the methanol extract of P. nil seeds, only the butanol layer displayed the activity with an MIC value of 125 μg/ml against Xap. An antibacterial fraction was obtained from P. nil seeds by repeated column chromatography and identified as pharbitin, a crude resin glycoside, by instrumental analysis. The antibacterial activity of pharbitin was tested in vitro against 14 phytopathogenic bacteria, and it was found to inhibit Ralstonia solanacearum and four Xanthomonas species. The minimum inhibitory concentration values against the five bacteria were 125-500 μg/ml for the n-butanol layer and 31.25-125 μg/ml for pharbitin. In a detached peach leaf assay, it effectively suppressed the development of bacterial leaf spot, with a control value of 87.5% at 500 μg/ml. In addition, pharbitin strongly reduced the development of bacterial wilt on tomato seedlings by 97.4% at 250 μg/ml, 7 days after inoculation. These findings suggest that the crude extract of P. nil seeds can be used as an alternative biopesticide for the control of plant diseases caused by R. solanacearum and Xanthomonas spp. This is the first report on the antibacterial activity of pharbitin against phytopathogenic bacteria.

  5. Microemulsion-Based Soft Bacteria-Driven Microswimmers for Active Cargo Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Park, Byung-Wook; Yasa, Oncay; Sitti, Metin

    2017-10-24

    Biohybrid cell-driven microsystems offer unparalleled possibilities for realization of soft microrobots at the micron scale. Here, we introduce a bacteria-driven microswimmer that combines the active locomotion and sensing capabilities of bacteria with the desirable encapsulation and viscoelastic properties of a soft double-micelle microemulsion for active transport and delivery of cargo (e.g., imaging agents, genes, and drugs) to living cells. Quasi-monodisperse double emulsions were synthesized with an aqueous core that encapsulated the fluorescence imaging agents, as a proof-of-concept cargo in this study, and an outer oil shell that was functionalized with streptavidin for specific and stable attachment of biotin-conjugated Escherichia coli. Motile bacteria effectively propelled the soft microswimmers across a Transwell membrane, actively delivering imaging agents (i.e., dyes) encapsulated inside of the micelles to a monolayer of cultured MCF7 breast cancer and J744A.1 macrophage cells, which enabled real-time, live-cell imaging of cell organelles, namely mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi body. This in vitro model demonstrates the proof-of-concept feasibility of the proposed soft microswimmers and offers promise for potential biomedical applications in active and/or targeted transport and delivery of imaging agents, drugs, stem cells, siRNA, and therapeutic genes to live tissue in in vitro disease models (e.g., organ-on-a-chip devices) and stagnant or low-flow-velocity fluidic regions of the human body.

  6. Antibacterial Activity of Marine and Black Band Disease Cyanobacteria against Coral-Associated Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantar, Miroslav; Kaczmarsky, Longin T.; Stanić, Dina; Miller, Aaron W.; Richardson, Laurie L.

    2011-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) of corals is a cyanobacteria-dominated polymicrobial disease that contains diverse populations of heterotrophic bacteria. It is one of the most destructive of coral diseases and is found globally on tropical and sub-tropical reefs. We assessed ten strains of BBD cyanobacteria, and ten strains of cyanobacteria isolated from other marine sources, for their antibacterial effect on growth of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from BBD, from the surface mucopolysaccharide layer (SML) of healthy corals, and three known bacterial coral pathogens. Assays were conducted using two methods: co-cultivation of cyanobacterial and bacterial isolates, and exposure of test bacteria to (hydrophilic and lipophilic) cyanobacterial cell extracts. During co-cultivation, 15 of the 20 cyanobacterial strains tested had antibacterial activity against at least one of the test bacterial strains. Inhibition was significantly higher for BBD cyanobacteria when compared to other marine cyanobacteria. Lipophilic extracts were more active than co-cultivation (extracts of 18 of the 20 strains were active) while hydrophilic extracts had very limited activity. In some cases co-cultivation resulted in stimulation of BBD and SML bacterial growth. Our results suggest that BBD cyanobacteria are involved in structuring the complex polymicrobial BBD microbial community by production of antimicrobial compounds. PMID:22073011

  7. The Effect of Alkaloidal Fraction from Annona squamosa L. against Pathogenic Bacteria with Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmushin M. Shami

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Annona squamosa is used in different places such as India as a general tonic to enrich blood, relieve vomiting, cancer, as a vermicide, for skin complaints and also applied to wounds and ulcers. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial and antioxidant properties from of the alkaloidal fraction of A. squamosa. Methods: Well diffusion assay, minimum inhibitory concentration and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were used to evaluate antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MRSA and Helicobacter pylori. DPPH and SOD assays were used to evaluate antioxidant activity. LC-MS analysis was used to identify alkaloids and scanning electron microscopy studies that revealed mode of action. Results: Alkaloidal fraction of A. squamosa exhibited significant inhibition against the tested bacteria. Extracted alkaloids from the leaves of A. squamosa showed high level of antioxidant activities. LC-MS analyses of alkaloids of the plant were identified as corydine, sanjoinine, norlaureline, norcodeine, oxanalobine and aporphine in the leaves of A. squamosa. SEM analysis of the interaction of these substances with the bacteria showed morphological changes of cell wall and lysis of the targeted bacterial cells. Conclusions: It could be concluded that the alkaloids isolated from A. squamosa showed good antibacterial and antioxidant activity. The results suggest the alkaloids can be a new source of antimicrobial agents against pathogenic bacteria and antioxidant source.

  8. Prediction of residual metabolic activity after treatment in NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios Velazquez, Emmanuel; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Oberije, Cary; Ruysscher, Dirk De; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Metabolic response assessment is often used as a surrogate of local failure and survival. Early identification of patients with residual metabolic activity is essential as this enables selection of patients who could potentially benefit from additional therapy. We report on the development of a pre-treatment prediction model for metabolic response using patient, tumor and treatment factors. Methods. One hundred and one patients with inoperable NSCLC (stage I-IV), treated with 3D conformal radical (chemo)-radiotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. All patients received a pre and post-radiotherapy fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography FDG-PET-CT scan. The electronic medical record system and the medical patient charts were reviewed to obtain demographic, clinical, tumor and treatment data. Primary outcome measure was examined using a metabolic response assessment on a post-radiotherapy FDG-PET-CT scan. Radiotherapy was delivered in fractions of 1.8 Gy, twice a day, with a median prescribed dose of 60 Gy. Results. Overall survival was worse in patients with residual metabolic active areas compared with the patients with a complete metabolic response (p=0.0001). In univariate analysis, three variables were significantly associated with residual disease: larger primary gross tumor volume (GTVprimary, p=0.002), higher pre-treatment maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max , p=0.0005) in the primary tumor and shorter overall treatment time (OTT, p=0.046). A multivariate model including GTVprimary, SUV max , equivalent radiation dose at 2 Gy corrected for time (EQD2, T) and OTT yielded an area under the curve assessed by the leave-one-out cross validation of 0.71 (95% CI, 0.65-0.76). Conclusion. Our results confirmed the validity of metabolic response assessment as a surrogate of survival. We developed a multivariate model that is able to identify patients at risk of residual disease. These patients may benefit from

  9. Effects of vasoactive and metabolic active substances (measurement of RCBF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrschaft, H.

    1986-09-29

    Methods, principles, normal values, reproducibility and clinical indications of rCBF-measurements, using the intraartrial 133-Xenon-clearance-technique, are presented. The effect of vaso- and metabolically active drugs on cerebral blood flow was examined in 215 patients, suffering from cerebral ischemia. Significant increase of rCBF was ascertained after intravenous injection of centrophenoxine, pyrithioxine, extractum sanguis deproteinatus, piracetam and solutions of low molecular dextran. All the other drugs tested proved to be either without any effect or caused decrease of rCBF. In 130 patients with obstructive disease of internal carotid artery after surgery at an interval of 6 - 8 weeks and 1 year a significant increase of CBF could be stated. The rank of psychological tests and quantitative EEF-investigations relating to evidence of efficacy of metabolically active drugs is discussed critically. Therapeutic efficacy and clinical relevance of vaso- and metabolically active drugs in cerebral ischemia of man are to be substantiated only by double-blind controlled studies.

  10. Effects of vasoactive and metabolic active substances (measurement of RCBF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrschaft, H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods, principles, normal values, reproducibility and clinical indications of rCBF-measurements, using the intraartrial 133-Xenon-clearance-technique, are presented. The effect of vaso- and metabolically active drugs on cerebral blood flow was examined in 215 patients, suffering from cerebral ischemia. Significant increase of rCBF was ascertained after intravenous injection of centrophenoxine, pyrithioxine, extractum sanguis deproteinatus, piracetam and solutions of low molecular dextran. All the other drugs tested proved to be either without any effect or caused decrease of rCBF. In 130 patients with obstructive disease of internal carotid artery after surgery at an interval of 6 - 8 weeks and 1 year a significant increase of CBF could be stated. The rank of psychological tests and quantitative EEF-investigations relating to evidence of efficacy of metabolically active drugs is discussed critically. Therapeutic efficacy and clinical relevance of vaso- and metabolically active drugs in cerebral ischemia of man are to be substantiated only by double-blind controlled studies. (orig.) [de

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Pigments Extracted from Rhodotorula glutinis Against Some Bacteria and Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Yolmeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Nowadays hazards of synthetic additives and preservatives have been identified, so researchers are looking to a natural and safe alternative for them. The aim of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial effect of carotenoids of Rhodotorula glutinis on the some pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Methods This experimental study was done in Gorgan University of Agriculture and Natural Resources. After cultivating R. glutinis in 50 mL YPG broth at 30°C for overnight, cells were harvested by centrifugation at 10,000 rpm for 10 minutes and were washed three times with distilled water. Cells were ruptured 3 times with 12 mL of acetone and broken using homogenizer. Then the suspension was centrifuged and the supernatant collected. The supernatant (contain pigments was powdered using freeze-dryer. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC was determined by using the agar dilution method. Results Giving the results, carotenoids of R. glutinis was effective on the growth of all the tested bacteria, so that Bacillus cereus and Salmonella enteritidis were the lowest and highest sensitivity to this pigment, respectively. The highest MIC and MBC among the tested bacteria were observed for S. enteritidis and Escherichia coli, respectively; whereas MBC was not observed for S. enteritidis at concentrations of the tested pigment. Conclusions Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive than Gram-negative bacteria against the antimicrobial activity of pigments of R. glutinis. According to the results, pigments of R. glutinis can be used as an inhibitor of bacterial growth.

  12. EVALUATION OF THE TEA TREE OIL ACTIVITY TO ANAEROBIC BACTERIA--IN VITRO STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska-Klinkosz, Marta; Kedzia, Anna; Meissner, Hhenry O; Kedzia, Andrzej W

    2016-01-01

    The study of the sensitivity to tea tree oil (Australian Company TTD International Pty. Ltd. Sydney) was carried out on 193 strains of anaerobic bacteria isolated from patients with various infections within the oral cavity and respiratory tracts. The susceptibility (MIC) of anaerobes was determined by means of plate dilution technique in Brucella agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated sheep blood, menadione and hemin. Inoculum contained 10(5) CFU per spot was cultured with Steers replicator upon the surface of agar with various tea tree oil concentrations or without oil (anaerobes growth control). Incubation the plates was performed in anaerobic jars under anaerobic conditions at 37 degrees C for 48 h. MIC was defined as the lowest concentrations of the essential oil completely inhibiting growth of anaerobic bacteria. Test results indicate, that among Gram-negative bacteria the most sensitive to essential oil were strains of Veillonella and Porphyromonas species. Essential oil in low concentrations (MIC in the range of = 0.12 - 0.5 mg/mL) inhibited growth of accordingly 80% and 68% strains. The least sensitive were strains of the genus Tannerella, Parabacteroides and Dialister (MIC 1.0 - 2.0 mg/mL). In the case of Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria the tea tree oil was the most active to strains of cocci of the genus Anaerococcus and Ruminococcus (MIC in range = 0.12 - 0.5 mg/mL) or strains of rods of the genus Eubacterium and Eggerthella (MIC = 0.25 mg/mL). Among Gram-positive rods the least sensitive were the strains of the genus Bifidobacterium ( MIC = 2.0 mg/mL). The tea tree oil was more active to Gram-positive than to Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria.

  13. Thermal effects on metabolic activities of thermophilic microorganisms from the thermal discharge point of Tuticorin thermal power plant area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthukkannan, N.; Murugesan, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic activities of thermophilic microorganisms isolated from the thermal water discharge point at Tuticorin thermal power station were studied by growing the microorganisms in sterile medium and at various temperature regimes of 25, 35, 45, 55 and 65degC. The optimum temperature for the growth of the bacterium isolated from the thermal power plant station was 45 degC and beyond 65 degC the growth was gradually decreased. The bacteria isolated from open sea water were mesophiles with their growth optimum at 35 degC and microbes inhabiting the thermal discharge area were thermopiles as they were tolerant even at 55 degC. The amylase production, carbohydrate metabolism and lactose fermentation activities were optimum at 45 degC. At 25 degC and beyond 65 degC biochemical activities of the organisms were inhibited to a greater extent. (author)

  14. Physical activity, body composition and metabolic syndrome in young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna K Salonen

    Full Text Available Low physical activity (PA is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in all age groups. We measured intensity and volume of PA and examined the associations between PA and the metabolic syndrome (MS, its components and body composition among young Finnish adults.The study comprises 991 men and women born 1985-86, who participated in a clinical study during the years 2009-11 which included assessments of metabolism, body composition and PA. Objectively measured (SenseWear Armband five-day PA data was available from 737 participants and was expressed in metabolic equivalents of task (MET.The prevalence of MS ranged between 8-10%. Higher total mean volume (MET-hours or intensity (MET were negatively associated with the risk of MS and separate components of MS, while the time spent at sedentary level of PA was positively associated with MS.MS was prevalent in approximately every tenth of the young adults at the age of 24 years. Higher total mean intensity and volume rates as well as longer duration spent at moderate and vigorous PA level had a beneficial impact on the risk of MS. Longer time spent at the sedentary level of PA increased the risk of MS.

  15. Adsorption of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate on activated carbons: effects of solution chemistry and presence of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Toledo, M I; Méndez-Díaz, J D; Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J; Ferro-García, M A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effectiveness of activated carbon in removing sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and to analyze the chemical and textural characteristics of the activated carbons that are involved in the adsorption process. Studies were also performed on the influence of operational variables (pH, ionic strength, and presence of microorganisms) and on the kinetics and interactions involved in the adsorption of this pollutant on activated carbon. The kinetics study of SDBS adsorption revealed no problems in its diffusion on any of the activated carbons studied, and Weisz-Prater coefficient (C WP) values were considerably lower than unity for all activated carbons studied. SDBS adsorption isotherms on these activated carbons showed that: (i) adsorption capacity of activated carbons was very high (260-470 mg/g) and increased with larger surface area; and (ii) dispersive interactions between SDBS and carbon surface were largely responsible for the adsorption of this pollutant. SDBS adsorption was not significantly affected by the solution pH, indicating that electrostatic adsorbent-adsorbate interactions do not play an important role in this process. The presence of electrolytes (NaCl) in the medium favors SDBS adsorption, accelerating the process and increasing adsorption capacity. Under the working conditions used, SDBS is not degraded by bacteria; however, the presence of bacteria during the process accelerates and increases SDBS adsorption on the activated carbon. Microorganism adsorption on the activated carbon surface increases its hydrophobicity, explaining the results observed.

  16. In vitro Antibacterial activity of Pimpinella anisum fruit extracts against some pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Akhtar

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activities of the aqueous, 50% (v/v methanol,acetone and petroleum ether extracts of Pimpinella anisum (L fruits were studied. The extracts of Pimpinella anisum were tested in vitro against 4 bacterial species by the disc diffusion method. Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 96, Streptococcus pyogenes (MTCC 442, Escherchia coli (MTCC 723 and Klebsiella Pneumoniae (MTCC 109 were used in this investigation. Only aqueous and 50% (v/v methanol extract exhibited fair antibacterial activity against all the test bacteria whereas acetone and petroleum ether extract were not observed to inhibit the growth of any of the test bacteria under study. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(9.000: 272-274

  17. Present-day biogeochemical activities of anaerobic bacteria and their relevance to future exobiological investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    If the primordial atmosphere was reducing, then the first microbial ecosystem was probably composed of anaerobic bacteria. However, despite the presence of an oxygen-rich atmosphere, anaerobic habitats are important, commonplace components of the Earth's present biosphere. The geochemical activities displayed by these anaerobes impact the global cycling of certain elements (e.g., C, N, S, Fe, Mn, etc.). Methane provides an obvious example of how human-enhanced activities on a global scale can influence the content of a "radiative" (i.e., infrared absorbing) trace gas in the atmosphere. Methane can be oxidized by anaerobic bacteria, but this does not appear to support their growth. Acetylene, however, does support such growth. This may form the basis for future exobiological investigations of the atmospheres of anoxic, hydrocarbon-rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn, as well as the latter's satellite Titan. ?? 1989.

  18. Antibacterial Activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss Essential Oil against Some Fish Spoilage Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashemi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate antimicrobial effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss essential oil (EO against six fish spoilage bacteria for evaluation of its potential utilization in the preservation of minimally processed fish products. Methods: Firstly, GC-MS analysis of the EO was performed to determine its chemical composition. Then, antibacterial effect of the EO in a range of 0.031 to 4 mg/ml was tested against different fish spoilage bacteria such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Shewanella putrefaciens, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis by broth microdilution method to determine minimum inhibitory (MIC and minimum bactericidal (MBC concentrations. Results: GC-MS results showed that phenolic components such as carvacrol (51.55% and thymol (25.49% were predominant constituents of the EO. Zataria multiflora Boiss EO exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria. Shewanella Putrefaciens was the most sensitive bacteria with MBC value of 0. 5 mg/ml. Conclusion: According to the results, this EO could be used as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food specially seafood products to preserve them against bacterial spoilage.

  19. Role of granular activated carbon in the microalgal cultivation from bacteria contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhi-Yi; Li, Jing-Ya; Xiong, Zhao-Zhao; Cheng, Li-Hua; Xu, Xin-Hua

    2018-01-01

    Microalgal wastewater treatment has been considered as one of the most promising measures to treat nitrogen and phosphorus in the municipal wastewater. While the municipal wastewater provides sufficient nitrogen and phosphorus for microalgal growth, the microalgae still faces serious biological contamination caused by bacteria in wastewater. In this study, the commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) was added into the simulated municipal wastewater to avoid the influence of bacteria on the growth of microalgae. The extracellular organic matter (EOM) in microalgal broth was then characterized to enlighten the role of GAC in reducing the bioavailability of EOM. The results showed that the GAC addition could increase the dry weight of microalgae from 0.06mgL -1 to 0.46mgL -1 under the condition of bacterial inoculation. The GAC could mitigate bacterial contamination mainly due to its adsorption of both bacteria and EOM that might contain algicidal extracellular substances. Moreover, compared to the control group, the GAC addition could mitigate the microalgal lysis caused by bacteria and thus greatly reduce the bioavailability of EOM from 2.80mgL -1 to 0.61mgL -1 , which was beneficial for the improvement of biostability and reuse of effluent after the microalgal harvesting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacteria-mediated bisphenol A degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yin, Kun; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important monomer in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, food cans, and other daily used chemicals. Daily and worldwide usage of BPA and BPA-contained products led to its ubiquitous distribution in water, sediment/soil, and atmosphere. Moreover, BPA has been identified as an environmental endocrine disruptor for its estrogenic and genotoxic activity. Thus, BPA contamination in the environment is an increasingly worldwide concern, and methods to efficiently remove BPA from the environment are urgently recommended. Although many factors affect the fate of BPA in the environment, BPA degradation is mainly depended on the metabolism of bacteria. Many BPA-degrading bacteria have been identified from water, sediment/soil, and wastewater treatment plants. Metabolic pathways of BPA degradation in specific bacterial strains were proposed, based on the metabolic intermediates detected during the degradation process. In this review, the BPA-degrading bacteria were summarized, and the (proposed) BPA degradation pathway mediated by bacteria were referred.

  1. Studies on tridecaptin B(1), a lipopeptide with activity against multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Stephen A; Lohans, Christopher T; van Belkum, Marco J; Bels, Manon A; Vederas, John C

    2015-06-07

    Previously other groups had reported that Paenibacillus polymyxa NRRL B-30507 produces SRCAM 37, a type IIA bacteriocin with antimicrobial activity against Campylobacter jejuni. Genome sequencing and isolation of antimicrobial compounds from this P. polymyxa strain show that the antimicrobial activity is due to polymyxins and tridecaptin B1. The complete structural assignment, synthesis, and antimicrobial profile of tridecaptin B1 is reported, as well as the putative gene cluster responsible for its biosynthesis. This peptide displays strong activity against multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria, a finding that is timely to the current problem of antibiotic resistance.

  2. Antagonistic activity of isolated lactic acid bacteria from Pliek U against gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli ATCC 25922

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiti, A. A.; Jamilah, I.; Rusmarilin, H.

    2017-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is one group of microbes that has many benefits, notably in food and health industries sector. LAB plays an important role in food fermentation and it has bacteriostatic effect against the growth of pathogenic microorganisms. The research related LAB continued to be done to increase the diversity of potential isolates derived from nature which is indigenous bacteria for biotechnological purposes. This study was aimed to isolate and characterize LAB derived from pliek u sample and to examine the potency to inhibits Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 bacteria growth. A total of 5 isolates were isolated and based on morphological and physiological characteristics of the fifth bacteria, they are allegedly belonging to the genus Bacillus. Result of antagonistic test showed that the five isolates could inhibits the growth of E. coli ATCC 25922. The highest inhibition zone is 8.5 mm was shown by isolates NQ2, while the lowest inhibition is 1.5 mm was shown by isolates NQ3.

  3. Activity syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alexander D. M.; Szekeres, Petra; Violich, Mackellar; Gutowsky, Lee F. G.; Eliason, Erika J.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-03-01

    Despite growing interest, the behavioural ecology of deep-sea organisms is largely unknown. Much of this scarcity in knowledge can be attributed to deepwater animals being secretive or comparatively 'rare', as well as technical difficulties associated with accessing such remote habitats. Here we tested whether two species of giant marine isopod (Bathynomus giganteus, Booralana tricarinata) captured from 653 to 875 m in the Caribbean Sea near Eleuthera, The Bahamas, exhibited an activity behavioural syndrome across two environmental contexts (presence/absence of food stimulus) and further whether this syndrome carried over consistently between sexes. We also measured routine metabolic rate and oxygen consumption in response to a food stimulus in B. giganteus to assess whether these variables are related to individual differences in personality. We found that both species show an activity syndrome across environmental contexts, but the underlying mechanistic basis of this syndrome, particularly in B. giganteus, is unclear. Contrary to our initial predictions, neither B. giganteus nor B. tricarinata showed any differences between mean expression of behavioural traits between sexes. Both sexes of B. tricarinata showed strong evidence of an activity syndrome underlying movement and foraging ecology, whereas only male B. giganteus showed evidence of an activity syndrome. Generally, individuals that were more active and bolder, in a standard open arena test were also more active when a food stimulus was present. Interestingly, individual differences in metabolism were not related to individual differences in behaviour based on present data. Our study provides the first measurements of behavioural syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods.

  4. ISOLATION AND LIGNOCELLULOLYTIC ACTIVITIES OF FIBER-DIGESTING BACTERIA FROM DIGESTIVE TRACT OF TERMITE (Cryptothermes sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.I.M. Tampoebolon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to obtain the fiber-digesting bacteria isolates from termitedigestive tract and to determine the optimum conditions of growth and production of cellulase, xylanaseand ligninase enzyme of isolate. The first study was conducted to isolate and select the fiber-digestingbacteria from the digestive tract of termites based on the highest activity of cellulolytic (S, xylanolytic(X and lignolytic (L. The second study was optimation of the growth conditions of bacteria and theenzyme production due to effect of rice straw substrate and nitrogen. The material used were dry woodtermites, rice straw, and culture medium. The design used was a completely randomized factorial design,in which the first factor was rice straw substrate (1, 2, and 3% W/V, while the second factor wasnitrogen (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% W/V. Variables measured were cellulase, xylanase and ligninase activities.Results of the first sudy showed that the isolates obtained consisted of 3 types, those were cellulolyticbacteria (S1, S2, and S3, 3 types of bacteria xylanolytic (X1, X2, and X3 and 3 types of bacteria lignolytic(L1, L2, and L3. Meanwhile, results of the second study showed that isolates of S2, X3, and L1 had thehighest activity, those were 1.894 U/mL, 1.722 U/mL and 0.314 U/mL, respectively. In conclusion, the addition of 1% level of rice straw substrate and 0.3% of nitrogen showed the highest enzyme activity oncellulase, xylanase and ligninase.

  5. Lactic acid bacteria affect serum cholesterol levels, harmful fecal enzyme activity, and fecal water content

    OpenAIRE

    Chung Myung; Shin Hea; Lee Kyung; Kim Mi; Baek Eun; Jang Seok; Lee Do; Kim Jin; Lee Kang; Ha Nam

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as lower cholesterol. Although present in many foods, most trials have been in spreads or dairy products. Here we tested whether Bifidobacteria isolates could lower cholesterol, inhibit harmful enzyme activities, and control fecal water content. Methods In vitro culture experiments were performed to ...

  6. Lactic acid bacteria active during the fermentation of wheat silage in small scale silos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, N.J.; Moon, L.C.; Ely, L.O.; Parker, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Wheat was ensiled and periodically analyzed for lactic acid bacteria present. Initially Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and Streptococcus lactis predominated. After two to four days enterococci including S. faecium and S. bovis were present in high populations as well as Lactobacillus plantarum. It was concluded that mixed populations of enterococci and L. plantarum are active in the successful fermentation of wheat silage. (Refs. 5).

  7. Differentiating leucine incorporation of Archaea and Bacteria throughout the water column of the eastern Atlantic using metabolic inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokokawa, Taichi; Sintes, Eva; de Corte, Daniele; Olbrich, Kerstin; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance (based on catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybrid ization, CARD-FISH) and leucine incorporation rates of Archaea and Bacteria were determined throughout the water column in the eastern Atlantic. Bacteria dominated throughout the water column, although their

  8. Influence of metabolism on endocrine activities of bisphenol S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skledar, Darja Gramec; Schmidt, Jan; Fic, Anja; Klopčič, Ivana; Trontelj, Jurij; Dolenc, Marija Sollner; Finel, Moshe; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol S (BPS; bis[4-hydroxyphenyl]sulfone) is commonly used as a replacement for bisphenol A in numerous consumer products. The main goal of this study was to examine the influence of different metabolic reactions that BPS undergoes on the endocrine activity. We demonstrate that hydroxylation of the aromatic ring of BPS, catalyzed mainly by the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C9, is its major in-vitro phase I biotransformation. Nevertheless, coupled oxidative-conjugative reactions analyses revealed that glucuronidation and formation of BPS glucuronide is the predominant BPS metabolic pathway. BPS reactive metabolites that can be tracked as glutathione conjugates were not detected in the present study. Two in-vitro systems were used to evaluate the endocrine activity of BPS and its two main metabolites, BPS glucuronide and hydroxylated BPS 4-(4-hydroxy-benzenesulfonyl)-benzene-1,2-diol (BPSM1). In addition, we have tested two structural analogs of BPS, bis[4-(2-hydroxyetoxy)phenyl]sulfone (BHEPS) and 4,4-sulfonylbis(2-methylphenol) (dBPS). The test systems were yeast cells, for evaluating estrogenic and androgenic activities, and the GH3.TRE-Luc reporter cell line for measuring thyroid hormone activity. BPS and BPSM1 were weak agonists of the estrogen receptor, EC50 values of 8.4 × 10(-5) M and 6.7 × 10(-4) M, respectively. Additionally, BPSM1 exhibited weak antagonistic activity toward the thyroid hormone receptor, with an IC50 of 4.3 × 10(-5) M. In contrast to BPSM1, BPS glucuronide was inactive in these assays, inhibiting neither the estrogen nor the thyroid hormone receptors. Hence, glucuronidation appears to be the most important pathway for both BPS metabolism and detoxification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anti-biofilm activities from marine cold adapted bacteria against staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna ePapa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world’s economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules.The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules.The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules

  10. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) as a novel metabolic target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Angel; Habegger, Kirk M; Clemmensen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    to block FAP enzymatic activity. RESULTS: TB administration to diet-induced obese (DIO) animals led to profound decreases in body weight, reduced food consumption and adiposity, increased energy expenditure, improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and lowered cholesterol levels. Total...... (TB), we explored the impact of FAP inhibition on metabolic regulation in mice. METHODS: To address this question we evaluated the pharmacology of TB in various mouse models including those deficient in FGF21, GLP1 and GIP signaling. We also studied the ability of FAP to process FGF21 in vitro and TB...... and intact plasma FGF21 were observed to be elevated in TB-treated DIO mice but not lean animals where the metabolic impact of TB was significantly attenuated. Furthermore, and in stark contrast to naïve DIO mice, the administration of TB to obese FGF21 knockout animals demonstrated no appreciable effect...

  11. Antimicrobial activity of extracellular metabolites from antagonistic bacteria isolated from potato (Solanum phureja crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinar David Granada García

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms for biological control are capable of producing active compounds that inhibit the development of phytopathogens, constituting a promising tool toob tain active principles that could replace synthetic pesticides. This study evaluatedtheability of severalpotentialbiocontrol microorganismsto produce active extracellular metabolites. In vitro antagonistic capability of 50 bacterial isolates from rhizospheric soils of "criolla" potato (Solanum phureja was tested through dual culture in this plant with different plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Isolates that showed significantly higher antagonistic activity were fermented in liquid media and crude extracts from the supernatants had their biological activities assessed by optical density techniques. Inhibitory effecton tested pathogens was observed for concentrations between 0.5% and 1% of crude extracts. There was a correlation between the antimicrobial activity of extracts and the use of nutrient-rich media in bacteria fermentation. Using a bioguided method, a peptidic compound, active against Fusarium oxysporum, was obtained from the 7ANT04 strain (Pyrobaculum sp.. Analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography coupled to mass detector evidenced an 11-amino acid compound. Bioinformatic software using raw mass data confirmed the presence of a cyclic peptide conformed by 11 mostly non-standard amino acids.

  12. Experimental investigation on the active range of sulfate-reducing bacteria for geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, S.; Fujiki, K.; Asano, H.; Yoshikawa, H.

    1995-01-01

    The active range of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a species of sulfate-reducing bacteria, was examined in terms of pH and Eh using a fermenter at controlled pH and Eh. Such research is important because sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are thought to exist underground at depths equal to those of supposed repositories for high-level radioactive wastes and to be capable of inducing corrosion of the metals used in containment vessels. SRB activity was estimated at 35 C, with lactate as an electron donor, at a pH range from 7 to 11 and Eh range from 0 to -380 mV. Activity increased as pH approached neutral and Eh declined. The upper pH limit for activity was between 9.9 and 10.3, at Eh of -360 to -384 mV. The upper Eh limit for activity was between -68 and -3 mV, at pH 7.1. These results show that SRB can be made active at higher pH by decreasing Eh, and that the higher pH levels of 8 to 10 produced by use of the buffer material bentonite does not suppress SRB completely. A chart was obtained showing the active range of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in terms of pH and Eh. Such charts can be used to estimate the viability of SRB and other microorganisms when the environmental conditions of a repository are specified

  13. Polaromonas and Hydrogenophaga species are the predominant bacteria cultured from granular activated carbon filters in water treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magic-Knezev, A.; Wullings, B.A.; Kooij, van der D.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Identification of the predominating cultivable bacteria in granular activated carbon (GAC) filters used in a variety of water treatment plants for selecting representative strains to study the role of bacteria in the removal of dissolved organic matter. METHODS AND RESULTS: Bacterial isolates

  14. Isolation and characterization of marine bacteria from macroalgae Gracilaria salicornia and Gelidium latifolium on agarolitic activity for bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaroe, M.; Pratiwi, I.; Sunudin, A.

    2017-05-01

    Gracilaria salicornia and Gelidium latifolium have high content of agar and potential to be use as raw material for bioethanol. In bioethanol production, one of the processes level is enzyme hydrolysis. Various microorganisms, one of which is bacteria, can carry out the enzyme hydrolysis. Bacteria that degrade the cell walls of macroalgae and produce an agarase enzyme called agarolytic bacteria. The purpose of this study was to isolate bacteria from macroalgae G. salicornia and G. latifolium, which has the highest agarase enzyme activities, and to obtain agarase enzyme characteristic for bioethanol production. There are two isolates bacteria resulted from G. salicornia that are N1 and N3 and there are two isolates from G. latifolium that are BSUC2 and BSUC4. The result of agarase enzyme qualitative test showed that isolates bacteria from G. latifolium were greater than G. salicornia. The highest agarolitic index of bacteria from G. salicornia produced by isolate N3 was 2.32 mm and isolate N3 was 2.27 mm. Bacteria from G. latifolium produced by isolate BSUC4 was 4.28 mm and isolate BSUC2 was 4.18 mm, respectively. Agarase enzyme activities from isolates N1 and N3 were optimum working at pH 7 and temperature 30 °C, while from isolates BSUC4 was optimum at pH 7 and temperature 50 °C. This is indicated that the four bacteria are appropriate to hydrolyze macro alga for bioethanol production.

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Different Plant Extracts and Phenolic Phytochemicals Tested on Paenibacillus Larvae Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Mărghitaş

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus larvae, a Gram-positive and spore-forming bacterium is responsible for American foulbrood disease inbees. The antimicrobial activity of different plant extracts and phenolic phytochemical was evaluated onPaenibacillus larvae bacteria. In addition possible correlation with antioxidant activity of the same plant extracts wasstudied. Extracts of the following plants were utilized: Achillea millefolium (yarrow, Ocimum basilicum (basil,Thymus vulgaris (thyme and Urtica dioica (nettle. The extracts that showed antimicrobial activity were later testedto determine the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC. Although nettle present the lowest polyphenolic contentcompared with the other plant extracts, exhibit the highest antimicrobial activity, measured as the inhibition zoneusing Mueller-Hinton agar plates. Basil presented both polyphenolic content and antimicrobial activity at higherlevels, while thyme had the lowest antimicrobial activity, even it present high amount of polyphenols.

  16. Simple glycolipids of microbes: Chemistry, biological activity and metabolic engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mohammad Abdel-Mawgoud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylated lipids (GLs are added-value lipid derivatives of great potential. Besides their interesting surface activities that qualify many of them to act as excellent ecological detergents, they have diverse biological activities with promising biomedical and cosmeceutical applications. Glycolipids, especially those of microbial origin, have interesting antimicrobial, anticancer, antiparasitic as well as immunomodulatory activities. Nonetheless, GLs are hardly accessing the market because of their high cost of production. We believe that experience of metabolic engineering (ME of microbial lipids for biofuel production can now be harnessed towards a successful synthesis of microbial GLs for biomedical and other applications. This review presents chemical groups of bacterial and fungal GLs, their biological activities, their general biosynthetic pathways and an insight on ME strategies for their production.

  17. Antifungal Activity of Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria and Propionic Acid Bacteria against Dairy-Associated Spoilage Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsbjerg, Stina Dissing

    Bacterial cultures of lactic and propionic acid bacteria are widely used in fermented products including dairy products. Spoilage fungi may constitute a quality and safety issue in these products. The antifungal properties of some lactic and propionic acid bacteria make them potential candidates...... defined interaction medium (CDIM) was developed allowing growth of protective Lb. paracasei and P. freudenreichii subsp. shermaniii as well as the spoilage fungi, Penicillium spp., Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Debaryomyces hansenii isolated from fermented dairy products. Lb. paracasei and P....... freudenreichii subsp. shermanii grew in CDIM and showed antifungal properties similar to those observed in milk-based systems. Most of the antifungal effect of the protective bacterial ferment was lost after removal of cells. This was explained by a marked decrease in diacetyl concentration, which...

  18. Survival and ice nucleation activity of bacteria as aerosols in a cloud simulation chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, P.; Joly, M.; Schaupp, C.; Attard, E.; Möhler, O.; Morris, C. E.; Brunet, Y.; Delort, A.-M.

    2015-06-01

    The residence time of bacterial cells in the atmosphere is predictable by numerical models. However, estimations of their aerial dispersion as living entities are limited by a lack of information concerning survival rates and behavior in relation to atmospheric water. Here we investigate the viability and ice nucleation (IN) activity of typical atmospheric ice nucleation active bacteria (Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens) when airborne in a cloud simulation chamber (AIDA, Karlsruhe, Germany). Cell suspensions were sprayed into the chamber and aerosol samples were collected by impingement at designated times over a total duration of up to 18 h, and at some occasions after dissipation of a cloud formed by depressurization. Aerosol concentration was monitored simultaneously by online instruments. The cultivability of airborne cells decreased exponentially over time with a half-life time of 250 ± 30 min (about 3.5 to 4.5 h). In contrast, IN activity remained unchanged for several hours after aerosolization, demonstrating that IN activity was maintained after cell death. Interestingly, the relative abundance of IN active cells still airborne in the chamber was strongly decreased after cloud formation and dissipation. This illustrates the preferential precipitation of IN active cells by wet processes. Our results indicate that from 106 cells aerosolized from a surface, one would survive the average duration of its atmospheric journey estimated at 3.4 days. Statistically, this corresponds to the emission of 1 cell that achieves dissemination every ~ 33 min m-2 of cultivated crops fields, a strong source of airborne bacteria. Based on the observed survival rates, depending on wind speed, the trajectory endpoint could be situated several hundreds to thousands of kilometers from the emission source. These results should improve the representation of the aerial dissemination of bacteria in numeric models.

  19. Soil microbial activity, mycelial lengths and physiological groups of bacteria in a heavy metal polluted area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordgren, A; Kauri, T; Baeaeth, E; Soederstroem, B

    1986-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy metal contamination of coniferous forest soils were studied in the A/sub 01//A/sub 02/ layer around a primary smelter in Northern Sweden. Soil concentrations of 17 elements were determined. Smelter-emitted heavy metals were 5 to 75 times higher in the plot closest to the smelter compared with background levels. Despite emission of sulfur no decrease in pH was found. Bacteria producing acid from maltose, cellobiose, arabinose or xylose and bacteria hydrolyzing starch, pectin, xyland or cellulose decreased 8- to 11-fold due to the soil contamination. Chitin hydrolyzers were 5 times less abundant at the most polluted site compared with background levels. Soil respiration rate and urease activity decreased by about a factor of 4, but phosphatase activity and mycelial lengths were unaffected by the soil contamination. Soil bacteria showed a sigmoidal response to the log of metal concentration in the soil and were affected at a lower pollution level than the other biological variables in the study. A multivariate analysis (partial least squares) showed that soil metal contamination and soil pH were the two environmental factors influencing the soil microorganisms.

  20. Activity of siderophores against drug-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokarn K

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Karuna Gokarn,1,2 Ramprasad B Pal1 1Department of Microbiology, Sir Hurkisondas Nurrotumdas Medical Research Society, 2Caius Research Laboratory, St Xavier’s College, Mumbai, India Abstract: Infections by drug-resistant bacteria are life-threatening. As iron is a vital element for the growth of bacteria, iron-chelating agents (siderophores can be used to arrest their multiplication. Exogenous siderophores – exochelin-MS and deferoxamine-B – were evaluated for their inhibitory activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and metallo-β-lactamase producers – Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii – by disc diffusion, micro-broth dilution, and turbidimetric growth assays. The drug-resistant isolates were inhibited by the synergistic activity of siderophores and antibiotics. Minimum inhibitory concentration of exochelin-MS+ampicillin for different isolates was between 0.05 and 0.5 mg/mL. Minimum inhibitory concentration of deferoxamine-B+ampicillin was 1.0 mg/mL and greater. Iron-chelation therapy could provide a complementary approach to overcome drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria. Keywords: iron-chelation, xenosiderophores, exochelin MS, deferoxamine B

  1. Superparamagnetic nickel colloidal nanocrystal clusters with antibacterial activity and bacteria binding ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Xinglin; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Dullens, Roel P. A.

    2018-06-01

    Recent progress in synthetic nanotechnology and the ancient use of metals in food preservation and the antibacterial treatment of wounds have prompted the development of nanometallic materials for antimicrobial applications1-4. However, the materials designed so far do not simultaneously display antimicrobial activity and the capability of binding and capturing bacteria and spores. Here, we develop a one-step pyrolysis procedure to synthesize monodisperse superparamagnetic nickel colloidal nanocrystal clusters (SNCNCs), which show both antibacterial activity and the ability to bind Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, as well as bacterial spores. The SNCNCs are formed from a rapid burst of nickel nanoparticles, which self-assemble slowly into clusters. The clusters can magnetically extract 99.99% of bacteria and spores and provide a promising approach for the removal of microbes, including hard-to-treat microorganisms. We believe that our work illustrates the exciting opportunities that nanotechnology offers for alternative antimicrobial strategies and other applications in microbiology.

  2. Isolation and partial characterization of soils actinomycetes with antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Belén Parada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and thirty four actinobacteria strains were isolated from Argentinian and Peruvian soil in order to evaluate the antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant bacteria On the basis of their antagonist activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and two vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (EVR-Van A and  EVR Van B,13 strains were selected. The presence of NRPS, PKS-I and PKS-II genes were also investigated by PCR techniques. Among the 13 selected actinobacteria, strain AC69C displayed the higher activity in diffusion tests in solid medium and was further evaluated for the production of antagonist metabolites in liquid media. The best results were obtained using fermentation broth with carbohydrates, when starch and glucose were used in combination. Antimicrobial activities of 640 arbitrary units (AU, 320 AU, 320 AU and 80 AU were obtained against EVR-Van A, EVR-Van B, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC7644 and MRSA, respectively. PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of AC69C strain displayed a 100 % homology with Streptomyces antibioticus NRRL B-1701. It was not possible to establish a correlation between the amplified genes and antimicrobial activity of the 13 selected strains. The results of this work show the wide distribution of actinobacteria in soil and the importance of the isolation of strain to screen novel active metabolites against multidrug resistant bacteria of clinical origin.

  3. Antimicrobial Activity of Endemic Herbs from Tangkahan Conservation Forest North Sumatera to Bacteria and Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KIKI NURTJAHJA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tangkahan Conservation Forest in Karo County, North Sumatera has high biodiversity of endemic herbs. Many species of the wild herbs are well known used as traditional medicine not only by local people but also by people out of the area. The methanol extract of the medicinal wild herbs in Tangkahan Conservation Forest, Karo County to relief skin diseases caused by bacteria and fungi never been studied medically. The antimicrobial activity leave extract of the medicinal herbs to pathogenic microorganisms are studied. The leaves extract of kembu-kembu (Callicarpa candicans, rintih bulung (Piper muricatum, cep-cepan (Castanopsis costata, and sereh kayu (Eugenia grandis, has antimicrobial to bacteria (Bacillus sp., Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus and yeast (Candida albicans. Toxicity assay of these plants by brine shrimp method using Artemia salina indicates that cep-cepan dan sereh kayu have lethal concentration higher than kembu-kembu and rintih bulung.

  4. Antigenotoxic activity of lactic acid bacteria, prebiotics, and products of their fermentation against selected mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Adriana; Śliżewska, Katarzyna; Otlewska, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Dietary components such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and prebiotics can modulate the intestinal microbiota and are thought to be involved in the reduction of colorectal cancer risk. The presented study measured, using the comet assay, the antigenotoxic activity of both probiotic and non-probiotic LAB, as well as some prebiotics and the end-products of their fermentation, against fecal water (FW). The production of short chain fatty acids by the bacteria was quantified using HPLC. Seven out of the ten tested viable strains significantly decreased DNA damage induced by FW. The most effective of them were Lactobacillus mucosae 0988 and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb-12, leading to a 76% and 80% decrease in genotoxicity, respectively. The end-products of fermentation of seven prebiotics by Lactobacillus casei DN 114-001 exhibited the strongest antigenotoxic activity against FW, with fermented inulin reducing genotoxicity by 75%. Among the tested bacteria, this strain produced the highest amounts of butyrate in the process of prebiotic fermentation, and especially from resistant dextrin (4.09 μM/mL). Fermented resistant dextrin improved DNA repair by 78% in cells pre-treated with 6.8 μM methylnitronitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Fermented inulin induced stronger DNA repair in cells pre-treated with mutagens (FW, 25 μM hydrogen peroxide, or MNNG) than non-fermented inulin, and the efficiency of DNA repair after 120 min of incubation decreased by 71%, 50% and 70%, respectively. The different degrees of genotoxicity inhibition observed for the various combinations of bacteria and prebiotics suggest that this effect may be attributable to carbohydrate type, SCFA yield, and the ratio of the end-products of prebiotic fermentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacteria and protozoa in soil microhabitats as affected by earthworms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winding, Anne; Rønn, Regin; Hendriksen, Niels B.

    1997-01-01

    , were compared. The total, viable, and culturable number of bacteria, the metabolic potentials of bacterial populations, and the number of protozoa and nematodes were determined in soil size fractions. Significant differences between soil fractions were shown by all assays. The highest number......-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolim chloride (CTC)-reducing bacteria explained a major part of the variation in the number of protozoa. High protozoan activity and predation thus coincided with high bacterial activity. In soil with elm leaves, fungal growth is assumed to inhibit bacterial and protozoan...... activity. In soil with elm leaves and earthworms, earthworm activity led to increased culturability of bacteria, activity of protozoa, number of nematodes, changed metabolic potentials of the bacteria, and decreased differences in metabolic potentials between bacterial populations in the soil fractions...

  6. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  7. Adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan monomer and its metabolic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halassy, Beata; Krstanović, Marina; Frkanec, Ruza; Tomasić, Jelka

    2003-02-14

    Peptidoglycan monomer (PGM) is a natural compound of bacterial origin. It is a non-toxic, non-pyrogenic, water-soluble immunostimulator potentiating humoral immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. It is fast degraded and its metabolic products-the pentapeptide (PP) and the disaccharide (DS)-are excreted from the mammalian organism upon parenteral administration. The present study investigates: (a). whether PGM could influence the long-living memory generation; (b). whether metabolic products retain adjuvant properties of the parent compound and contribute to its adjuvanticity. We report now that mice immunised twice with OVA+PGM had significantly higher anti-OVA IgG levels upon challenge with antigen alone 6 months later in comparison to control group immunised with OVA only. PP and DS were prepared enzymatically in vitro as apyrogenic and chemically pure compounds. When mice were immunised with OVA plus PP and DS, respectively, the level of anti-OVA IgGs in sera was not higher than in mice immunised with OVA alone, while PGM raised the level of specific antibodies. Results implicate that the adjuvant active molecule, capable of enhancing long-living memory generation, is PGM itself, and none of its metabolic products.

  8. Proteolytic activity and cooperative hemolytic effect of dermatophytes with different species of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakshir, K; Mohamadi, T; Khodadadi, H; Motamedifar, M; Zomorodian, K; Alipour, S; Motamedi, M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Globally, dermatophytes are the most common filamentous group of fungi causing cutaneous mycoses. Dermatophytes were shown to secrete a multitude of enzymes that play a role in their pathogenesis. There is limited data on co-hemolytic (CAMP-like) effect of different bacterial species on dermatophyte species. In this study, we sought to the evaluate exoenzyme activity and co-hemolytic effect of four bacteria on clinical dermatophytes isolated from patients in Shiraz, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 84 clinical dermatophyte species were isolated from patients suffering dermatophytosis and identified by conventional methods. Hemolytic activity was evaluated with Columbia 5% sheep blood agar. Proteolytic activity was determined by plate clearance assay method, using gelatin 8% agar. CAMP-like factor was evaluated with four bacteria, namely, S. areus, S. saprophyticus, S. pyogenes, and S. agalactiae. Fisher's exact test was run for statistical analysis. Results: T. mentagrophytes was the most predominant agent (27 [32.1%]) followed by T. verrucosum(20 [23.8%]), T. tonsurans (10 [11.9%]), Microsporum canis (7 [8.3%]), T. rubrum (6 [7.1%]), E. floccosum (6 [7.1%]), M. gypseum (5 [6%]), and T. violaceum (3[3.6%]). The most common clinical area of dermatophytosis was the skin. All the isolates expressed the zone of incomplete alpha hemolysis. All the isolates had CAMP- positive reaction with S. aureus and the other bacteria were CAMP-negative. All the isolates expressed proteolytic activity and no significant differences were noted among diverse genera of dermatophytes and severities of proteolytic activity. Conclusion: This study indicated that hemolysin and proteolytic enzymes potentially play a role in dermatophyte pathogenesis and S. aureus could be considered as a main bacterium for creation of co-hemolytic effect in association with dermatophyte species. PMID:28959790

  9. Identification of entomopathogenic nematodes and symbiotic bacteria from Nam Nao National Park in Thailand and larvicidal activity of symbiotic bacteria against Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yooyangket, Temsiri; Muangpat, Paramaporn; Polseela, Raxsina; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Thanwisai, Aunchalee; Vitta, Apichat

    2018-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) that are symbiotically associated with Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus bacteria can kill target insects via direct infection and toxin action. There are limited reports identifying such organisms in the National Park of Thailand. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to identify EPNs and symbiotic bacteria from Nam Nao National Park, Phetchabun Province, Thailand and to evaluate the larvicidal activity of bacteria against Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus. A total of 12 EPN isolates belonging to Steinernema and Heterorhabditis were obtained form 940 soil samples between February 2014 and July 2016. EPNs were molecularly identified as S. websteri (10 isolates) and H. baujardi (2 isolates). Symbiotic bacteria were isolated from EPNs and molecularly identified as P. luminescens subsp. akhurstii (13 isolates), X. stockiae (11 isolates), X. vietnamensis (2 isolates) and X. japonica (1 isolate). For the bioassay, bacterial suspensions were evaluated for toxicity against third to early fourth instar larvae of Aedes spp. The larvae of both Aedes species were orally susceptible to symbiotic bacteria. The highest larval mortality of Ae. aegypti was 99% after exposure to X. stockiae (bNN112.3_TH) at 96 h, and the highest mortality of Ae. albopictus was 98% after exposure to P. luminescens subsp. akhurstii (bNN121.4_TH) at 96 h. In contrast to the control groups (Escherichia coli and distilled water), the mortality rate of both mosquito larvae ranged between 0 and 7% at 72 h. Here, we report the first observation of X. vietnamensis in Thailand. Additionally, we report the first observation of P. luminescens subsp. akhurstii associated with H. baujardi in Thailand. X. stockiae has potential to be a biocontrol agent for mosquitoes. This investigation provides a survey of the basic diversity of EPNs and symbiotic bacteria in the National Park of Thailand, and it is a bacterial resource for further studies of bioactive compounds.

  10. Isolation and characterization of pigmented bacteria showing antimicrobial activity from Malaysian marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Natural products play a prominent role in the discovery of leads for the development of drugs in the treatment ofhuman diseases. Much of nature remains to be explored, especially marine and microbial environments.Methodology and results: Fifty-five pigmented marine bacteria were isolated from sponges, seawater, mangrovesediment, sea cucumber and mussel from different coastal area of Malaysia. The antimicrobial activities of thesebacteria were investigated by disk diffusion method against pathogenic bacteria. Out of 55 isolates, 18 isolates exhibitedantimicrobial activity, which based on morphological characterization, 53% of them were Gram positive and 47% wereGram negative. All active isolates were able to tolerate more than 4% NaCl in the nutrient agar medium that indicatedthey were autochthonous to marine environment and moderate salt tolerant in nature. Molecular identification of isolatesby the strong antimicrobial activities indicates that isolates WPRA3 (JX020764 and SM11-3j belong to genus Serratiaand isolate SDPM1 (JQ083392 belongs to genus Zooshikella.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The results of present study revealed that the active isolates arepotential producer of antimicrobial secondary metabolites and might be utilized as drug candidate.

  11. Digital imaging information technology for biospeckle activity assessment relative to bacteria and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E; Cabrera, Humberto; Grassi, Hilda C; de J Andrades, Efrén; Otero, Isabel; Rodríguez, Dania; Darias, Juan G

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports on the biospeckle processing of biological activity using a visualization scheme based upon the digital imaging information technology. Activity relative to bacterial growth in agar plates and to parasites affected by a drug is monitored via the speckle patterns generated by a coherent source incident on the microorganisms. We present experimental results to demonstrate the potential application of this methodology for following the activity in time. The digital imaging information technology is an alternative visualization enabling the study of speckle dynamics, which is correlated to the activity of bacteria and parasites. In this method, the changes in Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color component density are considered as markers of the growth of bacteria and parasites motility in presence of a drug. The RGB data was used to generate a two-dimensional surface plot allowing an analysis of color distribution on the speckle images. The proposed visualization is compared to the outcomes of the generalized differences and the temporal difference. A quantification of the activity is performed using a parameterization of the temporal difference method. The adopted digital image processing technique has been found suitable to monitor motility and morphological changes in the bacterial population over time and to detect and distinguish a short term drug action on parasites.

  12. Differentiating leucine incorporation of Archaea and Bacteria throughout the water column of the eastern Atlantic using metabolic inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Yokokawa, Taichi; Sintes, Eva; de Corte, Daniele; Olbrich, Kerstin; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance (based on catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybrid ization, CARD-FISH) and leucine incorporation rates of Archaea and Bacteria were determined throughout the water column in the eastern Atlantic. Bacteria dominated throughout the water column, although their contribution to total prokaryotic abundance in the bathypelagic layer (1000 to 4000 m depth) was lower than in the surface and mesopelagic layers (0 to 1000 m depth). While marine Crenarchaeota Group I (MCG ...

  13. Antioxidant Activities of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Quality Improvement of Fermented Sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulong; Hu, Ping; Lou, Lijiao; Zhan, Jianlong; Fan, Min; Li, Dan; Liao, Qianwei

    2017-12-01

    Lactobacillus curvatus (SR6) and Lactobacillus paracasei (SR10-1) were assessed for their antioxidant activities and inoculated into sausages to investigate their effects on quality during fermentation. The results showed that L. curvatus SR6 had better DPPH• scavenging activity (59.67% ± 6.68%) and reducing power (47.31% ± 4.62%) and L. paracasei SR10-1 had better OH• scavenging activity (285.67% ± 2.00%) and anti-lipid peroxidation capacity (63.89% ± 0.93%). The superoxide dismutase activity of the cell culture fluid was greater than 47.00 U/mL, and the catalase activity of the cell-free extracts was greater than 1.00 U/mL. In the sausage model, lactic acid bacteria rapidly became the dominant microflora and reduced the moisture content, water activity, nitrite, and pH. The bacteria significantly enhanced the antioxidant activity of the sausage extracts, which improved the sensory characteristics and safety of the sausages. These results illustrate that both strains have excellent antioxidant activities and can be used as antioxidant starters in fermented meat products. The study illustrated the antioxidant and antioxidase activities of Lactobacillus curvatus SR6 and Lactobacillus paracasei SR10-1 and demonstrated the changes in the quality characteristics and antioxidant activities of fermented sausages. The findings provide valuable information for the meat industry on the application of functional starters in fermented meat products. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. (Clinical Research Centre, Harrow (England))

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  15. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D.

    1990-01-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of [2H5]phenylalanine, [1-13C]propionate, and [1-13C]leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD

  16. Metabolic Syndrome and Physical Activity in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    derya atik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This descriptive study was carried out to reveal the level of physical activity in patients who receive hemodialysis due to chronic kidney failure and to identify its relationship with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS. Material and method: The study was conducted with 55 patients at the hemodialysis units of Alanya State Hospital and Private Alanya Anadolu Hospital between 10 and 30 June 2013. The study data were collected using the National Cholesterol Education Program, the Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III, a data collection form containing Metabolic Syndrome Diagnosis Criteria, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. The data were analyzed using arithmetic mean +/- standard deviation (SD, number and percentage distributions, independent sample t test, crosstabs, One Way Anova, and Pearson and #8217;s Correlation Analysis. Conclusion and suggestions: It was found that 41.8% of the patients were between 50 and 65 years of age, the majority of them were male (58.2%, hemodialysis had been administered to 69.1% of them for at least 36 months, and 50.9% of them met three and more of the MetS criteria. There was no statistically significant relationship between MetS and physical activity levels, but the length of physical activity was longer in those who did not meet the MetS diagnosis criteria (p>0.05. An increase in sedentary time raised the MetS criteria (p<0.05. Conclusion: Nearly 1/2 of the patients were at risk of MetS. Physical activity level being statistically ineffective on MetS can be associated with low physical activity level and longer sedentary time. It can be said that being completely sedentary increases BMI and therefore MetS. The study can be repeated on different samples and the results can be compared. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 69-75

  17. Pinostrobin Derivatives from PrenylationReaction and their Antibacterial Activity against Clinical Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marliyana, S. D.; Mujahidin, D.; Syah, Y. M.

    2018-04-01

    Kaempferia pandurata (syn. Boesenbergia rotunda, B. pandurata (Roxb.)Schltr), locally known as "TemuKunci"in Indonesia, is one of the medicinal plants of the family Zingiberaceae. Phytochemical studies on the rhizome of K. pandurata showed the presence of flavonoid derivative, namely flavanones, which constitute as the main components of this plant. Bioactivity studies on this species exhibited various biological activities, such as antibacteria, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antidiarrhea, antidisentri, anti-HIV, antioxidant, antipyretic, analgesic and insecticides. Among the biological activities, the antibacterial activity results are important as an attempt to answer the emergence of resistance of some bacteria against existing drugs, as well as the emergence of a number of outbreaks of disease caused by bacteria. Therefore, a search to find new compounds that are potential as an antibacterial is an urgent matter. The present study was aimed at the chemical transformation of pinostrobin (1) from K. pandurata rhizome and an antibacterial activity.The chemical transformation was performed through a prenylation reaction of pinostrobin (1) which is the main component of K. pandurata rhizome. The prenylation reaction was carried out by reacting pinostrobin (1) with prenyl bromide and potassium carbonat (K2CO3). The purification of product was done using the radial chromatography with mix solvent n-hexane and ethyl acetate (97.5:2.5; 9.5:0.5; 9.0:1.0.; 8.0:2.0). The purity test of isolated compound was analysedby TLC using different types of eluent. The identification of compounds was determined based on NMR data and mass spectra analysis. Five compounds were obtained from the prenylation reaction, i.e. monooxyprenylated pinostrobin (2), monooxyprenylated chalcone (3), diprenylated chalcone (4), triprenylated chalcone (5), and triprenylated cyclohexene chalcone (6). These compounds were tested for antibacterial activities against four clinical bacteria, namely

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Medicinal Plant Extracts against Multidrug Resistant Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Masoumian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, it is necessary to discover new and efficient antifungal or antimicrobial drugs because of increasing drug resistance organisms. Using medicinal plants for natural treatment of diseases caused by bacterial origin has mainly been considered. Objectives: In this study, the impacts of antimicrobial medicinal plants extract were compared based on four bacteria in vitro. Methods: In this experimental study, disc diffusion assay and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC method were used to investigate the antibacterial effects of selected plant extract elicited by two different solvent on S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. enteric. Data were analyzed with a statistical software program (SPSS 16. Results: The hydro-alcoholic extract of Myrtus communis (myrtle and water extract of Cinnamomun zeylanicum (cinnamon were the most active extracts screened for antimicrobial activities against different four bacteria as tested organisms. The diameter of inhibition zones ranged from 23 to 28 mm. Comparison of the antibacterial effect of plant extracts and commercial drug revealed that the size of inhibition zone of penicillin against Staphylococcus aureus bacterium was larger than the plant extracts. However, myrtle extract at the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 30 mg/mL showed more powerful antibacterial activity compared to the other extracts and even penicillin. Petroselinum crispum (parsley, Nerium oleander (Oleander and Glycyrihiza glabra (licorice were found to have the least effect on the tested bacteria. Conclusions: In the present study, plant extracts with different compounds showed antibacterial activity (especially myrtle and cinnamon. Hence, they can be used as new source for antibacterial substances.

  19. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Several Plant Extracts and Oils against Some Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Al-Mariri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicinal plants are considered new resources for producing agents that could act as alternatives to antibiotics in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of 28 plant extracts and oils against four Gram-negative bacterial species. Methods: Experimental, in vitro, evaluation of the activities of 28 plant extracts and oils as well as some antibiotics against E. coli O157:H7, Yersinia enterocolitica O9, Proteus spp., and Klebsiella pneumoniae was performed. The activity against 15 isolates of each bacterium was determined by disc diffusion method at a concentration of 5%. Microdilution susceptibility assay was used in order to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the plant extracts, oils, and antibiotics. Results: Among the evaluated herbs, only Origanum syriacum L., Thymus syriacus Boiss., Syzygium aromaticum L., Juniperus foetidissima Wild, Allium sativum L., Myristica fragrans Houtt, and Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. essential oils and Laurus nobilis L. plant extract showed anti-bacterial activity. The MIC50 values of these products against the Gram-negative organisms varied from 1.5 (Proteus spp. and K. pneumoniae( and 6.25 µl/ml (Yersinia enterocolitica O9 to 12.5 µl/ml (E. coli O:157. Conclusion: Among the studied essential oils, O. syriacum L., T. syriacus Boiss., C. zeylanicum L., and S. aromaticum L. essential oils were the most effective. Moreover, Cephalosporin and Ciprofloxacin were the most effective antibiotics against almost all the studied bacteria. Therefore, O. syriacum L., T. syriacus Boiss., C. zeylanicum L., and S. aromaticum L. could act as bactericidal agents against Gram-negative bacteria.

  20. Antibacterial activity of Achillea tenuifolia Lam. extract against standard bacteria and isolated strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Omidpanah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have been trying to develop new broad-spectrum antibiotics against the infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites for many decades. Prolonged usage of the antibiotics has led to the emergence of drug resistance among bacteria; therefore, there is a tremendous need for novel antimicrobial agents from different sources such as plants which are used in traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibacterial effect of Achillea tenuifolia. The plant material was extracted by maceration method using methanol three times at room temperature. The extract was concentrated after removing the solvent by rotary evaporator and then lyophilized using freeze dryer. Inhibitory effect of the extract was examined against four standard bacteria strains and two isolated strains from diseased hen using disk diffusion method and microdilution method to evaluate their inhibition zone diameter (IZD and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, respectively. The results showed that the extract of the plant was active against standard strains including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis with IZDs of 10.3±0.5, 14±0.0, 12±0.0 and 11.6±0.5, respectively. However, growths of isolated strains were not inhibited in the presence of the extract. Although, the growths of isolated strains were not inhibited by the plant extract, the standard strains were moderately susceptible to the extract; among those P. aeroginosa was more sensible than other tested strains

  1. Modified Polymeric Nanoparticles Exert In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity Against Oral Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Babu, Jegdish P; Osorio, Raquel; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; García-Godoy, Franklin; Toledano, Manuel

    2018-06-14

    Polymeric nanoparticles were modified to exert antimicrobial activity against oral bacteria. Nanoparticles were loaded with calcium, zinc and doxycycline. Ions and doxycycline release were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer and high performance liquid chromatography. Porphyromonas gingivalis , Lactobacillus lactis , Streptoccocus mutans , gordonii and sobrinus were grown and the number of bacteria was determined by optical density. Nanoparticles were suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 10, 1 and 0.1 mg/mL and incubated with 1.0 mL of each bacterial suspension for 3, 12, and 24 h. The bacterial viability was assessed by determining their ability to cleave the tetrazolium salt to a formazan dye. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Scheffe’s F ( p Nanoparticles (60% to 99% reduction) followed by Ca-Nanoparticles or Zn-Nanoparticles (30% to 70% reduction) and finally the non-doped nanoparticles (7% to 35% reduction). P. gingivalis , S. mutans and L. lactis were the most susceptible bacteria, being S. gordonii and S. sobrinus the most resistant to the tested nanoparticles.

  2. Smart Biointerface with Photoswitched Functions between Bactericidal Activity and Bacteria-Releasing Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; Zhan, Wenjun; Yu, Qian; Chen, Hong

    2017-08-09

    Smart biointerfaces with capability to regulate cell-surface interactions in response to external stimuli are of great interest for both fundamental research and practical applications. Smart surfaces with "ON/OFF" switchability for a single function such as cell attachment/detachment are well-known and useful, but the ability to switch between two different functions may be seen as the next level of "smart". In this work reported, a smart supramolecular surface capable of switching functions reversibly between bactericidal activity and bacteria-releasing ability in response to UV-visible light is developed. This platform is composed of surface-containing azobenzene (Azo) groups and a biocidal β-cyclodextrin derivative conjugated with seven quaternary ammonium salt groups (CD-QAS). The surface-immobilized Azo groups in trans form can specially incorporate CD-QAS to achieve a strongly bactericidal surface that kill more than 90% attached bacteria. On irradiation with UV light, the Azo groups switch to cis form, resulting in the dissociation of the Azo/CD-QAS inclusion complex and release of dead bacteria from the surface. After the kill-and-release cycle, the surface can be easily regenerated for reuse by irradiation with visible light and reincorporation of fresh CD-QAS. The use of supramolecular chemistry represents a promising approach to the realization of smart, multifunctional surfaces, and has the potential to be applied to diverse materials and devices in the biomedical field.

  3. The antagonistic activity of lactic acid bacteria isolated from peda, an Indonesian traditional fermented fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, T. F.; Suprapto, H.; Tjahjaningsih, W.; Pramono, H.

    2018-04-01

    Peda is an Indonesian traditional fermented whole fish prepared by addition of salt prior to fermentation and drying process. Salt used to control the growth of the lactic acid bacteria for the fermentation process. The objectives of this study were isolating and characterize the potential lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from peda as culture starter candidate, particularly its activity against pathogenic bacteria. A total of five samples from five regions of East Java Province was collected and subjected to LAB isolation. Fifty-seven of 108 colonies that show clear zone in de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) agar supplemented with 0.5% CaCO3 were identified as LAB. Twenty-seven of the LAB isolates were exhibit inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. Isolate Aerococcus NJ-20 was exhibited strong inhibition against S. aureus ATCC 6538 (7.6 ± 1.35 mm inhibition zone) but was not produce bacteriocin. This finding suggests that the isolate Aerococcus NJ-20 can be applied as biopreservative culture starter on peda production. Further analysis on technological properties of isolates will be needed prior to application.

  4. Survival of bacteria in nuclear waste buffer materials. The influence of nutrients, temperature and water activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, K.; Motamedi, M. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Karnland, O. [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    The concept of deep geological disposal of spent fuel is common to many national nuclear waste programs. Long-lived radioactive waste will be encapsulated in canisters made of corrosion resistant materials e.g. copper and buried several hundred meters below ground in a geological formation. Different types of compacted bentonite clay, or mixtures with sand, will be placed as a buffer around the waste canisters. A major concern for the performance of the canisters is that sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) may be present in the clay and induce corrosion by production of hydrogen sulphide. This report presents data on viable counts of SRB in the bedrock of Aespoe hard rock laboratory. A theoretical background on the concept water activity is given, together with basic information about SRB. Some results on microbial populations from a full scale buffer test in Canada is presented. These results suggested water activity to be a strong limiting factor for survival of bacteria in compacted bentonite. As a consequence, experiments were set up to investigate the effect from water activity on survival of SRB in bentonite. Here we show that survival of SRB in bentonite depends on the availability of water and that compacting a high quality bentonite to a density of 2.0 g/cm{sup 3}, corresponding to a water activity (a{sub w}) of 0.96, prevented SRB from surviving in the clay. 24 refs.

  5. Survival of bacteria in nuclear waste buffer materials. The influence of nutrients, temperature and water activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.; Motamedi, M.

    1995-12-01

    The concept of deep geological disposal of spent fuel is common to many national nuclear waste programs. Long-lived radioactive waste will be encapsulated in canisters made of corrosion resistant materials e.g. copper and buried several hundred meters below ground in a geological formation. Different types of compacted bentonite clay, or mixtures with sand, will be placed as a buffer around the waste canisters. A major concern for the performance of the canisters is that sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) may be present in the clay and induce corrosion by production of hydrogen sulphide. This report presents data on viable counts of SRB in the bedrock of Aespoe hard rock laboratory. A theoretical background on the concept water activity is given, together with basic information about SRB. Some results on microbial populations from a full scale buffer test in Canada is presented. These results suggested water activity to be a strong limiting factor for survival of bacteria in compacted bentonite. As a consequence, experiments were set up to investigate the effect from water activity on survival of SRB in bentonite. Here we show that survival of SRB in bentonite depends on the availability of water and that compacting a high quality bentonite to a density of 2.0 g/cm 3 , corresponding to a water activity (a w ) of 0.96, prevented SRB from surviving in the clay. 24 refs

  6. In-vitro activity of solithromycin against anaerobic bacteria from the normal intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Andrej; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Nord, Carl Erik

    2016-12-01

    Solithromycin is a novel fluoroketolide with high activity against bacteria associated with community-acquired respiratory tract infections as well as gonorrhea. However, data on the activity of solithromycin against anaerobic bacteria from the normal intestinal microbiota are scarce. In this study, 1024 Gram-positive and Gram-negative anaerobic isolates from the normal intestinal microbiota were analyzed for in-vitro susceptibility against solithromycin and compared to azithromycin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone, metronidazole and levofloxacin by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Solithromycin was active against Bifidobacteria (MIC 50 , 0.008 mg/L) and Lactobacilli (MIC 50 , 0.008 mg/L). The MIC 50 for Clostridia, Bacteroides, Prevotella and Veillonella were 0.5, 0.5, 0.125 and 0.016 mg/L, respectively. Gram-positive anaerobes were more susceptible to solithromycin as compared to the other antimicrobials tested. The activity of solithromycin against Gram-negative anaerobes was equal or higher as compared to other tested agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of bagging on sugar metabolism and the activity of sugar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate the effects of bagging on sugar metabolism and the activity of sugar metabolism related enzymes in Qingzhong loquat fruit development, the contents of sucrose, glucose and soluble solids as well as the activities of sugar metabolism related enzymes were evaluated. The content of sucrose, glucose and ...

  8. Active Matrixmetalloproteinase-8 and periodontal bacteria - interlink between periodontitis and inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J; Weigert, M; Leuschner, C; Hartmann, H; Raddatz, D; Haak, R; Mausberg, R F; Kottmann, Tanja; Schmalz, G; Ziebolz, D

    2018-03-25

    The aim of this study was the investigation of concentration and prevalence of selected periodontal pathogenic bacteria and concentration of active matrix-metalloproteinase-8 (aMMP-8) within a group of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and to compare the results with a group of healthy control subjects (HC). 59 IBD patients with Crohn`s disease (CD, n = 30) or ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 29) and 59 HC were included in this cross-sectional study. Based on periodontal probing depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL), periodontitis was classified into healthy/mild, moderate or severe. aMMP-8 was analyzed from gingival crevicular fluid using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Eleven selected periodontal pathogenic bacteria were analyzed in subgingival plaque samples using polymerase chain reaction. IBD patients showed higher CAL (p periodontitis (p = 0.04), gingival bleeding (p periodontitis was associated with an increase in aMMP-8 concentration (p = 0.02). The prevalences of Eubacterium nodatum and Eikanella corrodens were significantly lower in IBD compared to HC (p = 0.01). Additionally, the prevalence of Eikanella corrodens was significantly higher in CD compared to UC group (p = 0.04). Further statistically significant differences in selected bacteria between IBD and HC or CD and UC groups could not be found (p > 0.05). The results reveal changes in host immune response of IBD patients in terms of aMMP-8. Only in CD increasing aMMP-8 was associated with severity of periodontal disease. The role of periodontal pathogenic bacteria in the interrelation between IBD and periodontitis remains unclear. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytosolic Calcium Coordinates Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism with Presynaptic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Amit K.; Ivannikov, Maxim V.; Lu, Zhongmin; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Macleod, Gregory T.

    2012-01-01

    Most neurons fire in bursts, imposing episodic energy demands, but how these demands are coordinated with oxidative phosphorylation is still unknown. Here, using fluorescence imaging techniques on presynaptic termini of Drosophila motor neurons (MNs), we show that mitochondrial matrix pH (pHm), inner membrane potential (Δψm), and NAD(P)H levels ([NAD(P)H]m) increase within seconds of nerve stimulation. The elevations of pHm, Δψm, and [NAD(P)H]m indicate an increased capacity for ATP production. Elevations in pHm were blocked by manipulations which blocked mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, including replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Sr2+, and application of either tetraphenylphosphonium chloride or KB-R7943, indicating that it is Ca2+ that stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism. To place this phenomenon within the context of endogenous neuronal activity, the firing rates of a number of individually identified MNs were determined during fictive locomotion. Surprisingly, although endogenous firing rates are significantly different, there was little difference in presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c) between MNs when each fires at its endogenous rate. The average [Ca2+]c level (329±11nM) was slightly above the average Ca2+ affinity of the mitochondria (281±13nM). In summary, we show that when MNs fire at endogenous rates [Ca2+]c is driven into a range where mitochondria rapidly acquire Ca2+. As we also show that Ca2+ stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism, we conclude that [Ca2+]c levels play an integral role in coordinating mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity in Drosophila MNs. PMID:22279208

  10. Metabolic Equivalent in Adolescents, Active Adults and Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Melzer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available “Metabolic Equivalent” (MET represents a standard amount of oxygen consumed by the body under resting conditions, and is defined as 3.5 mL O2/kg × min or ~1 kcal/kg × h. It is used to express the energy cost of physical activity in multiples of MET. However, universal application of the 1-MET standard was questioned in previous studies, because it does not apply well to all individuals. Height, weight and resting metabolic rate (RMR, measured by indirect calorimetry were measured in adolescent males (n = 50 and females (n = 50, women during pregnancy (gestation week 35–41, n = 46, women 24–53 weeks postpartum (n = 27, and active men (n = 30, and were compared to values predicted by the 1-MET standard. The RMR of adolescent males (1.28 kcal/kg × h was significantly higher than that of adolescent females (1.11 kcal/kg × h, with or without the effects of puberty stage and physical activity levels. The RMR of the pregnant and post-pregnant subjects were not significantly different. The RMR of the active normal weight (0.92 kcal/kg × h and overweight (0.89 kcal/kg × h adult males were significantly lower than the 1-MET value. It follows that the 1-MET standard is inadequate for use not only in adult men and women, but also in adolescents and physically active men. It is therefore recommended that practitioners estimate RMR with equations taking into account individual characteristics, such as sex, age and Body Mass Index, and not rely on the 1-MET standard.

  11. Metabonomics-based analysis of Brachyspira pilosicoli's response to tiamulin reveals metabolic activity despite significant growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Caroline Ivanne; Passey, Jade Louise; Woodward, Martin John; La Ragione, Roberto Marcello; Claus, Sandrine Paule

    2017-06-01

    Pathogenic anaerobes Brachyspira spp. are responsible for an increasing number of Intestinal Spirochaetosis (IS) cases in livestock against which few approved treatments are available. Tiamulin is used to treat swine dysentery caused by Brachyspira spp. and recently has been used to handle avian intestinal spirochaetosis (AIS). The therapeutic dose used in chickens requires further evaluation since cases of bacterial resistance to tiamulin have been reported. In this study, we evaluated the impact of tiamulin at varying concentrations on the metabolism of B. pilosicoli using a 1 H-NMR-based metabonomics approach allowing the capture of the overall bacterial metabolic response to antibiotic treatment. Based on growth curve studies, tiamulin impacted bacterial growth even at very low concentration (0.008 μg/mL) although its metabolic activity was barely affected 72 h post exposure to antibiotic treatment. Only the highest dose of tiamulin tested (0.250 μg/mL) caused a major metabolic shift. Results showed that below this concentration, bacteria could maintain a normal metabolic trajectory despite significant growth inhibition by the antibiotic, which may contribute to disease reemergence post antibiotic treatment. Indeed, we confirmed that B. pilosicoli remained viable even after exposition to the highest antibiotic dose. This paper stresses the need to ensure new evaluation of bacterial viability post bacteriostatic exposure such as tiamulin to guarantee treatment efficacy and decrease antibiotic resistance development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Natural Killer Cells Are Activated by Lactic Acid Bacteria-Matured Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. Human peripheral blood NK cells were....... In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. These results demonstrate that various strains of lactobacilli have the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent or independent way. Hence, the encounter of NK cells...

  13. Proteolytic Activity in Reduced-Fat Cheddar Cheese Made with Lactic Acid Bacteria and Camel Chymosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Mette Winther

    be the need of an extended ripening period to reach a similar cheese structure as in cheeses produced with BC. The aim of this project was to compensate for the lower proteolytic activity in cheese produced with CC compared to BC. Selection of dairy lactic acid bacteria (LAB) for cheese production with high....... lactis subsp lactis, 10 thermophilic Lactobacillus strains and 15 frozen direct vat set strains of thermopholic Lactobacillus) to hydrolyse αS1-CN, candidates were selected for cheese-making experiments. None of the selected proteolytic strains contributed significantly to softening the cheese structure...

  14. Physical Activity Dimensions Associated with Impaired Glucose Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amadid, Hanan; Johansen, Nanna B.; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity (PA) is important in the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, yet little is known about the role of specific dimensions of PA, including sedentary time in subgroups at risk for impaired glucose metabolism (IGM). We applied a data-driven decision tool to identify dimensions of PA...... identified subgroups in which different activity dimensions were associated with IGM. Methodology and results from this study may suggest a preliminary step toward the goal of tailoring and targeting PA interventions aimed at Type 2 diabetes prevention....... associated with IGM across age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) groups. Methods This cross-sectional study included 1501 individuals (mean (SD) age, 65.6 (6.8) yr) at high risk for Type 2 diabetes from the ADDITION-PRO study. PA was measured by an individually calibrated combined accelerometer and heart rate...

  15. Functional bacteria and process metabolism of the Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (DS-EBPR) system: An investigation by operating the system from deterioration to restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gang; Wu, Di; Hao, Tianwei; Mackey, Hamish Robert; Wei, Li; Wang, Haiguang; Chen, Guanghao

    2016-05-15

    A sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus (P) Removal (EBPR) system is being developed to cater for the increasing needs to treat saline/brackish wastewater resulting from seawater intrusion into groundwater and sewers and frequent use of sulfate coagulants during drinking water treatment, as well as to meet the demand for eutrophication control in warm climate regions. However, the major functional bacteria and metabolism in this emerging biological nutrient removal system are still poorly understood. This study was thus designed to explore the functional microbes and metabolism in this new EBPR system by manipulating the deterioration, failure and restoration of a lab-scale system. This was achieved by changing the mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration to monitor and evaluate the relationships among sulfur conversion (including sulfate reduction and sulfate production), P removal, variation in microbial community structures, and stoichiometric parameters. The results show that the stable Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated EBPR (DS-EBPR) system was enriched by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). These bacteria synergistically participated in this new EBPR process, thereby inducing an appropriate level of sulfur conversion crucial for achieving a stable DS-EBPR performance, i.e. maintaining sulfur conversion intensity at 15-40 mg S/L, corresponding to an optimal sludge concentration of 6.5 g/L. This range of sulfur conversion favors microbial community competition and various energy flows from internal polymers (i.e. polysulfide or elemental sulfur (poly-S(2-)/S(0)) and poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA)) for P removal. If this range was exceeded, the system might deteriorate or even fail due to enrichment of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs). Four methods of restoring the failed system were investigated: increasing the sludge concentration, lowering the salinity or doubling the COD

  16. Antimicrobial effect of selected lactic acid bacteria against microorganisms with decarboxylase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatantuul Purevdorj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of twenty-one bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (12 strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, 4 strains of Lactobacillus gasseri, 3 strains of Lb. helveticus and 2 strains of Lb. acidophilus, LAB against 28 Staphylococcus and 33 Enterococcus strains able to produce tyramine, putrescine, 2-phenylethylamine and cadaverine. The antimicrobial activity of cell-free supernatants (CFS from tested LAB was examined by an agar-well diffusion assay. Nine out of twenty-one strains (33% showed the inhibitory effect on tested enterococci and staphylococci, namely 9 strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The diameters of inhibition zones ranged between 7 mm and 14 mm. The biggest diameter of 14 mm inhibition was obtained with the CFS's from strains CCDM 670 and CCDM 731 on Enterococcus sp. E16 and E28. The cell-free supernatants from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CCDM 71 and from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CCDM 731 displayed the broadest antibacterial activity (52% inhibition of all tested strains. On the other hand, the cell-free supernatants from the screened Lactobacillus strains did not show any inhibitory effect on the tested Staphylococcus and Enterococcus strains. Nowadays, the great attention is given to the antibacterial substances produced by lactic acid bacteria. With the ability to produce a variety of metabolites displaying inhibitory effect, the LAB have great potential in biopreservation of food.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Kefir against Various Food Pathogens and Spoilage Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Jeong, Dana; Kim, Hyunsook; Kang, Il-Byeong; Chon, Jung-Whan; Song, Kwang-Young; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Kefir is a unique fermented dairy product produced by a mixture of lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, and yeast. Here, we compared the antimicrobial spectra of four types of kefirs (A, L, M, and S) fermented for 24, 36, 48, or 72 h against eight food-borne pathogens. Bacillus cereus , Staphylococcus aureus , Listeria monocytogenes , Enterococcus faecalis , Escherichia coli , Salmonella Enteritidis , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and Cronobacter sakazakii were used as test strains, and antibacterial activity was investigated by the spot on lawn method. The spectra, potencies, and onsets of activity varied according to the type of kefir and the fermentation time. The broadest and strongest antimicrobial spectrum was obtained after at least 36-48 h of fermentation for all kefirs, although the traditional fermentation method of kefir is for 18-24 h at 25℃. For kefir A, B. cereus , E. coli , S . Enteritidis, P. aeruginosa , and C. sakazakii were inhibited, while B. cereus , S. aureus , E. coli , S . Enteritidis, P. aeruginosa , and C. sakazakii were inhibited to different extents by kefirs L, M, and S. Remarkably, S. aureus , S . Enteritidis, and C. sakazakii were only inhibited by kefirs L, M, and S, and L. monocytogenes by kefir M after fermentation for specific times, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity is attributable not only to a low pH but also to antimicrobial substances secreted during the fermentation.

  18. Activation of the TREM-1 pathway in human monocytes by periodontal pathogens and oral commensal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanat, M; Haase, E M; Kay, J G; Scannapieco, F A

    2017-08-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent disease caused in part by an aberrant host response to the oral multi-species biofilm. A balance between the oral bacteria and host immunity is essential for oral health. Imbalances in the oral microbiome lead to an uncontrolled host inflammatory response and subsequent periodontal disease (i.e. gingivitis and periodontitis). TREM-1 is a signaling receptor present on myeloid cells capable of acting synergistically with other pattern recognition receptors leading to amplification of inflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to investigate the activation of the TREM-1 pathway in the human monocyte-like cell line THP-1 exposed to both oral pathogens and commensals. The relative expression of the genes encoding TREM-1 and its adapter protein DAP12 were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The surface expression of TREM-1 was determined by flow cytometry. Soluble TREM-1 and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrate that both commensal and pathogenic oral bacteria activate the TREM-1 pathway, resulting in a proinflammatory TREM-1 activity-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokine production. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Antibacterial activity of [10]-gingerol and [12]-gingerol isolated from ginger rhizome against periodontal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miri; Bae, Jungdon; Lee, Dae-Sil

    2008-11-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has been used widely as a food spice and an herbal medicine. In particular, its gingerol-related components have been reported to possess antimicrobial and antifungal properties, as well as several pharmaceutical properties. However, the effective ginger constituents that inhibit the growth of oral bacteria associated with periodontitis in the human oral cavity have not been elucidated. This study revealed that the ethanol and n-hexane extracts of ginger exhibited antibacterial activities against three anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 53978, Porphyromonas endodontalis ATCC 35406 and Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611, causing periodontal diseases. Thereafter, five ginger constituents were isolated by a preparative high-performance liquid chromatographic method from the active silica-gel column chromatography fractions, elucidated their structures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and their antibacterial activity evaluated. In conclusion, two highly alkylated gingerols, [10]-gingerol and [12]-gingerol effectively inhibited the growth of these oral pathogens at a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) range of 6-30 microg/mL. These ginger compounds also killed the oral pathogens at a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) range of 4-20 microg/mL, but not the other ginger compounds 5-acetoxy-[6]-gingerol, 3,5-diacetoxy-[6]-gingerdiol and galanolactone.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Tetradenia riparia (Hochst.) Codd. (Lamiaceae) against cariogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Nathalya Isabel; de Carvalho, Carlos Eduardo; Fracarolli, Letícia; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Veneziani, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Crotti, Antônio Eduardo Miller

    2015-01-01

    In Brazilian folk medicine, Tetradenia riparia (Hochst.) Codd. (Lamiaceae) is used to treat toothaches and dental abscesses and diseases induced by worms, bacteria, or fungi. This paper aims to investigate the chemical composition and the antibacterial effects of the essential oil obtained from Tetradenia riparia leaves (TR-EO) grown in Southeastern Brazil against a representative panel of oral pathogens. We evaluated the antibacterial activity of TR-EO in terms of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). We identified aromadendrene oxide (14.0%), (E,E)-farnesol (13.6%), dronabinol (12.5%), and fenchone (6.2%) as the major constituents of TR-EO. TR-EO displayed MIC values between 31.2 and 500 μg/mL, with the lowest MIC value being obtained against Streptococcus mitis (31.2 μg/mL), S. mutans (62.5 μg/mL), S. sobrinus (31.2 μg/mL), and Lactobacillus casei (62.5 μg/mL). In time-kill experiments, TR-EO demonstrated bactericidal activity against S. mutans within the first 12 h, resulting in a curve profile similar to that of chlorhexidine. These results revealed that the essential oil of Tetradenia riparia displays promising activity against most of the selected cariogenic bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans. PMID:26273268

  1. Ureases display biological effects independent of enzymatic activity: Is there a connection to diseases caused by urease-producing bacteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Olivera-Severo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Ureases are enzymes from plants, fungi and bacteria that catalyze the hydrolysis of urea to form ammonia and carbon dioxide. While fungal and plant ureases are homo-oligomers of 90-kDa subunits, bacterial ureases are multimers of two or three subunit complexes. We showed that some isoforms of jack bean urease, canatoxin and the classical urease, bind to glycoconjugates and induce platelet aggregation. Canatoxin also promotes release of histamine from mast cells, insulin from pancreatic cells and neurotransmitters from brain synaptosomes. In vivo it induces rat paw edema and neutrophil chemotaxis. These effects are independent of ureolytic activity and require activation of eicosanoid metabolism and calcium channels. Helicobacter pylori, a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human stomach mucosa, causes gastric ulcers and cancer by a mechanism that is not understood. H. pylori produces factors that damage gastric epithelial cells, such as the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, the cytotoxin-associated protein CagA, and a urease (up to 10% of bacterial protein that neutralizes the acidic medium permitting its survival in the stomach. H. pylori whole cells or extracts of its water-soluble proteins promote inflammation, activate neutrophils and induce the release of cytokines. In this paper we review data from the literature suggesting that H. pylori urease displays many of the biological activities observed for jack bean ureases and show that bacterial ureases have a secretagogue effect modulated by eicosanoid metabolites through lipoxygenase pathways. These findings could be relevant to the elucidation of the role of urease in the pathogenesis of the gastrointestinal disease caused by H. pylori.

  2. Does physical activity during pregnancy adversely influence markers of the metabolic syndrome in adult offspring?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Inge; Granström, Charlotta; Rytter, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown whether physical activity during pregnancy (PA) has long-term impact on the metabolic profile of the offspring. We investigated associations of PA with markers of the metabolic syndrome (MS) in 20y old offspring.......It is unknown whether physical activity during pregnancy (PA) has long-term impact on the metabolic profile of the offspring. We investigated associations of PA with markers of the metabolic syndrome (MS) in 20y old offspring....

  3. Seasonal variation in population density and heterotrophic activity of attached and free-living bacteria in coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriberri, J.; Unanue, M.; Barcina, I.; Egea, L.

    1987-01-01

    The abundance and heterotrophic activity of attached and free-living bacteria was examined seasonally in coastal water. Heterotrophic activity was determined by the uptake of [ 14 C]glucose. The density of attached bacteria was always minor, not showing a seasonal variation, whereas the free-living bacteria were more numerous and showed a marked seasonal variation, their density being higher under warmer conditions. The contribution of the attached bacteria to the total assimilation of [ 14 C]glucose was lower than that of the free-living bacteria, neither of them showing a seasonal variation. On a cellular basis, attached bacteria were more active, since they assimilated more [ 14 C]glucose and showed, under warmer conditions, a higher cellular volume. The authors consider that the factors responsible for these observations were the amount and quality of the particulate material, the different availability of organic matter for the two types of bacteria, and in a fundamental way, the variation in water temperature

  4. Antimicrobial activity of some Pacific Northwest woods against anaerobic bacteria and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, W H; Karchesy, J J; Constantine, G H; Craig, A M

    2001-11-01

    Extracts of woods commonly used for animal bedding were tested for antimicrobial activity. Essential oils from Alaska cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) and old growth Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) as well as methanol extracts of wood from these trees plus western red cedar (Thuja plicata) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) were tested for antimicrobial activity against anaerobic bacteria and yeast. The test microbes included Fusobacterium necrophorum, Clostridium perfringens, Actinomyces bovis and Candida albicans which are common to foot diseases and other infections in animals. The essential oils and methanol extracts were tested using a standardized broth assay. Only extracts of Alaska cedar and western juniper showed significant antimicrobial activity against each of the microbes tested. The essential oil of Douglas fir did show antimicrobial activity against A. bovis at the concentrations tested. The methanol extracts of the heartwood of Douglas fir and the sapwood of ponderosa pine showed no antimicrobial activity. The major chemical components of western juniper (cedrol and alpha- and beta-cedrene) and Alaska cedar (nootkatin) were also tested. In western juniper, alpha- and beta-cedrene were found to be active components. Nootkatin showed activity only against C. albicans. The inhibitory activity in Alaska cedar oil was high enough to justify further efforts to define the other chemical components responsible for the antimicrobial activity. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. PROTEOLYTIC AND FIBRINOLYTIC ACTIVITIES OF HALOPHILIC LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FROM TWO INDONESIAN FERMENTED FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep A. Prihanto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of fermented foods as sources of fibrinolytic enzymes is increased in the last decades. Terasi and Jambal roti is Indonesian traditional fermented fish products, which were famous in Java Island. Both are important products in Indonesian dishes, especially in Java. Investigation on halophilic lactic acid bacteria using MRS and M-17 agar obtained seventy four isolated strains. Their proteolytic and fibrinolytic activities were determined using skim milk agar and plasminogen-free fibrin plate. Twenty five isolates showed protease activities, while only four of them secreted fibrinolitic enzyme. The highest proteolytic and fibrinolytic activity was shown by TB1 strain, which is identified as Bacillus coagulans. The 16s rDNA is still in investigating to confirm the TB1 strain identity.

  6. Effects of activated carbon on reductive dechlorination of PCBs by organohalide respiring bacteria indigenous to sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellerup, B V; Naff, C; Edwards, S J; Ghosh, U; Baker, J E; Sowers, K R

    2014-04-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have accumulated in aquatic sediments due to their inherent chemical stability and their presence poses a risk due to their potential toxicity in humans and animals. Granular activated carbon (GAC) has been applied to PCB contaminated sediment sites to reduce the aqueous concentration by sequestration thus reducing the PCB exposure and toxicity to both benthic and aquatic organisms. However, it is not known how the reduction of PCB bioavailability by adsorption to GAC affects bacterial transformation of PCBs by indigenous organohalide respiring bacteria. In this study, the impact of GAC on anaerobic dechlorination by putative organohalide respiring bacteria indigenous to sediment from Baltimore Harbor was examined. It was shown that the average Cl/biphenyl after dehalogenation of Aroclor 1260 was similar between treatments with and without GAC amendment. However, GAC caused a substantial shift in the congener distribution whereby a smaller fraction of highly chlorinated congeners was more extensively dechlorinated to mono- through tri-chlorinated congeners compared to the formation of tri- through penta-chlorinated congeners in unamended sediment. The results combined with comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences suggest that GAC caused a community shift to putative organohalide respiring phylotypes that coincided with more extensive dechlorination of ortho and unflanked chlorines. This shift in activity by GAC shown here for the first time has the potential to promote greater degradation in situ by promoting accumulation of less chlorinated congeners that are generally more susceptible to complete mineralization by aerobic PCB degrading bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oil of Sature jahortensis Against Multi-DrugResistant Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeide Saeidi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of resistance to many of the commonly used antibiotics is an impetus for further attempts to search for new antimicrobial agents. Objectives: In the present study, the antibacterial activity of Saturejahortensis essential oil against multi-drug resistant bacteria isolated from the urinary tract infections was investigated. Materials and Methods: During the years 2011 to 2012 a total of 36 strains of pathogenic bacteria including 12 Klebsiellapneumoniae, 12 Escherichia coli and 12 Staphylococcus aureus species were isolated from urine samples of hospitalized patients (Amir Al-Momenin Hospital, Zabol, South-eastern Iran suffering from urinary tract infections. After bacteriological confirmatory tests, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the essential oil of Saturejahortensis were determined using micro-dilution method. Results: The antibiotic resistance profile of the E. coli isolates were as follows: ceftazidime (50% cefixime (41.6%, tetracycline (75%, erythromycin (58.3%. However K. pneumoniae isolates showed resistance to ceftazidime (33.3%, cefixime (58.3%, erythromycin (75% and S. aureus isolates were resistant to cefixime (33.3%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (41.66%, penicillin (50%, oxacillin (83.3%, ceftazidime (66.6% and vancomycin (8.3%. The essential oil of this plant had inhibitory effect against most isolates. More than 1/3 of the E. coli isolates showed the lowest MIC (10 ppm whereas more than 1/3 of the K. pneumoniae isolates showed the highest (250 ppm MIC values. In contrast ,equal number of S. aureus isolates showed the low MIC values (10 and 50 ppm, while the heighest MIC (250 ppm was seen in 1/3 of isolates and moderate MIC (100 ppm was seen in one isolate only. Conclusions: The Saturejahortensis essential oil has a potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria. The present study confirms the usefullness of this essential oil as antibacterial agent but further research is

  8. Screening Cellulolytic Bacteria from the Digestive Tract Snail (Achatina fulica and Test the Ability of Cellulase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijanarka Wijanarka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available On the research of enzyme production levels observed cellulase produced by bacteria in the digestive tract of the isolation of the Snail (Achatina fulica. Isolation of bacteria based on the ability of bacteria to grow on CMC media. The purpose of this study was to determine cellulase activity by cellulolytic bacteria. Some bacterial isolates were identified as cellulolytic bacteria, they were KE-B1, KE-B2, KE-B3, KE-B4, KE-B5, and KE-B6. Isolates KE-B6 was the best isolates. Furthermore KE-B6 isolates were grown on media production to determine the pattern of growth and enzyme activity. Measurement of cell growth was conducted by inoculating starter aged 22 hours at CMC production of liquid medium. Cellulase enzyme activity measurements was performed by the DNS method. The results showed that the highest activity by new isolate bacteria KE-B6 and its value of the activity of 0.4539 U/mL, growth rate (µ 0.377/hour and generation time (g 1.84 hour. This research expected cellulase of producing bacteria were easy, inexpensive and efficient. This enzyme can be used as an enzyme biolytic once expected to replace expensive commercial enzyme. The biotylic enzyme can be applied to strains improvement (protoplast fusion.How to CiteWijanarka, W., Kusdiyantini, E. & Parman, S. (2016. Screening Cellulolytic Bacteria from the Digestive Tract Snail (Achatina fulica and Test the Ability of Cellulase Activity. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(3, 386-392. 

  9. Effects of rare sugar D-allulose on acid production and probiotic activities of dairy lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto-Nira, H; Moriya, N; Hayakawa, S; Kuramasu, K; Ohmori, H; Yamasaki, S; Ogawa, M

    2017-07-01

    It has recently been reported that the rare sugar d-allulose has beneficial effects, including the suppression of postprandial blood glucose elevation in humans, and can be substituted for sucrose as a low-calorie food ingredient. To examine the applications of d-allulose in the dairy industry, we investigated the effects of d-allulose on the acid production of 8 strains of yogurt starter (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) and 4 strains of lactococci, including potential probiotic candidates derived from dairy products. Acid production by 2 L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus yogurt starter strains in milk was suppressed by d-allulose, but this phenomenon was also observed in some strains with another sugar (xylose), a sugar alcohol (sorbitol), or both. In contrast, among the dairy probiotic candidates, Lactococcus lactis H61, which has beneficial effects for human skin when drunk as part of fermented milk, was the only strain that showed suppression of acid production in the presence of d-allulose. Strain H61 did not metabolize d-allulose. We did not observe suppression of acid production by strain H61 with the addition of xylose or sorbitol, and xylose and sorbitol were not metabolized by strain H61. The acid production of strain H61 after culture in a constituted medium (tryptone-yeast extract-glucose broth) was also suppressed with the addition of d-allulose, but growth efficiency and sugar fermentation style were not altered. Probiotic activities-such as the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of H61-fermented milk and the superoxide dismutase activity of H61 cells grown in tryptone-yeast extract-glucose broth-were not affected by d-allulose. d-Allulose may suppress acid production in certain lactic acid bacteria without altering their probiotic activity. It may be useful for developing new probiotic dairy products from probiotic strains such as Lactococcus lactis H61. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science

  10. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria......, the 80 x 600 mum large Epulopiscium sp. from the gut of tropical fish, are presumably living in a very nutrient-rich medium. Many large bacteria contain numerous inclusions in the cells that reduce the volume of active cytoplasm. The most striking examples of competitive advantage from large cell size...

  11. Influence of Dilution Rate on Enzymes of Intermediary Metabolism in Two Freshwater Bacteria Grown in Continuous Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matin, A.; Grootjans, A.; Hogenhuis, H.

    1976-01-01

    Two freshwater bacteria, a Pseudomonas sp. and a Spirillum sp., were grown in continuous culture under steady-state conditions in L-lactate-, succinate-, ammonium- or phosphate-limited media. In Pseudomonas sp., NAD-independent and NAD-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenases, aconitase, isocitrate

  12. Isolation of Biosurfactant–Producing Bacteria with Antimicrobial Activity against Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siripun Sarin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to study biosurfactant producing bacteria isolated from soil and to determine their property and efficiency as biosurfactants in order to inhibit bacterial pathogens. The result showed that there were 8 bacterial isolates out of 136 isolates of the total biosurfactant producing bacteria screened that exhibited the diameter of clear zone more than 1.5 cm. in the oil spreading test. The highest potential of emulsifying activity (%EA24 of 54.4 and the maximum additive concentration, (%MAC of 24.2 was obtained from the fermentation broth of the G7 isolate which the G7 isolate was later identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Psuedomonas aeruginosa were the tested bacterial pathogens that were most sensitive to the acid precipitated biosurfactant obtained from P. fluorescens G7 with the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 41.6 mg/ml and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of 41.6 mg/ml compared with the acid precipitated bisurfactants of the other isolates used in the antimicrobial activity test. The type of the separated crude biosurfactant produced by P. fluorescens G7 analyzed later by using the rhamose test, TLC and FT-IR techniques was rhamnolipid.

  13. Nutrient scavenging activity and antagonistic factors of non-photobiont lichen-associated bacteria: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurbjörnsdóttir, M Auður; Andrésson, Ólafur S; Vilhelmsson, Oddur

    2016-04-01

    Lichens are defined as the specific symbiotic structure comprising a fungus and a green alga and/or cyanobacterium. Up until recently, non-photobiont endothallic bacteria, while known to be present in large numbers, have generally been dismissed as functionally irrelevant cohabitants of the lichen thallus, or even environmental contaminants. Recent analyses of lichen metagenomes and innovative co-culture experiments have uncovered a functionally complex community that appears to contribute to a healthy lichen thallus in several ways. Lichen-associated bacteriomes are typically dominated by several lineages of Proteobacteria, some of which may be specific for lichen species. Recent work has implicated members of these lineages in several important ecophysiological roles. These include nutrient scavenging, including mobilization of iron and phosphate, nitrogen fixation, cellulase, xylanase and amylase activities, and oxidation of recalcitrant compounds, e.g. aromatics and aliphatics. Production of volatile organic compounds, conferring antibacterial and antifungal activity, has also been demonstrated for several lichen-associated isolates. In the present paper we review the nature of non-phototrophic endolichenic bacteria associated with lichens, and give insight into the current state of knowledge on their importance the lichen symbiotic association.

  14. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activities of Citrus limon, Citrus reticulata, and Citrus grandis Against Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sholeh Saeb

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microorganisms resistant to most antibiotics are rapidly spreading, and there is an urgent and continuous need for novel antimicrobial compounds. The genus Citrus belongs to the family Rutaceae has many biologically active secondary metabolites. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial activity of essential oil and extract of Lemon (Citrus limon, Mandarin (Citrus reticulata and Pummelo (Citrus grandis against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhi. Materials and Methods: The fresh Citrus leaves were shade-dried and powdered. Antimicrobial metabolites were extracted from them by 80% methanol for extract and using a Clevenger-type apparatus for essential oil. Eight different concentrations of the each leaf extract and essential oil were prepared. The antimicrobial susceptibility assay of Citrus leaves metabolites were subjected against four bacterial strains by agar disc diffusion and E-test method. Results: In this study, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of different Citrus leaf extracts were determined against all four food-borne pathogens. The C. grandis leaf essential oil had potent antimicrobial activity against all four pathogens, and the C. limon leaf essential oil was effective on Gram-positive bacteria. S. typhi was resistant against two leaves essential oils. Conclusions: The results showed that there was no antimicrobial activity effect in all extracts on tested bacteria. In this study, the antibacterial effect of essential oil of Citrus leaves on four strains of pathogenic microorganisms was confirmed. The C. grandis leaf essential oil had the most powerful antimicrobial properties, suggesting its potential application as natural preservative in foods or an effective medicine against different pathogenic microbes. Key words: Antibacterial activity, E-test, Citr

  15. Biofilm-forming activity of bacteria isolated from toilet bowl biofilms and the bactericidal activity of disinfectants against the isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Miho; Gomi, Mitsuhiro; Matsumune, Norihiko; Niizeki, Kazuma; Sakagami, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the sanitary conditions of toilets, the bacterial counts of the toilet bowl biofilms in 5 Kansai area and 11 Kansai and Kanto area homes in Japan were measured in winter and summer seasons, respectively. Isolates (128 strains) were identified by analyzing 16S ribosomal RNA sequences. The number of colonies and bacterial species from biofilms sampled in winter tended to be higher and lower, respectively, than those in summer. Moreover, the composition of bacterial communities in summer and winter samples differed considerably. In summer samples, biofilms in Kansai and Kanto areas were dominated by Blastomonas sp. and Mycobacterium sp., respectively. Methylobacterium sp. was detected in all toilet bowl biofilms except for one sample. Methylobacterium sp. constituted the major presence in biofilms along with Brevundimonas sp., Sphingomonas sp., and/or Pseudomonas sp. The composition ratio of the sum of their genera was 88.0 from 42.9% of the total bacterial flora. The biofilm formation abilities of 128 isolates were investigated, and results suggested that Methylobacterium sp. and Sphingomonas sp. were involved in biofilm formation in toilet bowls. The biofilm formation of a mixed bacteria system that included bacteria with the highest biofilm-forming ability in a winter sample was greater than mixture without such bacteria. This result suggests that isolates possessing a high biofilm-forming activity are involved in the biofilm formation in the actual toilet bowl. A bactericidal test against 25 strains indicated that the bactericidal activities of didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) tended to be higher than those of polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) and N-benzyl-N,N-dimethyldodecylammonium chloride (ADBAC). In particular, DDAC showed high bactericidal activity against approximately 90% of tested strains under the 5 h treatment.

  16. Antibacterial activity of curcuma long varieties against different strains of bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, S.; Jabeen, S.; Ilyas, S.; Aslam, F.; Manzoor, F.; Ali, A.

    2010-01-01

    Crude extracts of curcuminoids and essential oil of Curcuma long varieties Kasur, Faisalabad and Bannu were studied for their antibacterial activity against 4 bacterial strains viz., Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus macerans, Bacillus licheniformis and Azotobacter using agar well diffusion method. Solvents used to determine antibacterial activity were ethanol and methanol. Ethanol was used for the extraction of curcuminoids. Essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation and diluted in methanol by serial dilution method. Both Curcuminoids and oil showed zone of inhibition against all tested strains of bacteria. Among all the three turmeric varieties, Kasur variety had the most inhibitory effect on the growth of all bacterial strains tested as compared to Faisalabad and Bannu varieties. Among all the bacterial strains B. subtilis was the most sensitive to turmeric extracts of curcuminoids and oil. The MIC value for different strains and varieties ranged from 3.0 to 20.6 mm in diameter. (author)

  17. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Plant-Derived Diterpenes against Bovine Mastitis Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo C. S. Veneziani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the antibacterial activity of three diterpenes isolated from natural sources against a panel of microorganisms responsible for bovine mastitis. ent-Copalic acid (CA was the most active metabolite, with promising MIC values (from 1.56 to 6.25 µg mL−1 against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC and clinical isolate, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae. We conducted time-kill assays of CA against S. aureus, a commensal organism considered to be a ubiquitous etiological agent of bovine mastitis in dairy farms worldwide. In the first 12 h, CA only inhibited the growth of the inoculums (bacteriostatic effect, but its bactericidal effect was clearly noted thereafter (between 12 and 24 h. In conclusion, CA should be considered for the control of several Gram-positive bacteria related to bovine mastitis.

  18. Differential activity of autochthonous bacteria in controlling drought stress in native Lavandula and Salvia plants species under drought conditions in natural arid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armada, Elisabeth; Roldán, Antonio; Azcon, Rosario

    2014-02-01

    The effectiveness of autochthonous plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria was studied in Lavandula dentata and Salvia officinalis growing in a natural arid Mediterranean soil under drought conditions. These bacteria identified as Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Enterobacter sp. (E), Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), and Bacillus sp. (Bsp). Each bacteria has different potential to meliorate water limitation and alleviating drought stress in these two plant species. B. thuringiensis promoted growth and drought avoidance in Lavandula by increasing K content, by depressing stomatal conductance, and it controlled shoot proline accumulation. This bacterial effect on increasing drought tolerance was related to the decrease of glutathione reductase (GR) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) that resulted sensitive indexes of lower cellular oxidative damage involved in the adaptative drought response in B. thuringiensis-inoculated Lavandula plants. In contrast, in Salvia, having intrinsic lower shoot/root ratio, higher stomatal conductance and lower APX and GR activities than Lavandula, the bacterial effects on nutritional, physiological and antioxidant enzymatic systems were lower. The benefit of bacteria depended on intrinsic stress tolerance of plant involved. Lavadula demonstrated a greater benefit than Salvia to control drought stress when inoculated with B. thuringiensis. The bacterial drought tolerance assessed as survival, proline, and indolacetic acid production showed the potential of this bacteria to help plants to grow under drought conditions. B. thuringiensis may be used for Lavandula plant establishment in arid environments. Particular characteristic of the plant species as low shoot/root ratio and high stomatal conductance are important factors controlling the bacterial effectiveness improving nutritional, physiological, and metabolic plant activities.

  19. Antibacterial activity and optimisation of bacteriocin producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from beef (red meat) samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, N.M.; Mazhar, B.; Khadija, I.; Kalim, B.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriocin producing bacteria are commonly found in meat products to enhance their shelf-life. In the present study, bacterial species were isolated from meat samples (beef) from different localities of Lahore, Pakistan. MRS agar medium was used to isolate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) through spread and streak methods (incubated for 72 h at 37 degree C). Identification of bacteriocinogenic LAB strains was done by using staining techniques, morphology based characteristics and biochemical tests. These strains were BSH 1b, BSH 3a, BIP 4a, BIP 3a, BIP 1b and BRR 3a. Antibacterial activity of LAB was performed against food borne pathogens viz., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus through paper disc diffusion method. Three bacterial strains showed maximum inhibition and characterised by ribotyping viz., BIP 4a was identified as Lactobacillus curvatures, BIP 3a was Staphylococcus warneri and BIP 1b was Lactobacillus graminis . Optimum pH 5-6.5 and 30-37 degree C temperature for isolated bacterial strains was recorded. Protein concentration measured was 0.07 mg/mL for BSH 1b, 0.065 mg/mL for BSH 3a, 0.057 mg/mL for BIP 4a, 0.062 mg/mL for BIP 1b, 0.065 mg/mL for BIP 3a and for BRR 3a 0.078 mg/mL, respectively. Bacteriocin of all isolates except BIP 3a was found to be sensitive towards pepsin and resistant towards Rnase. Bacteriocin production was stable at between pH 5.0 and 6.0 and resistant temperature was 40 degree C. It was concluded that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from meat can be helpful as antibacterial agents against food-borne bacterial pathogens because of thermostable producing bacteriocin. (author)

  20. Fisetin disposition and metabolism in mice: Identification of geraldol as an active metabolite. : Fisetin disposition and metabolism in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Touil, Yasmine,; Auzeil, Nicolas; Boulinguez, François; Saighi, Hanane; Regazzetti, Anne; Scherman, Daniel; Chabot, Guy,

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Although the natural flavonoid fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone) has been recently identified as an anticancer agent with antiangiogenic properties in mice, its in vivo pharmacokinetics and metabolism are presently not characterized. Our purpose was to determine the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of fisetin in mice and determine the biological activity of a detected fisetin metabolite. After fisetin administration of an efficacious dose of 223 mg/kg i.p. in mice...

  1. Anaerobic 4-hydroxyproline utilization: Discovery of a new glycyl radical enzyme in the human gut microbiome uncovers a widespread microbial metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yolanda Y; Martínez-Del Campo, Ana; Balskus, Emily P

    2018-02-06

    The discovery of enzymes responsible for previously unappreciated microbial metabolic pathways furthers our understanding of host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions. We recently identified and characterized a new gut microbial glycyl radical enzyme (GRE) responsible for anaerobic metabolism of trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline (Hyp). Hyp dehydratase (HypD) catalyzes the removal of water from Hyp to generate Δ 1 -pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C). This enzyme is encoded in the genomes of a diverse set of gut anaerobes and is prevalent and abundant in healthy human stool metagenomes. Here, we discuss the roles HypD may play in different microbial metabolic pathways as well as the potential implications of this activity for colonization resistance and pathogenesis within the human gut. Finally, we present evidence of anaerobic Hyp metabolism in sediments through enrichment culturing of Hyp-degrading bacteria, highlighting the wide distribution of this pathway in anoxic environments beyond the human gut.

  2. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the Snomax™ cells induced immersion freezing of the spray droplets before the droplets evaporated in the cloud chamber. The living cells didn't induce any detectable immersion freezing in the spray droplets at −5.7°C. After evaporation of the spray droplets the bacterial cells remained as aerosol particles in the cloud chamber and were exposed to typical cloud formation conditions in experiments with expansion cooling to about −11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets. Then, only a minor fraction of the cells acted as heterogeneous ice nuclei either in the condensation or the immersion mode. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between −7 and −11°C with an ice nucleation (IN active fraction of the order of 10−4. In agreement to previous literature results, the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax™ cells was much larger with an IN active fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around −8°C.

  3. High inorganic triphosphatase activities in bacteria and mammalian cells: identification of the enzymes involved.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Kohn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPP(i is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPP(i but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. CONCLUSIONS AND GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPP(i in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPP(i, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca(2+, thereby interfering with Ca(2+ signaling.

  4. Changes in antagonistic activity of lactic acid bacteria induced by their response to technological factors

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    Dovile Jonkuviene

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the changes in antagonistic activity of selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB in response to technological factors used in food production. The antimicrobial activity of 12 selected LAB strains was assessed against the bacterial and fungal strains using the agar well diffusion method. Sodium chloride (NaCl 6.5–8.0%, glucose 20-30% and pH 4.0, pH 8.0 and higher were the most crucial factors in reducing the spectra of the microorganisms antagonized. Heating at 80 °C or 100 °C had a greater negative impact than 63 °C on the antifungal activity of LAB. Freezing at –72 °C eliminated the antifungal activity, or it changed from fungicidal to fungistatic. Although each LAB demonstrated the ability to retain antimicrobial activity induced by various technological factors, Lactococcus lactis 768/5 was superior in retaining high antimicrobial activity against tested indicator strains.

  5. New perspective of dendrobium crumenatum orchid for antimicrobial activity against selected pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrasagaran, U.M.; Murugaiyah, V.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the potential anti-microbial activity from different parts of Dendrobium crumenatum (leaf, stem, root and pseudo-bulb) against 8 pathogenic bacteria. The antimicrobial activities were determined by using disc diffusion assay, microdilution test for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The methanolic extracts of stem, root and pseudo-bulb displayed antimicrobial activity comparable to that of the standard antibiotics. Stem extract of D. crumenatum had the most potent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter aerogenes with MIC values of 0.39, 0.195 and 0.195 mg/mL, respectively. Root and stem extracts were found to be active against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Shigella dysentriae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae with MIC values of 0.78 mg/ml compared to 0.00312 mg/mL, 0.025 mg/mL and 0.0125 mg/mL of standard antibiotics of amoxcillin, chloramphenicol and kanamycin. Stem and root extracts yield MBC values in the range of 0.78 mg/mL to 6.25 mg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The present study showed that D. crumenatum exhibited potential antimicrobial activity which could be due to the presence of alkaloid and flavonoid compounds and this is a first report on South East Asia region's wild orchid. (author)

  6. Variation of a benthic heterotrophic bacteria community with different respiratory metabolisms in Coyuca de Benítez coastal lagoon (Guerrero, Mexico

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    María Jesús Ferrara-Guerrero

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The fluctuations of the number, biomass and composition of the heterotrophic community were studied daily for two days, according to depth, pH, Eh, O2 and organic carbon concentration within a zone of the canal between the Coyuca de Benítez lagoon (Guerrero, Mexico and the coastal waters. At the three moments of the day studied (6 am, 2 pm and 10 pm, the oxygen concentrations in the overlying water and in the superficial sediment layer were near air-saturation in the diurnal samplings (582 µM at 6 am and 665 µM at 2 pm, and sub-satured during the night (158 µM. In the sediments, the models of vertical distribution of Eh and organic carbon distributions were very irregular due to the bio-perturbation of the benthic, meio- and macrofauna, whose activity allows the superficial organic carbon to migrate towards sediment deeper layers. Vertical distribution of the different viable bacteria populations seems to be related to the hydrodynamic patterns of the communicating canal and sediments heterogeneity. In the sediment column, the heterotrophic bacteria total number varied from 6.8 to 20.3 x 108 cells cm-3. The highest heterotrophic bacterial biomass values were encountered during the diurnal samplings (39.2 µgC.l-1 at 6 am and 34.4 µgC.l-1 at 2 pm and the lowest during the night (9.7 µgC.l-1. The fluctuations of viable heterotrophic bacteria populations with different respiratory metabolisms (aerobic, microaerophilic and anaerobic can be explained by the existence of suboxic microniches that appear when particles of sediment are resuspended due to the water circulation and the benthic infauna excavating activity, that allows the supernatant water oxygen to penetrate through its galleries towards deeper sediment zones. The statistical analysis (Multiple lineal regression model r²≥ 0.5 showed that the on the whole, the hydrological parameters are not influence over the bacterial number and bacterial biomass distribution (r²≤ 0

  7. In vitro antifungal activity of bacteria against Mycosphaerella fijiensis mediated by diffused and volatile metabolites

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    Mileidy Cruz-Martín

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Antagonistic microorganisms do not have a unique mode of action. Multiplicity of these is an important feature for selection as biological control agents. Black Sigatoka is considered the foliar disease with most economic impact for the banana industry worldwide. New strategies to control it are required to reduce the use of fungicides. That is why an increasing interest to find biological alternatives, such as the use of antagonistic bacteria, has risen. Assays wer e carr ied ou t to determine whether in v it r o ant if ungal ac ti vity of 20 bacterial str ai ns against My cosphaer ella fijiensis was caused by metabolites diffused into the culture medium or volatile. Results demonstrated that 80.0% of bacterial strains tested showed in vitro antifungal activity by diffused metabolites in the culture medium and 60.0% by producing volatile metabolites. The 55.0% of strains showed both mechanisms. This feature makes these bacteria the best candidate for its selection as biological control agent. Keywords: antagonistic, biocontrol, volatile compounds, diffused metabolites.

  8. Pomegranate ellagitannins stimulate growth of gut bacteria in vitro: Implications for prebiotic and metabolic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoping; Summanen, Paula H; Komoriya, Tomoe; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Carlson, Eliisa; Heber, David; Finegold, Sydney M

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated the effect of pomegranate extract (POMx) and pomegranate juice (POM juice) on the growth of major groups of intestinal bacteria: Enterobacteriaceae, Bacteroides fragilis group, clostridia, bifidobacteria, and lactobacilli, and the utilization of pomegranate polyphenols by Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. The total phenolic content of the pomegranate extract and juice was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteau colorimetric method and reported as gallic acid equivalent (GAE). The polyphenol composition was determined by HPLC. Stool specimens were incubated with 400, 100, and 25 μg/ml GAE POMx and POM juice and subjected to selective culture. Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains were incubated with 400 μg/ml GAE POMx and POM juice and metabolites were analyzed. POMx and POM juice increased the mean counts of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus and significantly inhibited the growth of B. fragilis group, clostridia, and Enterobacteriaceae in a dose-response manner. Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus utilized ellagic acid and glycosyl ellagic acid but little or no punicalin was utilized. Neither POMx nor POM juice was converted to urolithins by the test bacteria or the in vitro stool cultures. The effect of pomegranate on the gut bacteria considered to be beneficial (Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus) suggests that pomegranate may potentially work as a prebiotic. The concept that polyphenols such as those in pomegranate impact gut microbiota populations may establish a new role for polyphenols in human health. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The metabolic activator FOXO1 binds hepatitis B virus DNA and activates its transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomai, Amir; Shaul, Yosef

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus that targets the liver and infects humans worldwide. Recently we have shown that the metabolic regulator PGC-1α coactivates HBV transcription thereby rendering the virus susceptible to fluctuations in the nutritional status of the liver. PGC-1α coactivation of HBV is mediated through the liver-enriched nuclear receptor HNF4α and through another yet unknown transcription factor(s). Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a known target for PGC-1α coactivation and a central mediator of glucose metabolism in the liver, binds HBV core promoter and activates its transcription. This activation is further enhanced in the presence of PGC-1α, implying that FOXO1 is a target for PGC-1α coactivation of HBV transcription. Thus, our results identify another key metabolic regulator as an activator of HBV transcription, thereby supporting the principle that HBV gene expression is regulated in a similar way to key hepatic metabolic genes.

  10. Caspase inhibitors of the P35 family are more active when purified from yeast than bacteria.

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    Ingo L Brand

    Full Text Available Many insect viruses express caspase inhibitors of the P35 superfamily, which prevent defensive host apoptosis to enable viral propagation. The prototypical P35 family member, AcP35 from Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, has been extensively studied. Bacterially purified AcP35 has been previously shown to inhibit caspases from insect, mammalian and nematode species. This inhibition occurs via a pseudosubstrate mechanism involving caspase-mediated cleavage of a "reactive site loop" within the P35 protein, which ultimately leaves cleaved P35 covalently bound to the caspase's active site. We observed that AcP35 purifed from Saccharomyces cerevisae inhibited caspase activity more efficiently than AcP35 purified from Escherichia coli. This differential potency was more dramatic for another P35 family member, MaviP35, which inhibited human caspase 3 almost 300-fold more potently when purified from yeast than bacteria. Biophysical assays revealed that MaviP35 proteins produced in bacteria and yeast had similar primary and secondary structures. However, bacterially produced MaviP35 possessed greater thermal stability and propensity to form higher order oligomers than its counterpart purified from yeast. Caspase 3 could process yeast-purified MaviP35, but failed to detectably cleave bacterially purified MaviP35. These data suggest that bacterially produced P35 proteins adopt subtly different conformations from their yeast-expressed counterparts, which hinder caspase access to the reactive site loop to reduce the potency of caspase inhibition, and promote aggregation. These data highlight the differential caspase inhibition by recombinant P35 proteins purified from different sources, and caution that analyses of bacterially produced P35 family members (and perhaps other types of proteins may underestimate their activity.

  11. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  12. Antimicrobial activities of commercial essential oils and their components against food-borne pathogens and food spoilage bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mith, Hasika; Duré, Rémi; Delcenserie, Véronique; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Clinquart, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of 15 commercial essential oils and their main components in order to pre-select candidates for potential application in highly perishable food preservation. The antibacterial effects against food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7) and food spoilage bacteria (Brochothrix thermosphacta and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were tested using paper disk diffusion method, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations. Most of the tested essential oils exhibited antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria, except galangal oil. The essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, and thyme showed strong antimicrobial activities with MIC ≥ 0.125 μL/mL and MBC ≥ 0.25 μL/mL. Among tested bacteria, P. fluorescens was the most resistant to selected essential oils with MICs and MBCs of 1 μL/mL. The results suggest that the activity of the essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, thyme, and clove can be attributed to the existence mostly of cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol, which appear to possess similar activities against all the tested bacteria. These materials could be served as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food products. PMID:25473498

  13. In vitro activity of FK037, a new parenteral cephalosporin, against anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, N; Kato, H; Tanaka, Y; Bando, K; Watanabe, K; Ueno, K

    1993-01-01

    The activity of FK037, a new parenteral cephalosporin, was compared with those of cefpirome, ceftazidime, and flomoxef against 322 recent clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. A fastidious facultative anaerobe, Gardnerella vaginalis, was also studied. FK037 inhibited 90% of isolates of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus, Clostridium perfringens, Mobiluncus spp., G. vaginalis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis at 200 micrograms/ml, respectively; the activity of FK037 was comparable to those of cefpirome and ceftazidime but lower than that of flomoxef. The activity of FK037 against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium varium, and Bilophila wadsworthia decreased when inoculum size was increased from 10(6) to 10(8) CFU/ml. Little influence of inoculum size on the activity of FK037 was observed for other isolates tested. Medium pH affected the activity of FK037 against F. varium (MICs at pHs 5 and 7, 3.13 and 100 micrograms/ml, respectively) and Bacteroides gracilis (MICs at pHs 5 and 7, 12.5 and 1.56 micrograms/ml, respectively) but not against other organisms tested. FK037 was less resistant than flomoxef to hydrolysis by beta-lactamase group 2e derived from B. fragilis GAI 0558 and GAI 10150. PMID:8517721

  14. Evaluation of sonication treatment and buffer composition on rumen bacteria protein extraction and carboxymethylcellulase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prauchner, Carlos A; Kozloski, Gilberto V; Farenzena, Roberta

    2013-05-01

    The methodological procedures for studying the fibrolytic activity of rumen bacteria are not clearly established. In this study the efficiency of sonication treatment and buffer composition (i.e. buffer varying in tonicity or pH) on the level of protein extraction from the residue of forage samples incubated in the rumen of a grazing steer and the effect of buffer composition or CaCl₂ concentration on the carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) activity of the released protein were evaluated. The amount of protein released from the residue of incubation was higher (P buffer pH (P buffer. Both linear and quadratic effects (P buffer pH on CMCase activity were significant, with CMCase activity being maximal at pH 5.4-6.1. CMCase activity was higher (P buffer solution that includes a calcium source. When pH is not a treatment factor, the buffer pH should be between 5.5 and 6. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. White shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) recombinant lysozyme has antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria: Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-la-Re-Vega, Enrique; García-Galaz, Alfonso; Díaz-Cinco, Martha E; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2006-03-01

    C-type lysozyme has been described as an antibacterial component of the shrimp innate defence system. We determined quantitatively the antibacterial activity of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) recombinant lysozyme against three Gram negative bacteria: Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae, using a turbidimetric assay with live bacteria and differential bacterial viable count after interaction with the protein. In conclusion, the antibacterial activity of recombinant shrimp lysozyme against Vibrio sp. is at least equal to the values against the Gram positive M. luteus and more active against the shrimp pathogens V. alginolyticus and V. parahemolyticus.

  16. Metabolism of Oxo-Bile Acids and Characterization of Recombinant 12α-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases from Bile Acid 7α-Dehydroxylating Human Gut Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doden, Heidi; Sallam, Lina A; Devendran, Saravanan; Ly, Lindsey; Doden, Greta; Daniel, Steven L; Alves, João M P; Ridlon, Jason M

    2018-05-15

    Bile acids are important cholesterol-derived nutrient signaling hormones, synthesized in the liver, that act as detergents to solubilize dietary lipids. Bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating gut bacteria generate the toxic bile acids deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid from host bile acids. The ability of these bacteria to remove the 7-hydroxyl group is partially dependent on 7α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSDH) activity, which reduces 7-oxo-bile acids generated by other gut bacteria. 3α-HSDH has an important enzymatic activity in the bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation pathway. 12α-HSDH activity has been reported for the low-activity bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating bacterium Clostridium leptum ; however, this activity has not been reported for high-activity bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating bacteria, such as Clostridium scindens , Clostridium hylemonae , and Clostridium hiranonis Here, we demonstrate that these strains express bile acid 12α-HSDH. The recombinant enzymes were characterized from each species and shown to preferentially reduce 12-oxolithocholic acid to deoxycholic acid, with low activity against 12-oxochenodeoxycholic acid and reduced activity when bile acids were conjugated to taurine or glycine. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that 12α-HSDH is widespread among Firmicutes , Actinobacteria in the Coriobacteriaceae family, and human gut Archaea IMPORTANCE 12α-HSDH activity has been established in the medically important bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating bacteria C. scindens , C. hiranonis , and C. hylemonae Experiments with recombinant 12α-HSDHs from these strains are consistent with culture-based experiments that show a robust preference for 12-oxolithocholic acid over 12-oxochenodeoxycholic acid. Phylogenetic analysis identified novel members of the gut microbiome encoding 12α-HSDH. Future reengineering of 12α-HSDH enzymes to preferentially oxidize cholic acid may provide a means to industrially produce the therapeutic bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid. In

  17. Antilisterial Activity of Bacteriocin Isolated from Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides IMAU:10231 in the Production of Sremska Sausages: Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolation, Bacteriocin Identification and Meat Application Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Škrinjar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB have an essential role in the production of fermented meat products. The metabolic activity of LAB affects the ripening process, leading to the formation of the desired sensory characteristics of the products, while inhibiting the growth of undesirable microorganisms. Bacteriocins are extracellular peptides or protein molecules, produced by some LAB, which possess bactericidal properties against specific species or genera of microorganisms, usually related bacteria. Bacteriocin production by LAB can act in a selective and competitive way against the surrounding microbiota, which may contain spoilage bacteria or pathogenic microorganisms including Listeria monocytogenes. This pathogen is widely distributed in raw products, it survives in different production areas, and human infections have a high mortality rate, all of which makes the control of this microorganism important in food production. The aim of this work is to determine the possibilities of utilizing a novel bacteriocin isolated from Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides IMAU:10231 in order to prevent the survival of Listeria monocytogenes in the production of traditional Serbian Sremska sausages. The bacteriocin-producing strain of Leuconostoc originated from the same sausage, which had been produced in the traditional manner. Bacteriocin was isolated using precipitation procedures with ammonium sulphate, and then its properties (strength and range of activities, relationship to high temperatures and proteolytic enzymes were determined under laboratory conditions. Also, based on the obtained laboratory results, the antilisterial effect of bacteriocin, included as an additive, was examined in the production of traditional Sremska sausages. Expressed antilisterial activity of bacteriocin has an interesting food safety potential which can be used in the meat industry in the production of fermented sausages. Further research will contribute to a better

  18. Cool temperatures reduce antifungal activity of symbiotic bacteria of threatened amphibians--implications for disease management and patterns of decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua H Daskin

    Full Text Available Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, is a widespread disease of amphibians responsible for population declines and extinctions. Some bacteria from amphibians' skins produce antimicrobial substances active against Bd. Supplementing populations of these cutaneous antifungal bacteria might help manage chytridiomycosis in wild amphibians. However, the activity of protective bacteria may depend upon environmental conditions. Biocontrol of Bd in nature thus requires knowledge of how environmental conditions affect their anti-Bd activity. For example, Bd-driven amphibian declines have often occurred at temperatures below Bd's optimum range. It is possible these declines occurred due to reduced anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts at cool temperatures. Better understanding of the effects of temperature on chytridiomycosis development could also improve risk evaluation for amphibian populations yet to encounter Bd. We characterized, at a range of temperatures approximating natural seasonal variation, the anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts from the skins of three species of rainforest tree frogs (Litoria nannotis, Litoria rheocola, and Litoria serrata. All three species declined during chytridiomycosis outbreaks in the late 1980s and early 1990s and have subsequently recovered to differing extents. We collected anti-Bd bacterial symbionts from frogs and cultured the bacteria at constant temperatures from 8 °C to 33 °C. Using a spectrophotometric assay, we monitored Bd growth in cell-free supernatants (CFSs from each temperature treatment. CFSs from 11 of 24 bacteria showed reduced anti-Bd activity in vitro when they were produced at cool temperatures similar to those encountered by the host species during population declines. Reduced anti-Bd activity of metabolites produced at low temperatures may, therefore, partially explain the association between Bd-driven declines and cool temperatures. We show that to

  19. Cool temperatures reduce antifungal activity of symbiotic bacteria of threatened amphibians--implications for disease management and patterns of decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskin, Joshua H; Bell, Sara C; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Alford, Ross A

    2014-01-01

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is a widespread disease of amphibians responsible for population declines and extinctions. Some bacteria from amphibians' skins produce antimicrobial substances active against Bd. Supplementing populations of these cutaneous antifungal bacteria might help manage chytridiomycosis in wild amphibians. However, the activity of protective bacteria may depend upon environmental conditions. Biocontrol of Bd in nature thus requires knowledge of how environmental conditions affect their anti-Bd activity. For example, Bd-driven amphibian declines have often occurred at temperatures below Bd's optimum range. It is possible these declines occurred due to reduced anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts at cool temperatures. Better understanding of the effects of temperature on chytridiomycosis development could also improve risk evaluation for amphibian populations yet to encounter Bd. We characterized, at a range of temperatures approximating natural seasonal variation, the anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts from the skins of three species of rainforest tree frogs (Litoria nannotis, Litoria rheocola, and Litoria serrata). All three species declined during chytridiomycosis outbreaks in the late 1980s and early 1990s and have subsequently recovered to differing extents. We collected anti-Bd bacterial symbionts from frogs and cultured the bacteria at constant temperatures from 8 °C to 33 °C. Using a spectrophotometric assay, we monitored Bd growth in cell-free supernatants (CFSs) from each temperature treatment. CFSs from 11 of 24 bacteria showed reduced anti-Bd activity in vitro when they were produced at cool temperatures similar to those encountered by the host species during population declines. Reduced anti-Bd activity of metabolites produced at low temperatures may, therefore, partially explain the association between Bd-driven declines and cool temperatures. We show that to avoid

  20. Metabolic signals and innate immune activation in obesity and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus; Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a sedentary lifestyle and excess energy intake has led to an increased prevalence of obesity which constitutes a major risk factor for several co-morbidities including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Intensive research during the last two decades has revealed that a characteristic feature of obesity linking it to insulin resistance is the presence of chronic low-grade inflammation being indicative of activation of the innate immune system. Recent evidence suggests that activation of the innate immune system in the course of obesity is mediated by metabolic signals, such as free fatty acids (FFAs), being elevated in many obese subjects, through activation of pattern recognition receptors thereby leading to stimulation of critical inflammatory signaling cascades, like IκBα kinase/nuclear factor-κB (IKK/NF- κB), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) and NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway, that interfere with insulin signaling. Exercise is one of the main prescribed interventions in obesity management improving insulin sensitivity and reducing obesity- induced chronic inflammation. This review summarizes current knowledge of the cellular recognition mechanisms for FFAs, the inflammatory signaling pathways triggered by excess FFAs in obesity and the counteractive effects of both acute and chronic exercise on obesity-induced activation of inflammatory signaling pathways. A deeper understanding of the effects of exercise on inflammatory signaling pathways in obesity is useful to optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies to combat the increasing incidence of obesity and its comorbidities. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Exercise and Immunology. All rights reserved.

  1. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids: Metabolic Activation Pathways Leading to Liver Tumor Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peter P

    2017-01-17

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) and PA N-oxides are a class of phytochemical carcinogens contained in over 6000 plant species spread around the world. It has been estimated that approximately half of the 660 PAs and PA N-oxides that have been characterized are cytotoxic, genotoxic, and tumorigenic. It was recently determined that a genotoxic mechanism of liver tumor initiation mediated by PA-derived DNA adducts is a common metabolic activation pathway of a number of PAs. We proposed this set of PA-derived DNA adducts could be a common biological biomarker of PA exposure and a potential biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor formation. We have also found that several reactive secondary pyrrolic metabolites can dissociate and interconvert to other secondary pyrrolic metabolites, resulting in the formation of the same exogenous DNA adducts. This present perspective reports the current progress on these new findings and proposes future research needed for obtaining a greater understanding of the role of this activation pathway and validating the use of this set of PA-derived DNA adducts as a biological biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor initiation.

  2. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50 μL leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  3. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L. on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipul Biswas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water. The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50 μL leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties.

  4. Exploration, antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activity of halophilic bacteria communities from saline soils of Howze-Soltan playa in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Samaneh; Aghaei, Seyed-Soheil; Afifi-Sabet, Hossein; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Jahanshiri, Zahra; Gholami-Shabani, Mohammadhassan; Shafiei-Darabi, Seyedahmad; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, halophilic bacteria communities were explored in saline soils of Howze-Soltan playa in Iran with special attention to their biological activity against an aflatoxigenic Aspergillus parasiticus NRRL 2999. Halophilic bacteria were isolated from a total of 20 saline soils using specific culture media and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing in neighbor-joining tree analysis. Antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activities of the bacteria were screened by a nor-mutant A. parasiticus NRRL 2999 using visual agar plate assay and confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Among a total of 177 halophilic bacteria belonging to 11 genera, 121 isolates (68.3%) inhibited A. parasiticus growth and/or aflatoxin production. The most potent inhibitory bacteria of the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Staphylococcus were distributed in three main phylogenetic clusters as evidenced by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. A. parasiticus growth was inhibited by 0.7-92.7%, while AFB 1 and AFG 1 productions were suppressed by 15.1-98.9 and 57.0-99.6%, respectively. Taken together, halophilic bacteria identified in this study may be considered as potential sources of novel bioactive metabolites as well as promising candidates to develop new biocontrol agents for managing toxigenic fungi growth and subsequent aflatoxin contamination of food and feed in practice.

  5. Lactic acid bacteria from chicken carcasses with inhibitory activity against Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaridis, I; Soultos, N; Dovas, C I; Papavergou, E; Ambrosiadis, I; Koidis, P

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to isolate psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from chicken carcasses with inhibitory activity against strains of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes. A total of 100 broiler samples were examined for the presence of LAB. Ninety-two LAB isolates that showed antimicrobial effects against Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes were further analysed to examine their LAB (Gram-positive, catalase negative, oxidase negative) and psychrotrophic characteristics (ability to grow at 7 °C). Fifty isolates were further selected and identified initially using standard biochemical tests in miniature (Micro-kits API CH 50) and then by sequencing of the 16s-23s rRNA gene boundary region (Intergenic Spacer Region). By molecular identification, these isolates were classified into 5 different LAB species: Lactobacillus salivarius, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus johnsonii, Pediococcus acidilactici, and Lactobacillus paralimentarius. None of the isolates produced tyramine or histamine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of protruding filamentous bacteria on floc stability and solid-liquid separation in the activated sludge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Wilhelm; Krysiak-Baltyn, Konrad; Scales, Peter J; Martin, Gregory J O; Stickland, Anthony D; Gras, Sally L

    2017-10-15

    Filamentous bacteria can impact on the physical properties of flocs in the activated sludge process assisting solid-liquid separation or inducing problems when bacteria are overabundant. While filamentous bacteria within the flocs are understood to increase floc tensile strength, the relationship between protruding external filaments, dewatering characteristics and floc stability is unclear. Here, a quantitative methodology was applied to determine the abundance of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge samples from four wastewater treatment plants. An automated image analysis procedure was applied to identify filaments and flocs and calculate the length of the protruding filamentous bacteria (PFB) relative to the floc size. The correlation between PFB and floc behavior was then assessed. Increased filament abundance was found to increase interphase drag on the settling flocs, as quantified by the hindered settling function. Additionally, increased filament abundance was correlated with a lower gel point concentration leading to poorer sludge compactability. The floc strength factor, defined as the relative change in floc size upon shearing, correlated positively with filament abundance. This influence of external protruding filamentous bacteria on floc stability is consistent with the filamentous backbone theory, where filamentous bacteria within flocs increase floc resistance to shear-induced breakup. A qualitative correlation was also observed between protruding and internal filamentous structure. This study confirms that filamentous bacteria are necessary to enhance floc stability but if excessively abundant will adversely affect solid-liquid separation. The tools developed here will allow quantitative analysis of filament abundance, which is an improvement on current qualitative methods and the improved method could be used to assist and optimize the operation of waste water treatment plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced degradation activity by endophytic bacteria of plants growing in hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, L.; Germida, J.J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Greer, C.W. [National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Biotechnology Research Inst.

    2006-07-01

    The feasibility of using phytoremediation for cleaning soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons was discussed. Petroleum hydrocarbons are problematic because of their toxicity, mobility and persistence in the environment. Appropriate clean-up methods are needed, given that 60 per cent of Canada's contaminated sites contain these compounds. Phytoremediation is an in situ biotechnology in which plants are used to facilitate contaminant removal. The approach relies on a synergistic relationship between plants and their root-associated microbial communities. Previous studies on phytoremediation have focussed on rhizosphere communities. However, it is believed that endophytic microbes may also play a vital role in organic contaminant degradation. This study investigated the structural and functional dynamics of both rhizosphere and endophytic microbial communities of plants from a phytoremediation field site in south-eastern Saskatchewan. The former flare pit contains up to 10,000 ppm of F3 to F4 hydrocarbon fractions. Root samples were collected from tall wheatgrass, wild rye, saltmeadow grass, perennial ryegrass, and alfalfa. Culture-based and culture-independent methods were used to evaluate the microbial communities associated with these roots. Most probable number assays showed that the rhizosphere communities contained more n-hexadecane, diesel fuel, and PAH degraders. However, mineralization assays with 14C labelled n-hexadecane, naphthalene, and phenanthrene showed that endophytic communities had more degradation activities per standardized initial degrader populations. Total community DNA samples taken from bulk, rhizosphere, and endophytic samples, were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. It was shown that specific bacteria increased in endophytic communities compared to rhizosphere communities. It was suggested plants may possibly recruit specific bacteria in response to hydrocarbon contamination, thereby increasing degradation

  8. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants against several foodborne and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nuno; Alves, Sofia; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Amaral, Joana S; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of essential oils extracted from a variety of aromatic plants, often used in the Portuguese gastronomy was studied in vitro by the agar diffusion method. The essential oils of thyme, oregano, rosemary, verbena, basil, peppermint, pennyroyal and mint were tested against Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative strains (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). For most essential oils examined, S. aureus, was the most susceptible bacteria, while P. aeruginosa showed, in general, least susceptibility. Among the eight essential oils evaluated, thyme, oregano and pennyroyal oils showed the greatest antimicrobial activity, followed by rosemary, peppermint and verbena, while basil and mint showed the weakest antimicrobial activity. Most of the essential oils considered in this study exhibited a significant inhibitory effect. Thyme oil showed a promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, thus revealing its potential as a natural preservative in food products against several causal agents of foodborne diseases and food spoilage. In general, the results demonstrate that, besides flavoring the food, the use of aromatic herbs in gastronomy can also contribute to a bacteriostatic effect against pathogens.

  9. Interactions between Carotenoids from Marine Bacteria and Other Micronutrients: Impact on Stability and Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Charlotte; Dangles, Olivier; Borel, Patrick; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine

    2015-11-19

    Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria Bacillus indicus HU36 are sources of oxygenated carotenoids with original structures (about fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments with acylated d-glucosyl groups). In this study, we evaluated the stability (sensitivity to iron-induced autoxidation) and antioxidant activity (inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation) of combinations of bacterial HU36 carotenoids with the bacterial vitamin menaquinone MQ-7 and with phenolic antioxidants (vitamin E, chlorogenic acid, rutin). Unexpectedly, MQ-7 strongly improves the ability of HU36 carotenoids to inhibit Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation, although MQ-7 was not consumed in the medium. We propose that their interaction modifies the carotenoid antioxidant mechanism(s), possibly by allowing carotenoids to scavenge the initiating radicals. For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually. HU36 carotenoids and phenolic antioxidants displayed synergistic activities in the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by heme iron, but not by free iron. Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron. Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail.

  10. Trace cobalt speciation in bacteria and at enzymic active sites using emission Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, A.A.; Antonyuk, L.P.; Smirnova, V.E.; Serebrennikova, O.B. [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, Saratov (Russian Federation); Kulikov, L.A.; Perfiliev, Yu.D. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2002-02-01

    {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy (EMS) allows the chemical state of cobalt, as influenced by its coordination environment, to be monitored in biological samples at its physiological (trace) concentrations. To draw attention to EMS as a valuable tool for speciation of cobalt in biocomplexes, the process of cobalt(II) metabolism in cells of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 was investigated using EMS of {sup 57}Co{sup II}-doped bacterial cells. EMS measurements also showed {sup 57}Co{sup II}-activated glutamine synthetase (GS, a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism, isolated from this bacterium) to have two different cobalt(II) forms at its active sites, in agreement with data available on other bacterial GSs. Chemical after-effects following electron capture by the nucleus of the parent {sup 57}Co{sup II} during the {sup 57}Co{yields}{sup 57}Fe transition, which contribute to the formation of a stabilised daughter {sup 57}Fe{sup III} component along with the nucleogenic {sup 57}Fe{sup II} forms, are also briefly considered. (orig.)

  11. Glycyrrhiza glabra HPLC fractions: identification of Aldehydo Isoophiopogonone and Liquirtigenin having activity against multidrug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Hazir; Khan, Ilyas; Hussain, Anwar; Shahat, Abdelaaty Abdelaziz; Tawab, Abdul; Qasim, Muhammad; Adnan, Muhammad; Al-Said, Mansour S; Ullah, Riaz; Khan, Shahid Niaz

    2018-05-02

    Medicinal plants have been founded as traditional herbal medicine worldwide. Most of the plant's therapeutic properties are due to the presence of secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, glycosides, tannins and volatile oil. The present investigation analyzed the High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fractions of Glycyrrhiza glabra (Aqueous, Chloroform, Ethanol and Hexane) against multidrug resistant human bacterial pathogens (Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). All the fractions showed antibacterial activity, were subjected to LC MS/MS analysis for identification of bioactive compounds. Among total HPLC fractions of G. glabra (n = 20), three HPLC fractions showed potential activity against multidrug resistant (MDR) bacterial isolates. Fraction 1 (F1) of aqueous extracts, showed activity against A. baumannii (15 ± 0.5 mm). F4 from hexane extract of G. glabra showed activity against S. aureus (10 ± 0.2 mm). However, F2 from ethanol extract exhibited activity against S. aureus (10 ± 0.3 mm). These active fractions were further processed by LC MS/MS analysis for the identification of compounds. Ellagic acid was identified in the F1 of aqueous extract while 6-aldehydo-isoophiopogonone was present in F4 of hexane extract. Similarly, Liquirtigenin was identified in F2 of ethanol. Glycyrrhiza glabra extracts HPLC fractions showed anti-MDR activity. Three bioactive compounds were identified in the study. 6-aldehydo-isoophiopogonone and Liquirtigenin were for the first time reported in G. glabra. Further characterization of the identified compounds will be helpful for possible therapeutic uses against infectious diseases caused by multidrug resistant bacteria.

  12. Proteolytic and antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria grown in goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova, Jivka; Moncheva, Penka; Ivanova, Iskra

    2014-11-02

    We examined 62 strains and 21 trade starter cultures from the collection of LB Bulgaricum PLC for proteolytic and antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) grown in goat milk. The aim of this study was to investigate the fermentation of caseins, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin by LAB, using the o -phthaldialdehyde (OPA) spectrophotometric assay and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The proteolysis targeted mainly caseins, especially β-casein. Whey proteins were proteolyzed, essentially β-lactoglobulin. The proteolytic activity of Lactococcus lactis l598, Streptococcus thermophilus t3D1, Dt1, Lactobacillus lactis 1043 and L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus b38, b122 and b24 was notably high. The proteolysis process gave rise to medium-sized peptide populations. Most of the examined strains showed antimicrobial activity against some food pathogens, such as Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , Salmonella cholere enteridis , Listeria monocytogenes , Listeria innocua and Enterobacter aerogenes . The most active producers of antimicrobial-active peptides were strains of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus , which are of practical importance. The starter cultures containing the examined species showed high proteolytic and antimicrobial activity in skimmed goat milk. The greatest antimicrobial activity of the cultures was detected against E. aerogenes . The obtained results demonstrated the significant proteolytic potential of the examined strains in goat milk and their potential for application in the production of dairy products from goat's milk. The present results could be considered as the first data on the proteolytic capacity of strains and starter cultures in goat milk for the purposes of trade interest of LB Bulgaricum PLC.

  13. Surface-active biopolymers from marine bacteria for potential biotechnological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Sałek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface-active agents are amphiphilic chemicals that are used in almost every sector of modern industry, the bulk of which are produced by organo-chemical synthesis. Those produced from biological sources (biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers, however, have gained increasing interest in recent years due to their wide structural and functional diversity, lower toxicities and high biodegradability, compared to their chemically-synthesised counterparts. This review aims to present a general overview on surface-active agents, including their classification, where new types of these biomolecules may lay awaiting discovery, and some of the main bottlenecks for their industrial-scale production. In particular, the marine environment is highlighted as a largely untapped source for discovering new types of surface-active agents. Marine bacteria, especially those living associated with micro-algae (eukaryotic phytoplankton, are a highly promising source of polymeric surface-active agents with potential biotechnological applications. The high uronic acids content of these macromolecules has been linked to conferring them with amphiphilic qualities, and their high structural diversity and polyanionic nature endows them with the potential to exhibit a wide range of functional diversity. Production yields (e.g. by fermentation for most microbial surface-active agents have often been too low to meet the volume demands of industry, and this principally remains as the most important bottleneck for their further commercial development. However, new developments in recombinant and synthetic biology approaches can offer significant promise to alleviate this bottleneck. This review highlights a particular biotope in the marine environment that offers promise for discovering novel surface-active biomolecules, and gives a general overview on specific areas that researchers and the industry could focus work towards increasing the production yields of microbial surface-active

  14. Evaluation of the in vitro activity of levornidazole, its metabolites and comparators against clinical anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiali; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Shi; Zhu, Demei; Huang, Haihui; Chen, Yuancheng; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yingyuan

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro anti-anaerobic activity and spectrum of levornidazole, its metabolites and comparators against 375 clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria, including Gram-negative bacilli (181 strains), Gram-negative cocci (11 strains), Gram-positive bacilli (139 strains) and Gram-positive cocci (44 strains), covering 34 species. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of levornidazole, its five metabolites and three comparators against these anaerobic isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. Minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of levornidazole and metronidazole were measured against 22 strains of Bacteroides fragilis. Levornidazole showed good activity against B. fragilis, other Bacteroides spp., Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Peptostreptococcus magnus, evidenced by MIC90 values of 0.5, 1, 0.25, 2 and 1mg/L, respectively. The activity of levornidazole and the comparators was poor for Veillonella spp. Generally, levornidazole displayed activity similar to or slightly higher than that of metronidazole, ornidazole and dextrornidazole against anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli, Gram-positive bacilli and Gram-positive cocci, especially B. fragilis. Favourable anti-anaerobic activity was also seen with levornidazole metabolites M1 and M4 but not M2, M3 or M5. For the 22 clinical B. fragilis strains, MBC50 and MBC90 values of levornidazole were 2mg/L and 4mg/L, respectively. Both MBC50/MIC50 and MBC90/MIC90 ratios of levornidazole were 4, similar to those of metronidazole. Levornidazole is an important anti-anaerobic option in clinical settings in terms of its potent and broad-spectrum in vitro activity, bactericidal property, and the anti-anaerobic activity of its metabolites M1 and M4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Global Phenotypic Characterization of Effects of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Selection on the Metabolic Activities and Drug Susceptibilities of Clostridium perfringens Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miseon Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone resistance affects toxin production of Clostridium perfringens strains differently. To investigate the effect of fluoroquinolone resistance selection on global changes in metabolic activities and drug susceptibilities, four C. perfringens strains and their norfloxacin-, ciprofloxacin-, and gatifloxacin-resistant mutants were compared in nearly 2000 assays, using phenotype microarray plates. Variations among mutant strains resulting from resistance selection were observed in all aspects of metabolism. Carbon utilization, pH range, osmotic tolerance, and chemical sensitivity of resistant strains were affected differently in the resistant mutants depending on both the bacterial genotype and the fluoroquinolone to which the bacterium was resistant. The susceptibilities to gentamicin and erythromycin of all resistant mutants except one increased, but some resistant strains were less susceptible to amoxicillin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, and metronidazole than their wild types. Sensitivity to ethidium bromide decreased in some resistant mutants and increased in others. Microarray analysis of two gatifloxacin-resistant mutants showed changes in metabolic activities that were correlated with altered expression of various genes. Both the chemical structures of fluoroquinolones and the genomic makeup of the wild types influenced the changes found in resistant mutants, which may explain some inconsistent reports of the effects of therapeutic use of fluoroquinolones on clinical isolates of bacteria.

  16. Fe biomineralization mirrors individual metabolic activity in a nitrate-dependent Fe(II-oxidizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer eMIOT

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biomineralization sometimes leads to periplasmic encrustation, which is predicted to enhance microorganism preservation in the fossil record. Mineral precipitation within the periplasm is however thought to induce death, as a result of permeability loss preventing nutrient and waste transit across the cell wall. This hypothesis had however never been investigated down to the single cell level. Here, we cultured the nitrate reducing Fe(II oxidizing bacteria Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 that have been previously shown to promote the precipitation of a diversity of Fe minerals (lepidocrocite, goethite, Fe phosphate encrusting the periplasm. We investigated the connection of Fe biomineralization with carbon assimilation at the single cell level, using a combination of electron microscopy and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS. Our analyses revealed strong individual heterogeneities of Fe biomineralization. Noteworthy, a small proportion of cells remaining free of any precipitate persisted even at advanced stages of biomineralization. Using pulse chase experiments with 13C-acetate, we provide evidences of individual phenotypic heterogeneities of carbon assimilation, correlated with the level of Fe biomineralization. Whereas non- and moderately encrusted cells were able to assimilate acetate, higher levels of periplasm encrustation prevented any carbon incorporation. Carbon assimilation only depended on the level of Fe encrustation and not on the nature of Fe minerals precipitated in the cell wall. Carbon assimilation decreased exponentially with increasing cell-associated Fe content. Persistence of a small proportion of non-mineralized and metabolically active cells might constitute a strategy of survival in highly ferruginous environments. Eventually, our results suggest that periplasmic Fe biomineralization may provide a signature of individual metabolic status, which could be looked for in the fossil record and in modern

  17. Basal metabolic regulatory responses and rhythmic activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Rattus sp. Low concentrations of kola nut extract stimulated the heart by increasing rate and force of contraction as well as metabolic rate. Higher concentrations reduced rate and amplitude of beat resulting, at still higher concentrations in heart failure. Keywords: Kolanut, extract, basal metabolic rate, mammalian heart ...

  18. The missing link: Bordetella petrii is endowed with both the metabolic versatility of environmental bacteria and virulence traits of pathogenic Bordetellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneiker-Bekel Susanne

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bordetella petrii is the only environmental species hitherto found among the otherwise host-restricted and pathogenic members of the genus Bordetella. Phylogenetically, it connects the pathogenic Bordetellae and environmental bacteria of the genera Achromobacter and Alcaligenes, which are opportunistic pathogens. B. petrii strains have been isolated from very different environmental niches, including river sediment, polluted soil, marine sponges and a grass root. Recently, clinical isolates associated with bone degenerative disease or cystic fibrosis have also been described. Results In this manuscript we present the results of the analysis of the completely annotated genome sequence of the B. petrii strain DSMZ12804. B. petrii has a mosaic genome of 5,287,950 bp harboring numerous mobile genetic elements, including seven large genomic islands. Four of them are highly related to the clc element of Pseudomonas knackmussii B13, which encodes genes involved in the degradation of aromatics. Though being an environmental isolate, the sequenced B. petrii strain also encodes proteins related to virulence factors of the pathogenic Bordetellae, including the filamentous hemagglutinin, which is a major colonization factor of B. pertussis, and the master virulence regulator BvgAS. However, it lacks all known toxins of the pathogenic Bordetellae. Conclusion The genomic analysis suggests that B. petrii represents an evolutionary link between free-living environmental bacteria and the host-restricted obligate pathogenic Bordetellae. Its remarkable metabolic versatility may enable B. petrii to thrive in very different ecological niches.

  19. Isolation And Partial Characterization Of Bacteria Activity Associated With Gorgonian Euplexaura sp. Against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiana, R.; Ayuningrum, D.; Asagabaldan, M. A.; Nuryadi, H.; Sabdono, A.; Radjasa, O. K.; Trianto, A.

    2017-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has emerged in around the world and has been resistance to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin. The aims of this study were to isolate, to investigate and to characterize bacterial symbionts gorgonian having activity against MRSA. Euplexaura sp. was collected from Panjang Island, Jepara, Indonesia by snorkling 2-5 m in depth. Bacterias were isolated by using spesific media with dilution method. Bacterias were conducted by using the streak method. Antibacterial activity was investigated by overlay method. The potent bacteria was identified by using molecular identification (DNA extraction, electrophoresis, PCR and phylogenetic analysis using 16S rDNA genes with actinobacteria-spesific primers) and bio-chemical test (among 5 isolated bacteria from gorgonian showed activity against MRSA). The strain PG-344 was the best candidat that has an inhibition zone against MRSA. The result of sequencing bacteria is 100% closely related with Virgibacillus salarius. This becomes a potential new bioactive compounds to against MRSA that can be a new drug discovery.

  20. Lactic acid bacteria affect serum cholesterol levels, harmful fecal enzyme activity, and fecal water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Do Kyung; Jang, Seok; Baek, Eun Hye; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Kyung Soon; Shin, Hea Soon; Chung, Myung Jun; Kim, Jin Eung; Lee, Kang Oh; Ha, Nam Joo

    2009-06-11

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as lower cholesterol. Although present in many foods, most trials have been in spreads or dairy products. Here we tested whether Bifidobacteria isolates could lower cholesterol, inhibit harmful enzyme activities, and control fecal water content. In vitro culture experiments were performed to evaluate the ability of Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from healthy Koreans (20 approximately 30 years old) to reduce cholesterol-levels in MRS broth containing polyoxyethanylcholesterol sebacate. Animal experiments were performed to investigate the effects on lowering cholesterol, inhibiting harmful enzyme activities, and controlling fecal water content. For animal studies, 0.2 ml of the selected strain cultures (108 approximately 109 CFU/ml) were orally administered to SD rats (fed a high-cholesterol diet) every day for 2 weeks. B. longum SPM1207 reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL levels significantly (p water content, and reduced body weight and harmful intestinal enzyme activities. Daily consumption of B. longum SPM1207 can help in managing mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia, with potential to improve human health by helping to prevent colon cancer and constipation.

  1. Lactic acid bacteria affect serum cholesterol levels, harmful fecal enzyme activity, and fecal water content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Myung

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as lower cholesterol. Although present in many foods, most trials have been in spreads or dairy products. Here we tested whether Bifidobacteria isolates could lower cholesterol, inhibit harmful enzyme activities, and control fecal water content. Methods In vitro culture experiments were performed to evaluate the ability of Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from healthy Koreans (20~30 years old to reduce cholesterol-levels in MRS broth containing polyoxyethanylcholesterol sebacate. Animal experiments were performed to investigate the effects on lowering cholesterol, inhibiting harmful enzyme activities, and controlling fecal water content. For animal studies, 0.2 ml of the selected strain cultures (108~109 CFU/ml were orally administered to SD rats (fed a high-cholesterol diet every day for 2 weeks. Results B. longum SPM1207 reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL levels significantly (p B. longum SPM1207 also increased fecal LAB levels and fecal water content, and reduced body weight and harmful intestinal enzyme activities. Conclusion Daily consumption of B. longum SPM1207 can help in managing mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia, with potential to improve human health by helping to prevent colon cancer and constipation.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Cell Free Supernatant of Irradiated Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaleem, M.A.; AL-Hagar, O.E.Aa.

    2015-01-01

    Attempts were made to isolate bio preservatives using food wastes with no value and low cost. Whey is the raw material achieved that value. Whey and many other food wastes are used in our study to isolate Lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Cell free supernatants (CFS) of isolates are used to evaluate their antimicrobial activity against indicator pathogenic bacterial strains. CFS-9 isolate from whey has the highest inhibitory activity compared to all other isolates. The inhibitory activity of CFS-9, Nisin (400 IU / ml) and the standard Lactococcus Lactis Subsp. Lactis ATCC 11454 (Lacto) were determined. Furthermore, isolate-9 and Lacto strains were exposed to irradiation at different doses. The inhibition zones of; control isolate-9 (non-irradiated) showed the highest values against all indicator strains, CFS of irradiated Lacto at dose 250 Gy was the highest value against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli compared to other irradiation treatments, CFS of irradiated Lacto at dose 100 Gy was the highest value against Staph aureus, while the inhibition zone was in the highest value in CFS of irradiated Lacto at dose 500 Gy against Salmonella typhimurium. Nisin (400 IU / ml) was significantly higher than all CFS of irradiated isolate-9 while, the inhibition zones of all CFS-Lacto (irradiated and nonirradiated) are better and higher than nisin-400

  3. Substrate-dependent denitrification of abundant probe-defined denitrifying bacteria in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Sagastume, Fernando; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2008-11-01

    The denitrification capacity of different phylogenetic bacterial groups was investigated on addition of different substrates in activated sludge from two nutrient-removal plants. Nitrate/nitrite consumption rates (CRs) were calculated from nitrate and nitrite biosensor, in situ measurements. The nitrate/nitrite CRs depended on the substrate added, and acetate alone or combined with other substrates yielded the highest rates (3-6 mg N gVSS(-1) h(-1)). The nitrate CRs were similar to the nitrite CRs for most substrates tested. The structure of the active denitrifying population was investigated using heterotrophic CO2 microautoradiography (HetCO2-MAR) and FISH. Probe-defined denitrifiers appeared as specialized substrate utilizers despite acetate being preferentially used by most of them. Azoarcus and Accumulibacter abundance in the two different sludges was related to differences in their substrate-specific nitrate/nitrite CRs. Aquaspirillum-related bacteria were the most abundant potential denitrifiers (c. 20% of biovolume); however, Accumulibacter (3-7%) and Azoarcus (2-13%) may have primarily driven denitrification by utilizing pyruvate, ethanol, and acetate. Activated sludge denitrification was potentially conducted by a diverse, versatile population including not only Betaproteobacteria (Aquaspirillum, Thauera, Accumulibacter, and Azoarcus) but also some Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, as indicated by the assimilation of 14CO2 by these probe-defined groups with a complex substrate mixture as an electron donor and nitrite as an electron acceptor in HetCO2-MAR-FISH tests.

  4. Bacteria and viruses modulate FcεRI-dependent mast cell activity 

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    Aleksandra Słodka

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Undoubtedly, mast cells play a central role in allergic processes. Specific allergen cross-linking of IgE bound to the high affinity receptors (FcεRI on the mast cell surface leads to the release of preformed mediators and newly synthesized mediators, i.e. metabolites of arachidonic acid and cytokines. More and more data indicate that bacteria and viruses can influence FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. Some bacterial and viral components can reduce the surface expression of FcεRI. There are also findings that ligation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs by bacterial or viral antigens can affect IgE-dependent mast cell degranulation and preformed mediator release as well as eicosanoid production. The synergistic interaction of TLR ligands and allergen can also modify cytokine synthesis by mast cells stimulated via FcεRI. Moreover, data suggest that specific IgE for bacterial or viral antigens can influence mast cell activity. What is more, some bacterial and viral components or some endogenous proteins produced during viral infection can act as superantigens by interacting with the VH3 domain of IgE. All these observations indicate that bacterial and viral infections modify the course of allergic diseases by affecting FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation

  5. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Pomegranate Juice and Peel Extracts on Cariogenic Bacteria

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    Gianmaria Fabrizio Ferrazzano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of hydroalcoholic extracts of pomegranate (Punica granatum L. peel and juice, against the microorganisms considered the main etiologic agents of dental caries. Methods. The values of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined against Streptococcus mutans Clarke ATCC® 25175™ strain and Rothia dentocariosa clinical isolate. Results. Peel extracts inhibit effectively the growth and survival of S. mutans ATCC 25175 strain and R. dentocariosa clinical isolate with MIC and MBC values of 10 μg/μl and 15 μg/μl, respectively. Furthermore, the pomegranate juice extract showed high inhibitory activity against S. mutans ATCC 25175 strain with a MIC value of 25 μg/μl and a MBC value of 40 μg/μl, whereas, against R. dentocariosa, it has displayed a moderate inhibitory activity, with MIC and MBC values of 20 μg/μl and 140 μg/μl, respectively. Conclusions. In vitro microbiological tests demonstrate that the hydroalcoholic extracts of pomegranate juice and peel are able to contrast the main cariogenic bacteria involved in tooth decay. Although being preliminary data, our results suggest that pomegranate polyphenolic compounds could represent a good adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of dental caries.

  6. Identification and Antimicrobial Activity Detection of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Corn Stover Silage

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    Dongxia Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A total of 59 lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains were isolated from corn stover silage. According to phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA sequences and recA gene polymerase chain reaction amplification, these LAB isolates were identified as five species: Lactobacillus (L. plantarum subsp. plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Enterococcus mundtii, Weissella cibaria and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, respectively. Those strains were also screened for antimicrobial activity using a dual-culture agar plate assay. Based on excluding the effects of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide, two L. plantarum subsp. plantarum strains ZZU 203 and 204, which strongly inhibited Salmonella enterica ATCC 43971T, Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698T and Escherichia coli ATCC 11775T were selected for further research on sensitivity of the antimicrobial substance to heat, pH and protease. Cell-free culture supernatants of the two strains exhibited strong heat stability (60 min at 100°C, but the antimicrobial activity was eliminated after treatment at 121°C for 15 min. The antimicrobial substance remained active under acidic condition (pH 2.0 to 6.0, but became inactive under neutral and alkaline condition (pH 7.0 to 9.0. In addition, the antimicrobial activities of these two strains decreased remarkably after digestion by protease K. These results preliminarily suggest that the desirable antimicrobial activity of strains ZZU 203 and 204 is the result of the production of a bacteriocin-like substance, and these two strains with antimicrobial activity could be used as silage additives to inhibit proliferation of unwanted microorganism during ensiling and preserve nutrients of silage. The nature of the antimicrobial substances is being investigated in our laboratory.

  7. ß-defensin-2 in breast milk displays a broad antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria

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    Joanna Baricelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the antimicrobial activity of ß-defensin-2 produced in the mammary gland and secreted in human breast milk. METHODS: The peptide production was performed by DNA cloning. ß-defensin-2 levels were quantified in 61 colostrum samples and 39 mature milk samples from healthy donors, by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Using halo inhibition assay, this study assessed activity against seven clinical isolates from diarrheal feces of children between 0 and 2 years of age. The activity of ß-defensin-2 against three opportunistic pathogens that can cause nosocomial infections was determined by microdilution test. RESULTS: The peptide levels were higher in colostrum (n = 61 than in mature milk samples (n = 39, as follows: median and range, 8.52 (2.6-16.3 µg/ml versus 0.97 (0.22-3.78, p < 0.0001; Mann-Whitney test. The recombinant peptide obtained showed high antimicrobial activity against a broad range of pathogenic bacteria. Its antibacterial activity was demonstrated in a disk containing between 1-4 µg, which produced inhibition zones ranging from 18 to 30 mm against three isolates of Salmonella spp. and four of E. coli. ß-defensin-2 showed minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of 0.25 µg/mL and 0.5 µg/mL for S. marcescen and P. aeruginosa, respectively, while a higher MIC (4 µg/mL was obtained against an isolated of multidrug-resistant strain of A. baumannii. CONCLUSIONS: To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to report ß-defensin-2 levels in Latin American women. The production and the activity of ß-defensin-2 in breast milk prove its importance as a defense molecule for intestinal health in pediatric patients.

  8. Abnormal metabolic network activity in REM sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtbernd, Florian; Gagnon, Jean-François; Postuma, Ron B; Ma, Yilong; Tang, Chris C; Feigin, Andrew; Dhawan, Vijay; Vendette, Mélanie; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Eidelberg, David; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2014-02-18

    To determine whether the Parkinson disease-related covariance pattern (PDRP) expression is abnormally increased in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and whether increased baseline activity is associated with greater individual risk of subsequent phenoconversion. For this cohort study, we recruited 2 groups of RBD and control subjects. Cohort 1 comprised 10 subjects with RBD (63.5 ± 9.4 years old) and 10 healthy volunteers (62.7 ± 8.6 years old) who underwent resting-state metabolic brain imaging with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET. Cohort 2 comprised 17 subjects with RBD (68.9 ± 4.8 years old) and 17 healthy volunteers (66.6 ± 6.0 years old) who underwent resting brain perfusion imaging with ethylcysteinate dimer SPECT. The latter group was followed clinically for 4.6 ± 2.5 years by investigators blinded to the imaging results. PDRP expression was measured in both RBD groups and compared with corresponding control values. PDRP expression was elevated in both groups of subjects with RBD (cohort 1: p abnormalities in subjects with idiopathic RBD are associated with a greater likelihood of subsequent phenoconversion to a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome.

  9. Spatial localization of the first and last enzymes effectively connects active metabolic pathways in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Pablo; Cecchi, Guillermo; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Background Although much is understood about the enzymatic cascades that underlie cellular biosynthesis, comparatively little is known about the rules that determine their cellular organization. We performed a detailed analysis of the localization of E.coli GFP-tagged enzymes for cells growing exponentially. Results We found that out of 857 globular enzymes, at least 219 have a discrete punctuate localization in the cytoplasm and catalyze the first or the last reaction in 60% of biosynthetic ...

  10. Anti-bacteria activity of carbon nanotubes grown on trimetallic catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, S. O.; Abdulkareem, A. S.; Isah, K. U.; Ahmadu, U.; Bankole, M. T.; Kariim, I.

    2018-06-01

    Trimetallic catalyst was prepared using wet impregnation method to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through the method of catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). Characterization of the developed catalyst and CNTs were carried out using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), specific surface area Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM)/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM)/selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The BET and TGA analysis indicated that the catalyst has a high surface area and is thermally stable. The FTIR of the developed catalyst shows notable functional group with presence of unbound water. The HRSEM of the catalyst revealed agglomerated, homogeneous and porous particles while the HRSEM/HRTEM of the produced CNTs gave the formation of long strand of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and homogeneous crystalline fringe like structure with irregular diameter. EDS revealed the dominance of carbon in the elemental composition. XRD/SAED patterns of the catalyst suggest high dispersion of the metallic particles in the catalyst mixture while that of the CNTs confirmed that the produced MWCNTs were highly graphitized and crystalline in nature with little structural defects. The anti-bacteria activity of the produced MWCNTs on Klebsiella pneumoneae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was also carried out. It was observed that the produced MWCNTs have an inhibitory property on bacteria; Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoneae from zero day ( and ) through to twelfth day (Nil count) respectively. It has no effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa with too numerous to count at zero-sixth day, but a breakdown in its growth at ninth-twelfth day (). This study implied that MWCNTs with varying diameter and well-ordered nano-structure can be produced from catalyst via CCVD

  11. Active matrix metalloproteinase-8 and periodontal bacteria depending on periodontal status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, A; Jäger, J; Krohn-Grimberghe, B; Patschan, S; Kottmann, T; Schmalz, G; Mausberg, R F; Haak, R; Ziebolz, D

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this clinical cross-sectional study was to determine the level of active matrix metalloproteinase-8 (aMMP-8) and periodontal pathogenic bacteria in gingival crevicular fluid in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with varying periodontal conditions. In total, 103 patients with RA and 104 healthy controls (HC) were included. The assessment of periodontal status included periodontal probing depth, bleeding on probing and clinical attachment loss. Periodontal disease was classified as healthy/mild, moderate or severe. For the determination of aMMP-8 levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and periodontal pathogenic bacteria using polymerase chain reaction, samples of gingival crevicular fluid were taken from the deepest gingival pockets. The statistical analyses used included a Mann-Whitney U-test, a chi-squared test or a Fisher's exact test, and the significance level was set at α = 5%. We found that 65% of patients with RA and 79% of HC had moderate to severe periodontal disease (p = 0.02). The prevalence of periodontal pathogens was almost equal (p > 0.05). Furthermore, depending on periodontal disease severity only minor differences in bacterial prevalence were detected. With increasing severity of periodontal disease, higher aMMP-8 levels were observed. Accordingly, a significant difference in patients with moderate periodontal disease (RA: 15.3 ± 13.8; HC: 9.1 ± 9.1; p ≤ 0.01) and severe periodontal disease (RA: 21.7 ± 13.3; HC: 13.1 ± 8.6; p = 0.07) was detected, with a greater tendency in the latter group. The increased aMMP-8 levels in the RA group indicate that the presence of RA appears to have an influence on the host response at a comparable level of bacterial load and periodontal disease severity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.