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Sample records for metabolically active bacteria

  1. Distinguishing between metabolically active and dormant bacteria on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hice, Stephanie A; Santoscoy, Miguel C; Soupir, Michelle L; Cademartiri, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    Switching between metabolically active and dormant states provides bacteria with protection from environmental stresses and allows rapid growth under favorable conditions. This rapid growth can be detrimental to the environment, e.g., pathogens in recreational lakes, or to industrial processes, e.g., fermentation, making it useful to quickly determine when the ratio of dormant to metabolically active bacteria changes. While a rapid increase in metabolically active bacteria can cause complications, a high number of dormant bacteria can also be problematic, since they can be more virulent and antibiotic-resistant. To determine the metabolic state of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium, we developed two paper-based colorimetric assays. The color changes were based on oxidoreductases reducing tetrazolium salts to formazans, and alkaline phosphatases cleaving phosphates from nitrophenyl phosphate salt. Specifically, we added iodophenyl-nitrophenyl-phenyl tetrazolium salt (INT) and methylphenazinium methyl sulfate to metabolically active bacteria on paper and INT and para-nitrophenyl phosphate salt to dormant bacteria on paper. The color changed in less than 60 min and was generally visible at 10 3  CFU and quantifiable at 10 6  CFU. The color changes occurred in both bacteria, since oxidoreductases and alkaline phosphatases are common bacterial enzymes. On one hand, this feature makes the assays suitable to a wide range of applications, on the other, it requires specific capture, if only one type of bacterium is of interest. We captured Salmonella or E. coli with immobilized P22 or T4 bacteriophages on the paper, before detecting them at levels of 10 2 or 10 4  CFU, respectively. Determining the ratio of the metabolic state of bacteria or a specific bacterium at low cost and in a short time, makes this methodology useful in environmental, industrial and health care settings.

  2. Metabolic activity of permafrost bacteria below the freezing point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkina, E. M.; Friedmann, E. I.; McKay, C. P.; Gilichinsky, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic activity was measured in the laboratory at temperatures between 5 and -20 degrees C on the basis of incorporation of (14)C-labeled acetate into lipids by samples of a natural population of bacteria from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil). Incorporation followed a sigmoidal pattern similar to growth curves. At all temperatures, the log phase was followed, within 200 to 350 days, by a stationary phase, which was monitored until the 550th day of activity. The minimum doubling times ranged from 1 day (5 degrees C) to 20 days (-10 degrees C) to ca. 160 days (-20 degrees C). The curves reached the stationary phase at different levels, depending on the incubation temperature. We suggest that the stationary phase, which is generally considered to be reached when the availability of nutrients becomes limiting, was brought on under our conditions by the formation of diffusion barriers in the thin layers of unfrozen water known to be present in permafrost soils, the thickness of which depends on temperature.

  3. Effect of tributyltin (TBT) in the metabolic activity of TBT-resistant and sensitive estuarine bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andreia; Oliveira, Vanessa; Baptista, Inês; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Angela; Suzuki, Satoru; Mendo, Sónia

    2012-01-01

    The effect of tributyltin (TBT) on growth and metabolic activity of three estuarine bacteria with different TBT resistance profiles was investigated in an organic-rich culture medium (TSB) and in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) buffer. Exposure to TBT was assessed by determining its effect on growth (OD(600 nm) measurement), bacterial productivity (leucine incorporation), viability (CFU counts), aggregation and cell size (from Live/Dead analysis), ATP and NADH concentrations. TBT exposure resulted in decrease of bacterial density, cell size, and metabolic activity. In addition, cell aggregates were observed in the TBT-treated cultures. TBT strongly affected bacterial cell metabolism and seemed to exert an effect on its equilibrium, interfering with cell activity. Also, TBT toxicity was lower when cells were grown in TSB than in PBS, suggesting that a nutrient-rich growth medium can protect cells from TBT toxicity. This study contributes to our understanding of the TBT-resistant cell behavior reflected in its physiology and metabolic activity. This information is of utmost importance for further studies of TBT bioremediation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Effect of Culture Medium on Metabolic and Antibacterial Activities of Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirdavoudi F

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Probiotic bacteria is added directly to food components and it has beneficial effect on function and the health of organisms. The bifidogenic factors enter the colon where they contribute to an increase lactic acid bacteria population including Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria and they inhibit enteric pathogenic bacterial growth. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of culture medium on metabolic and antibacterial of probiotic bacteria.Methods: In this study, the probiotics bacterial and intestine pathogenic are to be used. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium were identified by plating samples on MRS medium, Gram Staining and standard biochemical methods. The effect of antagonistic probiotics was investigated in the presence of growth factor in the method well diffusion Ager on the Shigella flexneri (PTCC 1234, Escherichia coli (PTCC 1552, Salmonella typhi ( PTCC 1609 and the culture medium pH was measured.Results: The probiotics bacterial growth in MRS and lactose1%, sorbitol, raffinose, riboflavin were shown the effect antibacterial. The results of the study show the most antagonistic activity in commercial strain Lactobacillus acidophilus on Shigella flexneri and lower activity was in Lactobacillus casei (PTCC 1608, and Salmonella typhimurium (PTCC 1609, and also in Bbifidobacterium bifidum, it showed the most decrease pH value.Conclusion: According to the result of the study, adding growth factors to MRS medium base and lactose 1%, probiotic growth was increased and which also increased antagonistic activity.

  5. Sirtuin Lipoamidase Activity Is Conserved in Bacteria as a Regulator of Metabolic Enzyme Complexes

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    Elizabeth A. Rowland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipoic acid is an essential metabolic cofactor added as a posttranslational modification on several multimeric enzyme complexes. These protein complexes, evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to humans, are core regulators of cellular metabolism. While the multistep enzymatic process of adding lipoyl modifications has been well characterized in Escherichia coli, the enzyme required for the removal of these lipoyl moieties (i.e., a lipoamidase or delipoylase has not yet been identified. Here, we describe our discovery of sirtuins as lipoamidases in bacteria and establish their conserved substrates. Specifically, by using a series of knockout, overexpression, biochemical, in vitro, proteomic, and functional assays, we determined the substrates of sirtuin CobB in E. coli as components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KDH, and glycine cleavage (GCV complexes. In vitro assays provided direct evidence for this specific CobB activity and its NAD+ dependence, a signature of all sirtuins. By designing a targeted quantitative mass spectrometry method, we further measured sirtuin-dependent, site-specific lipoylation on these substrates. The biological significance of CobB-modulated lipoylation was next established by its inhibition of both PDH and KDH activities. By restricting the carbon sources available to E. coli, we demonstrated that CobB regulates PDH and KDH under several growth conditions. Additionally, we found that SrtN, the sirtuin homolog in Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, can also act as a lipoamidase. By demonstrating the evolutionary conservation of lipoamidase activity across sirtuin homologs, along with the conservation of common substrates, this work emphasizes the significance of protein lipoylation in regulating central metabolic processes.

  6. Distribution of Metabolically Active Prokaryotes (Archaea and Bacteria) throughout the Profiles of Chernozem and Brown Semidesert Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, M. V.; Manucharova, N. A.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    The distribution of metabolically active cells of archaea and bacteria in the profiles of typical chernozems (Voronezh oblast) and brown semidesert soils (Astrakhan oblast) of natural and agricultural ecosystems was studied using the method of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The studied soils differed sharply in the microbial biomass and in the numbers of metabolically active cells of archaea and bacteria. The number of active bacterial cells was 3.5-7.0 times greater than that of archaea. In the arable chernozem, the numbers of active cells of archaea and bacteria were 2.6 and 1.5 times, respectively, lower than those in the chernozem under the shelterbelt. The agricultural use of the brown semidesert soil had little effect on the abundances of bacteria and archaea. The soil organic carbon content was the major factor controlling the numbers of metabolically active cells of both domains. However, the dependence of the abundance of bacteria on the organic matter content was more pronounced. The decrease in the organic carbon and total nitrogen contents down the soil profiles was accompanied by the decrease in the bacteria: archaea ratio attesting to a better adaptation of archaea to the permanent deficiency of carbon and nitrogen. The bacteria: archaea ratio can serve as an ecotrophic indicator of the state of soil microbial communities.

  7. Diversity of Metabolically Active Bacteria in Water-Flooded High-Temperature Heavy Oil Reservoir

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    Tamara N. Nazina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to study the overall genomic diversity of microorganisms of the Dagang high-temperature oilfield (PRC and to characterize the metabolically active fraction of these populations. At this water-flooded oilfield, the microbial community of formation water from the near-bottom zone of an injection well where the most active microbial processes of oil degradation occur was investigated using molecular, cultural, radiotracer, and physicochemical techniques. The samples of microbial DNA and RNA from back-flushed water were used to obtain the clone libraries for the 16S rRNA gene and cDNA of 16S rRNA, respectively. The DNA-derived clone libraries were found to contain bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the alkB genes encoding alkane monooxygenases similar to those encoded by alkB-geo1 and alkB-geo6 of geobacilli. The 16S rRNA genes of methanogens (Methanomethylovorans, Methanoculleus, Methanolinea, Methanothrix, and Methanocalculus were predominant in the DNA-derived library of Archaea cloned sequences; among the bacterial sequences, the 16S rRNA genes of members of the genus Geobacillus were the most numerous. The RNA-derived library contained only bacterial cDNA of the 16S rRNA sequences belonging to metabolically active aerobic organotrophic bacteria (Tepidimonas, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, as well as of denitrifying (Azoarcus, Tepidiphilus, Calditerrivibrio, fermenting (Bellilinea, iron-reducing (Geobacter, and sulfate- and sulfur-reducing bacteria (Desulfomicrobium, Desulfuromonas. The presence of the microorganisms of the main functional groups revealed by molecular techniques was confirmed by the results of cultural, radioisotope, and geochemical research. Functioning of the mesophilic and thermophilic branches was shown for the microbial food chain of the near-bottom zone of the injection well, which included the microorganisms of the carbon, sulfur, iron, and nitrogen cycles.

  8. The Effect of Culture Medium on Metabolic and Antibacterial Activities of Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    f Mirdavoudi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Probiotic bacteria is added directly to food components and it has beneficial effect on function and the health of organisms. The bifidogenic factors enter the colon where they contribute to an increase lactic acid bacteria population including Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria and they inhibit enteric pathogenic bacterial growth. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of culture medium on metabolic and antibacterial of probiotic bacteria.

     

    Methods: In this study, the probiotics bacterial and intestine pathogenic are to be used. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium were identified by plating samples on MRS medium, Gram Staining and standard biochemical methods. The effect of antagonistic probiotics was investigated in the presence of growth factor in the method well diffusion Ager on the Shigella flexneri (PTCC 1234, Escherichia coli (PTCC 1552, Salmonella typhi ( PTCC 1609 and the culture medium pH was measured.

     

    Results: The probiotics bacterial growth in MRS and lactose1%, sorbitol, raffinose, riboflavin were shown the effect antibacterial. The results of the study show the most antagonistic activity in commercial strain Lactobacillus acidophilus on Shigella flexneri and lower activity was in Lactobacillus casei (PTCC 1608, and Salmonella typhimurium (PTCC 1609, and also in Bbifidobacterium bifidum, it showed the most decrease pH value.

     

    Conclusion: According to the result of the study, adding growth factors to MRS medium base and lactose 1%, probiotic growth was increased and which also increased antagonistic activity.

     

  9. Spatial localization of the first and last enzymes effectively connects active metabolic pathways in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pablo; Cecchi, Guillermo; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-12-14

    Although much is understood about the enzymatic cascades that underlie cellular biosynthesis, comparatively little is known about the rules that determine their cellular organization. We performed a detailed analysis of the localization of E.coli GFP-tagged enzymes for cells growing exponentially. We found that out of 857 globular enzymes, at least 219 have a discrete punctuate localization in the cytoplasm and catalyze the first or the last reaction in 60% of biosynthetic pathways. A graph-theoretic analysis of E.coli's metabolic network shows that localized enzymes, in contrast to non-localized ones, form a tree-like hierarchical structure, have a higher within-group connectivity, and are traversed by a higher number of feed-forward and feedback loops than their non-localized counterparts. A Gene Ontology analysis of these enzymes reveals an enrichment of terms related to essential metabolic functions in growing cells. Given that these findings suggest a distinct metabolic role for localization, we studied the dynamics of cellular localization of the cell wall synthesizing enzymes in B. subtilis and found that enzymes localize during exponential growth but not during stationary growth. We conclude that active biochemical pathways inside the cytoplasm are organized spatially following a rule where their first or their last enzymes localize to effectively connect the different active pathways and thus could reflect the activity state of the cell's metabolic network.

  10. Metabolism in bacteria at low temperature: A recent report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... The adaptability of bacteria to extreme cold environments has been demonstrated from time to time by various investigators. Metabolic activity of bacteria at subzero temperatures is also evidenced. Recent studies indicate that bacteria continue both catabolic and anabolic activities at subzero temperatures.

  11. Transport of metabolically active bacteria in porous media:the effect of substrate, age, and grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, J. B.; Bradford, S. A.; Simunek, J.; Vereecken, H.; Klumpp, E.

    2008-12-01

    In our studies we sought to understand the biological processes affecting the microbial transport and retention of metabolically active Pseudomonas putida. To study the role of the metabolic state of the bacteria, we conducted a series of column experiments, varying saturation, substrate concentration, and grain size to help elucidate mechanisms present. Results show a significant difference between the metabolic state in the effluent, under unsaturated conditions, offset by grain-size effects. The presence of substrate appears to influence the breakthrough behavior of these cells in the smaller sand grains. We have also observed that the hydrophobicity of cells change according to their life-cycle. In addition we conducted a simple micro-model experiment, to observe if the cells behavior could be affected by their own motility. The results show that the cells travel with solution, suggesting that the flagella does not significantly contribute to movement through the porous media under these conditions. Furthermore, we monitored the cells in fresh batch solution and filtered solution under the microscope. In this case, we confirmed that during the stationary phase, when the cells are older there is an increased presence of aggregates, contrasting to the cells in the log-phase. There are also very long rod-shaped cells, which appear to undergo a process of cell division. The spatial distribution of these cells was also analyzed. The results indicate there are various mechanisms influencing the retention mechanisms of Pseudomonas putida, which are directly dependent on the metabolic state, substrate presence, and saturation of the porous media. The experimental data were analyzed using a mathematical model under a modified HYDRUS1D.

  12. Detoxification, metabolism, and glutathione pathway activity of aflatoxin B1 by dietary lactic acid bacteria in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N; Ding, K; Wang, J Q; Jia, S C; Wang, J P; Xu, T S

    2017-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and the glutathione (GSH) pathway are protective against aflatoxin, but information on the effect of LAB on aflatoxin metabolism and GSH activity in farm animals is scarce. This study aimed to investigate the effects of LAB and aflatoxin B (AFB) on growth performance, aflatoxin metabolism, and GSH pathway activity using 480 male Arbor Acres broiler chickens from d 1 to 35 of age. Diets were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial design, including AFB at 0 or 40 µg/kg of feed and LAB at 0 or 3 × 10 cfu/kg of feed, and the LAB was a mixture of equal amounts of , , and . The results showed that there were highly significant ( < 0.01) effects of AFB toxicity, LAB protection, and their interaction on ADFI, ADG, and G:F of broilers during d 1 to 35. Compared with the AFB diet, the LAB diet reduced ( < 0.05) the residues of AFB in the liver, kidney, serum, ileal digesta, and excreta on d 14 by 121.5, 80.6, 43.7, 47.0, and 26.5%, respectively, and on d 35 by 40.6, 60.2, 131.7, 37.9, and 32.9%, respectively, whereas the LAB diet increased ( < 0.05) the contents of aflatoxin M, a metabolite of AFB, in the liver, kidney, serum, and ileal digesta on d 14 by 98.2, 154.2, 168.6, 19.1, and 34.1%, respectively, and in the kidney and serum on d 35 by 32.6 and 142.2%, respectively. For the activity of the GSH pathway in the liver and duodenal mucosa, there were significant ( ≤ 0.01) effects of LAB and AFB on reduced GSH, glutathione S-transferases (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) on d 14 and 35; compared with the control diet, the LAB diet increased ( < 0.05) GSH, GST, and GR by a range of 11.6 to 86.1%, and compared with the AFB diet, the LAB diet increased ( < 0.05) GSH, GST, and GR by a range of 24.1 to 146.9%. In the liver, there were interactions ( < 0.05) on GSH and GST on d 14 and on GSH on d 35; in the mucosa, interactions were significant ( ≤ 0.01) on GSH and GR on d 14 and on GST on d 35. It can be concluded that LAB is effective in the

  13. Production of exopolysaccharides by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains of human origin, and metabolic activity of the producing bacteria in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, N; Prieto, A; Leal, J A; Mayo, B; Bada-Gancedo, J C; de los Reyes-Gavilán, C G; Ruas-Madiedo, P

    2009-09-01

    This work reports on the physicochemical characterization of 21 exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, as well as the growth and metabolic activity of the EPS-producing strains in milk. The strains belong to the species Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus vaginalis, Bifidobacterium animalis, Bifidobacterium longum, and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum. The molar mass distribution of EPS fractions showed 2 peaks of different sizes, which is a feature shared with some EPS from bacteria of food origin. In general, we detected an association between the EPS size distribution and the EPS-producing species, although because of the low numbers of human bacterial EPS tested, we could not conclusively establish a correlation. The main monosaccharide components of the EPS under study were glucose, galactose, and rhamnose, which are the same as those found in food polymers; however, the rhamnose and glucose ratios was generally higher than the galactose ratio in our human bacterial EPS. All EPS-producing strains were able to grow and acidify milk; most lactobacilli produced lactic acid as the main metabolite. The lactic acid-to-acetic acid ratio in bifidobacteria was 0.7, close to the theoretical ratio, indicating that the EPS-producing strains did not produce an excessive amount of acetic acid, which could adversely affect the sensory properties of fermented milks. With respect to their viscosity-intensifying ability, L. plantarum H2 and L. rhamnosus E41 and E43R were able to increase the viscosity of stirred, fermented milks to a similar extent as the EPS-producing Streptococcus thermophilus strain used as a positive control. Therefore, these human EPS-producing bacteria could be used as adjuncts in mixed cultures for the formulation of functional foods if probiotic characteristics could be demonstrated. This is the first article reporting the

  14. Improved strength and durability of concrete through metabolic activity of ureolytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Maria Jose Castro; Ortiz, Carlos Eloir Lopez; Perez, Sixto Omar Garcia; Narayanasamy, Rajeswari; Fajardo San Miguel, Gerardo Del Jesús; Hernández, Héctor Herrera; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2017-06-07

    In recent years, biomineralization process is being employed in development of bioconcrete, which is emerging as a sustainable method to enhance the durability of concrete by way of increasing compressive strength and reducing the chloride permeability. In this study, different bacterial strains isolated from the soils of the Laguna Region of Mexico were selected for further study. ACRN5 strain demonstrated higher urease activity than other strains, and the optimum substrate concentration, pH, and temperature were 120 mM, pH 8, and 25 °C, respectively. Further, Km and Vmax of urease activity of ACRN5 were 21.38 mM and 0.212 mM min -1 , respectively. It was observed that addition of ACRN5 at 10 5  cells ml -1 to cement-water mixture significantly increased (14.94%) in compressive strength after 36 days of curing and reduced chloride penetration. Deposition of calcite in bio-mortars was observed in scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction spectrometry analyses. Results of this study demonstrated the role of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation in improving the physico-mechanical properties of bio-mortars.

  15. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...... in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative...

  16. [Role of the ribosomes in controlling cellular differentiation and secondary metabolism in sporulating bacteria. I. Sporogenesis, antibiotic formation and the proteolytic activity of streptomycin-resistant mutants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, A A; Korolev, V I

    1981-01-01

    A ribosomal mutant Bacillus subtilis IG1 resistant to 100 mkg/ml of streptomycin was isolated. The strA mutation is cotransduced with the cysA gene and, consequently, maps in the ribosomal cluster. The mutation does not influence cell division but does reduce a level of sporulation as well as its antibiotic and proteolytic activity. Involvement of ribosomes in the control of sporulation and secondary metabolism of spore forming bacteria is discussed.

  17. Metabolic engineering in methanotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyuzhnaya, MG; Puri, AW; Lidstrom, ME

    2015-05-01

    Methane, as natural gas or biogas, is the least expensive source of carbon for (bio)chemical synthesis. Scalable biological upgrading of this simple alkane to chemicals and fuels can bring new sustainable solutions to a number of industries with large environmental footprints, such as natural gas/petroleum production, landfills, wastewater treatment, and livestock. Microbial biocatalysis with methane as a feedstock has been pursued off and on for almost a half century, with little enduring success. Today, biological engineering and systems biology provide new opportunities for metabolic system modulation and give new optimism to the concept of a methane-based bio-industry. Here we present an overview of the most recent advances pertaining to metabolic engineering of microbial methane utilization. Some ideas concerning metabolic improvements for production of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, two main precursors for bioconversion, are presented. We also discuss main gaps in the current knowledge of aerobic methane utilization, which must be solved in order to release the full potential of methane-based biosystems. (C) 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, enhances energy metabolism by activation of TRPV1.

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    Kim, Minji; Furuzono, Tomoya; Yamakuni, Kanae; Li, Yongjia; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Haruya; Ohue-Kitano, Ryuji; Jheng, Huei-Fen; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kano, Yuriko; Yu, Rina; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Yamazaki, Jun; Tominaga, Makoto; Kawada, Teruo; Goto, Tsuyoshi

    2017-11-01

    Gut microbiota can regulate the host energy metabolism; however, the underlying mechanisms that could involve gut microbiota-derived compounds remain to be understood. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of KetoA [10-oxo-12( Z )-octadecenoic acid]-a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria-on whole-body energy metabolism and found that dietary intake of KetoA could enhance energy expenditure in mice, thereby protecting mice from diet-induced obesity. By using Ca 2+ imaging and whole-cell patch-clamp methods, KetoA was noted to potently activate transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and enhance noradrenalin turnover in adipose tissues. In addition, KetoA up-regulated genes that are related to brown adipocyte functions, including uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in white adipose tissue (WAT), which was later diminished in the presence of a β-adrenoreceptor blocker. By using obese and diabetic model KK-Ay mice, we further show that KetoA intake ameliorated obesity-associated metabolic disorders. In the absence of any observed KetoA-induced antiobesity effect or UCP1 up-regulation in TRPV1-deficient mice, we prove that the antiobesity effect of KetoA was caused by TRPV1 activation-mediated browning in WAT. KetoA produced in the gut could therefore be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism.-Kim, M., Furuzono, T., Yamakuni, K., Li, Y., Kim, Y.-I., Takahashi, H., Ohue-Kitano, R., Jheng, H.-F., Takahashi, N., Kano, Y., Yu, R., Kishino, S., Ogawa, J., Uchida, K., Yamazaki, J., Tominaga, M., Kawada, T., Goto, T. 10-oxo-12( Z )-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, enhances energy metabolism by activation of TRPV1. © FASEB.

  19. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

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    C. Jeanthon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a, the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 54 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94 % was affiliated to the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies

  20. Recent insight in α-glucan metabolism in probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Goh, Yong Jun; Viborg, Alexander Holm

    2014-01-01

    biochemically understood activities in bifidobacteria compared to lactobacilli, where important members have been recently described at the molecular level. This review presents some aspects of α-glucan metabolism in probiotic bacteria and highlights vague issues that merit experimental effort, especially...

  1. Activation of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase by Sodium Dichloroacetate Shifts Metabolic Consumption from Amino Acids to Glucose in IPEC-J2 Cells and Intestinal Bacteria in Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Rui; Tang, Zhiru; Li, Yunxia; Li, Tiejun; Xu, Qingqing; Zhen, Jifu; Huang, Feiru; Yang, Jing; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Zhaoliang; Li, Mao; Sun, Jiajing; Zhang, Xiangxin; Chen, Jinchao; Wu, Liuting; Zhao, Shengjun; Qingyan, Jiang; Zhu, Weiyun; Yin, Yulong; Sun, Zhihong

    2018-04-18

    The extensive metabolism of amino acids (AA) as fuel is an important reason for the low use efficiency of protein in pigs. In this study, we investigated whether regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)/pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha 1 (PDHA1) pathway affected AA consumption by porcine intestinal epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells and intestinal bacteria in pigs. The effects of knockdown of PDHA1 and PDK1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) on nutrient consumption by IPEC-J2 cells were evaluated. IPEC-J2 cells were then cultured with sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) to quantify AA and glucose consumption and nutrient oxidative metabolism. The results showed that knockdown of PDHA1 using siRNA decreased glucose consumption but increased total AA (TAA) and glutamate (Glu) consumption by IPEC-J2 cells ( P < 0.05). Opposite effects were observed using siRNA targeting PDK1 ( P < 0.05). Additionally, culturing IPEC-J2 cells in the presence of 5 mM DCA markedly increased the phosphorylation of PDHA1 and PDH phosphatase 1, but inhibited PDK1 phosphorylation ( P < 0.05). DCA treatment also reduced TAA and Glu consumption and increased glucose depletion ( P < 0.05). These results indicated that PDH was the regulatory target for shifting from AA metabolism to glucose metabolism and that culturing cells with DCA decreased the consumption of AAs by increasing the depletion of glucose through PDH activation.

  2. Prebiotic potential of L-sorbose and xylitol in promoting the growth and metabolic activity of specific butyrate-producing bacteria in human fecal culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tadashi; Kusuhara, Shiro; Yokoi, Wakae; Ito, Masahiko; Miyazaki, Kouji

    2017-01-01

    Dietary low-digestible carbohydrates (LDCs) affect gut microbial metabolism, including the production of short-chain fatty acids. The ability of various LDCs to promote butyrate production was evaluated in in vitro human fecal cultures. Fecal suspensions from five healthy males were anaerobically incubated with various LDCs. L-Sorbose and xylitol markedly promoted butyrate formation in cultures. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses of these fecal cultures revealed a marked increase in the abundance of bacteria closely related to the species Anaerostipes hadrus or A. caccae or both, during enhanced butyrate formation from L-sorbose or xylitol. By using an agar plate culture, two strains of A. hadrus that produced butyrate from each substrate were isolated from the feces of two donors. Furthermore, of 12 species of representative colonic butyrate producers, only A. hadrus and A. caccae demonstrated augmented butyrate production from L-sorbose or xylitol. These findings suggest that L-sorbose and xylitol cause prebiotic stimulation of the growth and metabolic activity of Anaerostipes spp. in the human colon. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Metabolic Flexibility of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline M. Plugge

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRB are a very diverse group of anaerobic bacteria that are omnipresent in nature and play an imperative role in the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. In anoxic marine sediments sulfate reduction accounts for up to 50% of the entire organic mineralization in coastal and shelf ecosystems where sulfate diffuses several meters deep into the sediment. As a consequence, SRB would be expected in the sulfate-containing upper sediment layers, whereas methanogenic Archaea would be expected to succeed in the deeper sulfate-depleted layers of the sediment. Where sediments are high in organic matter, sulfate is depleted at shallow sediment depths, and biogenic methane production will occur. In the absence of sulfate, many SRB ferment organic acids and alcohols, producing hydrogen, acetate, and carbon dioxide, and may even rely on hydrogen- and acetate-scavenging methanogens to convert organic compounds to methane. SRB can establish two different life styles, and these can be termed as sulfidogenic and acetogenic, hydrogenogenic metabolism. The advantage of having different metabolic capabilities is that it raises the chance of survival in environments when electron acceptors become depleted. In marine sediments, SRB and methanogens do not compete but rather complement each other in the degradation of organic matter.Also in freshwater ecosystems with sulfate concentrations of only 10-200 μM, sulfate is consumed efficiently within the top several cm of the sediments. Here, many of the δ-Proteobacteria present have the genetic machinery to perform dissimilatory sulfate reduction, yet they have an acetogenic, hydrogenogenic way of life.In this review we evaluate the physiology and metabolic mode of SRB in relation with their environment.

  4. [Chitinolytic activity of bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saks, Elzbieta; Jankiewicz, Urszula

    2010-01-01

    Chitinolytic bacteria play an important role in degradation of chitin, one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature. These microorganisms synthesize specific enzymes, that catalyze hydrolysis of beta-1,4-glycosidic bonds in low-digestible chitin polymers, turning it into low-molecular, easy to digest compounds. During last decades many bacterial chitinolytic enzymes have been studied and characterized, mainly for their potential applications in agriculture, industry and medicine. Several chitinase classifications have been proposed, either on the base of substrate specificity or amino acid sequence similarities. X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy techniques enabled the determination of three dimensional structure of some chitinases, what was helpful in explaining their catalytic mechanism. Development of biotechnology and molecular biology enables a deep research in regulation and cloning of bacterial chitinase genes.

  5. [Metabolism of mangiferin by human intestinal bacteria in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huixue; Tan, Zhenyuan; Deng, Jiagang; Liang, Qiuyun; Nong, Yumei; Song, Nianmei

    2011-02-01

    To study the metabolism of mangiferin by human intestinal bacteria in vitro. Human intestinal bacteria and mangiferin were incubated under anaerobic conditions in vitro. The metabolite was separated and purified by D101 macroporous resin column and preparation high performance liquid chromatography, and its structure was identified by MS and NMR. After 12 h incubation with human intestinal bacteria, the content of mangiferin metabolite reached the maximum, and it was determined as 1, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydroxyxanthen by MS and NMR. Mangiferin can be metabolized in vitro by human intestinal bacteria into its aglycone (1, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydroxyxanthen).

  6. Production of L-carnitine by secondary metabolism of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iborra José L

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The increasing commercial demand for L-carnitine has led to a multiplication of efforts to improve its production with bacteria. The use of different cell environments, such as growing, resting, permeabilized, dried, osmotically stressed, freely suspended and immobilized cells, to maintain enzymes sufficiently active for L-carnitine production is discussed in the text. The different cell states of enterobacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Proteus sp., which can be used to produce L-carnitine from crotonobetaine or D-carnitine as substrate, are analyzed. Moreover, the combined application of both bioprocess and metabolic engineering has allowed a deeper understanding of the main factors controlling the production process, such as energy depletion and the alteration of the acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio which are coupled to the end of the biotransformation. Furthermore, the profiles of key central metabolic activities such as the TCA cycle, the glyoxylate shunt and the acetate metabolism are seen to be closely interrelated and affect the biotransformation efficiency. Although genetically modified strains have been obtained, new strain improvement strategies are still needed, especially in Escherichia coli as a model organism for molecular biology studies. This review aims to summarize and update the state of the art in L-carnitine production using E. coli and Proteus sp, emphasizing the importance of proper reactor design and operation strategies, together with metabolic engineering aspects and the need for feed-back between wet and in silico work to optimize this biotransformation.

  7. Production of L-carnitine by secondary metabolism of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Vicente; Sevilla, Angel; Cánovas, Manuel; Iborra, José L

    2007-10-02

    The increasing commercial demand for L-carnitine has led to a multiplication of efforts to improve its production with bacteria. The use of different cell environments, such as growing, resting, permeabilized, dried, osmotically stressed, freely suspended and immobilized cells, to maintain enzymes sufficiently active for L-carnitine production is discussed in the text. The different cell states of enterobacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Proteus sp., which can be used to produce L-carnitine from crotonobetaine or D-carnitine as substrate, are analyzed. Moreover, the combined application of both bioprocess and metabolic engineering has allowed a deeper understanding of the main factors controlling the production process, such as energy depletion and the alteration of the acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio which are coupled to the end of the biotransformation. Furthermore, the profiles of key central metabolic activities such as the TCA cycle, the glyoxylate shunt and the acetate metabolism are seen to be closely interrelated and affect the biotransformation efficiency. Although genetically modified strains have been obtained, new strain improvement strategies are still needed, especially in Escherichia coli as a model organism for molecular biology studies. This review aims to summarize and update the state of the art in L-carnitine production using E. coli and Proteus sp, emphasizing the importance of proper reactor design and operation strategies, together with metabolic engineering aspects and the need for feed-back between wet and in silico work to optimize this biotransformation.

  8. Disentangling metabolic functions of bacteria in the honey bee gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Kešnerová

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is presently unclear how much individual community members contribute to the overall metabolic output of a gut microbiota. To address this question, we used the honey bee, which harbors a relatively simple and remarkably conserved gut microbiota with striking parallels to the mammalian system and importance for bee health. Using untargeted metabolomics, we profiled metabolic changes in gnotobiotic bees that were colonized with the complete microbiota reconstituted from cultured strains. We then determined the contribution of individual community members in mono-colonized bees and recapitulated our findings using in vitro cultures. Our results show that the honey bee gut microbiota utilizes a wide range of pollen-derived substrates, including flavonoids and outer pollen wall components, suggesting a key role for degradation of recalcitrant secondary plant metabolites and pollen digestion. In turn, multiple species were responsible for the accumulation of organic acids and aromatic compound degradation intermediates. Moreover, a specific gut symbiont, Bifidobacterium asteroides, stimulated the production of host hormones known to impact bee development. While we found evidence for cross-feeding interactions, approximately 80% of the identified metabolic changes were also observed in mono-colonized bees, with Lactobacilli being responsible for the largest share of the metabolic output. These results show that, despite prolonged evolutionary associations, honey bee gut bacteria can independently establish and metabolize a wide range of compounds in the gut. Our study reveals diverse bacterial functions that are likely to contribute to bee health and provide fundamental insights into how metabolic activities are partitioned within gut communities.

  9. Systems biology and metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for improved fermented foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flahaut, N.A.L.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have long been used in industrial dairy and other food fermentations that make use of their metabolic activities leading to products with specific organoleptic properties. Metabolic engineering is a rational approach to steer fermentations toward the production of desired

  10. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including...... the interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods...... for manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  11. VISCOSITY DICTATES METABOLIC ACTIVITY of Vibrio ruber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja eBoric

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment.

  12. Viscosity dictates metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment. PMID:22826705

  13. Programmed evolution for optimization of orthogonal metabolic output in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd T Eckdahl

    Full Text Available Current use of microbes for metabolic engineering suffers from loss of metabolic output due to natural selection. Rather than combat the evolution of bacterial populations, we chose to embrace what makes biological engineering unique among engineering fields - evolving materials. We harnessed bacteria to compute solutions to the biological problem of metabolic pathway optimization. Our approach is called Programmed Evolution to capture two concepts. First, a population of cells is programmed with DNA code to enable it to compute solutions to a chosen optimization problem. As analog computers, bacteria process known and unknown inputs and direct the output of their biochemical hardware. Second, the system employs the evolution of bacteria toward an optimal metabolic solution by imposing fitness defined by metabolic output. The current study is a proof-of-concept for Programmed Evolution applied to the optimization of a metabolic pathway for the conversion of caffeine to theophylline in E. coli. Introduced genotype variations included strength of the promoter and ribosome binding site, plasmid copy number, and chaperone proteins. We constructed 24 strains using all combinations of the genetic variables. We used a theophylline riboswitch and a tetracycline resistance gene to link theophylline production to fitness. After subjecting the mixed population to selection, we measured a change in the distribution of genotypes in the population and an increased conversion of caffeine to theophylline among the most fit strains, demonstrating Programmed Evolution. Programmed Evolution inverts the standard paradigm in metabolic engineering by harnessing evolution instead of fighting it. Our modular system enables researchers to program bacteria and use evolution to determine the combination of genetic control elements that optimizes catabolic or anabolic output and to maintain it in a population of cells. Programmed Evolution could be used for applications in

  14. Programmed evolution for optimization of orthogonal metabolic output in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckdahl, Todd T; Campbell, A Malcolm; Heyer, Laurie J; Poet, Jeffrey L; Blauch, David N; Snyder, Nicole L; Atchley, Dustin T; Baker, Erich J; Brown, Micah; Brunner, Elizabeth C; Callen, Sean A; Campbell, Jesse S; Carr, Caleb J; Carr, David R; Chadinha, Spencer A; Chester, Grace I; Chester, Josh; Clarkson, Ben R; Cochran, Kelly E; Doherty, Shannon E; Doyle, Catherine; Dwyer, Sarah; Edlin, Linnea M; Evans, Rebecca A; Fluharty, Taylor; Frederick, Janna; Galeota-Sprung, Jonah; Gammon, Betsy L; Grieshaber, Brandon; Gronniger, Jessica; Gutteridge, Katelyn; Henningsen, Joel; Isom, Bradley; Itell, Hannah L; Keffeler, Erica C; Lantz, Andrew J; Lim, Jonathan N; McGuire, Erin P; Moore, Alexander K; Morton, Jerrad; Nakano, Meredith; Pearson, Sara A; Perkins, Virginia; Parrish, Phoebe; Pierson, Claire E; Polpityaarachchige, Sachith; Quaney, Michael J; Slattery, Abagael; Smith, Kathryn E; Spell, Jackson; Spencer, Morgan; Taye, Telavive; Trueblood, Kamay; Vrana, Caroline J; Whitesides, E Tucker

    2015-01-01

    Current use of microbes for metabolic engineering suffers from loss of metabolic output due to natural selection. Rather than combat the evolution of bacterial populations, we chose to embrace what makes biological engineering unique among engineering fields - evolving materials. We harnessed bacteria to compute solutions to the biological problem of metabolic pathway optimization. Our approach is called Programmed Evolution to capture two concepts. First, a population of cells is programmed with DNA code to enable it to compute solutions to a chosen optimization problem. As analog computers, bacteria process known and unknown inputs and direct the output of their biochemical hardware. Second, the system employs the evolution of bacteria toward an optimal metabolic solution by imposing fitness defined by metabolic output. The current study is a proof-of-concept for Programmed Evolution applied to the optimization of a metabolic pathway for the conversion of caffeine to theophylline in E. coli. Introduced genotype variations included strength of the promoter and ribosome binding site, plasmid copy number, and chaperone proteins. We constructed 24 strains using all combinations of the genetic variables. We used a theophylline riboswitch and a tetracycline resistance gene to link theophylline production to fitness. After subjecting the mixed population to selection, we measured a change in the distribution of genotypes in the population and an increased conversion of caffeine to theophylline among the most fit strains, demonstrating Programmed Evolution. Programmed Evolution inverts the standard paradigm in metabolic engineering by harnessing evolution instead of fighting it. Our modular system enables researchers to program bacteria and use evolution to determine the combination of genetic control elements that optimizes catabolic or anabolic output and to maintain it in a population of cells. Programmed Evolution could be used for applications in energy

  15. Engineering metabolic highways in Lactococci and other lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used in industrial food fermentations and are receiving increased attention for use as cell factories for the production of food and pharmaceutical products. Glycolytic conversion of sugars into lactic acid is the main metabolic highway in these Gram-positive

  16. Interventions on Metabolism: Making Antibiotic-Susceptible Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Baquero

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics act on bacterial metabolism, and antibiotic resistance involves changes in this metabolism. Interventions on metabolism with drugs might therefore modify drug susceptibility and drug resistance. In their recent article, Martin Vestergaard et al. (mBio 8:e01114-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01114-17 illustrate the possibility of converting intrinsically resistant bacteria into susceptible ones. They reported that inhibition of a central metabolic enzyme, ATP synthase, allows otherwise ineffective polymyxin antibiotics to act on Staphylococcus aureus. The study of the intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens has shown that several metabolic genes, including multigene transcriptional regulators, contribute to antibiotic resistance. In some cases, these genes only marginally increase antibiotic resistance, but reduced levels of susceptibility might be critical in the evolution or resistance under low antibiotic concentrations or in the clinical response of highly resistant bacteria. Drug interventions on bacterial metabolism might constitute a critical adjuvant therapy in combination with antibiotics to ensure susceptibility of pathogens with intrinsic or acquired antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Cholesterol-Lowering Potentials of Lactic Acid Bacteria Based on Bile-Salt Hydrolase Activity and Effect of Potent Strains on Cholesterol Metabolism In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chih Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study collected different probiotic isolates from animal and plant sources to evaluate the bile-salt hydrolase activity of probiotics in vitro. The deconjugation potential of bile acid was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 cells were cultured with probiotic strains with high BSH activity. The triglyceride (TG and apolipoprotein B (apo B secretion by HepG2 cells were evaluated. Our results show that the BSH activity and bile-acid deconjugation abilities of Pediococcus acidilactici NBHK002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis NBHK006, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NBHK007, and Lactobacillus acidophilus NBHK008 were higher than those of the other probiotic strains. The cholesterol concentration in cholesterol micelles was reduced within 24 h. NBHK007 reduced the TG secretion by 100% after 48 h of incubation. NBHK002, NBHK006, and NBHK007 could reduce apo B secretion by 33%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The product PROBIO S-23 produced a greater decrease in the total concentration of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, TG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance in the serum or livers of hamsters with hypercholesterolemia compared with that of hamsters fed with a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. These results show that the three probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria are better candidates for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  18. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY OF GALACTOSIDE TRANSPORT AND METABOLISM IN LACTIC-ACID BACTERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B

    1993-01-01

    Until a few years ago the description of the pathways of transport and metabolism of galactosides in lactic acid bacteria was mainly phenomenological. Different transport and enzymatic activities had been detected but the individual components (proteins, enzymes) were largely unknown and the genes

  19. Recent insight into oligosaccharide uptake and metabolism in probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou Hachem, Maher; Andersen, Joakim Mark; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a plethora of studies have demonstrated the paramount physiological importance of the gut microbiota on various aspects of human health and development. Particular focus has been set on probiotic members of this community, the best studied of which are assigned into the Lactobaci......In recent years, a plethora of studies have demonstrated the paramount physiological importance of the gut microbiota on various aspects of human health and development. Particular focus has been set on probiotic members of this community, the best studied of which are assigned...... into the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium genera. Effects such as pathogen exclusion, alleviation of inflammation and allergies, colon cancer, and other bowel disorders are attributed to the activity of probiotic bacteria, which selectively ferment prebiotics comprising mainly non-digestible oligosaccharides. Thus......, glycan metabolism is an important attribute of probiotic action and a factor influencing the composition of the gut microbiota. In the quest to understand the molecular mechanism of this selectivity for certain glycans, we have explored the routes of uptake and utilization of a variety...

  20. Antagonism correlates with metabolic similarity in diverse bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, Jakob; Røder, Henriette L; Madsen, Jonas S; Burmølle, Mette; Sørensen, Søren J

    2017-10-03

    In the Origin of Species , Charles R. Darwin [Darwin C (1859) On the Origin of Species ] proposed that the struggle for existence must be most intense among closely related species by means of their functional similarity. It has been hypothesized that this similarity, which results in resource competition, is the driver of the evolution of antagonism among bacteria. Consequently, antagonism should mostly be prevalent among phylogenetically and metabolically similar species. We tested the hypothesis by screening for antagonism among all possible pairwise interactions between 67 bacterial species from 8 different environments: 2,211 pairs of species and 4,422 interactions. We found a clear association between antagonism and phylogenetic distance, antagonism being most likely among closely related species. We determined two metabolic distances between our strains: one by scoring their growth on various natural carbon sources and the other by creating metabolic networks of predicted genomes. For both metabolic distances, we found that the probability of antagonism increased the more metabolically similar the strains were. Moreover, our results were not compounded by whether the antagonism was between sympatric or allopatric strains. Intriguingly, for each interaction the antagonizing strain was more likely to have a wider metabolic niche than the antagonized strain: that is, larger metabolic networks and growth on more carbon sources. This indicates an association between an antagonistic and a generalist strategy.

  1. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-04

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis.

  2. Enhancing flora balance in the gastrointestinal tract of mice by lactic acid bacteria from Chinese sourdough and enzyme activities indicative of metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate by the flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Yu, Xiaomin; Wu, Yaoping; Chen, Xingxing; Wei, Hua; Shah, Nagendra P; Xu, Feng

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of administration of 5 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from traditional Chinese sourdough on the flora balance of gastrointestinal tract of mice. We specifically measured Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Bacteroides, and Lactobacillus by plate count and real-time PCR methods, and α-glucosidase, lactate dehydrogenase, esterase, and aminopeptidase activities as indicative of metabolism of sugar, fat, and protein from LAB isolated from feces of mice in vitro. The results showed that administration of Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201 and Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 lowered the uricacid index of serum. Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201, L. fermentum LFE0302, as well as Lactobacillus curvatus LCU0401 administration resulted in a reduction in the opportunistic pathogens (i.e., Enterococcus and Enterobacter), meanwhile, administration of L. fermentum LFE0302 and Lactobacillus sp. ULA0104 resulted in an increase in the counts of Lactobacillus. Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 administration increased starch digestion of intestinal flora after 4wk of feeding and also resulted in increased α-glucosidase activity in the intestinal flora after 3wk of feeding. We found a similar trend in esterase activity after administration of L. acidophilus LAC0201 for 3wk. Hence, our study suggested that LAB from Chinese sourdough might be used as potential probiotics to strengthen the flora balance in gastrointestinal tract and positively change the metabolism of nutrients through bacterial enzyme activities. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of Metabolically Active Bacteria in the Gut of the Generalist Spodoptera littoralis via DNA Stable Isotope Probing Using 13C-Glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Yongqi; Arias-Cordero, Erika M; Boland, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Guts of most insects are inhabited by complex communities of symbiotic nonpathogenic bacteria. Within such microbial communities it is possible to identify commensal or mutualistic bacteria species. The latter ones, have been observed to serve multiple functions to the insect, i.e. helping in insect reproduction1, boosting the immune response2, pheromone production3, as well as nutrition, including the synthesis of essential amino acids4, among others.    

  4. Relations between active bacteria and heterotrophic potential in the sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of heterotrophic substrate uptake and turnover rates of water-soluble substances suggest that these parameters are closely related to the degree of eutrophication of a water body. Respiration ratios (i.e. the respired fraction of the gross uptake) of organic substances by heterotrophic bacteria seem to be very similar under different conditions. The efficiency of incorporation is considerably higher than in other organisms (e.g. 44% for aspartic acid, 72% for glucose). Organic substrates excreted by phytoplanktonic algae are a food source for the heterotrophs. Autoradiographic experiments demonstrate that mainly heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the substrate uptake from the water, though common and dominant algal species in brackish water also show slight substrate uptake even at nearly natural substrate concentrations (30 μg C l -1 ). Free living bacteria, not forming colonies on routine agar media but actively metabolizing organic substrates, are predominant inhabitants of offshore marine regions. Average annual numbers of active bacteria in the western Baltic vary from 945000 ml -1 in polluted inshore to 450 000 ml -1 in unpolluted offshore waters. In summer up to 56% of the total bacterial flora is metabolically active, whereas in winter sometimes only about 10% shows detectable substrate uptake in autoradiographic experiments. Colony forming bacteria range from 0.01% to 12.5% of the actively metabolizing bacterial population. The predominant active bacterial flora is well-adapted to the seasonal changes of water temperature and the uptake velocity of tritiated substrates is correlated with the number of active cells. (Auth.)

  5. Silver enhances antibiotic activity against gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morones-Ramirez, J Ruben; Winkler, Jonathan A; Spina, Catherine S; Collins, James J

    2013-06-19

    A declining pipeline of clinically useful antibiotics has made it imperative to develop more effective antimicrobial therapies, particularly against difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogens. Silver has been used as an antimicrobial since antiquity, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. We show that silver disrupts multiple bacterial cellular processes, including disulfide bond formation, metabolism, and iron homeostasis. These changes lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased membrane permeability of Gram-negative bacteria that can potentiate the activity of a broad range of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria in different metabolic states, as well as restore antibiotic susceptibility to a resistant bacterial strain. We show both in vitro and in a mouse model of urinary tract infection that the ability of silver to induce oxidative stress can be harnessed to potentiate antibiotic activity. Additionally, we demonstrate in vitro and in two different mouse models of peritonitis that silver sensitizes Gram-negative bacteria to the Gram-positive-specific antibiotic vancomycin, thereby expanding the antibacterial spectrum of this drug. Finally, we used silver and antibiotic combinations in vitro to eradicate bacterial persister cells, and show both in vitro and in a mouse biofilm infection model that silver can enhance antibacterial action against bacteria that produce biofilms. This work shows that silver can be used to enhance the action of existing antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria, thus strengthening the antibiotic arsenal for fighting bacterial infections.

  6. Efflux systems in bacteria and their metabolic engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher M; Hernández Lozada, Néstor J; Pfleger, Brian F

    2015-11-01

    The production of valuable chemicals from metabolically engineered microbes can be limited by excretion from the cell. Efflux is often overlooked as a bottleneck in metabolic pathways, despite its impact on alleviating feedback inhibition and product toxicity. In the past, it has been assumed that endogenous efflux pumps and membrane porins can accommodate product efflux rates; however, there are an increasing number of examples wherein overexpressing efflux systems is required to improve metabolite production. In this review, we highlight specific examples from the literature where metabolite export has been studied to identify unknown transporters, increase tolerance to metabolites, and improve the production capabilities of engineered bacteria. The review focuses on the export of a broad spectrum of valuable chemicals including amino acids, sugars, flavins, biofuels, and solvents. The combined set of examples supports the hypothesis that efflux systems can be identified and engineered to confer export capabilities on industrially relevant microbes.

  7. Antioxidant activity of Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Fino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associated bacteria living on macroalgae surfaces are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites with biological activities. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine algae Sphaerococcus coronopifolius and the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of the bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1 extraction. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbent capacity (ORAC. The extracts with higher antioxidant activity were tested on MCF-7 and HepG-2 cell lines in oxidative stress conditions induced by H2O2 at 0.2 mM and 0.5 mM, respectively. In total were isolated 21 Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria and identified as Vibrio sp. (28.57%, Shewanella sp. (23.81%, Pseudoalteromonas sp. (19.05%, Bacillus sp. (9.52% and Halomonas sp. (9.52%. Two (9.52% of them presented less than 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST match. The epiphytic bacteria with the most antioxidant potential evaluated by ORAC and DPPH methods were Sp2, Sp12, Sp23, Sp25 and Sp27. The strain Sp4 show high antioxidant activity in all antioxidant methods (ORAC, DPPH and TPC. In oxidative stress conditions on MCF-7 cell line, the extracts of bacteria (1mg.ml-1: 24hours Sp4 (16.15%, Sp25 (17.95% and Sp27 (10.65% prevented the cell death induced by H2O2. In the HepG-2 cell line was the extracts of Sp2 (9.01%, Sp4 (11.21%, Sp12 (7.20% and Sp23 (8.81% bacteria that high prevented the oxidative stress condition induced by H2O2. In conclusion, the Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria can be an interesting and excellent source of marine natural compounds with antioxidant activity.

  8. The Role of Colonic Bacteria in the Metabolism of the Natural Isoflavone Daidzin to Equol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rafii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavones are found in leguminous plants, especially soybeans. They have a structural similarity to natural estrogens, which enables them to bind to estrogen receptors and elicit biological activities similar to natural estrogens. They have been suggested to be beneficial for the prevention and therapy of hormone-dependent diseases. After soy products are consumed, the bacteria of the intestinal microflora metabolize isoflavones to metabolites with altered absorption, bioavailability, and estrogenic characteristics. Variations in the effect of soy products have been correlated with the isoflavone metabolites found in plasma and urine samples of the individuals consuming soy products. The beneficial effects of the soy isoflavone daidzin, the glycoside of daidzein, have been reported in individuals producing equol, a reduction product of daidzein produced by specific colonic bacteria in individuals called equol producers. These individuals comprise 30% and 60% of populations consuming Western and soy-rich Asian diets, respectively. Since the higher percentage of equol producers in populations consuming soy-rich diets is correlated with a lower incidence of hormone-dependent diseases, considerable efforts have been made to detect the specific colonic bacteria involved in the metabolism of daidzein to the more estrogenic compound, equol, which should facilitate the investigation of the metabolic activities related to this compound.

  9. Production of L-carnitine by secondary metabolism of bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bernal, Vicente; Sevilla, Ángel; Cánovas, Manuel; Iborra, José L

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The increasing commercial demand for L-carnitine has led to a multiplication of efforts to improve its production with bacteria. The use of different cell environments, such as growing, resting, permeabilized, dried, osmotically stressed, freely suspended and immobilized cells, to maintain enzymes sufficiently active for L-carnitine production is discussed in the text. The different cell states of enterobacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Proteus sp., which can be used to produce ...

  10. Activation of Acetone and Other Simple Ketones in Anaerobic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Johann; Schühle, Karola; Frey, Jasmin; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Acetone and other ketones are activated for subsequent degradation through carboxylation by many nitrate-reducing, phototrophic, and obligately aerobic bacteria. Acetone carboxylation leads to acetoacetate, which is subsequently activated to a thioester and degraded via thiolysis. Two different types of acetone carboxylases have been described, which require either 2 or 4 ATP equivalents as an energy supply for the carboxylation reaction. Both enzymes appear to combine acetone enolphosphate with carbonic phosphate to form acetoacetate. A similar but more complex enzyme is known to carboxylate the aromatic ketone acetophenone, a metabolic intermediate in anaerobic ethylbenzene metabolism in denitrifying bacteria, with simultaneous hydrolysis of 2 ATP to 2 ADP. Obligately anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria activate acetone to a four-carbon compound as well, but via a different process than bicarbonate- or CO2-dependent carboxylation. The present evidence indicates that either carbon monoxide or a formyl residue is used as a cosubstrate, and that the overall ATP expenditure of this pathway is substantially lower than in the known acetone carboxylase reactions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. A metabolic pathway for catabolizing levulinic acid in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, Jacqueline M.; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Clark, Ryan L.; Thiede, Joshua M.; Mehrer, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms can catabolize a wide range of organic compounds and therefore have the potential to perform many industrially relevant bioconversions. One barrier to realizing the potential of biorefining strategies lies in our incomplete knowledge of metabolic pathways, including those that can be used to assimilate naturally abundant or easily generated feedstocks. For instance, levulinic acid (LA) is a carbon source that is readily obtainable as a dehydration product of lignocellulosic biomass and can serve as the sole carbon source for some bacteria. Yet, the genetics and structure of LA catabolism have remained unknown. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a seven-gene operon that enables LA catabolism in Pseudomonas putida KT2440. When the pathway was reconstituted with purified proteins, we observed the formation of four acyl-CoA intermediates, including a unique 4-phosphovaleryl-CoA and the previously observed 3-hydroxyvaleryl-CoA product. Using adaptive evolution, we obtained a mutant of Escherichia coli LS5218 with functional deletions of fadE and atoC that was capable of robust growth on LA when it expressed the five enzymes from the P. putida operon. Here, this discovery will enable more efficient use of biomass hydrolysates and metabolic engineering to develop bioconversions using LA as a feedstock.

  12. Comparison of cell-specific activity between free-living and attached bacteria using isolates and natural assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, H.P.; Tang, K.W.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Marine snow aggregates are microbial hotspots that support high bacterial abundance and activities. We conducted laboratory experiments to compare cell-specific bacterial protein production (BPP) and protease activity between free-living and attached bacteria. Natural bacterial assemblages attached...... bacteria increasing their metabolism upon attachment to surfaces. In subsequent experiments, we used four strains of marine snow bacteria isolates to test the hypothesis that bacteria could up- and down-regulate their metabolism while on and off an aggregate. The protease activity of attached bacteria...

  13. Analysis of metabolic activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeast in model kefirs made from goat’s milk and mixtures of goat’s milk with mare’s milk based on changes in electrical conductivity and impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Cais-Sokolińska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the metabolic activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeast based of changes in electrical conductivity and electrical impedance during fermentation of goat milk and mixtures of goat’s milk and mare’s milk (1:1, 1:2. As a result of fermentation, conductivity increased 1.4-fold. The conductivity of kefir prepared from goat and mare milk mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (6.210 Ω-3∙cm-1 was lower than that of the 1:1 mixture or of goat milk alone (7.242 Ω-3∙cm-1. A significant dependence of electrical conductivity and pH (0.970 ≤ r ≤ 0.993 was recorded during fermentation. The addition of mare milk to goat milk significantly slowed down the growth of LAB (Δλ = 0.8 h and yeasts during kefir production.

  14. ACTION OF SYNTHETIC DETERGENTS ON THE METABOLISM OF BACTERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Z; Harrison, R W; Miller, B F

    1941-01-31

    A study of the effects of synthetic detergents and wetting agents on respiration and glycolysis of Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms has led to the following conclusions. 1. All the cationic detergents studied are very effective inhibitors of bacterial metabolism at 1:3000 concentration, and several are equally active at 1:30,000. Few of the anionic detergents inhibit as effectively as the cationic compounds. 2. Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms are equally sensitive to the action of the cationic detergents. On the other hand, all the anionic detergents included in our studies selectively inhibit the metabolism of Gram-positive microorganisms. 3. The inhibitory action of both types of detergents is influenced markedly by hydrogen ion concentration. Cationic detergents exhibit their maximum activity in the alkaline pH range, and the anionic, in the acid range. 4. Studies of homologous series of straight chain alkyl sulfates and sulfoacetates (C(8) to C(18)) demonstrate that maximum inhibition is exerted by the 12, 14, and 16 carbon compounds (lauryl, myristyl, and cetyl). 5. It has been observed that three lauryl esters of amino acids are powerful inhibitors of bacterial metabolism. To our knowledge, the effects on bacterial metabolism of such cationic detergents (without the quaternary ammonium structure) have not been studied previously. Our results demonstrate that other cationic detergents can exhibit an inhibitory activity comparable to quaternary ammonium compounds. 6. Certain detergents stimulate bacterial metabolism at concentrations lower than the inhibiting values. This effect has been found more frequently among the anionic detergents.

  15. Probiotic Bacteria for Healthier Aging: Immunomodulation and Metabolism of Phytoestrogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Landete

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related degeneration gives rise to a number of pathologies, many of them associated with imbalances of the microbiota and the gut-associated immune system. Thus, the intestine is considered a key target organ to improve the quality of life in senescence. Gut microbiota can have a powerful impact in the deterioration linked to aging by its nutritional and immunomodulatory activity. Reduced numbers of beneficial species and low microbial biodiversity in the elderly have been linked with pathogenesis of many diseases. A healthy lifestyle with an elderly customized diet including probiotics can contribute to reducing the chronic proinflammatory status and other age-related pathologies. Beneficial effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria to alleviate some of these disorders based on their immunomodulatory properties as well as their capacity to produce bioactive metabolites from dietary phytoestrogens are summarized. On one hand, the preservation of gut barrier integrity and an increased ability to fight infections are the main reported immune benefits of probiotics. On the other hand, the intake of a diet rich in phytoestrogens along with the presence of selected probiotic bacteria may lead to the production of equol, enterolignans, and urolithins, which are considered protective against chronic diseases related to aging.

  16. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...

  17. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic ...

  18. Expanded metabolic versatility of ubiquitous nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Albertsen, Mads; Kitzinger, Katharina; Herbold, Craig; Spieck, Eva; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2015-09-08

    Nitrospira are a diverse group of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and among the environmentally most widespread nitrifiers. However, they remain scarcely studied and mostly uncultured. Based on genomic and experimental data from Nitrospira moscoviensis representing the ubiquitous Nitrospira lineage II, we identified ecophysiological traits that contribute to the ecological success of Nitrospira. Unexpectedly, N. moscoviensis possesses genes coding for a urease and cleaves urea to ammonia and CO2. Ureolysis was not observed yet in nitrite oxidizers and enables N. moscoviensis to supply ammonia oxidizers lacking urease with ammonia from urea, which is fully nitrified by this consortium through reciprocal feeding. The presence of highly similar urease genes in Nitrospira lenta from activated sludge, in metagenomes from soils and freshwater habitats, and of other ureases in marine nitrite oxidizers, suggests a wide distribution of this extended interaction between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers, which enables nitrite-oxidizing bacteria to indirectly use urea as a source of energy. A soluble formate dehydrogenase lends additional ecophysiological flexibility and allows N. moscoviensis to use formate, with or without concomitant nitrite oxidation, using oxygen, nitrate, or both compounds as terminal electron acceptors. Compared with Nitrospira defluvii from lineage I, N. moscoviensis shares the Nitrospira core metabolism but shows substantial genomic dissimilarity including genes for adaptations to elevated oxygen concentrations. Reciprocal feeding and metabolic versatility, including the participation in different nitrogen cycling processes, likely are key factors for the niche partitioning, the ubiquity, and the high diversity of Nitrospira in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  19. Metabolic and spatio-taxonomic response of uncultivated seafloor bacteria following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, K. M.; Piceno, Y. M.; Hu, P.; Tom, L. M.; Mason, O. U.; Andersen, G. L.; Jansson, J. K.; Gilbert, J. A.

    2017-08-04

    The release of 700 million liters of oil into the Gulf of Mexico over a few months in 2010 produced dramatic changes in the microbial ecology of the water and sediment. Here, we reconstructed the genomes of 57 widespread uncultivated bacteria from post-spill deep-sea sediments, and recovered their gene expression pattern across the seafloor. These genomes comprised a common collection of bacteria that were enriched in heavily affected sediments around the wellhead. Although rare in distal sediments, some members were still detectable at sites up to 60 km away. Many of these genomes exhibited phylogenetic clustering indicative of common trait selection by the environment, and within half we identified 264 genes associated with hydrocarbon degradation. Alkane degradation ability was near ubiquitous among candidate hydrocarbon degraders, whereas just three harbored elaborate gene inventories for the degradation of alkanes and aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Differential gene expression profiles revealed a spill-promoted microbial sulfur cycle alongside gene upregulation associated with PAH degradation. Gene expression associated with alkane degradation was widespread, although active alkane degrader identities changed along the pollution gradient. Analyses suggest that a broad metabolic capacity to respond to oil inputs exists across a large array of usually rare indigenous deep-sea bacteria.

  20. [Effect of the medium redox potential on the growth and metabolism of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilian, A; Trchunian, A

    2008-01-01

    Based on the available literature data on a decrease in the redox potential of medium to low negative values and a decrease in pH during the growth of sugar-fermenting anaerobic bacteria, it was concluded that these processes cannot be described by the theory of redox potential. A theory was developed according to which the regulation of bacterial metabolism is accomplished through changes in the redox potential. The theory considers the redox potential as a factor determining the growth of anaerobic bacteria, which is regulated by oxidizers and reducers. The assumption is put forward that, under anaerobic conditions, bacteria are sensitive to changes in the redox potential and have a redox taxis. The effect of the redox potential on the transport of protons and other substances through membranes and the activity of membrane-bound enzymes, including the proton F1-F0-ATPase, whose mechanisms of action involve changes in the proton conductance of the membrane, the generation of proton-driving force, and dithiol-disulfide transitions in proteins was studied.

  1. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  2. Effect of radiation on activity of sulphate reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agaev, N.M.; Smorodin, A.E.; Gusejnov, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of γ-radiation on activity of sulphate reducing bacteria has been studied. Concentration of biogenic hydrogen, generated in the medium, is the main criterion, characterizing corrosion activity of the bacteria studied. The developed method of suppression of active development of sulfate reducing bacteria considerably reduces, and at lethal doses of γ-radiation eliminates altogether the bacteria activity and formation of the main corrosion agent-hydrogen sulphide-in the medium and that, in its turn, liquidates hydrogen sulphide corrosion

  3. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  4. Activity of abundant and rare bacteria in a coastal ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Barbara J; Yu, Liying; Heidelberg, John F; Kirchman, David L

    2011-08-02

    The surface layer of the oceans and other aquatic environments contains many bacteria that range in activity, from dormant cells to those with high rates of metabolism. However, little experimental evidence exists about the activity of specific bacterial taxa, especially rare ones. Here we explore the relationship between abundance and activity by documenting changes in abundance over time and by examining the ratio of 16S rRNA to rRNA genes (rDNA) of individual bacterial taxa. The V1-V2 region of 16S rRNA and rDNA was analyzed by tag pyrosequencing in a 3-y study of surface waters off the Delaware coast. Over half of the bacterial taxa actively cycled between abundant and rare, whereas about 12% always remained rare and potentially inactive. There was a significant correlation between the relative abundance of 16S rRNA and the relative abundance of 16S rDNA for most individual taxa. However, 16S rRNA:rDNA ratios were significantly higher in about 20% of the taxa when they were rare than when abundant. Relationships between 16S rRNA and rDNA frequencies were confirmed for five taxa by quantitative PCR. Our findings suggest that though abundance follows activity in the majority of the taxa, a significant portion of the rare community is active, with growth rates that decrease as abundance increases.

  5. Metabolic Interactions between Bacteria and Fungi in Commensal Oral Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Lof, Marloes; Janus, Marleen M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    2017-01-01

    Oral health is more than just the absence of disease. The key to oral health is a diverse microbiome in an ecological balance. The oral microbiota is one of the most complex and diverse microbial communities in the human body. To maintain oral health, balance between the human host and the intrinsic microorganisms is essential. The healthy oral cavity is represented by a great microbial diversity, including both bacteria and fungi. The bacterial microbiome is very well studied. In contrast, f...

  6. Metabolic and functional paths of lactic acid bacteria in plant foods: get out of the labyrinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco

    2018-02-01

    Even though lactic acid bacteria are only a small part of the plant autochthonous microbiota, they represent the most important microbes having the capability to promote significant changes in the health-promoting properties of plant foods. Owing to the variety of plant chemical components and the possible pathways for bioconversion, plant fermentation is like a metabolic labyrinth undertaken by bacteria. The winding metabolic pathways involve several secondary plant metabolites (e.g. phenolics). The success of these paths is connected to the adaptive growth and survival of lactic acid bacteria. A panel of various interacting omics approaches unraveled the specific traits of lactic acid bacteria to adapt to plants, which allow the optimal design of fermentation strategies for targeted raw matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Surface display for metabolic engineering of industrially important acetic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshal Blank

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid bacteria have unique metabolic characteristics that suit them for a variety of biotechnological applications. They possess an arsenal of membrane-bound dehydrogenases in the periplasmic space that are capable of regiospecific and enantioselective partial oxidations of sugars, alcohols, and polyols. The resulting products are deposited directly into the medium where they are easily recovered for use as pharmaceutical precursors, industrial chemicals, food additives, and consumer products. Expression of extracytoplasmic enzymes to augment the oxidative capabilities of acetic acid bacteria is desired but is challenging due to the already crowded inner membrane. To this end, an original surface display system was developed to express recombinant enzymes at the outer membrane of the model acetic acid bacterium Gluconobacter oxydans. Outer membrane porin F (OprF was used to deliver alkaline phosphatase (PhoA to the cell surface. Constitutive high-strength p264 and moderate-strength p452 promoters were used to direct expression of the surface display system. This system was demonstrated for biocatalysis in whole-cell assays with the p264 promoter having a twofold increase in PhoA activity compared to the p452 promoter. Proteolytic cleavage of PhoA from the cell surface confirmed proper delivery to the outer membrane. Furthermore, a linker library was constructed to optimize surface display. A rigid (EAAAK1 linker led to the greatest improvement, increasing PhoA activity by 69%. This surface display system could be used both to extend the capabilities of acetic acid bacteria in current biotechnological processes, and to broaden the potential of these microbes in the production of value-added products.

  8. Genetics of mesophilic citrate metabolizing lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David, S.

    1992-01-01

    A prerequisite for the stabilization of important features, such as aroma production, in starter strains used in dairy fermentations, is an extensive knowledge of the genetic basis of these properties. In this thesis the genetic basis of citrate metabolism in Lactococcus

  9. Metabolic Engineering and Modeling of Metabolic Pathways to Improve Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Navid, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-19

    Rising energy demands and the imperative to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are driving research on biofuels development. Hydrogen gas (H2) is one of the most promising biofuels and is seen as a future energy carrier by virtue of the fact that 1) it is renewable, 2) does not evolve the “greenhouse gas” CO2 in combustion, 3) liberates large amounts of energy per unit weight in combustion (having about 3 times the energy content of gasoline), and 4) is easily converted to electricity by fuel cells. Among the various bioenergy strategies, environmental groups and others say that the concept of the direct manufacture of alternative fuels, such as H2, by photosynthetic organisms is the only biofuel alternative without significant negative criticism [1]. Biological H2 production by photosynthetic microorganisms requires the use of a simple solar reactor such as a transparent closed box, with low energy requirements, and is considered as an attractive system to develop as a biocatalyst for H2 production [2]. Various purple bacteria including Rhodopseudomonas palustris, can utilize organic substrates as electron donors to produce H2 at the expense of solar energy. Because of the elimination of energy cost used for H2O oxidation and the prevention of the production of O2 that inhibits the H2-producing enzymes, the efficiency of light energy conversion to H2 by anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria is in principle much higher than that by green algae or cyanobacteria, and is regarded as one of the most promising cultures for biological H2 production [3]. Here implemented a simple and relatively straightforward strategy for hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms using sunlight, sulfur- or iron-based inorganic substrates, and CO2 as the feedstock. Carefully selected microorganisms with bioengineered beneficial

  10. Metabolic gene-targeted monitoring of non-starter lactic acid bacteria during cheese ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levante, Alessia; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Gatti, Monica; Neviani, Erasmo; Ercolini, Danilo; Lazzi, Camilla

    2017-09-18

    Long ripened cheeses, such as Grana Padano (GP), a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) Italian cheese, harbor a viable microbiota mainly composed of non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB), which contribute to the final characteristics of cheese. The NSLAB species Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lb. casei and Lb. paracasei are frequently found in GP, and form a closely related taxonomic group (Lb. casei group), making it difficult to distinguish the three species through 16S rRNA sequencing. SpxB, a metabolic gene coding for pyruvate oxidase in Lb. casei group, was recently used to distinguish the species within this bacterial group, both in pure cultures and in cheese, where it could provide an alternative energy source through the conversion of pyruvate to acetate. The aim of this work was to study the evolution of the metabolically active microbiota during different stages of GP ripening, targeting 16S rRNA to describe the whole microbiota composition, and spxB gene to monitor the biodiversity within the Lb. casei group. Furthermore, activation of pyruvate oxidase pathway was measured directly in cheese by reverse transcription real time PCR (RT-qPCR). The results showed that Lb. casei group dominates throughout the ripening and high-throughput sequencing of spxB allowed to identify four clusters inside the Lb. casei group. The dynamics of the sequence types forming the clusters were followed during ripening. Pyruvate oxidase pathway was expressed in cheese, showing a decreasing trend over ripening time. This work highlights how the composition of the microbiota in the early manufacturing stages influences the microbial dynamics throughout ripening, and how targeting of a metabolic gene can provide an insight into the activity of strains relevant for dairy products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of preparations after combined cultivation of lactic acid bacteria and yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabekyan, Ts R; Karapetyan, K J; Khachatryan, T V; Khachatryan, G E; Tatikyan, S Sh

    2018-03-30

    Use of antimicrobials in both human and animal populations over the past several decades has led to the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria populations that are resistant to many commercially available drugs. For example, acquired resistance to first-line antimicrobial agents increasingly complicates the management of extra-intestinal infections due to Escherichia coli, which are a major source of illness and death. The continued development of new classes of natural antimicrobial agents, possessing antibacterial activity, has become of increasing importance for medicine and veterinary. So, selection of lactic acid bacteria and yeast strains for their combined cultivation with the aim of increasing of the activity is topical. It was shown that during combined cultivation of the lactic acid bacteria with probiotic properties and yeast strains, antimicrobial activity depends on the genus and species to which the strain of lactic acid bacteria and yeast belongs. They inhibited the growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria with better efficiency. Increasing of the antimicrobial activity can be explained by the synergetic effect of products of cultures metabolism and by interaction between lactic acid bacteria cells with the cell wall of yeasts. Our data showed perspectives of combined cultivation of yeast and lactic acid bacteria for creation of a new class of antimicrobial preparations with high antibacterial activity and broad spectrum of action. Preparation can be recommended for treatment of animals. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Technical note: fatty acids and purine profile of cecum and colon bacteria as indicators of equine microbial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A S; Jerónimo, E; Ferreira, L M; Rodrigues, M A M; Bessa, R J B

    2013-04-01

    The potential use of odd- and branched-chain fatty acids (OBCFA) and purine bases (PB) as microbial markers in the equine hindgut was studied. For this purpose, feed particles adherent bacteria [solid associated bacteria (SAB)] and planktonic bacteria [liquid associated bacteria (PAB)] were isolated from total cecum and colon contents of 8 healthy, crossbred horses (9 ± 3 yr). Horses were fasted for 12 to 15 h before slaughter, and the cecum and colon were identified and clamped in their extremities to avoid mixing of digesta contents. The total cecum or colon contents was collected into thermal containers previously filled with CO2, immediately transported to the laboratory, and subjected to separation of solid and liquid phases to obtain bacterial PAB and SAB pellets from each horse. Overall differences observed were mainly between site of bacterial collection (cecum vs. colon) rather than between type of bacterial population (PAB vs. SAB). Cecal bacteria fraction had greater (P indicated that the composition of cecal and colon bacteria is very different from that of similar ecosystems (e.g., rumen). These differences can be a reflection of different growth stages or nutrition of particular populations as well as different bacterial metabolic activities. Results presented herein provide evidence that PB and fatty acids can be used as microbial markers in equine studies.

  13. Influence of different anoxic time exposures on active biomass, protozoa and filamentous bacteria in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Perez, S; Fermoso, F G; Arnaiz, C

    Medium-sized wastewater treatment plants are considered too small to implement anaerobic digestion technologies and too large for extensive treatments. A promising option as a sewage sludge reduction method is the inclusion of anoxic time exposures. In the present study, three different anoxic time exposures of 12, 6 and 4 hours have been studied to reduce sewage sludge production. The best anoxic time exposure was observed under anoxic/oxic cycles of 6 hours, which reduced 29.63% of the biomass production compared with the oxic control conditions. The sludge under different anoxic time exposures, even with a lower active biomass concentration than the oxic control conditions, showed a much higher metabolic activity than the oxic control conditions. Microbiological results suggested that both protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria decrease under anoxic time exposures compared to oxic control conditions. The anoxic time exposures 6/6 showed the highest reduction in both protozoa density, 37.5%, and abundance of filamentous bacteria, 41.1%, in comparison to the oxic control conditions. The groups of crawling ciliates, carnivorous ciliates and filamentous bacteria were highly influenced by the anoxic time exposures. Protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria have been shown as promising bioindicators of biomass production reduction.

  14. Why Do Fast-Growing Bacteria Enter Overflow Metabolism? Testing the Membrane Real Estate Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szenk, Mariola; Dill, Ken A; de Graff, Adam M R

    2017-08-23

    Bacteria and other cells show a puzzling behavior. At high growth rates, E. coli switch from respiration (which is ATP-efficient) to using fermentation for additional ATP (which is inefficient). This overflow metabolism results in a several-fold decrease in ATP produced per glucose molecule provided as food. By integrating diverse types of experimental data into a simple biophysical model, we give evidence that this onset is the result of the membrane real estate hypothesis: Fast growth drives cells to be bigger, reducing their surface-to-volume ratios. This decreases the membrane area available for respiratory proteins despite growing demand, causing increased crowding. Only when respiratory proteins reach their crowding limit does the cell activate fermentation, since fermentation allows faster ATP production per unit membrane area. Surface limitation thus creates a Pareto trade-off between membrane efficiency and ATP yield that links metabolic choice to the size and shape of a bacterial cell. By exploring the predictions that emerge from this trade-off, we show how consideration of molecular structures, energetics, rates, and equilibria can provide important insight into cellular behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermodynamic and Probabilistic Metabolic Control Analysis of Riboflavin (Vitamin B₂) Biosynthesis in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenmeier, Markus; Mack, Matthias; Röder, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we applied a coupled in silico thermodynamic and probabilistic metabolic control analysis methodology to investigate the control mechanisms of the commercially relevant riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in bacteria. Under the investigated steady-state conditions, we found that several enzyme reactions of the pathway operate far from thermodynamic equilibrium (transformed Gibbs energies of reaction below about -17 kJ mol(-1)). Using the obtained thermodynamic information and applying enzyme elasticity sampling, we calculated the distributions of the scaled concentration control coefficients (CCCs) and scaled flux control coefficients (FCCs). From the statistical analysis of the calculated distributions, we inferred that the control over the riboflavin producing flux is shared among several enzyme activities and mostly resides in the initial reactions of the pathway. More precisely, the guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase II activity, and therefore the bifunctional RibA protein of Bacillus subtilis because it catalyzes this activity, appears to mainly control the riboflavin producing flux (mean FCCs = 0.45 and 0.55, respectively). The GTP cyclohydrolase II activity and RibA also exert a high positive control over the riboflavin concentration (mean CCCs = 2.43 and 2.91, respectively). This prediction is consistent with previous findings for microbial riboflavin overproducing strains.

  16. Comparison of Nitrogen Oxide Metabolism among Diverse Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Jessica A; Kits, K Dimitri; Stein, Lisa Y

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have well characterized genes that encode and express nitrite reductases (NIR) and nitric oxide reductases (NOR). However, the connection between presence or absence of these and other genes for nitrogen transformations with the physiological production of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) has not been tested across AOB isolated from various trophic states, with diverse phylogeny, and with closed genomes. It is therefore unclear if genomic content for nitrogen oxide metabolism is predictive of net N2O production. Instantaneous microrespirometry experiments were utilized to measure NO and N2O emitted by AOB during active oxidation of ammonia (NH3) or hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and through a period of anoxia. This data was used in concert with genomic content and phylogeny to assess whether taxonomic factors were predictive of nitrogen oxide metabolism. Results showed that two oligotrophic AOB strains lacking annotated NOR-encoding genes released large quantities of NO and produced N2O abiologically at the onset of anoxia following NH3-oxidation. Furthermore, high concentrations of N2O were measured during active O2-dependent NH2OH oxidation by the two oligotrophic AOB in contrast to non-oligotrophic strains that only produced N2O at the onset of anoxia. Therefore, complete nitrifier denitrification did not occur in the two oligotrophic strains, but did occur in meso- and eutrophic strains, even in Nitrosomonas communis Nm2 that lacks an annotated NIR-encoding gene. Regardless of mechanism, all AOB strains produced measureable N2O under tested conditions. This work further confirms that AOB require NOR activity to enzymatically reduce NO to N2O in the nitrifier denitrification pathway, and also that abiotic reactions play an important role in N2O formation, in oligotrophic AOB lacking NOR activity.

  17. Sedentary activity associated with metabolic syndrome independent of physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bankoski, Andrea; Harris, Tamara B; McClain, James J

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the association between objectively measured sedentary activity and metabolic syndrome among older adults.......This study examined the association between objectively measured sedentary activity and metabolic syndrome among older adults....

  18. Phytase activity in rabbit cecal bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marounek, Milan; Břeňová, Natalia; Suchorská, O.; Mrázek, Jakub

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2009), s. 111-114 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/07/0673 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : rabbit * cecal bacteria Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 0.978, year: 2009

  19. One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT

    One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Life on earth is sustained by the constant cycling of six essential elements: oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorous,

  20. One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT

    One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Life on earth is sustained by the constant cycling of six essential elements: oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen,

  1. Genome-Scale Model of Streptococcus thermophilus LMG18311 for Metabolic Comparison of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastink, M.I.; Teusink, B.; Hols, P.; Visser, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this report we describe amino acid-metabolism and amino acid-dependency of the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus LMG18311 and compare that with two other characterized lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum. Through the construction of a genome-scale

  2. Metabolic and Community Synergy of Oral Bacteria in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin J. Flynn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The oral periodontopathic bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum has been repeatedly associated with colorectal tumors. Molecular analysis has identified specific virulence factors that promote tumorigenesis in the colon. However, other oral community members, such as members of the Porphyromonas spp., are also found with F. nucleatum on colonic tumors, and thus, narrow studies of individual pathogens do not take community-wide virulence properties into account. A broader view of oral bacterial physiology and pathogenesis identifies two factors that could promote colonization and persistence of oral bacterial communities in the colon. The polymicrobial nature of oral biofilms and the asaccharolytic metabolism of many of these species make them well suited to life in the microenvironment of colonic lesions. Consideration of these two factors offers a novel perspective on the role of oral microbiota in the initiation, development, and treatment of colorectal cancer.

  3. One carbon metabolism in SAR11 pelagic marine bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    Full Text Available The SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria are the most abundant heterotrophs in the oceans and are believed to play a major role in mineralizing marine dissolved organic carbon. Their genomes are among the smallest known for free-living heterotrophic cells, raising questions about how they successfully utilize complex organic matter with a limited metabolic repertoire. Here we show that conserved genes in SAR11 subgroup Ia (Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique genomes encode pathways for the oxidation of a variety of one-carbon compounds and methyl functional groups from methylated compounds. These pathways were predicted to produce energy by tetrahydrofolate (THF-mediated oxidation, but not to support the net assimilation of biomass from C1 compounds. Measurements of cellular ATP content and the oxidation of (14C-labeled compounds to (14CO(2 indicated that methanol, formaldehyde, methylamine, and methyl groups from glycine betaine (GBT, trimethylamine (TMA, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO, and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP were oxidized by axenic cultures of the SAR11 strain Ca. P. ubique HTCC1062. Analyses of metagenomic data showed that genes for C1 metabolism occur at a high frequency in natural SAR11 populations. In short term incubations, natural communities of Sargasso Sea microbial plankton expressed a potential for the oxidation of (14C-labeled formate, formaldehyde, methanol and TMAO that was similar to cultured SAR11 cells and, like cultured SAR11 cells, incorporated a much larger percentage of pyruvate and glucose (27-35% than of C1 compounds (2-6% into biomass. Collectively, these genomic, cellular and environmental data show a surprising capacity for demethylation and C1 oxidation in SAR11 cultures and in natural microbial communities dominated by SAR11, and support the conclusion that C1 oxidation might be a significant conduit by which dissolved organic carbon is recycled to CO(2 in the upper ocean.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty samples of traditional fermented milk “Raib” were collected in eastern Algeria from individual household. They were evaluated for the presence of autochthonous bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria. From 13 of these samples 52 strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated, and shown to exhibit inhibitory activity ...

  5. Antimicrobial activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from akamu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-16

    Jul 16, 2014 ... Key words: Bacteriocins, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), target organisms, antimicrobial activity. INTRODUCTION. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play essential roles in the fermentative production of many traditional foods. A wide variety of strains are routinely used as starter cultures in the manufacture of fermented ...

  6. Inhibition of Streptococcus gordonii Metabolic Activity in Biofilm by Cranberry Juice High-Molecular-Weight Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdish Babu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies demonstrated that a cranberry high-molecular-mass, nondialyzable material (NDM can inhibit adhesion of numerous species of bacteria and prevents bacterial coaggregation of bacterial pairs. Bacterial coaggregation leads to plaque formation leading to biofilm development on surfaces of oral cavity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of low concentrations of NDM on Streptococcus gordonii metabolic activity and biofilm formation on restorative dental surfaces. We found that the NDM selectively inhibited metabolic activity of S. gordonii, without affecting bacterial viability. Inhibiting the metabolic activity of bacteria in biofilm may benefit the health of the oral cavity.

  7. Simultaneous Fluorescent Gram Staining and Activity Assessment of Activated Sludge Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Scott; Snape, Jason R.; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M.; Porter, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Wastewater treatment is one of the most important commercial biotechnological processes, and yet the component bacterial populations and their associated metabolic activities are poorly understood. The novel fluorescent dye hexidium iodide allows assessment of Gram status by differential absorption through bacterial cell walls. Differentiation between gram-positive and gram-negative wastewater bacteria was achieved after flow cytometric analysis. This study shows that the relative proportions of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells identified by traditional microscopy and hexidium iodide staining were not significantly different. Dual staining of cells for Gram status and activity proved effective in analyzing mixtures of cultured bacteria and wastewater populations. Levels of highly active organisms at two wastewater treatment plants, both gram positive and gram negative, ranged from 1.5% in activated sludge flocs to 16% in the activated sludge fluid. Gram-positive organisms comprised Gram status and activity within activated sludge samples over a 4-day period showed significant differences over time. This method provides a rapid, quantitative measure of Gram status linked with in situ activity within wastewater systems. PMID:12324319

  8. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan

    2015-09-11

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6oC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μat the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 106 cells mL-1 and generally covaried with μbut, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μand K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. © FEMS 2015.

  9. Extremophile bacteria glycolipids: structure and biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    Carillo, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Extremophile bacteria are able to survive in harsh life conditions, such as high or low temperatures (thermophiles and psychrophiles, respectively), high pressure (barophiles), high or low pH values (acidophiles or alkalophiles), environments characterized by high salt concentrations (halophiles). Structural features of the macromolecules belonging to the external layer are fundamental in adaptation mechanisms, e.g. it is well known that halophiles membrane phospholipids showed an increase...

  10. Metabolic network modeling of redox balancing and biohydrogen production in purple nonsulfur bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grammel Hartmut

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purple nonsulfur bacteria (PNSB are facultative photosynthetic bacteria and exhibit an extremely versatile metabolism. A central focus of research on PNSB dealt with the elucidation of mechanisms by which they manage to balance cellular redox under diverse conditions, in particular under photoheterotrophic growth. Results Given the complexity of the central metabolism of PNSB, metabolic modeling becomes crucial for an integrated analysis of the accumulated biological knowledge. We reconstructed a stoichiometric model capturing the central metabolism of three important representatives of PNSB (Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Using flux variability analysis, the model reveals key metabolic constraints related to redox homeostasis in these bacteria. With the help of the model we can (i give quantitative explanations for non-intuitive, partially species-specific phenomena of photoheterotrophic growth of PNSB, (ii reproduce various quantitative experimental data, and (iii formulate several new hypotheses. For example, model analysis of photoheterotrophic growth reveals that - despite a large number of utilizable catabolic pathways - substrate-specific biomass and CO2 yields are fixed constraints, irrespective of the assumption of optimal growth. Furthermore, our model explains quantitatively why a CO2 fixing pathway such as the Calvin cycle is required by PNSB for many substrates (even if CO2 is released. We also analyze the role of other pathways potentially involved in redox metabolism and how they affect quantitatively the required capacity of the Calvin cycle. Our model also enables us to discriminate between different acetate assimilation pathways that were proposed recently for R. sphaeroides and R. rubrum, both lacking the isocitrate lyase. Finally, we demonstrate the value of the metabolic model also for potential biotechnological applications: we examine the theoretical

  11. Metabolic network modeling of redox balancing and biohydrogen production in purple nonsulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädicke, Oliver; Grammel, Hartmut; Klamt, Steffen

    2011-09-25

    Purple nonsulfur bacteria (PNSB) are facultative photosynthetic bacteria and exhibit an extremely versatile metabolism. A central focus of research on PNSB dealt with the elucidation of mechanisms by which they manage to balance cellular redox under diverse conditions, in particular under photoheterotrophic growth. Given the complexity of the central metabolism of PNSB, metabolic modeling becomes crucial for an integrated analysis of the accumulated biological knowledge. We reconstructed a stoichiometric model capturing the central metabolism of three important representatives of PNSB (Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas palustris). Using flux variability analysis, the model reveals key metabolic constraints related to redox homeostasis in these bacteria. With the help of the model we can (i) give quantitative explanations for non-intuitive, partially species-specific phenomena of photoheterotrophic growth of PNSB, (ii) reproduce various quantitative experimental data, and (iii) formulate several new hypotheses. For example, model analysis of photoheterotrophic growth reveals that--despite a large number of utilizable catabolic pathways--substrate-specific biomass and CO₂ yields are fixed constraints, irrespective of the assumption of optimal growth. Furthermore, our model explains quantitatively why a CO₂ fixing pathway such as the Calvin cycle is required by PNSB for many substrates (even if CO₂ is released). We also analyze the role of other pathways potentially involved in redox metabolism and how they affect quantitatively the required capacity of the Calvin cycle. Our model also enables us to discriminate between different acetate assimilation pathways that were proposed recently for R. sphaeroides and R. rubrum, both lacking the isocitrate lyase. Finally, we demonstrate the value of the metabolic model also for potential biotechnological applications: we examine the theoretical capabilities of PNSB for photoheterotrophic

  12. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims...... at describing strain-dependent effects of lactic acid bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactic acid bacteria affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon...... bacterial stimulation. Methods: CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from buffy coats by negative isolation using a lineage specific antibody cocktail and magnetic beads binding the labelling antibodies on non-NK cells. NK cells were incubated either with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated lactic acid bacteria or 10...

  13. Metabolism of Fructophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from the Apis mellifera L. Bee Gut: Phenolic Acids as External Electron Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Addante, Rocco; Pontonio, Erica; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) are strongly associated with the gastrointestinal tracts (GITs) of Apis mellifera L. worker bees due to the consumption of fructose as a major carbohydrate. Seventy-seven presumptive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from GITs of healthy A. mellifera L. adults, which were collected from 5 different geographical locations of the Apulia region of Italy. Almost all of the isolates showed fructophilic tendencies: these isolates were identified as Lactobacillus kunkeei (69%) or Fructobacillus fructosus (31%). A high-throughput phenotypic microarray targeting 190 carbon sources was used to determine that 83 compounds were differentially consumed. Phenotyping grouped the strains into two clusters, reflecting growth performance. The utilization of phenolic acids, such as p-coumaric, caffeic, syringic, or gallic acids, as electron acceptors was investigated in fructose-based medium. Almost all FLAB strains showed tolerance to high phenolic acid concentrations. p-Coumaric acid and caffeic acid were consumed by all FLAB strains through reductases or decarboxylases. Syringic and gallic acids were partially metabolized. The data collected suggest that FLAB require external electron acceptors to regenerate NADH. The use of phenolic acids as external electron acceptors by the 4 FLAB showing the highest phenolic acid reductase activity was investigated in glucose-based medium supplemented with p-coumaric acid. Metabolic responses observed through a phenotypic microarray suggested that FLAB may use p-coumaric acid as an external electron acceptor, enhancing glucose dissimilation but less efficiently than other external acceptors such as fructose or pyruvic acid. IMPORTANCE Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) remain to be fully explored. This study intends to link unique biochemical features of FLAB with their habitat. The quite unique FLAB phenome within the group lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may have practical relevance

  14. Exploring photosynthesis evolution by comparative analysis of metabolic networks between chloroplasts and photosynthetic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Jing

    2006-04-01

    findings are consistent with the notion that since the light energy absorption, transfer and conversion is highly efficient even in photosynthetic bacteria, the further improvements in photosynthetic efficiency in higher plants may rely on changes in metabolic network properties.

  15. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO 2 . Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions

  16. Dissimilatory Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Bacteria:Comparative Reconstruction of Transcriptional Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, EricJ.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2005-09-01

    Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO) is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR and NnrR, two-component systems NarXL and NarQP, NO-responsive activator NorR, and nitrite sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches we predict DNA-binding signals for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA signal. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria including Clostridia, Thermotogales and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides metabolism not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species like Escherichia coli), but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding signal. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon includes also two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr) and nipC(dnrN), thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e., nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include denitrification genes. As the

  17. Dissimilatory metabolism of nitrogen oxides in bacteria: comparative reconstruction of transcriptional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR, and NnrR; two-component systems NarXL and NarQP; NO-responsive activator NorR; and nitrite-sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches, we predict DNA-binding motifs for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA recognition motif. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria, including Clostridia, Thermotogales, and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides' metabolism, not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species such as Escherichia coli, but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding motif. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon also includes two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr and nipC (dnrN, thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e. nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include

  18. METABOLIC ENGINEERING OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FOR THE PRODUCTION OF INDUSTRIALLY IMPORTANT COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Papagianni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are receiving increased attention for use as cell factories for the production of metabolites with wide use by the food and pharmaceutical industries. The availability of efficient tools for genetic modification of LAB during the past decade permitted the application of metabolic engineering strategies at the levels of both the primary and the more complex secondary metabolism. The recent developments in the area with a focus on the production of industrially important metabolites will be discussed in this review.

  19. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for the production of industrially important compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Papagianni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are receiving increased attention for use as cell factories for the production of metabolites with wide use by the food and pharmaceutical industries. The availability of efficient tools for genetic modification of LAB during the past decade permitted the application of metabolic engineering strategies at the levels of both the primary and the more complex secondary metabolism. The recent developments in the area with a focus on the production of industrially important metabolites will be discussed in this review.

  20. Phytase-active lactic acid bacteria from sourdoughs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuobariene, Lina; Cizeikiene, Dalia; Gradzeviciute, Egle

    2015-01-01

    bacteria (LAB) which could be used as a starter to increase mineral bioavailability in whole-meal bread. Hence, LAB isolates were isolated from Lithuanian sourdoughs, tested for phytase activity, and phytase active isolates were identified. Studies of phytase activity of the isolates were carried out...

  1. Bacteria from wheat and cucurbit plant roots metabolize PAHs and aromatic root exudates: Implications for rhizodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Cairn S; Smets, Barth F

    2017-10-03

    The chemical interaction between plants and bacteria in the root zone can lead to soil decontamination. Bacteria that degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been isolated from the rhizospheres of plant species with varied biological traits; however, it is not known what phytochemicals promote contaminant degradation. One monocot and two dicotyledon plants were grown in PAH-contaminated soil from a manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. A phytotoxicity assay confirmed greater soil decontamination in rhizospheres when compared to bulk soil controls. Bacteria were isolated from plant roots (rhizobacteria) and selected for growth on anthracene and chrysene on PAH-amended plates. Rhizosphere isolates metabolized 3- and 4-ring PAHs and PAH catabolic intermediates in liquid incubations. Aromatic root exudate compounds, namely flavonoids and simple phenols, were also substrates for isolated rhizobacteria. In particular, the phenolic compounds-morin, caffeic acid, and protocatechuic acid-appear to be linked to bacterial degradation of 3- and 4-ring PAHs in the rhizosphere.

  2. P-Ser-HPr-a link between carbon metabolism and the virulence of some pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    HPr kinase/phosphorylase phosphorylates HPr, a phosphocarrier protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system, at serine-46. P-Ser-HPr is the central regulator of carbon metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria, but also plays a role in virulence development of certain patho...... a role in pathogenesis. Indeed, inactivation of Neisseria meningitidis hprK strongly diminished cell adhesion of this pathogen....

  3. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF MEDICINAL PLANTS AGAINST DIFFERENT STRAINS OF BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vatľák

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, methanolic extracts of Tilia cordata Mill. and Aesculus hippocastanum which had been described in herbal books, were screened for their antimicrobial activity against gramnegative and grampositive bacteria. The following strains of bacteria for antimicrobial activity were used gramnegative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Listeria ivanovii CCM 5884, Listeria innocua CCM 4030, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCM 1960, Serratia rubidaea CCM 4684 and grampositive bacteria: Brochothrix thermosphacta CCM 4769, Enterococcus raffinosus CCM 4216, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCM 1828, Paenobacillus larvae CCM 4483 and Staphylococcus epidermis CCM 4418 using disc diffusion method and microbroth dilution technique according to CLSI. Probit analysis was used in this experiment. Of the 2 plant extracts tested, all extracts showed antimicrobial activity against one or more species of microorganisms. The highest antibacterial activity of Tilia cordata and Aesculus hippocastanum methanolic extract was measured against gramnegative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa used with disc diffusion method. The strong antimicrobial activity with microbroth dilution method of Tilia cordata and Aesculus hippocastanum were found against Listeria ivanovii.

  4. Potency of Amylase-producing Bacteria and Optimization Amylase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indriati, G.; Megahati, R. R. P.; Rosba, E.

    2018-04-01

    Enzymes are capable to act as biocatalyst for a wide variety of chemical reactions. Amylase have potential biotechnological applications in a wide range of industrial processes and account for nearly 30% of the world’s enzyme market. Amylase are extracellular enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of internal α-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch to dextrin, and other small carbohydrate molecules constituted of glucose units. Although enzymes are produced from animal and plant sources, the microbial sources are generally the most suitable for commercial applications. Bacteria from hot springs is widely used as a source of various enzymes, such as amylase. But the amount of amylase-producing bacteria is still very limited. Therefore it is necessary to search sources of amylase-producing bacteria new, such as from hot springs Pariangan. The purpose of this study was to isolation of amylase-producing bacteria from Pariangan hot spring, West Sumatera and amylase activity optimization. The results were obtained 12 isolates of thermophilic bacteria and 5 isolates of amyalse-producing bacteria with the largest amylolytic index of 3.38 mm. The highest amylase activity was obtained at 50°C and pH 7.5.

  5. Antibacterial activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from cow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the antimicrobial activity of cow's intestinal Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) against enteric commensals. Method: ... Conclusion: This study shows that LAB from cow faeces possess considerable antimicrobial activity against resistant Es- cherichia ... tries1. The meat from cattle, goat, sheep, pig and poul-.

  6. Evaluation of the ability to metabolize 1,2-propanediol by heterofermentative bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Zielińska

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: All tested isolates showed the ability to effectively metabolize 1,2-PD (in the presence of cobalamin and its conversion to propionic acid, which reveals that investigated bacteria meet the essential requirements of microorganisms with a potential application.

  7. Metabolism of aflatoxin, ochratoxin, zearalenone, and three trichothecenes by intact rumen fluid, rumen protozoa, and rumen bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, K H; Pettersson, H; Sandholm, K; Olsen, M

    1984-01-01

    The effect of rumen microbes on six mycotoxins (aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, diacetoxyscirpenol, and deoxynivalenol ) considered to be health risks for domestic animals was investigated. The mycotoxins were incubated with intact rumen fluid or fractions of rumen protozoa and bacteria from sheep and cattle in the presence or absence of milled feed. Rumen fluid had no effect on aflatoxin B1 and deoxynivalenol . The remaining four mycotoxins were all metabolized, and protozoa were more active than bacteria. Metabolism of ochratoxin A, zearalenone, and diacetoxyscirpenol was moderately or slightly inhibited by addition of milled feed in vitro. The capacity of rumen fluid to degrade ochratoxin A decreased after feeding, but this activity was gradually restored by the next feeding time. Ochratoxin A was cleaved to ochratoxin alpha and phenylalanine; zearalenone was reduced to alpha-zearalenol and to a lesser degree to beta-zearalenol; diacetoxyscirpenol and T-2 toxin were deacetylated to monoacetoxyscirpenol and HT-2 toxin, respectively. Feeding of 5 ppm (5 mg/kg) of ochratoxin A to sheep revealed 14 ppb (14 ng/ml) of ochratoxin A and ochratoxin alpha in rumen fluid after 1 h, but neither was detected in the blood. Whether such conversions in the rumen fluid may be considered as a first line of defense against toxic compounds present in the diet is briefly discussed. PMID:6234859

  8. Industry as a metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, B

    1992-02-01

    The concept of "industrial economic metabolism" can provide a bridge to better understanding between environmentalists and industry. In nature each individual or species reacts to natural stimuli, competing with others for resources, extending its domain until it loses comparative advantage and comes to equilibrium with an adjacent competitor. Those species that succeed over time flourish; those that do not, diminish or disappear. Nature's rule book has no moral or ethical ingredient beyond self-interest. Corporate metabolisms are remarkably similar to those of nature. They too react to stimuli, collect and use resources, and grow or perish based on how effectively they compete. Corporate management recognizes and responds naturally and efficiently to cost and price signals. Through them it selects resources and converts them into useful products. The efficiency with which this is done is measured by profit, the lifeblood of the corporation and its means of growth. Profit thus provides a discipline on corporate behavior, encouraging efficient performers, and, by its absence, weeding out others. Unfettered by influences other than economics, the path to corporate success is unlikely to be a compassionate one. The dilemma of the manager is that to do what is socially "right" often conflicts with what must be done to survive and prosper. Fortunately, corporations' behavior can be altered by society when their purely economic role comes into conflict with other human values. The environment and the economy are not separate systems but intertwined to form a complex natural and social setting. The human-designed economic system depends on natural resource inputs, and in turn its metabolic wastes can overload the ecological system, threatening the long-term survivability of both. Increasing concern for the environment now gives the farsighted manager new latitude. There are competitive benefits in some pollution prevention. But there are not sufficiently strong forces to

  9. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E

    2004-01-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines

  10. Activity of endodontic antibacterial agents against selected anaerobic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Cláudio Maniglia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of substances used as antibacterial agents (solutions of 10% calcium hydroxide, camphorated paramonochlorophenol - PMCC, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate and 10% castor oil plant detergent on anaerobic bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586, Prevotella nigrescens ATCC 33563, Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124 and Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285, using a broth dilution technique, was evaluated in vitro. For determination of minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericide concentrations (MIC and MBC, two culture broths, Reinforced Clostridial Medium (RCM and supplemented Brucella, standardized inoculum and serially diluted solutions were used. All antibacterial agents presented antimicrobial activity that varied for different bacteria. There were no differences in the performance of the two broths. Chlorhexidine digluconate was the most effective, with the lowest MICs, followed by castor oil detergent, PMCC and calcium hydroxide. C. perfringens and B. fragilis were the most resistant bacteria to all agents.

  11. Recent advances in engineering the central carbon metabolism of industrially important bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papagianni Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper gives an overview of the recent advances in engineering the central carbon metabolism of the industrially important bacteria Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Corynobacterium glutamicum, Streptomyces spp., Lactococcus lactis and other lactic acid bacteria. All of them are established producers of important classes of products, e.g. proteins, amino acids, organic acids, antibiotics, high-value metabolites for the food industry and also, promising producers of a large number of industrially or therapeutically important chemicals. Optimization of existing or introduction of new cellular processes in these microorganisms is often achieved through manipulation of targets that reside at major points of central metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with the glyoxylate shunt. Based on the huge progress made in recent years in biochemical, genetic and regulatory studies, new fascinating engineering approaches aim at ensuring an optimal carbon and energy flow within central metabolism in order to achieve optimized metabolite production.

  12. Direct estimate of active bacteria: CTC use and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creach, V.; Baudoux, A.C.; Bertru, G.; Le Rouzic, B.

    2003-01-01

    During the last 10 years, the dye 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) has been used to determine the in situ number of "active" bacteria in different ecosystems. A part of this success is due to a simple protocol, which does not require sophisticated equipment. However, it has not been

  13. Antimicrobial Activities of Bacteria Associated with the Brown Alga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, A.; Ktari, L.; Bolhuis, H.; Ahmed, M.; Boudabbous, A.; Stal, L.J.; Cretoiu, M.S.; El Bour, M.

    2016-01-01

    Macroalgae belonging to the genus Padina are known to produce antibacterial compounds that may inhibit growth of human- and animal pathogens. Hitherto, it was unclear whether this antibacterial activity is produced by the macroalga itself or by secondary metabolite producing epiphytic bacteria. Here

  14. Antibacterial activity of soaps against daily encountered bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aims to check the antibacterial activity of various branded soaps against bacteria that are normally present in the environment. The proposed study includes selection of most common bacterial strains from the environment. Identification of bacterial strains was done by standard microbiological techniques, which ...

  15. Novel TPP-riboswitch activators bypass metabolic enzyme dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lünse, Christina E; Scott, Fraser J; Suckling, Colin J; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Riboswitches are conserved regions within mRNA molecules that bind specific metabolites and regulate gene expression. TPP-riboswitches, which respond to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), are involved in the regulation of thiamine metabolism in numerous bacteria. As these regulatory RNAs are often modulating essential biosynthesis pathways they have become increasingly interesting as promising antibacterial targets. Here, we describe thiamine analogs containing a central 1,2,3-triazole group to induce repression of thiM-riboswitch dependent gene expression in different E. coli strains. Additionally, we show that compound activation is dependent on proteins involved in the metabolic pathways of thiamine uptake and synthesis. The most promising molecule, triazolethiamine (TT), shows concentration dependent reporter gene repression that is dependent on the presence of thiamine kinase ThiK, whereas the effect of pyrithiamine (PT), a known TPP-riboswitch modulator, is ThiK independent. We further show that this dependence can be bypassed by triazolethiamine-derivatives that bear phosphate-mimicking moieties. As triazolethiamine reveals superior activity compared to pyrithiamine, it represents a very promising starting point for developing novel antibacterial compounds that target TPP-riboswitches. Riboswitch-targeting compounds engage diverse endogenous mechanisms to attain in vivo activity. These findings are of importance for the understanding of compounds that require metabolic activation to achieve effective riboswitch modulation and they enable the design of novel compound generations that are independent of endogenous activation mechanisms.

  16. Relationship between serologic markers of periodontal bacteria and metabolic syndrome and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deepika; Choi, Youn-Hee; Zhang, Jiajia; Hazlett, Linda J; Merchant, Anwar T

    2015-03-01

    Periodontitis is a result of a complex biologic alteration of the periodontal microenvironment and a distributional shift of key periodontal pathogens. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a complex cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, has been linked to periodontal diseases; however, the contribution of periodontal bacteria to systemic conditions remains unclear. The study population comprised 7,848 United States adults who participated in an interview, underwent a clinical oral-health examination, and had serum immunoglobulin G titers measured against 19 periodontal bacteria as part of the third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey. The z-score antibody titers were clustered into four mutually exclusive groups and named after Socransky's classification of periodontal bacteria (Orange-Red, Red-Green, Yellow-Orange, and Orange-Blue). Survey logistic regression was used to investigate the independent associations between the cluster scores, and MetS and each component, including hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, central obesity, and elevated fasting glucose. The Orange-Red cluster score (that included Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella spp.) was positively associated (odds ratio [OR] = 1.067, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.12) and the Orange-Blue cluster score (which included Actinomyces naeslundii and Eubacterium nodatum) was inversely associated (OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.88 to 0.97) with elevated fasting glucose (≥ 110 mg/dL) after adjustment for clusters and potential confounders. Neither MetS nor its other remaining MetS components were associated with a particular cluster score. The associations between specific antibody clusters (Orange-Red and Orange-Blue) against periodontal bacteria and elevated plasma glucose were in qualitatively opposite directions after multivariable adjustment in a large, adult population. The periodontal bacterial profile was not found to be associated with metabolic

  17. Antibacterial activity of Espand (Peganum harmala alcoholic extracts against six pathogenic bacteria in planktonic and biofilm forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinab Mohsenipour

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microbial biofilms have attracted interest in recent years because they have become the most important cause of nosocomial infections. This study was aimed to examine the antibacterial activities of Peganum harmala extracts on the development of microbial biofilms and planktonic form of six pathogenic bacteria which include Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Materials and methods: Antimicrobial activities of the crude extracts against the planktonic form of bacteria were evaluated by using disc diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values were determined by a macrobroth dilution technique. Anti- biofilm effects of the extracts were assessed by microtiter plate method. Results: According to the results, P. harmala extracts could inhibit test bacteria in planktonic form. To inhibit biofilm formation, biofilm metabolic activity and eradication of established biofilms, efficiency of the extracts depended on concentration. The highest inhibitory effects of P. harmala extracts were observed on biofilm formation of S. aureus (90.28% also, the greatest demolish were observed on S. pneumonia biofilm (77.76%. These extracts cause dramatically decrease the metabolic activity of bacteria in biofilm structures, in this case the decrement of B. cereus were highest (69.98% compared to other tested bacteria. Discussion and conclusion: Therefore, it can be suggested that P.harmala extracts applied as antimicrobial agents against testing bacteria particularly in biofilm forms. 

  18. Community size and metabolic rates of psychrophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria in Arctic marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB; Harder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The numbers of sulfate reducers in two Arctic sediments within situ temperatures of 2.6 and -1.7 degrees C were determined. Most-probable-number counts were higher at 10 degrees C than at 20 degrees C, indicating the predominance of a psychrophilic community. Mean specific sulfate reduction rates...... of 19 isolated psychrophiles were compared to corresponding rates of 9 marine, mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. The results indicate that, as a physiological adaptation to the permanently cold Arctic environment, psychrophilic sulfate reducers have considerably higher specific metabolic rates than...... their mesophilic counterparts at similarly low temperatures....

  19. Subversion of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa D Cunha

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to a notably high number of pathogenic microbes and is a broad innate immune response that effectively contributes to restriction of pathogen replication and generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of these platforms leads to caspase-1- and/or caspase-11-dependent secretion of proteins, including cytokines, and induction of a specific form of cell death called pyroptosis, which directly or indirectly contribute for restriction of pathogen replication. Not surprisingly, bona fide intracellular pathogens developed strategies for manipulation of cell death to guarantee intracellular replication. In this sense, the remarkable advances in the knowledge of the inflammasome field have been accompanied by several reports characterizing the inhibition of this platform by several pathogenic bacteria. Herein, we review some processes used by pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Francisella tularensis, Shigella flexneri, Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii to evade the activation of the inflammasome and the induction of pyroptosis.

  20. Subversion of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Larissa D; Zamboni, Dario S

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to a notably high number of pathogenic microbes and is a broad innate immune response that effectively contributes to restriction of pathogen replication and generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of these platforms leads to caspase-1- and/or caspase-11-dependent secretion of proteins, including cytokines, and induction of a specific form of cell death called pyroptosis, which directly or indirectly contribute for restriction of pathogen replication. Not surprisingly, bona fide intracellular pathogens developed strategies for manipulation of cell death to guarantee intracellular replication. In this sense, the remarkable advances in the knowledge of the inflammasome field have been accompanied by several reports characterizing the inhibition of this platform by several pathogenic bacteria. Herein, we review some processes used by pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Francisella tularensis, Shigella flexneri, Legionella pneumophila, and Coxiella burnetii to evade the activation of the inflammasome and the induction of pyroptosis.

  1. The metabolic and ecological interactions of oxalate-degrading bacteria in the Mammalian gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron W; Dearing, Denise

    2013-12-06

    Oxalate-degrading bacteria comprise a functional group of microorganisms, commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Oxalate is a plant secondary compound (PSC) widely produced by all major taxa of plants and as a terminal metabolite by the mammalian liver. As a toxin, oxalate can have a significant impact on the health of mammals, including humans. Mammals do not have the enzymes required to metabolize oxalate and rely on their gut microbiota for this function. Thus, significant metabolic interactions between the mammalian host and a complex gut microbiota maintain the balance of oxalate in the body. Over a dozen species of gut bacteria are now known to degrade oxalate. This review focuses on the host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions that regulate the degradation of oxalate by the gut microbiota. We discuss the pathways of oxalate throughout the body and the mammalian gut as a series of differentiated ecosystems that facilitate oxalate degradation. We also explore the mechanisms and functions of microbial oxalate degradation along with the implications for the ecological and evolutionary interactions within the microbiota and for mammalian hosts. Throughout, we consider questions that remain, as well as recent technological advances that can be employed to answer them.

  2. Beta-lactamase induction and cell wall metabolism in Gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ximin; Lin, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Production of beta-lactamases, the enzymes that degrade beta-lactam antibiotics, is the most widespread and threatening mechanism of antibiotic resistance. In the past, extensive research has focused on the structure, function, and ecology of beta-lactamases while limited efforts were placed on the regulatory mechanisms of beta-lactamases. Recently, increasing evidence demonstrate a direct link between beta-lactamase induction and cell wall metabolism in Gram-negative bacteria. Specifically, expression of beta-lactamase could be induced by the liberated murein fragments, such as muropeptides. This article summarizes current knowledge on cell wall metabolism, beta-lactam antibiotics, and beta-lactamases. In particular, we comprehensively reviewed recent studies on the beta-lactamase induction by muropeptides via two major molecular mechanisms (the AmpG–AmpR–AmpC pathway and BlrAB-like two-component regulatory system) in Gram-negative bacteria. The signaling pathways for beta-lactamase induction offer a broad array of promising targets for the discovery of new antibacterial drugs used for combination therapies. Therefore, to develop effective mitigation strategies against the widespread beta-lactam resistance, examination of the molecular basis of beta-lactamase induction by cell wall fragment is highly warranted. PMID:23734147

  3. CTC staining and counting of actively respiring bacteria in natural stone using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosch, S; Mansch, R; Knötzsch, K; Bock, E

    2003-01-01

    A method was established for staining and counting of actively respiring bacteria in natural stone by using the tetrazolium salt 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyltetrazolium chloride (CTC) in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Applying 5 mM CTC for 2 h to pure cultures of representative stone-inhabiting microorganisms showed that chemoorganotrophic bacteria and fungi-in contrast to lithoautotrophic nitrifying bacteria-were able to reduce CTC to CTF, the red fluorescing formazan crystals of CTC. Optimal staining conditions for microorganisms in stone material were found to be 15 mM CTC applied for 24 h. The cells could be visualized on transparent and nontransparent mineral materials by means of CLSM. A semi-automated method was used to count the cells within the pore system of the stone. The percentage of CTC-stained bacteria was dependent on temperature and humidity of the material. At 28 degrees C and high humidity (maximum water holding capacity) in the laboratory, about 58% of the total bacterial microflora was active. On natural stone exposed for 9 years at an urban exposure site in Germany, 52-56% of the bacterial microflora was active at the east, west, and north side of the specimen, while only 18% cells were active at the south side. This is consistent with microclimatic differences on the south side which was more exposed to sunshine thus causing UV and water stress as well as higher temperatures on a microscale level. In combination with CLSM, staining by CTC can be used as a fast method for monitoring the metabolic activity of chemoorganotrophic bacteria in monuments, buildings of historic interest or any art objects of natural stone. Due to the small size of samples required, the damage to these objects and buildings can be minimized.

  4. Metabolic benefits of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Volčanšek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is the most beneficial intervention in prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. Life style, which has become mostly sedentary, leads to growing incidence in obesity, what could cause the first so far reduction in life expectancy in developed countries.Physical activity reduces the chronic low-grade inflammation, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer. Regular physical activity exerts two anti-inflammatory effects: reduction of visceral fat, which produces the majority of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and production of myokines. It has been proposed that cytokines and other peptides that are produced by muscle fibers should be classified as myokines that exert autocrine, paracrine and endocrine effects. Myokines induce muscle hypertrophy and myogenesis, stimulate fat oxidation, improve insulin sensitivity and have an anti-inflammatory effect.  Therefore, skeletal muscle has been identified as a secretory organ and this provides the basis for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs, such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, gut, bones and brain. Physical inactivity leads to an altered myokine profile, associating sedentary life style with some chronic diseases.Physical activity is recommended as a tool for weight management and prevention of weight gain, for weight loss and for prevention of weight regain. High quality studies have confirmed the important impact of exercise on improving blood glucose control in diabetic patients, and on preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in predisposed populations. Prescribing specific exercise tailored to individual's needs is an intervention strategy for health improvement. Physical fitness counteracts the detrimental effects of obesity reducing morbidity and mortality.

  5. Molecular characterization of the phenolic acid metabolism in the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum

    OpenAIRE

    Barthelmebs, Lise; Diviés, Charles; Cavin, Jean-François

    2001-01-01

    International audience; The lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum displays substrate-inducible decarboxylase activities on $p$-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids. Purification of the $p$-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) was performed. Sequence of the N-terminal part of the PDC led to the cloning of the corresponding pdc gene. Expression of this gene in Escherichia coli revealed that PDC displayed a weak activity on ferulic acid, detectable in vitro in the presence of ammonium sulfate...

  6. Passive and active response of bacteria under mechanical compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Renata; Miller, Samantha; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Byophysics Team; Institute of Medical Sciences Collaboration

    Bacteria display simple but fascinating cellular structures and geometries. Their shapes are the result of the interplay between osmotic pressure and cell wall construction. Typically, bacteria maintain a high difference of osmotic pressure (on the order of 1 atm) to the environment. This pressure difference (turgor pressure) is supported by the cell envelope, a composite of lipid membranes and a rigid cell wall. The response of the cell envelope to mechanical perturbations such as geometrical confinements is important for the cells survival. Another key property of bacteria is the ability to regulate turgor pressure after abrupt changes of external osmotic conditions. This response relies on the activity of mechanosensitive (MS) channels: membrane proteins that release solutes in response to excessive stress in the cell envelope. We here present experimental data on the mechanical response of the cell envelope and on turgor regulation of bacteria subjected to compressive forces. We indent living cells with micron-sized beads attached to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). This approach ensures global deformation of the cell. We show that such mechanical loading is sufficient to gate mechanosensitive channels in isosmotic conditions.

  7. In vitro activity of mecillinam against anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinkraus, G E; McCarthy, L R

    1980-01-01

    A microtiter broth dilution method was employed to determine the in vitro activity of mecillinam against 201 recent clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. Both the anerobic gram-positive and anaerobic gram-negative bacilli displayed a wide range of minimal inhibitory concentrations of mecillinam; most strains were resistant to the antibiotic. The anaerobic cocci exhibited a narrower range of minimal inhibitory concentrations than were observed with other anaerobes, but also exhibited mecill...

  8. Mechanistic insight into acrylate metabolism and detoxification in marine dimethylsulfoniopropionate-catabolizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Cao, Hai-Yan; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Li, Chun-Yang; Li, Ping-Yi; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Qin, Qi-Long; Todd, Jonathan D; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2017-09-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) cleavage, yielding dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and acrylate, provides vital carbon sources to marine bacteria, is a key component of the global sulfur cycle and effects atmospheric chemistry and potentially climate. Acrylate and its metabolite acryloyl-CoA are toxic if allowed to accumulate within cells. Thus, organisms cleaving DMSP require effective systems for both the utilization and detoxification of acrylate. Here, we examine the mechanism of acrylate utilization and detoxification in Roseobacters. We propose propionate-CoA ligase (PrpE) and acryloyl-CoA reductase (AcuI) as the key enzymes involved and through structural and mutagenesis analyses, provide explanations of their catalytic mechanisms. In most cases, DMSP lyases and DMSP demethylases (DmdAs) have low substrate affinities, but AcuIs have very high substrate affinities, suggesting that an effective detoxification system for acylate catabolism exists in DMSP-catabolizing Roseobacters. This study provides insight on acrylate metabolism and detoxification and a possible explanation for the high K m values that have been noted for some DMSP lyases. Since acrylate/acryloyl-CoA is probably produced by other metabolism, and AcuI and PrpE are conserved in many organisms across all domains of life, the detoxification system is likely relevant to many metabolic processes and environments beyond DMSP catabolism. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. SCREENING OF PLANT EXTRACTS FOR ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AGAINST BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vatľák

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was antimicrobial action of the methanolic extracts of Equisetum arvense L. and Urtica dioica L. against gramnegative and grampositive bacteria. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts against gramnegative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Listeria ivanovii CCM 5884, Listeria innocua CCM 4030, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCM 1960, Serratia rubidaea CCM 4684 and grampositive bacteria: Brochothrix thermosphacta CCM 4769, Enterococcus raffinosus CCM 4216, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCM 1828, Paenobacillus larvae CCM 4483 and Staphylococcus epidermis CCM 4418 were determined by the disc diffusion method and the microbroth dilution method according to CLSI. Probit analysis was used in this experiment. Of the 2 plant extracts tested, all extracts showed antimicrobial activity against one or more species of microorganisms. The most antimicrobial activity showed methanolic plant extract of E. arvense against S. epidermis with disc diffusion method and with microbroth dilution method against S. rubidaea and plant extract Urtica dioica with disc diffusion method against P. aeruginosa and with microbroth dilution method against S. rubidaea and E. coli.

  10. Phenolic content, antioxidant activities and stimulatory roles of citrus fruits on some lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irkin Reyhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities in citrus fruits and their peels were determined, and their stimulatory roles on some lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Phenolic compounds in citrus fruits such as mandarin, lemon, orange and grapefruit were determined either in the juices or in the peel extracts. Total phenolic content was determined in a spectrophotometer at 685 nm using the adapted Folin-Ciocalteu method. Total flavonoid content was measured using LC/MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The effects of the fruit juices and peel extracts on the selected lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus delbrueckii NRRL B5448, Lb. casei NRRL B1922, Lb. acidophilus NRRL B4495 were investigated. The tested lactic acid bacteria were significantly affected by chlorogenic acid, hesperidin, naringin and caffeic acid compared to the control samples (P≤0.05. Antioxidant properties of fruit samples were also measured using the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl method. The phenolics positively affected the metabolism of bacteria, with the stimulatory effects of the assayed samples being influenced by the phenolic profile.

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Activity and Folate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursen Keser

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Folate is a vital B vitamin which is easily water-soluble. It is a natural source which is found in the herbal and animal foods. Folate has important duties in the human metabolism, one of them is the adjustment of the level of plasma homocysteine. Reduction in MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase,which is in charge of the metabolism of homocysteine activity affects the level of homocysteine. Therefore MTHFR is an important enzyme in folate metabolism. Some of the mutations occurring in the MTHFR gene is a risk factor for various diseases and may be caused the hyperhomocysteinemia or the homocystinuria, and they also may lead to metabolic problems. MTHFR is effective in the important pathways such as DNA synthesis, methylation reactions and synthesis of RNA. C677T and A1298C are the most commonly occurring polymorphisms in the gene of MTHFR. The frequency of these polymorphisms show differences in the populations. MTHFR, folate distribution, metabolism of homocysteine and S-adenosylmethionine, by the MTHFR methylation the genetic defects have the potential of affecting the risk of disease in the negative or positive way.

  12. Expanded metabolic versatility of ubiquitous nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Albertsen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    , with or without concomitant nitrite oxidation, using oxygen, nitrate, or both compounds as terminal electron acceptors. Compared with Nitrospira defluvii from lineage I, N. moscoviensis shares the Nitrospira core metabolism but shows substantial genomic dissimilarity including genes for adaptations to elevated......Nitrospira are a diverse group of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and among the environmentally most widespread nitrifiers. However, they remain scarcely studied and mostly uncultured. Based on genomic and experimental data from Nitrospira moscoviensis representing the ubiquitous Nitrospira lineage II......, we identified ecophysiological traits that contribute to the ecological success of Nitrospira. Unexpectedly, N. moscoviensis possesses genes coding for a urease and cleaves urea to ammonia and CO2. Ureolysis was not observed yet in nitrite oxidizers and enables N. moscoviensis to supply ammonia...

  13. Experimental evolution and the adjustment of metabolic strategies in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Herwig; Molenaar, Douwe; Branco Dos Santos, Filipe; Teusink, Bas

    2017-08-01

    Experimental evolution of microbes has gained lots of interest in recent years, mainly due to the ease of strain characterisation through next-generation sequencing. While evolutionary and systems biologists use experimental evolution to address fundamental questions in their respective fields, studies with lactic acid bacteria are often more directed by applied questions. Insight into population and genome dynamics are valuable for experimental design and data interpretation, and it is becoming increasingly apparent how different constraints limit and govern the outcome of microbial adaptation to a selective environment. Examples for such constraints are the finite membrane and cellular space which can lead to trade-offs between cellular strategies. A powerful perspective is that of resource allocation, which allows cells to maximise fitness. This impacts on metabolic strategies that have different protein/resource demands. This review focuses on parameters and forces that shape cellular optimisation processes and that are determining for the outcome of laboratory evolution experiments. Phenotypic changes of experimentally evolved lactic acid bacteria will be discussed in the light of the selection conditions and the prevailing constraints. © FEMS 2017.

  14. Dissecting and engineering metabolic and regulatory networks of thermophilic bacteria for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu; Xu, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Interest in thermophilic bacteria as live-cell catalysts in biofuel and biochemical industry has surged in recent years, due to their tolerance of high temperature and wide spectrum of carbon-sources that include cellulose. However their direct employment as microbial cellular factories in the highly demanding industrial conditions has been hindered by uncompetitive biofuel productivity, relatively low tolerance to solvent and osmic stresses, and limitation in genome engineering tools. In this work we review recent advances in dissecting and engineering the metabolic and regulatory networks of thermophilic bacteria for improving the traits of key interest in biofuel industry: cellulose degradation, pentose-hexose co-utilization, and tolerance of thermal, osmotic, and solvent stresses. Moreover, new technologies enabling more efficient genetic engineering of thermophiles were discussed, such as improved electroporation, ultrasound-mediated DNA delivery, as well as thermo-stable plasmids and functional selection systems. Expanded applications of such technological advancements in thermophilic microbes promise to substantiate a synthetic biology perspective, where functional parts, module, chassis, cells and consortia were modularly designed and rationally assembled for the many missions at industry and nature that demand the extraordinary talents of these extremophiles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Active invasion of bacteria into living fungal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, Nadine; Üzüm, Zerrin; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Lackner, Gerald; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The rice seedling blight fungus Rhizopus microsporus and its endosymbiont Burkholderia rhizoxinica form an unusual, highly specific alliance to produce the highly potent antimitotic phytotoxin rhizoxin. Yet, it has remained a riddle how bacteria invade the fungal cells. Genome mining for potential symbiosis factors and functional analyses revealed that a type 2 secretion system (T2SS) of the bacterial endosymbiont is required for the formation of the endosymbiosis. Comparative proteome analyses show that the T2SS releases chitinolytic enzymes (chitinase, chitosanase) and chitin-binding proteins. The genes responsible for chitinolytic proteins and T2SS components are highly expressed during infection. Through targeted gene knock-outs, sporulation assays and microscopic investigations we found that chitinase is essential for bacteria to enter hyphae. Unprecedented snapshots of the traceless bacterial intrusion were obtained using cryo-electron microscopy. Beyond unveiling the pivotal role of chitinolytic enzymes in the active invasion of a fungus by bacteria, these findings grant unprecedented insight into the fungal cell wall penetration and symbiosis formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03007.001 PMID:25182414

  16. Bacteria activate sensory neurons that modulate pain and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Isaac M; Heesters, Balthasar A; Ghasemlou, Nader; Von Hehn, Christian A; Zhao, Fan; Tran, Johnathan; Wainger, Brian; Strominger, Amanda; Muralidharan, Sriya; Horswill, Alexander R; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Hwang, Sun Wook; Carroll, Michael C; Woolf, Clifford J

    2013-09-05

    Nociceptor sensory neurons are specialized to detect potentially damaging stimuli, protecting the organism by initiating the sensation of pain and eliciting defensive behaviours. Bacterial infections produce pain by unknown molecular mechanisms, although they are presumed to be secondary to immune activation. Here we demonstrate that bacteria directly activate nociceptors, and that the immune response mediated through TLR2, MyD88, T cells, B cells, and neutrophils and monocytes is not necessary for Staphylococcus aureus-induced pain in mice. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice is correlated with live bacterial load rather than tissue swelling or immune activation. Bacteria induce calcium flux and action potentials in nociceptor neurons, in part via bacterial N-formylated peptides and the pore-forming toxin α-haemolysin, through distinct mechanisms. Specific ablation of Nav1.8-lineage neurons, which include nociceptors, abrogated pain during bacterial infection, but concurrently increased local immune infiltration and lymphadenopathy of the draining lymph node. Thus, bacterial pathogens produce pain by directly activating sensory neurons that modulate inflammation, an unsuspected role for the nervous system in host-pathogen interactions.

  17. BACTERICIDAL COATINGS ON TEXTILES FOR REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY (BaCTeRIA) SUMMARY REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    TEXTILES FOR REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY ( BaCTeRIA ) SUMMARY REPORT by Tobyn A. Branck Courtney M. Cowell Jennifer M. Rego and...October 2011 – September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BACTERICIDAL COATINGS ON TEXTILES FOR REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY ( BaCTeRIA ) SUMMARY REPORT...ANTHRAX PURIFICATION BACILLUS ANTHRACIS ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES BACTERIA BACTERIOCINS TARGETED ACTIVITY

  18. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plant extracts against periodontopathic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iauk, L; Lo Bue, A M; Milazzo, I; Rapisarda, A; Blandino, G

    2003-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Althaea officinalis L. roots, Arnica montana L. flowers, Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hamamelis virginiana L. leaves, Illicium verum Hook. fruits and Melissa officinalis L. leaves, against anaerobic and facultative aerobic periodontal bacteria: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga gingivalis, Veilonella parvula, Eikenella corrodens, Peptostreptococcus micros and Actinomyces odontolyticus. The methanol extracts of H. virginiana and A. montana and, to a lesser extent, A. officinalis were shown to possess an inhibiting activity (MIC or = 2048 mg/L) against all the tested species with the exception of Prevotella sp. Illicium verum methanol extract was not very active though it had a particular good activity against E. corrodens. The results suggest the use of the alcohol extracts of H. virginiana, A. montana and A. officinalis for topical medications in periodontal prophylactics. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Evaluating Antimutagenic Activity of Probiotic Bacteria Isolated from Probiotic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kazemi Darsanki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Probiotic bacteria are microbial nutrition supplements which have useful effects on human health by maintaining of bowel microbial balance. There are many studies that have been suggested the use of probiotic products as cancer risk reducer. The aim of this study, is isolation and detection of probiotic agents from yoghurt and probiotical tablet and evaluation of their abilities to decrease some effects of mutagenic and carcinogenic agents.

     

    Methods: In this study, probiotic bacteria were isolated from yogurt and probiotic tablet by using MRS in anaerobic condition (5% Co2 and gas peck and temperature of 37°c. Then, they were detected by using biochemical tests. Their anti mutagenic effects of supernatant culture were evaluated against mutagenic agents of azid Sodium and Potassium Permanganate by ames test (Salmonella typhimurium TA100 in presence and absence of S9.

     

    Results: Six probiotic bacteria were isolated from yogurt and probiotic tablet. Their anti mutagenic activity results based on ames test showed they can inhibit mutagenic agents more than 40% in some species, which is considered as a good result.

     

    Conclusion: The results of this study show that the use of probiotic bacteria found in different products such as yogurt and probiotic tablets, have proper anti mutagenic and anti carcinogenic effects. They change the micro flora of bowel and, as a result, reduce absorption of mutagenic and carcinogenic agents and help to maintain human health.

     

  20. New insights into the impact of Lactobacillus population on host-bacteria metabolic interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Caroline I; Štšepetova, Jelena; Sepp, Epp; Songisepp, Epp; Claus, Sandrine P; Mikelsaar, Marika

    2015-10-13

    We aimed at evaluating the association between intestinal Lactobacillus sp. composition and their metabolic activity with the host metabolism in adult and elderly individuals. Faecal and plasma metabolites were measured and correlated to the Lactobacillus species distribution in healthy Estonian cohorts of adult (n = 16; 65 y). Total cholesterol, LDL, C-reactive protein and glycated hemoglobin were statistically higher in elderly, while platelets, white blood cells and urinary creatinine were higher in adults. Aging was associated with the presence of L. paracasei and L. plantarum and the absence of L. salivarius and L. helveticus. High levels of intestinal Lactobacillus sp. were positively associated with increased concentrations of faecal short chain fatty acids, lactate and essential amino acids. In adults, high red blood cell distribution width was positively associated with presence of L. helveticus and absence of L. ruminis. L. helveticus was correlated to lactate and butyrate in faecal waters. This indicates a strong relationship between the composition of the gut Lactobacillus sp. and host metabolism. Our results confirm that aging is associated with modulations of blood biomarkers and intestinal Lactobacillus species composition. We identified specific Lactobacillus contributions to gut metabolic environment and related those to blood biomarkers. Such associations may prove useful to decipher the biological mechanisms underlying host-gut microbial metabolic interactions in an ageing population.

  1. Determination of the activity signature of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes in phenolic-rich grapevine tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Covington, Elizabeth Dunn; Roitsch, Thomas Georg; Dermastia, Marina

    2016-01-01

    . As a case study we applied the protocol to grapevine leaf samples infected with plant pathogenic bacteria 'Candidatus Phytoplasma solani', known to alter carbohydrate metabolism in grapevine. The described adaptations may be useful for determination of metabolic fingerprints for physiological phenotyping...... assays for enzymes of primary carbohydrate metabolism, while based on our recently published one for quantitative measurement of activities using coupled spectrophotometric assays in a 96-well format, is tailored to the complexities of phenolic- and anthocyanin-rich extracts from grapevine leaf...

  2. The key to acetate: metabolic fluxes of acetic acid bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Philipp; Frey, Lasse Jannis; Berger, Antje; Bolten, Christoph Josef; Hansen, Carl Erik; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-08-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role during cocoa fermentation, as their main product, acetate, is a major driver for the development of the desired cocoa flavors. Here, we investigated the specialized metabolism of these bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions. A carefully designed combination of parallel 13C isotope labeling experiments allowed the elucidation of intracellular fluxes in the complex environment of cocoa pulp, when lactate and ethanol were included as primary substrates among undefined ingredients. We demonstrate that AAB exhibit a functionally separated metabolism during coconsumption of two-carbon and three-carbon substrates. Acetate is almost exclusively derived from ethanol, while lactate serves for the formation of acetoin and biomass building blocks. Although this is suboptimal for cellular energetics, this allows maximized growth and conversion rates. The functional separation results from a lack of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzymes, typically present in bacteria to interconnect metabolism. In fact, gluconeogenesis is driven by pyruvate phosphate dikinase. Consequently, a balanced ratio of lactate and ethanol is important for the optimum performance of AAB. As lactate and ethanol are individually supplied by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the initial phase of cocoa fermentation, respectively, this underlines the importance of a well-balanced microbial consortium for a successful fermentation process. Indeed, AAB performed the best and produced the largest amounts of acetate in mixed culture experiments when lactic acid bacteria and yeasts were both present.

  3. AMPK Activation Affects Glutamate Metabolism in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Caroline Marie; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    acid (TCA) cycle was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis supplemented with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technology. It was found that AMPK activation had profound effects on the pathways involved in glutamate metabolism since the entrance of the glutamate carbon...... skeleton into the TCA cycle was reduced. On the other hand, glutamate uptake into the astrocytes as well as its conversion to glutamine catalyzed by glutamine synthetase was not affected by AMPK activation. Interestingly, synthesis and release of citrate, which are hallmarks of astrocytic function, were...

  4. Beneficial effects on host energy metabolism of short-chain fatty acids and vitamins produced by commensal and probiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Chain, Florian; Martín, Rebeca; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Courau, Stéphanie; Langella, Philippe

    2017-05-08

    The aim of this review is to summarize the effect in host energy metabolism of the production of B group vitamins and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) by commensal, food-grade and probiotic bacteria, which are also actors of the mammalian nutrition. The mechanisms of how these microbial end products, produced by these bacterial strains, act on energy metabolism will be discussed. We will show that these vitamins and SCFA producing bacteria could be used as tools to recover energy intakes by either optimizing ATP production from foods or by the fermentation of certain fibers in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Original data are also presented in this work where SCFA (acetate, butyrate and propionate) and B group vitamins (riboflavin, folate and thiamine) production was determined for selected probiotic bacteria.

  5. Ideal free distribution of metabolic activity: Implications of seasonal metabolic-activity patterns on competitive coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Péter

    2016-10-01

    The seasonal distribution of metabolic activity determines how much individuals experience different aspects of a periodically changing environment. Seasonal metabolic-activity patterns of coexisting species may differ significantly despite their shared environmental conditions, suggesting that interspecific diversification of this trait has a major role in the coexistence of competing species. In the present study the effect of the seasonal distribution of metabolic activity on intra- and interspecific competition is investigated in a consumer-resource model. It is shown that, in a periodically changing environment, for each environmental preference pattern there is an ideal seasonal distribution of metabolic activity, which results in maximum resource utilisation efficiency and competitive superiority. Contrary to the common interpretation of temporal niche segregation, opposing species-specific seasonal preferences are not a sufficient condition for the coexistence of two species on a population dynamical time scale. A necessary and sufficient condition for coexistence is the temporal segregation of the species via different seasonal activity distributions. However, coexistence is evolutionarily stable only if seasonal metabolic activities and preferences are positively correlated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inter-Kingdom Modification of Metabolic Behavior: [GAR+] Prion Induction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mediated by Wine Ecosystem Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda F Bisson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has evolved to dominate grape juice fermentation. A suite of cellular properties, rapid nutrient depletion, production of inhibitory compounds and the metabolic narrowing of the niche, all enable a minor resident of the initial population to dramatically increase its relative biomass in the ecosystem. This dominance of the grape juice environment is fueled by a rapid launch of glycolysis and energy generation mediated by transport of hexoses and an efficient coupling of transport and catabolism. Fermentation occurs in the presence of molecular oxygen as the choice between respiratory or fermentative growth is regulated by the availability of sugar a phenomenon known as glucose or catabolite repression. Induction of the GAR+ prion alters the expression of the major hexose transporter active under these conditions, Hxt3, reducing glycolytic capacity. Bacteria present in the grape juice ecosystem were able to induce the GAR+ prion in wine strains of S. cerevisiae. This induction reduced fermentation capacity but did not block it entirely. However, dominance factors such as the rapid depletion of amino acids and other nitrogen sources from the environment were impeded enabling greater access to these substrates for the bacteria. Bacteria associated with arrested commercial wine fermentations were able to induce the prion state, and yeast cells isolated from arrested commercial fermentations were found to be GAR+ thus confirming the ecological relevance of prion induction. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the presence of environmental acetic acid could lead to GAR+ induction in yeast strains under certain conditions. The induction of the prion enabled yeast growth on non-preferred substrates, oxidation and reduction products of glucose and fructose, present as a consequence of bacterial energy production. In native ecosystems prion induction never exceeded roughly 50-60% of the population of yeast cells

  7. Relation between presence-absence of a visible nucleoid and metabolic activity in bacterioplankton cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon, W.; Sherr, E.B.; Sherr, B.F. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1996-09-01

    We investigated the report of Zweifel and Hagstroem that only a portion of marine bacteria contain nucleoids--the DNA-containing regions of procaryotic cells-- and that such bacteria correspond to the active or viable fraction of bacterioplankton. In Oregon coastal waters, 21-64% of bacteria had visible nucleoids; number of nucleoid-visible (NV) bacteria were greater than numbers of metabolically active bacteria, based on cells with active electron transport systems (ETS) and intact cell membranes. During log growth of a marine isolate, proportions of NV and ETS-active cells approached 100%. In stationary growth phase, the fraction of ETS-active cells decreased rapidly, while that of NV cells remained high for 7 d. When starved cells of the isolate were resupplied with nutrient (50 mg liter{sup -1} peptone), total cell number did not increase during the initial 6 h, but the proportion of NV cells increased from 27 to 100%, and that of ETS-active cells from 6 to 75%. In an analogous experiment with a bacterioplankton assemblage, a similar trend was observed: the number of NV cells double during the initial 6 h prior to an increase in total cell counts. These results show that some bacteria without visible nucleoids are capable of becoming NV cells, and thus have DNa in a nucleoid region not detectable with the method used here. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakara S S M Uppu

    Full Text Available Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells. The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  9. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Sarkar, Paramita; Samaddar, Sandip; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Farias-Junior, Celio; Krishnamoorthy, Paramanandam; Shome, Bibek R; Franco, Octávio L; Haldar, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin) to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells). The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC) clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms) and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  10. Metabolic assessments during extra-vehicular activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Yu. Yu.; Spichkov, A. N.; Filipenkov, S. N.

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) has a significant role during extended space flights. It demonstrates that humans can survive and perform useful work outside the Orbital Space Stations (OSS) while wearing protective space suits (SS). When the International Space Station 'Alpha'(ISSA) is fully operational, EVA assembly, installation, maintenance and repair operations will become an everyday repetitive work activity in space. It needs new ergonomic evaluation of the work/rest schedule for an increasing of the labor amount per EVA hour. The metabolism assessment is a helpful method to control the productivity of the EVA astronaut and to optimize the work/rest regime. Three following methods were used in Russia to estimate real-time metabolic rates during EVA: 1. Oxygen consumption, computed from the pressure drop in a high pressure bottle per unit time (with actual thermodynamic oxygen properties under high pressure and oxygen leakage taken into account). 2. Carbon dioxide production, computed from CO 2 concentration at the contaminant control cartridge and gas flow rate in the life support subsystem closed loop (nominal mode) or gas leakage in the SS open loop (emergency mode). 3. Heat removal, computed from the difference between the temperatures of coolant water or gas and its flow rate in a unit of time (with assumed humidity and wet oxygen state taken into account). Comparison of heat removal values with metabolic rates enables us to determine the thermal balance during an operative medical control of EVA at "Salyut-6", "Salyut-7" and "Mir" OSS. Complex analysis of metabolism, body temperature and heat rate supports a differential diagnosis between emotional and thermal components of stress during EVA. It gives a prognosis of human homeostasis during EVA. Available information has been acquired into an EVA data base which is an effective tool for ergonomical optimization.

  11. Effect of communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria on degradation of 17-alpha-ethynylestradiol by nitrifying activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limpiyakorn, T.; Sermwaraphan, P.; Kurisu, F.

    2009-07-01

    An endocrine disrupting compound, 17-alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), is a synthetic estrogen used as a key ingredient in oral contraceptives pill. this persistent organic pollutant, no biodegradable by most microorganisms, is discharged via municipal waste streams to natural receiving waters. Recently, it was found that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) enriched with high ammonium loads can degrade EE2 via co-metabolism during ammonia oxidation. (Author)

  12. A mathematical model for electrochemically active filamentous sulfide-oxidising bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Keelan M; Batstone, Damien J; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Picioreanu, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Oxygen and sulfide in ocean sediments can be consumed biologically over long spatial distances by way of filamentous bacteria in electron-conducting sheaths. To analyse observations, a mathematical model of these filamentous sulfur-oxidising bacteria was developed, including electrical conduction between reactive zones. Mechanisms include Nernst-Planck diffusion and migration of ions coupled with Ohm's law for conduction along filaments, and metabolic activity throughout the filaments. Simulations predict outward biomass growth toward the boundaries of the sediment floor and top surface, resulting in two distinct zones with anode (sulfide consumption) and cathode (oxygen consumption) reactions enabled by electron conduction. Results show inward fluxes of 4.6 mmol O2/m(2)/d and 2.5 mmol S/m(2)/d, with consumption increasing with growth to final fluxes of 8.2 mmol O2/m(2)/d and 4.34 mmol S/m(2)/d. Qualitatively, the effect of varying cell conductivity and substrate affinity is evaluated. Controlling mechanisms are identified to shift from biomass limitation, to substrate limitation, and to conductivity limitations as the lengths of the filaments increase. While most observed data are reflected in the simulation results, a key discrepancy is the lower growth rates, which are largely fixed by thermodynamics, indicating that microbes may utilise secondary substrates or an alternative metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. FOXO1 Regulates Bacteria-Induced Neutrophil Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyu Dong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an essential role in the innate immune response to microbial infection and are particularly important in clearing bacterial infection. We investigated the role of the transcription factor FOXO1 in the response of neutrophils to bacterial challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis in vivo and in vitro. In these experiments, the effect of lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion in LyzM.Cre+FOXO1L/L mice was compared with matched littermate controls. FOXO1 deletion negatively affected several critical aspects of neutrophil function in vivo including mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow (BM to the vasculature, recruitment of neutrophils to sites of bacterial inoculation, and clearance of bacteria. In vitro FOXO1 regulated neutrophil chemotaxis and bacterial killing. Moreover, bacteria-induced expression of CXCR2 and CD11b, which are essential for several aspects of neutrophil function, was dependent on FOXO1 in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, FOXO1 directly interacted with the promoter regions of CXCR2 and CD11b. Bacteria-induced nuclear localization of FOXO1 was dependent upon toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and/or TLR4 and was significantly reduced by inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide synthase and deacetylases (Sirt1 and histone deacetylases. These studies show for the first time that FOXO1 activation by bacterial challenge is needed to mobilize neutrophils to transit from the BM to peripheral tissues in response to infection as well as for bacterial clearance in vivo. Moreover, FOXO1 regulates neutrophil function that facilitates chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and bacterial killing.

  14. Electronic Nose Technology to Measure Soil Microbial Activity and Classify Soil Metabolic Status

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio De Cesare; Elena Di Mattia; Simone Pantalei; Emiliano Zampetti; Vittorio Vinciguerra; Antonella Macagnano

    2011-01-01

    The electronic nose (E-nose) is a sensing technology that has been widely used to monitor environments in the last decade. In the present study, the capability of an E-nose, in combination with biochemical and microbiological techniques, of both detecting the microbial activity and estimating the metabolic status of soil ecosystems, was tested by measuring on one side respiration, enzyme activities and growth of bacteria in natural but simplified soil ecosystems over 23 days of incubation thr...

  15. Analyzing lipid metabolism: activation and beta-oxidation of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Paul Robert

    2009-01-01

    There is massive gene replication predicted for the activation of fatty acids and their entry into the beta-oxidation cycle for fatty acid oxidation. These two steps in fatty acid metabolism are catalyzed by FadD and FadE enzymes with 36 genes predicted for each of these respective activities in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we present methods for the cell-free assay of types of enzymes in live bacteria, as well as for fatty acid oxidation overall.

  16. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids--genotoxicity, metabolism enzymes, metabolic activation, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peter P; Xia, Qingsu; Lin, Ge; Chou, Ming W

    2004-02-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are widely distributed in the world and are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Because of their abundance and potent toxicities, the mechanisms by which pyrrolizidine alkaloids induce genotoxicities, particularly carcinogenicity, were extensively studied for several decades but not exclusively elucidated until recently. To date, the pyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced genotoxicities were revealed to be elicited by the hepatic metabolism of these naturally occurring toxins. In this review, we present updated information on the metabolism, metabolizing enzymes, and the mechanisms by which pyrrolizidine alkaloids exert genotoxicity and tumorigenicity.

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Rats' Gut Microbiota Composition in Animals with Different Ginsenosides Metabolizing Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei-Wei; Xuan, Fang-Ling; Zhong, Fei-Liang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Songquan; Li, Donghao; Quan, Lin-Hu

    2017-01-18

    Following oral intake of Panax ginseng, major ginsenosides are metabolized to deglycosylated ginsenosides by gut microbiota before absorption into the blood. As the composition of gut microbiota varies between individuals, metabolic activities are significantly different. We selected 6 rats with low efficiency metabolism (LEM) and 6 rats with high efficiency metabolism (HEM) from 60 rats following oral administration of Panax ginseng extract, and analyzed their gut microbiota composition using Illumina HiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The components of gut microbiota between the LEM and HEM groups were significantly different. Between the 2 groups, S24-7, Alcaligenaceae, and Erysipelotrichaceae occupied most OTUs of the HEM group, which was notably higher than the LEM group. Furthermore, we isolated Bifidobacterium animalis GM1 that could convert the ginsenoside Rb1 to Rd. The result implies that these specific intestinal bacteria may dominate the metabolism of Panax ginseng.

  18. Multifunctional Bacteria-Driven Microswimmers for Targeted Active Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung-Wook; Zhuang, Jiang; Yasa, Oncay; Sitti, Metin

    2017-09-26

    High-performance, multifunctional bacteria-driven microswimmers are introduced using an optimized design and fabrication method for targeted drug delivery applications. These microswimmers are made of mostly single Escherichia coli bacterium attached to the surface of drug-loaded polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) microparticles with embedded magnetic nanoparticles. The PEM drug carriers are 1 μm in diameter and are intentionally fabricated with a more viscoelastic material than the particles previously studied in the literature. The resulting stochastic microswimmers are able to swim at mean speeds of up to 22.5 μm/s. They can be guided and targeted to specific cells, because they exhibit biased and directional motion under a chemoattractant gradient and a magnetic field, respectively. Moreover, we demonstrate the microswimmers delivering doxorubicin anticancer drug molecules, encapsulated in the polyelectrolyte multilayers, to 4T1 breast cancer cells under magnetic guidance in vitro. The results reveal the feasibility of using these active multifunctional bacteria-driven microswimmers to perform targeted drug delivery with significantly enhanced drug transfer, when compared with the passive PEM microparticles.

  19. Anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients of siraitia grosvenorii on the spoilage bacteria isolated from sauced pork head meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Xu, L. Y.; Cui, Y. Q.; Pang, M. X.; Wang, F.; Qi, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    Extraction and anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients of Siraitia grosvenorii were studied in this paper. Extraction combined with ultrasonic was adopted. The optimum extraction condition was determined by single factor test; the anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were valued by Oxford-cup method. The results indicated that optimum extraction condition of active ingredients extracted from Siraitia grosvenorii were described as follows: ethanol concentrations of sixty-five percent and twenty minutes with ultrasonic assisted extraction; the active ingredients of Siraitia grosvenorii had anti-bacteria effect on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus sp, Serratia sp and MIC was 0.125g/mL, 0.0625g/mL, 0.125g/mL and 0.125g/mL. The active constituent of Siraitia grosvenorii has obvious anti-bacteria effect on the spoilage bacteria isolated from Sauced pork head meat and can be used as a new natural food preservation to prolong the shelf-life of Low-temperature meat products.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of medicinal plant leaf extracts against pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atikya Farjana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine antibacterial activity of water, oil and methanol extracts of guava (Psidium guajava, green tea (Camellia sinensis, neem (Azadirachta indica and marigold (Calendula officinalis against different species of bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus, Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. Methods: Antibacterial activity of plant extracts was measured by agar well diffusion method. Results: Boiled water extracts of guava leaf showed the largest zone of inhibition (22 mm against V. parahaemolyticus. Water extracts of green tea leaf at boiling and room temperature showed 17.5 mm and 19 mm zone of inhibitions against V. parahaemolyticus and S. aureus, respectively. Boiled water extract of neem leaf showed moderate zone of inhibition against Escherichia coli (10 mm and Klebsiella spp. (11 mm. Water and oil extracts of marigold leaf at both boiling and room temperature did not show any zone of inhibition against any of the tested microorganisms. Methanol extracts of both guava and green tea leaves showed same zone of inhibition against Pseudomonus spp. (18 mm. Methanol extract of neem leaf showed antibacterial acitivity against Klebsiella spp. (16 mm and Vibrio cholerae (14 mm and that of marigold leaf showed antimicrobial activity against S. aureus (18 mm and Klebsiella spp. (12 mm. Conclusions: The results from the study suggest that the leaves of guava, green tea, neem and marigold show anibacterial activity against different bacterial species. They could be used as alternatives to common antimicrobial agents for treatment of bacterial infections.

  1. Distribution and activity of petroleum hydrocarbon degrading bacteria in the North Sea and Baltic Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, K.; Dahlmann, G.; Gunkel, W.

    1993-01-01

    Data were collected in 1988 and 1989 on the distribution and activity of petroleum hydrocarbon degrading bacteria in the North Sea and Baltic Sea. Crude oil degrading bacteria and the number of bacteria which in particular degrade naphthalene were quantified using a modified dilution method (MPN). Crude oil degrading bacteria were present in all of about 100 water samples, with as many as 10 3 ml -1 in some samples. Numbers of naphthalene degrading bacteria were at least tenfold lower. There is obviously a greater connection between this bacteria group and petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contamination than between the more nonspecific group of crude oil degrading bacteria and PHC contamination. Data from the North Sea show an extremely high abundance of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, even in winter, while in the southern Baltic Sea low numbers of bacteria were found and slower crude oil degradation was observed. (orig.)

  2. Antimicrobial activity of Antrodia camphorata extracts against oral bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Man Lien

    Full Text Available Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata is a unique, endemic and extremely rare mushroom species native to Taiwan, and both crude extracts of and purified chemical compounds from A. camphorata have been reported to have a variety of significant beneficial effects, such as anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory activity. However, reports on the effects of A. camphorata against dental pathogens have been limited. Oral health is now recognized as important for overall general health, including conditions such as dental caries, periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis are the most common bacteria associated with dental plaque and periodontopathic diseases, respectively. Thus, our study examined the ability of five various crude extracts of A. camphorata to inhibit the growth of dental bacteria and anti-adherence in vitro. Among the extracts, the ethanol, ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts exhibited the lowest MICs against P. gingivalis and S. mutans (MIC = 4∼16 µg/mL. The MIC of the aqueous extract was greater than 2048 µg/mL against both P. gingivalis and S. mutans. In vitro adherence of S. mutans was significantly inhibited by the addition of either the ethyl acetate extract or chloroform extract (MIC = 16∼24 µg/mL, while the ethanol extract (MIC = 32∼64 µg/mL exhibited moderate inhibitory activity. Based on the result of this study, the ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts of A. camphorata may be good candidates for oral hygiene agents to control dental caries and periodontopathic conditions.

  3. Metabolism of fructophilic lactic acid bacteria isolated from Apis mellifera L. bee-gut: a focus on the phenolic acids as external electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Addante, Rocco; Pontonio, Erica; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-09-16

    Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) are strongly associated to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of Apis mellifera L. worker bees due to the consumption of fructose as a major carbohydrate. Seventy-seven presumptive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from GIT of healthy A. mellifera L. adults, which were collected from 5 different geographical locations of Apulia region (Italy). Almost all the isolates showed fructophilic tendencies, which were identified as Lactobacillus kunkeei (69%) or Fructobacillus fructosus (31%). A high-throughput phenotypic microarray, targeting 190 carbon sources, was used to determine that 83 compounds were differentially consumed. Phenotyping grouped the strains into two clusters, reflecting growth performance. The utilization of phenolic acids, such as p-coumaric, caffeic, syringic or gallic acids, as electron acceptors was investigated in fructose based medium. Almost all FLAB strains showed tolerance to high phenolic acid concentrations. p-Coumaric acid and caffeic acid were consumed by all FLAB strains through reductases or decarboxylases. Syringic and gallic acids were partially metabolized. The data collected suggest that FLAB require external electron acceptors to regenerate NADH. The use of phenolic acids as external electron acceptors by 4 FLAB, showing the highest phenolic acid reductase activity, was investigated in glucose based medium supplemented with p-coumaric acid. Metabolic responses observed through phenotypic microarray suggested that FLAB may use p-coumaric acid as external electron acceptor, enhancing glucose dissimilation but less efficiently than other external acceptors such as fructose or pyruvic acid. Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) remain to be fully explored. This study intends to link unique biochemical features of FLAB with their habitat. The quite unique FLAB phenome within the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group may have practical relevance in food fermentations. The FLAB phenome may have

  4. Antimicrobial activity of yeasts against some pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Younis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to isolate and identify yeast species from milk and meat products, and to test their antimicrobial activity against some bacterial species. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 milk and meat products samples were collected from random sellers and super markets in New Damietta city, Damietta, Egypt. Samples were subjected to yeast isolation procedures and tested for its antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. In addition, all yeast species isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR for detection of khs (kievitone hydratase and pelA (pectate degrading enzyme genes. Results: The recovery rate of yeasts from sausage was 20% (2/10 followed by kareish cheese, processed cheese, and butter 10% (1/10 each as well as raw milk 9% (9/100, and fruit yoghurt 30% (6/20. Different yeast species were recovered, namely, Candida kefyr (5 isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4 isolates, Candida intermedia (3 isolates, Candida tropicalis (2 isolates, Candida lusitaniae (2 isolates, and Candida krusei (1 isolate. khs gene was detected in all S. cerevisiae isolates, however, pelA gene was not detected in all identified yeast species. Antimicrobial activity of recovered yeasts against the selected bacterial species showed high activity with C. intermedia against S. aureus and E. coli, C. kefyr against E. coli, and C. lusitaniae against S. aureus. Moderate activities were obtained with C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and S. cerevisiae against E. coli; meanwhile, all the tested yeasts revealed a very low antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: The obtained results confirmed that some kinds of yeasts have the ability to produce antimicrobial compounds that could inhibit some pathogenic and spoilage bacteria and these antimicrobial activity of yeasts enables them to be one of the novel agents in controlling spoilage of food.

  5. Metabolic Environments and Genomic Features Associated with Pathogenic and Mutualistic Interactions between Bacteria and Plants is accepted for publication in MPMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Park, Byung H [ORNL; Syed, Mustafa H [ORNL; Klotz, Martin G [University of North Carolina, Charlotte; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Most bacterial symbionts of plants are phenotypically characterized by their parasitic or matualistic relationship with the host; however, the genomic characteristics that likely discriminate mutualistic symbionts from pathogens of plants are poorly understood. This study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 54 plant-symbiontic bacteria, 27 mutualists and 27 pathogens, to discover genomic determinants of their parasitic and mutualistic nature in terms of protein family domains, KEGG orthologous groups, metabolic pathways and families of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). We further used all bacteria with sequenced genomesl, published microarrays and transcriptomics experimental datasets, and literature to validate and to explore results of the comparison. The analysis revealed that genomes of mutualists are larger in size and higher in GC content and encode greater molecular, functional and metabolic diversity than the investigated genomes of pathogens. This enriched molecular and functional enzyme diversity included constructive biosynthetic signatures of CAZymes and metabolic pathways in genomes of mutualists compared with catabolic signatures dominant in the genomes of pathogens. Another discriminative characteristic of mutualists is the co-occurence of gene clusters required for the expression and function of nitrogenase and RuBisCO. Analysis of previously published experimental data indicate that nitrogen-fixing mutualists may employ Rubisco to fix CO2 not in the canonical Calvin-Benson-Basham cycle but in a novel metabolic pathway, here called Rubisco-based glycolysis , to increase efficiency of sugar utilization during the symbiosis with plants. An important discriminative characteristic of plant pathogenic bacteria is two groups of genes likely encoding effector proteins involved in host invasion and a genomic locus encoding a putative secretion system that includes a DUF1525 domain protein conserved in pathogens of plants and of other organisms. The

  6. Anti-bacteria Effect of Active Ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi on the Spoilage Bacteria of Sauced Pork Head Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Xu, Lingyi; Cui, Yuqian; Pang, Meixia; Wang, Fang; Qi, Jinghua

    2017-12-01

    Extraction and anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi were studied in this paper. Extraction combined with ultrasonic was adopted. The optimum extraction condition was determined by single factor test; the anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients and minimum inhibitory concentration(MIC) were valued by Oxford-cup method. The results indicated that kaempferol was the active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi whose optimum extraction condition for ethanol concentrations were sixty-five percent and twenty minutes with ultrasonic assisted extraction.; the active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi had anti-bacteria effect on Staphylococcus, Proteus, Bacillus, Serratia and MIC was 0.5 g/mL,0.5 g/mL,0.0313 g/mL and 0.0625 g/mL. The active constituent of Cacumen Platycladi is kaempferol which has obvious anti-bacteria effect and can be used to prolong the shelf-life of Low-temperature meat products.

  7. [Isolation and identification of bacteria with ferro-oxidase activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Zhang, Wensen; Zhang, Xiaorong; Wu, Xiaomei; Zhan, Xingdai; Deng, Jiacong

    2014-12-04

    We screened and isolated Ferro-oxidase producing bacteria, for adsorbing iron and manganese. The strains producing Ferro-oxidase were isolated from three samples of water. Ferro-oxidase producing strains were screened in shake flask culture, and identified according to morphological features, physiological and biochemical analysis as well as 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. We isolated a bacterium S9. The strain was identified as Sphaerotilus natans. This strain had strongest adsorption on iron and manganese among the strains we identified, with 29.02 mg/g iron adsorption amount in water, and 66.77% adsorption rate for 4 hours' adsorption. When the adsorption time is 6 h, the adsorption amount of manganese was 34.49 mg/g, and the adsorption rate was 70.68%. The optimum temperature and pH value of Ferro-oxidase were 30 degrees C and 7.5, respectively. Mg2+, Na+, K+ could activate Ferro-oxidase, whereas Cu2+ had little impact. While Mn2+, Zn2+ could strongly inhibit Ferro-Oxidase, Pb2+, Ag+ had only modest inhibitory effect. Strain S9 had a high Ferro-oxidase activity, and has application potential in sewage treatment.

  8. Antibacterial Activities of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Members of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known probiotics and have been reported to have antimicrobial properties. Although various researchers have documented the isolation of these bacteria from fruits and vegetables, studies on LAB associated with lettuce, cucumber and cabbage are limited and non-existing in ...

  9. Biopreservative activity of lactic acid bacteria on suya produced from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... fermentative microorganisms (Ogunbanwo et al., 2004). *Corresponding author. E-mail: sokanisaac@yahoo.co.uk. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been employed in the preservation of food materials for many centuries. In the meat industry, lactic acid bacteria are widely used as starter cultures for sausage ...

  10. Platelet Activation by Streptococcus pyogenes Leads to Entrapment in Platelet Aggregates, from Which Bacteria Subsequently Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Lisbeth; Baumgarten, Maria; Mörgelin, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation and aggregation have been reported to occur in response to a number of Gram-positive pathogens. Here, we show that platelet aggregates induced by Streptococcus pyogenes were unstable and that viable bacteria escaped from the aggregates over time. This was not due to differential activation in response to the bacteria compared with physiological activators. All the bacterial isolates induced significant platelet activation, including integrin activation and alpha and dense-granule release, at levels equivalent to those induced by potent physiological platelet activators that induced stable aggregates. The ability to escape the aggregates and to resist the antibacterial effects of platelets was dependent on active protein synthesis by the bacteria within the aggregate. We conclude that S. pyogenes bacteria can temporarily cover themselves with activated platelets, and we propose that this may facilitate survival of the bacteria in the presence of platelets. PMID:25069984

  11. Exploring the Behavior and Metabolic Transformations of SeNPs in Exposed Lactic Acid Bacteria. Effect of Nanoparticles Coating Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Palomo-Siguero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The behavior and transformation of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs in living systems such as microorganisms is largely unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we examined the effect of three types of SeNP suspensions toward Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LB-12 using a variety of techniques. SeNPs were synthesized using three types of coating agents (chitosan (CS-SeNPs, hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC-SeNPs and a non-ionic surfactant, surfynol (ethoxylated-SeNPs. Morphologies of SeNPs were all spherical. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to locate SeNPs in the bacteria. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC on line coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was applied to evaluate SeNP transformation by bacteria. Finally, flow cytometry employing the live/dead test and optical density measurements at 600 nm (OD600 were used for evaluating the percentages of bacteria viability when supplementing with SeNPs. Negligible damage was detected by flow cytometry when bacteria were exposed to HEC-SeNPs or CS-SeNPs at a level of 10 μg Se mL−1. In contrast, ethoxylated-SeNPs were found to be the most harmful nanoparticles toward bacteria. CS-SeNPs passed through the membrane without causing damage. Once inside, SeNPs were metabolically transformed to organic selenium compounds. Results evidenced the importance of capping agents when establishing the true behavior of NPs.

  12. Diurnal and water salinity-dependent metabolic activity of juvenile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to contribute to ecophysiogical data on this species, oxygen consumption by white steenbras was determined to quantify metabolic activity. White steenbras were most active during daylight hours when oxygen consumption was 28% higher than during the scotophase. Standard, routine and active metabolic rate ...

  13. Exploring Anopheles gut bacteria for Plasmodium blocking activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia, Ana C; Dong, Yuemei; Blumberg, Benjamin J; Mlambo, Godfree; Tripathi, Abhai; BenMarzouk-Hidalgo, Omar J; Chandra, Ramesh; Dimopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Malaria parasite transmission requires the successful development of Plasmodium gametocytes into flagellated microgametes upon mosquito blood ingestion, and the subsequent fertilization of microgametes and macrogametes for the development of motile zygotes, called ookinetes, which invade and transverse the Anopheles vector mosquito midgut at around 18-36 h after blood ingestion. Within the mosquito midgut, the malaria parasite has to withstand the mosquito's innate immune response and the detrimental effect of its commensal bacterial flora. We have assessed the midgut colonization capacity of 5 gut bacterial isolates from field-derived, and 2 from laboratory colony, mosquitoes and their effect on Plasmodium development in vivo and in vitro, along with their impact on mosquito survival. Some bacterial isolates activated the mosquito's immune system, affected the mosquito's life span, and were capable of blocking Plasmodium development. We have also shown that the ability of these bacteria to inhibit the parasites is likely to involve different mechanisms and factors. A Serratia marcescens isolate was particularly efficient in colonizing the mosquitoes’ gut, compromising mosquito survival, and inhibiting both sexual- and asexual-stage Plasmodium through secreted factors, thereby rendering it a potential candidate for the development of a malaria transmission intervention strategy. PMID:24428613

  14. Bacteria from Wheat and Cucurbit Plant Roots Metabolize PAHs and Aromatic Root Exudates: Implications for Rhizodegradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ely, Cairn S; Smets, Barth F.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical interaction between plants and bacteria in the root zone can lead to soil decontamination. Bacteria which degrade PAHs have been isolated from the rhizospheres of plant species with varied biological traits, however, it is not known what phytochemicals promote contaminant degradation...

  15. From physiology to systems metabolic engineering for the production of biochemicals by lactic acid bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Paula; Carvalho, Ana L.; Vinga, Susana

    2013-01-01

    The lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a functionally related group of low-GC Gram-positive bacteria known essentially for their roles in bioprocessing of foods and animal feeds. Due to extensive industrial use and enormous economical value, LAB have been intensively studied and a large body of compr...

  16. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), namely, Lactobacillus acidophilus 1, Lactobacillus acidophilus 2, Lactobacillus brevis 1, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 1, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 2, Lactococcus raffinolactis 1, Pediococcus acidilactici 1, Pediococcus pentosaceus 1, and Pediococcus ...

  18. Antibacterial Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Salad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the inhibitory capacity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) due to the action of antagonistic substances, 8 members of the LAB group namely, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus cellebiosuis, Lactobacillus delbruesckii, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides ...

  19. Inactivation and changes in metabolic profile of selected foodborne bacteria by 460 nm LED illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Ghate, Vinayak; Kim, Min-Jeong; Zhou, Weibiao; Khoo, Gek Hoon; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 460 nm light-emitting diode (LED) on the inactivation of foodborne bacteria. Additionally, the change in the endogenous metabolic profile of LED illuminated cells was analyzed to understand the bacterial response to the LED illumination. Six different species of bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella Typhimurium) were illuminated with 460 nm LED to a maximum dose of 4080 J/cm 2 at 4, 10 and 25 °C. Inactivation curves were modeled using Hom model. Metabolic profiling of the non-illuminated and illuminated cells was performed using a Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Results indicate that the 460 nm LED significantly (p LED illumination. These results elucidate the effectiveness of 460 nm LED against foodborne bacteria and hence, its suitability as a novel antimicrobial control method to ensure food safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome-scale modeling and transcriptome analysis of Leuconostoc mesenteroides unravel the redox governed metabolic states in obligate heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Lokanand; Kim, Yujin; Bang, Jeongsu; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Han, Nam Soo; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2017-11-16

    Obligate heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are well-known for their beneficial health effects in humans. To delineate the incompletely characterized metabolism that currently limits their exploitation, at systems-level, we developed a genome-scale metabolic model of the representative obligate heterofermenting LAB, Leuconostoc mesenteroides (iLME620). Constraint-based flux analysis was then used to simulate several qualitative and quantitative phenotypes of L. mesenteroides, thereby evaluating the model validity. With established predictive capabilities, we subsequently employed iLME620 to elucidate unique metabolic characteristics of L. mesenteroides, such as the limited ability to utilize amino acids as energy source, and to substantiate the role of malolactic fermentation (MLF) in the reduction of pH-homeostatic burden on F 0 F 1 -ATPase. We also reported new hypothesis on the MLF mechanism that could be explained via a substrate channelling-like phenomenon mainly influenced by intracellular redox state rather than the intermediary reactions. Model simulations further revealed possible proton-symporter dependent activity of the energy efficient glucose-phosphotransferase system in obligate heterofermentative LAB. Moreover, integrated transcriptomic analysis allowed us to hypothesize transcriptional regulatory bias affecting the intracellular redox state. The insights gained here about the low ATP-yielding metabolism of L. mesenteroides, dominantly controlled by the cellular redox state, could potentially aid strain design for probiotic and cell factory applications.

  1. Total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, and acceptance of synbiotic yoghurt with red ginger extract (Zingiberofficinale var. rubrum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larasati, B. A.; Panunggal, B.; Afifah, D. N.; Anjani, G.; Rustanti, N.

    2018-02-01

    Antioxidant related to oxidative stress can caused the metabolic disorders. A functional food that high in antioxidant can be use as the alternative prevention. The addition of red ginger extract in yoghurt could form a functional food, that high in antioxidant, synbiotic and fiber. The influence of red ginger extract on yoghurt synbiotic against lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity and acceptance were analyzed. This was an experimental research with one factor complete randomized design, specifically the addition of red ginger extract 0%; 0,1%; 0,3% and 0,5% into synbiotic yoghurt. Total plate count method used to analyze the lactic acid bacteria, 1-1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method for antioxidant activity, and acceptance analyzed with hedonic test. The higher the dose of extract added to synbiotic yoghurt, the antioxidant activity got significantly increased (ρ=0,0001), while the lactic acid bacteria got insignificantly decreased (ρ=0,085). The addition of 0,5% red ginger extract obtained the antioxidant activity of 71% and 4,86 × 1013 CFU/ml on lactic acid bacteria, which the requirement for probiotic on National Standard of Indonesia is >107 CFU/ml. The addition of extract had a significant effect on acceptance (ρ=0,0001) in flavor, color, and texture, but not aroma (ρ=0,266). The optimal product in this research was the yoghurt synbiotic with addition of 0,1% red ginger extract. To summarize, the addition of red ginger extract in synbiotic yoghurt had significant effect on antioxidant activity, flavor, color, and texture, but no significant effect on lactic acid bacteria and aroma.

  2. Distribution of bacterioplankton with active metabolism in waters of the St. Anna Trough, Kara Sea, in autumn 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosharova, I. V.; Mosharov, S. A.; Ilinskiy, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of bacterioplankton with active electron transport chains, as well as bacteria with intact cell membranes, was investigated for the first time in the region of St. Anna Trough in the Kara Sea. The average number of bacteria with active electron transport chains in the waters of the St. Anna Trough was 15.55 × 103 cells mL-1 (the limits of variation were 1.06-92.17 × 103 cells mL-1). The average number of bacteria with intact membranes was 33.46 × 103 cells mL-1 (the limits of variation were 6.78 to 103.18 × 103 cells mL-1). Almost all bacterioplankton microorganisms in the studied area were potentially viable, and the average share of bacteria with intact membranes was 92.1% of the total number of bacterioplankton (TNB) (the limits of variation were 76.2 to 98.4%). The share of bacteria with active metabolisms was 38.2% of the TNB (the limits of variation were 5.6-93.4%). The shares of the bacteria with active metabolisms were maximum in areas with the most stable environmental conditions (on the shelf and in deep water), whereas on the slope, where the gradients of water temperature and salinity were maximum, these values were lower.

  3. Size-dependent antibacterial activities of silver nanoparticles against oral anaerobic pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Rong, Kaifeng; Li, Ju; Yang, Hao; Chen, Rong

    2013-06-01

    Dental caries and periodontal disease are widespread diseases for which microorganism infections have been identified as the main etiology. Silver nanoparticles (Ag Nps) were considered as potential control oral bacteria infection agent due to its excellent antimicrobial activity and non acute toxic effects on human cells. In this work, stable Ag Nps with different sizes (~5, 15 and 55 nm mean values) were synthesized by using a simple reduction method or hydrothermal method. The Nps were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The antibacterial activities were evaluated by colony counting assay and growth inhibition curve method, and corresponding minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against five anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria and aerobic bacteria E. coli were determined. The results showed that Ag Nps had apparent antibacterial effects against the anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria and aerobic bacteria. The MIC values of 5-nm Ag against anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria A. actinomycetemcomitans, F. nuceatum, S. mitis, S. mutans and S. sanguis were 25, 25, 25, 50 and 50 μg/mL, respectively. The aerobic bacteria were more susceptible to Ag NPs than the anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria. In the mean time, Ag NPs displayed an obvious size-dependent antibacterial activity against the anaerobic bacteria. The 5-nm Ag presents the highest antibacterial activity. The results of this work indicated a potential application of Ag Nps in the inhibition of oral microorganism infections.

  4. Emerging principles of inorganic nitrogen metabolism in Paracoccus denitrificans and related bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthamer, A.H.; de Boer, A P; van der Oost, J.; van Spanning, R J

    The taxonomy of Paracoccus denitrificans and related bacteria is discussed. Evidence is given which shows that the physiological differences between P. denitrificans and Thiosphaera pantotropha are less fundamental than previously thought. A proposal to consider a species P. pantotropha is

  5. Extracellular enzyme activities of aquatic bacteria in polluted environment: 2. Amylolytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbaciauskiene, V.

    2003-01-01

    Water samples were taken from Lake Drukshiai tributaries (Ricanka); Gulbinele Stream affected by urban rain sewerage from Visaginas; Gulbinele Stream into which municipal sewage from Visaginas (MS) and industrial rain sewerage from the Ignalina NPP and their mouth, and Lake Dringis. Lake Dringis, in Aukstaitija National Park, was selected as an ecosystem pattern of a weak anthropogenic influence, while Lake Drukshiai was chosen as a regularly polluted water body. Lake Drukshiai, the cooling basin of the Ignalina NPP (IRS-1.2), is being polluted with industrial and municipal sewage through its tributaries. The amylolytic activity (AA) of heterotrophic aquatic bacteria was tested. The highest total mean AA of aquatic bacteria was calculated in Lake Dringis. Here, the results were significantly higher than in Lake Drukshiai tributaries and their mouths, excepting the mouths of the Ricanka and MS. The lowest mean of AA in Lake Drukshiai was characteristic of the IRS-1.2 tributary. A comparison of the mean AA of active isolates showed that certain bacterial strains from the sites of varying degrees of pollution could be noted for a relatively high level of enzymatic activity. Thus, anthropogenic pollution exerts a negative effect on the total mean AA, although certain strains of bacteria are able to adapt to the stressful environment and remain active. (author)

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF A NARROW SPECTRUM ANTIMICROBIAL THAT EXHIBITS SPECIFIC ACTIVITY AGAINST UROPATHOGENIC BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    NARROW-SPECTRUM ANTIMICROBIAL THAT EXHIBITS SPECIFIC ACTIVITY AGAINST UROPATHOGENIC BACTERIA by Caitlin M. Barrows Courtney M. Cowell Jennifer...AGAINST UROPATHOGENIC BACTERIA 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Caitlin M. Barrows, Courtney M...antimicrobials which have been implicated as a critical cause of the rise of drug resistant bacteria . Additionally, the presence of females in the field

  7. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Traditional Artisanal Milk Cheese from Northeast China Against Enteropathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xingyang; Shi, Yunjia; Gu, Shanshan; Yan, Xin; Chen, Hongyan; Ge, Junwei

    2017-12-07

    The present study aims to investigate the probiotic properties of novel strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional artisanal milk cheese from Northeast China and to explore their antibacterial activity against enteropathogenic bacteria. Of the 321 isolates, 86 exhibited survival in low pH, resistance to pancreatin, and tolerance to bile salts; of these, 12 inhibited the growth of more than seven enteropathogenic bacteria and exhibited antibiofilm activities against Staphylococcus aureus CMCC26003 and/or Escherichia coli CVCC230. Based on 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis, the 12 isolates were assigned to Lactobacillus plantarum (7), Lactobacillus helveticus (3), Pediococcus acidilactici (1), and Enterococcus faecium (1) species. In addition, 5 of the 12 strains were susceptible to most of the tested antibiotics. Furthermore, four strains with sensitivity to antibiotics showed significantly high levels of hydrophobicity similar to or better than the reference strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Moreover, three strains were confirmed safe through non-hemolytic activities and bacterial translocation. Overall, the selected Lact. plantarum 27053 and 27172 and Lact. helveticus 27058 strains can be considered potential probiotic strains and candidates for further application in functional food and prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal diseases.

  8. Experimental investigation of activities and tolerance of denitrifying bacteria under alkaline and reducing condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mine, Tatsuya; Mihara, Morihiro; Ooi, Takao

    2000-07-01

    In the geological disposal system of TRU wastes, nitrogen generation by denitrifying bacteria could provide significant impact on the assessment of this system, because nitrate contained in process concentrated liquid waste might be electron acceptor for denitrifying bacteria. In this study, the activities and tolerance of denitrifying under disposal condition were investigated. Pseudomonas denitrificans as denitrifying bacteria was used. The results showed that Pseudomonas denitrificans had activity under reducing condition, but under high pH condition (pH>9.5), the activity of Pseudomonas denitrificans was not detected. It is possible that the activity of Pseudomonas denitrificans would be low under disposal condition. (author)

  9. Impact of interspecific interactions on antimicrobial activity among soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, O.; Berg, van den M.; Gerards, S.; Veen, van J.A.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Boer, de W.; Garbeva, P.

    2014-01-01

    Certain bacterial species produce antimicrobial compounds only in the presence of a competing species. However, little is known on the frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antibiotic compound production in natural communities of soil bacteria. Here we developed a high-throughput method to

  10. [Ligninolytic Activity of Bacteria of the Genera Azospirillum and Niveispirillum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupryashina, M A; Petrov, S V; Ponomareva, E G; Nikitina, V E

    2015-01-01

    Capacity of associative soil bacteria of the genera Azospirillum and Niveispirillum for degradation of lignin model compounds was demonstrated. Lignin and Mn-peroxidases were detected in the culture liquid of the type strains of these genera. The data on involvement of nonspecific bacterial peroxidases in lignin degradation were obtained.

  11. Antimicrobial activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from akamu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates designated AS1, AS2 and KN4 isolated from kunun-zaki (a sorghum based non-alcoholic beverage widely consumed in Northern Nigeria) and identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus delbruckii, respectively, produced significant inhibitory ...

  12. Amylase activity of a starch degrading bacteria isolated from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Starch degrading bacteria are most important for industries such as food, fermentation, textile and paper. Thus isolating and manipulating pure culture from various waste materials has manifold importance for various biotechnology industries. In the present investigation a bacterial strain was isolated from soil sample ...

  13. Short Communication Antibacterial Activities of Lactic Acid Bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-20

    Dec 20, 2011 ... A total of four lactic acid bacteria were isolated as follows: Pediococcus pentosaceus 2 from cucumber, Lactobacillus cellobiosus from cabbage, Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus plantarum 1 from lettuce. Pediococcus pentosaceus 2 and L. salivarius showed inhibitory effects on all the standard ...

  14. Amylase activity of a starch degrading bacteria isolated from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... Starch degrading bacteria are most important for industries such as food, fermentation, textile and paper. ... Microorganism. During the present investigation Bacillus strain was isolated from soil samples collected from different sites receiving kitchen wastes. One gram of soil ..... Cloning and Expression of.

  15. Chitinase producing bacteria with direct algicidal activity on marine diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Lei, Xueqian; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Huajun; Guan, Chengwei; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Fu, Lijun; Zheng, Tianling

    2016-02-23

    Chitinase producing bacteria can involve extensively in nutrient cycling and energy flow in the aquatic environment through degradation and utilization of chitin. It is well known that diatoms cells are encased by box-like frustules composed of chitin. Thus the chitin containing of diatoms shall be a natural target of chitinase producing bacteria, however, the interaction between these two organismic groups has not been studied thus far. Therefore, in this study, the algicidal mechanism of one chitinase producing bacterium (strain LY03) on Thalassiosira pseudonana was investigated. The algicidal range and algicidal mode of strain LY03 were first studied, and then bacterial viability, chemotactic ability and direct interaction characteristic between bacteria and diatom were also confirmed. Finally, the characteristic of the intracellular algicidal substance was identified and the algicidal mechanism was determined whereby algicidal bacterial cells showed chemotaxis to algal cells, fastened themselves on algal cells with their flagella, and then produced chitinase to degrade algal cell walls, and eventually caused algal lysis and death. It is the first time to investigate the interaction between chitinase producing bacteria and diatoms, and this novel special interaction mode was confirmed in this study, which will be helpful in protection and utilization of diatoms resources.

  16. Dynamic Evolution of Nitric Oxide Detoxifying Flavohemoglobins, a Family of Single-Protein Metabolic Modules in Bacteria and Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Alexander, William G; King, Sean B; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-08-01

    Due to their functional independence, proteins that comprise standalone metabolic units, which we name single-protein metabolic modules, may be particularly prone to gene duplication (GD) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Flavohemoglobins (flavoHbs) are prime examples of single-protein metabolic modules, detoxifying nitric oxide (NO), a ubiquitous toxin whose antimicrobial properties many life forms exploit, to nitrate, a common source of nitrogen for organisms. FlavoHbs appear widespread in bacteria and have been identified in a handful of microbial eukaryotes, but how the distribution of this ecologically and biomedically important protein family evolved remains unknown. Reconstruction of the evolutionary history of 3,318 flavoHb protein sequences covering the family's known diversity showed evidence of recurrent HGT at multiple evolutionary scales including intrabacterial HGT, as well as HGT from bacteria to eukaryotes. One of the most striking examples of HGT is the acquisition of a flavoHb by the dandruff- and eczema-causing fungus Malassezia from Corynebacterium Actinobacteria, a transfer that growth experiments show is capable of mediating NO resistance in fungi. Other flavoHbs arose via GD; for example, many filamentous fungi possess two flavoHbs that are differentially targeted to the cytosol and mitochondria, likely conferring protection against external and internal sources of NO, respectively. Because single-protein metabolic modules such as flavoHb function independently, readily undergo GD and HGT, and are frequently involved in organismal defense and competition, we suggest that they represent "plug-and-play" proteins for ecological arms races. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The interplay between intestinal bacteria and host metabolism in health and disease: lessons from Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. N. Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available All higher organisms negotiate a truce with their commensal microbes and battle pathogenic microbes on a daily basis. Much attention has been given to the role of the innate immune system in controlling intestinal microbes and to the strategies used by intestinal microbes to overcome the host immune response. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the metabolisms of intestinal microbes and their hosts are linked and that this interaction is equally important for host health and well-being. For instance, an individual's array of commensal microbes can influence their predisposition to chronic metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. A better understanding of host–microbe metabolic interactions is important in defining the molecular bases of these disorders and could potentially lead to new therapeutic avenues. Key advances in this area have been made using Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we review studies that have explored the impact of both commensal and pathogenic intestinal microbes on Drosophila carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These studies have helped to elucidate the metabolites produced by intestinal microbes, the intestinal receptors that sense these metabolites, and the signaling pathways through which these metabolites manipulate host metabolism. Furthermore, they suggest that targeting microbial metabolism could represent an effective therapeutic strategy for human metabolic diseases and intestinal infection.

  18. Influence of bacteria and bacterial activity on the evolution of the free corrosion potentials of stainless steels in natural seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, I.

    1996-10-01

    The free corrosion potential of a stainless steel under seawater increases. This increase depends of a lot of parameters, among them is found in particular: the temperature, the presence of molecular oxygen and the microorganisms. The aim of this work is to describe the role of the sea bacteria and of their activities on the increase of this potential. Stainless steel test-pieces have been put in natural seawater at different temperatures and their corrosion potential determined. It has been shown that the potential increases at 20 C but not at 40 C. The marine bacteria, present in seawater and fixed on the test-pieces at 20 and 40 C have been quantified by epi-fluorescence microscopy. The number of bacteria fixed at these two temperatures are similar. A sample of bacteria has been cut off on test-pieces and in seawater at 20 and 40 C. Their phenotypic analysis has allowed to classify them by numerical taxonomy in different phenons and by their metabolic spectra, it has been possible to distinguish the bacteria fixed at 20 C and those fixed at 40 C. The presence of an important bio-film at 40 C in the absence of a change of potential shows that the fixation of bacteria on stainless steel, if it is necessary, is not a sufficient condition for the starting of this phenomenon. The addition of a microbial enzyme in sterile seawater, the glucose oxidase, catalyzing the oxygen reduction in presence of glucose leads to an increase of the potential. The formation of hydrogen peroxide and the decrease of the pH of the medium seem responsible of this phenomenon. All these results have led us to propose a mechanism clarifying the increase of the potential of stainless steel in natural seawater. (O.M.)

  19. Enzyme activity screening of thermophilic bacteria isolated from Dusun Tua Hot Spring, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msarah, Marwan; Ibrahim, Izyanti; Aqma, Wan Syaidatul

    2018-04-01

    Thermophilic bacteria have biotechnological importance due to the availability of unique enzymes which are stable in extreme circumstances. The aim of this study includes to isolate thermophilic bacteria from hot spring and screen for important enzyme activities. Water samples from the Dusun Tua Hot Spring were collected and the physiochemical characterisation of water was measured. Eight thermophilic bacteria were isolated and determined to have at least three strong enzyme activity including protease, lipase, amylase, cellulase, pectinase and xylanase. The results showed that HuluC2 displayed all the enzyme activities and can be further studied.

  20. Metabolism features in the active rheumatoid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossermelli, W.; Carvalho, N.; Papaleo Netto, M.

    1974-01-01

    It was studied the 131 I-labelled albumin metabolism in fourteen female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The half-life of distribution was increased while the turnover half-life and turnover rate was within normal limits. These results led to assume that synthesis and catabolism may not change this disease, not being the responsible mechanism of hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemia would appear as compensatory mechanism in view of other protein alterations, as hypergammaglobulinemia, without changes of stabilizing and metabolic properties of albumin, perhaps due to albumin molecular alterations [pt

  1. Directed transport of active magnetotactic bacteria in porous media flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbord, Nicolas; Dehkharghani, Amin; Coons, Thomas; Guasto, Jeffrey S.

    2017-11-01

    Swimming cell migration through porous media is a topic of ecological and technical relevance for understanding sediment ecosystems and bioremediation of soil for decontamination. We focus on magnetotactic bacteria - which align passively with Earth's magnetic field and migrate in such sediment environments - as a model system. The transport properties of magnetotactic bacteria are measured in a 2D microfluidic porous medium as a function of the porous microstructure geometry and under a variety of environmental conditions. In a quiescent fluid and in the absence of an external, guiding magnetic field, the effective diffusion of cells' random walk is unsurprisingly hindered with decreasing porosity due to cell-surface interactions. When guided by a magnetic field, cell trajectories acquire a net direction and form lanes, a behavior that is enhanced with increasing magnetic field. When the directed motility is coupled with an opposing fluid flow through the porous medium, convective cells form and locally trap the swimming bacteria. These results, which are corroborated by Langevin Simulations are an important step toward understanding magnetotactic bacterial ecology as well as for the magnetic guidance of microrobots in complex environments. Supported by NSF Grant CBET-1511340.

  2. Impact of Seasonal Hypoxia on Activity and Community Structure of Chemolithoautotrophic Bacteria in a Coastal Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsewers, Yvonne A; Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Seitaj, Dorina; Schauer, Regina; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Meysman, Filip J R; Villanueva, Laura; Boschker, Henricus T S

    2017-05-15

    Seasonal hypoxia in coastal systems drastically changes the availability of electron acceptors in bottom water, which alters the sedimentary reoxidation of reduced compounds. However, the effect of seasonal hypoxia on the chemolithoautotrophic community that catalyzes these reoxidation reactions is rarely studied. Here, we examine the changes in activity and structure of the sedimentary chemolithoautotrophic bacterial community of a seasonally hypoxic saline basin under oxic (spring) and hypoxic (summer) conditions. Combined 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and analysis of phospholipid-derived fatty acids indicated a major temporal shift in community structure. Aerobic sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria ( Thiotrichales ) and Epsilonproteobacteria ( Campylobacterales ) were prevalent during spring, whereas Deltaproteobacteria ( Desulfobacterales ) related to sulfate-reducing bacteria prevailed during summer hypoxia. Chemolithoautotrophy rates in the surface sediment were three times higher in spring than in summer. The depth distribution of chemolithoautotrophy was linked to the distinct sulfur oxidation mechanisms identified through microsensor profiling, i.e., canonical sulfur oxidation, electrogenic sulfur oxidation by cable bacteria, and sulfide oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction by Beggiatoaceae The metabolic diversity of the sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community suggests a complex niche partitioning within the sediment, probably driven by the availability of reduced sulfur compounds (H 2 S, S 0 , and S 2 O 3 2- ) and electron acceptors (O 2 and NO 3 - ) regulated by seasonal hypoxia. IMPORTANCE Chemolithoautotrophic microbes in the seafloor are dependent on electron acceptors, like oxygen and nitrate, that diffuse from the overlying water. Seasonal hypoxia, however, drastically changes the availability of these electron acceptors in the bottom water; hence, one expects a strong impact of seasonal hypoxia on sedimentary chemolithoautotrophy. A

  3. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production: Progress report, February 1, 1987-February 1, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeikus, J.G.; Shen, Gwo-Jenn.

    1988-01-01

    These studies concern the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that control carbon and electron flow in anaerobic bacteria that conserve energy when coupling hydrogen consumption to the production of acetic, propionic, or butyric acids. Two acidogens, Propionispira arboris and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum were chosen as model systems to understand the function of oxidoreductases and electron carriers in the regulation of hydrogen metabolism and single carbon metabolism. In P. arboris, H 2 consumption was linked to the inhibition of CO 2 production and an increase in the propionate/acetate rate; whereas, H 2 consumption was linked to a stimulation of CO 2 consumption and an increase in the butyrate/acetate ratio in B. methylotrophicum. We report studies on the enzymes involved in the regulation of singe carbon metabolism, the enzyme activities and pathways responsible for conversion of multicarbon components to acetate and propionate or butyrate, and how low pH inhibits H 2 and acetic acid production in Sarcina ventriculi as a consequence of hydrogenase regulation. 9 refs

  4. Genomic Insights into the Sulfur Metabolism of Phototrophic Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, ferrous iron, and hydrogen for anaerobic photoautotrophic growth. Genome sequence data is currently available for 12 strains of GSB. We present here a genome-based survey of the distribution...

  5. Genomic and Evolutionary Perspectives on Sulfur Metabolism in Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are anaerobic photoautotrophs that oxidize sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, ferrous iron, and hydrogen for growth. We present here an analysis of the distribution and evolution of enzymes involved in oxidation of sulfur compounds in GSB based on genome sequence...

  6. Anaerobic hydrocarbon and fatty acid metabolism by syntrophic bacteria and their impact on carbon steel corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Neil Lyles

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbial metabolism of hydrocarbons is increasingly associated with the corrosion of carbon steel in sulfate-rich marine waters. However, how such transformations influence metal biocorrosion in the absence of an electron acceptor is not fully recognized. We grew a marine alkane-utilizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens, with either sulfate or Methanospirillum hungatei as electron acceptors, and tested the ability of the cultures to catalyze metal corrosion. Axenically, D. alkanexedens had a higher instantaneous corrosion rate and produced more pits in carbon steel coupons than when the same organism was grown in syntrophic co-culture with the methanogen. Since anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways converge on fatty acid intermediates, the corrosive ability of a known fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus aciditrophicus was compared when grown in pure culture or in co-culture with a H2-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp., strain G11 or a methanogen (M. hungatei. The instantaneous corrosion rates in the cultures were not substantially different, but the syntrophic, sulfate-reducing co-culture produced more pits in coupons than other combinations of microorganisms. Lactate-grown cultures of strain G11 had higher instantaneous corrosion rates and coupon pitting compared to the same organism cultured with hydrogen as an electron donor. Thus, if sulfate is available as an electron acceptor, the same microbial assemblages produce sulfide and low molecular weight organic acids that exacerbated biocorrosion. Despite these trends, a surprisingly high degree of variation was encountered with the corrosion assessments. Differences in biomass, initial substrate concentration, rates of microbial activity or the degree of end product formation did not account for the variations. We are forced to ascribe such differences to the metallurgical properties of the coupons.

  7. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that

  8. Antibacterial activities of β-glucan (laminaran) against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamidah, A.; Hardoko, Prihanto, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the antibacterial activity of β-Glucan (laminaran) of LAE and LME extracts from brown algae Sargassum crassifolium using HPMS and Ultrasonication against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli). The highest antibacterial activities of LME extract obtained using the HPMS method against Gram-positive bacteria (B. subtilis and S. aureus) were at 18:10 and 18.80 mm. The ultrasonication method showed a lower inhibition trend than the HPMS method, with MIC and MBC values of 250 mg/ml and 2-8 CFU/ml, respectively, in all Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The results showed that LME extract at a concentration of 250 mg/mL is bacteriostatic against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria.

  9. Epithermal neutron activation analysis of CR(VI)-reducer basalt-inhabiting bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsibakhashvili, N.Ya.; Kalabegishvili, T.L.; Murusidze, I.G.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Kirkesali, E.I.; Aksenova, N.G.; Holman, H.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) has been applied to studying elemental composition of Cr(VI)-reducer bacteria isolated from polluted basalts from the Republic of Georgia. Cr(VI)-reducing ability of the bacteria was examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) demonstrating that the bacteria differ in the rates of Cr(VI) reduction. A well-pronounced correlation between the ability of the bacteria to accumulate Cr(VI) and their ability to reduce Cr(V) to Cr(III) observed in our experiments is discussed. Elemental analysis of these bacteria also revealed that basalt-inhabiting bacteria are distinguished by relative contents of essential elements such as K, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Co. A high rate of Cr(III) formation correlates with a high concentration of Co in the bacterium. ENAA detected some similarity in the elemental composition of the bacteria. The relatively high contents of Fe detected in the bacteria (140-340 μg/g of dry weight) indicate bacterial adaptation to the environmental conditions typical of the basalts. The concentrations of at least 12-19 different elements ranging from major- to ultratrace ones were determined in each type of bacteria simultaneously. The range of concentrations spans over 8 orders of magnitude

  10. Lactic acid bacteria of the Leuconostoc genus with high innate immunity-stimulating activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masaki; Nishida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Keiko; Nishiyama, Yayoi; Abe, Shigeru; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2017-03-22

    We screened lactic acid bacteria that exhibited high innate immunity-stimulating activity by monitoring muscle contraction activity in silkworms. Heat-treated fractions of lactic acid bacteria, Leuconostoc carnosum #7-2, Leuconostoc gelidum #4-2, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides 8/11-3, had high (250-460 units/mg) innate immunity-stimulating activity. These lactic acid bacteria proliferated in milk to concentrations of 1 × 10 6 colony forming unit/mL. The present findings suggest that the silkworm muscle contraction assay is useful for screening lactic acid bacteria with high innate immunity-stimulating activity, and that the assay can be used for the production of fermented foods made from milk.

  11. Bacillus spp. produce antibacterial activities against lactic acid bacteria that contaminate fuel ethanol plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) frequently contaminate commercial fuel ethanol fermentations, reducing yields and decreasing profitability of biofuel production. Microorganisms from environmental sources in different geographic regions of Thailand were tested for antibacterial activity against LAB. Fou...

  12. Antimicrobial Activity – The Most Important Property of Probiotic and Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaženka Kos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of industrially important lactic acid bacteria as starter cultures and probiotic bacteria is the main subject of this review. This activity has been attributed to the production of metabolites such as organic acids (lactic and acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, diacetyl, acetaldehyde, acetoine, carbon dioxide, reuterin, reutericyclin and bacteriocins. The potential of using bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria, primarily used as biopreservatives, represents a perspective, alternative antimicrobial strategy for continuously increasing problem with antibiotic resistance. Another strategy in resolving this problem is an application of probiotics for different gastrointestinal and urogenital infection therapies.

  13. Effects of culture medium compositions on antidiabetic activity and anticancer activity of marine endophitic bacteria isolated from sponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryani, Faiza; Mulyani, Hani; Artanti, Nina; Udin, Linar Zalinar; Dewi, Rizna Triana; Hanafi, Muhammad; Murniasih, Tutik

    2017-01-01

    High diversity of Indonesia marine spesies and their ability in producing secondary metabolite that can be used as a drug candidate cause this fascinating topic need to explore. Most of marine organisms explored to discover drug is macroorganism whereas microorganism (such as Indonesia marine bacteria) is very limited. Therefore, in this report, antidiabetic and anticancer activity of Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from Sponges's extract have been studied. Bacteria strain 8.9 which are collection of Research Center for Oseanography, Indonesian Institute of Sciences were from Barrang Lompo Island, Makasar, Indonesia. Bacteria were cultured in different culture medium compositions (such as: different pH, source of glucose and water) for 48 hours on a shaker, then they were extracted with ethyl asetate. Extracts of bacteria were tested by DPPH method (antioxidant activity), alpha glucosidase inhibitory activity method (antidiabetic activity), and Alamar Blue assay (anticancer activity) at 200 ppm. According to result, extract of bacteria in pH 8.0 exhibited the greatest antioxidant (19.27% inhibition), antidiabetic (63.95% inhibition) and anticancer activity of T47D cell line (44.62% cell viability) compared to other extracts. However, effect of addition of sugar sources (such as: glucose, sucrose, and soluble starch) and effect of addition of water/sea water exhibited less influence on their bioactivities. In conclusion, Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from sponge have potential a source of bioactive compound in drug discovery field.

  14. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tgoto@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Ohue, Ryuji [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Nomura, Wataru [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Sugawara, Tatsuya [Laboratory of Marine Bioproducts Technology, Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yu, Rina [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kitamura, Nahoko [Laboratory of Fermentation Physiology and Applied Microbiology, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  15. Metabolic features of Protochlamydia amoebophila elementary bodies--a link between activity and infectivity in Chlamydiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara S Sixt

    Full Text Available The Chlamydiae are a highly successful group of obligate intracellular bacteria, whose members are remarkably diverse, ranging from major pathogens of humans and animals to symbionts of ubiquitous protozoa. While their infective developmental stage, the elementary body (EB, has long been accepted to be completely metabolically inert, it has recently been shown to sustain some activities, including uptake of amino acids and protein biosynthesis. In the current study, we performed an in-depth characterization of the metabolic capabilities of EBs of the amoeba symbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila. A combined metabolomics approach, including fluorescence microscopy-based assays, isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS, ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ICR/FT-MS, and ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS was conducted, with a particular focus on the central carbon metabolism. In addition, the effect of nutrient deprivation on chlamydial infectivity was analyzed. Our investigations revealed that host-free P. amoebophila EBs maintain respiratory activity and metabolize D-glucose, including substrate uptake as well as host-free synthesis of labeled metabolites and release of labeled CO2 from (13C-labeled D-glucose. The pentose phosphate pathway was identified as major route of D-glucose catabolism and host-independent activity of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle was observed. Our data strongly suggest anabolic reactions in P. amoebophila EBs and demonstrate that under the applied conditions D-glucose availability is essential to sustain metabolic activity. Replacement of this substrate by L-glucose, a non-metabolizable sugar, led to a rapid decline in the number of infectious particles. Likewise, infectivity of Chlamydia trachomatis, a major human pathogen, also declined more rapidly in the absence of nutrients. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that D-glucose is utilized by P. amoebophila

  16. Isolation of dextran-hydrolyzing intestinal bacteria and characterization of their dextranolytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Kyoung; Shin, So-Yeon; Moon, Jin Seok; Li, Ling; Cho, Seung Kee; Kim, Tae-Jip; Han, Nam Soo

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate dextran-hydrolyzing bacteria from the human intestines and to identify their dextranolytic enzymes. For this, dextranase-producing microorganisms were screened from fecal samples by using blue dextran-containing media. Colonies producing a decolorized zone were isolated and they were grouped using RAPD-PCR. 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed the isolates were Bacteroides (B.) thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus, B. vulgatus, B. dorei, B. xylanisolvens, B. uniformis, and Veillonella (V.) rogosae. Thin layer chromatography analysis showed that the dextranases exhibit mainly endo-type activity and produce various oligosaccharides including isomaltose and isomaltotriose. Zymogram analysis demonstrated that enzymes localized mainly in the cell membrane fraction and the molecular weight was 50-70 kDa. When cultured in a dextran-containing medium, all strains isolated in this study produced short-chain fatty acids, with butyric acid as the major compound. This is the first study to report that human intestinal B. xylanisolvens, B. dorei, and V. rogosae metabolize dextran utilizing dextranolytic enzymes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Lactic acid bacteria: promising supplements for enhancing the biological activities of kombucha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Khoi; Dong, Ngan Thi Ngoc; Nguyen, Huong Thuy; Le, Phu Hong

    2015-01-01

    Kombucha is sweetened black tea that is fermented by a symbiosis of bacteria and yeast embedded within a cellulose membrane. It is considered a health drink in many countries because it is a rich source of vitamins and may have other health benefits. It has previously been reported that adding lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus) strains to kombucha can enhance its biological functions, but in that study only lactic acid bacteria isolated from kefir grains were tested. There are many other natural sources of lactic acid bacteria. In this study, we examined the effects of lactic acid bacteria from various fermented Vietnamese food sources (pickled cabbage, kefir and kombucha) on kombucha's three main biological functions: glucuronic acid production, antibacterial activity and antioxidant ability. Glucuronic acid production was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, antibacterial activity was assessed by the agar-well diffusion method and antioxidant ability was evaluated by determining the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity. Four strains of food-borne pathogenic bacteria were used in our antibacterial experiments: Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19111, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 and Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778. Our findings showed that lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from kefir are superior to those from other sources for improving glucuronic acid production and enhancing the antibacterial and antioxidant activities of kombucha. This study illustrates the potential of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from kefir as biosupplements for enhancing the bioactivities of kombucha.

  18. Metabolic activity, experiment M171. [space flight effects on human metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, E. L.; Rummel, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab metabolic activity experiment determines if man's metabolic effectiveness in doing mechanical work is progressively altered by a simulated Skylab environment, including environmental factors such as slightly increased pCO2. This test identified several hardware/procedural anomalies. The most important of these were: (1) the metabolic analyzer measured carbon dioxide production and expired water too high; (2) the ergometer load module failed under continuous high workload conditions; (3) a higher than desirable number of erroneous blood pressure measurements were recorded; (4) vital capacity measurements were unreliable; and (5) anticipated crew personal exercise needs to be more structured.

  19. Quantification of Aerobic Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soil using Activity-Based Fluorescent Labeling of Ammonia Monooxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnan, J.; Bennett, K.; Hyman, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrification is a key step in the biological nitrogen cycle and has a large effect on the fate of nitrogen species in both wastewater treatment systems and agricultural soils. Aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) initiate nitrification by converting ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2-) and are therefore pivotal to the process. AOB are ubiquitous in the environment but are difficult to quantify as they grow poorly on solid media. Other quantification methods like iquid most-probable number techniques are slow and error-prone, while modern molecular approaches involving polymerase chain reaction amplification are faster and more accurate but do not differentiate between active and inactive AOB. In this study, we explored using activity-based fluorescent mechanisms for rapidly quantifying metabolically active forms of AOB in soils. Initial experiments using Nitrosomonas europaea aimed to establish a relationship between NH3-dependent nitrite production and bacterial cell numbers. Active AMO was treated cells with 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) to inactivate the enzyme and a subsequent copper-dependent "click" reaction attached a fluor. The labeled protein was quantified by SDS-PAGE and IR scanning. In future experiments, AOB will be stimulated in soil microcosms by adding NH4Cl. AMO will again be inactivated by adding 17OD, and total bacteria will be separated from the soil samples using gradient centrifugation. After "click" conjugation with AlexaFluor 647 azide, the abundance of AMO will be determined with SDS-PAGE and IR analysis while metabolically active AOB will be measured via fluorescence-activating cell sorting.

  20. Activating transcription factor 3 regulates immune and metabolic homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek; Uhlirova, Mirka

    2012-10-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins.

  1. Active bacteria (CTC+) in temperate lakes: temporal and cross-system variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten; Danielsen, M.

    2001-01-01

    consequence of the low abundance of active bacteria is that in situ growth rates scaled to CTC+ cells are 3- to 7-fold higher than those scaled to DAPI counts. It is suggested that studies on factors controlling bacterioplankton activity at the single-cell level should be investigated scaled to active cells....

  2. Phylloplane bacteria of Jatropha curcas: diversity, metabolic characteristics, and growth-promoting attributes towards vigor of maize seedling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Garima; Kollah, Bharati; Ahirwar, Usha; Mandal, Asit; Thakur, Jyoti Kumar; Patra, Ashok Kumar; Mohanty, Santosh Ranjan

    2017-10-01

    The complex role of phylloplane microorganisms is less understood than that of rhizospheric microorganisms in lieu of their pivotal role in plant's sustainability. This experiment aims to study the diversity of the culturable phylloplane bacteria of Jatropha curcas and evaluate their growth-promoting activities towards maize seedling vigor. Heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from the phylloplane of J. curcas and their 16S rRNA genes were sequenced. Sequences of the 16S rRNA gene were very similar to those of species belonging to the classes Bacillales (50%), Gammaproteobacteria (21.8%), Betaproteobacteria (15.6%), and Alphaproteobacteria (12.5%). The phylloplane bacteria preferred to utilize alcohol rather than monosaccharides and polysaccharides as a carbon source. Isolates exhibited ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) deaminase, phosphatase, potassium solubilization, and indole acetic acid (IAA) production activities. The phosphate-solubilizing capacity (mg of PO 4 solubilized by 10 8 cells) varied from 0.04 to 0.21. The IAA production potential (μg IAA produced by 10 8 cells in 48 h) of the isolates varied from 0.41 to 9.29. Inoculation of the isolates to maize seed significantly increased shoot and root lengths of maize seedlings. A linear regression model of the plant-growth-promoting activities significantly correlated (p < 0.01) with the growth parameters. Similarly, a correspondence analysis categorized ACC deaminase and IAA production as the major factors contributing 41% and 13.8% variation, respectively, to the growth of maize seedlings.

  3. Peroxisome Proliferators-Activated Receptor (PPAR Modulators and Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Chul Cho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity lead to an increased risk for metabolic disorders such as impaired glucose regulation/insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Several molecular drug targets with potential to prevent or treat metabolic disorders have been revealed. Interestingly, the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR, which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has many beneficial clinical effects. PPAR directly modulates gene expression by binding to a specific ligand. All PPAR subtypes (α,γ, and σ are involved in glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and energy balance. PPAR agonists play an important role in therapeutic aspects of metabolic disorders. However, undesired effects of the existing PPAR agonists have been reported. A great deal of recent research has focused on the discovery of new PPAR modulators with more beneficial effects and more safety without producing undesired side effects. Herein, we briefly review the roles of PPAR in metabolic disorders, the effects of PPAR modulators in metabolic disorders, and the technologies with which to discover new PPAR modulators.

  4. Antimicrobial Activities against Periodontopathic Bacteria of Pittosporum tobira and Its Active Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hyun Oh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of medicinal plants for treatment of periodontitis is of great value to establish their efficacy as sources of new antimicrobial drugs. Five hundred and fifty eight Korean local plant extracts were screened for antibacterial activity against representative periodontopathic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Among the various medicinal plants, the alcohol extract of Pittosporum tobira, which significantly exhibited antibacterial effect for all tested strains, showed the highest activity in the antimicrobial assays. NMR analyses revealed that R1-barrigenol, a triterpene sapogenin, was the most effective compound in P. tobira. These results demonstrated that P. tobira possesses antimicrobial properties and would be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of periodontitis.

  5. Antifungal Activity of Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria and Propionic Acid Bacteria against Dairy-Associated Spoilage Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsbjerg, Stina Dissing

    Bacterial cultures of lactic and propionic acid bacteria are widely used in fermented products including dairy products. Spoilage fungi may constitute a quality and safety issue in these products. The antifungal properties of some lactic and propionic acid bacteria make them potential candidates...... diacetyl and lactic acid, 6 antifungal hydroxy acids were identified. Of these, 3 have previously been reported from antifungal lactic acid bacteria, whereas the other 3 hydroxy acids have not previously been reported produced by antifungal lactic acid bacteria....

  6. Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms with higher proportions of dormant bacteria induce a lower activation of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerca, Filipe; Andrade, Filipa; França, Ângela; Andrade, Elva Bonifácio; Ribeiro, Adília; Almeida, Agostinho A; Cerca, Nuno; Pier, Gerald; Azeredo, Joana; Vilanova, Manuel

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an opportunistic pathogen and, due to its ability to establish biofilms, is a leading causative agent of indwelling medical device-associated infection. The presence of high amounts of dormant bacteria is a hallmark of biofilms, making them more tolerant to antimicrobials and to the host immune response. We observed that S. epidermidis biofilms grown in excess glucose accumulated high amounts of viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacteria, as assessed by their low ratio of culturable bacteria over the number of viable bacteria. This effect, which was a consequence of the accumulation of acidic compounds due to glucose metabolism, was counteracted by high extracellular levels of calcium and magnesium added to the culture medium allowing modulation of the proportions of VBNC bacteria within S. epidermidis biofilms. Using bacterial inocula obtained from biofilms with high and low proportions of VBNC bacteria, their stimulatory effect on murine macrophages was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The inoculum enriched in VBNC bacteria induced in vitro a lower production of tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 by bone-marrow-derived murine macrophages and, in vivo, a lower stimulatory effect on peritoneal macrophages, assessed by increased surface expression of Gr1 and major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Overall, these results show that environmental conditions, such as pH and extracellular levels of calcium and magnesium, can induce dormancy in S. epidermidis biofilms. Moreover, they show that bacterial suspensions enriched in dormant cells are less inflammatory, suggesting that dormancy can contribute to the immune evasion of biofilms. © 2011 SGM

  7. Effect of Soluble Sulfide on the Activity of Luminescent Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide is an important water pollutant widely found in industrial waste water that has attracted much attention. S2−, as a weak acidic anion, is easy hydrolyzed to HS and H2S in aqueous solution. In this study, biological tests were performed to establish the toxicity of sulfide solutions on luminescent bacteria. Considering the sulfide solution was contained three substances—S2−, HS and H2S—the toxicity test was performed at different pH values to investigate which form of sulfide increased light emission and which reduced light emission. It was shown that the EC50 values were close at pH 7.4, 8.0 and 9.0 which were higher than pH 5 and 10. The light emission and sulfide concentrations displayed an inverse exponential dose-response relationship within a certain concentration range at pH 5, 6.5 and 10. The same phenomenon occurred for the high concentration of sulfide at pH 7.4, 8 and 9, in which the concentration of sulfide was HS >> H2S > S2−. An opposite hormesis-effect appeared at the low concentrations of sulfide.

  8. Biodiversity of Active and Inactive Bacteria in the Gut Flora of Wood-Feeding Huhu Beetle Larvae (Prionoplus reticularis)▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Nicola M.; Addison, Sarah L.; Macdonald, Lucy J.; Lloyd-Jones, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    Huhu grubs (Prionoplus reticularis) are wood-feeding beetle larvae endemic to New Zealand and belonging to the family Cerambycidae. Compared to the wood-feeding lower termites, very little is known about the diversity and activity of microorganisms associated with xylophagous cerambycid larvae. To address this, we used pyrosequencing to evaluate the diversity of metabolically active and inactive bacteria in the huhu larval gut. Our estimate, that the gut harbors at least 1,800 phylotypes, is based on 33,420 sequences amplified from genomic DNA and reverse-transcribed RNA. Analysis of genomic DNA- and RNA-derived data sets revealed that 71% of all phylotypes (representing 95% of all sequences) were metabolically active. Rare phylotypes contributed considerably to the richness of the community and were also largely metabolically active, indicating their participation in digestive processes in the gut. The dominant families in the active community (RNA data set) included Acidobacteriaceae (24.3%), Xanthomonadaceae (16.7%), Acetobacteraceae (15.8%), Burkholderiaceae (8.7%), and Enterobacteriaceae (4.1%). The most abundant phylotype comprised 14% of the active community and affiliated with Dyella ginsengisoli (Gammaproteobacteria), suggesting that a Dyella-related organism is a likely symbiont. This study provides new information on the diversity and activity of gut-associated microorganisms that are essential for the digestion of the nutritionally poor diet consumed by wood-feeding larvae. Many huhu gut phylotypes affiliated with insect symbionts or with bacteria present in acidic environments or associated with fungi. PMID:21841025

  9. [Antibacterial activity of Porphyra spp. epiphytic bacteria and polyketide synthase I gene screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wenya; Yang, Rui; Zhu, Peng; Shan, Yuanyuan; Yan, Xiaojun

    2009-02-01

    Based on the antibacterial analysis, we screened Polyketide synthase (PKS I) gene from the epiphytic bacteria of Porphyra spp., in order to obtain the PKS I positive strains and detect the potential connection between the PKS pathway and the antibacterial mechanisms. A total of 31 bacteria with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity were screened by agar-screening methods. The 16S rDNA and the Ketosynthase gene were amplified from the genome DNA of these bacteria, which were cloned into pMD19-T vector for sequencing analysis. Porphyra spp. epiphytic bacteria showed broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Three PKS I positive epiphytic bacteria were obtained from Wenzhou rotten Porphyra spp. samples which had high antibacterial activity. The BLAST results indicated that the Ketosynthase fragments of PKS I from the strains of WPhG3, WPySwl and WPySw2 shared highest similarity (98%, 99%, 98%) to the strains of Bacillus subtilis subsp. Subtilis str. 168 (NP_389602), Bacillus subtilis (ABR19776) and Aspergillus carbonarius (AAZ99721), respectively. Furthermore, the phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences indicated that they belonged to the genus of Bacillus. The flora of Porphyra spp. epiphytic bacteria was complex, which regulated the phycosphere in many ways. The PKS I pathway might be a performance of antibacterial function of Bacillus from Wenzhou rotten samples.

  10. Metabolic response induced by endophytic fungi and bacteria in H. marrubioides Epling in vitro microplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cristina Vitorino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyptis marrubioides Epling is a native plant from Brazilian Cerrado. In this paper, the response of in vitro microplants of this species to inoculation with bacterial and fungal endophytic isolates is evaluated. HPLC-DAD analysis showed the presence of 3,4-O-(Z-dicaffeoylquinic acid and quercetin-7-O-glucoside as the main components. GC/MS analysis demonstrated that the sesquiterpenes τ-cadinol and caryophyllene oxide were only produced in microplants inoculated with endophytic bacteria, while methyl hexadecanoate, methyl heptadecanoate and methyl (Z,Z,Z 9,12,15-octadecatrienoate and the triterpene methyl 3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oate were overexpressed only when the microplant was treated with endophytic fungi.

  11. Metabolic response induced by endophytic fungi and bacteria in H. marrubioides Epling in vitro micro plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitorino, Luciana Cristina; Silva, Fabiano Guimaraes, E-mail: fabianocefetrv@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia Goiano, Rio Verde, GO (Brazil); Lima, William Cardoso; Soares, Marcos Antonio [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Dept. de Botanica e Ecologia; Pedroso, Rita Cassia Nascimento; Silva, Maroli Rodrigues; Dias, Herbert Junior; Crotti, Antonio Eduardo Miller; Silva, Marcio Luis Andrade e; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Pauletti, Patricia Mendonca; Januario, Ana Helena [Universidade de Franca, SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisa em Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas

    2013-10-01

    Hyptis marrubioides Epling is a native plant from Brazilian Cerrado. In this paper, the response of in vitro micro plants of this species to inoculation with bacterial and fungal endophytic isolates is evaluated. HPLC-DAD analysis showed the presence of 3,4-O-(Z)-dicaffeoylquinic acid and quercetin-7-O-glucoside as the main components. GC/MS analysis demonstrated that the sesquiterpenes Greek-Small-Letter-Tau -cadinol and caryophyllene oxide were only produced in micro plants inoculated with endophytic bacteria, while methyl hexadecanoate, methyl heptadecanoate and methyl (Z,Z,Z) 9,12,15-octadecatrienoate and the triterpene methyl 3{beta}-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oate were over expressed only when the micro plant was treated with endophytic fungi. (author)

  12. Nitrous Oxide Metabolism in Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria: Physiology and Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M J; Simon, J; Rowley, G; Bedmar, E J; Richardson, D J; Gates, A J; Delgado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas (GHG) with substantial global warming potential and also contributes to ozone depletion through photochemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. The negative effects of N2O on climate and stratospheric ozone make N2O mitigation an international challenge. More than 60% of global N2O emissions are emitted from agricultural soils mainly due to the application of synthetic nitrogen-containing fertilizers. Thus, mitigation strategies must be developed which increase (or at least do not negatively impact) on agricultural efficiency whilst decrease the levels of N2O released. This aim is particularly important in the context of the ever expanding population and subsequent increased burden on the food chain. More than two-thirds of N2O emissions from soils can be attributed to bacterial and fungal denitrification and nitrification processes. In ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, N2O is formed through the oxidation of hydroxylamine to nitrite. In denitrifiers, nitrate is reduced to N2 via nitrite, NO and N2O production. In addition to denitrification, respiratory nitrate ammonification (also termed dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium) is another important nitrate-reducing mechanism in soil, responsible for the loss of nitrate and production of N2O from reduction of NO that is formed as a by-product of the reduction process. This review will synthesize our current understanding of the environmental, regulatory and biochemical control of N2O emissions by nitrate-reducing bacteria and point to new solutions for agricultural GHG mitigation. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ;Every dogma has its day': a personal look at carbon metabolism in photosynthetic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, John

    2003-01-01

    Dogmas are unscientific. What is perhaps the greatest biological dogma of all time, the 'unity of biochemistry' is, in the main, still having its day. According to present knowledge, the exceptions to this dogma are mere details when seen in relation to the biosystem as a whole. Nevertheless the exceptions are scientifically interesting and the understanding of them has led to a better comprehension of photosynthesis and ecology. Until the discovery of (14)C, photosynthetic CO(2) fixation was like a slightly opened black box. With (14)C in hand scientists mapped out the path of carbon in green plant photosynthesis in the course of a few years. The impressive reductive pentose phosphate cycle was almost immediately assumed to be universal in autotrophs, including anoxygenic phototrophs, in spite of the odd observation to the contrary. A new dogma was born and held the field for about two decades. Events began to turn when green sulfur bacteria were found to contain ferredoxin-coupled ketoacid-oxidoreductases. This led to the formulation of a novel CO(2)-fixing pathway, the reductive citric acid cycle, but its general acceptance required much work by many investigators. However, the ice had now been broken and after some years a third mechanism of CO(2) fixation was discovered, this time in Chloroflexus,and then a fourth in the same genus. One consequence of these discoveries is that it has become apparent that oxygen is an important factor that determines the kind of CO(2)-fixing mechanism an organism uses. With the prospect of the characterization of hordes of novel bacteria forecast by molecular ecologists we can expect further distinctive CO(2) fixation mechanisms to turn up.

  14. The association between physical activity and the metabolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metabolic syndrome was defined based on the International Diabetes Federation criteria. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to measure physical activity. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 20. Results: A significant inverse association was found between inactive patients and ...

  15. Bactericidal activity of bio-synthesized silver nanoparticles against human pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abalkhil, Tarad Abdulaziz; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Salmen, Saleh Hussein; Wainwright, Milton

    2017-01-01

    Green synthesis is an attractive and eco-friendly approach to generate potent antibacterial silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). Such particles have long been used to fight bacteria and represent a promising tool to overcome the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. In this study, green synthesis of Ag-NPs was attempted using plant extracts of Aloe vera, Portulaca oleracea and Cynodon dactylon. The identity and size of Ag-NPs was characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscopy. Monodispersed Ag-NPs were produced with a range of different sizes based on the plant extract used. The bactericidal activity of Ag-NPs against a number of human pathogenic bacteria was determined using the disc diffusion method. The results showed that Gram positive bacteria were more susceptible than Gram negative ones to these antibacterial agents. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined using the 96- well plate method. Finally, the mechanism by which Ag-NPs affect bacteria was investigated by SEM analysis. Bacteria treated with Ag-NPs were seen to undergo shrinkage and to lose their viability. This study provides evidence for a cheap and effective method for synthesizing potent bactericidal Ag-NPs and demonstrates their effectiveness against human pathogenic bacteria

  16. STAT3 Activities and Energy Metabolism: Dangerous Liaisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camporeale, Annalisa; Demaria, Marco; Monteleone, Emanuele; Giorgi, Carlotta; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Pinton, Paolo; Poli, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    STAT3 mediates cytokine and growth factor receptor signalling, becoming transcriptionally active upon tyrosine 705 phosphorylation (Y-P). Constitutively Y-P STAT3 is observed in many tumors that become addicted to its activity, and STAT3 transcriptional activation is required for tumor transformation downstream of several oncogenes. We have recently demonstrated that constitutively active STAT3 drives a metabolic switch towards aerobic glycolysis through the transcriptional induction of Hif-1α and the down-regulation of mitochondrial activity, in both MEF cells expressing constitutively active STAT3 (Stat3 C/C ) and STAT3-addicted tumor cells. This novel metabolic function is likely involved in mediating pre-oncogenic features in the primary Stat3 C/C MEFs such as resistance to apoptosis and senescence and rapid proliferation. Moreover, it strongly contributes to the ability of primary Stat3 C/C MEFs to undergo malignant transformation upon spontaneous immortalization, a feature that may explain the well known causative link between STAT3 constitutive activity and tumor transformation under chronic inflammatory conditions. Taken together with the recently uncovered role of STAT3 in regulating energy metabolism from within the mitochondrion when phosphorylated on Ser 727, these data place STAT3 at the center of a hub regulating energy metabolism under different conditions, in most cases promoting cell survival, proliferation and malignant transformation even though with distinct mechanisms

  17. STAT3 Activities and Energy Metabolism: Dangerous Liaisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, Annalisa; Demaria, Marco; Monteleone, Emanuele; Giorgi, Carlotta; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Pinton, Paolo; Poli, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    STAT3 mediates cytokine and growth factor receptor signalling, becoming transcriptionally active upon tyrosine 705 phosphorylation (Y-P). Constitutively Y-P STAT3 is observed in many tumors that become addicted to its activity, and STAT3 transcriptional activation is required for tumor transformation downstream of several oncogenes. We have recently demonstrated that constitutively active STAT3 drives a metabolic switch towards aerobic glycolysis through the transcriptional induction of Hif-1α and the down-regulation of mitochondrial activity, in both MEF cells expressing constitutively active STAT3 (Stat3C/C) and STAT3-addicted tumor cells. This novel metabolic function is likely involved in mediating pre-oncogenic features in the primary Stat3C/C MEFs such as resistance to apoptosis and senescence and rapid proliferation. Moreover, it strongly contributes to the ability of primary Stat3C/C MEFs to undergo malignant transformation upon spontaneous immortalization, a feature that may explain the well known causative link between STAT3 constitutive activity and tumor transformation under chronic inflammatory conditions. Taken together with the recently uncovered role of STAT3 in regulating energy metabolism from within the mitochondrion when phosphorylated on Ser 727, these data place STAT3 at the center of a hub regulating energy metabolism under different conditions, in most cases promoting cell survival, proliferation and malignant transformation even though with distinct mechanisms. PMID:25089666

  18. STAT3 Activities and Energy Metabolism: Dangerous Liaisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camporeale, Annalisa, E-mail: annalisa.camporeale@unito.it [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy); Demaria, Marco [Buck Institute for Research on Aging, 8001 Redwood Blvd, Novato, CA 94945 (United States); Monteleone, Emanuele [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy); Giorgi, Carlotta [Department of Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Section of General Pathology, Laboratory for Technologies of Advances Therapies (LTTA), University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 70, Ferrara 44121 (Italy); Wieckowski, Mariusz R. [Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Department of Biochemistry, Pasteur Str. 3, Warsaw 02-093 (Poland); Pinton, Paolo [Department of Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Section of General Pathology, Laboratory for Technologies of Advances Therapies (LTTA), University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 70, Ferrara 44121 (Italy); Poli, Valeria, E-mail: annalisa.camporeale@unito.it [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy)

    2014-07-31

    STAT3 mediates cytokine and growth factor receptor signalling, becoming transcriptionally active upon tyrosine 705 phosphorylation (Y-P). Constitutively Y-P STAT3 is observed in many tumors that become addicted to its activity, and STAT3 transcriptional activation is required for tumor transformation downstream of several oncogenes. We have recently demonstrated that constitutively active STAT3 drives a metabolic switch towards aerobic glycolysis through the transcriptional induction of Hif-1α and the down-regulation of mitochondrial activity, in both MEF cells expressing constitutively active STAT3 (Stat3{sup C/C}) and STAT3-addicted tumor cells. This novel metabolic function is likely involved in mediating pre-oncogenic features in the primary Stat3{sup C/C} MEFs such as resistance to apoptosis and senescence and rapid proliferation. Moreover, it strongly contributes to the ability of primary Stat3{sup C/C} MEFs to undergo malignant transformation upon spontaneous immortalization, a feature that may explain the well known causative link between STAT3 constitutive activity and tumor transformation under chronic inflammatory conditions. Taken together with the recently uncovered role of STAT3 in regulating energy metabolism from within the mitochondrion when phosphorylated on Ser 727, these data place STAT3 at the center of a hub regulating energy metabolism under different conditions, in most cases promoting cell survival, proliferation and malignant transformation even though with distinct mechanisms.

  19. Genomic insights into metabolic potentials of two simultaneous aerobic denitrification and phosphorus removal bacteria Achromobacter sp. GAD3 and Agrobacterium sp. LAD9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufeng; Chen, Qian; Ma, Tao; Wang, Ming; Ni, Jinren

    2018-02-01

    Bacteria capable of simultaneous aerobic denitrification and phosphorus removal (SADPR) are promising to establish novel one-stage wastewater treatment systems. Nevertheless, insights into metabolic potentials of SADPR related bacteria are limited. Here, comprehensive metabolic models of two efficient SADPR bacteria Achromobacter sp. GAD3 and Agrobacterium sp. LAD9 were yielded for the first time by high-throughput genome sequencing. With succinate as the preferred carbon source, both strains employed a complete TCA cycle as the major carbon metabolism for various organic acids and complex carbon oxidation potentials. Complete and truncated aerobic denitrification routes were confirmed in GAD3 and LAD9, respectively, facilitated by all major components of electron transfer chain via oxidative phosphorylation. Comparative genome analysis revealed distinctive ecological niches involved in denitrifying potential among different phylogenetic clades within Achromobacter and Agrobacterium. Excellent phosphorus removal capacities were contributed by inorganic phosphate uptake, polyphosphate synthesis and phosphonate metabolism. Additionally, the physiology of GAD3/LAD9 is different to that displayed by most available polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs), and reveals both strains to be more versatile, carrying out diverse organics degradation potentials and outstanding SADPR capacity within a single organism. The functional explorations of SADPR bacteria broaden their significant application prospects in concurrent carbon and nutrients removal aerobically. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptors and The Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is a growing threat to global health by virtue of its association with insulin resistance, inflammation, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, collectively known as the metabolic syndrome (MetS. The nuclear receptors PPARα and PPARγ are therapeutic targets for hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, respectively, and drugs that modulate these receptors are currently in clinical use. More recent work on the PPARδ has uncovered a dual benefit for both hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, highlighting the broad potential of PPARs in the treatment of metabolic disease. CONTENT: We have learned much about PPARs, the metabolic fat sensors, and the molecular pathways they regulate. Through their distinct tissue distribution and specific target gene activation, the three PPARs together control diverse aspects of fatty acid metabolism, energy balance, insulin sensitivity glucose homeostasis, inflammation, hypertension and atherosclerosis. These studies have advanced our understanding of the etiology for the MetS. Mechanisms revealed by these studies highlight the importance of emerging concepts, such as the endocrine function of adipose tissue, tissue-tissue cross-talk and lipotoxicity, in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and CVD. SUMMARY: The elucidation of key regulators of energy balance and insulin signaling have revolutionized our understanding of fat and sugar metabolism and their intimate link. The three ‘lipidsensing’ (PPARα, PPARγ and PPARδ exemplify this connection, regulating diverse aspects of lipid and glucose homeostasis, and serving as bonafide therapeutic targets. KEYWORDS: peroxisome proliferator, activated receptor, metabolic syndrome.

  1. Subversion of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Larissa D.; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to a notably high number of pathogenic microbes and is a broad innate immune response that effectively contributes to restriction of pathogen replication and generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of these platforms leads to caspase-1- and/or caspase-11-dependent secretion of proteins, including cytokines, and induction of a specific form of cell death called pyroptosis, which directly or indirectly contribute for restriction of pathogen ...

  2. New and Rare Carotenoids Isolated from Marine Bacteria and Their Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Shindo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacteria have not been examined as extensively as land bacteria. We screened carotenoids from orange or red pigments-producing marine bacteria belonging to rare or novel species. The new acyclic carotenoids with a C30 aglycone, diapolycopenedioc acid xylosylesters A–C and methyl 5-glucosyl-5,6-dihydro-apo-4,4′-lycopenoate, were isolated from the novel Gram-negative bacterium Rubritalea squalenifaciens, which belongs to phylum Verrucomicrobia, as well as the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Planococcus maritimus strain iso-3 belonging to the class Bacilli, phylum Firmicutes, respectively. The rare monocyclic C40 carotenoids, (3R-saproxanthin and (3R,2′S-myxol, were isolated from novel species of Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the family Flavobacteriaceae, phylum Bacteroidetes. In this review, we report the structures and antioxidant activities of these carotenoids, and consider relationships between bacterial phyla and carotenoid structures.

  3. New and rare carotenoids isolated from marine bacteria and their antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Kazutoshi; Misawa, Norihiko

    2014-03-24

    Marine bacteria have not been examined as extensively as land bacteria. We screened carotenoids from orange or red pigments-producing marine bacteria belonging to rare or novel species. The new acyclic carotenoids with a C₃₀ aglycone, diapolycopenedioc acid xylosylesters A-C and methyl 5-glucosyl-5,6-dihydro-apo-4,4'-lycopenoate, were isolated from the novel Gram-negative bacterium Rubritalea squalenifaciens, which belongs to phylum Verrucomicrobia, as well as the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Planococcus maritimus strain iso-3 belonging to the class Bacilli, phylum Firmicutes, respectively. The rare monocyclic C₄₀ carotenoids, (3R)-saproxanthin and (3R,2'S)-myxol, were isolated from novel species of Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the family Flavobacteriaceae, phylum Bacteroidetes. In this review, we report the structures and antioxidant activities of these carotenoids, and consider relationships between bacterial phyla and carotenoid structures.

  4. Diversity, activity, and abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in saline nad hypersaline soda lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foti, M.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Lomans, B.P.; Mussman, M.; Zacharova, E.E.; Pimenov, N.V.; Kuenen, J.G.; Muyzer, G.

    2007-01-01

    Soda lakes are naturally occurring highly alkaline and saline environments. Although the sulfur cycle is one of the most active element cycles in these lakes, little is known about the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this study we investigated the diversity, activity, and abundance of SRB in

  5. In vivo assay to identify bacteria with β-glucosidase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Strahsburger

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: This in vivo β-glucosidase assay can be used as an enzymatic test on living cells without cell disruption. The method is simple, quantitative, and recommended, especially in studies screening for bacteria not only with β-glucosidase activity but also with high β-glucosidase activity.

  6. Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpirito, Alan A [Ames, IA; Zahn, James A [Harbor Beach, MI; Graham, David W [Lawrence, KS; Kim, Hyung J [St. Paul, MN; Alterman, Michail [Lawrence, KS; Larive, Cynthia [Lawrence, KS

    2007-04-03

    A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

  7. Antibacterial activity of some plants from family Apiaceae in relation to selected phytopathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Brković, Duško L.; Čomić, Ljiljana; Solujić-Sukdolak, Slavica

    2006-01-01

    Water, ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of 12 plants from the family Apiaceae were screened for antibacterial activities against selected phytopathogenic bacteria. Following plants were tested: Aegopodium podagraria, Angelica silvestris, Chaerophyllum bulbosum, Daucus carota subsp. carota, Foeniculum vulgare, Heracleum sphondylium, Pastinaca sativa Peucedanum cerevaria, Peucedanum oreoselinum, Pimpinella saxifraga, Sanicula europea, Torilis anthriscus. The antibacterial activities were test...

  8. Co-metabolic formation of substituted phenylacetic acids by styrene-degrading bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Oelschlägel

    2015-06-01

    The styrene-degrading strains Rhodococcus opacus 1CP, Pseudomonas fluorescens ST, and the novel isolates Sphingopyxis sp. Kp5.2 and Gordonia sp. CWB2 were investigated with respect to their applicability to co-metabolically produce substituted phenylacetic acids. Isolates were found to differ significantly in substrate tolerance and biotransformation yields. Especially, P. fluorescens ST was identified as a promising candidate for the production of several phenylacetic acids. The biotransformation of 4-chlorostyrene with cells of strain ST was shown to be stable over a period of more than 200 days and yielded about 38 mmolproduct gcelldryweight−1 after nearly 350 days. Moreover, 4-chloro-α-methylstyrene was predominantly converted to the (S-enantiomer of the acid with 40% enantiomeric excess.

  9. Physical activity and metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallwitz, Eric R; Loy, Veronica; Mettu, Praveen; Von Roenn, Natasha; Berkes, Jamie; Cotler, Scott J

    2013-10-01

    There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients, a population that tends to be physically inactive. The aim of this study was to characterize physical activity and evaluate the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. A cross-sectional analysis was performed in patients more than 3 months after transplantation. Metabolic syndrome was classified according to National Cholesterol Education Panel Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Physical activity, including duration, frequency, and metabolic equivalents of task (METs), was assessed. The study population consisted of 204 subjects, with 156 more than 1 year after transplantation. The median time after transplantation was 53.5 months (range = 3-299 months). The mean duration of exercise was 90 ± 142 minutes, and the mean MET score was 3.6 ± 1.5. Metabolic syndrome was observed in 58.8% of all subjects and in 63.5% of the subjects more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis involving all subjects, metabolic syndrome was associated with a time after transplantation greater than 1 year [odds ratio (OR) = 2.909, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.389-6.092] and older age (OR = 1.036, 95% CI = 1.001-1.072). A second analysis was performed for only patients more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis, metabolic syndrome was associated with lower exercise intensity (OR = 0.690, 95% CI = 0.536-0.887), older age (OR = 1.056, 95% CI = 1.014-1.101), and pretransplant diabetes (OR = 4.246, 95% CI = 1.300-13.864). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome is common after liver transplantation, and the rate is significantly higher in patients more than 1 year after transplantation. The observation that exercise intensity is inversely related to metabolic syndrome after transplantation is novel and suggests that physical activity might provide a means for reducing metabolic syndrome complications in liver

  10. Exogenous lytic activity of SPN9CC endolysin against gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-A; Shin, Hakdong; Heu, Sunggi; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-06-28

    Concerns over drug-resistant bacteria have stimulated interest in developing alternative methods to control bacterial infections. Endolysin, a phage-encoded enzyme that breaks down bacterial peptidoglycan at the terminal stage of the phage reproduction cycle, is reported to be effective for the control of bacterial pathogenic bacteria. Bioinformatic analysis of the SPN9CC bacteriophage genome revealed a gene that encodes an endolysin with a domain structure similar to those of the endolysins produced by the P1 and P22 coliphages. The SPN9CC endolysin was purified with a C-terminal oligo-histidine tag. The endolysin was relatively stable and active over a broad temperature range (from 24°C to 65°C). It showed maximal activity at 50°C, and its optimum pH range was from pH 7.5 to 8.5. The SPN9CC endolysin showed antimicrobial activity against only gram-negative bacteria and functioned by cutting the glycosidic bond of peptidoglycan. Interestingly, the SPN9CC endolysin could lyse intact gram-negative bacteria in the absence of EDTA as an outer membrane permeabilizer. The exogenous lytic activity of the SPN9CC endolysin makes it a potential therapeutic agent against gram-negative bacteria.

  11. Effects of food preservatives on growth and metabolism of plaque bacteria in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leikanger, S.; Bjertness, E.; Aamdal Scheie, A.

    1992-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the consumption of food preservatives during the last decades, and to study the effect of the preservatives, sorbic and benzoic acid, on growth and glycolysis of oral bacteria in vitro, and on acid formation by dental plaque in vivo. Five consumption reports from the Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway were used to estimate alterations in consumption of staple food containing the two preservatives. A modified broth dilution method was used to determine the MIC values of the preservatives against Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguis. Extracellular 14 C-glycolytic metabolites were studied by HPLC analyses. Plaque-pH measurements were used to assess possible effects on acid production. The consumption reports were used to assess possible effects on acid production. The consumption reports indicated increased consumption of preservatives. The in vitro testing suggested that legal concentrations of preservatives may inhibit the growth of oral streptococci. However, the preservatives did not inhibit in vitro glycolysis at tested concentrations. In vivo testing with similar concentrations (0.4% w/v) showed a significant effect. A higher concentration (2% w/v potassium sorbate) had a tendency to inhibit acid-formation by dental plaque even more. (au)

  12. Metabolic-epigenetic crosstalk in macrophage activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baardman, Jeroen; Licht, Iris; de Winther, Menno P. J.; van den Bossche, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic enzymes are emerging as crucial controllers of macrophages, innate immune cells that determine the outcome of many inflammatory diseases. Recent studies demonstrate that the activity of particular chromatin-modifying enzymes is regulated by the availability of specific metabolites like

  13. Antimicrobial activity of Mucuna pruriens on selected bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... negative and spore forming microorganisms and fungi. The methanol extract of M. pruriens showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against all the tested microorganisms except Candida albicans. The results obtained in the study shows that M. pruriens extract can be a potential surce of natural antimicrobial agent.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of Crataeva religiosa Forst against bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt has been made to carry out a screening on the antibacterial activity of leaves of Crateva religiosa Forst used in Benin traditional veterinary medicine against bacterial infection of Thryonomys swinderianus (class of Mammalia, family of Thryonomyidae) commonly called agouti or kholan. The aim of this study was ...

  15. Seasonal distribution and activity of nitrogen-cycling bacteria in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial counts and activities, and the concentrations of both organic and inorganic nitrogen compounds, were higher at colonised sites. In late summer, as macrophytes started to die off, organic nitrogen content in the sediments increased, mineralisation of the organic nitrogen in the sediments was pronounced, and ...

  16. Biochemical activities of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) degrading bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five indigenous DCA degrading bacterial isolates capable of completely degrading DCA under aerobic conditions recently isolated from South African waste water treatment facilities, were found to belong to the genus Ancylobacter. The specific activities of the enzymes in DCA catabolism were compared with previously ...

  17. Effects of activation of endocannabinoid system on myocardial metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Polak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids exert their effect on the regulation of energy homeostasis via activation of specific receptors. They control food intake, secretion of insulin, lipids and glucose metabolism, lipid storage. Long chain fatty acids are the main myocardial energy substrate. However, the heart exerts enormous metabolic flexibility emphasized by its ability to utilzation not only fatty acids, but also glucose, lactate and ketone bodies. Endocannabinoids can directly act on the cardiomyocytes through the CB1 and CB2 receptors present in cardiomyocytes. It appears that direct activation of CB1 receptors promotes increased lipogenesis, pericardial steatosis and bioelectrical dysfunction of the heart. In contrast, stimulation of CB2 receptors exhibits cardioprotective properties, helping to maintain appropriate amount of ATP in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the effects of endocannabinoids at both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, such as liver, pancreas, or adipose tissue, resulting indirectly in plasma availability of energy substrates and affects myocardial metabolism. To date, there is little evidence that describes effects of activation of the endocannabinoid system in the cardiovascular system under physiological conditions. In the present paper the impact of metabolic diseases, i. e. obesity and diabetes, as well as the cardiovascular diseases - hypertension, myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction on the deregulation of the endocannabinoid system and its effect on the metabolism are described.

  18. Copper oxide nanoparticles inhibit the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashock, Michael J; Kappell, Anthony D; Hallaj, Nadia; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2016-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are used increasingly in industrial applications and consumer products and thus may pose risk to human and environmental health. The interaction of CuO NPs with complex media and the impact on cell metabolism when exposed to sublethal concentrations are largely unknown. In the present study, the short-term effects of 2 different sized manufactured CuO NPs on metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. The role of released Cu(2+) during dissolution of NPs in the growth media and the CuO nanostructure were considered. Characterization showed that the 28 nm and 64 nm CuO NPs used in the present study have different primary diameter, similar hydrodynamic diameter, and significantly different concentrations of dissolved Cu(2+) ions in the growth media released from the same initial NP mass. Exposures to CuO NPs or the released Cu(2+) fraction, at doses that do not have impact on cell viability, showed significant inhibition on S. cerevisiae cellular metabolic activity. A greater CuO NP effect on the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae growth under respiring conditions was observed. Under the tested conditions the observed metabolic inhibition from the NPs was not explained fully by the released Cu ions from the dissolving NPs. © 2015 SETAC.

  19. Effects of activation of endocannabinoid system on myocardial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Agnieszka; Harasim, Ewa; Chabowski, Adrian

    2016-05-21

    Endocannabinoids exert their effect on the regulation of energy homeostasis via activation of specific receptors. They control food intake, secretion of insulin, lipids and glucose metabolism, lipid storage. Long chain fatty acids are the main myocardial energy substrate. However, the heart exerts enormous metabolic flexibility emphasized by its ability to utilzation not only fatty acids, but also glucose, lactate and ketone bodies. Endocannabinoids can directly act on the cardiomyocytes through the CB1 and CB2 receptors present in cardiomyocytes. It appears that direct activation of CB1 receptors promotes increased lipogenesis, pericardial steatosis and bioelectrical dysfunction of the heart. In contrast, stimulation of CB2 receptors exhibits cardioprotective properties, helping to maintain appropriate amount of ATP in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the effects of endocannabinoids at both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, such as liver, pancreas, or adipose tissue, resulting indirectly in plasma availability of energy substrates and affects myocardial metabolism. To date, there is little evidence that describes effects of activation of the endocannabinoid system in the cardiovascular system under physiological conditions. In the present paper the impact of metabolic diseases, i. e. obesity and diabetes, as well as the cardiovascular diseases - hypertension, myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction on the deregulation of the endocannabinoid system and its effect on the metabolism are described.

  20. Glucose metabolism regulates T cell activation, differentiation and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Steve Palmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune system is equipped to eliminate both tumors and pathogenic microorganisms. It requires a series of complex and coordinated signals to drive the activation, proliferation and differentiation of appropriate T cell subsets. It is now established that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, emerging evidence now suggest that specific metabolic alterations associated with distinct T cell subsets may be ancillary to their differentiation and influential in their immune functions. The Warburg effect originally used to describe a phenomenon in which most cancer cells relied on aerobic glycolysis for their growth is a key process that sustain T cell activation and differentiation. Here we review how different aspects of metabolism in T cells influence their functions, focusing on the emerging role of key regulators of glucose metabolism such as HIF-1α. A thorough understanding of the role of metabolism in T cell function could provide insights into mechanisms involved in inflammatory-mediated conditions, with the potential for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat these diseases.

  1. [Composition diversity and metabolic characters of lactic acid bacteria community SGL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Yang, Fuyu; Wang, Xiaofen; Liu, Jinhuan; Yuan, Xufeng; Cui, Zongjun

    2015-11-04

    We aimed to select a stable lactic acid bacteria community from switchgrass silage, that was efficient in lactic acid production. We obtained the community by continuous restricted subcultivation in MRS broth, and analysed the composition diversity and stability of the community by 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), respectively. In addition, we studied the effect of different nitrogen sources on growth and lactic acid production of the community, through adding different concentrations of yeast extraction, different nitrogen sources [yeast extract, peptone, urea and (NH4) 2SO4] and different proportions of (NH4)2SO4 and yeast extract leveled with elemental nitrogen 1.8 g/L. The microbial composition of SGL became stable from the 8th generation according to the results of DGGE. The pH value of the MRS inoculated with SGL dropped to 3.7, and the concentration of lactic acid reached 26 g/L after 24 h cultivation. The result of the pyrosequencing showed that the major composition of SGL were Lactobacillus nantensis (78.78%), Lactobacillus plantarum (7.92%), Lactobacillus pantheris (5.27%), Bacillus coagulans (4.41%) and Lactococcus lactics (3.31%). The best supplementation of yeast extraction for SGL was 20 g/L. When the elemental nitrogen ratio of (NH4) 2SO4 to yeast extract was 1:4, the growth and lactic acid production were no significant difference with 0:5 (P lactic acid production. This study would offer theoretical basis for cultivate and application of SGL in production.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Diterpenes from Viguiera arenaria against Endodontic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H. G. Martins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Six pimarane-type diterpenes isolated from Viguiera arenaria Baker and two semi-synthetic derivatives were evaluated in vitro against a panel of representative microorganisms responsible for dental root canal infections. The microdilution method was used for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC against Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella buccae, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces viscosus, Peptostreptococcus micros, Enterococcus faecalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The compounds ent-pimara-8(14,15-dien-19-oic acid, its sodium salt and ent-8(14,15-pimaradien-3β-ol were the most active, displaying MIC values ranging from 1 to 10 μg mL-1. The results also allow us to conclude that minor structural differences among these diterpenes significantly influence their antimicrobial activity, bringing new perspectives to the discovery of new chemicals for use as a complement to instrumental endodontic procedures.

  3. Metabolically active human brown adipose tissue derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Francisco J; Holt, Dolly J; Vargas, Vanessa; Yockman, James; Boudina, Sihem; Atkinson, Donald; Grainger, David W; Revelo, Monica P; Sherman, Warren; Bull, David A; Patel, Amit N

    2014-02-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a key role in the evolutionarily conserved mechanisms underlying energy homeostasis in mammals. It is characterized by fat vacuoles 5-10 µm in diameter and expression of uncoupling protein one, central to the regulation of thermogenesis. In the human newborn, BAT depots are typically grouped around the vasculature and solid organs. These depots maintain body temperature during cold exposure by warming the blood before its distribution to the periphery. They also ensure an optimal temperature for biochemical reactions within solid organs. BAT had been thought to involute throughout childhood and adolescence. Recent studies, however, have confirmed the presence of active BAT in adult humans with depots residing in cervical, supraclavicular, mediastinal, paravertebral, and suprarenal regions. While human pluripotent stem cells have been differentiated into functional brown adipocytes in vitro and brown adipocyte progenitor cells have been identified in murine skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue, multipotent metabolically active BAT-derived stem cells from a single depot have not been identified in adult humans to date. Here, we demonstrate a clonogenic population of metabolically active BAT stem cells residing in adult humans that can: (a) be expanded in vitro; (b) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential; and (c) functionally differentiate into metabolically active brown adipocytes. Our study defines a new target stem cell population that can be activated to restore energy homeostasis in vivo for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Lipolytic activity from bacteria prospected in polluted portuary sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Levy Fonseca

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates that these TBT resistant isolates have, at the same time, the capacity to produce enzymes with a large biotechnological potential but, nevertheless, their relationship is not well understood, representing a novel approach. It is expected for these organisms to produce highly biotechnological relevant biocatalysts, due to their severe adaptations (Suehiro et al., 2007. The fully characterization of these lipases, mostly for F3 with elevated lipolytic activity exhibited, presents also a future challenge.

  5. [Number of bacteria and features of their activity in hypersaline reservoirs of the Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrynin, E G

    1979-01-01

    The incidence of bacteria, their biomass production, and heterotrophic assimilation of CO2 by bacterioplankton were studied in the Crimean hypersaline water reservoirs from May to October of 1974. The total incidence of bacteria in the natural brine of these reservoirs varied from 20 to 70 x 10(6) cells per 1 ml. Such a high bacterial number may be caused by the combined action of water evaporation which increased the concentration of bacterial cells and active growth of microflora. Low values of bacterial production and heterotrophic CO2 assimilation should be attributed to weak activity of microflora in the reservoirs.

  6. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Judy D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2014-12-23

    The degradation of our environment and the depletion of fossil fuels make the exploration of alternative fuels evermore imperative. Among the alternatives is biohydrogen which has high energy content by weight and produces only water when combusted. Considerable effort is being expended to develop photosynthetic systems -- algae, cyanobacteria, and anaerobic phototrophs -- for sustainable H2 production. While promising, this approach also has hurdles such as the harvesting of light in densely pigmented cultures that requires costly constant mixing and large areas for exposure to sunlight. Little attention is given to fermentative H2 generation. Thus understanding the microbial pathways to H2 evolution and metabolic processes competing for electrons is an essential foundation that may expand the variety of fuels that can be generated or provide alternative substrates for fine chemical production. We studied a widely found soil anaerobe of the class Deltaproteobacteria, a sulfate-reducing bacterium to determine the electron pathways used during the oxidation of substrates and the potential for hydrogen production.

  7. Antifungal Activity of Lactobacillus sp. Bacteria in the Presence of Xylitol and Galactosyl-Xylitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipińska, Lidia; Klewicki, Robert; Klewicka, Elżbieta; Kołodziejczyk, Krzysztof; Sójka, Michał; Nowak, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid fermentation is a natural method of antimicrobial food protection. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus sp. bacteria, taking part in this process, is directed mainly against the same or other microorganisms. In this work we determine the impact of the presence of xylitol and galactosyl-xylitol on the antagonistic activity of 60 Lactobacillus sp. strains against indicator molds (Alternaria alternata, Alternaria brassicicola, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium latenicum, Geotrichum candidum, and Mucor hiemalis) and yeasts (Candida vini). We used double-layer method to select antifungal strains of Lactobacillus bacteria and poisoned medium method to confirm their fungistatic properties. Additionally, we examined the inhibition of Alternaria brassicicola by Lactobacillus paracasei ŁOCK 0921 cultivated with xylitol or galactosyl-xylitol directly on wild cherries. The presence of xylitol and its galactosyl derivative led to increase of spectrum of antifungal activity in most of the studied plant-associated lactobacilli strains. However, no single strain exhibited activity against all the indicator microorganisms. The antifungal activity of Lactobacillus bacteria against molds varied considerably and depended on both the indicator strain and the composition of the medium. The presence of xylitol and galactosyl-xylitol in the growth medium is correlated with the antifungal activity of the studied Lactobacillus sp. bacteria against selected indicator molds.

  8. Activity and selectivity of histidine-containing lytic peptides to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharidia, Riddhi; Tu, Zhigang; Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2012-09-01

    Lytic peptides are a group of membrane-acting peptides that are active to antibiotic-resistant bacteria but demonstrate high toxicity to tissue cells. Here, we reported the construction of new lytic peptide derivatives through the replacement of corresponding lysine/arginine residues in lytic peptide templates with histidines. Resulting lytic peptides had the same lethality to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, but showed greatly improved selectivity to bacteria. When incubated with co-cultured bacteria and tissue cells, these histidine-containing lytic peptide derivatives killed bacteria selectively but spared co-cultured human cells. Membrane insertion and peptide-quenching studies revealed that histidine protonation controlled peptide interactions with cell membranes determined the bacterial selectivity of lytic peptide derivatives. Compared with parent peptides, lytic peptide derivatives bound to bacteria strongly and inserted deeply into the bacterial cell membrane. Therefore, histidine-containing lytic peptides represent a new group of antimicrobial peptides for bacterial infections in which the antibiotic resistance has developed.

  9. Effects of lactic bacteria on immunological activation and radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzen, Hajime; Yuki, Rumio [Otsu Red Cross Hospital, Shiga (Japan); Gu, Yeunhwa; Hasegawa, Takeo [Suzuka Univ. of Medical Science, Mie (Japan). Graduate School

    2003-03-01

    Although some studies have suggested that certain substances, such as vitamins and glucan, found in natural food products may have protective effect against radiation injuries, no substance is used practically as radioprotectors. Safe radioprotectors without side effects are, however, yet to see. Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) in intestines is known to enhance immunity of the host as a biological response modifier. In this report, we have examined the radiation protection effect of Ef using C3H mice and assessed the effect of Ef on the natural killer (NK) cells activity of the splenic cells in the mice. Less body weight losses after irradiation were observed among Ef injection groups, in comparison with control groups. Our data showed a strong tendency to prolong the surviving fraction among the groups with the Ef injection. Hence, the Ef treatment appeared to have protected mucosal damage caused by the X-ray irradiation. The NK cells activities were markedly enhanced after the Ef injection as well. With the evidence mentioned above, we conclude that the Ef may have positive effect on patients who undergo a radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Comparative genomics unravels metabolic differences at the species and/or strain level and extremely acidic environmental adaptation of ten bacteria belonging to the genus Acidithiobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; She, Siyuan; Dong, Weiling; Niu, Jiaojiao; Xiao, Yunhua; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Fan, Fenliang; Yin, Huaqun

    2016-12-01

    Members of the Acidithiobacillus genus are widely found in extreme environments characterized by low pH and high concentrations of toxic substances, thus it is necessary to identify the cellular mechanisms needed to cope with these harsh conditions. Pan-genome analysis of ten bacteria belonging to the genus Acidithiobacillus suggested the existence of core genome, most of which were assigned to the metabolism-associated genes. Additionally, the unique genes of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans were much less than those of other species. A large proportion of Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans-specific genes were mapped especially to metabolism-related genes, indicating that diverse metabolic pathways might confer an advantage for adaptation to local environmental conditions. Analyses of functional metabolisms revealed the differences of carbon metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, and sulfur metabolism at the species and/or strain level. The findings also showed that Acidithiobacillus spp. harbored specific adaptive mechanisms for thriving under extreme environments. The genus Acidithiobacillus had the genetic potential to resist and metabolize toxic substances such as heavy metals and organic solvents. Comparison across species and/or strains of Acidithiobacillus populations provided a deeper appreciation of metabolic differences and environmental adaptation, as well as highlighting the importance of cellular mechanisms that maintain the basal physiological functions under complex acidic environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) as a novel metabolic target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Angel; Habegger, Kirk M; Clemmensen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease belonging to a S9B prolyl oligopeptidase subfamily. This enzyme has been implicated in cancer development and recently reported to regulate degradation of FGF21, a potent metabolic hormone. Using a known FAP inhibitor, talabostat...

  12. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among active sportsmen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to establish the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) among active sportsmen/sportswomen and sedentary workers in the Kumasi Metropolis using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), World Health Organization (WHO), and International Diabetes ...

  13. Small azobenzene derivatives active against bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotto, Stefano; Concilio, Simona; Sessa, Lucia; Porta, Amalia; Calabrese, Elena Concetta; Zanfardino, Anna; Varcamonti, Mario; Iannelli, Pio

    2013-10-01

    ATP synthase and protein kinase (PKs) are prime targets for drug discovery in a variety of diseases. It is well known that numerous stilbenes are capable to interact and inhibit ATP synthase and PKs. This work focuses on a series of azobenzene based molecules having high structural similarity with antimicrobial stilbenes. An investigation was carried out analyzing the potential toxicity of a large set of molecules by means of computational analysis. A small selection of potential low toxic molecules have been therefore synthesized, characterized and finally microbiologically tested. The synthesized compounds show potent bactericidal activity against Gram+ and a fungus, and are capable of inhibiting biofilm formation. Finally, the compounds demonstrated a thermal stability that makes them potential candidates for incorporation in polymer matrix for application as biomedical devices and food packaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Using graphene oxide to enhance the activity of anammox bacteria for nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Guowen; Zhang, Guoquan; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, Fenglin

    2013-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was applied in this study to enhance the activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria for nitrogen removal. A GO dose-dependent effect on anammox bacteria was observed through batch tests. The results showed that the activity increased as the GO dose was varied within 0.05-0.1gL(-1). A maximum 10.26% increase of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing activity was achieved at 0.1gL(-1) GO. Analysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) indicated that the highest carbohydrate, protein, and total EPS contents (42.5, 125.7, and 168.2mg (g volatile suspended solids)(-1), respectively) were obtained with 0.1gL(-1) GO. Appropriate GO dose stimulated EPS production to promote the activity of anammox bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy showed the large surface area of GO benefited cell attachment. These findings proved that the application of GO was an effective approach to enhancing the activity of anammox bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Low abundance of colonic butyrate-producing bacteria in HIV infection is associated with microbial translocation and immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Stephanie M; Kibbie, Jon; Lee, Eric J; Guo, Kejun; Santiago, Mario L; Austin, Gregory L; Gianella, Sara; Landay, Alan L; Donovan, Andrew M; Frank, Daniel N; McCARTER, Martin D; Wilson, Cara C

    2017-02-20

    Gut microbial translocation is a major driving force behind chronic immune activation during HIV-1 infection. HIV-1-related intestinal dysbiosis, including increases in mucosa-associated pathobionts, may influence microbial translocation and contribute to mucosal and systemic inflammation. Thus, it is critical to understand the mechanisms by which gut microbes and their metabolic products, such as butyrate, influence immune cell function during HIV-1 infection. A cross-sectional study was performed to compare the relative abundance of butyrate-producing bacterial (BPB) species in colonic biopsies and stool of untreated, chronic HIV-1-infected (n = 18) and HIV-1-uninfected (n = 14) study participants. The effect of exogenously added butyrate on gut T-cell activation and HIV-1 infection was evaluated using an ex-vivo human intestinal cell culture model. Species were identified in 16S ribosomal RNA sequence datasets. Ex-vivo isolated lamina propria mononuclear cells were infected with C-C chemokine receptor type 5-tropic HIV-1Bal, cultured with enteric gram-negative bacteria and a range of butyrate doses, and lamina propria T-cell activation and HIV-1 infection levels measured. Relative abundance of total BPB and specifically of Roseburia intestinalis, were lower in colonic mucosa of HIV-1-infected versus HIV-1-uninfected individuals. In HIV-1-infected study participants, R. intestinalis relative abundance inversely correlated with systemic indicators of microbial translocation, immune activation, and vascular inflammation. Exogenous butyrate suppressed enteric gram-negative bacteria-driven lamina propria T-cell activation and HIV-1 infection levels in vitro. Reductions in mucosal butyrate from diminished colonic BPB may exacerbate pathobiont-driven gut T-cell activation and HIV replication, thereby contributing to HIV-associated mucosal pathogenesis.

  16. Radioassay for hydrogenase activity in viable cells and documentation of aerobic hydrogen-consuming bacteria living in extreme environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schink, B.; Lupton, F.S.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    An isotopic tracer assay based on the hydrogenase-dependent formation of tritiated water from tritium gas was developed for in life analysis of microbial hydrogen transformation. This method allowed detection of bacterial hydrogen metabolism in pure cultures or in natural samples obtained from aquatic ecosystems. A differentiation between chemical-biological and aerobic-anaerobic hydrogen metabolism was established by variation of the experimental incubation temperature or by addition of selective inhibitors. Hydrogenase activity was shown to be proportional to the consumption or production of hydrogen by cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Methanosarcina barkeri. This method was applied, in connection with measurements of free hydrogen and most-probable-number enumerations, in aerobic natural source waters to establish the activity and document the ecology of hydrogen-consuming bacteria in extreme acid, thermal, or saline environments. The utility of the assay is based in part on the ability to quantify bacterial hydrogen transformation at natural hydrogen partial pressures, without the use of artificial electron acceptors

  17. Isolation of Lactic Acid Bacteria with High Biological Activity from Local Fermented Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Munkhtsetseg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The thirty-two strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from the Mongolian traditional fermented dairy products, among them 25 strains show antimicrobial activity against test microorganisms including Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , Enterococcus faecalis , Pseudom о nas aeruginosa . Protease sensitivity assay demonstrated that the antimicrobial substances produced by isolates А 23, Т 2 are bacteriocins as their antibacterial activities were eliminated completely after treatment with protease. Identi fi cation of bacteria is being carried out. Among the isolates 22 strains show protease enzyme producing activity. The selected strains isolated from mare’s fermented milk (airag or kumis and yoghurt (tarag show the speci fi c protease activity from 7.9 μ g/ml to 11.9 μ g/ml. The strain T2, isolated from yoghurt exhibited the highest proteolytic activity.

  18. Phylogeography, salinity adaptations and metabolic potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria based on a partial single cell genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Nigro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that has been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome (SAG of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis – previously developed based on 14C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source.

  19. Metabolic profiling of two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines inoculated with the nitrogen fixing plant-interacting bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusamarello-Santos, Liziane Cristina; Gilard, Françoise; Brulé, Lenaïg; Quilleré, Isabelle; Gourion, Benjamin; Ratet, Pascal; Maltempi de Souza, Emanuel; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Maize roots can be colonized by free-living atmospheric nitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs). However, the agronomic potential of non-symbiotic N2-fixation in such an economically important species as maize, has still not been fully exploited. A preliminary approach to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the establishment of such N2-fixing associations has been developed, using two maize inbred lines exhibiting different physiological characteristics. The bacterial-plant interaction has been characterized by means of a metabolomic approach. Two established model strains of Nif+ diazotrophic bacteria, Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense and their Nif- couterparts defficient in nitrogenase activity, were used to evaluate the impact of the bacterial inoculation and of N2 fixation on the root and leaf metabolic profiles. The two N2-fixing bacteria have been used to inoculate two genetically distant maize lines (FV252 and FV2), already characterized for their contrasting physiological properties. Using a well-controlled gnotobiotic experimental system that allows inoculation of maize plants with the two diazotrophs in a N-free medium, we demonstrated that both maize lines were efficiently colonized by the two bacterial species. We also showed that in the early stages of plant development, both bacterial strains were able to reduce acetylene, suggesting that they contain functional nitrogenase activity and are able to efficiently fix atmospheric N2 (Fix+). The metabolomic approach allowed the identification of metabolites in the two maize lines that were representative of the N2 fixing plant-bacterial interaction, these included mannitol and to a lesser extend trehalose and isocitrate. Whilst other metabolites such as asparagine, although only exhibiting a small increase in maize roots following bacterial infection, were specific for the two Fix+ bacterial strains, in comparison to their Fix- counterparts. Moreover, a number

  20. Lactic acid bacteria active during the fermentation of wheat silage in small scale silos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, N.J.; Parker, J.A.; Moon, L.C.; Ely, L.O.

    1981-01-01

    Wheat was ensiled and periodically analyzed for lactic acid bacteria present. Initially Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and Streptococcus lactis predominated. After two to four days enterococci including S. faecium and S. bovis were present in high populations as well as Lactobacillus plantarum. It was concluded that mixed populations of enterococci and L. plantarum are active in the successful fermentation of wheat silage.

  1. Thermostable 𝜶-Amylase Activity from Thermophilic Bacteria Isolated from Bora Hot Spring, Central Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazali, F. M.; Suwastika, I. N.

    2018-03-01

    α-Amylase is one of the most important enzyme in biotechnology field, especially in industrial application. Thermostability of α-Amylase produced by thermophilic bacteria improves industrial process of starch degradation in starch industry. The present study were concerned to the characterization of α-Amylase activity from indigenous thermophilic bacteria isolated from Bora hot spring, Central Sulawesi. There were 18 isolates which had successfully isolated from 90°C sediment samples of Bora hot spring and 13 of them showed amylolytic activity. The α-Amylase activity was measured qualitatively at starch agar and quantitatively based on DNS (3,5-Dinitrosalicylic acid) methods, using maltose as standard solution. Two isolates (out of 13 amylolytic bacteria), BR 002 and BR 015 showed amylolytic index of 0.8 mm and 0.5 mm respectively, after being incubated at 55°C in the 0.002% Starch Agar Medium. The α-Amylase activity was further characterized quantitatively which includes the optimum condition of pH and temperature of α-Amylase crude enzyme from each isolate. To our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation and characterization of a thermostable α-Amylase from thermophilic bacteria isolated from Central Sulawesi particularly from Bora hot spring.

  2. Antibacterial activities of selected edible plants extracts against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeussi, Doriane E; Noumedem, Jaurès A K; Seukep, Jackson A; Fankam, Aimé G; Voukeng, Igor K; Tankeo, Simplice B; Nkuete, Antoine H L; Kuete, Victor

    2013-07-10

    In response to the propagation of bacteria resistant to many antibiotics also called multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, the discovery of new and more efficient antibacterial agents is primordial. The present study was aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activities of seven Cameroonian dietary plants (Adansonia digitata, Aframomum alboviolaceum, Aframomum polyanthum, Anonidium. mannii, Hibiscus sabdarifa, Ocimum gratissimum and Tamarindus indica). The phytochemical screening of the studied extracts was performed using described methods whilst the liquid broth micro dilution was used for all antimicrobial assays against 27 Gram-negative bacteria. The results of the phytochemical tests indicate that all tested extracts contained phenols and triterpenes, other classes of chemicals being selectively present. The studied extracts displayed various degrees of antibacterial activities. The extracts of A. digitata, H. sabdarifa, A. polyanthum, A. alboviolaceum and O. gratissimum showed the best spectra of activity, their inhibitory effects being recorded against 81.48%, 66.66%, 62.96%, 55.55%, and 55.55% of the 27 tested bacteria respectively. The extract of A. polyanthum was very active against E. aerogenes EA294 with the lowest recorded minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 32 μg/ml. The results of the present work provide useful baseline information for the potential use of the studied edible plants in the fight against both sensitive and MDR phenotypes.

  3. Simultaneous interaction of bacteria and tissue cells with photocatalytically activated, anodized titanium surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, Chongxia; Kuijer, Roelof; Kaper, H. J.; van der Mei, Henderina; Busscher, Hendrik; Kuijer, Roelof

    Photocatalytic-activation of anodized TiO2-surfaces has been demonstrated to yield antibacterial and tissue integrating effects, but effects on simultaneous growth of tissue cells and bacteria in co-culture have never been studied. Moreover, it is unknown how human-bone-marrow-mesenchymal-stem

  4. use of gamma irradiation for enhancing antibacterial activity of chitosan against pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, S.M.A.; Swailam, H.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    the effect of chitosan on growth of food poisoning bacteria including gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium) and gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) was investigated at ph 6.0 and 7.0 also, the effect of irradiation on the antibacterial activity of chitosan was studied . it was found that chitosan was more effective on the growth of gram-negative bacteria at ph 6 than ph 7 . addition of chitosan affected the growth of the tested pathogens in varying degrees compared to the control. as the concentration of chitosan increased, its effectiveness against these pathogens also increased. the growth for gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial isolates was completely inhibited at 0.6% chitosan after 72 hours of incubation. inactivation of these pathogens needs only 24 hour with 1.0% of chitosan. irradiation of chitosan at 50 kGy slightly increased the antimicrobial activity whereas at 100 kGy increased the antimicrobial activity and at 150 kGy the growth of these pathogens was completely inhibited . irradiation of chitosan at 50 kGy increased the flow index, whereas consistency index markedly decreased by increasing dose. the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of unirradiated chitosan ranged from 0.35% to 0.50%, whereas the MIC of irradiated chitosan ranged from 0.1% to 0.45% depending on the bacteria and the irradiation dose used. these results demonstrate that irradiated chitosan was more effective to decontaminate pathogenic bacteria and can be easily used in different foods for enhancing health quality and ensuring safety

  5. Isolation, structural elucidation and in vitro activity of 2-acetyl-2-decarboxamido-oxytetracycline against environmental relevant bacteria, including tetracycline-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkeberg, Anne Kruse; Sengeløv, Gitte; Cornett, Claus

    2004-01-01

    i.d., 5 microm), and the mobile phase contained methanol-water (27:73 (v/v)) with 0.08 M formic acid added. The flow rate was 9.0 ml/min. It was possible to isolate few milligram ADOTC in a day. The compound was unambiguously identified using NMR and MS-MS. The anti-microbial activity against...... activated sludge bacteria was determined giving a potency of only 3% of that of OTC. With tetracycline-resistant bacteria, no anti-microbial activity was observed, indicating a mode of action similar to that of OTC....

  6. Metabolic activation of 2-methylfuran by rat microsomal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindranath, V.; Boyd, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    2-Methylfuran (2-MF), a constituent of cigarette smoke and coffee, causes necrosis of liver, lungs, and kidneys in rodents. 2-MF is metabolically activated by mixed-function oxidases to acetylacrolein, a reactive metabolite that binds covalently to microsomal protein. The hepatic microsomal metabolism of 2-MF to reactive metabolite required the presence of NADPH and oxygen and was dependent on incubation time and substrate concentration. The microsomal metabolism of 2-MF was inducible by pretreatment of rats with phenobarbital and was inhibited by piperonyl butoxide and N-octyl imidazole, which indicates that the metabolism of 2-MF may be mediated by cytochrome P-450. Acetylacrolein was a potent inhibitor of mixed-function oxidase and completely inhibited the microsomal metabolism of 2-MF, indicating that 2-MF is a suicide substrate for the enzyme. The sulfhydryl nucleophile cysteine was a better trapping agent of the reactive metabolite of 2-MF than N-acetylcysteine or glutathione. Lysine decreased the covalent binding of 2-MF metabolites, presumably by reacting with the aldehyde group of acetylacrolein. In addition, in the presence of NADPH, 2-MF was bioactivated by both pulmonary and renal cortical microsomes to reactive metabolites that were covalently bound to microsomal proteins

  7. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Regulates Immune and Metabolic Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D.; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins. PMID:22851689

  8. Activity of autoinducer two (AI-2) in bacteria isolated from surface ripened cheeses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gori, Klaus; Jespersen, Lene

    A large number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria have been found to produce the signaling molecule autoinducer two (AI-2), which is used for interspecies communication. In this study, AI-2 activity was for the first time determined in Arthrobacter nicotianae, Brevibacterium linens (BL2......). Corynebacterium casei, Microbacterium barkeri, Microbacterium gubbeenense and S. equorum subsp. linens (all isolated from the smear of surface ripened cheeses) using the AI-2 bioluminescence assay. This indicates that AI-2 signaling could take place between bacteria found in the smear of surface ripened cheeses....

  9. Metabolic, autophagic, and mitophagic activities in cancer initiation and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Hjelmeland

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a complex disease marked by uncontrolled cell growth and invasion. These processes are driven by the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that promote cancer initiation and progression. Contributing to genome changes are the regulation of oxidative stress and reactive species-induced damage to molecules and organelles. Redox regulation, metabolic plasticity, autophagy, and mitophagy play important and interactive roles in cancer hallmarks including sustained proliferation, activated invasion, and replicative immortality. However, the impact of these processes can differ depending on the signaling pathways altered in cancer, tumor type, tumor stage, and/or the differentiation state. Here, we highlight some of the representative studies on the impact of oxidative and nitrosative activities, mitochondrial bioenergetics, metabolism, and autophagy and mitophagy in the context of tumorigenesis. We discuss the implications of these processes for cellular activities in cancer for anti-cancer-based therapeutics.

  10. Structure, function, and regulation of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism of bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Takeo

    2017-11-01

    Amino acids are essential components in all organisms because they are building blocks of proteins. They are also produced industrially and used for various purposes. For example, L-glutamate is used as the component of "umami" taste and lysine has been used as livestock feed. Recently, many kinds of amino acids have attracted attention as biological regulators and are used for a healthy life. Thus, to clarify the mechanism of how amino acids are biosynthesized and how they work as biological regulators will lead to further effective utilization of them. Here, I review the leucine-induced-allosteric activation of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from Thermus thermophilus and the relationship with the allosteric regulation of GDH from mammals. Next, I describe structural insights into the efficient production of L-glutamate by GDH from an excellent L-glutamate producer, Corynebacterium glutamicum. Finally, I review the structural biology of lysine biosynthesis of thermophilic bacterium and archaea.

  11. Acid base activity of live bacteria: Implications for quantifying cell wall charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Jacqueline; van Lith, Yvonne; Laverman, Anniet M.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    To distinguish the buffering capacity associated with functional groups in the cell wall from that resulting from metabolic processes, base or acid consumption by live and dead cells of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens was measured in a pH stat system. Live cells exhibited fast consumption of acid (pH 4) or base (pH 7, 8, 9, and 10) during the first few minutes of the experiments. At pH 5.5, no acid or base was required to maintain the initial pH constant. The initial amounts of acid or base consumed by the live cells at pH 4, 8, and 10 were of comparable magnitudes as those neutralized at the same pHs by intact cells killed by exposure to gamma radiation or ethanol. Cells disrupted in a French press required higher amounts of acid or base, due to additional buffering by intracellular constituents. At pH 4, acid neutralization by suspensions of live cells stopped after 50 min, because of loss of viability. In contrast, under neutral and alkaline conditions, base consumption continued for the entire duration of the experiments (5 h). This long-term base neutralization was, at least partly, due to active respiration by the cells, as indicated by the build-up of succinate in solution. Qualitatively, the acid-base activity of live cells of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis resembled that of S. putrefaciens. The pH-dependent charging of ionizable functional groups in the cell walls of the live bacteria was estimated from the initial amounts of acid or base consumed in the pH stat experiments. From pH 4 to 10, the cell wall charge increased from near-zero values to about -4 × 10 -16 mol cell -1 and -6.5 × 10 -16 mol cell -1 for S. putrefaciens and B. subtilis, respectively. The similar cell wall charging of the two bacterial strains is consistent with the inferred low contribution of lipopolysaccharides to the buffering capacity of the Gram-negative cell wall (of the order of 10%).

  12. Phytase Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Dairy and Pharmaceutical Probiotic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Khodaii

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytate, the major storage form of phosphorus in plant seeds, can form insoluble complexes with minerals such as iron, zinc and calcium thus reducing their bioavailability. Phytase enzymes are often used to upgrade the nutritional quality of phytate-rich foods and feeds such as grains. The phytate-degrading activity of 43 lactic acid bacteria including isolates from commercial probiotic preparations, dairy products and type strains were measured. The phytate-degrading activity of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus isolates from pharmaceutical probiotics, dairy products and type strains were determined. The enzyme activity of probotic bacteria ranged between 1.1-5.4 mU and was strain not species specific. Phytase activity may thus be a useful additional attribute of probiotics to be used as food supplements.

  13. Electroresponsive Supramolecular Graphene Oxide Hydrogels for Active Bacteria Adsorption and Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bin; Qin, Meng; Wu, Junhua; Luo, Dongjun; Jiang, Qing; Li, Ying; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-22

    Bacteria contamination in drinking water and medical products can cause severe health problems. However, currently available sterilization methods, mainly based on the size-exclusion mechanism, are typically slow and require the entire contaminated water to pass through the filter. Here, we present an electroresponsive hydrogel based approach for bacteria adsorption and removal. We successfully engineered a series of graphene oxide hydrogels using redox-active ruthenium complexes as noncovalent cross-linkers. The resulting hydrogels can reversibly switch their physical properties in response to the applied electric field along with the changes of oxidation states of the ruthenium ions. The hydrogels display strong bacteria adsorbing capability. A hydrogel of 1 cm(3) can adsorb a maximum of 1 × 10(8) E. coli. The adsorbed bacteria in the hydrogels can then be inactivated by a high voltage electric pulse and removed from the hydrogels subsequently. Owing to the high bacteria removal rate, reusability, and low production cost, these hydrogels represent promising candidates for the emergent sterilization of medical products or large-scale purification of drinking water.

  14. Antagonistic activity of antibiotic producing Streptomyces sp. against fish and human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmul Hossain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to isolate Streptomyces sp. from soil samples of two different regions of Bangladesh and evaluate their antagonistic activity against fish and human pathogenic bacteria. A total of 10 isolates were identified as Streptomyces sp. based on several morphological, physiological and biochemical tests. Cross streak method was used to observe the antagonistic activity of the Streptomyces sp. isolates against different fish pathogens belonging to the genus Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Edwardsiella and human clinical isolates belonging to the genus Klebsiella, Salmonella and Streptococcus. Seven Streptomyces sp. isolates showed antagonism against both fish and human pathogenic bacteria. Four isolates viz., N24, N26, N28 and N47 showed broad spectrum of antagonistic activity (80-100% against all genera of fish and human pathogenic bacteria. The isolate N49 exhibited highest spectrum of antagonism against all fish pathogens (90-100% but comparatively lower degree of antagonism against human pathogens (50-60%. Rest of the two isolates (N21 and N23 showed variability in their antagonism. Results showed that broad spectrum antibiotic(s could be developed from the isolates N24, N26, N28 and N47against several human and fish pathogens. The isolate N49 could be a potential source of antibiotic, especially for fish pathogenic bacteria.

  15. Batch experiment on H2S degradation by bacteria immobilised on activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, R; Ng, Y L; Chen, X G; Geng, A L; Gould, W D; Duan, H Q; Liang, D T; Koe, L C C

    2004-01-01

    Biological treatments of odorous compounds, as compared to chemical or physical technologies, are in general ecologically and environmentally favourable. However, there are some inefficiencies relative to the media used in biofiltration processes, such as the need for an adequate residence time; the limited lifetime, and pore blockage of media, which at present render the technology economically non-viable. The aim of the study is to develop novel active media to be used in performance-enhanced biofiltration processes, by achieving an optimum balance and combination of the media adsorption capacity with the biodegradation of H2S through the bacteria immobilised on the media. An enrichment culture was obtained from activated sludges in order to metabolise thiosulphate. Batch-wise experiments were conducted to optimise the bacteria immobilisation on activated carbon, so as to develop a novel "biocarbon". Biofilm was mostly developed through culturing the bacteria with the presence of carbons in mineral media. SEM and BET tests of the carbon along with the culturing process were used to identify, respectively, the biofilm development and biocarbon porosity. Breakthrough tests evaluated the biocarbon performance with varying gas resistance time, inlet H2S concentration, and type of support materials. Fundamental issues were discussed, including type of support material, mode of bacteria immobilisation, pore blockages, and biodegradation kinetics, etc. This batch-wise study provides a basis for our future research on optimisation of the biofiltration process using a bio-trickling reactor.

  16. DETECTION OF PHENOL DEGRADING BACTERIA AND PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Movahedyan ، H. Khorsandi ، R. Salehi ، M. Nikaeen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is one of the organic pollutants in various industrial wastewaters especially petrochemical and oil refining. Biological treatment is one of the considerable choices for removing of phenol present in these wastewaters. Identification of effective microbial species is considered as one of the important priorities for production of the biomass in order to achieve desirable kinetic of biological reactions. Basic purpose of this research is identification of phenol-degrading Pseudomonas Putida in activated sludge by polymerase chain reaction (PCR that has high speed and specificity. In this research, 10 various colonies of phenol-degrading bacteria were isolated from municipal activated sludge and the rate of phenol removal and growth rate of these bacteria were assessed in different concentrations of phenol (200 – 900 mg/L. Confirmation of the largest subunit of multicomponent phenol hydroxylase (LmPH gene and gene coding the N fragment in Pseudomonas Putida-derived methyl phenol operon (DmpN gene through PCR were used for general identification of phenol-degrading bacteria and Pseudomonas Putida, respectively. Presence of a 600 bp (base pairs bond in all of isolated strains indicated that they contain phenol hydroxylase gene. 6 of 10 isolated bacteria were Pseudomonas Putida because they produced a 199 bp PCR product by DmpN primers. According to PCR results in this study, the best phenol-degrading bacteria that can utilize 500 – 600 mg/L phenol completely after 48 hours incubation, belong to Pseudomonas Putida strains. It is clear that use of isolated bacteria can lead to considerable decrease of treatment time as well as promotion of phenol removal rate.

  17. Biological and structure-activity evaluation of chalcone derivatives against bacteria and fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Wender A.; Andrade, Carlos Kleber Z.; Napolitano, Hamilton B., E-mail: wender@unb.br, E-mail: ckleber@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (LaQMOS/UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Vencato, Ivo; Castro, Miriam R.C. de; Camargo, Ademir J. [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Anapolis, GO (Brazil). Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Lariucci, Carlito [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2013-01-15

    The present work describes the antibacterial and antifungal activities of several chalcones obtained by a straight Claisen-Schmidt aldol condensation determined by the minimal inhibitory concentration against different microorganisms (Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi). Solid state crystal structures of seven chalcones were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Chemometric studies were carried out in order to identify a potential structure activity relationship. (author)

  18. Biological and structure-activity evaluation of chalcone derivatives against bacteria and fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Wender A.; Andrade, Carlos Kleber Z.; Napolitano, Hamilton B.; Vencato, Ivo; Lariucci, Carlito; Castro, Miriam. R. C. de; Camargo, Ademir J.

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the antibacterial and antifungal activities of several chalcones obtained by a straight Claisen-Schmidt aldol condensation determined by the minimal inhibitory concentration against different microorganisms (Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi). Solid state crystal structures of seven chalcones were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Chemometric studies were carried out in order to identify a potential structure-activity relationship. ...

  19. Analysis the Existence of Heterotrophic Bacteria in Active Water Desalination Plant Output of Kashan City, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseindoost Gh. MSc,; Mazaheri Tehrani A. MSc,; Ghilasi H.R. PhD,; Ahmadi Marzaleh M. BSc,; Sabuhi H.MSc,; Miranzadeh M.B.* PhD

    2015-01-01

    Aims One of the consequences of taking ground water into surface is changing its chemical quality, specially increasing the concentration of dissolved salts. This research was performed in order to analyze growth possibility of heterotrophic bacteria in the membrane of active desalination plants in Kashan City, Iran. Instrument & Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was done on water output of 20 active desalination plants in 2013 in Kashan City, Iran and 200 specimen...

  20. The PECACE domain: a new family of enzymes with potential peptidoglycan cleavage activity in Gram-positive bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Guilmi Anne

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of bacterial peptidoglycan is a dynamic process, synthases and cleavage enzymes are functionally coordinated. Lytic Transglycosylase enzymes (LT are part of multienzyme complexes which regulate bacterial division and elongation. LTs are also involved in peptidoglycan turnover and in macromolecular transport systems. Despite their central importance, no LTs have been identified in the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. We report the identification of the first putative LT enzyme in S. pneumoniae and discuss its role in pneumococcal peptidoglycan metabolism. Results Homology searches of the pneumococcal genome allowed the identification of a new domain putatively involved in peptidoglycan cleavage (PECACE, PEptidoglycan CArbohydrate Cleavage Enzyme. This sequence has been found exclusively in Gram-positive bacteria and gene clusters containing pecace are conserved among Streptococcal species. The PECACE domain is, in some instances, found in association with other domains known to catalyze peptidoglycan hydrolysis. Conclusions A new domain, PECACE, putatively involved in peptidoglycan hydrolysis has been identified in S. pneumoniae. The probable enzymatic activity deduced from the detailed analysis of the amino acid sequence suggests that the PECACE domain may proceed through a LT-type or goose lyzosyme-type cleavage mechanism. The PECACE function may differ largely from the other hydrolases already identified in the pneumococcus: LytA, LytB, LytC, CBPD and PcsB. The multimodular architecture of proteins containing the PECACE domain is another example of the many activities harbored by peptidoglycan hydrolases, which is probably required for the regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism. The release of new bacterial genomes sequences will probably add new members to the five groups identified so far in this work, and new groups could also emerge. Conversely, the functional characterization of the unknown

  1. Alteration In Bones Metabolism In Active Rheumatoid Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    The strength and integrity of the human skeleton depends on a delicate equilibrium between bone resorption and bone formation. Osteocalcin (OC) is synthesized by osteoblasts and is considered to be a marker of bone formation and helps in corporating calcium into bone tissue. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory joint disease characterized by bone complication including bone pain, erosion and osteoporosis. The aim of the present study is to evaluate some factors responsible in bone metabolism termed OC, vitamin D (vit. D), oncostatin M (OSM), ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase. Fifty pre-menopausal female patients with active RA and twenty healthy controls of the same age were included in the present study. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to estimate serum OC and active vitamin D. The quantitative determination of ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase were carried out colorimetrically. OSM was measured by ELISA and serum levels of OC and active vitamin D were significantly decreased in RA patients as compared to those of the control group. On the other hand, the levels of serum OSM, ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase were significantly increased in the RA patients as compared to their healthy control subjects. The results of this study indicated that early investigation and therapy of disturbances of bone metabolism in active RA are necessary for better prognosis and exhibited the importance of OC as a diagnostic tool of alterations of bone metabolism in RA patients.

  2. Pathogenic and Ice-Nucleation Active (INA) Bacteria causing Dieback of Willows in Short Rotation Forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, Pajand

    2005-03-01

    To find out whether bacteria isolated from diseased plant parts can be the main causal agent for the dieback appearing in Salix energy forestry plantations in Sweden during the last few years, and if the joint effects of bacteria and frost injury are synergistic, extensive sampling of shoots from diseased Salix plants was performed. We performed several laboratory and greenhouse investigations and used evaluation techniques on the functions of the Ice-Nucleation Active (INA) bacteria. We carried out a comparison between spring and autumn bacterial communities isolated from within (endophytically) and surface (epiphytically) plant tissues of Salix viminalis. Seasonal variation of bacteria in willow clones with different levels of frost sensitivity and symptoms of bacterial damage was also investigated. We further focussed on possible effect of fertilisation and nutrient availability on the bacterial community in relation to plant dieback in Estonian willow plantations. The identification and detection of INA bacteria which cause damage in combination with frost to willow (Salix spp) plants in late fall, winter and spring was performed using BIOLOG MicroPlate, biochemical tests, selective INA primers and 16S rDNA analysis. To distinguish the character for differentiation between these bacteria morphologically and with respect to growing ability different culture media were used. We studied the temperature, at which ice nucleation occurred for individual bacteria, estimated the population of INA bacteria, effect of growth limiting factors, and evaluated the effect of chemical and physical agents for disruption and possible inhibition of INA among individual bacterial strains. The concentration of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus on INA is discussed. We demonstrate that among the bacterial isolates recovered from the willow plantations, there were many that were capable of ice nucleation at temperatures between -2 and -10 deg C, many that were capable of inducing a

  3. Identification and Antibacterial Activity of Bacteria Isolated from Marine Sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. against Multi-Drug Resistant Human Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhanu Asagabaldan, Meezan; Ayuningrum, D.; Kristiana, R.; Sabdono, A.; Radjasa, O. K.; Trianto, A.

    2017-02-01

    The marine sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. was a potential source of natural bioactive compounds. This sponge widely distributed along the coast of Panjang Island, Jepara, Indonesia. The aims of this research were to isolate the associated bacteria with Haliclona (Reniera) sp. and to screen the antibacterial activity against Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) bacteria. Amount five bacteria were isolated using media selective for bacteria. The antibacterial activities of bacteria were performed by overlay methods. The bacteria strain PSP. 39-04 had the best activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Enterobacter cloaceae. Based on colony morphology and phylogenetic characterization using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, PSP 39-04 was closely related with Chromohalobacter salixigens strain DSM3043.

  4. Differences in activity and N demand between bacteria and fungi in a microcosm incubation experiment with selective inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, A.M.; Bloem, J.; Dalen, van B.R.; Kalbitz, K.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi are important micro-organisms in the soil, but may differ in their impact on net N-mineralization. The hypothesis was tested that fungi are characterized by low microbial activity, but also low immobilization, and bacteria by high activity and high immobilization. A one-month

  5. Mammary remodelling and metabolic activity in dairy goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safayi, Sina

    glands continuously milked throughout late gestation still need to be resolved. The decreasing mammary metabolic activity with progressing lactation appears to alter the sensitivity of the mammary gland towards variations in nutrient supply. Milk protein synthesis requires presence in the MEC of building...... of epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis; 2) the secretory activity of these cells, which in turn is affected by their differentiation; and 3) the provision of nutrients and removal of metabolic waste products via the blood. The present thesis aimed to address the hypotheses that 1) differences between PP...... and MP animals with respect to milk production and lactation persistency may be related to differences in mammary growth and remodelling also during lactation, 2) the factors responsible for interfering with mammary remodelling in continuous lactation throughout the dry period into the subsequent...

  6. Metabolic syndrome and cognitive decline: the role of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rinaldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MetS is a cluster of conditions, each of which represents a risk factor for cardiovascular disease: central obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Any of these conditions and MetS itself have been associated to Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia. In recent years there is a growing evidence for the role of physical activity in preventing metabolic diseases and cognitive decline. In our research we assessed the prevalence of MetS in a sample of 154 elderly people. Furthermore, we evaluated cognition (with Mini Mental State Examination, MMSE  and the physical activity level in every patient. We found a significant association between MetS, borderline cognitive impairment and sedentary lifestyle.

  7. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Lavandula coronopifolia essential oil against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Said, L; Zahlane, K; Ghalbane, I; El Messoussi, S; Romane, A; Cavaleiro, C; Salgueiro, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the composition of the essential oil (EO) of Lavandula coronopifolia from Morocco and to evaluate its in vitro antibacterial activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from clinical infections. The antimicrobial activity was assessed by a broth micro-well dilution method using multiresistant clinical isolates of 11 pathogenic bacteria: Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae, Klebsiella ornithinolytica, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Providencia rettgeri, Citrobacter freundii, Hafnia alvei, Salmonella spp., Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The main compounds of the oil were carvacrol (48.9%), E-caryophyllene (10.8%) and caryophyllene oxide (7.7%). The oil showed activity against all tested strains with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging between 1% and 4%. For most of the strains, the MIC value was equivalent to the minimal bactericidal concentration value, indicating a clear bactericidal effect of L. coronopifolia EO.

  8. Antiproliferative activity of VLC fractions obtained from Asparagopsis armata associated bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fonseca Francisco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many studies are showing the presence of bioactive compounds in marine organisms, such as algae and algae associated bacteria. Cancer is one of the major causes of death in the world, consequently research for new antitumor compounds is continuous and have high importance for the human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antitumor activity of Shewanella sp. associated bacteria from Asparagopsis armata. Crude extract of associated bacteria was obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1 extraction. Then the crude extract was fractioned by vacuum liquid chromatography (VLC using cyclohexane with increasing amounts of 25% of ethyl acetate, in order to isolate different compounds obtained five fractions (F1-F5. The cell viability and the cell proliferation studies were performed on human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7 cells according to MTT method. In cytotoxicity assay (1mg/ml; 24 hours, the highest reduction of MCF-7 viability was induced by F2 and F3 fractions (53.6% and 48.6% respectively. On the other hand in cell proliferation assay (1mg/ml; 24 hours, all fractions showed anti-proliferative activity (1mg/mL, however the highest inhibition of MCF-7 proliferation was exhibited by F3 and F5 fractions, 15% and 17,7%, respectively. These results suggest that the Shewanella sp. associated bacteria from Asparagopsis armata can be an interesting source of new antitumor drugs.

  9. The inhibitory activity of Lactic acid bacteria isolated from fresh cow cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevijo Zdolec

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria are the constituent part of milk microbial flora that could influence the safety of dairy products due production of organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, carbon dioxide and bacteriocins. Taking this in consideration, the objective of this study was to investigate the composition of lactic acid bacteria population in fresh cow cheeses taken from local markets, as well as their antimicrobial capacity. Lactic acid bacteria counts were determined according to ISO 1524:1998 method, biochemical determination using API 50 CHL system, and inhibitory activity against L. monocytogenes NCTC 10527 by agar well diffusion assay. Lactic acid bacteria count in fresh cow cheeses (n=10 ranged from 5.87 to 8.38 log10 CFU g-1. Among 52 MRS isolates collected, 61.54 % were assigned to the Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis species, 23.07 % Lactobacillus helveticus, 11.54 % Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and 3.85 % Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides. Antilisterial activity was found in 18 isolates.

  10. Incidence of Bacteriocins Produced by Food-Related Lactic Acid Bacteria Active towards Oral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Papadimitriou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the incidence of bacteriocins produced by 236 lactic acid bacteria (LAB food isolates against pathogenic or opportunistic pathogenic oral bacteria. This set of LAB contained several strains (≥17% producing bacteriocins active against food-related bacteria. Interestingly only Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 was able to inhibit the growth of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus gordonii, while Lactobacillus fermentum ACA-DC 179 and Lactobacillus plantarun ACA-DC 269 produced bacteriocins solely against Streptococcus oralis. Thus, the percentage of strains that were found to produce bacteriocins against oral bacteria was ~1.3%. The rarity of bacteriocins active against oral LAB pathogens produced by food-related LAB was unexpected given their close phylogenetic relationship. Nevertheless, when tested in inhibition assays, the potency of the bacteriocin(s of S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against the three oral streptococci was high. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis revealed that exposure of the target cells to the antimicrobial compounds caused major alterations of key cellular constituents. Our findings indicate that bacteriocins produced by food-related LAB against oral LAB may be rare, but deserve further investigation since, when discovered, they can be effective antimicrobials.

  11. The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in isogenous bacteria strains with different radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.I.; Goncharenko, E.N.; Yudz, T.I.; Samojlenko, I.I.

    1984-01-01

    The catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in isogenous bacterial strains with various radiosensitivity is investigated. In micrococcus radiodurans mutants with defects in the DNA repair systems the superoxide dismutase activity is lower than in the wild type cells. In investigated Escherichia coli strains differing in radiosensitivity, no alteration in catalase and superoxide dismutase activity is found. The conclusion is drawn that viability of bacteria subjected to the effect of ionizing radiations is determined by the efficiency of DNA repair systems whose functional reliability is sometimes connected with the catalase and suferoxide dismutase activity

  12. Antioxidant activity of probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from Mongolian airag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Uugantsetseg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from airag. In this study, 42 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from Mongolian airag. All isolates were identified by using morphological, biochemical and physiological methods. The isolated bacteria were studied for antagonistic effects on Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, 22 strains showed antibacterial activity. When we examined their probiotic properties such as bile acid tolerance and gastric acid tolerance, it is shown that only 6 bacterial strains can survive up to 3  hours in a pH 3.0 acid environment  and up to 8 hours in  0.3% bile acid environment. Selected probiotic strains were further identified to species by API 50CHL system. Antioxidant activity of  probiotic  strains were determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay. While the antioxidant activity in cell free supernatant fluctuated between the range of 26.1-38.4%,  the antioxidant activity after 72 hours of fermentation in the whey fraction was between 17.23-55.12%. DOI: http://doi.dx.org/10.5564/mjc.v15i0.327 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 15 (41, 2014, p73-78

  13. Synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Farooqui

    Full Text Available Synergistic combinations of antimicrobial agents with different mechanisms of action have been introduced as more successful strategies to combat infections involving multidrug resistant (MDR bacteria. In this study, we investigated synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia which are commonly used plants with different antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 350 Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains belonging to 10 different bacterial species, was tested against Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs were determined by agar dilution and microbroth dilution assays. Plant extracts were tested for synergistic antimicrobial activity with different antimicrobial agents by checkerboard titration, Etest/agar incorporation assays, and time kill kinetics. Extract treated and untreated bacteria were subjected to transmission electron microscopy to see the effect on bacterial cell morphology. Camellia sinensis extract showed higher antibacterial activity against MDR S. Typhi, alone and in combination with nalidixic acid, than to susceptible isolates." We further explore anti-staphylococcal activity of Juglans regia that lead to the changes in bacterial cell morphology indicating the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria as possible target of action. The synergistic combination of Juglans regia and oxacillin reverted oxacillin resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains in vitro. This study provides novel information about antimicrobial and synergistic activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against MDR pathogens.

  14. Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-14

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus subtilis were harvested shortly after release from sporangia, incubated under...Dec-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 spores, Bacillus , spore dormancy, 3-phosphoglycerate REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  15. Characterization of the microbial community composition and the distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria in a creek contaminated by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weimin; Xiao, Enzong; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Qingxiang

    2016-10-01

    A small watershed heavily contaminated by long-term acid mine drainage (AMD) from an upstream abandoned coal mine was selected to study the microbial community developed in such extreme system. The watershed consists of AMD-contaminated creek, adjacent contaminated soils, and a small cascade aeration unit constructed downstream, which provide an excellent contaminated site to study the microbial response in diverse extreme AMD-polluted environments. The results showed that the innate microbial communities were dominated by acidophilic bacteria, especially acidophilic Fe-metabolizing bacteria, suggesting that Fe and pH are the primary environmental factors in governing the indigenous microbial communities. The distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria showed distinct site-specific patterns. A pronounced shift from diverse communities in the upstream to Proteobacteria-dominated communities in the downstream was observed in the ecosystem. This location-specific trend was more apparent at genus level. In the upstream samples (sampling sites just below the coal mining adit), a number of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria such as Alicyclobacillus spp., Metallibacterium spp., and Acidithrix spp. were dominant, while Halomonas spp. were the major Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria observed in downstream samples. Additionally, Acidiphilium, an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, was enriched in the upstream samples, while Shewanella spp. were the dominant Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in downstream samples. Further investigation using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) clustering confirmed the difference of microbial communities between upstream and downstream samples. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and Spearman's rank correlation indicate that total organic carbon (TOC) content is the primary environmental parameter in structuring the indigenous microbial communities

  16. Inhibitors of Testosterone Biosynthetic and Metabolic Activation Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leping Ye

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Leydig cells of the testis have the capacity to biosynthesize testosterone from cholesterol. Testosterone and its metabolically activated product dihydrotestosterone are critical for the development of male reproductive system and spermatogenesis. At least four steroidogenic enzymes are involved in testosterone biosynthesis: Cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1 for the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone within the mitochondria, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B, for the conversion of pregnenolone into progesterone, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1 for the conversion of progesterone into androstenedione and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B3 for the formation of testosterone from androstenedione. Testosterone is also metabolically activated into more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone by two isoforms 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1 and 2 (SRD5A2 in Leydig cells and peripheral tissues. Many endocrine disruptors act as antiandrogens via directly inhibiting one or more enzymes for testosterone biosynthesis and metabolic activation. These chemicals include industrial materials (perfluoroalkyl compounds, phthalates, bisphenol A and benzophenone and pesticides/biocides (methoxychlor, organotins, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and prochloraz and plant constituents (genistein and gossypol. This paper reviews these endocrine disruptors targeting steroidogenic enzymes.

  17. Effects of vasoactive and metabolic active substances (measurement of RCBF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrschaft, H.

    1986-09-29

    Methods, principles, normal values, reproducibility and clinical indications of rCBF-measurements, using the intraartrial 133-Xenon-clearance-technique, are presented. The effect of vaso- and metabolically active drugs on cerebral blood flow was examined in 215 patients, suffering from cerebral ischemia. Significant increase of rCBF was ascertained after intravenous injection of centrophenoxine, pyrithioxine, extractum sanguis deproteinatus, piracetam and solutions of low molecular dextran. All the other drugs tested proved to be either without any effect or caused decrease of rCBF. In 130 patients with obstructive disease of internal carotid artery after surgery at an interval of 6 - 8 weeks and 1 year a significant increase of CBF could be stated. The rank of psychological tests and quantitative EEF-investigations relating to evidence of efficacy of metabolically active drugs is discussed critically. Therapeutic efficacy and clinical relevance of vaso- and metabolically active drugs in cerebral ischemia of man are to be substantiated only by double-blind controlled studies.

  18. Effects of vasoactive and metabolic active substances (measurement of RCBF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrschaft, H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods, principles, normal values, reproducibility and clinical indications of rCBF-measurements, using the intraartrial 133-Xenon-clearance-technique, are presented. The effect of vaso- and metabolically active drugs on cerebral blood flow was examined in 215 patients, suffering from cerebral ischemia. Significant increase of rCBF was ascertained after intravenous injection of centrophenoxine, pyrithioxine, extractum sanguis deproteinatus, piracetam and solutions of low molecular dextran. All the other drugs tested proved to be either without any effect or caused decrease of rCBF. In 130 patients with obstructive disease of internal carotid artery after surgery at an interval of 6 - 8 weeks and 1 year a significant increase of CBF could be stated. The rank of psychological tests and quantitative EEF-investigations relating to evidence of efficacy of metabolically active drugs is discussed critically. Therapeutic efficacy and clinical relevance of vaso- and metabolically active drugs in cerebral ischemia of man are to be substantiated only by double-blind controlled studies. (orig.) [de

  19. Inhibitors of testosterone biosynthetic and metabolic activation enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Leping; Su, Zhi-Jian; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2011-12-02

    The Leydig cells of the testis have the capacity to biosynthesize testosterone from cholesterol. Testosterone and its metabolically activated product dihydrotestosterone are critical for the development of male reproductive system and spermatogenesis. At least four steroidogenic enzymes are involved in testosterone biosynthesis: Cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1) for the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone within the mitochondria, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B), for the conversion of pregnenolone into progesterone, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) for the conversion of progesterone into androstenedione and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B3) for the formation of testosterone from androstenedione. Testosterone is also metabolically activated into more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone by two isoforms 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1) and 2 (SRD5A2) in Leydig cells and peripheral tissues. Many endocrine disruptors act as antiandrogens via directly inhibiting one or more enzymes for testosterone biosynthesis and metabolic activation. These chemicals include industrial materials (perfluoroalkyl compounds, phthalates, bisphenol A and benzophenone) and pesticides/biocides (methoxychlor, organotins, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and prochloraz) and plant constituents (genistein and gossypol). This paper reviews these endocrine disruptors targeting steroidogenic enzymes.

  20. Prediction of residual metabolic activity after treatment in NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios Velazquez, Emmanuel; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Oberije, Cary; Ruysscher, Dirk De; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Metabolic response assessment is often used as a surrogate of local failure and survival. Early identification of patients with residual metabolic activity is essential as this enables selection of patients who could potentially benefit from additional therapy. We report on the development of a pre-treatment prediction model for metabolic response using patient, tumor and treatment factors. Methods. One hundred and one patients with inoperable NSCLC (stage I-IV), treated with 3D conformal radical (chemo)-radiotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. All patients received a pre and post-radiotherapy fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography FDG-PET-CT scan. The electronic medical record system and the medical patient charts were reviewed to obtain demographic, clinical, tumor and treatment data. Primary outcome measure was examined using a metabolic response assessment on a post-radiotherapy FDG-PET-CT scan. Radiotherapy was delivered in fractions of 1.8 Gy, twice a day, with a median prescribed dose of 60 Gy. Results. Overall survival was worse in patients with residual metabolic active areas compared with the patients with a complete metabolic response (p=0.0001). In univariate analysis, three variables were significantly associated with residual disease: larger primary gross tumor volume (GTVprimary, p=0.002), higher pre-treatment maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max , p=0.0005) in the primary tumor and shorter overall treatment time (OTT, p=0.046). A multivariate model including GTVprimary, SUV max , equivalent radiation dose at 2 Gy corrected for time (EQD2, T) and OTT yielded an area under the curve assessed by the leave-one-out cross validation of 0.71 (95% CI, 0.65-0.76). Conclusion. Our results confirmed the validity of metabolic response assessment as a surrogate of survival. We developed a multivariate model that is able to identify patients at risk of residual disease. These patients may benefit from

  1. Biochemical characterisation of the esterase activities of wine lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Angela; Grbin, Paul R; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2007-11-01

    Esters are an important group of volatile compounds that can contribute to wine flavour. Wine lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been shown to produce esterases capable of hydrolysing ester substrates. This study aims to characterise the esterase activities of nine LAB strains under important wine conditions, namely, acidic conditions, low temperature (to 10 degrees C) and in the presence of ethanol (2-18% v/v). Esterase substrate specificity was also examined using seven different ester substrates. The bacteria were generally found to have a broad pH activity range, with the majority of strains showing maximum activity close to pH 6.0. Exceptions included an Oenococcus oeni strain that retained most activity even down to a pH of 4.0. Most strains exhibited highest activity across the range 30-40 degrees C. Increasing ethanol concentration stimulated activity in some of the strains. In particular, O. oeni showed an increase in activity up to a maximum ethanol concentration of around 16%. Generally, strains were found to have greater activity towards short-chained esters (C2-C8) compared to long-chained esters (C10-C18). Even though the optimal physicochemical conditions for enzyme activity differed from those found in wine, these findings are of potential importance to oenology because significant activities remained under wine-like conditions.

  2. Activity syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alexander D. M.; Szekeres, Petra; Violich, Mackellar; Gutowsky, Lee F. G.; Eliason, Erika J.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-03-01

    Despite growing interest, the behavioural ecology of deep-sea organisms is largely unknown. Much of this scarcity in knowledge can be attributed to deepwater animals being secretive or comparatively 'rare', as well as technical difficulties associated with accessing such remote habitats. Here we tested whether two species of giant marine isopod (Bathynomus giganteus, Booralana tricarinata) captured from 653 to 875 m in the Caribbean Sea near Eleuthera, The Bahamas, exhibited an activity behavioural syndrome across two environmental contexts (presence/absence of food stimulus) and further whether this syndrome carried over consistently between sexes. We also measured routine metabolic rate and oxygen consumption in response to a food stimulus in B. giganteus to assess whether these variables are related to individual differences in personality. We found that both species show an activity syndrome across environmental contexts, but the underlying mechanistic basis of this syndrome, particularly in B. giganteus, is unclear. Contrary to our initial predictions, neither B. giganteus nor B. tricarinata showed any differences between mean expression of behavioural traits between sexes. Both sexes of B. tricarinata showed strong evidence of an activity syndrome underlying movement and foraging ecology, whereas only male B. giganteus showed evidence of an activity syndrome. Generally, individuals that were more active and bolder, in a standard open arena test were also more active when a food stimulus was present. Interestingly, individual differences in metabolism were not related to individual differences in behaviour based on present data. Our study provides the first measurements of behavioural syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods.

  3. In-vitro activity of sodium-hypochlorite gel on bacteria associated with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurczyk, Karolina; Nietzsche, Sandor; Ender, Claudia; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of a sodium hypochlorite formulation including its components against bacteria associated with periodontal disease. Sodium hypochlorite formulation (NaOCl gel), its components sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and the activating vehicle were compared with 0.1 % chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) solution. The antimicrobial activity was proven by determination of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC), minimal bactericidal concentrations, and killing assays. Furthermore, the influence on formation as well as on a 4-day-old 6-species biofilm was tested. Except for one strain (Parvimonas micra ATCC 33270 in case of NaOCl gel), the MICs both of the CHX solution and NaOCl gel did not exceed 10 % of the formulations' concentration. In general, MICs of the NaOCl gel were equal as of the CHX solution against Gram-negatives but higher against Gram-positive bacteria. CHX but not NaOCl gel clearly inhibited biofilm formation; however, the activity of NaOCl gel was more remarkable on a 4-day-old biofilm. NaOCl killed bacteria in the biofilm and interfered with the matrix. The NaOCl gel acts antimicrobial in particular against Gram-negative species associated with periodontitis. Moreover, its component NaOCl hypochlorite is able to alter biofilm matrices. The NaOCl gel may represent a potential alternative for adjunctive topical antimicrobial treatment in periodontitis.

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Marine and Black Band Disease Cyanobacteria against Coral-Associated Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantar, Miroslav; Kaczmarsky, Longin T.; Stanić, Dina; Miller, Aaron W.; Richardson, Laurie L.

    2011-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) of corals is a cyanobacteria-dominated polymicrobial disease that contains diverse populations of heterotrophic bacteria. It is one of the most destructive of coral diseases and is found globally on tropical and sub-tropical reefs. We assessed ten strains of BBD cyanobacteria, and ten strains of cyanobacteria isolated from other marine sources, for their antibacterial effect on growth of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from BBD, from the surface mucopolysaccharide layer (SML) of healthy corals, and three known bacterial coral pathogens. Assays were conducted using two methods: co-cultivation of cyanobacterial and bacterial isolates, and exposure of test bacteria to (hydrophilic and lipophilic) cyanobacterial cell extracts. During co-cultivation, 15 of the 20 cyanobacterial strains tested had antibacterial activity against at least one of the test bacterial strains. Inhibition was significantly higher for BBD cyanobacteria when compared to other marine cyanobacteria. Lipophilic extracts were more active than co-cultivation (extracts of 18 of the 20 strains were active) while hydrophilic extracts had very limited activity. In some cases co-cultivation resulted in stimulation of BBD and SML bacterial growth. Our results suggest that BBD cyanobacteria are involved in structuring the complex polymicrobial BBD microbial community by production of antimicrobial compounds. PMID:22073011

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Marine and Black Band Disease Cyanobacteria against Coral-Associated Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie L. Richardson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Black band disease (BBD of corals is a cyanobacteria-dominated polymicrobial disease that contains diverse populations of heterotrophic bacteria. It is one of the most destructive of coral diseases and is found globally on tropical and sub-tropical reefs. We assessed ten strains of BBD cyanobacteria, and ten strains of cyanobacteria isolated from other marine sources, for their antibacterial effect on growth of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from BBD, from the surface mucopolysaccharide layer (SML of healthy corals, and three known bacterial coral pathogens. Assays were conducted using two methods: co-cultivation of cyanobacterial and bacterial isolates, and exposure of test bacteria to (hydrophilic and lipophilic cyanobacterial cell extracts. During co-cultivation, 15 of the 20 cyanobacterial strains tested had antibacterial activity against at least one of the test bacterial strains. Inhibition was significantly higher for BBD cyanobacteria when compared to other marine cyanobacteria. Lipophilic extracts were more active than co-cultivation (extracts of 18 of the 20 strains were active while hydrophilic extracts had very limited activity. In some cases co-cultivation resulted in stimulation of BBD and SML bacterial growth. Our results suggest that BBD cyanobacteria are involved in structuring the complex polymicrobial BBD microbial community by production of antimicrobial compounds.

  6. Inhibitory activity spectrum of reuterin produced by Lactobacillus reuteri against intestinal bacteria

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    Duboux Marc

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reuterin produced from glycerol by Lactobacillus reuteri, a normal inhabitant of the human intestine, is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. It has been postulated that reuterin could play a role in the probiotic effects of Lb. reuteri. Reuterin is active toward enteropathogens, yeasts, fungi, protozoa and viruses, but its effect on commensal intestinal bacteria is unknown. Moreover reuterin's mode of action has not yet been elucidated. Glutathione, a powerful antioxidant, which also plays a key role in detoxifying reactive aldehydes, protects certain bacteria from oxidative stress, and could also be implicated in resistance to reuterin. The aim of this work was to test the activity of reuterin against a representative panel of intestinal bacteria and to study a possible correlation between intracellular low molecular weight thiols (LMW-SH such as glutathione, hydrogen peroxide and/or reuterin sensitivity. Reuterin was produced by Lb. reuteri SD2112 in pure glycerol solution, purified and used to test the minimal inhibitory (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC. Hydrogen peroxide sensitivity and intracellular LMW-SH concentration were also analysed. Results Our data showed that most tested intestinal bacteria showed MIC below that for a sensitive indicator Escherichia coli (7.5–15 mM. Lactobacilli and Clostridium clostridioforme were more resistant with MIC ranging from 15 to 50 mM. No correlation between bacterial intracellular concentrations of LMW-SH, including glutathione, and reuterin or hydrogen peroxide sensitivities were found. Conclusion Our data showed that intestinal bacteria were very sensitive to reuterin and that their intracellular concentration of LMW-SH was not directly linked to their capacity to resist reuterin or hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that detoxification by LMW-SH such as glutathione is not a general mechanism and that other mechanisms are probably involved in bacterial tolerance

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Pigments Extracted from Rhodotorula glutinis Against Some Bacteria and Fungi

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    Mahmoud Yolmeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Nowadays hazards of synthetic additives and preservatives have been identified, so researchers are looking to a natural and safe alternative for them. The aim of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial effect of carotenoids of Rhodotorula glutinis on the some pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Methods This experimental study was done in Gorgan University of Agriculture and Natural Resources. After cultivating R. glutinis in 50 mL YPG broth at 30°C for overnight, cells were harvested by centrifugation at 10,000 rpm for 10 minutes and were washed three times with distilled water. Cells were ruptured 3 times with 12 mL of acetone and broken using homogenizer. Then the suspension was centrifuged and the supernatant collected. The supernatant (contain pigments was powdered using freeze-dryer. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC was determined by using the agar dilution method. Results Giving the results, carotenoids of R. glutinis was effective on the growth of all the tested bacteria, so that Bacillus cereus and Salmonella enteritidis were the lowest and highest sensitivity to this pigment, respectively. The highest MIC and MBC among the tested bacteria were observed for S. enteritidis and Escherichia coli, respectively; whereas MBC was not observed for S. enteritidis at concentrations of the tested pigment. Conclusions Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive than Gram-negative bacteria against the antimicrobial activity of pigments of R. glutinis. According to the results, pigments of R. glutinis can be used as an inhibitor of bacterial growth.

  8. In vitro Antibacterial activity of Pimpinella anisum fruit extracts against some pathogenic bacteria

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    A.Akhtar

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activities of the aqueous, 50% (v/v methanol,acetone and petroleum ether extracts of Pimpinella anisum (L fruits were studied. The extracts of Pimpinella anisum were tested in vitro against 4 bacterial species by the disc diffusion method. Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 96, Streptococcus pyogenes (MTCC 442, Escherchia coli (MTCC 723 and Klebsiella Pneumoniae (MTCC 109 were used in this investigation. Only aqueous and 50% (v/v methanol extract exhibited fair antibacterial activity against all the test bacteria whereas acetone and petroleum ether extract were not observed to inhibit the growth of any of the test bacteria under study. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(9.000: 272-274

  9. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: Role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baeuerlein, Annette; Ackermann, Stefanie; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to clarify whether commercially available probiotics induce greater trans-epithelial activation of human leukocytes than do commensal, food-derived and pathogenic bacteria and to identify the compounds responsible for this activation. Eleven different bacterial...... strains, and some of their pathogen-associated molecular patterns, were incubated apically on a confluent layer of intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2), which were basolaterally co-cultured with human mononuclear leukocytes. Only Gram-negative bacteria having Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin (commensal...... Escherichia coli K12, probiotic E. coli Nissle, EPEC) induced basolateral production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL 6, 8, and 10. Gram-positive probiotics (Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp.) had virtually no effect. In addition, commensals (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacteroides vulgatus) and food...

  10. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäuerlein, A.; Ackermann, S.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to clarify whether commercially available probiotics induce greater trans-epithelial activation of human leukocytes than do commensal, food-derived and pathogenic bacteria and to identify the compounds responsible for this activation. Eleven different bacterial...... strains, and some of their pathogen-associated molecular patterns, were incubated apically on a confluent layer of intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2), which were basolaterally co-cultured with human mononuclear leukocytes. Only Gram-negative bacteria having Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin (commensal...... Escherichia coli K12, probiotic E. coli Nissle, EPEC) induced basolateral production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL 6, 8, and 10. Gram-positive probiotics (Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp.) had virtually no effect. In addition, commensals (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacteroides vulgatus) and food...

  11. Present-day biogeochemical activities of anaerobic bacteria and their relevance to future exobiological investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    If the primordial atmosphere was reducing, then the first microbial ecosystem was probably composed of anaerobic bacteria. However, despite the presence of an oxygen-rich atmosphere, anaerobic habitats are important, commonplace components of the Earth's present biosphere. The geochemical activities displayed by these anaerobes impact the global cycling of certain elements (e.g., C, N, S, Fe, Mn, etc.). Methane provides an obvious example of how human-enhanced activities on a global scale can influence the content of a "radiative" (i.e., infrared absorbing) trace gas in the atmosphere. Methane can be oxidized by anaerobic bacteria, but this does not appear to support their growth. Acetylene, however, does support such growth. This may form the basis for future exobiological investigations of the atmospheres of anoxic, hydrocarbon-rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn, as well as the latter's satellite Titan. ?? 1989.

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss Essential Oil against Some Fish Spoilage Bacteria

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    Mohammad Hashemi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate antimicrobial effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss essential oil (EO against six fish spoilage bacteria for evaluation of its potential utilization in the preservation of minimally processed fish products. Methods: Firstly, GC-MS analysis of the EO was performed to determine its chemical composition. Then, antibacterial effect of the EO in a range of 0.031 to 4 mg/ml was tested against different fish spoilage bacteria such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Shewanella putrefaciens, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis by broth microdilution method to determine minimum inhibitory (MIC and minimum bactericidal (MBC concentrations. Results: GC-MS results showed that phenolic components such as carvacrol (51.55% and thymol (25.49% were predominant constituents of the EO. Zataria multiflora Boiss EO exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria. Shewanella Putrefaciens was the most sensitive bacteria with MBC value of 0. 5 mg/ml. Conclusion: According to the results, this EO could be used as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food specially seafood products to preserve them against bacterial spoilage.

  13. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation

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    James W.A. Murphy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2 < 2 mg/L occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health.

  14. Lactic acid bacteria active during the fermentation of wheat silage in small scale silos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, N.J.; Moon, L.C.; Ely, L.O.; Parker, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Wheat was ensiled and periodically analyzed for lactic acid bacteria present. Initially Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and Streptococcus lactis predominated. After two to four days enterococci including S. faecium and S. bovis were present in high populations as well as Lactobacillus plantarum. It was concluded that mixed populations of enterococci and L. plantarum are active in the successful fermentation of wheat silage. (Refs. 5).

  15. ISOLATION AND LIGNOCELLULOLYTIC ACTIVITIES OF FIBER-DIGESTING BACTERIA FROM DIGESTIVE TRACT OF TERMITE (Cryptothermes sp.

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    B.I.M. Tampoebolon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to obtain the fiber-digesting bacteria isolates from termitedigestive tract and to determine the optimum conditions of growth and production of cellulase, xylanaseand ligninase enzyme of isolate. The first study was conducted to isolate and select the fiber-digestingbacteria from the digestive tract of termites based on the highest activity of cellulolytic (S, xylanolytic(X and lignolytic (L. The second study was optimation of the growth conditions of bacteria and theenzyme production due to effect of rice straw substrate and nitrogen. The material used were dry woodtermites, rice straw, and culture medium. The design used was a completely randomized factorial design,in which the first factor was rice straw substrate (1, 2, and 3% W/V, while the second factor wasnitrogen (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% W/V. Variables measured were cellulase, xylanase and ligninase activities.Results of the first sudy showed that the isolates obtained consisted of 3 types, those were cellulolyticbacteria (S1, S2, and S3, 3 types of bacteria xylanolytic (X1, X2, and X3 and 3 types of bacteria lignolytic(L1, L2, and L3. Meanwhile, results of the second study showed that isolates of S2, X3, and L1 had thehighest activity, those were 1.894 U/mL, 1.722 U/mL and 0.314 U/mL, respectively. In conclusion, the addition of 1% level of rice straw substrate and 0.3% of nitrogen showed the highest enzyme activity oncellulase, xylanase and ligninase.

  16. Antagonistic activity of isolated lactic acid bacteria from Pliek U against gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli ATCC 25922

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiti, A. A.; Jamilah, I.; Rusmarilin, H.

    2017-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is one group of microbes that has many benefits, notably in food and health industries sector. LAB plays an important role in food fermentation and it has bacteriostatic effect against the growth of pathogenic microorganisms. The research related LAB continued to be done to increase the diversity of potential isolates derived from nature which is indigenous bacteria for biotechnological purposes. This study was aimed to isolate and characterize LAB derived from pliek u sample and to examine the potency to inhibits Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 bacteria growth. A total of 5 isolates were isolated and based on morphological and physiological characteristics of the fifth bacteria, they are allegedly belonging to the genus Bacillus. Result of antagonistic test showed that the five isolates could inhibits the growth of E. coli ATCC 25922. The highest inhibition zone is 8.5 mm was shown by isolates NQ2, while the lowest inhibition is 1.5 mm was shown by isolates NQ3.

  17. Engineering of Secondary Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Secondary (specialized) metabolites, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants, and other organisms, exhibit enormous structural variation, and consequently display a wide range of biological activities. Secondary metabolism improves and modulates the phenotype of the host producer. Furthermore, these biological activities have resulted in the use of secondary metabolites in a variety of industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Metabolic engineering presents a powerful strategy to improve access to these valuable molecules. A critical overview of engineering approaches in secondary metabolism is presented, both in heterologous and native hosts. The recognition of the increasing role of compartmentalization in metabolic engineering is highlighted. Engineering approaches to modify the structure of key secondary metabolite classes are also critically evaluated.

  18. Selective enrichment and production of highly urease active bacteria by non-sterile (open) chemostat culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2013-10-01

    In general, bioprocesses can be subdivided into naturally occurring processes, not requiring sterility (e.g., beer brewing, wine making, lactic acid fermentation, or biogas digestion) and other processes (e.g., the production of enzymes and antibiotics) that typically require a high level of sterility to avoid contaminant microbes overgrowing the production strain. The current paper describes the sustainable, non-sterile production of an industrial enzyme using activated sludge as inoculum. By using selective conditions (high pH, high ammonia concentration, and presence of urea) for the target bacterium, highly active ureolytic bacteria, physiologically resembling Sporosarcina pasteurii were reproducibly enriched and then continuously produced via chemostat operation of the bioreactor. When using a pH of 10 and about 0.2 M urea in a yeast extract-based medium, ureolytic bacteria developed under aerobic chemostat operation at hydraulic retention times of about 10 h with urease levels of about 60 μmol min⁻¹ ml⁻¹ culture. For cost minimization at an industrial scale the costly protein-rich yeast extract medium could be replaced by commercial milk powder or by lysed activated sludge. Glutamate, molasses, or glucose-based media did not result in the enrichment of ureolytic bacteria by the chemostat. The concentration of intracellular urease was sufficiently high such that the produced raw effluent from the reactor could be used directly for biocementation in the field.

  19. Phylogenetic diversity and antimicrobial activity of marine bacteria associated with the soft coral Sarcophyton glaucum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElAhwany, Amani M D; Ghozlan, Hanan A; ElSharif, Hafed A; Sabry, Soraya A

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are the most biodiverse and biologically productive of all marine ecosystems. Corals harbor diverse and abundant prokaryotic groups. However, little is known about the diversity of coral-associated microorganisms. We used molecular techniques to identify and compare the culturable bacterial assemblages associated with the soft coral Sarcophyton glaucum from the Red sea. Different media were utilized for microbial isolation, and the phylogeny of the culturable bacteria associated with the coral was analyzed based on 16S rDNA sequencing. The coral associated bacteria were found to be representatives within the Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Antimicrobial activities of twenty bacterial isolates were tested against four pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio fluvialis) and three fungi (Penicillium sp., Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans). A relatively high proportion of bacterial strains displayed distinct antibacterial and antifungal activities, suggesting that soft coral-associated microorganisms may aid their host in protection against marine pathogens. Members of genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas had the highest proportion of antimicrobial activity which supported the hypothesis that they might play a protective role in the coral hosts. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Simple glycolipids of microbes: Chemistry, biological activity and metabolic engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mohammad Abdel-Mawgoud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylated lipids (GLs are added-value lipid derivatives of great potential. Besides their interesting surface activities that qualify many of them to act as excellent ecological detergents, they have diverse biological activities with promising biomedical and cosmeceutical applications. Glycolipids, especially those of microbial origin, have interesting antimicrobial, anticancer, antiparasitic as well as immunomodulatory activities. Nonetheless, GLs are hardly accessing the market because of their high cost of production. We believe that experience of metabolic engineering (ME of microbial lipids for biofuel production can now be harnessed towards a successful synthesis of microbial GLs for biomedical and other applications. This review presents chemical groups of bacterial and fungal GLs, their biological activities, their general biosynthetic pathways and an insight on ME strategies for their production.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of extracellular metabolites from antagonistic bacteria isolated from potato (Solanum phureja crops

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    Sinar David Granada García

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms for biological control are capable of producing active compounds that inhibit the development of phytopathogens, constituting a promising tool toob tain active principles that could replace synthetic pesticides. This study evaluatedtheability of severalpotentialbiocontrol microorganismsto produce active extracellular metabolites. In vitro antagonistic capability of 50 bacterial isolates from rhizospheric soils of "criolla" potato (Solanum phureja was tested through dual culture in this plant with different plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Isolates that showed significantly higher antagonistic activity were fermented in liquid media and crude extracts from the supernatants had their biological activities assessed by optical density techniques. Inhibitory effecton tested pathogens was observed for concentrations between 0.5% and 1% of crude extracts. There was a correlation between the antimicrobial activity of extracts and the use of nutrient-rich media in bacteria fermentation. Using a bioguided method, a peptidic compound, active against Fusarium oxysporum, was obtained from the 7ANT04 strain (Pyrobaculum sp.. Analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography coupled to mass detector evidenced an 11-amino acid compound. Bioinformatic software using raw mass data confirmed the presence of a cyclic peptide conformed by 11 mostly non-standard amino acids.

  2. Bacteria-mediated bisphenol A degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yin, Kun; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important monomer in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, food cans, and other daily used chemicals. Daily and worldwide usage of BPA and BPA-contained products led to its ubiquitous distribution in water, sediment/soil, and atmosphere. Moreover, BPA has been identified as an environmental endocrine disruptor for its estrogenic and genotoxic activity. Thus, BPA contamination in the environment is an increasingly worldwide concern, and methods to efficiently remove BPA from the environment are urgently recommended. Although many factors affect the fate of BPA in the environment, BPA degradation is mainly depended on the metabolism of bacteria. Many BPA-degrading bacteria have been identified from water, sediment/soil, and wastewater treatment plants. Metabolic pathways of BPA degradation in specific bacterial strains were proposed, based on the metabolic intermediates detected during the degradation process. In this review, the BPA-degrading bacteria were summarized, and the (proposed) BPA degradation pathway mediated by bacteria were referred.

  3. Anti-biofilm activities from marine cold adapted bacteria against staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Rosanna ePapa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world’s economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules.The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules.The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules

  4. Effects of probiotic bacteria on diarrhea, lipid metabolism, and carcinogenesis: a review of papers published between 1988 and 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, de N.M.; Katan, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed the evidence from human intervention studies for the health effects of probiotic bacteria, ie, live bacteria that survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract and have beneficial effects on the host. Of the 49 studies reviewed, 26 dealt with the prevention or treatment of diarrheal

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Different Plant Extracts and Phenolic Phytochemicals Tested on Paenibacillus Larvae Bacteria

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    Liviu Mărghitaş

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus larvae, a Gram-positive and spore-forming bacterium is responsible for American foulbrood disease inbees. The antimicrobial activity of different plant extracts and phenolic phytochemical was evaluated onPaenibacillus larvae bacteria. In addition possible correlation with antioxidant activity of the same plant extracts wasstudied. Extracts of the following plants were utilized: Achillea millefolium (yarrow, Ocimum basilicum (basil,Thymus vulgaris (thyme and Urtica dioica (nettle. The extracts that showed antimicrobial activity were later testedto determine the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC. Although nettle present the lowest polyphenolic contentcompared with the other plant extracts, exhibit the highest antimicrobial activity, measured as the inhibition zoneusing Mueller-Hinton agar plates. Basil presented both polyphenolic content and antimicrobial activity at higherlevels, while thyme had the lowest antimicrobial activity, even it present high amount of polyphenols.

  6. Polaromonas and Hydrogenophaga species are the predominant bacteria cultured from granular activated carbon filters in water treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magic-Knezev, A.; Wullings, B.A.; Kooij, van der D.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Identification of the predominating cultivable bacteria in granular activated carbon (GAC) filters used in a variety of water treatment plants for selecting representative strains to study the role of bacteria in the removal of dissolved organic matter. METHODS AND RESULTS: Bacterial isolates

  7. Metabolic dysfunction in the brain: implications of astrocyte activation

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    Sonia Luz Albarracin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the central nervous system (CNS. They participate in different processes such as maintaining the blood–brain barrier and ion homeostasis, uptake and turnover of neurotransmitters, and formation of synapses. In addition, astrocytes also respond to brain insults to prevent the damage. For instance, astrocyte activation plays a central role in the cellular response to brain insults like trauma, infections, stroke, tumorigenesis, and neurodegeneration. However, chronic astrocyte activation can also interfere with normal brain function. Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are characterized by an inflammatory response that is considered the main cause of damage in these CNS disorders. This response is mediated by activated glial cells, which overexpress cytokines like TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6, and other different pro-inflammatory factors. These pro-inflammatory signalling cascades can cause neurotoxicity and cell-death by reducing the astrocyte capacity of releasing neurotrophic factors, therefore decreasing their repair capability. Astrocyte activation is a dynamic process and its regulation is critical for maintaining an optimal neurological function that avoids the deleterious effects in neuronal survival. However, cellular and functional changes during astrocyte activation can be regulated in a context-specific manner by inter- and intracellular signalling molecules, for example increases in ammonium, glutamate, reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide favoured astrocyte activation. In this review, we will discuss the state of the art of the metabolic changes that can lead to astrocyte activation and the possible therapeutic approaches to regulate these metabolic changes in astrocytes and their impact in neurons.

  8. Isolation and partial characterization of soils actinomycetes with antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Belén Parada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and thirty four actinobacteria strains were isolated from Argentinian and Peruvian soil in order to evaluate the antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant bacteria On the basis of their antagonist activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and two vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (EVR-Van A and  EVR Van B,13 strains were selected. The presence of NRPS, PKS-I and PKS-II genes were also investigated by PCR techniques. Among the 13 selected actinobacteria, strain AC69C displayed the higher activity in diffusion tests in solid medium and was further evaluated for the production of antagonist metabolites in liquid media. The best results were obtained using fermentation broth with carbohydrates, when starch and glucose were used in combination. Antimicrobial activities of 640 arbitrary units (AU, 320 AU, 320 AU and 80 AU were obtained against EVR-Van A, EVR-Van B, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC7644 and MRSA, respectively. PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of AC69C strain displayed a 100 % homology with Streptomyces antibioticus NRRL B-1701. It was not possible to establish a correlation between the amplified genes and antimicrobial activity of the 13 selected strains. The results of this work show the wide distribution of actinobacteria in soil and the importance of the isolation of strain to screen novel active metabolites against multidrug resistant bacteria of clinical origin.

  9. Medicinal plant extracts with efflux inhibitory activity against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Mark I; Rahman, M Mukhlesur; Gibbons, Simon; Piddock, Laura J V

    2011-02-01

    It was hypothesised that extracts from plants that are used as herbal medicinal products contain inhibitors of efflux in Gram-negative bacteria. Extracts from 21 plants were screened by bioassay for synergy with ciprofloxacin against Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, including mutants in which acrB and tolC had been inactivated. The most active extracts, fractions and purified compounds were further examined by minimum inhibitory concentration testing with five antibiotics for activity against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Efflux activity was determined using the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. Eighty-four extracts from 21 plants, 12 fractions thereof and 2 purified molecules were analysed. Of these, 12 plant extracts showed synergy with ciprofloxacin, 2 of which had activity suggesting efflux inhibition. The most active extract, from Levisticum officinale, was fractionated and the two fractions displaying the greatest synergy with the five antibiotics were further analysed. From these two fractions, falcarindiol and the fatty acids oleic acid and linoleic acid were isolated. The fractions and compounds possessed antibacterial activity especially for mutants lacking a component of AcrAB-TolC. However, no synergism was seen with the fractions or purified molecules, suggesting that a combination of compounds is required for efflux inhibition. These data indicate that medicinal plant extracts may provide suitable lead compounds for future development and possible clinical utility as inhibitors of efflux for various Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Activity of siderophores against drug-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokarn K

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Karuna Gokarn,1,2 Ramprasad B Pal1 1Department of Microbiology, Sir Hurkisondas Nurrotumdas Medical Research Society, 2Caius Research Laboratory, St Xavier’s College, Mumbai, India Abstract: Infections by drug-resistant bacteria are life-threatening. As iron is a vital element for the growth of bacteria, iron-chelating agents (siderophores can be used to arrest their multiplication. Exogenous siderophores – exochelin-MS and deferoxamine-B – were evaluated for their inhibitory activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and metallo-β-lactamase producers – Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii – by disc diffusion, micro-broth dilution, and turbidimetric growth assays. The drug-resistant isolates were inhibited by the synergistic activity of siderophores and antibiotics. Minimum inhibitory concentration of exochelin-MS+ampicillin for different isolates was between 0.05 and 0.5 mg/mL. Minimum inhibitory concentration of deferoxamine-B+ampicillin was 1.0 mg/mL and greater. Iron-chelation therapy could provide a complementary approach to overcome drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria. Keywords: iron-chelation, xenosiderophores, exochelin MS, deferoxamine B

  11. Antibacterial activity of Lactobacillus spp. isolated from the feces of healthy infants against enteropathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodabadi, Abolfazl; Soltan Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Douraghi, Masoumeh; Sharifi Yazdi, Mohammad Kazem; Amin Harati, Farzaneh

    2015-08-01

    Lactobacilli are normal microflora of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and are a heterogeneous group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Lactobacillus strains with Probiotic activity may have health Benefits for human. This study investigates the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus strains obtained from the feces of healthy infants and also explores antibacterial activity of Lactobacillus strains with probiotic potential against enteropathogenic bacteria. Fecal samples were collected from 95 healthy infants younger than 18 months. Two hundred and ninety Lactobacillus strains were isolated and assessed for probiotic potential properties including ability to survive in gastrointestinal conditions (pH 2.0, 0.3% oxgall), adherence to HT-29 cells and antibiotic resistance. Six strains including Lactobacillus fermentum (4 strains), Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus plantarum showed good probiotic potential and inhibited the growth of enteropathogenic bacteria including ETEC H10407, Shigella flexneri ATCC 12022, Shigella sonnei ATCC 9290, Salmonella enteritidis H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica ATCC 23715. These Lactobacillus strains with probiotic potential may be useful for prevention or treatment of diarrhea, but further in vitro and in vivo studies on these strains are still required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Concurrent Activity of Anammox and Denitrifying Bacteria in the Black Sea

    OpenAIRE

    John B. Kirkpatrick; John B. Kirkpatrick; Clara A. Fuchsman; Evgeniy eYakushev; James T. Staley; James W. Murray

    2012-01-01

    After the discovery of ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation (anammox) in the Black Sea in 2003, the role of heterotrophic denitrification as the main marine pathway for fixed N loss was questioned. A 3 part, 15 month time series investigating Black Sea nitrite reductase (nirS) mRNA transcripts at a single location was conducted in order to better understand the activity of anammox and denitrifying bacteria. Here we show that both of these groups were active, as well as being concurrent in the lower s...

  13. Concurrent activity of anammox and denitrifying bacteria in the Black Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, John B.; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Yakushev, Evgeniy; Staley, James T.; Murray, James W.

    2012-01-01

    After the discovery of ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation (anammox) in the environment, the role of heterotrophic denitrification as the main marine pathway for fixed N loss has been questioned. A 3 part, 15 month time series investigating nitrite reductase (nirS) mRNA transcripts at a single location in the Black Sea was conducted in order to better understand the activity of anammox and denitrifying bacteria. Here we show that both of these groups were active, as well as being concurrent in the l...

  14. [Special effects of a complex probiotic containing cellulolytic bacteria Cellulomonas on actively growing rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, N A; Laktionov, K S; Kozlova, A A; Ratnikova, I A; Gavrilova, N N

    2013-01-01

    It was shown that the association of probiotic bacteria of the genuses Bacillus and Cellulomonas form biolayers on the surface of beet marc particles. The positive effect of a fodder additive that contained the biolayer on the basis of a phytomatrix on the growth and development of young rabbits was shown. Feeding of animals with a mixed fodder that contained 0.1% preparation resulted in stimulation of digestion of all components of the food. Among other components of the mixed fodder, cellulose was digested most effectively. An increase in the biomass of symbiotic bacteria and enzymatic activity in the blindgut chymus was also observed. The positive nitrogen balance demonstrated an increase in the nitrogen content in animals and a decrease of its losses with excretion. The mechanism of response of the rabbit's organism to introduction of the complex probiotic preparation into the digestive tract is discussed.

  15. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D.

    1990-01-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of [2H5]phenylalanine, [1-13C]propionate, and [1-13C]leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD

  16. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. (Clinical Research Centre, Harrow (England))

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  17. Antigenotoxic activity of lactic acid bacteria, prebiotics, and products of their fermentation against selected mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Adriana; Śliżewska, Katarzyna; Otlewska, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Dietary components such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and prebiotics can modulate the intestinal microbiota and are thought to be involved in the reduction of colorectal cancer risk. The presented study measured, using the comet assay, the antigenotoxic activity of both probiotic and non-probiotic LAB, as well as some prebiotics and the end-products of their fermentation, against fecal water (FW). The production of short chain fatty acids by the bacteria was quantified using HPLC. Seven out of the ten tested viable strains significantly decreased DNA damage induced by FW. The most effective of them were Lactobacillus mucosae 0988 and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb-12, leading to a 76% and 80% decrease in genotoxicity, respectively. The end-products of fermentation of seven prebiotics by Lactobacillus casei DN 114-001 exhibited the strongest antigenotoxic activity against FW, with fermented inulin reducing genotoxicity by 75%. Among the tested bacteria, this strain produced the highest amounts of butyrate in the process of prebiotic fermentation, and especially from resistant dextrin (4.09 μM/mL). Fermented resistant dextrin improved DNA repair by 78% in cells pre-treated with 6.8 μM methylnitronitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Fermented inulin induced stronger DNA repair in cells pre-treated with mutagens (FW, 25 μM hydrogen peroxide, or MNNG) than non-fermented inulin, and the efficiency of DNA repair after 120 min of incubation decreased by 71%, 50% and 70%, respectively. The different degrees of genotoxicity inhibition observed for the various combinations of bacteria and prebiotics suggest that this effect may be attributable to carbohydrate type, SCFA yield, and the ratio of the end-products of prebiotic fermentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic Syndrome and Physical Activity in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    derya atik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This descriptive study was carried out to reveal the level of physical activity in patients who receive hemodialysis due to chronic kidney failure and to identify its relationship with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS. Material and method: The study was conducted with 55 patients at the hemodialysis units of Alanya State Hospital and Private Alanya Anadolu Hospital between 10 and 30 June 2013. The study data were collected using the National Cholesterol Education Program, the Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III, a data collection form containing Metabolic Syndrome Diagnosis Criteria, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. The data were analyzed using arithmetic mean +/- standard deviation (SD, number and percentage distributions, independent sample t test, crosstabs, One Way Anova, and Pearson and #8217;s Correlation Analysis. Conclusion and suggestions: It was found that 41.8% of the patients were between 50 and 65 years of age, the majority of them were male (58.2%, hemodialysis had been administered to 69.1% of them for at least 36 months, and 50.9% of them met three and more of the MetS criteria. There was no statistically significant relationship between MetS and physical activity levels, but the length of physical activity was longer in those who did not meet the MetS diagnosis criteria (p>0.05. An increase in sedentary time raised the MetS criteria (p<0.05. Conclusion: Nearly 1/2 of the patients were at risk of MetS. Physical activity level being statistically ineffective on MetS can be associated with low physical activity level and longer sedentary time. It can be said that being completely sedentary increases BMI and therefore MetS. The study can be repeated on different samples and the results can be compared. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 69-75

  19. The application of digestive tract lactic acid bacteria with high esterase activity for zearalenone detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiau-Wei; Hsu, Jih-Tay; Chou, Yan-An; Wang, Han-Tsung

    2018-01-24

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is an estrogenic mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium species and frequently contaminates cereals used for food or animal feed. This study attempted to select lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with high esterase activity from the digestive tract, with the goal of using these bacteria for ZEA detoxification. No ZEA activity-related biotransformation products were observed in three isolates (B1, B2 and D10) during incubation in the presence of ZEA. All three LAB strains were Lactobacillus plantarum, but the API 50 CHL results suggested that the three isolates were different strains. Increased esterase activity was associated with an increase in cell growth, and the ZEA-detoxifying capabilities of isolates rely on the concentration of bacteria in the culture medium. The lipolytic activity and ZEA removal assay indicated that ZEA degradation by the supernatant fraction was dependent on esterase activity; the supernatant of B2 strain showed the highest ZEA degradation ability and did not release the binding ZEA back into the medium. The D10 strain showed fast ZEA binding ability during the late log phase but began to release the bound ZEA back into the medium after the early stationary phase. All isolates showed good acid and bile salt tolerance ability but all strains showed low adhesion ability to epithelial cells. Based on the ZEA removal characterization and ability of the isolates, it is suggested that the isolates could be applied to ZEA detoxification of contaminated feed, but the with the requirement of high cell number for ZEA binding and limited degradation time before absorption of ZEA in the digestive tract. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Proteolytic activity and cooperative hemolytic effect of dermatophytes with different species of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakshir, K; Mohamadi, T; Khodadadi, H; Motamedifar, M; Zomorodian, K; Alipour, S; Motamedi, M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Globally, dermatophytes are the most common filamentous group of fungi causing cutaneous mycoses. Dermatophytes were shown to secrete a multitude of enzymes that play a role in their pathogenesis. There is limited data on co-hemolytic (CAMP-like) effect of different bacterial species on dermatophyte species. In this study, we sought to the evaluate exoenzyme activity and co-hemolytic effect of four bacteria on clinical dermatophytes isolated from patients in Shiraz, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 84 clinical dermatophyte species were isolated from patients suffering dermatophytosis and identified by conventional methods. Hemolytic activity was evaluated with Columbia 5% sheep blood agar. Proteolytic activity was determined by plate clearance assay method, using gelatin 8% agar. CAMP-like factor was evaluated with four bacteria, namely, S. areus, S. saprophyticus, S. pyogenes, and S. agalactiae. Fisher's exact test was run for statistical analysis. Results: T. mentagrophytes was the most predominant agent (27 [32.1%]) followed by T. verrucosum(20 [23.8%]), T. tonsurans (10 [11.9%]), Microsporum canis (7 [8.3%]), T. rubrum (6 [7.1%]), E. floccosum (6 [7.1%]), M. gypseum (5 [6%]), and T. violaceum (3[3.6%]). The most common clinical area of dermatophytosis was the skin. All the isolates expressed the zone of incomplete alpha hemolysis. All the isolates had CAMP- positive reaction with S. aureus and the other bacteria were CAMP-negative. All the isolates expressed proteolytic activity and no significant differences were noted among diverse genera of dermatophytes and severities of proteolytic activity. Conclusion: This study indicated that hemolysin and proteolytic enzymes potentially play a role in dermatophyte pathogenesis and S. aureus could be considered as a main bacterium for creation of co-hemolytic effect in association with dermatophyte species. PMID:28959790

  1. Isolation, structural elucidation and in vitro activity of 2-acetyl-2-decarboxamido-oxytetracycline against environmental relevant bacteria, including tetracycline-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkeberg, Anne Kruse; Sengeløv, Gitte; Cornett, Claus

    2004-01-01

    2-Acetyl-2-decarboxamido-oxytetracycline (ADOTC) is a major impurity of oxytetracycline (OTC) produced as a side product during fermentation. ADOTC was isolated from OTC and other impurities using preparative HPLC. The preparative column was an Xterra MS. C-18 chromatographic column (100 mm x 19...... turn W., 5 mum), and the mobile phase contained methanol-water (27:73 (v/v)) with 0.08 M formic acid added. The flow rate was 9.0 ml/min. It was possible to isolate few milligram ADOTC in a day. The compound was unambiguously identified using NMR and MS-MS. The anti-microbial activity against activated...... sludge bacteria was deter-mined giving a potency of only 3% of that of OTC. With tetracycline-resistant bacteria, no anti-microbial activity was observed, indicating a mode of action similar to that of OTC....

  2. Isolation and characterization of pigmented bacteria showing antimicrobial activity from Malaysian marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Natural products play a prominent role in the discovery of leads for the development of drugs in the treatment ofhuman diseases. Much of nature remains to be explored, especially marine and microbial environments.Methodology and results: Fifty-five pigmented marine bacteria were isolated from sponges, seawater, mangrovesediment, sea cucumber and mussel from different coastal area of Malaysia. The antimicrobial activities of thesebacteria were investigated by disk diffusion method against pathogenic bacteria. Out of 55 isolates, 18 isolates exhibitedantimicrobial activity, which based on morphological characterization, 53% of them were Gram positive and 47% wereGram negative. All active isolates were able to tolerate more than 4% NaCl in the nutrient agar medium that indicatedthey were autochthonous to marine environment and moderate salt tolerant in nature. Molecular identification of isolatesby the strong antimicrobial activities indicates that isolates WPRA3 (JX020764 and SM11-3j belong to genus Serratiaand isolate SDPM1 (JQ083392 belongs to genus Zooshikella.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The results of present study revealed that the active isolates arepotential producer of antimicrobial secondary metabolites and might be utilized as drug candidate.

  3. Digital imaging information technology for biospeckle activity assessment relative to bacteria and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E; Cabrera, Humberto; Grassi, Hilda C; de J Andrades, Efrén; Otero, Isabel; Rodríguez, Dania; Darias, Juan G

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports on the biospeckle processing of biological activity using a visualization scheme based upon the digital imaging information technology. Activity relative to bacterial growth in agar plates and to parasites affected by a drug is monitored via the speckle patterns generated by a coherent source incident on the microorganisms. We present experimental results to demonstrate the potential application of this methodology for following the activity in time. The digital imaging information technology is an alternative visualization enabling the study of speckle dynamics, which is correlated to the activity of bacteria and parasites. In this method, the changes in Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color component density are considered as markers of the growth of bacteria and parasites motility in presence of a drug. The RGB data was used to generate a two-dimensional surface plot allowing an analysis of color distribution on the speckle images. The proposed visualization is compared to the outcomes of the generalized differences and the temporal difference. A quantification of the activity is performed using a parameterization of the temporal difference method. The adopted digital image processing technique has been found suitable to monitor motility and morphological changes in the bacterial population over time and to detect and distinguish a short term drug action on parasites.

  4. Diversity of culturable root-associated/endophytic bacteria and their chitinolytic and aflatoxin inhibition activity of peanut plant in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yan, Pei-Sheng; Ding, Qing-Long; Wu, Qin-Xi; Wang, Zhong-Bo; Peng, Jie

    2013-01-01

    A total of 72 isolates of root-associated/endophytic (RAE) bacteria were isolated from peanut plants grown in the main producing areas of 6 provinces in China. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of these isolates were determined and phylogenetic analyses revealed that 72 isolates belonged to the classes Bacilli (49 isolates) and Gammaproteobacteria (23 isolates). The majority of RAE bacteria in Bacilli belonged to 2 genera, Bacillus and Lysinibacillus (48 and 1) while those in Gammaproteobacteria belonged to the genera Enterobacter, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, and Pseudomonas (7, 11, 3 and 2 isolates, respectively). This is the first report of Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus isolate as biocontrol agent against AFs. All of the selected RAE bacteria showed inhibitory activities against Aspergillus parasiticus (A. parasiticus) growth and/or aflatoxins (AFs) production by visual agar plate assay and tip culture method. Most of the RAE bacteria strains (96 % strains) were determined to have decreased mycelia growth or AFs production levels by >50 % (p chitinolytic activity and 22 strains (30 % strains) of identified RAE bacteria degraded colloidal chitin on the chitin medium plate. Ten selected chitinolytic RAE bacteria were tested for antifungal activity on peanuts and most of them significantly decreased mycelial growth and AFs production levels by >90 %. These results showed a wide distribution of biological control bacteria against AFs in Chinese peanut main producing areas and the selected RAE bacteria could potentially be utilized for the biocontrol of toxicogenic fungi.

  5. Antioxidant Activities of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Quality Improvement of Fermented Sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulong; Hu, Ping; Lou, Lijiao; Zhan, Jianlong; Fan, Min; Li, Dan; Liao, Qianwei

    2017-12-01

    Lactobacillus curvatus (SR6) and Lactobacillus paracasei (SR10-1) were assessed for their antioxidant activities and inoculated into sausages to investigate their effects on quality during fermentation. The results showed that L. curvatus SR6 had better DPPH• scavenging activity (59.67% ± 6.68%) and reducing power (47.31% ± 4.62%) and L. paracasei SR10-1 had better OH• scavenging activity (285.67% ± 2.00%) and anti-lipid peroxidation capacity (63.89% ± 0.93%). The superoxide dismutase activity of the cell culture fluid was greater than 47.00 U/mL, and the catalase activity of the cell-free extracts was greater than 1.00 U/mL. In the sausage model, lactic acid bacteria rapidly became the dominant microflora and reduced the moisture content, water activity, nitrite, and pH. The bacteria significantly enhanced the antioxidant activity of the sausage extracts, which improved the sensory characteristics and safety of the sausages. These results illustrate that both strains have excellent antioxidant activities and can be used as antioxidant starters in fermented meat products. The study illustrated the antioxidant and antioxidase activities of Lactobacillus curvatus SR6 and Lactobacillus paracasei SR10-1 and demonstrated the changes in the quality characteristics and antioxidant activities of fermented sausages. The findings provide valuable information for the meat industry on the application of functional starters in fermented meat products. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  6. Effects of bagging on sugar metabolism and the activity of sugar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate the effects of bagging on sugar metabolism and the activity of sugar metabolism related enzymes in Qingzhong loquat fruit development, the contents of sucrose, glucose and soluble solids as well as the activities of sugar metabolism related enzymes were evaluated. The content of sucrose, glucose and ...

  7. Plant growth-promoting potential of bacteria isolated from active volcano sites of Barren Island, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaresan, N; Kumar, K; Sureshbabu, K; Madhuri, K

    2014-02-01

    To elucidate the biodiversity of plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria in active volcano sites of Barren Island, India, a total of 102 bacteria were isolated and screened for their multifunctional PGP properties. The results revealed that 21 isolates (20.6%) survived heat shock at 72°C and 11 (10.8%) isolates were able to grow exposed to 25% NaCl (w/v). In assaying for PGP properties, 59 (57.8%) isolates shown indole acetic acid (IAA) like substances production, 57 isolates (55.9%) produced siderophore and 34 (33.3%) solubilized inorganic phosphate qualitatively. Whereas in the production of extracellular enzymes, 42 isolates (41.2%) produced protease and amylase, 26 (25.5%) isolates produced lipase and 24 (23.5%) isolates produced cellulase. In antagonistic activity, 30 isolates (29.4%) were found antagonistic against Macrophomina sp., 20 isolates (19.6%) against Rhizoctonia solani and 15 isolates (14.7%) against Sclerotium rolfsii. The results based on 16 rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the PGP bacteria belonged to 22 different species comprising 13 genera. Based on multifunctional properties, nine isolates were further selected to determine the PGP in brinjal and chilli seeds. Of the bacteria tested, the isolate BAN87 showed increased root and shoot length of both the crops followed in plant growth promotion by BAN86 and BAN43. The outcome of this research proves plausible practical applicability of these PGPB for crop production in soils of saline and arid environments. The present research shows diverse plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria could be isolated from the active volcano site and suggests that volcano sites represent an ecological niche, which harbours a diverse and hitherto largely uncharacterized microbial population with yet unknown and untapped potential biotechnological applications, for example, plant growth promoters, as evidenced from this study. The outcome of this research may have a practical effect on crop production methodologies in

  8. Treatment Benefits on Metabolic Syndrome with Diet and Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gani Dragusha

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The research has included 422 patients aged between 25 to 60, of whom 341 were men and 81 women. The purpose of research was to determine impact of diet and physical activity in the treatment of metabolic syndrome during the six month period.Processing of results through descriptive and discriminative analysis have indicated that 6 month treatment with diet and physical activity have had an impact in the: waistline decrease by 6,05 cm or 5,50% among males, and 4,92 cm or 5,10% among females; body mass index (BMI decrease by 1.78 or 6.20% among males, and 2,3 or 8,16% among females; decrease of blood triglycerides levels by 0,35 mmol/L or 16,28% among males, and 0,27 mmol/L or 13,30% among females; increase of blood cholesterol HDL-C by 0,48 mmol/L or 34,78% among males, and 0,06 mmol/L or 4,28% among females; systolic arterial pressure decreased by 15 mmHg or 10,18%, and diastolic blood pressure by 8,74 mmHg or 9,47% among males, and systolic arterial pressure decreased by 7,39 mmHg or 5,17%, and diastolic blood pressure decreased by 5,18 mmHg or 5,75% among females; the level of blood glucose decreased by 0,45 mmol/L or 7,04% among males, and by 0,64 mmol/L or 9,92% decreased among females.The results show that physical exercise and diet are important factors in reducing the values symptoms of metabolic syndrome.In order to improve symptoms of metabolic syndrome, it is necessary to keep on with healthy diet and physical exercise that means the change of lifestyle.

  9. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Several Plant Extracts and Oils against Some Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Al-Mariri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicinal plants are considered new resources for producing agents that could act as alternatives to antibiotics in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of 28 plant extracts and oils against four Gram-negative bacterial species. Methods: Experimental, in vitro, evaluation of the activities of 28 plant extracts and oils as well as some antibiotics against E. coli O157:H7, Yersinia enterocolitica O9, Proteus spp., and Klebsiella pneumoniae was performed. The activity against 15 isolates of each bacterium was determined by disc diffusion method at a concentration of 5%. Microdilution susceptibility assay was used in order to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the plant extracts, oils, and antibiotics. Results: Among the evaluated herbs, only Origanum syriacum L., Thymus syriacus Boiss., Syzygium aromaticum L., Juniperus foetidissima Wild, Allium sativum L., Myristica fragrans Houtt, and Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. essential oils and Laurus nobilis L. plant extract showed anti-bacterial activity. The MIC50 values of these products against the Gram-negative organisms varied from 1.5 (Proteus spp. and K. pneumoniae( and 6.25 µl/ml (Yersinia enterocolitica O9 to 12.5 µl/ml (E. coli O:157. Conclusion: Among the studied essential oils, O. syriacum L., T. syriacus Boiss., C. zeylanicum L., and S. aromaticum L. essential oils were the most effective. Moreover, Cephalosporin and Ciprofloxacin were the most effective antibiotics against almost all the studied bacteria. Therefore, O. syriacum L., T. syriacus Boiss., C. zeylanicum L., and S. aromaticum L. could act as bactericidal agents against Gram-negative bacteria.

  10. Metabolic activity of bacterial cell enumerated by direct viable count

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roszak, D.B.; Colwell, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    The direct viable count (DVC) method was modified by incorporation radiolabeled substrates in microautoradiographic analyses to assess bacterial survival in controlled laboratory microcosms. The DVC method, which permits enumeration of culturable and nonculturable cells, discriminates those cells that are responsive to added nutrients but in which division is inhibited by the addition of nalidixic acid. The resulting elongated cells represent all viable cells; this includes those that are culturable on routine media and those that are not. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis were employed in the microcosm studies, and radiolabeled substrates included [methyl- 3 H] thymidine or [U- 14 C] glutamic acid. Samples taken at selected intervals during the survival experiments were examined by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate cells by the DVC and acridine orange direct count methods, as well as by culture methods. Good correlation was obtained for cell-associated metabolic activity, measured by microautoradiography and substrate responsiveness (by the DVC method) at various stages of survival. Of the cells responsive to nutrients by the DVC method, ca. 90% were metabolically active by the microautoradiographic method. No significant difference was observed between DVC enumerations with or without added radiolabeled substrate

  11. Smart Biointerface with Photoswitched Functions between Bactericidal Activity and Bacteria-Releasing Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; Zhan, Wenjun; Yu, Qian; Chen, Hong

    2017-08-09

    Smart biointerfaces with capability to regulate cell-surface interactions in response to external stimuli are of great interest for both fundamental research and practical applications. Smart surfaces with "ON/OFF" switchability for a single function such as cell attachment/detachment are well-known and useful, but the ability to switch between two different functions may be seen as the next level of "smart". In this work reported, a smart supramolecular surface capable of switching functions reversibly between bactericidal activity and bacteria-releasing ability in response to UV-visible light is developed. This platform is composed of surface-containing azobenzene (Azo) groups and a biocidal β-cyclodextrin derivative conjugated with seven quaternary ammonium salt groups (CD-QAS). The surface-immobilized Azo groups in trans form can specially incorporate CD-QAS to achieve a strongly bactericidal surface that kill more than 90% attached bacteria. On irradiation with UV light, the Azo groups switch to cis form, resulting in the dissociation of the Azo/CD-QAS inclusion complex and release of dead bacteria from the surface. After the kill-and-release cycle, the surface can be easily regenerated for reuse by irradiation with visible light and reincorporation of fresh CD-QAS. The use of supramolecular chemistry represents a promising approach to the realization of smart, multifunctional surfaces, and has the potential to be applied to diverse materials and devices in the biomedical field.

  12. Antimicrobial activities of novel cultivable bacteria isolated from marine sponge Tedania anhelans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhen; Zhao, Jing; Ke, Caihuan; Wang, Dexiang

    2013-05-01

    Marine sponge Tedania anhelans distributes throughout the intertidal zone of Fujian, southeastern China, and is a potential source of natural bioactive products. The sponge harbors a large number of bacterial groups that have been identified using various techniques, including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Fractionation of dissociated sponge allowed isolation of 25 bacterial species. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, phylogenetic analysis attributed most of these eubacteria to α- Proteobacteria, γ- Proteobacteria, Cytophaga / Flavobacterium / Bacteroidetes (CFB group), and the family Bacillaceae of Gram-positive bacteria. In sequence similarity, five putatively novel species were identified with less than 98% similarity to other strains in the NCBI database. Tests for antimicrobial activities were performed against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, antitumor indicators Escherichia coli 343/591 (with DNA repair deficiency), regular E. coli 343/636 (with different DNA repair capacity), and 10 bacterial isolates exhibited inhibitory bioactivities. Among these strains, three isolates were detected involving function gene NRPS-A domains, which were most closely related to the amino acid sequences of linear gramicidin synthetase and pyoverdine synthetase. These results contribute to our knowledge of the microbes associated with marine sponges and further reveal novel bacterial resources for the screening of bioactive marine natural products.

  13. Antibacterial activity of Achillea tenuifolia Lam. extract against standard bacteria and isolated strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Omidpanah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have been trying to develop new broad-spectrum antibiotics against the infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites for many decades. Prolonged usage of the antibiotics has led to the emergence of drug resistance among bacteria; therefore, there is a tremendous need for novel antimicrobial agents from different sources such as plants which are used in traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibacterial effect of Achillea tenuifolia. The plant material was extracted by maceration method using methanol three times at room temperature. The extract was concentrated after removing the solvent by rotary evaporator and then lyophilized using freeze dryer. Inhibitory effect of the extract was examined against four standard bacteria strains and two isolated strains from diseased hen using disk diffusion method and microdilution method to evaluate their inhibition zone diameter (IZD and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, respectively. The results showed that the extract of the plant was active against standard strains including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis with IZDs of 10.3±0.5, 14±0.0, 12±0.0 and 11.6±0.5, respectively. However, growths of isolated strains were not inhibited in the presence of the extract. Although, the growths of isolated strains were not inhibited by the plant extract, the standard strains were moderately susceptible to the extract; among those P. aeroginosa was more sensible than other tested strains

  14. Survival of bacteria in nuclear waste buffer materials. The influence of nutrients, temperature and water activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.; Motamedi, M.

    1995-12-01

    The concept of deep geological disposal of spent fuel is common to many national nuclear waste programs. Long-lived radioactive waste will be encapsulated in canisters made of corrosion resistant materials e.g. copper and buried several hundred meters below ground in a geological formation. Different types of compacted bentonite clay, or mixtures with sand, will be placed as a buffer around the waste canisters. A major concern for the performance of the canisters is that sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) may be present in the clay and induce corrosion by production of hydrogen sulphide. This report presents data on viable counts of SRB in the bedrock of Aespoe hard rock laboratory. A theoretical background on the concept water activity is given, together with basic information about SRB. Some results on microbial populations from a full scale buffer test in Canada is presented. These results suggested water activity to be a strong limiting factor for survival of bacteria in compacted bentonite. As a consequence, experiments were set up to investigate the effect from water activity on survival of SRB in bentonite. Here we show that survival of SRB in bentonite depends on the availability of water and that compacting a high quality bentonite to a density of 2.0 g/cm 3 , corresponding to a water activity (a w ) of 0.96, prevented SRB from surviving in the clay. 24 refs

  15. In-vitro activity of solithromycin against anaerobic bacteria from the normal intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Andrej; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Nord, Carl Erik

    2016-12-01

    Solithromycin is a novel fluoroketolide with high activity against bacteria associated with community-acquired respiratory tract infections as well as gonorrhea. However, data on the activity of solithromycin against anaerobic bacteria from the normal intestinal microbiota are scarce. In this study, 1024 Gram-positive and Gram-negative anaerobic isolates from the normal intestinal microbiota were analyzed for in-vitro susceptibility against solithromycin and compared to azithromycin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone, metronidazole and levofloxacin by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Solithromycin was active against Bifidobacteria (MIC 50 , 0.008 mg/L) and Lactobacilli (MIC 50 , 0.008 mg/L). The MIC 50 for Clostridia, Bacteroides, Prevotella and Veillonella were 0.5, 0.5, 0.125 and 0.016 mg/L, respectively. Gram-positive anaerobes were more susceptible to solithromycin as compared to the other antimicrobials tested. The activity of solithromycin against Gram-negative anaerobes was equal or higher as compared to other tested agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Phytate degrading activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional fermented food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damayanti, Ema; Ratisiwi, Febiyani Ndaru; Istiqomah, Lusty; Sembiring, Langkah; Febrisiantosa, Andi

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential of LAB with phytate degrading activity from fermented traditional food grain-based and legume-based. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from different sources of traditional fermented food from Gunungkidul Yogyakarta Indonesia such as gembus tempeh (tofu waste), soybean tempeh, lamtoro tempeh (Leucaena bean) and kara tempeh. Isolation of LAB was performed using Total Plate Count (TPC) on de Man Rogosa Sharpe Agar (MRSA) medium supplemented with CaCO3. They were screened for their ability to degrade myo-inositol hexaphosphate or IP6 by using qualitative streak platemethod with modified de Man Rogosa-MorpholinoPropanesulfonic Acid Sharpe (MRS-MOPS) medium contained sodium salt of phytic acid as substrate and cobalt chloride staining (plate assay) method. The selected isolates were further assayed for phytase activities using quantitative method with spectrophotometer and the two selected isolates growth were optimized. Furthermore, thhe isolates that shown the highest phytase activity was characterized and identified using API 50 CH kitand 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results showed that there were 18 LAB isolates obtained from samplesand 13 isolates were able to degrade sodium phytate based on qualitative screening. According to quantitative assay, the highest phytate degrading activities were found in TG-2(23.562 U/mL) and TG-1 (19.641 U/mL) isolated from gembus tempeh. The phytate activity of TG-2 was optimum at 37 °C with agitation, while the phytate activity of TG-1 was optimum at 45 °C without agitation. Characterization and identification of TG-2 isolate with the highest phytate degrading activity using API 50 CH and 16S rRNA showed that TG-2had homology with Lactobacillus fermentum. It could be concluded that LAB from from fermented traditional food grain-based and legume-based produced the extracellular phytase. Keywords: lactic acid bacteria, tempeh, phytatedegrading activity

  17. Isolation of Lactic Acid Bacteria Showing Antioxidative and Probiotic Activities from Kimchi and Infant Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Keunho; Jang, Na Young; Kim, Young Tae

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate lactic acid bacteria with antioxidative and probiotic activities isolated from Korean healthy infant feces and kimchi. Isolates A1, A2, S1, S2, and S3 were assigned to Lactobacillus sp. and isolates A3, A4, E1, E2, E3, and E4 were assigned to Leuconostoc sp. on the basis of their physiological properties and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Most strains were confirmed as safe bioresources through nonhemolytic activities and non-production of harmful enzymes such as β-glucosidase, β- glucuronidase and tryptophanase. The 11 isolates showed different resistance to acid and bile acids. In addition, they exhibited antibacterial activity against foodborne bacteria, especially Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, all strains showed significantly high levels of hydrophobicity. The antioxidant effects of culture filtrates of the 11 strains included 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity, 2.2'- azino-bis (2-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation scavenging activity, and superoxide dismutase activity. The results revealed that most of the culture filtrates have effective scavenging activity for DPPH and ABTS radicals. All strains appeared to have effective superoxide dismutase activity. In conclusion, the isolated strains A1, A3, S1, and S3 have significant probiotic activities applicable to the development of functional foods and health-related products. These strains might also contribute to preventing and controlling several diseases associated with oxidative stress, when used as probiotics.

  18. Glyphosate application increased catabolic activity of gram-negative bacteria but impaired soil fungal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yehao; Li, Yongchun; Hua, Xiaomei; Müller, Karin; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Tongyi; Wang, Qiong; Peng, Xin; Wang, Mengcheng; Pang, Yanjun; Qi, Jinliang; Yang, Yonghua

    2018-03-14

    Glyphosate is a non-selective organophosphate herbicide that is widely used in agriculture, but its effects on soil microbial communities are highly variable and often contradictory, especially for high dose applications. We applied glyphosate at two rates: the recommended rate of 50 mg active ingredient kg -1 soil and 10-fold this rate to simulate multiple glyphosate applications during a growing season. After 6 months, we investigated the effects on the composition of soil microbial community, the catabolic activity and the genetic diversity of the bacterial community using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs), community level catabolic profiles (CLCPs), and 16S rRNA denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Microbial biomass carbon (C mic ) was reduced by 45%, and the numbers of the cultivable bacteria and fungi were decreased by 84 and 63%, respectively, under the higher glyphosate application rate. According to the PLFA analysis, the fungal biomass was reduced by 29% under both application rates. However, the CLCPs showed that the catabolic activity of the gram-negative (G-) bacterial community was significantly increased under the high glyphosate application rate. Furthermore, the DGGE analysis indicated that the bacterial community in the soil that had received the high glyphosate application rate was dominated by G- bacteria. Real-time PCR results suggested that copies of the glyphosate tolerance gene (EPSPS) increased significantly in the treatment with the high glyphosate application rate. Our results indicated that fungi were impaired through glyphosate while G- bacteria played an important role in the tolerance of microbiota to glyphosate applications.

  19. Natural Killer Cells Are Activated by Lactic Acid Bacteria-Matured Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. Human peripheral blood NK cells were....... In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. These results demonstrate that various strains of lactobacilli have the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent or independent way. Hence, the encounter of NK cells...

  20. Distribution of Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria and Soil Phosphatase Activity in Different Land Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Sarikhani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phosphorous is one of the essential macronutrients for plant growth and development but its mobility in soil is very low. The utilization of the soil biological potential, in particular phosphate solubilizing bacteria, is an efficient way which can be used for exploiting available sources of phosphorous in the soil. The principal mechanism for mineral phosphate solubilization is the production of organic acid, and acid and alkaline phosphatases play a major role in the mineralization of organic phosphorous in the soil. Presence and distribution of phosphate solubilizing bacteria in the soil and soil phosphatase activities is influenced by soil conditions such as climate, soil type, vegetation and land uses. In order to understand the relationships and considering the importance of the subject, the soil samples were chosen from two different climates; semi-moist (Fandoghlou-Ardabil and semi-arid (Namin- Ardabil under culture of legumes, cereals and uncultivated areas, in this experiment. Materials and Methods: In order to study the effects of different land uses, climate conditions and soil physicochemical properties on phosphate solubilizing microorganism (PSM distribiution and soil acid and alkaline phosphatase activity, a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design was performed with considering three different land uses (including legumes, cereals and wasteland and two climate conditions (semi-moist: Fandoghlu- Ardabil and semi-arid: Namin-Ardabil. Four composite soil samples (0-25 cm were taken from each land uses. Finally, a total number of 24 soil samples were used to enumerate phosphate solubilizng bacteria and evaluate soil phosphatase activities. The enumeration and selection of bacteria in the mineral Sperber medium was done by attention to the clear zone production in the presence of tri-calcium phosphate and in organic sperber (IHP+BCIP due to blue phenotype of grown colonies. Also, phosphatase activity

  1. Ureases display biological effects independent of enzymatic activity: Is there a connection to diseases caused by urease-producing bacteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Olivera-Severo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Ureases are enzymes from plants, fungi and bacteria that catalyze the hydrolysis of urea to form ammonia and carbon dioxide. While fungal and plant ureases are homo-oligomers of 90-kDa subunits, bacterial ureases are multimers of two or three subunit complexes. We showed that some isoforms of jack bean urease, canatoxin and the classical urease, bind to glycoconjugates and induce platelet aggregation. Canatoxin also promotes release of histamine from mast cells, insulin from pancreatic cells and neurotransmitters from brain synaptosomes. In vivo it induces rat paw edema and neutrophil chemotaxis. These effects are independent of ureolytic activity and require activation of eicosanoid metabolism and calcium channels. Helicobacter pylori, a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human stomach mucosa, causes gastric ulcers and cancer by a mechanism that is not understood. H. pylori produces factors that damage gastric epithelial cells, such as the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, the cytotoxin-associated protein CagA, and a urease (up to 10% of bacterial protein that neutralizes the acidic medium permitting its survival in the stomach. H. pylori whole cells or extracts of its water-soluble proteins promote inflammation, activate neutrophils and induce the release of cytokines. In this paper we review data from the literature suggesting that H. pylori urease displays many of the biological activities observed for jack bean ureases and show that bacterial ureases have a secretagogue effect modulated by eicosanoid metabolites through lipoxygenase pathways. These findings could be relevant to the elucidation of the role of urease in the pathogenesis of the gastrointestinal disease caused by H. pylori.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Kefir against Various Food Pathogens and Spoilage Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Jeong, Dana; Kim, Hyunsook; Kang, Il-Byeong; Chon, Jung-Whan; Song, Kwang-Young; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Kefir is a unique fermented dairy product produced by a mixture of lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, and yeast. Here, we compared the antimicrobial spectra of four types of kefirs (A, L, M, and S) fermented for 24, 36, 48, or 72 h against eight food-borne pathogens. Bacillus cereus , Staphylococcus aureus , Listeria monocytogenes , Enterococcus faecalis , Escherichia coli , Salmonella Enteritidis , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and Cronobacter sakazakii were used as test strains, and antibacterial activity was investigated by the spot on lawn method. The spectra, potencies, and onsets of activity varied according to the type of kefir and the fermentation time. The broadest and strongest antimicrobial spectrum was obtained after at least 36-48 h of fermentation for all kefirs, although the traditional fermentation method of kefir is for 18-24 h at 25℃. For kefir A, B. cereus , E. coli , S . Enteritidis, P. aeruginosa , and C. sakazakii were inhibited, while B. cereus , S. aureus , E. coli , S . Enteritidis, P. aeruginosa , and C. sakazakii were inhibited to different extents by kefirs L, M, and S. Remarkably, S. aureus , S . Enteritidis, and C. sakazakii were only inhibited by kefirs L, M, and S, and L. monocytogenes by kefir M after fermentation for specific times, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity is attributable not only to a low pH but also to antimicrobial substances secreted during the fermentation.

  3. Antimicrobial effect of selected lactic acid bacteria against microorganisms with decarboxylase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatantuul Purevdorj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of twenty-one bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (12 strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, 4 strains of Lactobacillus gasseri, 3 strains of Lb. helveticus and 2 strains of Lb. acidophilus, LAB against 28 Staphylococcus and 33 Enterococcus strains able to produce tyramine, putrescine, 2-phenylethylamine and cadaverine. The antimicrobial activity of cell-free supernatants (CFS from tested LAB was examined by an agar-well diffusion assay. Nine out of twenty-one strains (33% showed the inhibitory effect on tested enterococci and staphylococci, namely 9 strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The diameters of inhibition zones ranged between 7 mm and 14 mm. The biggest diameter of 14 mm inhibition was obtained with the CFS's from strains CCDM 670 and CCDM 731 on Enterococcus sp. E16 and E28. The cell-free supernatants from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CCDM 71 and from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CCDM 731 displayed the broadest antibacterial activity (52% inhibition of all tested strains. On the other hand, the cell-free supernatants from the screened Lactobacillus strains did not show any inhibitory effect on the tested Staphylococcus and Enterococcus strains. Nowadays, the great attention is given to the antibacterial substances produced by lactic acid bacteria. With the ability to produce a variety of metabolites displaying inhibitory effect, the LAB have great potential in biopreservation of food.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Tetradenia riparia (Hochst.) Codd. (Lamiaceae) against cariogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Nathalya Isabel; de Carvalho, Carlos Eduardo; Fracarolli, Letícia; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Veneziani, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Crotti, Antônio Eduardo Miller

    2015-01-01

    In Brazilian folk medicine, Tetradenia riparia (Hochst.) Codd. (Lamiaceae) is used to treat toothaches and dental abscesses and diseases induced by worms, bacteria, or fungi. This paper aims to investigate the chemical composition and the antibacterial effects of the essential oil obtained from Tetradenia riparia leaves (TR-EO) grown in Southeastern Brazil against a representative panel of oral pathogens. We evaluated the antibacterial activity of TR-EO in terms of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). We identified aromadendrene oxide (14.0%), (E,E)-farnesol (13.6%), dronabinol (12.5%), and fenchone (6.2%) as the major constituents of TR-EO. TR-EO displayed MIC values between 31.2 and 500 μg/mL, with the lowest MIC value being obtained against Streptococcus mitis (31.2 μg/mL), S. mutans (62.5 μg/mL), S. sobrinus (31.2 μg/mL), and Lactobacillus casei (62.5 μg/mL). In time-kill experiments, TR-EO demonstrated bactericidal activity against S. mutans within the first 12 h, resulting in a curve profile similar to that of chlorhexidine. These results revealed that the essential oil of Tetradenia riparia displays promising activity against most of the selected cariogenic bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans. PMID:26273268

  5. Protein-inspired antibiotics active against vancomycin- and daptomycin-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskovich, Mark A T; Hansford, Karl A; Gong, Yujing; Butler, Mark S; Muldoon, Craig; Huang, Johnny X; Ramu, Soumya; Silva, Alberto B; Cheng, Mu; Kavanagh, Angela M; Ziora, Zyta; Premraj, Rajaratnam; Lindahl, Fredrik; Bradford, Tanya A; Lee, June C; Karoli, Tomislav; Pelingon, Ruby; Edwards, David J; Amado, Maite; Elliott, Alysha G; Phetsang, Wanida; Daud, Noor Huda; Deecke, Johan E; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Ramaologa, Sefetogi; Zuegg, Johannes; Betley, Jason R; Beevers, Andrew P G; Smith, Richard A G; Roberts, Jason A; Paterson, David L; Cooper, Matthew A

    2018-01-02

    The public health threat posed by a looming 'post-antibiotic' era necessitates new approaches to antibiotic discovery. Drug development has typically avoided exploitation of membrane-binding properties, in contrast to nature's control of biological pathways via modulation of membrane-associated proteins and membrane lipid composition. Here, we describe the rejuvenation of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin via selective targeting of bacterial membranes. Peptide libraries based on positively charged electrostatic effector sequences are ligated to N-terminal lipophilic membrane-insertive elements and then conjugated to vancomycin. These modified lipoglycopeptides, the 'vancapticins', possess enhanced membrane affinity and activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other Gram-positive bacteria, and retain activity against glycopeptide-resistant strains. Optimised antibiotics show in vivo efficacy in multiple models of bacterial infection. This membrane-targeting strategy has potential to 'revitalise' antibiotics that have lost effectiveness against recalcitrant bacteria, or enhance the activity of other intravenous-administered drugs that target membrane-associated receptors.

  6. Effect of Real Wastewater on Biotransformation of 17α-ethynylestradiol by Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Nitrifying Activated Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Natthawan Likitmongkonsakun; Tawan Limpiyakorn

    2013-01-01

    17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic estrogen used as a key ingredient in an oral contraceptives pill. EE2 is an endocrine disrupting compound, high in estrogenic potency. Although EE2 exhibits low degree of biodegradability with common microorganisms in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), this compound can be biotransformed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) via a co-metabolism mechanism in WWTPs. This study aimed to investigate the effect of real wastewater on ...

  7. Seasonal variation in population density and heterotrophic activity of attached and free-living bacteria in coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriberri, J.; Unanue, M.; Barcina, I.; Egea, L.

    1987-10-01

    The abundance and heterotrophic activity of attached and free-living bacteria was examined seasonally in coastal water. Heterotrophic activity was determined by the uptake of (/sup 14/C)glucose. The density of attached bacteria was always minor, not showing a seasonal variation, whereas the free-living bacteria were more numerous and showed a marked seasonal variation, their density being higher under warmer conditions. The contribution of the attached bacteria to the total assimilation of (/sup 14/C)glucose was lower than that of the free-living bacteria, neither of them showing a seasonal variation. On a cellular basis, attached bacteria were more active, since they assimilated more (/sup 14/C)glucose and showed, under warmer conditions, a higher cellular volume. The authors consider that the factors responsible for these observations were the amount and quality of the particulate material, the different availability of organic matter for the two types of bacteria, and in a fundamental way, the variation in water temperature.

  8. Seasonal variation in population density and heterotrophic activity of attached and free-living bacteria in coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriberri, J.; Unanue, M.; Barcina, I.; Egea, L.

    1987-01-01

    The abundance and heterotrophic activity of attached and free-living bacteria was examined seasonally in coastal water. Heterotrophic activity was determined by the uptake of [ 14 C]glucose. The density of attached bacteria was always minor, not showing a seasonal variation, whereas the free-living bacteria were more numerous and showed a marked seasonal variation, their density being higher under warmer conditions. The contribution of the attached bacteria to the total assimilation of [ 14 C]glucose was lower than that of the free-living bacteria, neither of them showing a seasonal variation. On a cellular basis, attached bacteria were more active, since they assimilated more [ 14 C]glucose and showed, under warmer conditions, a higher cellular volume. The authors consider that the factors responsible for these observations were the amount and quality of the particulate material, the different availability of organic matter for the two types of bacteria, and in a fundamental way, the variation in water temperature

  9. PROTEOLYTIC AND FIBRINOLYTIC ACTIVITIES OF HALOPHILIC LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FROM TWO INDONESIAN FERMENTED FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep A. Prihanto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of fermented foods as sources of fibrinolytic enzymes is increased in the last decades. Terasi and Jambal roti is Indonesian traditional fermented fish products, which were famous in Java Island. Both are important products in Indonesian dishes, especially in Java. Investigation on halophilic lactic acid bacteria using MRS and M-17 agar obtained seventy four isolated strains. Their proteolytic and fibrinolytic activities were determined using skim milk agar and plasminogen-free fibrin plate. Twenty five isolates showed protease activities, while only four of them secreted fibrinolitic enzyme. The highest proteolytic and fibrinolytic activity was shown by TB1 strain, which is identified as Bacillus coagulans. The 16s rDNA is still in investigating to confirm the TB1 strain identity.

  10. Useful Extracellular Activity of Bacteria Isolated from Bhitarkanika Mangrove Ecosystem of Orissa Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta, N.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the isolation of bacteria from Bhitarkanika mangrove ecosystem of Orissa and screening for their antifungal properties against five pathogenic fungi, extracellular enzyme activity like amylase, protease and lipase, and phosphate solubilization capacity. From 567 bacterial isolates obtained, 26 bacterial isolates have exhibited wide spectrum antifungal activity against all five fungi tested. Most of the bacterial isolates were found to be amylase and protease producers. In present study, 41 lipase producers and 33 phosphate solubilisers were also found. Bacterial isolates from plant origin exhibited all the four extracellular enzyme activity except lipase. The maximum % occurrence of phosphate solubilisers was found in soil and plant system of mangrove. This screening study opens an avenue to work with some of the potent strains for useful product formation at large scale.

  11. Comparative analysis of antimicrobial and proteolytic activity of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Zlatar cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topisirović Ljubiša

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional artisan Zlatar cheese belongs to the group of white, semi hard home-made cheeses, which are produced from no pasteurized cow's milk, without addition of any known bacterial starter culture. In total, 253 Gram-positive and catalase negative lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated. Results showed that 70 out of 253 analyzed isolates produced antimicrobial compounds known as bacteriocins. Most isolates from genera Lactococcus and Enterococcus, and isolates belonging to species Lactobacillus plantarum and Lb. brevis, do not synthesize extracellular proteinase. In contrast, isolates from subspecies Lb. paracasei subsp. paracasei showed very good proteolytic activity. It was observed that good proteolytic activity of isolates was not in correlation with their good antimicrobial activity in the most of isolates.

  12. Antibacterial activity of hen egg white lysozyme modified by heat and enzymatic treatments against oenological lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, W; García-Ruiz, A; Recio, I; Moreno-Arribas, M V

    2014-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of heat-denatured and hydrolyzed hen egg white lysozyme against oenological lactic acid and acetic acid bacteria was investigated. The lysozyme was denatured by heating, and native and heat-denatured lysozymes were hydrolyzed by pepsin. The lytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus of heat-denatured lysozyme decreased with the temperature of the heat treatment, whereas the hydrolyzed lysozyme had no enzymatic activity. Heat-denatured and hydrolyzed lysozyme preparations showed antimicrobial activity against acetic acid bacteria. Lysozyme heated at 90°C exerted potent activity against Acetobacter aceti CIAL-106 and Gluconobacter oxydans CIAL-107 with concentrations required to obtain 50% inhibition of growth (IC50) of 0.089 and 0.013 mg/ml, respectively. This preparation also demonstrated activity against Lactobacillus casei CIAL-52 and Oenococcus oeni CIAL-91 (IC50, 1.37 and 0.45 mg/ml, respectively). The two hydrolysates from native and heat-denatured lysozyme were active against O. oeni CIAL-96 (IC50, 2.77 and 0.3 mg/ml, respectively). The results obtained suggest that thermal and enzymatic treatments increase the antibacterial spectrum of hen egg white lysozyme in relation to oenological microorganisms.

  13. Noninvasive measurements of activity-induced changes in muscle metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, K K; Kakihira, H; Vandenborne, K; Kent-Braun, J

    1991-01-01

    Two noninvasive measurement techniques were used to monitor activity-induced changes in skeletal muscle in humans. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-MRS) was used to measure changes in energy metabolism by measuring the ratio of inorganic phosphate to phosphocreatine (Pi/PCr) during steady level work in the wrist flexor muscles in a 30 cm bore, 1.9 Telsa magnet, and the rate of PCr recovery from exercise in the calf muscles in a 76 cm bore, 1.8 Tesla magnet. Near red spectroscopy (NRS) was used to measure changes in oxygen saturation of hemoglobin and myoglobin during and after exercise. Fourteen days of wrist flexion exercise resulted in significant improvement in muscle metabolism as measured by MRS. This improvement disappeared after 35 days of inactivity. Indications of muscle stress during training such as muscle soreness and decreased maximum strength were associated with increases in resting Pi/PCr. A similar training protocol using plantar flexion exercise resulted in an improved rate of PCr resynthesis, which returned to control values 42 days after training stopped. NRS measurements of the wrist flexor muscles during a ramp exercise protocol demonstrated a decrease in the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin-myoglobin from 60% at rest to 15% at the highest work levels. The half time of recovery of oxygen saturation was faster than that of PCr in both young and old subjects, supporting the hypothesis that oxygen delivery is not rate limiting in submaximal exercise in healthy individuals.

  14. Functional bacteria and process metabolism of the Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (DS-EBPR) system: An investigation by operating the system from deterioration to restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gang; Wu, Di; Hao, Tianwei; Mackey, Hamish Robert; Wei, Li; Wang, Haiguang; Chen, Guanghao

    2016-05-15

    A sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus (P) Removal (EBPR) system is being developed to cater for the increasing needs to treat saline/brackish wastewater resulting from seawater intrusion into groundwater and sewers and frequent use of sulfate coagulants during drinking water treatment, as well as to meet the demand for eutrophication control in warm climate regions. However, the major functional bacteria and metabolism in this emerging biological nutrient removal system are still poorly understood. This study was thus designed to explore the functional microbes and metabolism in this new EBPR system by manipulating the deterioration, failure and restoration of a lab-scale system. This was achieved by changing the mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration to monitor and evaluate the relationships among sulfur conversion (including sulfate reduction and sulfate production), P removal, variation in microbial community structures, and stoichiometric parameters. The results show that the stable Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated EBPR (DS-EBPR) system was enriched by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). These bacteria synergistically participated in this new EBPR process, thereby inducing an appropriate level of sulfur conversion crucial for achieving a stable DS-EBPR performance, i.e. maintaining sulfur conversion intensity at 15-40 mg S/L, corresponding to an optimal sludge concentration of 6.5 g/L. This range of sulfur conversion favors microbial community competition and various energy flows from internal polymers (i.e. polysulfide or elemental sulfur (poly-S(2-)/S(0)) and poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA)) for P removal. If this range was exceeded, the system might deteriorate or even fail due to enrichment of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs). Four methods of restoring the failed system were investigated: increasing the sludge concentration, lowering the salinity or doubling the COD

  15. Assessing the activity and diversity of fumarate-fed denitrifying bacteria by performing field single-well push-pull tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hoon; Ha, Chul-Yoon; Oa, Seong-Wook; Lee, Jin-Woo; Park, Sun-Hwa; Kwon, Soo-Youl; Kim, Sungpyo; Kim, Young

    2011-01-01

    In situ biological denitrification has been proposed as an important metabolic activity in the remediation of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. In this study, the effects of fumarate, an electron donor for biological denitrification, on the in situ denitrifying activity were determined by using three types of single-well push-pull tests; transport, biostimulation and activity tests. During the tests, changes in microbial community composition were also investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Transport test demonstrated that non-reactive tracer and biologically reactive solutes behaved similarly. A biostimulation test was conducted to stimulate the denitrifying activities of native microorganisms, which were monitored by detecting the simultaneous production of CO(2) and drastic degradations of both nitrate and fumarate after the injection of fumarate as an electron donor and/or carbon source, with nitrate as an electron acceptor. A phylogenetic analysis suggested that the taxonomic affiliation of the dominant species before biostimulation was γ-Proteobacteria, including Acinetobacter species and Pseudomonas fluorescens, while the dominant species after biostimulation were affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides and high G+C gram-positive bacteria. These results suggest that the analyses of groundwater samples using a combination of single well push pull tests with DGGE can be applied to investigate the activity, diversity and composition shift of denitrifying bacteria in a nitrate-contaminated aquifer.

  16. Effects of rare sugar D-allulose on acid production and probiotic activities of dairy lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto-Nira, H; Moriya, N; Hayakawa, S; Kuramasu, K; Ohmori, H; Yamasaki, S; Ogawa, M

    2017-07-01

    It has recently been reported that the rare sugar d-allulose has beneficial effects, including the suppression of postprandial blood glucose elevation in humans, and can be substituted for sucrose as a low-calorie food ingredient. To examine the applications of d-allulose in the dairy industry, we investigated the effects of d-allulose on the acid production of 8 strains of yogurt starter (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) and 4 strains of lactococci, including potential probiotic candidates derived from dairy products. Acid production by 2 L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus yogurt starter strains in milk was suppressed by d-allulose, but this phenomenon was also observed in some strains with another sugar (xylose), a sugar alcohol (sorbitol), or both. In contrast, among the dairy probiotic candidates, Lactococcus lactis H61, which has beneficial effects for human skin when drunk as part of fermented milk, was the only strain that showed suppression of acid production in the presence of d-allulose. Strain H61 did not metabolize d-allulose. We did not observe suppression of acid production by strain H61 with the addition of xylose or sorbitol, and xylose and sorbitol were not metabolized by strain H61. The acid production of strain H61 after culture in a constituted medium (tryptone-yeast extract-glucose broth) was also suppressed with the addition of d-allulose, but growth efficiency and sugar fermentation style were not altered. Probiotic activities-such as the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of H61-fermented milk and the superoxide dismutase activity of H61 cells grown in tryptone-yeast extract-glucose broth-were not affected by d-allulose. d-Allulose may suppress acid production in certain lactic acid bacteria without altering their probiotic activity. It may be useful for developing new probiotic dairy products from probiotic strains such as Lactococcus lactis H61. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science

  17. Inferring the metabolism of human orphan metabolites from their metabolic network context affirms human gluconokinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfsson, Óttar; Paglia, Giuseppe; Magnusdóttir, Manuela; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Thiele, Ines

    2013-01-15

    Metabolic network reconstructions define metabolic information within a target organism and can therefore be used to address incomplete metabolic information. In the present study we used a computational approach to identify human metabolites whose metabolism is incomplete on the basis of their detection in humans but exclusion from the human metabolic network reconstruction RECON 1. Candidate solutions, composed of metabolic reactions capable of explaining the metabolism of these compounds, were then identified computationally from a global biochemical reaction database. Solutions were characterized with respect to how metabolites were incorporated into RECON 1 and their biological relevance. Through detailed case studies we show that biologically plausible non-intuitive hypotheses regarding the metabolism of these compounds can be proposed in a semi-automated manner, in an approach that is similar to de novo network reconstruction. We subsequently experimentally validated one of the proposed hypotheses and report that C9orf103, previously identified as a candidate tumour suppressor gene, encodes a functional human gluconokinase. The results of the present study demonstrate how semi-automatic gap filling can be used to refine and extend metabolic reconstructions, thereby increasing their biological scope. Furthermore, we illustrate how incomplete human metabolic knowledge can be coupled with gene annotation in order to prioritize and confirm gene functions.

  18. Physical Activity Dimensions Associated with Impaired Glucose Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amadid, Hanan; Johansen, Nanna B.; Bjerregaard, Anne Louise

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity (PA) is important in the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, yet little is known about the role of specific dimensions of PA, including sedentary time in subgroups at risk for impaired glucose metabolism (IGM). We applied a data-driven decision tool to identify dimensions of PA...... was based on oral glucose tolerance test results and defined as a fasting plasma glucose level of ≥6.1 mmol·L-1 and/or a 2-h plasma glucose level of ≥7.8 mmol·L-1. Results Among overweight (BMI ≥25 kg·m-2) men, accumulating less than 30 min·d-1 of moderate-to-vigorous PA was associated with IGM, whereas...

  19. Nutrient scavenging activity and antagonistic factors of non-photobiont lichen-associated bacteria: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurbjörnsdóttir, M Auður; Andrésson, Ólafur S; Vilhelmsson, Oddur

    2016-04-01

    Lichens are defined as the specific symbiotic structure comprising a fungus and a green alga and/or cyanobacterium. Up until recently, non-photobiont endothallic bacteria, while known to be present in large numbers, have generally been dismissed as functionally irrelevant cohabitants of the lichen thallus, or even environmental contaminants. Recent analyses of lichen metagenomes and innovative co-culture experiments have uncovered a functionally complex community that appears to contribute to a healthy lichen thallus in several ways. Lichen-associated bacteriomes are typically dominated by several lineages of Proteobacteria, some of which may be specific for lichen species. Recent work has implicated members of these lineages in several important ecophysiological roles. These include nutrient scavenging, including mobilization of iron and phosphate, nitrogen fixation, cellulase, xylanase and amylase activities, and oxidation of recalcitrant compounds, e.g. aromatics and aliphatics. Production of volatile organic compounds, conferring antibacterial and antifungal activity, has also been demonstrated for several lichen-associated isolates. In the present paper we review the nature of non-phototrophic endolichenic bacteria associated with lichens, and give insight into the current state of knowledge on their importance the lichen symbiotic association.

  20. Validation of a new image analysis procedure for quantifying filamentous bacteria in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liwarska-Bizukojc, Ewa; Bizukojc, Marcin; Andrzejczak, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems can be made by manual counting under a microscope or by the application of various automated image analysis procedures. The latter has been significantly developed in the last two decades. In this work a new method based upon automated image analysis techniques was elaborated and presented. It consisted of three stages: (a) Neisser staining, (b) grabbing of microscopic images, and (c) digital image processing and analysis. This automated image analysis procedure possessed the features of novelty. It simultaneously delivered data about aggregates and filaments in an individual calculation routine, which is seldom met in the procedures described in the literature so far. What is more important, the macroprogram performing image processing and calculation of morphological parameters was written in the same software which was used for grabbing of images. Previously published procedures required using two different types of software, one for image grabbing and another one for image processing and analysis. Application of this new procedure for the quantification of filamentous bacteria in the full-scale as well as laboratory activated sludge systems proved that it was simple, fast and delivered reliable results.

  1. Isolation of Biosurfactant–Producing Bacteria with Antimicrobial Activity against Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siripun Sarin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to study biosurfactant producing bacteria isolated from soil and to determine their property and efficiency as biosurfactants in order to inhibit bacterial pathogens. The result showed that there were 8 bacterial isolates out of 136 isolates of the total biosurfactant producing bacteria screened that exhibited the diameter of clear zone more than 1.5 cm. in the oil spreading test. The highest potential of emulsifying activity (%EA24 of 54.4 and the maximum additive concentration, (%MAC of 24.2 was obtained from the fermentation broth of the G7 isolate which the G7 isolate was later identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Psuedomonas aeruginosa were the tested bacterial pathogens that were most sensitive to the acid precipitated biosurfactant obtained from P. fluorescens G7 with the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 41.6 mg/ml and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of 41.6 mg/ml compared with the acid precipitated bisurfactants of the other isolates used in the antimicrobial activity test. The type of the separated crude biosurfactant produced by P. fluorescens G7 analyzed later by using the rhamose test, TLC and FT-IR techniques was rhamnolipid.

  2. Antibacterial activity of Baccharis trimera (Less. DC. (carqueja against bacteria of medical interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álan Alex Aleixo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Baccharis trimera (Less. (Asteraceae, popularly know as "carqueja", is a species commonly used in folk medicine for the treatment or prevention of diseases. In this context, the purpose of this work was to study the antibacterial activity of crude hydroalcoholic extract from Baccharis trimera against Gram-positive bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Staphylococcus saprophyticus ATCC 15305, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19433 and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli EHEC ATCC 43895, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 27736, Salmonella typhi ATCC 19430 of clinical interest. Antibacterial susceptibility was evaluated by broth microdilution assay following the CLSI (formerly the NCCLS guidelines. The extract from B. trimera showed antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and the most interesting result was obtained against S. epidermidis that presented Minimal Inhibitory Concentration of 250μg/mL. These results indicate that B. trimera have bacterisostatic potential against Gram-positive bacterial strains of medical interest and could serve as a base for further studies on the use of isolated compounds from this species as future antimicrobials.

  3. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activities of Citrus limon, Citrus reticulata, and Citrus grandis Against Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sholeh Saeb

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microorganisms resistant to most antibiotics are rapidly spreading, and there is an urgent and continuous need for novel antimicrobial compounds. The genus Citrus belongs to the family Rutaceae has many biologically active secondary metabolites. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial activity of essential oil and extract of Lemon (Citrus limon, Mandarin (Citrus reticulata and Pummelo (Citrus grandis against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhi. Materials and Methods: The fresh Citrus leaves were shade-dried and powdered. Antimicrobial metabolites were extracted from them by 80% methanol for extract and using a Clevenger-type apparatus for essential oil. Eight different concentrations of the each leaf extract and essential oil were prepared. The antimicrobial susceptibility assay of Citrus leaves metabolites were subjected against four bacterial strains by agar disc diffusion and E-test method. Results: In this study, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of different Citrus leaf extracts were determined against all four food-borne pathogens. The C. grandis leaf essential oil had potent antimicrobial activity against all four pathogens, and the C. limon leaf essential oil was effective on Gram-positive bacteria. S. typhi was resistant against two leaves essential oils. Conclusions: The results showed that there was no antimicrobial activity effect in all extracts on tested bacteria. In this study, the antibacterial effect of essential oil of Citrus leaves on four strains of pathogenic microorganisms was confirmed. The C. grandis leaf essential oil had the most powerful antimicrobial properties, suggesting its potential application as natural preservative in foods or an effective medicine against different pathogenic microbes. Key words: Antibacterial activity, E-test, Citr

  4. Multiple-site mutations of phage Bp7 endolysin improves its activities against target bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Wang, Yuanchao; Sun, Huzhi; Ren, Huiying

    2015-10-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has caused serious drug resistance. Bacteria that were once easily treatable are now extremely difficult to treat. Endolysin can be used as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteria. To analyze the antibacterial activity of the endolysin of phage Bp7 (Bp7e), a 489-bp DNA fragment of endolysin Bp7e was PCR-amplified from a phage Bp7 genome and cloned, and then a pET28a-Bp7e prokaryotic expression vector was constructed. Two amino acids were mutated (L99A, M102E) to construct pET28a-Bp7Δe, with pET28a-Bp7e as a template. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that BP7e belongs to a T4-like phage endolysin group. Bp7e and its mutant Bp7Δe were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) as soluble proteins. They were purified by affinity chromatography, and then their antibacterial activities were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the recombinant proteins Bp7e and Bp7Δe showed obvious antibacterial activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus but no activity against Staphylococcus aureus. In the presence of malic acid, Bp7e and Bp7Δe exhibited an effect on most E. coli strains which could be lysed by phage Bp7, but no effect on Salmonella paratyphi or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, Bp7Δe with double-site mutations showed stronger antibacterial activity and a broader lysis range than Bp7e.

  5. Proteolytic activity of gut bacteria isolated from the velvet bean caterpillar Anticarsia gemmatalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilon, F M; Visôtto, L E; Guedes, R N C; Oliveira, M G A

    2013-08-01

    The development of proteinase inhibitors as potential insect control agents has been constrained by insect adaptation to these compounds. The velvet bean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis) is a key soybean pest species that is well-adapted to proteinase inhibitors, particularly serine-proteinase inhibitors, which are abundant in the caterpillar host. The expression of diverse proteolytic enzymes by gut symbionts may allow the velvet bean caterpillar to circumvent proteinase inhibitors produced by the host plant. In this study, we characterized the proteolytic activity of the four nonpathogenic species of gut bacteria isolated from the velvet bean caterpillar-Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus gallinarum, Enterococcus mundtii and Staphylococcus xylosus. Two proteinase substrates, N-α-benzoyl-L-Arg-p-nitroanilide (L-BApNA) and N-α-p-tosyl-L-Arg methyl ester (L-TAME) and five proteinase inhibitors [aprotinin, E-64, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), pepstatin and N-α-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK)] as well as CaCl2, pH and temperature profiles were used to characterize the expressed proteolytic activity of these bacterial strains in vitro. Kinetic parameters for proteolytic activity were also estimated. The results of these experiments indicated that serine- and cysteine-proteinase activities were expressed by all four gut bacteria symbionts of the velvet bean caterpillar. The cysteine- and serine-proteinase activities of these gut symbionts were distinct and different from that of gut proteinases of the caterpillar itself. This finding provides support for the potential involvement of gut symbionts in the mitigation of the negative effects of serine-proteinase inhibitors in the velvet bean caterpillar.

  6. Biofilm-forming activity of bacteria isolated from toilet bowl biofilms and the bactericidal activity of disinfectants against the isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Miho; Gomi, Mitsuhiro; Matsumune, Norihiko; Niizeki, Kazuma; Sakagami, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the sanitary conditions of toilets, the bacterial counts of the toilet bowl biofilms in 5 Kansai area and 11 Kansai and Kanto area homes in Japan were measured in winter and summer seasons, respectively. Isolates (128 strains) were identified by analyzing 16S ribosomal RNA sequences. The number of colonies and bacterial species from biofilms sampled in winter tended to be higher and lower, respectively, than those in summer. Moreover, the composition of bacterial communities in summer and winter samples differed considerably. In summer samples, biofilms in Kansai and Kanto areas were dominated by Blastomonas sp. and Mycobacterium sp., respectively. Methylobacterium sp. was detected in all toilet bowl biofilms except for one sample. Methylobacterium sp. constituted the major presence in biofilms along with Brevundimonas sp., Sphingomonas sp., and/or Pseudomonas sp. The composition ratio of the sum of their genera was 88.0 from 42.9% of the total bacterial flora. The biofilm formation abilities of 128 isolates were investigated, and results suggested that Methylobacterium sp. and Sphingomonas sp. were involved in biofilm formation in toilet bowls. The biofilm formation of a mixed bacteria system that included bacteria with the highest biofilm-forming ability in a winter sample was greater than mixture without such bacteria. This result suggests that isolates possessing a high biofilm-forming activity are involved in the biofilm formation in the actual toilet bowl. A bactericidal test against 25 strains indicated that the bactericidal activities of didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) tended to be higher than those of polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) and N-benzyl-N,N-dimethyldodecylammonium chloride (ADBAC). In particular, DDAC showed high bactericidal activity against approximately 90% of tested strains under the 5 h treatment.

  7. Phenolic compounds from sugarcane molasses possessing antibacterial activity against cariogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Kensaku; Ushijima, Kenji; Wada, Koji; Iwasaki, Hironori; Yamashita, Masatsugu

    2007-01-01

    During the course of our research into the use of cane by-products from sugar manufacturing, we have studied the isolation and structural determination of bioactive compounds present in sugarcane molasses. In this study, dehydrodiconiferylalcohol-9'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1) and isoorientin-7, 3'-O-dimethyl ether (2) were isolated as antibacterial active compounds against cariogenic bacteria. Their structures were elucidated by (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and ESI-MS. The activities of these isolated compounds against Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus were assessed by a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test. The MICs of compounds 1 and 2 against both S. mutans and S. sobrinus were >4 mg/mL and 4 mg/mL, respectively.

  8. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Plant-Derived Diterpenes against Bovine Mastitis Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo C. S. Veneziani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the antibacterial activity of three diterpenes isolated from natural sources against a panel of microorganisms responsible for bovine mastitis. ent-Copalic acid (CA was the most active metabolite, with promising MIC values (from 1.56 to 6.25 µg mL−1 against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC and clinical isolate, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae. We conducted time-kill assays of CA against S. aureus, a commensal organism considered to be a ubiquitous etiological agent of bovine mastitis in dairy farms worldwide. In the first 12 h, CA only inhibited the growth of the inoculums (bacteriostatic effect, but its bactericidal effect was clearly noted thereafter (between 12 and 24 h. In conclusion, CA should be considered for the control of several Gram-positive bacteria related to bovine mastitis.

  9. Antibacterial activity of curcuma long varieties against different strains of bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, S.; Jabeen, S.; Ilyas, S.; Aslam, F.; Manzoor, F.; Ali, A.

    2010-01-01

    Crude extracts of curcuminoids and essential oil of Curcuma long varieties Kasur, Faisalabad and Bannu were studied for their antibacterial activity against 4 bacterial strains viz., Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus macerans, Bacillus licheniformis and Azotobacter using agar well diffusion method. Solvents used to determine antibacterial activity were ethanol and methanol. Ethanol was used for the extraction of curcuminoids. Essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation and diluted in methanol by serial dilution method. Both Curcuminoids and oil showed zone of inhibition against all tested strains of bacteria. Among all the three turmeric varieties, Kasur variety had the most inhibitory effect on the growth of all bacterial strains tested as compared to Faisalabad and Bannu varieties. Among all the bacterial strains B. subtilis was the most sensitive to turmeric extracts of curcuminoids and oil. The MIC value for different strains and varieties ranged from 3.0 to 20.6 mm in diameter. (author)

  10. Antibacterial Activities of Surfactants in the Laundry Detergents and Isolation of the Surfactant Resistant Aquatic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehara, Yoko; Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

     Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) and polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (POLE) are major surfactants contained in the laundry detergents. In the present study, the antibacterial activities of the surfactants to aquatic microorganisms were compared. When freshwater samples from a small river in Okayama city were treated with each of the surfactants, only LAS showed the significant antibacterial activity. Several strains, which survived after the treatment with 2.0% LAS, were isolated and identified by sequencing of 16S rDNA. All strains were classified into the family Enterobacteriaceae. However, this family was not a major member of the aquatic microflora, suggesting that the bacteria in Enterobacteriaceae have a common property of LAS-resistance in the river water.

  11. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria......, the 80 x 600 mum large Epulopiscium sp. from the gut of tropical fish, are presumably living in a very nutrient-rich medium. Many large bacteria contain numerous inclusions in the cells that reduce the volume of active cytoplasm. The most striking examples of competitive advantage from large cell size...

  12. Antibacterial activity and optimisation of bacteriocin producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from beef (red meat) samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, N.M.; Mazhar, B.; Khadija, I.; Kalim, B.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriocin producing bacteria are commonly found in meat products to enhance their shelf-life. In the present study, bacterial species were isolated from meat samples (beef) from different localities of Lahore, Pakistan. MRS agar medium was used to isolate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) through spread and streak methods (incubated for 72 h at 37 degree C). Identification of bacteriocinogenic LAB strains was done by using staining techniques, morphology based characteristics and biochemical tests. These strains were BSH 1b, BSH 3a, BIP 4a, BIP 3a, BIP 1b and BRR 3a. Antibacterial activity of LAB was performed against food borne pathogens viz., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus through paper disc diffusion method. Three bacterial strains showed maximum inhibition and characterised by ribotyping viz., BIP 4a was identified as Lactobacillus curvatures, BIP 3a was Staphylococcus warneri and BIP 1b was Lactobacillus graminis . Optimum pH 5-6.5 and 30-37 degree C temperature for isolated bacterial strains was recorded. Protein concentration measured was 0.07 mg/mL for BSH 1b, 0.065 mg/mL for BSH 3a, 0.057 mg/mL for BIP 4a, 0.062 mg/mL for BIP 1b, 0.065 mg/mL for BIP 3a and for BRR 3a 0.078 mg/mL, respectively. Bacteriocin of all isolates except BIP 3a was found to be sensitive towards pepsin and resistant towards Rnase. Bacteriocin production was stable at between pH 5.0 and 6.0 and resistant temperature was 40 degree C. It was concluded that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from meat can be helpful as antibacterial agents against food-borne bacterial pathogens because of thermostable producing bacteriocin. (author)

  13. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the Snomax™ cells induced immersion freezing of the spray droplets before the droplets evaporated in the cloud chamber. The living cells didn't induce any detectable immersion freezing in the spray droplets at −5.7°C. After evaporation of the spray droplets the bacterial cells remained as aerosol particles in the cloud chamber and were exposed to typical cloud formation conditions in experiments with expansion cooling to about −11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets. Then, only a minor fraction of the cells acted as heterogeneous ice nuclei either in the condensation or the immersion mode. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between −7 and −11°C with an ice nucleation (IN active fraction of the order of 10−4. In agreement to previous literature results, the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax™ cells was much larger with an IN active fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around −8°C.

  14. High inorganic triphosphatase activities in bacteria and mammalian cells: identification of the enzymes involved.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Kohn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPP(i is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPP(i but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. CONCLUSIONS AND GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPP(i in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPP(i, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca(2+, thereby interfering with Ca(2+ signaling.

  15. The metabolic activator FOXO1 binds hepatitis B virus DNA and activates its transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomai, Amir; Shaul, Yosef

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus that targets the liver and infects humans worldwide. Recently we have shown that the metabolic regulator PGC-1α coactivates HBV transcription thereby rendering the virus susceptible to fluctuations in the nutritional status of the liver. PGC-1α coactivation of HBV is mediated through the liver-enriched nuclear receptor HNF4α and through another yet unknown transcription factor(s). Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a known target for PGC-1α coactivation and a central mediator of glucose metabolism in the liver, binds HBV core promoter and activates its transcription. This activation is further enhanced in the presence of PGC-1α, implying that FOXO1 is a target for PGC-1α coactivation of HBV transcription. Thus, our results identify another key metabolic regulator as an activator of HBV transcription, thereby supporting the principle that HBV gene expression is regulated in a similar way to key hepatic metabolic genes.

  16. Differential activity of autochthonous bacteria in controlling drought stress in native Lavandula and Salvia plants species under drought conditions in natural arid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armada, Elisabeth; Roldán, Antonio; Azcon, Rosario

    2014-02-01

    The effectiveness of autochthonous plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria was studied in Lavandula dentata and Salvia officinalis growing in a natural arid Mediterranean soil under drought conditions. These bacteria identified as Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Enterobacter sp. (E), Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), and Bacillus sp. (Bsp). Each bacteria has different potential to meliorate water limitation and alleviating drought stress in these two plant species. B. thuringiensis promoted growth and drought avoidance in Lavandula by increasing K content, by depressing stomatal conductance, and it controlled shoot proline accumulation. This bacterial effect on increasing drought tolerance was related to the decrease of glutathione reductase (GR) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) that resulted sensitive indexes of lower cellular oxidative damage involved in the adaptative drought response in B. thuringiensis-inoculated Lavandula plants. In contrast, in Salvia, having intrinsic lower shoot/root ratio, higher stomatal conductance and lower APX and GR activities than Lavandula, the bacterial effects on nutritional, physiological and antioxidant enzymatic systems were lower. The benefit of bacteria depended on intrinsic stress tolerance of plant involved. Lavadula demonstrated a greater benefit than Salvia to control drought stress when inoculated with B. thuringiensis. The bacterial drought tolerance assessed as survival, proline, and indolacetic acid production showed the potential of this bacteria to help plants to grow under drought conditions. B. thuringiensis may be used for Lavandula plant establishment in arid environments. Particular characteristic of the plant species as low shoot/root ratio and high stomatal conductance are important factors controlling the bacterial effectiveness improving nutritional, physiological, and metabolic plant activities.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oil of Plectranthus neochilus against Cariogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevelin, Eduardo José; Caixeta, Soraya Carolina; Dias, Herbert Júnior; Groppo, Milton; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Crotti, Antônio Eduardo Miller

    2015-01-01

    This work used the broth microdilution method to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil obtained from the leaves of Plectranthus neochilus (PN-EO) against a representative panel of oral pathogens. We assessed the antimicrobial activity of this oil in terms of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). PN-EO displayed moderate activity against Enterococcus faecalis (MIC = 250 μg/mL) and Streptococcus salivarus (MIC = 250 μg/mL), significant activity against Streptococcus sobrinus (MIC = 62.5 μg/mL), Streptococcus sanguinis (MIC = 62.5 μg/mL), Streptococcus mitis (MIC = 31.25 μg/mL), and Lactobacillus casei (MIC = 31.25 μg/mL), and interesting activity against Streptococcus mutans (MIC = 3.9 μg/mL). GC-FID and GC-MS helped to identify thirty-one compounds in PN-EO; α-pinene (1, 14.1%), β-pinene (2, 7.1%), trans-caryophyllene (3, 29.8%), and caryophyllene oxide (4, 12.8%) were the major chemical constituents of this essential oil. When tested alone, compounds 1, 2, 3, and 4 were inactive (MIC > 4000 μg/mL) against all the microorganisms. These results suggested that the essential oil extracted from the leaves of Plectranthus neochilus displays promising activity against most of the evaluated cariogenic bacteria, especially S. mutans.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oil of Plectranthus neochilus against Cariogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo José Crevelin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work used the broth microdilution method to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil obtained from the leaves of Plectranthus neochilus (PN-EO against a representative panel of oral pathogens. We assessed the antimicrobial activity of this oil in terms of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. PN-EO displayed moderate activity against Enterococcus faecalis (MIC = 250 μg/mL and Streptococcus salivarus (MIC = 250 μg/mL, significant activity against Streptococcus sobrinus (MIC = 62.5 μg/mL, Streptococcus sanguinis (MIC = 62.5 μg/mL, Streptococcus mitis (MIC = 31.25 μg/mL, and Lactobacillus casei (MIC = 31.25 μg/mL, and interesting activity against Streptococcus mutans (MIC = 3.9 μg/mL. GC-FID and GC-MS helped to identify thirty-one compounds in PN-EO; α-pinene (1, 14.1%, β-pinene (2, 7.1%, trans-caryophyllene (3, 29.8%, and caryophyllene oxide (4, 12.8% were the major chemical constituents of this essential oil. When tested alone, compounds 1, 2, 3, and 4 were inactive (MIC > 4000 μg/mL against all the microorganisms. These results suggested that the essential oil extracted from the leaves of Plectranthus neochilus displays promising activity against most of the evaluated cariogenic bacteria, especially S. mutans.

  19. Screening for glycosidase activities of lactic acid bacteria as a biotechnological tool in oenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martín, Fátima; Seseña, Susana; Izquierdo, Pedro Miguel; Martín, Raúl; Palop, María Llanos

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability from a number of lactic acid bacteria isolated from different sources to produce glycosidase enzymes. Representative isolates (225) from clusters obtained after genotyping, using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) analysis, of 1,464 isolates, were screened for β-D-glucosidase activity. Thirty-five of them were selected for subsequent analysis. These strains were able to hydrolyze α-D-glucopyranoside, β-D-xylopyranoside and α-L-arabinofuranoside although β-D-glucosidase activity was the predominant activity for 22 of the selected strains. Only some of them did so with α-L-rhamnopyranoside. All of these were from wine samples and were identified as belonging to the Oenococcus oeni species using Amplification and Restriction Analysis of 16S-rRNA gene (16S-ARDRA). When the influence of pH, temperature and ethanol or sugars content on β-D-glucosidase activity was assayed, a strain-dependent response was observed. The β-D-glucosidase activity occurred in both whole and sonicated cells but not in the supernatants from cultures or obtained after cell sonication. Strains 10, 17, 21, and 23 retained the most β-D-glucosidase activity when they were assayed at the conditions of temperature, pH, ethanol and sugar content used in winemaking. These results suggest that these strains could be used as a source of glycosidase enzymes for use in winemaking.

  20. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of fermented milk with lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Hsin; Wu, Chi-Rei; Fang, Tony J; Guo, Jiun-Ting; Huang, Shi-Ying; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2011-06-01

    Ten strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were investigated for their anti-Helicobacter pylori effects. The bactericidal activity and organic acid content in spent culture supernatants (SCS) from fermented milk were measured. In addition, the exclusion effect of SCS against H. pylori infection of human gastric epithelial AGS cells was assayed. Three LAB strains, LY1, LY5 and IF22, showed better anti-Helicobacter effects than the other strains. There were no significant differences in the bactericidal activity of LAB strains between original SCS, artificial SCS and SCS treated by heating or protease digestion. However, neutralised SCS lost this activity. These results suggest that the anti-H. pylori activity of SCS may be related to the concentration of organic acids and the pH value but not to protein components. In the AGS cell culture test, both fermented LY5-SCS and artificial LY5-SCS significantly reduced H. pylori infection and urease activity (P < 0.05). In this study, in vitro methods were used to screen potential probiotics with anti-H. pylori activity. This may provide an excellent and rapid system for studying probiotics in the functional food and dairy industries. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. New perspective of dendrobium crumenatum orchid for antimicrobial activity against selected pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrasagaran, U.M.; Murugaiyah, V.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the potential anti-microbial activity from different parts of Dendrobium crumenatum (leaf, stem, root and pseudo-bulb) against 8 pathogenic bacteria. The antimicrobial activities were determined by using disc diffusion assay, microdilution test for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The methanolic extracts of stem, root and pseudo-bulb displayed antimicrobial activity comparable to that of the standard antibiotics. Stem extract of D. crumenatum had the most potent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter aerogenes with MIC values of 0.39, 0.195 and 0.195 mg/mL, respectively. Root and stem extracts were found to be active against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Shigella dysentriae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae with MIC values of 0.78 mg/ml compared to 0.00312 mg/mL, 0.025 mg/mL and 0.0125 mg/mL of standard antibiotics of amoxcillin, chloramphenicol and kanamycin. Stem and root extracts yield MBC values in the range of 0.78 mg/mL to 6.25 mg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The present study showed that D. crumenatum exhibited potential antimicrobial activity which could be due to the presence of alkaloid and flavonoid compounds and this is a first report on South East Asia region's wild orchid. (author)

  2. Changes in antagonistic activity of lactic acid bacteria induced by their response to technological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovile Jonkuviene

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the changes in antagonistic activity of selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB in response to technological factors used in food production. The antimicrobial activity of 12 selected LAB strains was assessed against the bacterial and fungal strains using the agar well diffusion method. Sodium chloride (NaCl 6.5–8.0%, glucose 20-30% and pH 4.0, pH 8.0 and higher were the most crucial factors in reducing the spectra of the microorganisms antagonized. Heating at 80 °C or 100 °C had a greater negative impact than 63 °C on the antifungal activity of LAB. Freezing at –72 °C eliminated the antifungal activity, or it changed from fungicidal to fungistatic. Although each LAB demonstrated the ability to retain antimicrobial activity induced by various technological factors, Lactococcus lactis 768/5 was superior in retaining high antimicrobial activity against tested indicator strains.

  3. Counting and Size Classification of Active Soil Bacteria by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with an rRNA Oligonucleotide Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Henrik; Hansen, Michael; Sørensen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique based on binding of a rhodamine-labelled oligonucleotide probe to 16S rRNA was used to estimate the numbers of ribosome-rich bacteria in soil samples. Such bacteria, which have high cellular rRNA contents, were assumed to be active (and growing) in the soil. Hybridization to an rRNA probe, EUB338, for the domain Bacteria was performed with a soil slurry, and this was followed by collection of the bacteria by membrane filtration (pore size, 0.2 μm). A nonsense probe, NONEUB338 (which has a nucleotide sequence complementary to the nucleotide sequence of probe EUB338), was used as a control for nonspecific staining. Counting and size classification into groups of small, medium, and large bacteria were performed by fluorescence microscopy. To compensate for a difference in the relative staining intensities of the probes and for binding by the rhodamine part of the probe, control experiments in which excess unlabelled probe was added were performed. This resulted in lower counts with EUB338 but not with NONEUB338, indicating that nonspecific staining was due to binding of rhodamine to the bacteria. A value of 4.8 × 108 active bacteria per g of dry soil was obtained for bulk soil incubated for 2 days with 0.3% glucose. In comparison, a value of 3.8 × 108 active bacteria per g of dry soil was obtained for soil which had been air dried and subsequently rewetted. In both soils, the majority (68 to 77%) of actively growing bacteria were members of the smallest size class (cell width, 0.25 to 0.5 μm), but the active (and growing) bacteria still represented only approximately 5% of the total bacterial population determined by DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining. The FISH technique in which slurry hybridization is used holds great promise for use with phylogenetic probes and for automatic counting of soil bacteria. PMID:10103277

  4. The impact of temperature change on the activity and community composition of sulfate-reducing bacteria in arctic versus temperate marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robador, Alberto; Brüchert, Volker; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2009-01-01

    Arctic regions may be particularly sensitive to climate warming and, consequently, rates of carbon mineralization in warming marine sediment may also be affected. Using long-term (24 months) incubation experiments at 0°C, 10°C and 20°C, the temperature response of metabolic activity and community...... (between -3.5°C and +40°C) were used to assess variations in sulfate reduction rates during the course of the experiment. Warming of arctic sediment resulted in a gradual increase of the temperature optima (Topt) for sulfate reduction suggesting a positive selection of psychrotolerant/mesophilic sulfate......-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, high rates at in situ temperatures compared with maximum rates showed the predominance of psychrophilic SRB even at high incubation temperatures. Changing apparent activation energies (Ea) showed that increasing temperatures had an initial negative impact on sulfate reduction...

  5. Metabolic Activation of Heterocyclic Amines and Expression of Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Wageh S; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Itotani, Yuumi; Ohno, Marumi; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2015-07-01

    Heterocyclic amines get entry into human body mainly through ingestion of pan-fried meats cooked at high temperatures. Exposure of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) to ingested xenobiotics prior to delivery to the liver may lead to metabolic activation, which may explain the high incidence of GIT carcinogenesis. Therefore, this study investigated the mutagenic activation of 2 heterocyclic amines, 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-prydo[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-2), in the GIT of rats. In addition, the constitutive mRNA expression profiles of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) in the GIT of rats were examined. Metabolic activation of 2-AA was detected in all GIT tissues except the duodenum and rectum, and it was detected at high levels in the ileum and cecum. Furthermore, we revealed high metabolic activation of 2-AA and Trp-P-2 in the jejunum. The mRNA expression of phase I and II enzymes in rat GIT corresponded with their mutagenic activation ability. In conclusion, our results suggest that different expression levels of XME among GIT tissues may contribute to the tissue-specific differences in metabolic activation of xenobiotics such as heterocyclic amines in rats. This study declares mutagenic activation of 2 heterocyclic amines namely 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-prydo[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-2), in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of rats. In addition, results obtained in this study suggest that GIT tissue-specific expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes may contribute to the tissue-specific mutagenesis/carcinogenesis. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions: Anabolism (uh-NAB-uh-liz-um), or constructive metabolism, is all about building and storing. It ... in infants and young children. Hypothyroidism slows body processes and causes fatigue (tiredness), slow heart rate, excessive ...

  7. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  8. Structure and activity of lacustrine sediment bacteria involved in nutrient and iron cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Martins, Gilberto Jorge; Terada, Akihiko; Ribeiro, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    lakes with distinct trophic states (Verde, Azul, Furnas and Fogo). Inferred from quantitative PCR, bacteria performing anaerobic ammonia oxidation were the most abundant in the eutrophic lakes Verde, Azul and Furnas (4.5-16.6%), followed by nitrifying bacteria (0.8-13.0%), denitrifying bacteria (DNB) (0...

  9. Effect of afforestation and reforestation of pastures on the activity and population dynamics of methanotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Brajesh K; Tate, Kevin R; Kolipaka, Gokul; Hedley, Carolyn B; Macdonald, Catriona A; Millard, Peter; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the effect of afforestation and reforestation of pastures on methane oxidation and the methanotrophic communities in soils from three different New Zealand sites. Methane oxidation was measured in soils from two pine (Pinus radiata) forests and one shrubland (mainly Kunzea ericoides var. ericoides) and three adjacent permanent pastures. The methane oxidation rate was consistently higher in the pine forest or shrubland soils than in the adjacent pasture soils. A combination of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and stable isotope probing (SIP) analyses of these soils revealed that different methanotrophic communities were active in soils under the different vegetations. The C18 PLFAs (signature of type II methanotrophs) predominated under pine and shrublands, and C16 PLFAs (type I methanotrophs) predominated under pastures. Analysis of the methanotrophs by molecular methods revealed further differences in methanotrophic community structure under the different vegetation types. Cloning and sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the particulate methane oxygenase gene (pmoA) from different samples confirmed the PLFA-SIP results that methanotrophic bacteria related to type II methanotrophs were dominant in pine forest and shrubland, and type I methanotrophs (related to Methylococcus capsulatus) were dominant in all pasture soils. We report that afforestation and reforestation of pastures caused changes in methane oxidation by altering the community structure of methanotrophic bacteria in these soils.

  10. In vitro antifungal activity of bacteria against Mycosphaerella fijiensis mediated by diffused and volatile metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mileidy Cruz-Martín

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Antagonistic microorganisms do not have a unique mode of action. Multiplicity of these is an important feature for selection as biological control agents. Black Sigatoka is considered the foliar disease with most economic impact for the banana industry worldwide. New strategies to control it are required to reduce the use of fungicides. That is why an increasing interest to find biological alternatives, such as the use of antagonistic bacteria, has risen. Assays wer e carr ied ou t to determine whether in v it r o ant if ungal ac ti vity of 20 bacterial str ai ns against My cosphaer ella fijiensis was caused by metabolites diffused into the culture medium or volatile. Results demonstrated that 80.0% of bacterial strains tested showed in vitro antifungal activity by diffused metabolites in the culture medium and 60.0% by producing volatile metabolites. The 55.0% of strains showed both mechanisms. This feature makes these bacteria the best candidate for its selection as biological control agent. Keywords: antagonistic, biocontrol, volatile compounds, diffused metabolites.

  11. Caspase inhibitors of the P35 family are more active when purified from yeast than bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo L Brand

    Full Text Available Many insect viruses express caspase inhibitors of the P35 superfamily, which prevent defensive host apoptosis to enable viral propagation. The prototypical P35 family member, AcP35 from Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, has been extensively studied. Bacterially purified AcP35 has been previously shown to inhibit caspases from insect, mammalian and nematode species. This inhibition occurs via a pseudosubstrate mechanism involving caspase-mediated cleavage of a "reactive site loop" within the P35 protein, which ultimately leaves cleaved P35 covalently bound to the caspase's active site. We observed that AcP35 purifed from Saccharomyces cerevisae inhibited caspase activity more efficiently than AcP35 purified from Escherichia coli. This differential potency was more dramatic for another P35 family member, MaviP35, which inhibited human caspase 3 almost 300-fold more potently when purified from yeast than bacteria. Biophysical assays revealed that MaviP35 proteins produced in bacteria and yeast had similar primary and secondary structures. However, bacterially produced MaviP35 possessed greater thermal stability and propensity to form higher order oligomers than its counterpart purified from yeast. Caspase 3 could process yeast-purified MaviP35, but failed to detectably cleave bacterially purified MaviP35. These data suggest that bacterially produced P35 proteins adopt subtly different conformations from their yeast-expressed counterparts, which hinder caspase access to the reactive site loop to reduce the potency of caspase inhibition, and promote aggregation. These data highlight the differential caspase inhibition by recombinant P35 proteins purified from different sources, and caution that analyses of bacterially produced P35 family members (and perhaps other types of proteins may underestimate their activity.

  12. Altered Activities of Antioxidant Enzymes in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Vávrová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS, an increase of oxidative stress could play an important role which is closely linked with insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and chronic inflammation. The aim of our study was to assess several parameters of the antioxidant status in MetS. Methods: 40 subjects with MetS and 40 age- and sex-matched volunteers without MetS were examined for activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1, glutathione reductase (GR, paraoxonase1 (PON1, concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH, and conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein (CD-LDL. Results: Subjects with MetS had higher activities of CuZnSOD (p Conclusions: Our results implicated an increased oxidative stress in MetS and a decreased antioxidative defense that correlated with some laboratory (triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and clinical (waist circumference, blood pressure components of MetS.

  13. Association of metabolic syndrome with reduced central serotonergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Marquez, Rocio; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jorge; Medina-Serrano, Julio; Boyzo-Montes de Oca, Alfonso; Manjarrez-Gutierrez, Gabriel

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the differences between two groups of adolescents with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and normal controls in relation to brain serotonergic activity through intensity-dependent auditory-evoked potentials (IDAEPs) and plasma free fraction of L-tryptophan. Eighteen adolescents with MetS and thirteen controls were studied. Free fraction, bound and total plasma L-tryptophan, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, albumin and IDAEPs were determined. Glycemia, triglycerides were significantly elevated, and HDL-cholesterol in plasma was significantly reduced. Free fraction and free fraction/total L-tryptophan ratio were decreased. The slope of the amplitude/stimulus intensity function of the N1/P2 component significantly increased in adolescents with MetS. Decrease of free fraction of L-tryptophan in plasma and increase of the slope of the N1/P2 component suggest a low brain serotonin tone. Cortex responses are regulated by serotonergic innervations and may show a different behavior in young patients with MetS. Therefore, the slope of the N1/P2 component along with the free fraction of L-tryptophan in plasma, indicate that in adolescents with MetS the state of serotonergic brain activity is depressed and possibly related to psychiatric disorders.

  14. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids: Metabolic Activation Pathways Leading to Liver Tumor Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peter P

    2017-01-17

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) and PA N-oxides are a class of phytochemical carcinogens contained in over 6000 plant species spread around the world. It has been estimated that approximately half of the 660 PAs and PA N-oxides that have been characterized are cytotoxic, genotoxic, and tumorigenic. It was recently determined that a genotoxic mechanism of liver tumor initiation mediated by PA-derived DNA adducts is a common metabolic activation pathway of a number of PAs. We proposed this set of PA-derived DNA adducts could be a common biological biomarker of PA exposure and a potential biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor formation. We have also found that several reactive secondary pyrrolic metabolites can dissociate and interconvert to other secondary pyrrolic metabolites, resulting in the formation of the same exogenous DNA adducts. This present perspective reports the current progress on these new findings and proposes future research needed for obtaining a greater understanding of the role of this activation pathway and validating the use of this set of PA-derived DNA adducts as a biological biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor initiation.

  15. Antibacterial activity of Artemisia nilagirica leaf extracts against clinical and phytopathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahameethunisa, Abdul R; Hopper, Waheeta

    2010-01-29

    The six organic solvent extracts of Artemisia nilagirica were screened for the potential antimicrobial activity against phytopathogens and clinically important standard reference bacterial strains. The agar disk diffusion method was used to study the antibacterial activity of A. nilagirica extracts against 15 bacterial strains. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the plant extracts were tested using two fold agar dilution method at concentrations ranging from 32 to 512 microg/ml. The phytochemical screening of extracts was carried out for major phytochemical derivatives in A. nilagirica. All the extracts showed inhibitory activity for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria except for Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The hexane extract was found to be effective against all phytopathogens with low MIC of 32 microg/ml and the methanol extract exhibited a higher inhibition activity against Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella typhi, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (32 microg/ml), Bacillus subtilis (64 microg/ml) and Shigella flaxneri (128 microg/ml). The phytochemical screening of extracts answered for the major derivative of alkaloids, amino acids, flavonoids, phenol, quinines, tannins and terpenoids. All the extracts showed antibacterial activity against the tested strains. Of all, methanol and hexane extracts showed high inhibition against clinical and phytopathogens, respectively. The results also indicate the presence of major phytochemical derivatives in the A. nilagirica extracts. Hence, the isolation and purification of therapeutic potential compounds from A. nilagirica could be used as an effective source against bacterial diseases in human and plants.

  16. Evaluation of sonication treatment and buffer composition on rumen bacteria protein extraction and carboxymethylcellulase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prauchner, Carlos A; Kozloski, Gilberto V; Farenzena, Roberta

    2013-05-01

    The methodological procedures for studying the fibrolytic activity of rumen bacteria are not clearly established. In this study the efficiency of sonication treatment and buffer composition (i.e. buffer varying in tonicity or pH) on the level of protein extraction from the residue of forage samples incubated in the rumen of a grazing steer and the effect of buffer composition or CaCl₂ concentration on the carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) activity of the released protein were evaluated. The amount of protein released from the residue of incubation was higher (P buffer pH (P buffer. Both linear and quadratic effects (P buffer pH on CMCase activity were significant, with CMCase activity being maximal at pH 5.4-6.1. CMCase activity was higher (P buffer solution that includes a calcium source. When pH is not a treatment factor, the buffer pH should be between 5.5 and 6. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Antimicrobial activities of commercial essential oils and their components against food-borne pathogens and food spoilage bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mith, Hasika; Duré, Rémi; Delcenserie, Véronique; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Clinquart, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of 15 commercial essential oils and their main components in order to pre-select candidates for potential application in highly perishable food preservation. The antibacterial effects against food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7) and food spoilage bacteria (Brochothrix thermosphacta and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were tested using paper disk diffusion method, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations. Most of the tested essential oils exhibited antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria, except galangal oil. The essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, and thyme showed strong antimicrobial activities with MIC ≥ 0.125 μL/mL and MBC ≥ 0.25 μL/mL. Among tested bacteria, P. fluorescens was the most resistant to selected essential oils with MICs and MBCs of 1 μL/mL. The results suggest that the activity of the essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, thyme, and clove can be attributed to the existence mostly of cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol, which appear to possess similar activities against all the tested bacteria. These materials could be served as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food products. PMID:25473498

  18. Antimicrobial activities of commercial essential oils and their components against food-borne pathogens and food spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mith, Hasika; Duré, Rémi; Delcenserie, Véronique; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Clinquart, Antoine

    2014-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of 15 commercial essential oils and their main components in order to pre-select candidates for potential application in highly perishable food preservation. The antibacterial effects against food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7) and food spoilage bacteria (Brochothrix thermosphacta and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were tested using paper disk diffusion method, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations. Most of the tested essential oils exhibited antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria, except galangal oil. The essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, and thyme showed strong antimicrobial activities with MIC ≥ 0.125 μL/mL and MBC ≥ 0.25 μL/mL. Among tested bacteria, P. fluorescens was the most resistant to selected essential oils with MICs and MBCs of 1 μL/mL. The results suggest that the activity of the essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, thyme, and clove can be attributed to the existence mostly of cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol, which appear to possess similar activities against all the tested bacteria. These materials could be served as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food products.

  19. Pomegranate ellagitannins stimulate growth of gut bacteria in vitro: Implications for prebiotic and metabolic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoping; Summanen, Paula H; Komoriya, Tomoe; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Carlson, Eliisa; Heber, David; Finegold, Sydney M

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated the effect of pomegranate extract (POMx) and pomegranate juice (POM juice) on the growth of major groups of intestinal bacteria: Enterobacteriaceae, Bacteroides fragilis group, clostridia, bifidobacteria, and lactobacilli, and the utilization of pomegranate polyphenols by Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. The total phenolic content of the pomegranate extract and juice was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteau colorimetric method and reported as gallic acid equivalent (GAE). The polyphenol composition was determined by HPLC. Stool specimens were incubated with 400, 100, and 25 μg/ml GAE POMx and POM juice and subjected to selective culture. Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains were incubated with 400 μg/ml GAE POMx and POM juice and metabolites were analyzed. POMx and POM juice increased the mean counts of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus and significantly inhibited the growth of B. fragilis group, clostridia, and Enterobacteriaceae in a dose-response manner. Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus utilized ellagic acid and glycosyl ellagic acid but little or no punicalin was utilized. Neither POMx nor POM juice was converted to urolithins by the test bacteria or the in vitro stool cultures. The effect of pomegranate on the gut bacteria considered to be beneficial (Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus) suggests that pomegranate may potentially work as a prebiotic. The concept that polyphenols such as those in pomegranate impact gut microbiota populations may establish a new role for polyphenols in human health. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Cool temperatures reduce antifungal activity of symbiotic bacteria of threatened amphibians--implications for disease management and patterns of decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua H Daskin

    Full Text Available Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, is a widespread disease of amphibians responsible for population declines and extinctions. Some bacteria from amphibians' skins produce antimicrobial substances active against Bd. Supplementing populations of these cutaneous antifungal bacteria might help manage chytridiomycosis in wild amphibians. However, the activity of protective bacteria may depend upon environmental conditions. Biocontrol of Bd in nature thus requires knowledge of how environmental conditions affect their anti-Bd activity. For example, Bd-driven amphibian declines have often occurred at temperatures below Bd's optimum range. It is possible these declines occurred due to reduced anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts at cool temperatures. Better understanding of the effects of temperature on chytridiomycosis development could also improve risk evaluation for amphibian populations yet to encounter Bd. We characterized, at a range of temperatures approximating natural seasonal variation, the anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts from the skins of three species of rainforest tree frogs (Litoria nannotis, Litoria rheocola, and Litoria serrata. All three species declined during chytridiomycosis outbreaks in the late 1980s and early 1990s and have subsequently recovered to differing extents. We collected anti-Bd bacterial symbionts from frogs and cultured the bacteria at constant temperatures from 8 °C to 33 °C. Using a spectrophotometric assay, we monitored Bd growth in cell-free supernatants (CFSs from each temperature treatment. CFSs from 11 of 24 bacteria showed reduced anti-Bd activity in vitro when they were produced at cool temperatures similar to those encountered by the host species during population declines. Reduced anti-Bd activity of metabolites produced at low temperatures may, therefore, partially explain the association between Bd-driven declines and cool temperatures. We show that to

  1. Proteolytic Activity in Reduced-Fat Cheddar Cheese Made with Lactic Acid Bacteria and Camel Chymosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Mette Winther

    be the need of an extended ripening period to reach a similar cheese structure as in cheeses produced with BC. The aim of this project was to compensate for the lower proteolytic activity in cheese produced with CC compared to BC. Selection of dairy lactic acid bacteria (LAB) for cheese production with high...... for their ability to influence proteolysis and structure during cheese ripening. In an attempt to improve the screening methods and contribute to the development of a new classification system of Latcococcus lactic strains, the peptide profile formed by selected strains after growth in milk was analyzed...... mediated an increase in the total amount of amino acids as well as a shorter structure. A model system, used to study the retention of chymosin in a curd, showed that the retention of CC was less dependent on pH compared to BC, and the retention of CC was higher than BC in the pH interval 6...

  2. Aqueous Extracts of Wild Mushrooms Show Antimicrobial and Antiadhesion Activities against Bacteria and Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klančnik, Anja; Megušar, Polona; Sterniša, Meta; Jeršek, Barbara; Bucar, Franz; Smole Možina, Sonja; Kos, Janko; Sabotič, Jerica

    2017-12-01

    Mushrooms represent promising sources of novel bioactive compounds and can be applied as innovative strategies to control microbial contamination and infection via the food chain. We characterized aqueous extracts from 21 wild basidiomycete mushrooms and the cultivated oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, as putative sources of antimicrobial and antiadhesive compounds. Broth microdilutions and adhesion to a polystyrene surface were evaluated on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and on fungi. The aqueous extracts tested showed antimicrobial and antiadhesive activities against these microorganisms. Biochemical analyses of the P. ostreatus extract indicated the involvement of several compounds with different molecular masses. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  4. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50 μL leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  5. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Daniels, Dwayne; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50  μ L leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties.

  6. Functionality of lactic acid bacteria peptidase activities in the hydrolysis of gliadin-like fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerez, C L; Font de Valdez, G; Rollán, G C

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the role of the peptidase activities from sourdough lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the degradation of alpha-gliadin fragments. Different proline-containing substrates were hydrolysed by LAB indicating pro-specific peptidase activities. Lactobacillus plantarum CRL 775 and Pediococcus pentosaceus CRL 792 displayed the highest tri- and di-peptidase activities, respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum strains hydrolysed more than 60%alpha-gliadin fragments corresponding to the 31-43 and 62-75 amino acids in the protein after 2 h. None of the LAB strains alone could hydrolyse 57-89 alpha-gliadin peptide; however, the combination of L. plantarum CRL 775 and P. pentosaceus CRL 792 led to hydrolysis (57%) of this peptide in 8 h. The capacity of LAB strains to degrade alpha-gliadin fragments was not correlated to individual peptidase activities. Several strains separately degraded the 31-43 and 62-75 alpha-gliadin fragments, while the 57-89 peptide degradation was associated with the combination of peptidase profiles from pooled LAB strains. This is the first report on the peptide hydrolase system of sourdough pediococci and its ability to reduce alpha-gliadin fragments. This study contributes to a better knowledge of sourdough LAB proteolytic system and its role in the degradation of proline-rich alpha-gliadin peptides involved in celiac disease.

  7. Antibiotic resistance and antibacterial activity in heterotrophic bacteria of mineral water origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messi, Patrizia; Guerrieri, Elisa; Bondi, Moreno

    2005-06-15

    Antibiotic resistance and antibacterial activity were determined on heterotrophic bacteria isolated from mineral waters. Of the 120 isolates Pseudomonas spp. (55.8%) was the predominant group followed by Acinetobacter spp. (14.17%), Flavobacterium spp. (10.83%), Achromobacter spp. (10%), Burkholderia cepacia (3.3%), Agrobacterium/radiobacter (2.5%), Moraxella spp. (1.7%), Aeromonas hydrophila (1.7%). Over 80% of the isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics and the highest resistance was found for chloramphenicol, ampicillin, colistin and sulfamethizole (60%, 55%, 50% and 47.5%, respectively). Strains with multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) represented 55% of isolates and the most resistant organism belonged to the genus Pseudomonas. Of 40 randomly selected strains, 27 (67.5%) had antibacterial activity towards one or more indicators. This activity, found in a high percentage in the genus Pseudomonas (92%), emerged mainly against closely related microorganisms. Several producers were active also against Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Forty-six percent of the isolates harboured 1 to 5 plasmids with molecular weights ranging from 2.1 to 41.5 MDa.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of some seaweeds species from Red sea, against multidrug resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimaa M. El Shafay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the antibacterial activity of diethyl ether, methanol, ethanol and chloroform extracts of red algae Ceramium rubrum (Rhodophyta, Sargassum vulgare, Sargassum fusiforme and Padina pavonia (Phaeophyta collected from Red sea, Egypt. The algal extracts were tested for their antibacterial activity against ten multidrug resistant clinical isolates of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The highest inhibition activity among all extracts was obtained with 100 μl diethyl ether extract S. fusiforme against Staphylococcus aureus 2 and 50 μl ethanol extract of S. vulgare against Klebsiella pneumoniae. The algal extract of S. fusiforme and S. vulgare was characterized by Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS. The compounds with antimicrobial activity were identified, such as phenols, terpenes, acetogenins, indoles, fatty acids and volatile halogenated hydrocarbons. Transmission electron microscopy was applied for determining the morphological changes in S. aureus 2 and K. pneumonia treated with 100 μl diethyl ether extract of S. fusiforme and 50 μl ethanol extract of S. vulgare, respectively. Perforation of cell wall, leakage of cytoplasmic contents, severe distortion of outer cell shape, inner chromatin mild scattered cytoplasmic vacuolation, rupture of cell wall, and decreased cell size for both bacterial isolates treated with 100 μl diethyl ether of S. fusiforme extract and 50 μl S. vulgare ethanolic extract were recorded.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants against several foodborne and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nuno; Alves, Sofia; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Amaral, Joana S; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of essential oils extracted from a variety of aromatic plants, often used in the Portuguese gastronomy was studied in vitro by the agar diffusion method. The essential oils of thyme, oregano, rosemary, verbena, basil, peppermint, pennyroyal and mint were tested against Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative strains (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). For most essential oils examined, S. aureus, was the most susceptible bacteria, while P. aeruginosa showed, in general, least susceptibility. Among the eight essential oils evaluated, thyme, oregano and pennyroyal oils showed the greatest antimicrobial activity, followed by rosemary, peppermint and verbena, while basil and mint showed the weakest antimicrobial activity. Most of the essential oils considered in this study exhibited a significant inhibitory effect. Thyme oil showed a promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, thus revealing its potential as a natural preservative in food products against several causal agents of foodborne diseases and food spoilage. In general, the results demonstrate that, besides flavoring the food, the use of aromatic herbs in gastronomy can also contribute to a bacteriostatic effect against pathogens.

  10. Interactions between Carotenoids from Marine Bacteria and Other Micronutrients: Impact on Stability and Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Charlotte; Dangles, Olivier; Borel, Patrick; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine

    2015-11-19

    Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria Bacillus indicus HU36 are sources of oxygenated carotenoids with original structures (about fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments with acylated d-glucosyl groups). In this study, we evaluated the stability (sensitivity to iron-induced autoxidation) and antioxidant activity (inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation) of combinations of bacterial HU36 carotenoids with the bacterial vitamin menaquinone MQ-7 and with phenolic antioxidants (vitamin E, chlorogenic acid, rutin). Unexpectedly, MQ-7 strongly improves the ability of HU36 carotenoids to inhibit Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation, although MQ-7 was not consumed in the medium. We propose that their interaction modifies the carotenoid antioxidant mechanism(s), possibly by allowing carotenoids to scavenge the initiating radicals. For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually. HU36 carotenoids and phenolic antioxidants displayed synergistic activities in the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by heme iron, but not by free iron. Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron. Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail.

  11. Trace cobalt speciation in bacteria and at enzymic active sites using emission Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, A.A.; Antonyuk, L.P.; Smirnova, V.E.; Serebrennikova, O.B. [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, Saratov (Russian Federation); Kulikov, L.A.; Perfiliev, Yu.D. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2002-02-01

    {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy (EMS) allows the chemical state of cobalt, as influenced by its coordination environment, to be monitored in biological samples at its physiological (trace) concentrations. To draw attention to EMS as a valuable tool for speciation of cobalt in biocomplexes, the process of cobalt(II) metabolism in cells of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 was investigated using EMS of {sup 57}Co{sup II}-doped bacterial cells. EMS measurements also showed {sup 57}Co{sup II}-activated glutamine synthetase (GS, a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism, isolated from this bacterium) to have two different cobalt(II) forms at its active sites, in agreement with data available on other bacterial GSs. Chemical after-effects following electron capture by the nucleus of the parent {sup 57}Co{sup II} during the {sup 57}Co{yields}{sup 57}Fe transition, which contribute to the formation of a stabilised daughter {sup 57}Fe{sup III} component along with the nucleogenic {sup 57}Fe{sup II} forms, are also briefly considered. (orig.)

  12. The influence of protruding filamentous bacteria on floc stability and solid-liquid separation in the activated sludge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Wilhelm; Krysiak-Baltyn, Konrad; Scales, Peter J; Martin, Gregory J O; Stickland, Anthony D; Gras, Sally L

    2017-10-15

    Filamentous bacteria can impact on the physical properties of flocs in the activated sludge process assisting solid-liquid separation or inducing problems when bacteria are overabundant. While filamentous bacteria within the flocs are understood to increase floc tensile strength, the relationship between protruding external filaments, dewatering characteristics and floc stability is unclear. Here, a quantitative methodology was applied to determine the abundance of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge samples from four wastewater treatment plants. An automated image analysis procedure was applied to identify filaments and flocs and calculate the length of the protruding filamentous bacteria (PFB) relative to the floc size. The correlation between PFB and floc behavior was then assessed. Increased filament abundance was found to increase interphase drag on the settling flocs, as quantified by the hindered settling function. Additionally, increased filament abundance was correlated with a lower gel point concentration leading to poorer sludge compactability. The floc strength factor, defined as the relative change in floc size upon shearing, correlated positively with filament abundance. This influence of external protruding filamentous bacteria on floc stability is consistent with the filamentous backbone theory, where filamentous bacteria within flocs increase floc resistance to shear-induced breakup. A qualitative correlation was also observed between protruding and internal filamentous structure. This study confirms that filamentous bacteria are necessary to enhance floc stability but if excessively abundant will adversely affect solid-liquid separation. The tools developed here will allow quantitative analysis of filament abundance, which is an improvement on current qualitative methods and the improved method could be used to assist and optimize the operation of waste water treatment plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Basal metabolic regulatory responses and rhythmic activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Rattus sp. Low concentrations of kola nut extract stimulated the heart by increasing rate and force of contraction as well as metabolic rate. Higher concentrations reduced rate and amplitude of beat resulting, at still higher concentrations in heart failure. Keywords: Kolanut, extract, basal metabolic rate, mammalian heart ...

  14. Metabolic and Cardiovascular Responses of Children during Prolonged Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chausow, Sharon A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Metabolic and cardiovascular responses during 45 minutes of continuous moderate intensity exercise were investigated in 11 children, 8-11 years of age. Results indicate that children exhibit metabolic and cardiovascular adjustments similar to those noted in adults during prolonged exercise. (Author/JMK)

  15. Proteolytic and antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria grown in goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova, Jivka; Moncheva, Penka; Ivanova, Iskra

    2014-11-02

    We examined 62 strains and 21 trade starter cultures from the collection of LB Bulgaricum PLC for proteolytic and antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) grown in goat milk. The aim of this study was to investigate the fermentation of caseins, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin by LAB, using the o -phthaldialdehyde (OPA) spectrophotometric assay and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The proteolysis targeted mainly caseins, especially β-casein. Whey proteins were proteolyzed, essentially β-lactoglobulin. The proteolytic activity of Lactococcus lactis l598, Streptococcus thermophilus t3D1, Dt1, Lactobacillus lactis 1043 and L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus b38, b122 and b24 was notably high. The proteolysis process gave rise to medium-sized peptide populations. Most of the examined strains showed antimicrobial activity against some food pathogens, such as Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , Salmonella cholere enteridis , Listeria monocytogenes , Listeria innocua and Enterobacter aerogenes . The most active producers of antimicrobial-active peptides were strains of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus , which are of practical importance. The starter cultures containing the examined species showed high proteolytic and antimicrobial activity in skimmed goat milk. The greatest antimicrobial activity of the cultures was detected against E. aerogenes . The obtained results demonstrated the significant proteolytic potential of the examined strains in goat milk and their potential for application in the production of dairy products from goat's milk. The present results could be considered as the first data on the proteolytic capacity of strains and starter cultures in goat milk for the purposes of trade interest of LB Bulgaricum PLC.

  16. Surface-active biopolymers from marine bacteria for potential biotechnological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Sałek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface-active agents are amphiphilic chemicals that are used in almost every sector of modern industry, the bulk of which are produced by organo-chemical synthesis. Those produced from biological sources (biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers, however, have gained increasing interest in recent years due to their wide structural and functional diversity, lower toxicities and high biodegradability, compared to their chemically-synthesised counterparts. This review aims to present a general overview on surface-active agents, including their classification, where new types of these biomolecules may lay awaiting discovery, and some of the main bottlenecks for their industrial-scale production. In particular, the marine environment is highlighted as a largely untapped source for discovering new types of surface-active agents. Marine bacteria, especially those living associated with micro-algae (eukaryotic phytoplankton, are a highly promising source of polymeric surface-active agents with potential biotechnological applications. The high uronic acids content of these macromolecules has been linked to conferring them with amphiphilic qualities, and their high structural diversity and polyanionic nature endows them with the potential to exhibit a wide range of functional diversity. Production yields (e.g. by fermentation for most microbial surface-active agents have often been too low to meet the volume demands of industry, and this principally remains as the most important bottleneck for their further commercial development. However, new developments in recombinant and synthetic biology approaches can offer significant promise to alleviate this bottleneck. This review highlights a particular biotope in the marine environment that offers promise for discovering novel surface-active biomolecules, and gives a general overview on specific areas that researchers and the industry could focus work towards increasing the production yields of microbial surface-active

  17. Tidal switch on metabolic activity: Salinity induced responses on bacterioplankton metabolic capabilities in a tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thottathil, S.D.; Balachandran, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Gupta, G.V.M.; Nair, S.

    Biolog plates were used to study the changes in the metabolic capabilities of bacterioplankton over a complete tidal cycle in a tropical ecosystem (Cochin Estuary, Kerala, India) along southwest coast of India. The pattern of utilization of carbon...

  18. Fe biomineralization mirrors individual metabolic activity in a nitrate-dependent Fe(II-oxidizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer eMIOT

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biomineralization sometimes leads to periplasmic encrustation, which is predicted to enhance microorganism preservation in the fossil record. Mineral precipitation within the periplasm is however thought to induce death, as a result of permeability loss preventing nutrient and waste transit across the cell wall. This hypothesis had however never been investigated down to the single cell level. Here, we cultured the nitrate reducing Fe(II oxidizing bacteria Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 that have been previously shown to promote the precipitation of a diversity of Fe minerals (lepidocrocite, goethite, Fe phosphate encrusting the periplasm. We investigated the connection of Fe biomineralization with carbon assimilation at the single cell level, using a combination of electron microscopy and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS. Our analyses revealed strong individual heterogeneities of Fe biomineralization. Noteworthy, a small proportion of cells remaining free of any precipitate persisted even at advanced stages of biomineralization. Using pulse chase experiments with 13C-acetate, we provide evidences of individual phenotypic heterogeneities of carbon assimilation, correlated with the level of Fe biomineralization. Whereas non- and moderately encrusted cells were able to assimilate acetate, higher levels of periplasm encrustation prevented any carbon incorporation. Carbon assimilation only depended on the level of Fe encrustation and not on the nature of Fe minerals precipitated in the cell wall. Carbon assimilation decreased exponentially with increasing cell-associated Fe content. Persistence of a small proportion of non-mineralized and metabolically active cells might constitute a strategy of survival in highly ferruginous environments. Eventually, our results suggest that periplasmic Fe biomineralization may provide a signature of individual metabolic status, which could be looked for in the fossil record and in modern

  19. Model-driven multi-omic data analysis elucidates metabolic immunomodulators of macrophage activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Mo, Monica L.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Metz, Thomas O.; Jones, Marcus B.; Frank, Bryan C.; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2012-06-26

    Macrophages are central players in the immune response, manifesting divergent phenotypes to control inflammation and innate immunity through the release of cytokines and other regulatory factor-dependent signaling pathways. In recent years, the focus on metabolism has been reemphasized as critical signaling and regulatory pathways of human pathophysiology, ranging from cancer to aging, often converge on metabolic responses. Here, we used genome-scale modeling and multi-omics (transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) analysis to assess metabolic features critical for macrophage functions. We constructed a genome-scale metabolic network for the RAW 264.7 cell line to determine metabolic modulators of macrophage activation. Metabolites well-known to be associated with immunoactivation (e.g., glucose and arginine) and immunosuppression (e.g., tryptophan and vitamin D3) were amongst the most critical effectors. Intracellular metabolic mechanisms linked to critical suppressive effectors were then assessed, identifying a suppressive role for de novo nucleotide synthesis. Finally, the underlying metabolic mechanisms of macrophage activation are identified by analyzing multi-omic data obtained from LPS-stimulated RAW cells in the context of our flux-based predictions. Our study demonstrates metabolism's role in regulating activation may be greater than previously anticipated and elucidates underlying metabolic connections between activation and metabolic effectors.

  20. Investigating on the Correlation Between Some Biological Activities of Marine Sponge-Associated Bacteria Extracts and Isolated Diketopiperazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Hady, Faten K; Fayad, Walid; Iodice, Carmine; El-Shahid, Zeinab A; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed S; Crudele, Egle; Tommonaro, Giuseppina

    2017-01-01

    Marine organisms have been considered as the richest sources of novel bioactive metabolites, which can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. In the last years, the interest for marine microorganisms has grown for their enormous biodiversity and for the evidence that many novel compounds isolated from marine invertebrates are really synthesized by their associated bacteria. Nevertheless, the discovery of a chemical communication Quorum sensing (QS) between bacterial cells and between bacteria and host has gained the researchers to expand the aim of their study toward the role of bacteria associated with marine invertebrates, such as marine sponge. In the present paper, we report the evaluation of biological activities of different extracts of bacteria Vibrio sp. and Bacillus sp. associated with marine sponges Dysidea avara and Ircinia variabilis, respectively. Moreover, we evaluated the biological activities of some diketopiperazines (DKPs), previously isolated, and able to activate QS mechanism. The results showed that all extracts, fractions, and DKPs showed low scavenging activity against DPPH and superoxide anion, low cytotoxic and anti-tyrosinase activities, but no antimicrobial and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities. One DKP [cyclo-(trans-4-hydroxy-L-prolyl-L-leucine)] has the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity even than the standard acarbose.

  1. BACILLUS SPECIES IN THE OCEANIC WATERS ADJACENT TO CUBA: ASSOCIATION BETWEEN THEIR DISTRIBUTION AND METABOLIC ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Margarita Lugioyo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to identify spore-forming Gram-positive Bacillus strains isolated from oceanic waters adjacent to Cuba and to establish a possible relationship between their distribution and the metabolic activity of the isolates. Total protein patterns, derived from SDS-PAGE, were used to build a non-rooted dendrogram where the strains appeared clustered in three nodes. No direct relationship was observed between a node and particular species. In contrast, according to the physical and chemical characteristics of the zones, node I was different from node II and III, since it comprises strains from the farthest zones of the coast, poorer in nutrients. On the other hand, nodes II and III mainly collect strains isolated from nutrient and organic matter-enriched zones. Associating the node clustering with metabolic activities, it was found that in node I the ratio: number of positive activities/strain was 2.3, followed by node II with a ratio of 3.3, and finally node III exhibiting a ratio equal to 3.7. This could suggest that different total protein patterns in bacteria belonging to the same specie, but coming from environments with different degree of nutrient richness, could be an indicator of the capacities of these microorganisms to adapt and live in different environments.   El objetivo del presente trabajo fue la identificación de cepas de bacilos Gram-positivos esporulados aislados de las aguas oceánicas adyacentes a Cuba y el establecimiento de la posible relación entre la distribución y las actividades metabólicas de los aislados. A partir del patrón de proteínas obtenido mediante electroforesis SDS-PAGE, se construyó un dendrograma no enraizado, lo que permitió la agrupación de las cepas en tres nodos. No se observó una relación directa entre un nodo y especies particulares, sin embargo, se encontraron diferencias entre los nodos al considerar las características físicas y químicas de las zonas; el nodo I

  2. Metabolic adaptation to intermittent fasting is independent of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolin Li

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings indicate that PPARA activation prior to acute fasting cannot ameliorate fasting-induced hepatic steatosis, whereas EODF induced metabolic adaptations to protect against fasting-induced steatosis without altering PPARA signaling. Therefore, PPARA activation does not mediate the metabolic adaptation to fasting, at least in preventing acute fasting-induced steatosis.

  3. Metabolic activity of Glomus intraradices in Arum- and Paris-type arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aarle, IM; Cavagnaro, TR; Smith, SE; Dickson, S

    Colonization of two plant species by Glomus intraradices was studied to investigate the two morphological types (Arum and Paris), their symbiotic interfaces and metabolic activities. Root pieces and sections were stained to observe the colonization and metabolic activity of all mycorrhizal

  4. Identification and Antimicrobial Activity Detection of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Corn Stover Silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxia Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A total of 59 lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains were isolated from corn stover silage. According to phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA sequences and recA gene polymerase chain reaction amplification, these LAB isolates were identified as five species: Lactobacillus (L. plantarum subsp. plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Enterococcus mundtii, Weissella cibaria and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, respectively. Those strains were also screened for antimicrobial activity using a dual-culture agar plate assay. Based on excluding the effects of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide, two L. plantarum subsp. plantarum strains ZZU 203 and 204, which strongly inhibited Salmonella enterica ATCC 43971T, Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698T and Escherichia coli ATCC 11775T were selected for further research on sensitivity of the antimicrobial substance to heat, pH and protease. Cell-free culture supernatants of the two strains exhibited strong heat stability (60 min at 100°C, but the antimicrobial activity was eliminated after treatment at 121°C for 15 min. The antimicrobial substance remained active under acidic condition (pH 2.0 to 6.0, but became inactive under neutral and alkaline condition (pH 7.0 to 9.0. In addition, the antimicrobial activities of these two strains decreased remarkably after digestion by protease K. These results preliminarily suggest that the desirable antimicrobial activity of strains ZZU 203 and 204 is the result of the production of a bacteriocin-like substance, and these two strains with antimicrobial activity could be used as silage additives to inhibit proliferation of unwanted microorganism during ensiling and preserve nutrients of silage. The nature of the antimicrobial substances is being investigated in our laboratory.

  5. ß-defensin-2 in breast milk displays a broad antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Baricelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the antimicrobial activity of ß-defensin-2 produced in the mammary gland and secreted in human breast milk. METHODS: The peptide production was performed by DNA cloning. ß-defensin-2 levels were quantified in 61 colostrum samples and 39 mature milk samples from healthy donors, by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Using halo inhibition assay, this study assessed activity against seven clinical isolates from diarrheal feces of children between 0 and 2 years of age. The activity of ß-defensin-2 against three opportunistic pathogens that can cause nosocomial infections was determined by microdilution test. RESULTS: The peptide levels were higher in colostrum (n = 61 than in mature milk samples (n = 39, as follows: median and range, 8.52 (2.6-16.3 µg/ml versus 0.97 (0.22-3.78, p < 0.0001; Mann-Whitney test. The recombinant peptide obtained showed high antimicrobial activity against a broad range of pathogenic bacteria. Its antibacterial activity was demonstrated in a disk containing between 1-4 µg, which produced inhibition zones ranging from 18 to 30 mm against three isolates of Salmonella spp. and four of E. coli. ß-defensin-2 showed minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of 0.25 µg/mL and 0.5 µg/mL for S. marcescen and P. aeruginosa, respectively, while a higher MIC (4 µg/mL was obtained against an isolated of multidrug-resistant strain of A. baumannii. CONCLUSIONS: To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to report ß-defensin-2 levels in Latin American women. The production and the activity of ß-defensin-2 in breast milk prove its importance as a defense molecule for intestinal health in pediatric patients.

  6. Spatial Distribution of PCB Dechlorinating Bacteria and Activities in Contaminated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe V. Kjellerup

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil samples contaminated with Aroclor 1260 were analyzed for microbial PCB dechlorination potential, which is the rate-limiting step for complete PCB degradation. The average chlorines per biphenyl varied throughout the site suggesting that different rates of in situ dechlorination had occurred over time. Analysis of PCB transforming (aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities and dechlorinating potential revealed spatial heterogeneity of both putative PCB transforming phylotypes and dechlorination activity. Some soil samples inhibited PCB dechlorination in active sediment from Baltimore Harbor indicating that metal or organic cocontaminants might cause the observed heterogeneity of in situ dechlorination. Bioaugmentation of soil samples contaminated with PCBs ranging from 4.6 to 265 ppm with a pure culture of the PCB dechlorinating bacterium Dehalobium chlorocoercia DF-1 also yielded heterologous results with significant dechlorination of weathered PCBs observed in one location. The detection of indigenous PCB dehalorespiring activity combined with the detection of putative dechlorinating bacteria and biphenyl dioxygenase genes in the soil aggregates suggests that the potential exists for complete mineralization of PCBs in soils. However, in contrast to sediments, the heterologous distribution of microorganisms, PCBs, and inhibitory cocontaminants is a significant challenge for the development of in situ microbial treatment of PCB impacted soils.

  7. Preliminary survey of local bacteriophages with lytic activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latz, Simone; Wahida, Adam; Arif, Assuda; Häfner, Helga; Hoß, Mareike; Ritter, Klaus; Horz, Hans-Peter

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) represent a potential alternative for combating multi-drug resistant bacteria. Because of their narrow host range and the ever emergence of novel pathogen variants the continued search for phages is a prerequisite for optimal treatment of bacterial infections. Here we performed an ad hoc survey in the surroundings of a University hospital for the presence of phages with therapeutic potential. To this end, 16 aquatic samples of different origins and locations were tested simultaneously for the presence of phages with lytic activity against five current, but distinct strains each from the ESKAPE-group (i.e., Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter cloacae). Phages could be isolated for 70% of strains, covering all bacterial species except S. aureus. Apart from samples from two lakes, freshwater samples were largely devoid of phages. By contrast, one liter of hospital effluent collected at a single time point already contained phages active against two-thirds of tested strains. In conclusion, phages with lytic activity against nosocomial pathogens are unevenly distributed across environments with the prime source being the immediate hospital vicinity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Lactic acid bacteria affect serum cholesterol levels, harmful fecal enzyme activity, and fecal water content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Myung

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as lower cholesterol. Although present in many foods, most trials have been in spreads or dairy products. Here we tested whether Bifidobacteria isolates could lower cholesterol, inhibit harmful enzyme activities, and control fecal water content. Methods In vitro culture experiments were performed to evaluate the ability of Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from healthy Koreans (20~30 years old to reduce cholesterol-levels in MRS broth containing polyoxyethanylcholesterol sebacate. Animal experiments were performed to investigate the effects on lowering cholesterol, inhibiting harmful enzyme activities, and controlling fecal water content. For animal studies, 0.2 ml of the selected strain cultures (108~109 CFU/ml were orally administered to SD rats (fed a high-cholesterol diet every day for 2 weeks. Results B. longum SPM1207 reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL levels significantly (p B. longum SPM1207 also increased fecal LAB levels and fecal water content, and reduced body weight and harmful intestinal enzyme activities. Conclusion Daily consumption of B. longum SPM1207 can help in managing mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia, with potential to improve human health by helping to prevent colon cancer and constipation.

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Cell Free Supernatant of Irradiated Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaleem, M.A.; AL-Hagar, O.E.Aa.

    2015-01-01

    Attempts were made to isolate bio preservatives using food wastes with no value and low cost. Whey is the raw material achieved that value. Whey and many other food wastes are used in our study to isolate Lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Cell free supernatants (CFS) of isolates are used to evaluate their antimicrobial activity against indicator pathogenic bacterial strains. CFS-9 isolate from whey has the highest inhibitory activity compared to all other isolates. The inhibitory activity of CFS-9, Nisin (400 IU / ml) and the standard Lactococcus Lactis Subsp. Lactis ATCC 11454 (Lacto) were determined. Furthermore, isolate-9 and Lacto strains were exposed to irradiation at different doses. The inhibition zones of; control isolate-9 (non-irradiated) showed the highest values against all indicator strains, CFS of irradiated Lacto at dose 250 Gy was the highest value against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli compared to other irradiation treatments, CFS of irradiated Lacto at dose 100 Gy was the highest value against Staph aureus, while the inhibition zone was in the highest value in CFS of irradiated Lacto at dose 500 Gy against Salmonella typhimurium. Nisin (400 IU / ml) was significantly higher than all CFS of irradiated isolate-9 while, the inhibition zones of all CFS-Lacto (irradiated and nonirradiated) are better and higher than nisin-400

  10. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Pomegranate Juice and Peel Extracts on Cariogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmaria Fabrizio Ferrazzano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of hydroalcoholic extracts of pomegranate (Punica granatum L. peel and juice, against the microorganisms considered the main etiologic agents of dental caries. Methods. The values of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined against Streptococcus mutans Clarke ATCC® 25175™ strain and Rothia dentocariosa clinical isolate. Results. Peel extracts inhibit effectively the growth and survival of S. mutans ATCC 25175 strain and R. dentocariosa clinical isolate with MIC and MBC values of 10 μg/μl and 15 μg/μl, respectively. Furthermore, the pomegranate juice extract showed high inhibitory activity against S. mutans ATCC 25175 strain with a MIC value of 25 μg/μl and a MBC value of 40 μg/μl, whereas, against R. dentocariosa, it has displayed a moderate inhibitory activity, with MIC and MBC values of 20 μg/μl and 140 μg/μl, respectively. Conclusions. In vitro microbiological tests demonstrate that the hydroalcoholic extracts of pomegranate juice and peel are able to contrast the main cariogenic bacteria involved in tooth decay. Although being preliminary data, our results suggest that pomegranate polyphenolic compounds could represent a good adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of dental caries.

  11. Increased levels of deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1) in active bacteria-related appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaemmerer, Elke; Schneider, Ursula; Klaus, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Kaemmerer E, Schneider U, Klaus C, Plum P, Reinartz A, Adolf M, Renner M, Wolfs T G A M, Kramer B W, Wagner N, Mollenhauer J & Gassler N (2012) Histopathology Increased levels of deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1) in active bacteria-related appendicitis Aims:  Deleted in malignant brain...... adjacent to erosive lesions or ulcers. Conclusions:  Our data demonstrate that bacteria-related active inflammation results in a sharp increase of DMBT1 levels in enterocytes. These findings substantiate the view that DMBT1 is of functional relevance for host defence and modulation of the course...

  12. Dynamic regulation of metabolic flux in engineered bacteria using a pathway-independent quorum-sensing circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Apoorv; Reizman, Irene M Brockman; Reisch, Christopher R; Prather, Kristala L J

    2017-03-01

    Metabolic engineering of microorganisms to produce desirable products on an industrial scale can result in unbalanced cellular metabolic networks that reduce productivity and yield. Metabolic fluxes can be rebalanced using dynamic pathway regulation, but few broadly applicable tools are available to achieve this. We present a pathway-independent genetic control module that can be used to dynamically regulate the expression of target genes. We apply our module to identify the optimal point to redirect glycolytic flux into heterologous engineered pathways in Escherichia coli, resulting in titers of myo-inositol increased 5.5-fold and titers of glucaric acid increased from unmeasurable to >0.8 g/L, compared to the parent strains lacking dynamic flux control. Scaled-up production of these strains in benchtop bioreactors resulted in almost ten- and fivefold increases in specific titers of myo-inositol and glucaric acid, respectively. We also used our module to control flux into aromatic amino acid biosynthesis to increase titers of shikimate in E. coli from unmeasurable to >100 mg/L.

  13. Investigation of antibacterial activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria isolated from traditional kordish cheese in comparison with commercial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Tofangsazan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The health benefits of lactic acid bacteria in human, especially their anti-pathogenic properties has been the focus of recent interests. The objective of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from traditional Kurdish cheese against a few bacterial pathogens. Materials and Methods: The cell free culture supernatant of LAB isolated from Kurdish cheese which was treated with heat and NaOH were tested for their antibacterial activity by Agar Disk Diffusion method. Moreover, Minimum Inhibition Concentration and Co-aggregation of LAB against pathogens were determined. Each test was repeated for three times. Results: The LAB isolates, in comparison with commercial lactic acid bacteria, showed suitable antibacterial activity. Heating the bacterial supernatant eliminated its anti-bacterial property; however, alkali treatment did not have any effect. The Minimum Inhibition Concentration did not show significant differences between native and commercial lactic acid bacteria; however, the native LAB showed suitable co-aggregation with pathogens. Conclusion: Traditional lactic acid bacteria and their metabolites can inhibit growth of pathogens. This shows the positive role of LAB in human health which necessitates their increase usage as natural antimicrobial agent.

  14. Activity of bacteria in water of hot springs from Southern and Central Kamchatskaya geothermal provinces, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkova, Natalia L; Tazaki, Kazue; Zakharova, Juliya R; Parfenova, Valentina V

    2007-01-01

    The hot-spring waters of numerous hot springs at the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia differ in their chemical characteristics and elemental composition. Total bacterial abundance (TBA) as well as enzymatically active and respiring bacteria was enumerated in water samples collected from the Nalychevskie, Oksinskie, Apapelskie, and Dachnye hot springs. 5-Carboxyfluorescein diacetate activity was detected in all water samples and comprised 29-65% of the TBA as determined by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindol staining. The respiratory activity of iron-oxidizing bacteria was assayed by 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyltetrazolium chloride reduction. Respiring cells accounted for 9-14% of the TBA, indicating a positive correlation with the number of iron-oxidizing bacteria from the hot-spring biomats. Enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria revealed a high-density bacterial population only in the water of the Apapelskie hot spring, which has a temperature of 36 degrees C. Therefore, it appears that heterotrophic and iron-oxidizing bacteria inhabiting the hot-spring waters are essential for the geochemical processes occurring in hydrothermal systems.

  15. Isolation And Partial Characterization Of Bacteria Activity Associated With Gorgonian Euplexaura sp. Against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiana, R.; Ayuningrum, D.; Asagabaldan, M. A.; Nuryadi, H.; Sabdono, A.; Radjasa, O. K.; Trianto, A.

    2017-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has emerged in around the world and has been resistance to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin. The aims of this study were to isolate, to investigate and to characterize bacterial symbionts gorgonian having activity against MRSA. Euplexaura sp. was collected from Panjang Island, Jepara, Indonesia by snorkling 2-5 m in depth. Bacterias were isolated by using spesific media with dilution method. Bacterias were conducted by using the streak method. Antibacterial activity was investigated by overlay method. The potent bacteria was identified by using molecular identification (DNA extraction, electrophoresis, PCR and phylogenetic analysis using 16S rDNA genes with actinobacteria-spesific primers) and bio-chemical test (among 5 isolated bacteria from gorgonian showed activity against MRSA). The strain PG-344 was the best candidat that has an inhibition zone against MRSA. The result of sequencing bacteria is 100% closely related with Virgibacillus salarius. This becomes a potential new bioactive compounds to against MRSA that can be a new drug discovery.

  16. Urediospores of rust fungi are ice nucleation active at > -10 °C and harbor ice nucleation active bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Glaux, C.; Samsatly, J.; Asaad, S.; Moukahel, A. R.; Gonçalves, F. L. T.; Bigg, E. K.

    2013-04-01

    Various features of the biology of the rust fungi and of the epidemiology of the plant diseases they cause illustrate the important role of rainfall in their life history. Based on this insight we have characterized the ice nucleation activity (INA) of the aerially disseminated spores (urediospores) of this group of fungi. Urediospores of this obligate plant parasite were collected from natural infections of 7 species of weeds in France, from coffee in Brazil and from field and greenhouse-grown wheat in France, the USA, Turkey and Syria. Immersion freezing was used to determine freezing onset temperatures and the abundance of ice nuclei in suspensions of washed spores. Microbiological analyses of spores from France, the USA and Brazil, and subsequent tests of the ice nucleation activity of the bacteria associated with spores were deployed to quantify the contribution of bacteria to the ice nucleation activity of the spores. All samples of spores were ice nucleation active, having freezing onset temperatures as high as -4 °C. Spores in most of the samples carried cells of ice nucleation-active strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae (at rates of less than 1 bacterial cell per 100 urediospores), but bacterial INA accounted for only a small fraction of the INA observed in spore suspensions. Changes in the INA of spore suspensions after treatment with lysozyme suggest that the INA of urediospores involves a polysaccharide. Based on data from the literature, we have estimated the concentrations of urediospores in air at cloud height and in rainfall. These quantities are very similar to those reported for other biological ice nucleators in these same substrates. However, at cloud level convective activity leads to widely varying concentrations of particles of surface origin, so that mean concentrations can underestimate their possible effects on clouds. We propose that spatial and temporal concentrations of biological ice nucleators active at temperatures > -10

  17. Spatial localization of the first and last enzymes effectively connects active metabolic pathways in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Pablo; Cecchi, Guillermo; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Background Although much is understood about the enzymatic cascades that underlie cellular biosynthesis, comparatively little is known about the rules that determine their cellular organization. We performed a detailed analysis of the localization of E.coli GFP-tagged enzymes for cells growing exponentially. Results We found that out of 857 globular enzymes, at least 219 have a discrete punctuate localization in the cytoplasm and catalyze the first or the last reaction in 60% of biosynthetic ...

  18. A Youth Compendium of Physical Activities: Activity Codes and Metabolic Intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUTTE, NANCY F.; WATSON, KATHLEEN B.; RIDLEY, KATE; ZAKERI, ISSA F.; MCMURRAY, ROBERT G.; PFEIFFER, KARIN A.; CROUTER, SCOTT E.; HERRMANN, STEPHEN D.; BASSETT, DAVID R.; LONG, ALEXANDER; BERHANE, ZEKARIAS; TROST, STEWART G.; AINSWORTH, BARBARA E.; BERRIGAN, DAVID; FULTON, JANET E.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose A Youth Compendium of Physical Activities (Youth Compendium) was developed to estimate the energy costs of physical activities using data on youth only. Methods On the basis of a literature search and pooled data of energy expenditure measurements in youth, the energy costs of 196 activities were compiled in 16 activity categories to form a Youth Compendium of Physical Activities. To estimate the intensity of each activity, measured oxygen consumption (V˙O2) was divided by basal metabolic rate (Schofield age-, sex-, and mass-specific equations) to produce a youth MET (METy). A mixed linear model was developed for each activity category to impute missing values for age ranges with no observations for a specific activity. Results This Youth Compendium consists of METy values for 196 specific activities classified into 16 major categories for four age-groups, 6–9, 10–12, 13–15, and 16–18 yr. METy values in this Youth Compendium were measured (51%) or imputed (49%) from youth data. Conclusion This Youth Compendium of Physical Activities uses pediatric data exclusively, addresses the age dependency of METy, and imputes missing METy values and thus represents advancement in physical activity research and practice. This Youth Compendium will be a valuable resource for stakeholders interested in evaluating interventions, programs, and policies designed to assess and encourage physical activity in youth. PMID:28938248

  19. A Youth Compendium of Physical Activities: Activity Codes and Metabolic Intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butte, Nancy F; Watson, Kathleen B; Ridley, Kate; Zakeri, Issa F; McMurray, Robert G; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Crouter, Scott E; Herrmann, Stephen D; Bassett, David R; Long, Alexander; Berhane, Zekarias; Trost, Stewart G; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Berrigan, David; Fulton, Janet E

    2018-02-01

    A Youth Compendium of Physical Activities (Youth Compendium) was developed to estimate the energy costs of physical activities using data on youth only. On the basis of a literature search and pooled data of energy expenditure measurements in youth, the energy costs of 196 activities were compiled in 16 activity categories to form a Youth Compendium of Physical Activities. To estimate the intensity of each activity, measured oxygen consumption (V˙O2) was divided by basal metabolic rate (Schofield age-, sex-, and mass-specific equations) to produce a youth MET (METy). A mixed linear model was developed for each activity category to impute missing values for age ranges with no observations for a specific activity. This Youth Compendium consists of METy values for 196 specific activities classified into 16 major categories for four age-groups, 6-9, 10-12, 13-15, and 16-18 yr. METy values in this Youth Compendium were measured (51%) or imputed (49%) from youth data. This Youth Compendium of Physical Activities uses pediatric data exclusively, addresses the age dependency of METy, and imputes missing METy values and thus represents advancement in physical activity research and practice. This Youth Compendium will be a valuable resource for stakeholders interested in evaluating interventions, programs, and policies designed to assess and encourage physical activity in youth.

  20. The missing link: Bordetella petrii is endowed with both the metabolic versatility of environmental bacteria and virulence traits of pathogenic Bordetellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneiker-Bekel Susanne

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bordetella petrii is the only environmental species hitherto found among the otherwise host-restricted and pathogenic members of the genus Bordetella. Phylogenetically, it connects the pathogenic Bordetellae and environmental bacteria of the genera Achromobacter and Alcaligenes, which are opportunistic pathogens. B. petrii strains have been isolated from very different environmental niches, including river sediment, polluted soil, marine sponges and a grass root. Recently, clinical isolates associated with bone degenerative disease or cystic fibrosis have also been described. Results In this manuscript we present the results of the analysis of the completely annotated genome sequence of the B. petrii strain DSMZ12804. B. petrii has a mosaic genome of 5,287,950 bp harboring numerous mobile genetic elements, including seven large genomic islands. Four of them are highly related to the clc element of Pseudomonas knackmussii B13, which encodes genes involved in the degradation of aromatics. Though being an environmental isolate, the sequenced B. petrii strain also encodes proteins related to virulence factors of the pathogenic Bordetellae, including the filamentous hemagglutinin, which is a major colonization factor of B. pertussis, and the master virulence regulator BvgAS. However, it lacks all known toxins of the pathogenic Bordetellae. Conclusion The genomic analysis suggests that B. petrii represents an evolutionary link between free-living environmental bacteria and the host-restricted obligate pathogenic Bordetellae. Its remarkable metabolic versatility may enable B. petrii to thrive in very different ecological niches.

  1. Screening for proteolytically active lactic acid bacteria and bioactivity of peptide hydrolysates obtained with selected strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliche, T; Li, B; Bockelmann, W; Habermann, D; Klempt, M; de Vrese, M; Wutkowski, A; Clawin-Raedecker, I; Heller, K J

    2017-10-01

    In a screening for proteolytically active lactic acid bacteria, three strains, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis 92202, Lactobacillus helveticus 92201, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus 92059, showed the highest activities following growth in milk. All three strains degraded α- and β-casein, but did not hydrolyse κ-casein. HPLC analysis of skim milk fermentation revealed increasing amounts of peptides after 5 and 10 h with Lb. d. ssp. bulgaricus 92059. Hydrolysates obtained with Lb. d. ssp. lactis 92202 and Lb. d. ssp. bulgaricus 92059 revealed the highest angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory effect. The effect was dose dependent. Almost no effect (<10%) was seen for Lb. helveticus 92201. For Lb. d. ssp. bulgaricus 92059, maximal inhibition of approx. 65% was reached after 25 h of fermentation. In an in vitro assay measuring potential immunomodulation, hydrolysates of the three strains yielded anti-inflammatory activities in the presence of TNF-α. However, the effects were more pronounced at lower hydrolysate concentrations. In the absence of TNF-α, slight pro-inflammatory effects were observed. The hydrolysate of Lb. d. ssp. bulgaricus 92059, when purified by means of solid-phase extraction, exhibited pro-inflammatory activity. Sour whey containing Lb. d. ssp. bulgaricus 92059 cells showed pro-inflammatory activity while cell-free sour whey was clearly anti-inflammatory. In the purified hydrolysate, 20 different α- and β-casein (CN)-derived peptides could be identified by LC-MS. Most peptides originated from the central and C-terminal regions of β-casein. Peptide length was between 9 (β-CN(f 59-67)) and 22 amino acids (β-CN(f 117-138)).

  2. Antibacterial activity of Artemisia nilagirica leaf extracts against clinical and phytopathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The six organic solvent extracts of Artemisia nilagirica were screened for the potential antimicrobial activity against phytopathogens and clinically important standard reference bacterial strains. Methods The agar disk diffusion method was used to study the antibacterial activity of A. nilagirica extracts against 15 bacterial strains. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the plant extracts were tested using two fold agar dilution method at concentrations ranging from 32 to 512 μg/ml. The phytochemical screening of extracts was carried out for major phytochemical derivatives in A. nilagirica. Results All the extracts showed inhibitory activity for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria except for Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The hexane extract was found to be effective against all phytopathogens with low MIC of 32 μg/ml and the methanol extract exhibited a higher inhibition activity against Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella typhi, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (32 μg/ml), Bacillus subtilis (64 μg/ml) and Shigella flaxneri (128 μg/ml). The phytochemical screening of extracts answered for the major derivative of alkaloids, amino acids, flavonoids, phenol, quinines, tannins and terpenoids. Conclusion All the extracts showed antibacterial activity against the tested strains. Of all, methanol and hexane extracts showed high inhibition against clinical and phytopathogens, respectively. The results also indicate the presence of major phytochemical derivatives in the A. nilagirica extracts. Hence, the isolation and purification of therapeutic potential compounds from A. nilagirica could be used as an effective source against bacterial diseases in human and plants. PMID:20109237

  3. Antibacterial activity of Artemisia nilagirica leaf extracts against clinical and phytopathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopper Waheeta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The six organic solvent extracts of Artemisia nilagirica were screened for the potential antimicrobial activity against phytopathogens and clinically important standard reference bacterial strains. Methods The agar disk diffusion method was used to study the antibacterial activity of A. nilagirica extracts against 15 bacterial strains. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the plant extracts were tested using two fold agar dilution method at concentrations ranging from 32 to 512 μg/ml. The phytochemical screening of extracts was carried out for major phytochemical derivatives in A. nilagirica. Results All the extracts showed inhibitory activity for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria except for Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The hexane extract was found to be effective against all phytopathogens with low MIC of 32 μg/ml and the methanol extract exhibited a higher inhibition activity against Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella typhi, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (32 μg/ml, Bacillus subtilis (64 μg/ml and Shigella flaxneri (128 μg/ml. The phytochemical screening of extracts answered for the major derivative of alkaloids, amino acids, flavonoids, phenol, quinines, tannins and terpenoids. Conclusion All the extracts showed antibacterial activity against the tested strains. Of all, methanol and hexane extracts showed high inhibition against clinical and phytopathogens, respectively. The results also indicate the presence of major phytochemical derivatives in the A. nilagirica extracts. Hence, the isolation and purification of therapeutic potential compounds from A. nilagirica could be used as an effective source against bacterial diseases in human and plants.

  4. Biodegradation of Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine in Solution and Soil by Bacteria Isolated from Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qili Liao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The biodegradation effect and pathway of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH, which is a major rocket propellant with highly toxic properties, with two strains isolated from the acclimated activated sludge were investigated in solution and in soil. The results demonstrated that Stenotrophomonas sp. M12 (M12 was able to degrade UDMH of 50 mg·L−1 as the sole carbon source in aqueous mineral salt medium (MSM, but could not degrade UDMH in soil. Comamonas sp. P4 (P4 barely degraded UDMH of 50 mg·L−1 as the sole carbon source in aqueous MSM, but the degrading capacity of P4 could be improved by the addition of an extra carbon source. Meanwhile, P4 was able to degrade UDMH of 100–600 mg·kg−1 in the soil. The degradation of UDMH in the soil was influenced by organic matter, autochthonous microorganisms, and metal ions. UDMH could inhibit metabolism of M12 and P4, and the inhibition influence was more severe in aqueous MSM than in soil. Oxygen content was important for M12 biodegrading UDMH, and co-metabolism helped P4 to self-detoxify and self-recover. The main intermediates of UDMH were identified by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS qualitative analysis, and the concentrations of UDMH and its important transformation products were determined in solution and soil. According to the determination results, the synchronous degradation theory was proposed, and the degradation pathway was discussed.

  5. Sulfate reducing bacteria and their activities in oil sands process-affected water biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong; Yu, Tong, E-mail: tong.yu@ualberta.ca; Liu, Yang, E-mail: yang.liu@ualberta.ca

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm reactors were constructed to grow stratified multispecies biofilm in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) supplemented with growth medium. The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within the biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated. The community structure and potential activity of SRB in the biofilm were investigated with H{sub 2}S microsensor measurements, dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the stratified biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. The study expands current knowledge of biofilm treatment of OSPW and the function of anaerobic SRB in OSPW biofilm, and thus provides information for future bioreactor development in the reclamation of OSPW. - Graphical abstract: The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within Oil Sands Process-affected Water (OSPW) biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated by Liu and coworkers. Combined microsensor and molecular biology techniques were utilized in this study. Their results demonstrated that multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. - Highlights: • Biofilm in oil sands wastewater was developed on engineered biocarriers. • Bacterial community and in situ activity of SRB were studied in the

  6. Review of metabolic pathways activated in cancer cells as determined through isotopic labeling and network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wentao; Keibler, Mark A; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2017-09-01

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an indispensable part of contemporary cancer research. During the past 10 years, the use of stable isotopic tracers and network analysis have unveiled a number of metabolic pathways activated in cancer cells. Here, we review such pathways along with the particular tracers and labeling observations that led to the discovery of their rewiring in cancer cells. The list of such pathways comprises the reductive metabolism of glutamine, altered glycolysis, serine and glycine metabolism, mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) induced reprogramming and the onset of acetate metabolism. Additionally, we demonstrate the critical role of isotopic labeling and network analysis in identifying these pathways. The alterations described in this review do not constitute a complete list, and future research using these powerful tools is likely to discover other cancer-related pathways and new metabolic targets for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo Kyung; Larson, Janet L

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has been reported to be 20% to 50% in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because such people are sedentary and physically inactive, they are at risk of metabolic syndrome. The extent of this problem, however, is not fully understood. This study examined the relationship of sedentary time and physical activity to metabolic syndrome and the components of metabolic syndrome in a population-based sample of people with COPD. This was a secondary analysis of existing cross-sectional data. Subjects with COPD (n = 223) were drawn from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data set (2003-2006). Physical activity was measured by accelerometry. Waist circumference, triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, blood pressure, and fasting glucose level were used to describe metabolic syndrome. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for analysis. Fifty-five percent of the sample had metabolic syndrome. No significant differences in sedentary time and level of physical activity were found in people with COPD and metabolic syndrome and people with COPD only. However, those with a mean activity count of greater than 240 counts per minute had a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Waist circumference and glucose level were significantly associated with the time spent in sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous physical activity. Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in people with COPD, and greater physical activity and less sedentary time are associated with lower rates of metabolic syndrome. This suggests that interventions to decrease the risk of metabolic syndrome in people with COPD should include both reducing sedentary time and increasing the time and intensity of physical activity.

  8. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Associated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome among People in Rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing; Shen, Chong; Chu, Min J; Gao, Yue X; Xu, Guang F; Huang, Jian P; Xu, Qiong Q; Cai, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is prevalent worldwide and its prevalen