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Sample records for metabolic flux distribution

  1. Prediction of metabolic flux distribution from gene expression data based on the flux minimization principle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Seob Song

    Full Text Available Prediction of possible flux distributions in a metabolic network provides detailed phenotypic information that links metabolism to cellular physiology. To estimate metabolic steady-state fluxes, the most common approach is to solve a set of macroscopic mass balance equations subjected to stoichiometric constraints while attempting to optimize an assumed optimal objective function. This assumption is justifiable in specific cases but may be invalid when tested across different conditions, cell populations, or other organisms. With an aim to providing a more consistent and reliable prediction of flux distributions over a wide range of conditions, in this article we propose a framework that uses the flux minimization principle to predict active metabolic pathways from mRNA expression data. The proposed algorithm minimizes a weighted sum of flux magnitudes, while biomass production can be bounded to fit an ample range from very low to very high values according to the analyzed context. We have formulated the flux weights as a function of the corresponding enzyme reaction's gene expression value, enabling the creation of context-specific fluxes based on a generic metabolic network. In case studies of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and wild-type and mutant Escherichia coli strains, our method achieved high prediction accuracy, as gauged by correlation coefficients and sums of squared error, with respect to the experimentally measured values. In contrast to other approaches, our method was able to provide quantitative predictions for both model organisms under a variety of conditions. Our approach requires no prior knowledge or assumption of a context-specific metabolic functionality and does not require trial-and-error parameter adjustments. Thus, our framework is of general applicability for modeling the transcription-dependent metabolism of bacteria and yeasts.

  2. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  3. A Novel Methodology to Estimate Metabolic Flux Distributions in Constraint-Based Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Alessandro Massucci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Quite generally, constraint-based metabolic flux analysis describes the space of viable flux configurations for a metabolic network as a high-dimensional polytope defined by the linear constraints that enforce the balancing of production and consumption fluxes for each chemical species in the system. In some cases, the complexity of the solution space can be reduced by performing an additional optimization, while in other cases, knowing the range of variability of fluxes over the polytope provides a sufficient characterization of the allowed configurations. There are cases, however, in which the thorough information encoded in the individual distributions of viable fluxes over the polytope is required. Obtaining such distributions is known to be a highly challenging computational task when the dimensionality of the polytope is sufficiently large, and the problem of developing cost-effective ad hoc algorithms has recently seen a major surge of interest. Here, we propose a method that allows us to perform the required computation heuristically in a time scaling linearly with the number of reactions in the network, overcoming some limitations of similar techniques employed in recent years. As a case study, we apply it to the analysis of the human red blood cell metabolic network, whose solution space can be sampled by different exact techniques, like Hit-and-Run Monte Carlo (scaling roughly like the third power of the system size. Remarkably accurate estimates for the true distributions of viable reaction fluxes are obtained, suggesting that, although further improvements are desirable, our method enhances our ability to analyze the space of allowed configurations for large biochemical reaction networks.

  4. Prediction of Metabolic Flux Distribution from Gene Expression Data Based on the Flux Minimization Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-14

    biomass production. Although maximization of biomass produc- tion as used in E-Flux and FBA has been exploited to great advantage in many simulations and...due to appreciable production of fermentation products, particularly ethanol [37]. The experimentally obtained biomass yields by Lee et al. were 0.020...be larger than a certain level (e.g., 90% in our simulations ) of the theoretical maximal. Features of the E-Fmin Algorithm The main distinguishing

  5. Flux networks in metabolic graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, P B; Queiros, S M Duarte; Jones, J L

    2009-01-01

    A metabolic model can be represented as a bipartite graph comprising linked reaction and metabolite nodes. Here it is shown how a network of conserved fluxes can be assigned to the edges of such a graph by combining the reaction fluxes with a conserved metabolite property such as molecular weight. A similar flux network can be constructed by combining the primal and dual solutions to the linear programming problem that typically arises in constraint-based modelling. Such constructions may help with the visualization of flux distributions in complex metabolic networks. The analysis also explains the strong correlation observed between metabolite shadow prices (the dual linear programming variables) and conserved metabolite properties. The methods were applied to recent metabolic models for Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Methanosarcina barkeri. Detailed results are reported for E. coli; similar results were found for other organisms

  6. MID Max: LC–MS/MS Method for Measuring the Precursor and Product Mass Isotopomer Distributions of Metabolic Intermediates and Cofactors for Metabolic Flux Analysis Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCloskey, Douglas; Young, Jamey D.; Xu, Sibei

    2016-01-01

    The analytical challenges to acquire accurate isotopic data of intracellular metabolic intermediates for stationary, nonstationary, and dynamic metabolic flux analysis (MFA) are numerous. This work presents MID Max, a novel LC–MS/MS workflow, acquisition, and isotopomer deconvolution method for MFA...... that takes advantage of additional scan types that maximizes the number of mass isotopomer distributions (MIDs) that can be acquired in a given experiment. The analytical method was found to measure the MIDs of 97 metabolites, corresponding to 74 unique metabolite-fragment pairs (32 precursor spectra and 42...

  7. Uncertainty quantification in flux balance analysis of spatially lumped and distributed models of neuron-astrocyte metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvetti, Daniela; Cheng, Yougan; Somersalo, Erkki

    2016-12-01

    Identifying feasible steady state solutions of a brain energy metabolism model is an inverse problem that allows infinitely many solutions. The characterization of the non-uniqueness, or the uncertainty quantification of the flux balance analysis, is tantamount to identifying the degrees of freedom of the solution. The degrees of freedom of multi-compartment mathematical models for energy metabolism of a neuron-astrocyte complex may offer a key to understand the different ways in which the energetic needs of the brain are met. In this paper we study the uncertainty in the solution, using techniques of linear algebra to identify the degrees of freedom in a lumped model, and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods in its extension to a spatially distributed case. The interpretation of the degrees of freedom in metabolic terms, more specifically, glucose and oxygen partitioning, is then leveraged to derive constraints on the free parameters to guarantee that the model is energetically feasible. We demonstrate how the model can be used to estimate the stoichiometric energy needs of the cells as well as the household energy based on the measured oxidative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose and glutamate cycling. Moreover, our analysis shows that in the lumped model the net direction of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the cells can be deduced from the glucose partitioning between the compartments. The extension of the lumped model to a spatially distributed multi-compartment setting that includes diffusion fluxes from capillary to tissue increases the number of degrees of freedom, requiring the use of statistical sampling techniques. The analysis of the distributed model reveals that some of the conclusions valid for the spatially lumped model, e.g., concerning the LDH activity and glucose partitioning, may no longer hold.

  8. Carbon-flux distribution within Streptomyces coelicolor metabolism: a comparison between the actinorhodin-producing strain M145 and its non-producing derivative M1146.

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    Fabien Coze

    Full Text Available Metabolic Flux Analysis is now viewed as essential to elucidate the metabolic pattern of cells and to design appropriate genetic engineering strategies to improve strain performance and production processes. Here, we investigated carbon flux distribution in two Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2 strains: the wild type M145 and its derivative mutant M1146, in which gene clusters encoding the four main antibiotic biosynthetic pathways were deleted. Metabolic Flux Analysis and (13C-labeling allowed us to reconstruct a flux map under steady-state conditions for both strains. The mutant strain M1146 showed a higher growth rate, a higher flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and a higher flux through the anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. In that strain, glucose uptake and the flux through the Krebs cycle were lower than in M145. The enhanced flux through the pentose phosphate pathway in M1146 is thought to generate NADPH enough to face higher needs for biomass biosynthesis and other processes. In both strains, the production of NADPH was higher than NADPH needs, suggesting a key role for nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase for redox homeostasis. ATP production is also likely to exceed metabolic ATP needs, indicating that ATP consumption for maintenance is substantial.Our results further suggest a possible competition between actinorhodin and triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathways for their common precursor, acetyl-CoA. These findings may be instrumental in developing new strategies exploiting S. coelicolor as a platform for the production of bio-based products of industrial interest.

  9. Metabolic Flux Distribution during Defatting of Steatotic Human Hepatoma (HepG2 Cells

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    Gabriel Yarmush

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods that rapidly decrease fat in steatotic hepatocytes may be helpful to recover severely fatty livers for transplantation. Defatting kinetics are highly dependent upon the extracellular medium composition; however, the pathways involved are poorly understood. Steatosis was induced in human hepatoma cells (HepG2 by exposure to high levels of free fatty acids, followed by defatting using plain medium containing no fatty acids, or medium supplemented with a cocktail of defatting agents previously described before. We measured the levels of 28 extracellular metabolites and intracellular triglyceride, and fed the data into a steady-state mass balance model to estimate strictly intracellular fluxes. We found that during defatting, triglyceride content decreased, while beta-oxidation, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the urea cycle increased. These fluxes were augmented by defatting agents, and even more so by hyperoxic conditions. In all defatting conditions, the rate of extracellular glucose uptake/release was very small compared to the internal supply from glycogenolysis, and glycolysis remained highly active. Thus, in steatotic HepG2 cells, glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation may co-exist. Together, these pathways generate reducing equivalents that are supplied to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

  10. Metabolic pathway analysis of Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis: effect of oxygen availability on ethanol synthesis and flux distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrean, Pornkamol; Nguyen, Nhung H A

    2012-06-01

    Elementary mode analysis (EMA) identifies all possible metabolic states of the cell metabolic network. Investigation of these states can provide a detailed insight into the underlying metabolism in the cell. In this study, the flux states of Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis metabolism were examined. It was shown that increasing oxygen levels led to a decrease of ethanol synthesis. This trend was confirmed by experimental evaluation of S. stipitis in glucose-xylose fermentation. The oxygen transfer rate for an optimal ethanol production was 1.8 mmol/l/h, which gave the ethanol yield of 0.40 g/g and the ethanol productivity of 0.25 g/l/h. For a better understanding of the cell's regulatory mechanism in response to oxygenation levels, EMA was used to examine metabolic flux patterns under different oxygen levels. Up- and downregulation of enzymes in the network during the change of culturing condition from oxygen limitation to oxygen sufficiency were identified. The results indicated the flexibility of S. stipitis metabolism to cope with oxygen availability. In addition, relevant genetic targets towards improved ethanol-producing strains under all oxygenation levels were identified. These targeted genes limited the metabolic functionality of the cell to function according to the most efficient ethanol synthesis pathways. The presented approach is promising and can contribute to the development of culture optimization and strain engineers for improved lignocellulosic ethanol production by S. stipitis.

  11. Metabolic flux distributions in Corynebacterium glutamicum during growth and lysine overproduction. Reprinted from Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Vol. 41, Pp 633-646 (1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallino, J J; Stephanopoulos, G

    2000-03-20

    The two main contributions of this article are the solidification of Corynebacterium glutamicum biochemistry guided by bioreaction network analysis, and the determination of basal metabolic flux distributions during growth and lysine synthesis. Employed methodology makes use of stoichiometrically based mass balances to determine flux distributions in the C. glutamicum metabolic network. Presented are a brief description of the methodology, a thorough literature review of glutamic acid bacteria biochemistry, and specific results obtained through a combination of fermentation studies and analysis-directed intracellular assays. The latter include the findings of the lack of activity of glyoxylate shunt, and that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) is the only anaplerotic reaction expressed in C. glutamicum cultivated on glucose minimal media. Network simplifications afforded by the above findings facilitated the determination of metabolic flux distributions under a variety of culture conditions and led to the following conclusions. Both the pentose phosphate pathway and PPC support significant fluxes during growth and lysine overproduction, and that flux partitioning at the glucosa-6-phosphate branch point does not appear to limit lysine synthesis. Copyright 1993 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Revealing differences in metabolic flux distributions between a mutant strain and its parent strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955.

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    Cheng Zhong

    Full Text Available A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955 using DEC (diethyl sulfate and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0% compared with parent strain (17.0%. It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53-6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain.

  13. Oxygen-enriched fermentation of sodium gluconate by Aspergillus niger and its impact on intracellular metabolic flux distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuting; Tian, Xiwei; Zhao, Wei; Hang, Haifeng; Chu, Ju

    2018-01-01

    Different concentrations of oxygen-enriched air were utilized for sodium gluconate (SG) fermentation by Aspergillus niger. The fermentation time shortened from 20 to 15.5 h due to the increase of volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K L a) and the formation of more dispersed mycelia when inlet oxygen concentration ascended from 21 to 32%. According to metabolic flux analysis, during the growth phase, extracellular glucose for SG synthesis accounted for 79.0 and 85.3% with air and oxygen-enriched air (25%), respectively, whereas the proportions were 89.4 and 93.0% in the stationary phase. Intracellular glucose consumption decreased in oxygen-enriched fermentation, as cell respiration was more high-efficiently performed. Metabolic profiling indicated that most intermediates in TCA cycle and EMP pathway had smaller pool sizes in oxygen-enriched fermentations. Moreover, the main by-product of citric acid dramatically decreased from 1.36 to 0.34 g L -1 in oxygen-enriched fermentation. And the sodium gluconate yield increased from 0.856 to 0.903 mol mol -1 .

  14. Primary Metabolic Pathways and Metabolic Flux Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter introduces the metabolic flux analysis (MFA) or stoichiometry-based MFA, and describes the quantitative basis for MFA. It discusses the catabolic pathways in which free energy is produced to drive the cell-building anabolic pathways. An overview of these primary pathways provides...... the reader who is primarily trained in the engineering sciences with atleast a preliminary introduction to biochemistry and also shows how carbon is drained off the catabolic pathways to provide precursors for cell mass building and sometimes for important industrial products. The primary pathways...... to be examined in the following are: glycolysis, primarily by the EMP pathway, but other glycolytic pathways is also mentioned; fermentative pathways in which the redox generated in the glycolytic reactions are consumed; reactions in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which produce biomass precursors and redox...

  15. OpenFLUX: efficient modelling software for 13C-based metabolic flux analysis

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    Nielsen Lars K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quantitative analysis of metabolic fluxes, i.e., in vivo activities of intracellular enzymes and pathways, provides key information on biological systems in systems biology and metabolic engineering. It is based on a comprehensive approach combining (i tracer cultivation on 13C substrates, (ii 13C labelling analysis by mass spectrometry and (iii mathematical modelling for experimental design, data processing, flux calculation and statistics. Whereas the cultivation and the analytical part is fairly advanced, a lack of appropriate modelling software solutions for all modelling aspects in flux studies is limiting the application of metabolic flux analysis. Results We have developed OpenFLUX as a user friendly, yet flexible software application for small and large scale 13C metabolic flux analysis. The application is based on the new Elementary Metabolite Unit (EMU framework, significantly enhancing computation speed for flux calculation. From simple notation of metabolic reaction networks defined in a spreadsheet, the OpenFLUX parser automatically generates MATLAB-readable metabolite and isotopomer balances, thus strongly facilitating model creation. The model can be used to perform experimental design, parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis either using the built-in gradient-based search or Monte Carlo algorithms or in user-defined algorithms. Exemplified for a microbial flux study with 71 reactions, 8 free flux parameters and mass isotopomer distribution of 10 metabolites, OpenFLUX allowed to automatically compile the EMU-based model from an Excel file containing metabolic reactions and carbon transfer mechanisms, showing it's user-friendliness. It reliably reproduced the published data and optimum flux distributions for the network under study were found quickly ( Conclusion We have developed a fast, accurate application to perform steady-state 13C metabolic flux analysis. OpenFLUX will strongly facilitate and

  16. FluxVisualizer, a Software to Visualize Fluxes through Metabolic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Daniel Rose

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available FluxVisualizer (Version 1.0, 2017, freely available at https://fluxvisualizer.ibgc.cnrs.fr is a software to visualize fluxes values on a scalable vector graphic (SVG representation of a metabolic network by colouring or increasing the width of reaction arrows of the SVG file. FluxVisualizer does not aim to draw metabolic networks but to use a customer’s SVG file allowing him to exploit his representation standards with a minimum of constraints. FluxVisualizer is especially suitable for small to medium size metabolic networks, where a visual representation of the fluxes makes sense. The flux distribution can either be an elementary flux mode (EFM, a flux balance analysis (FBA result or any other flux distribution. It allows the automatic visualization of a series of pathways of the same network as is needed for a set of EFMs. The software is coded in python3 and provides a graphical user interface (GUI and an application programming interface (API. All functionalities of the program can be used from the API and the GUI and allows advanced users to add their own functionalities. The software is able to work with various formats of flux distributions (Metatool, CellNetAnalyzer, COPASI and FAME export files as well as with Excel files. This simple software can save a lot of time when evaluating fluxes simulations on a metabolic network.

  17. Using bioconductor package BiGGR for metabolic flux estimation based on gene expression changes in brain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gavai, Anand K.; Supandi, Farahaniza; Hettling, Hannes; Murell, Paul; Leunissen, Jack A.M.; van Beek, Johannes H.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the distribution of metabolic fluxes in biochemical networks is of major interest in systems biology. Several databases provide metabolic reconstructions for different organisms. Software to analyze flux distributions exists, among others for the proprietary MATLAB environment. Given the

  18. Using bioconductor package BiGGR for metabolic flux estimation based on gene expression changes in brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gavai, A.K.; Supandi, F.; Hettling, H.; Murrell, P.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Beek, van J.H.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the distribution of metabolic fluxes in biochemical networks is of major interest in systems biology. Several databases provide metabolic reconstructions for different organisms. Software to analyze flux distributions exists, among others for the proprietary MATLAB environment. Given the

  19. MetaFluxNet: the management of metabolic reaction information and quantitative metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Yup; Yun, Hongsoek; Park, Sunwon; Lee, Sang Yup

    2003-11-01

    MetaFluxNet is a program package for managing information on the metabolic reaction network and for quantitatively analyzing metabolic fluxes in an interactive and customized way. It allows users to interpret and examine metabolic behavior in response to genetic and/or environmental modifications. As a result, quantitative in silico simulations of metabolic pathways can be carried out to understand the metabolic status and to design the metabolic engineering strategies. The main features of the program include a well-developed model construction environment, user-friendly interface for metabolic flux analysis (MFA), comparative MFA of strains having different genotypes under various environmental conditions, and automated pathway layout creation. http://mbel.kaist.ac.kr/ A manual for MetaFluxNet is available as PDF file.

  20. From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Steffen; Gerstl, Matthias P.; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Müller, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks. PMID:28406903

  1. PFA toolbox: a MATLAB tool for Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Yeimy; Bosque, Gabriel; Vehí, Josep; Picó, Jesús; Llaneras, Francisco

    2016-07-11

    Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA) is a methodology that has been successfully applied to estimate metabolic fluxes in living cells. However, traditional frameworks based on this approach have some limitations, particularly when measurements are scarce and imprecise. This is very common in industrial environments. The PFA Toolbox can be used to face those scenarios. Here we present the PFA (Possibilistic Flux Analysis) Toolbox for MATLAB, which simplifies the use of Interval and Possibilistic Metabolic Flux Analysis. The main features of the PFA Toolbox are the following: (a) It provides reliable MFA estimations in scenarios where only a few fluxes can be measured or those available are imprecise. (b) It provides tools to easily plot the results as interval estimates or flux distributions. (c) It is composed of simple functions that MATLAB users can apply in flexible ways. (d) It includes a Graphical User Interface (GUI), which provides a visual representation of the measurements and their uncertainty. (e) It can use stoichiometric models in COBRA format. In addition, the PFA Toolbox includes a User's Guide with a thorough description of its functions and several examples. The PFA Toolbox for MATLAB is a freely available Toolbox that is able to perform Interval and Possibilistic MFA estimations.

  2. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  3. EL-2 reactor: Thermal neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, A.; Genthon, J.P.

    1958-01-01

    The flux distribution of thermal neutrons in EL-2 reactor is studied. The reactor core and lattices are described as well as the experimental reactor facilities, in particular, the experimental channels and special facilities. The measurement shows that the thermal neutron flux increases in the central channel when enriched uranium is used in place of natural uranium. However the thermal neutron flux is not perturbed in the other reactor channels by the fuel modification. The macroscopic flux distribution is measured according the radial positioning of fuel rods. The longitudinal neutron flux distribution in a fuel rod is also measured and shows no difference between enriched and natural uranium fuel rods. In addition, measurements of the flux distribution have been effectuated for rods containing other material as steel or aluminium. The neutron flux distribution is also studied in all the experimental channels as well as in the thermal column. The determination of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in all experimental facilities, the thermal column and the fuel channels has been made with a heavy water level of 1825 mm and is given for an operating power of 1000 kW. (M.P.)

  4. Metabolic-flux dependent regulation of microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsios, Athanasios; Ortega, Álvaro D; Wit, Ernst C; Heinemann, Matthias

    2018-04-01

    According to the most prevalent notion, changes in cellular physiology primarily occur in response to altered environmental conditions. Yet, recent studies have shown that changes in metabolic fluxes can also trigger phenotypic changes even when environmental conditions are unchanged. This suggests that cells have mechanisms in place to assess the magnitude of metabolic fluxes, that is, the rate of metabolic reactions, and use this information to regulate their physiology. In this review, we describe recent evidence for metabolic flux-sensing and flux-dependent regulation. Furthermore, we discuss how such sensing and regulation can be mechanistically achieved and present a set of new candidates for flux-signaling metabolites. Similar to metabolic-flux sensing, we argue that cells can also sense protein translation flux. Finally, we elaborate on the advantages that flux-based regulation can confer to cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation of flux through metabolic cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, K.

    1984-01-01

    The branchpoint of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate shunt was characterized in the intact organism by a multidimensional approach. Theory and methodology were developed to determine velocities for the net flow of carbon through the major steps of acetate metabolism in E. coli. Rates were assigned based on the 13 C-NMR spectrum of intracellular glutamate, measured rates of substrate incorporation into end products, the constituent composition of E. coli and a series of conservation equations which described the system at steady state. The in vivo fluxes through the branchpoint of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate cycles were compared to rates calculated from the kinetic constants of the branchpoint enzymes and the intracellular concentrations of their substrates. These studies elucidated the role of isocitrate dehydrogenase phosphorylation in the Krebs cycle and led to the development of a generalized mathematical description of the sensitivity of branchpoints to regulatory control. This theoretical analysis was termed the branchpoint effect and it describes conditions which result in large changes in the flux through an enzyme even though that enzyme is not subject to direct regulatory control. The theoretical and experimental characterization of this system provided a framework to study the effects of enzyme overproduction and underproduction on metabolic processes in the cell. An in vivo method was developed to determine the extent to which an enzyme catalyzes a rate-controlling reaction. The enzyme chosen for this study was citrate synthase

  6. Estimating biological elementary flux modes that decompose a flux distribution by the minimal branching property

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2014-01-01

    biologically feasible EFMs by considering their graphical properties. A previous study on the transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes found that distinct branches at a branch point metabolite usually belong to distinct metabolic pathways. This suggests an intuitive property of biologically feasible EFMs......, i.e. minimal branching. RESULTS: We developed the concept of minimal branching EFM and derived the minimal branching decomposition (MBD) to decompose flux distributions. Testing in the core Escherichia coli metabolic network indicated that MBD can distinguish branches at branch points and greatly...... knowledge, which facilitates interpretation. Comparison of the methods applied to a complex flux distribution in Lactococcus lactis similarly showed the advantages of MBD. The minimal branching EFM concept underlying MBD should be useful in other applications....

  7. Metabolic fuels: regulating fluxes to select mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-15

    Animals must regulate the fluxes of multiple fuels to support changing metabolic rates that result from variation in physiological circumstances. The aim of fuel selection strategies is to exploit the advantages of individual substrates while minimizing the impact of disadvantages. All exercising mammals share a general pattern of fuel selection: at the same %V(O(2,max)) they oxidize the same ratio of lipids to carbohydrates. However, highly aerobic species rely more on intramuscular fuels because energy supply from the circulation is constrained by trans-sarcolemmal transfer. Fuel selection is performed by recruiting different muscles, different fibers within the same muscles or different pathways within the same fibers. Electromyographic analyses show that shivering humans can modulate carbohydrate oxidation either through the selective recruitment of type II fibers within the same muscles or by regulating pathway recruitment within type I fibers. The selection patterns of shivering and exercise are different: at the same %V(O(2,max)), a muscle producing only heat (shivering) or significant movement (exercise) strikes a different balance between lipid and carbohydrate oxidation. Long-distance migrants provide an excellent model to characterize how to increase maximal substrate fluxes. High lipid fluxes are achieved through the coordinated upregulation of mobilization, transport and oxidation by activating enzymes, lipid-solubilizing proteins and membrane transporters. These endurance athletes support record lipolytic rates in adipocytes, use lipoprotein shuttles to accelerate transport and show increased capacity for lipid oxidation in muscle mitochondria. Some migrant birds use dietary omega-3 fatty acids as performance-enhancing agents to boost their ability to process lipids. These dietary fatty acids become incorporated in membrane phospholipids and bind to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors to activate membrane proteins and modify gene expression.

  8. Neutron flux distribution forecasting device of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi

    1991-01-01

    A neutron flux distribution is forecast by using current data obtained from a reactor. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux monitor disposed in various positions in the reactor, (2) a forecasting means for calculating and forecasting a one-dimensional neutron flux distribution relative to imaginable events by using data obtained from the neutron flux monitor and physical models, and (3) a display means for displaying the results forecast in the forecasting means to a reactor operation console. Since the forecast values for the one-dimensional neutron flux distribution relative to the imaginable events are calculated in the device of the present invention by using data obtained from the neutron flux monitor and the physical models, the data as a base of the calculation are new and the period for calculating the forecast values can be shortened. Accordingly, although there is a worry of providing some errors in the forecast values, they can be utilized sufficiently as reference data. As a result, the reactor can be operated more appropriately. (I.N.)

  9. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, John; Schwender, Jörg; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Morgan, John A

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (13)CO(2) dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  10. Compartmentation of glycogen metabolism revealed from 13C isotopologue distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin de Mas Igor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stable isotope tracers are used to assess metabolic flux profiles in living cells. The existing methods of measurement average out the isotopic isomer distribution in metabolites throughout the cell, whereas the knowledge of compartmental organization of analyzed pathways is crucial for the evaluation of true fluxes. That is why we accepted a challenge to create a software tool that allows deciphering the compartmentation of metabolites based on the analysis of average isotopic isomer distribution. Results The software Isodyn, which simulates the dynamics of isotopic isomer distribution in central metabolic pathways, was supplemented by algorithms facilitating the transition between various analyzed metabolic schemes, and by the tools for model discrimination. It simulated 13C isotope distributions in glucose, lactate, glutamate and glycogen, measured by mass spectrometry after incubation of hepatocytes in the presence of only labeled glucose or glucose and lactate together (with label either in glucose or lactate. The simulations assumed either a single intracellular hexose phosphate pool, or also channeling of hexose phosphates resulting in a different isotopic composition of glycogen. Model discrimination test was applied to check the consistency of both models with experimental data. Metabolic flux profiles, evaluated with the accepted model that assumes channeling, revealed the range of changes in metabolic fluxes in liver cells. Conclusions The analysis of compartmentation of metabolic networks based on the measured 13C distribution was included in Isodyn as a routine procedure. The advantage of this implementation is that, being a part of evaluation of metabolic fluxes, it does not require additional experiments to study metabolic compartmentation. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the distribution of measured 13C-labeled glucose metabolites is inconsistent with the idea of perfect mixing of hexose

  11. Metabolic flux analysis of heterotrophic growth in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanette R Boyle

    Full Text Available Despite the wealth of knowledge available for C. reinhardtii, the central metabolic fluxes of growth on acetate have not yet been determined. In this study, 13C-metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA was used to determine and quantify the metabolic pathways of primary metabolism in C. reinhardtii cells grown under heterotrophic conditions with acetate as the sole carbon source. Isotopic labeling patterns of compartment specific biomass derived metabolites were used to calculate the fluxes. It was found that acetate is ligated with coenzyme A in the three subcellular compartments (cytosol, mitochondria and plastid included in the model. Two citrate synthases were found to potentially be involved in acetyl-coA metabolism; one localized in the mitochondria and the other acting outside the mitochondria. Labeling patterns demonstrate that Acetyl-coA synthesized in the plastid is directly incorporated in synthesis of fatty acids. Despite having a complete TCA cycle in the mitochondria, it was also found that a majority of the malate flux is shuttled to the cytosol and plastid where it is converted to oxaloacetate providing reducing equivalents to these compartments. When compared to predictions by flux balance analysis, fluxes measured with 13C-MFA were found to be suboptimal with respect to biomass yield; C. reinhardtii sacrifices biomass yield to produce ATP and reducing equivalents.

  12. FluxPyt: a Python-based free and open-source software for 13C-metabolic flux analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Trunil S; Srivastava, Shireesh

    2018-01-01

    13 C-Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is a powerful approach to estimate intracellular reaction rates which could be used in strain analysis and design. Processing and analysis of labeling data for calculation of fluxes and associated statistics is an essential part of MFA. However, various software currently available for data analysis employ proprietary platforms and thus limit accessibility. We developed FluxPyt, a Python-based truly open-source software package for conducting stationary 13 C-MFA data analysis. The software is based on the efficient elementary metabolite unit framework. The standard deviations in the calculated fluxes are estimated using the Monte-Carlo analysis. FluxPyt also automatically creates flux maps based on a template for visualization of the MFA results. The flux distributions calculated by FluxPyt for two separate models: a small tricarboxylic acid cycle model and a larger Corynebacterium glutamicum model, were found to be in good agreement with those calculated by a previously published software. FluxPyt was tested in Microsoft™ Windows 7 and 10, as well as in Linux Mint 18.2. The availability of a free and open 13 C-MFA software that works in various operating systems will enable more researchers to perform 13 C-MFA and to further modify and develop the package.

  13. Non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörl, Manuel; Schnidder, Julian; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) has become a key method for metabolic engineering and systems biology. In the most common methodology, fluxes are calculated by global isotopomer balancing and iterative fitting to stationary (13)C-labeling data. This approach requires a closed carbon balance, long-lasting metabolic steady state, and the detection of (13)C-patterns in a large number of metabolites. These restrictions mostly reduced the application of (13)C-MFA to the central carbon metabolism of well-studied model organisms grown in minimal media with a single carbon source. Here we introduce non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis as a novel method for (13)C-MFA to allow estimating local, relative fluxes from ultra-short (13)C-labeling experiments and without the need for global isotopomer balancing. The approach relies on the acquisition of non-stationary (13)C-labeling data exclusively for metabolites in the proximity of a node of converging fluxes and a local parameter estimation with a system of ordinary differential equations. We developed a generalized workflow that takes into account reaction types and the availability of mass spectrometric data on molecular ions or fragments for data processing, modeling, parameter and error estimation. We demonstrated the approach by analyzing three key nodes of converging fluxes in central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis. We obtained flux estimates that are in agreement with published results obtained from steady state experiments, but reduced the duration of the necessary (13)C-labeling experiment to less than a minute. These results show that our strategy enables to formally estimate relative pathway fluxes on extremely short time scale, neglecting cellular carbon balancing. Hence this approach paves the road to targeted (13)C-MFA in dynamic systems with multiple carbon sources and towards rich media. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism. PMID:27197218

  15. Effect of amino acid supplementation on titer and glycosylation distribution in hybridoma cell cultures-Systems biology-based interpretation using genome-scale metabolic flux balance model and multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimonn, Thomas M; Park, Seo-Young; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Brorson, Kurt A; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2016-09-01

    Genome-scale flux balance analysis (FBA) is a powerful systems biology tool to characterize intracellular reaction fluxes during cell cultures. FBA estimates intracellular reaction rates by optimizing an objective function, subject to the constraints of a metabolic model and media uptake/excretion rates. A dynamic extension to FBA, dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA), can calculate intracellular reaction fluxes as they change during cell cultures. In a previous study by Read et al. (2013), a series of informed amino acid supplementation experiments were performed on twelve parallel murine hybridoma cell cultures, and this data was leveraged for further analysis (Read et al., Biotechnol Prog. 2013;29:745-753). In order to understand the effects of media changes on the model murine hybridoma cell line, a systems biology approach is applied in the current study. Dynamic flux balance analysis was performed using a genome-scale mouse metabolic model, and multivariate data analysis was used for interpretation. The calculated reaction fluxes were examined using partial least squares and partial least squares discriminant analysis. The results indicate media supplementation increases product yield because it raises nutrient levels extending the growth phase, and the increased cell density allows for greater culture performance. At the same time, the directed supplementation does not change the overall metabolism of the cells. This supports the conclusion that product quality, as measured by glycoform assays, remains unchanged because the metabolism remains in a similar state. Additionally, the DFBA shows that metabolic state varies more at the beginning of the culture but less by the middle of the growth phase, possibly due to stress on the cells during inoculation. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1163-1173, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Metabolite-balancing techniques vs. 13C tracer experiments to determine metabolic fluxes in hybridoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonarius, H P; Timmerarends, B; de Gooijer, C D; Tramper, J

    The estimation of intracellular fluxes of mammalian cells using only mass balances of the relevant metabolites is not possible because the set of linear equations defined by these mass balances is underdetermined. In order to quantify fluxes in cyclic pathways the mass balance equations can be complemented with several constraints: (1) the mass balances of co-metabolites, such as ATP or NAD(P)H, (2) linear objective functions, (3) flux data obtained by isotopic-tracer experiments. Here, these three methods are compared for the analysis of fluxes in the primary metabolism of continuously cultured hybridoma cells. The significance of different theoretical constraints and different objective functions is discussed after comparing their resulting flux distributions to the fluxes determined using 13CO2 and 13C-lactate measurements of 1 - 13C-glucose-fed hybridoma cells. Metabolic fluxes estimated using the objective functions "maximize ATP" and "maximize NADH" are relatively similar to the experimentally determined fluxes. This is consistent with the observation that cancer cells, such as hybridomas, are metabolically hyperactive, and produce ATP and NADH regardless of the need for these cofactors. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Synergy between 13C-metabolic flux analysis and flux balance analysis for understanding metabolic adaption to anaerobiosis in e. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome-based Flux Balance Analysis (FBA, constraints based flux analysis) and steady state isotopic-labeling-based Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA) are complimentary approaches to predicting and measuring the operation and regulation of metabolic networks. Here a genome-derived model of E. coli metabol...

  18. Expanded flux variability analysis on metabolic network of Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Tong; XIE ZhengWei; OUYANG Qi

    2009-01-01

    Flux balance analysis,based on the mass conservation law in a cellular organism,has been extensively employed to study the interplay between structures and functions of cellular metabolic networks.Consequently,the phenotypes of the metabolism can be well elucidated.In this paper,we introduce the Expanded Flux Variability Analysis (EFVA) to characterize the intrinsic nature of metabolic reactions,such as flexibility,modularity and essentiality,by exploring the trend of the range,the maximum and the minimum flux of reactions.We took the metabolic network of Escherichia coli as an example and analyzed the variability of reaction fluxes under different growth rate constraints.The average variability of all reactions decreases dramatically when the growth rate increases.Consider the noise effect on the metabolic system,we thus argue that the microorganism may practically grow under a suboptimal state.Besides,under the EFVA framework,the reactions are easily to be grouped into catabolic and anabolic groups.And the anabolic groups can be further assigned to specific biomass constitute.We also discovered the growth rate dependent essentiality of reactions.

  19. Modelling central metabolic fluxes by constraint-based optimization reveals metabolic reprogramming of developing Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombié, Sophie; Nazaret, Christine; Bénard, Camille; Biais, Benoît; Mengin, Virginie; Solé, Marion; Fouillen, Laëtitia; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Gibon, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Modelling of metabolic networks is a powerful tool to analyse the behaviour of developing plant organs, including fruits. Guided by our current understanding of heterotrophic metabolism of plant cells, a medium-scale stoichiometric model, including the balance of co-factors and energy, was constructed in order to describe metabolic shifts that occur through the nine sequential stages of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit development. The measured concentrations of the main biomass components and the accumulated metabolites in the pericarp, determined at each stage, were fitted in order to calculate, by derivation, the corresponding external fluxes. They were used as constraints to solve the model by minimizing the internal fluxes. The distribution of the calculated fluxes of central metabolism were then analysed and compared with known metabolic behaviours. For instance, the partition of the main metabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, etc.) was relevant throughout fruit development. We also predicted a valid import of carbon and nitrogen by the fruit, as well as a consistent CO2 release. Interestingly, the energetic balance indicates that excess ATP is dissipated just before the onset of ripening, supporting the concept of the climacteric crisis. Finally, the apparent contradiction between calculated fluxes with low values compared with measured enzyme capacities suggest a complex reprogramming of the metabolic machinery during fruit development. With a powerful set of experimental data and an accurate definition of the metabolic system, this work provides important insight into the metabolic and physiological requirements of the developing tomato fruits. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Multiobjective flux balancing using the NISE method for metabolic network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young-Gyun; Lee, Dong-Yup; Lee, Sang Yup; Park, Sunwon

    2009-01-01

    Flux balance analysis (FBA) is well acknowledged as an analysis tool of metabolic networks in the framework of metabolic engineering. However, FBA has a limitation for solving a multiobjective optimization problem which considers multiple conflicting objectives. In this study, we propose a novel multiobjective flux balance analysis method, which adapts the noninferior set estimation (NISE) method (Solanki et al., 1993) for multiobjective linear programming (MOLP) problems. NISE method can generate an approximation of the Pareto curve for conflicting objectives without redundant iterations of single objective optimization. Furthermore, the flux distributions at each Pareto optimal solution can be obtained for understanding the internal flux changes in the metabolic network. The functionality of this approach is shown by applying it to a genome-scale in silico model of E. coli. Multiple objectives for the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] production are considered simultaneously, and relationships among them are identified. The Pareto curve for maximizing succinic acid production vs. maximizing biomass production is used for the in silico analysis of various combinatorial knockout strains. This proposed method accelerates the strain improvement in the metabolic engineering by reducing computation time of obtaining the Pareto curve and analysis time of flux distribution at each Pareto optimal solution. (c) 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2009.

  1. Two-Scale 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis for Metabolic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David; Garcia Martin, Hector

    2018-01-01

    Accelerating the Design-Build-Test-Learn (DBTL) cycle in synthetic biology is critical to achieving rapid and facile bioengineering of organisms for the production of, e.g., biofuels and other chemicals. The Learn phase involves using data obtained from the Test phase to inform the next Design phase. As part of the Learn phase, mathematical models of metabolic fluxes give a mechanistic level of comprehension to cellular metabolism, isolating the principle drivers of metabolic behavior from the peripheral ones, and directing future experimental designs and engineering methodologies. Furthermore, the measurement of intracellular metabolic fluxes is specifically noteworthy as providing a rapid and easy-to-understand picture of how carbon and energy flow throughout the cell. Here, we present a detailed guide to performing metabolic flux analysis in the Learn phase of the DBTL cycle, where we show how one can take the isotope labeling data from a 13 C labeling experiment and immediately turn it into a determination of cellular fluxes that points in the direction of genetic engineering strategies that will advance the metabolic engineering process.For our modeling purposes we use the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) Quantitative Metabolic Modeling (jQMM) library, which provides an open-source, python-based framework for modeling internal metabolic fluxes and making actionable predictions on how to modify cellular metabolism for specific bioengineering goals. It presents a complete toolbox for performing different types of flux analysis such as Flux Balance Analysis, 13 C Metabolic Flux Analysis, and it introduces the capability to use 13 C labeling experimental data to constrain comprehensive genome-scale models through a technique called two-scale 13 C Metabolic Flux Analysis (2S- 13 C MFA) [1]. In addition to several other capabilities, the jQMM is also able to predict the effects of knockouts using the MoMA and ROOM methodologies. The use of the jQMM library is

  2. Constraining genome-scale models to represent the bow tie structure of metabolism for 13C metabolic flux analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backman, Tyler W.H.; Ando, David; Singh, Jahnavi

    2018-01-01

    for a minimum of fluxes into core metabolism to satisfy these experimental constraints. Together, these methods accelerate and automate the identification of a biologically reasonable set of core reactions for use with 13C MFA or 2S- 13C MFA, as well as provide for a substantially lower set of flux bounds......Determination of internal metabolic fluxes is crucial for fundamental and applied biology because they map how carbon and electrons flow through metabolism to enable cell function. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA) and Two-Scale 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (2S-13C MFA) are two techniques used...

  3. The measurements of thermal neutron flux distribution in a paraffin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The term `thermal flux' implies a Maxwellian distribution of velocity and energy corresponding to the most probable velocity of 2200 ms-1 at 293.4 K. In order to measure the thermal neutron flux density, the foil activation method was used. Thermal neutron flux determination in paraffin phantom by counting the emitted rays of ...

  4. Maintenance metabolism and carbon fluxes in Bacillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decasper Seraina

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection of an appropriate host organism is crucial for the economic success of biotechnological processes. A generally important selection criterion is a low maintenance energy metabolism to reduce non-productive consumption of substrate. We here investigated, whether various bacilli that are closely related to Bacillus subtilis are potential riboflavin production hosts with low maintenance metabolism. Results While B. subtilis exhibited indeed the highest maintenance energy coefficient, B. licheniformis and B. amyloliquefaciens exhibited only statistically insignificantly reduced maintenance metabolism. Both B. pumilus and B. subtilis (natto exhibited irregular growth patterns under glucose limitation such that the maintenance metabolism could not be determined. The sole exception with significantly reduced maintenance energy requirements was the B. licheniformis strain T380B. The frequently used spo0A mutation significantly increased the maintenance metabolism of B. subtilis. At the level of 13C-detected intracellular fluxes, all investigated bacilli exhibited a significant flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, a prerequisite for efficient riboflavin production. Different from all other species, B. subtilis featured high respiratory tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes in batch and chemostat cultures. In particular under glucose-limited conditions, this led to significant excess formation of NADPH of B. subtilis, while anabolic consumption was rather balanced with catabolic NADPH formation in the other bacilli. Conclusion Despite its successful commercial production of riboflavin, B. subtilis does not seem to be the optimal cell factory from a bioenergetic point of view. The best choice of the investigated strains is the sporulation-deficient B. licheniformis T380B strain. Beside a low maintenance energy coefficient, this strain grows robustly under different conditions and exhibits only moderate acetate overflow, hence

  5. Metabolic flux profiling of recombinant protein secreting Pichia pastoris growing on glucose:methanol mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. Mixed feeds of methanol and a multicarbon source instead of methanol as sole carbon source have been shown to improve product productivities and alleviate metabolic burden derived from protein production. Nevertheless, systematic quantitative studies on the relationships between the central metabolism and recombinant protein production in P. pastoris are still rather limited, particularly when growing this yeast on mixed carbon sources, thus hampering future metabolic network engineering strategies for improved protein production. Results The metabolic flux distribution in the central metabolism of P. pastoris growing on a mixed feed of glucose and methanol was analyzed by Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA) using 13C-NMR-derived constraints. For this purpose, we defined new flux ratios for methanol assimilation pathways in P. pastoris cells growing on glucose:methanol mixtures. By using this experimental approach, the metabolic burden caused by the overexpression and secretion of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol) in P. pastoris was further analyzed. This protein has been previously shown to trigger the unfolded protein response in P. pastoris. A series of 13C-tracer experiments were performed on aerobic chemostat cultivations with a control and two different Rol producing strains growing at a dilution rate of 0.09 h−1 using a glucose:methanol 80:20 (w/w) mix as carbon source. The MFA performed in this study reveals a significant redistristribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism when comparing the two recombinant strains vs the control strain, reflected in increased glycolytic, TCA cycle and NADH regeneration fluxes, as well as higher methanol dissimilation rates. Conclusions Overall, a further 13C-based MFA development to characterise the central metabolism of methylotrophic yeasts when growing on mixed

  6. Metabolic flux profiling of recombinant protein secreting Pichia pastoris growing on glucose:methanol mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordà Joel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. Mixed feeds of methanol and a multicarbon source instead of methanol as sole carbon source have been shown to improve product productivities and alleviate metabolic burden derived from protein production. Nevertheless, systematic quantitative studies on the relationships between the central metabolism and recombinant protein production in P. pastoris are still rather limited, particularly when growing this yeast on mixed carbon sources, thus hampering future metabolic network engineering strategies for improved protein production. Results The metabolic flux distribution in the central metabolism of P. pastoris growing on a mixed feed of glucose and methanol was analyzed by Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA using 13C-NMR-derived constraints. For this purpose, we defined new flux ratios for methanol assimilation pathways in P. pastoris cells growing on glucose:methanol mixtures. By using this experimental approach, the metabolic burden caused by the overexpression and secretion of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol in P. pastoris was further analyzed. This protein has been previously shown to trigger the unfolded protein response in P. pastoris. A series of 13C-tracer experiments were performed on aerobic chemostat cultivations with a control and two different Rol producing strains growing at a dilution rate of 0.09 h−1 using a glucose:methanol 80:20 (w/w mix as carbon source. The MFA performed in this study reveals a significant redistristribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism when comparing the two recombinant strains vs the control strain, reflected in increased glycolytic, TCA cycle and NADH regeneration fluxes, as well as higher methanol dissimilation rates. Conclusions Overall, a further 13C-based MFA development to characterise the central metabolism of methylotrophic

  7. An observer-theoretic approach to estimating neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Ho; Cho, Nam Zin

    1989-01-01

    State feedback control provides many advantages such as stabilization and improved transient response. However, when the state feedback control is considered for spatial control of a nuclear reactor, it requires complete knowledge of the distributions of the system state variables. This paper describes a method for estimating the flux spatial distribution using only limited flux measurements. It is based on the Luenberger observer in control theory, extended to the distributed parameter systems such as the space-time reactor dynamics equation. The results of the application of the method to simple reactor models showed that the flux distribution is estimated by the observer very efficiently using information from only a few sensors

  8. EL-2 reactor: Thermal neutron flux distribution; EL-2: Repartition du flux de neutrons thermiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, A; Genthon, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The flux distribution of thermal neutrons in EL-2 reactor is studied. The reactor core and lattices are described as well as the experimental reactor facilities, in particular, the experimental channels and special facilities. The measurement shows that the thermal neutron flux increases in the central channel when enriched uranium is used in place of natural uranium. However the thermal neutron flux is not perturbed in the other reactor channels by the fuel modification. The macroscopic flux distribution is measured according the radial positioning of fuel rods. The longitudinal neutron flux distribution in a fuel rod is also measured and shows no difference between enriched and natural uranium fuel rods. In addition, measurements of the flux distribution have been effectuated for rods containing other material as steel or aluminium. The neutron flux distribution is also studied in all the experimental channels as well as in the thermal column. The determination of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in all experimental facilities, the thermal column and the fuel channels has been made with a heavy water level of 1825 mm and is given for an operating power of 1000 kW. (M.P.)

  9. Effect of axial heat flux distribution on CHF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol

    2000-10-01

    Previous investigations for the effect of axial heat flux distributions on CHF and the prediction methods are reviewed and summarized. A total of 856 CHF data in a tube with a non-uniform axial heat flux distribution has been compiled from the articles and analyzed using the 1995 Groeneveld look-up table. The results showed that two representative correction factors, K5 of the look-up table and Tongs F factor, can be applied to describe the axial heat flux distribution effect on CHF. However, they overpredict slightly the measured CHF, depending on the quality and flux peak shape. Hence, a corrected K5 factor, which accounts for the axial heat flux distribution effect is suggested to correct these trends. It predicted the CHF power for the compiled data with an average error of 1.5% and a standard deviation of 10.3%, and also provides a reasonable prediction of CHF locations.

  10. TRANSHEX, 2-D Thermal Neutron Flux Distribution from Epithermal Flux in Hexagonal Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrakka, E.

    1994-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: TRANSHEX is a multigroup integral transport program that determines the thermal scalar flux distribution arising from a known epithermal flux in two- dimensional hexagonal geometry. 2 - Method of solution: The program solves the isotropic collision probability equations for a region-averaged scalar flux by an iterative method. Either a successive over-relaxation or an inner-outer iteration technique is applied. Flat flux collision probabilities between trigonal space regions with white boundary condition are utilized. The effect of epithermal flux is taken into consideration as a slowing-down source that is calculated for a given spatial distribution and 1/E energy dependence of the epithermal flux

  11. Reconstruction and flux analysis of coupling between metabolic pathways of astrocytes and neurons: application to cerebral hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akιn Ata

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a daunting task to identify all the metabolic pathways of brain energy metabolism and develop a dynamic simulation environment that will cover a time scale ranging from seconds to hours. To simplify this task and make it more practicable, we undertook stoichiometric modeling of brain energy metabolism with the major aim of including the main interacting pathways in and between astrocytes and neurons. Model The constructed model includes central metabolism (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, lipid metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS detoxification, amino acid metabolism (synthesis and catabolism, the well-known glutamate-glutamine cycle, other coupling reactions between astrocytes and neurons, and neurotransmitter metabolism. This is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive attempt at stoichiometric modeling of brain metabolism to date in terms of its coverage of a wide range of metabolic pathways. We then attempted to model the basal physiological behaviour and hypoxic behaviour of the brain cells where astrocytes and neurons are tightly coupled. Results The reconstructed stoichiometric reaction model included 217 reactions (184 internal, 33 exchange and 216 metabolites (183 internal, 33 external distributed in and between astrocytes and neurons. Flux balance analysis (FBA techniques were applied to the reconstructed model to elucidate the underlying cellular principles of neuron-astrocyte coupling. Simulation of resting conditions under the constraints of maximization of glutamate/glutamine/GABA cycle fluxes between the two cell types with subsequent minimization of Euclidean norm of fluxes resulted in a flux distribution in accordance with literature-based findings. As a further validation of our model, the effect of oxygen deprivation (hypoxia on fluxes was simulated using an FBA-derivative approach, known as minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA. The results show the power of the

  12. Constraining Genome-Scale Models to Represent the Bow Tie Structure of Metabolism for 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler W. H. Backman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of internal metabolic fluxes is crucial for fundamental and applied biology because they map how carbon and electrons flow through metabolism to enable cell function. 13 C Metabolic Flux Analysis ( 13 C MFA and Two-Scale 13 C Metabolic Flux Analysis (2S- 13 C MFA are two techniques used to determine such fluxes. Both operate on the simplifying approximation that metabolic flux from peripheral metabolism into central “core” carbon metabolism is minimal, and can be omitted when modeling isotopic labeling in core metabolism. The validity of this “two-scale” or “bow tie” approximation is supported both by the ability to accurately model experimental isotopic labeling data, and by experimentally verified metabolic engineering predictions using these methods. However, the boundaries of core metabolism that satisfy this approximation can vary across species, and across cell culture conditions. Here, we present a set of algorithms that (1 systematically calculate flux bounds for any specified “core” of a genome-scale model so as to satisfy the bow tie approximation and (2 automatically identify an updated set of core reactions that can satisfy this approximation more efficiently. First, we leverage linear programming to simultaneously identify the lowest fluxes from peripheral metabolism into core metabolism compatible with the observed growth rate and extracellular metabolite exchange fluxes. Second, we use Simulated Annealing to identify an updated set of core reactions that allow for a minimum of fluxes into core metabolism to satisfy these experimental constraints. Together, these methods accelerate and automate the identification of a biologically reasonable set of core reactions for use with 13 C MFA or 2S- 13 C MFA, as well as provide for a substantially lower set of flux bounds for fluxes into the core as compared with previous methods. We provide an open source Python implementation of these algorithms at https://github.com/JBEI/limitfluxtocore.

  13. Device for measuring neutron-flux distribution density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenbljum, N.D.; Mitelman, M.G.; Kononovich, A.A.; Kirsanov, V.S.; Zagadkin, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    An arrangement is described for measuring the distribution of neutron flux density over the height of a nuclear reactor core and which may be used for monitoring energy release or for detecting deviations of neutron flux from an optimal level so that subsequent balance can be achieved. It avoids mutual interference of detectors. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  14. ¹³C-based metabolic flux analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a reduced Crabtree effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumio; Yoshimi, Mika; Hayakawa, Kenshi; Furusawa, Chikara; Kanda, Akihisa; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows a Crabtree effect that produces ethanol in a high glucose concentration even under fully aerobic condition. For efficient production of cake yeast or compressed yeast for baking, ethanol by-production is not desired since glucose limited chemostat or fed-batch cultivations are performed to suppress the Crabtree effect. In this study, the (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was performed for the S288C derived S. cerevisiae strain to characterize a metabolic state under the reduced Crabtree effect. S. cerevisiae cells were cultured at a low dilution rate (0.1 h(-1)) under the glucose-limited chemostat condition. The estimated metabolic flux distribution showed that the acetyl-CoA in mitochondria was mainly produced from pyruvate by pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) reaction and that the level of the metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was much higher than that of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, which contributes to high biomass yield at low dilution rate by supplying NADPH required for cell growth. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic flux analysis during the exponential growth phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in wine fermentations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Quirós

    Full Text Available As a consequence of the increase in global average temperature, grapes with the adequate phenolic and aromatic maturity tend to be overripe by the time of harvest, resulting in increased sugar concentrations and imbalanced C/N ratios in fermenting musts. This fact sets obvious additional hurdles in the challenge of obtaining wines with reduced alcohols levels, a new trend in consumer demands. It would therefore be interesting to understand Saccharomyces cerevisiae physiology during the fermentation of must with these altered characteristics. The present study aims to determine the distribution of metabolic fluxes during the yeast exponential growth phase, when both carbon and nitrogen sources are in excess, using continuous cultures. Two different sugar concentrations were studied under two different winemaking temperature conditions. Although consumption and production rates for key metabolites were severely affected by the different experimental conditions studied, the general distribution of fluxes in central carbon metabolism was basically conserved in all cases. It was also observed that temperature and sugar concentration exerted a higher effect on the pentose phosphate pathway and glycerol formation than on glycolysis and ethanol production. Additionally, nitrogen uptake, both quantitatively and qualitatively, was strongly influenced by environmental conditions. This work provides the most complete stoichiometric model used for Metabolic Flux Analysis of S. cerevisiae in wine fermentations employed so far, including the synthesis and release of relevant aroma compounds and could be used in the design of optimal nitrogen supplementation of wine fermentations.

  16. Modeling of Drift Effects on Solar Tower Concentrated Flux Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis O. Lara-Cerecedo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel modeling tool for calculation of central receiver concentrated flux distributions is presented, which takes into account drift effects. This tool is based on a drift model that includes different geometrical error sources in a rigorous manner and on a simple analytic approximation for the individual flux distribution of a heliostat. The model is applied to a group of heliostats of a real field to obtain the resulting flux distribution and its variation along the day. The distributions differ strongly from those obtained assuming the ideal case without drift or a case with a Gaussian tracking error function. The time evolution of peak flux is also calculated to demonstrate the capabilities of the model. The evolution of this parameter also shows strong differences in comparison to the case without drift.

  17. Estimation of dynamic flux profiles from metabolic time series data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou I-Chun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in modern high-throughput techniques of molecular biology have enabled top-down approaches for the estimation of parameter values in metabolic systems, based on time series data. Special among them is the recent method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE, which uses such data not only for parameter estimation but also for the identification of functional forms of the processes governing a metabolic system. DFE furthermore provides diagnostic tools for the evaluation of model validity and of the quality of a model fit beyond residual errors. Unfortunately, DFE works only when the data are more or less complete and the system contains as many independent fluxes as metabolites. These drawbacks may be ameliorated with other types of estimation and information. However, such supplementations incur their own limitations. In particular, assumptions must be made regarding the functional forms of some processes and detailed kinetic information must be available, in addition to the time series data. Results The authors propose here a systematic approach that supplements DFE and overcomes some of its shortcomings. Like DFE, the approach is model-free and requires only minimal assumptions. If sufficient time series data are available, the approach allows the determination of a subset of fluxes that enables the subsequent applicability of DFE to the rest of the flux system. The authors demonstrate the procedure with three artificial pathway systems exhibiting distinct characteristics and with actual data of the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the proposed method successfully complements DFE under various situations and without a priori assumptions regarding the model representation. The proposed method also permits an examination of whether at all, to what degree, or within what range the available time series data can be validly represented in a particular functional format of

  18. Redistribution of metabolic fluxes in Chlorella protothecoides by variation of media nitrogen concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saratram Gopalakrishnan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the Elementary Metabolite Unit (EMU algorithm was employed to calculate intracellular fluxes for Chlorella protothecoides using previously generated growth and mass spec data. While the flux through glycolysis remained relatively constant, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP flux increased from 3% to 20% of the glucose uptake during nitrogen-limited growth. The TCA cycle flux decreased from 94% to 38% during nitrogen-limited growth while the flux of acetyl-CoA into lipids increased from 58% to 109% of the glucose uptake, increasing total lipid accumulation. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase activity was higher during nitrogen-sufficient growth. The glyoxylate shunt was found to be partially active in both cases, indicating the nutrient nature has an impact on flux distribution. It was found that the total NADPH supply within the cell remained almost constant under both conditions. In summary, algal cells substantially reorganize their metabolism during the switch from carbon-limited (nitrogen-sufficient to nitrogen-limited (carbon-sufficient growth. Keywords: Microalgae, Biofuels, Chlorella, MFA, EMU algorithm

  19. Fermentation characteristics in conversion of organic acids obtained by oxidation of low-rank coals to poly({beta}-hydroxybutyrate) using A. eutrophus cells with some analysis on metabolic flux distribution; Kattan no ekisosanka de erareru yukisan wo suiso saikin wo riyoshite pori {beta}-hidorokishi rakusan (PHB) ni henkansaseru tameno baiyo kogakuteki kento to taisha ryusoku bunpu shisutemu kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimoto, Shoko.; Shin, Huidong.; Shimizu, Kazuyuki. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan). Department of Biochemical engineering and science; Mae, Kazuhiro.; Miura, Koichi. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Department of Chemical Engineering

    1999-03-10

    Fermentation characteristics are investigated for the conversion of glycolate, acetate, formate, and malonate obtained by the oxidation of low-rank coals to poly ({beta}-hydrox butyrate) (PHB) using A. eutrophus cells. Based on the cultivation experiments using one of the organic acids as a sole carbon source, it is found that acetate is the most effectively converted to PHB. When mixed organic acids are used, formate is preferentially consumed, followed by acetate, and finally glycolate. Although malate can not be utilized, it is implied that it might change the pathway flux distributions based on the metabolic flux analysis. Namely, it shows competitive inhibition to succinate dehydrogenase so that its addition during fermentation results in flux reduction from succinate to maleic acid as well as glyoxylate flux and gluconeogenesis flux. It is also found that NADPH generated from isocitrate is preferentially utilized for the reaction from {alpha}-ketoglutarate to glutamate when NH{sub 3} concentration is high, while it is eventually used for the PHB production from acetoacetyl CoA as NH{sub 3} concentration decreases. (author)

  20. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis in S-adenosyl-L-methionine production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kenshi; Kajihata, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is a major biological methyl group donor, and is used as a nutritional supplement and prescription drug. Yeast is used for the industrial production of SAM owing to its high intracellular SAM concentrations. To determine the regulation mechanisms responsible for such high SAM production, (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was conducted to compare the flux distributions in the central metabolism between Kyokai no. 6 (high SAM-producing) and S288C (control) strains. (13)C-MFA showed that the levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux in SAM-overproducing strain were considerably increased compared to those in the S228C strain. Analysis of ATP balance also showed that a larger amount of excess ATP was produced in the Kyokai 6 strain because of increased oxidative phosphorylation. These results suggest that high SAM production in Kyokai 6 strains could be attributed to enhanced ATP regeneration with high TCA cycle fluxes and respiration activity. Thus, maintaining high respiration efficiency during cultivation is important for improving SAM production. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrogen production and metabolic flux analysis of metabolically engineered Escherichia coli strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seohyoung; Seol, Eunhee; Park, Sunghoon [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea); Oh, You-Kwan [Bioenergy Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon 305-543 (Korea); Wang, G.Y. [Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii at Manoa Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Escherichia coli can produce H{sub 2} from glucose via formate hydrogen lyase (FHL). In order to improve the H{sub 2} production rate and yield, metabolically engineered E. coli strains, which included pathway alterations in their H{sub 2} production and central carbon metabolism, were developed and characterized by batch experiments and metabolic flux analysis. Deletion of hycA, a negative regulator for FHL, resulted in twofold increase of FHL activity. Deletion of two uptake hydrogenases (1 (hya) and hydrogenase 2 (hyb)) increased H{sub 2} production yield from 1.20 mol/mol glucose to 1.48 mol/mol glucose. Deletion of lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA) and fumarate reductase (frdAB) further improved the H{sub 2} yield; 1.80 mol/mol glucose under high H{sub 2} pressure or 2.11 mol/mol glucose under reduced H{sub 2} pressure. Several batch experiments at varying concentrations of glucose (2.5-10 g/L) and yeast extract (0.3 or 3.0 g/L) were conducted for the strain containing all these genetic alternations, and their carbon and energy balances were analyzed. The metabolic flux analysis revealed that deletion of ldhA and frdAB directed most of the carbons from glucose to the glycolytic pathway leading to H{sub 2} production by FHL, not to the pentose phosphate pathway. (author)

  2. Metabolic flux analysis of the halophilic archaeon Haladaptatus paucihalophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangxiu; Zhang, Manxiao; Mo, Tianlu; He, Lian; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Yi; Zhang, Qi; Ding, Wei

    2015-11-27

    This work reports the (13)C-assisted metabolic flux analysis of Haladaptatus paucihalophilus, a halophilic archaeon possessing an intriguing osmoadaption mechanism. We showed that the carbon flow is through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle whereas the reductive TCA cycle is not operative in H. paucihalophilus. In addition, both threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute to isoleucine biosynthesis, whereas lysine is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. Unexpected, the labeling patterns of glycine from the cells grown on [1-(13)C]pyruvate and [2-(13)C]pyruvate suggest that, unlike all the organisms investigated so far, in which glycine is produced exclusively from the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) pathway, glycine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus involves different pathways including SHMT, threonine aldolase (TA) and the reverse reaction of glycine cleavage system (GCS), demonstrating for the first time that other pathways instead of SHMT can also make a significant contribution to the cellular glycine pool. Transcriptional analysis confirmed that both TA and GCS genes were transcribed in H. paucihalophilus, and the transcriptional level is independent of salt concentrations in the culture media. This study expands our understanding of amino acid biosynthesis and provides valuable insights into the metabolism of halophilic archaea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Flux distribution measurements in the Bruce A unit 1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, A.; Kettner, D.A.; Mohindra, V.K.

    1977-07-01

    Flux distribution measurements were made by copper wire activation during low power commissioning of the unit 1 reactor of the Bruce A generating station. The distribution was measured along one diameter near the axial and horizontal midplanes of the reactor core. The activity distribution along the copper wire was measured by wire scanners with NaI detectors. The experiments were made for five configurations of reactivity control mechanisms. (author)

  4. Multilevel power distribution synthesis for a movable flux mapping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollacasa, D.; Terney, W.B.; Vincent, G.F.; Dziadosz, D.; Schleicher, T.

    1992-01-01

    A Computer Software package has been developed to support the synthesis of the 3-dimensional power distribution from detector signals from a movable flux mapping system. The power distribution synthesis is based on methodology developed for fixed incore detectors. The full core solution effectively couples all assemblies in the core whether they are instrumented or not. The solution is not subject to approximations for the treatment of assemblies where a measurement cannot be made and provides an accurate representation of axial variations which may be induced by axial blankets, burnable absorber cut back regions and axially zoned flux suppression rods

  5. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  6. Metabolic flux analysis of the halophilic archaeon Haladaptatus paucihalophilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guangxiu; Zhang, Manxiao [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, Gansu Province, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Mo, Tianlu [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); He, Lian [Key Laboratory of Combinatory Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery (Ministry of Education), School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Zhang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, Gansu Province, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Yu, Yi, E-mail: yu_yi@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Combinatory Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery (Ministry of Education), School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Zhang, Qi, E-mail: qizhang@sioc.ac.cn [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Ding, Wei, E-mail: dingw@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, Gansu Province, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China)

    2015-11-27

    This work reports the {sup 13}C-assisted metabolic flux analysis of Haladaptatus paucihalophilus, a halophilic archaeon possessing an intriguing osmoadaption mechanism. We showed that the carbon flow is through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle whereas the reductive TCA cycle is not operative in H. paucihalophilus. In addition, both threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute to isoleucine biosynthesis, whereas lysine is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. Unexpected, the labeling patterns of glycine from the cells grown on [1-{sup 13}C]pyruvate and [2-{sup 13}C]pyruvate suggest that, unlike all the organisms investigated so far, in which glycine is produced exclusively from the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) pathway, glycine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus involves different pathways including SHMT, threonine aldolase (TA) and the reverse reaction of glycine cleavage system (GCS), demonstrating for the first time that other pathways instead of SHMT can also make a significant contribution to the cellular glycine pool. Transcriptional analysis confirmed that both TA and GCS genes were transcribed in H. paucihalophilus, and the transcriptional level is independent of salt concentrations in the culture media. This study expands our understanding of amino acid biosynthesis and provides valuable insights into the metabolism of halophilic archaea. - Highlights: • Serine hydroxymethyltransferase, threonine aldolase, and glycine cleavage system all contribute to the glycine pool of H. paucihalophilus. • Threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute equally to the isoleucine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus. • Lysine in H. paucihalophilus is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. • Glycine biosynthesis is likely unrelated to the cell osmoadaption mechanism.

  7. Metabolic flux analysis of the halophilic archaeon Haladaptatus paucihalophilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Guangxiu; Zhang, Manxiao; Mo, Tianlu; He, Lian; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Yi; Zhang, Qi; Ding, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the "1"3C-assisted metabolic flux analysis of Haladaptatus paucihalophilus, a halophilic archaeon possessing an intriguing osmoadaption mechanism. We showed that the carbon flow is through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle whereas the reductive TCA cycle is not operative in H. paucihalophilus. In addition, both threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute to isoleucine biosynthesis, whereas lysine is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. Unexpected, the labeling patterns of glycine from the cells grown on [1-"1"3C]pyruvate and [2-"1"3C]pyruvate suggest that, unlike all the organisms investigated so far, in which glycine is produced exclusively from the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) pathway, glycine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus involves different pathways including SHMT, threonine aldolase (TA) and the reverse reaction of glycine cleavage system (GCS), demonstrating for the first time that other pathways instead of SHMT can also make a significant contribution to the cellular glycine pool. Transcriptional analysis confirmed that both TA and GCS genes were transcribed in H. paucihalophilus, and the transcriptional level is independent of salt concentrations in the culture media. This study expands our understanding of amino acid biosynthesis and provides valuable insights into the metabolism of halophilic archaea. - Highlights: • Serine hydroxymethyltransferase, threonine aldolase, and glycine cleavage system all contribute to the glycine pool of H. paucihalophilus. • Threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute equally to the isoleucine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus. • Lysine in H. paucihalophilus is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. • Glycine biosynthesis is likely unrelated to the cell osmoadaption mechanism.

  8. INDIAN POINT REACTOR REACTIVITY AND FLUX DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batch, M. L.; Fischer, F. E.

    1963-11-15

    The reactivity of the Indian Point core was measured near zero reactivity at various shim and control rod patterns. Flux distribution measurements were also made, and the results are expressed in terms of power peaking factors and normalized detector response during rod withdrawal. (D.L.C.)

  9. Fast neutron fluxes distribution in Egyptian ilmenite concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, R.M.; Abou El-Nasr, T.Z.; Bashter, I.I.

    1978-01-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the distribution of fast neutron fluxes in a new type of heavy concrete made from Egyptian ilmenite ores. The neutron source used was a collimated beam of reactor neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. Measurements were carried-out using phosphorous activation detectors. Iso-flux curves were represented which give directly the shape and thickness required to attenuate the emitted fast neutron flux to a certain value. The relaxation lengths were also evaluated from the measured data for both disc monodirectional source and infinite plane monodirectional source. The obtained values were compared with that calculated using the derived values of relative number densities and microscopic removal cross-sections of the different constituents. The obtained data show that ilmenite concrete attenuates fast neutron flux more strongly than ordinary concrete. A semiemperical formula was derived to calculate the fast neutron flux at different thicknesses along the beam axis. Another semiemperical formula was also derived to calculate the fast neutron flux in ordinary concrete along the beam axis using the corresponding value in ilmenite concrete

  10. Interpreting expression data with metabolic flux models: predicting Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycolic acid production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Colijn

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism is central to cell physiology, and metabolic disturbances play a role in numerous disease states. Despite its importance, the ability to study metabolism at a global scale using genomic technologies is limited. In principle, complete genome sequences describe the range of metabolic reactions that are possible for an organism, but cannot quantitatively describe the behaviour of these reactions. We present a novel method for modeling metabolic states using whole cell measurements of gene expression. Our method, which we call E-Flux (as a combination of flux and expression, extends the technique of Flux Balance Analysis by modeling maximum flux constraints as a function of measured gene expression. In contrast to previous methods for metabolically interpreting gene expression data, E-Flux utilizes a model of the underlying metabolic network to directly predict changes in metabolic flux capacity. We applied E-Flux to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB. Key components of mycobacterial cell walls are mycolic acids which are targets for several first-line TB drugs. We used E-Flux to predict the impact of 75 different drugs, drug combinations, and nutrient conditions on mycolic acid biosynthesis capacity in M. tuberculosis, using a public compendium of over 400 expression arrays. We tested our method using a model of mycolic acid biosynthesis as well as on a genome-scale model of M. tuberculosis metabolism. Our method correctly predicts seven of the eight known fatty acid inhibitors in this compendium and makes accurate predictions regarding the specificity of these compounds for fatty acid biosynthesis. Our method also predicts a number of additional potential modulators of TB mycolic acid biosynthesis. E-Flux thus provides a promising new approach for algorithmically predicting metabolic state from gene expression data.

  11. Critical sizes and flux distributions in the shut down pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banchereau, A.; Berthier, P.; Genthon, J.P.; Gourdon, C.; Lattes, R.; Martelly, J.; Mazancourt, R. de; Portes, L.; Sagot, M.; Schmitt, A.P.; Tanguy, P.; Teste du Bailler, A.; Veyssiere, A.

    1957-01-01

    An important part of the experiments carried out on the reactor G1 during a period of shut-down has consisted in determinations of critical sizes, and measurements of flux distribution by irradiations of detectors. This report deals with the following points: 1- Critical sizes of the flat pile, the long pile and the uranium-thorium pile. 2- Flux charts of the same piles, and study of an exponential experiment. 3- Determination of the slit effect. 4- Calculation of the anisotropy of the lattice. 5- Description of the experimental apparatus of the irradiation measurements. (author) [fr

  12. MicrobesFlux: a web platform for drafting metabolic models from the KEGG database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xueyang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent with the efforts currently underway in mapping microbial genomes using high-throughput sequencing methods, systems biologists are building metabolic models to characterize and predict cell metabolisms. One of the key steps in building a metabolic model is using multiple databases to collect and assemble essential information about genome-annotations and the architecture of the metabolic network for a specific organism. To speed up metabolic model development for a large number of microorganisms, we need a user-friendly platform to construct metabolic networks and to perform constraint-based flux balance analysis based on genome databases and experimental results. Results We have developed a semi-automatic, web-based platform (MicrobesFlux for generating and reconstructing metabolic models for annotated microorganisms. MicrobesFlux is able to automatically download the metabolic network (including enzymatic reactions and metabolites of ~1,200 species from the KEGG database (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and then convert it to a metabolic model draft. The platform also provides diverse customized tools, such as gene knockouts and the introduction of heterologous pathways, for users to reconstruct the model network. The reconstructed metabolic network can be formulated to a constraint-based flux model to predict and analyze the carbon fluxes in microbial metabolisms. The simulation results can be exported in the SBML format (The Systems Biology Markup Language. Furthermore, we also demonstrated the platform functionalities by developing an FBA model (including 229 reactions for a recent annotated bioethanol producer, Thermoanaerobacter sp. strain X514, to predict its biomass growth and ethanol production. Conclusion MicrobesFlux is an installation-free and open-source platform that enables biologists without prior programming knowledge to develop metabolic models for annotated microorganisms in the KEGG

  13. Random sampling of elementary flux modes in large-scale metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Daniel; Soons, Zita; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Ferreira, Eugénio C; Rocha, Isabel

    2012-09-15

    The description of a metabolic network in terms of elementary (flux) modes (EMs) provides an important framework for metabolic pathway analysis. However, their application to large networks has been hampered by the combinatorial explosion in the number of modes. In this work, we develop a method for generating random samples of EMs without computing the whole set. Our algorithm is an adaptation of the canonical basis approach, where we add an additional filtering step which, at each iteration, selects a random subset of the new combinations of modes. In order to obtain an unbiased sample, all candidates are assigned the same probability of getting selected. This approach avoids the exponential growth of the number of modes during computation, thus generating a random sample of the complete set of EMs within reasonable time. We generated samples of different sizes for a metabolic network of Escherichia coli, and observed that they preserve several properties of the full EM set. It is also shown that EM sampling can be used for rational strain design. A well distributed sample, that is representative of the complete set of EMs, should be suitable to most EM-based methods for analysis and optimization of metabolic networks. Source code for a cross-platform implementation in Python is freely available at http://code.google.com/p/emsampler. dmachado@deb.uminho.pt Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. Poloidal and toroidal heat flux distribution in the CCT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.; Dhir, V.K.; Taylor, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma heat flux to the Faraday shield panels of the UCLA Continuous Current Tokamak (CCT) has been measured calorimetrically in order to identify the dominant parameters affecting the spatial distribution of heat deposition. Three heating methods were investigated: audio frequency discharge cleaning, RF heating, and AC ohmic. Significant poloidal asymmetry is present in the heat flux distribution. On the average, the outer panels received 25-30% greater heat flux than the inner ones, with the ratio of maximum to minimum values attaining a difference of more than a factor of 2. As a diagnostic experiment the current to a selected toroidal field coil was reduced in order to locally deflect the toroidal field lines outward in a ripple-like fashion. Greatly enhanced heat deposition (up to a factor of 4) was observed at this location on the outside Faraday panels. The enhancement was greatest for conditions of low toroidal field and low neutral pressure, leading to low plasma densities, for which Coulomb collisions are the smallest. An exponential model based on a heat flux e-folding length describes the experimentally found localization of thermal energy quite adequately. (orig.)

  15. Rerouting of carbon flux in a glycogen mutant of cyanobacteria assessed via isotopically non-stationary 13 C metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, John I; Prasannan, Charulata; Ma, Fangfang; Möllers, K Benedikt; Jaiswal, Damini; Digmurti, Madhuri; Allen, Doug K; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dasgupta, Santanu; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2017-10-01

    Cyanobacteria, which constitute a quantitatively dominant phylum, have attracted attention in biofuel applications due to favorable physiological characteristics, high photosynthetic efficiency and amenability to genetic manipulations. However, quantitative aspects of cyanobacterial metabolism have received limited attention. In the present study, we have performed isotopically non-stationary 13 C metabolic flux analysis (INST- 13 C-MFA) to analyze rerouting of carbon in a glycogen synthase deficient mutant strain (glgA-I glgA-II) of the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. During balanced photoautotrophic growth, 10-20% of the fixed carbon is stored in the form of glycogen via a pathway that is conserved across the cyanobacterial phylum. Our results show that deletion of glycogen synthase gene orchestrates cascading effects on carbon distribution in various parts of the metabolic network. Carbon that was originally destined to be incorporated into glycogen gets partially diverted toward alternate storage molecules such as glucosylglycerol and sucrose. The rest is partitioned within the metabolic network, primarily via glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle. A lowered flux toward carbohydrate synthesis and an altered distribution at the glucose-1-phosphate node indicate flexibility in the network. Further, reversibility of glycogen biosynthesis reactions points toward the presence of futile cycles. Similar redistribution of carbon was also predicted by Flux Balance Analysis. The results are significant to metabolic engineering efforts with cyanobacteria where fixed carbon needs to be re-routed to products of interest. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2298-2308. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Genome-scale modeling using flux ratio constraints to enable metabolic engineering of clostridial metabolism in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnulty, Michael J; Yen, Jiun Y; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S

    2012-05-14

    Genome-scale metabolic networks and flux models are an effective platform for linking an organism genotype to its phenotype. However, few modeling approaches offer predictive capabilities to evaluate potential metabolic engineering strategies in silico. A new method called "flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio)" was developed in this research and applied to a new genome-scale model of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (iCAC490) that contains 707 metabolites and 794 reactions. FBrAtio was used to model wild-type metabolism and metabolically engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum where only flux ratio constraints and thermodynamic reversibility of reactions were required. The FBrAtio approach allowed solutions to be found through standard linear programming. Five flux ratio constraints were required to achieve a qualitative picture of wild-type metabolism for C. acetobutylicum for the production of: (i) acetate, (ii) lactate, (iii) butyrate, (iv) acetone, (v) butanol, (vi) ethanol, (vii) CO2 and (viii) H2. Results of this simulation study coincide with published experimental results and show the knockdown of the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase increases butanol to acetone selectivity, while the simultaneous over-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase greatly increases ethanol production. FBrAtio is a promising new method for constraining genome-scale models using internal flux ratios. The method was effective for modeling wild-type and engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum.

  17. Optimization of neutron flux distribution in Isotope Production Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valladares, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    In order to optimize the thermal neutrons flux distribution in a Radioisotope Production and Research Reactor, the influence of two reactor parameters was studied, namely the Vmod / Vcomb ratio and the core volume. The reactor core is built with uranium oxide pellets (UO 2 ) mounted in rod clusters, with an enrichment level of ∼3 %, similar to LIGHT WATER POWER REATOR (LWR) fuel elements. (author) [pt

  18. SLAROM, Neutron Flux Distribution and Spectra in Lattice Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Tsuchihashi, K.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SLAROM solves the neutron integral transport equations to determine flux distribution and spectra in a lattice and calculates cell averaged effective cross sections. 2 - Method of solution: Collision probability method for cell calculation and 1D diffusion for core calculation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Variable dimensions are used throughout the program so that computer core requirements depend on a variety of program parameters

  19. Metabolic control over the oxygen consumption flux in intact skeletal muscle: in silico studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguzinski, Piotr; Korzeniewski, Bernard

    2006-12-01

    It has been postulated previously that a direct activation of all oxidative phosphorylation complexes in parallel with the activation of ATP usage and substrate dehydrogenation (the so-called each-step activation) is the main mechanism responsible for adjusting the rate of ATP production by mitochondria to the current energy demand during rest-to-work transition in intact skeletal muscle in vivo. The present in silico study, using a computer model of oxidative phosphorylation developed previously, analyzes the impact of the each-step-activation mechanism on the distribution of control (defined within Metabolic Control Analysis) over the oxygen consumption flux among the components of the bioenergetic system in intact oxidative skeletal muscle at different energy demands. It is demonstrated that in the absence of each-step activation, the oxidative phosphorylation complexes take over from ATP usage most of the control over the respiration rate and oxidative ATP production at higher (but still physiological) energy demands. This leads to a saturation of oxidative phosphorylation, impossibility of a further acceleration of oxidative ATP synthesis, and dramatic drop in the phosphorylation potential. On the other hand, the each-step-activation mechanism allows maintenance of a high degree of the control exerted by ATP usage over the ATP turnover and oxygen consumption flux even at high energy demands and thus enables a potentially very large increase in ATP turnover. It is also shown that low oxygen concentration shifts the metabolic control from ATP usage to cytochrome oxidase and thus limits the oxidative ATP production.

  20. Study of the neutron flux distribution in acylindrical reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vidal-Ferràndiz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the Energy Engineering Degree of the Universitat Politècnica de València, the students attend to the Nuclear Technology course, in which the basic knowledge of this technology is presented. A main objective of this technology is to obtain neutron population distribution inside a reactor core, in order to maintain the fission reaction chain. As this activity cannot be experimentally developed, mathematical modelling is of great importance to achieve such objective.  One of the computer laboratories proposed consists in the neutron flux determination analytically and numerically in a cylindrical geometry. The analytical solution makes use of the Bessel functions and is a good example of their applications. Alternatively, a numerical solution based on finite differences is used to obtain an approximate solution of the neutron flux. In this work, different discretizations of the cylindrical geometry are implemented and their results are compared.

  1. Quantitative Metabolomics and Instationary 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis Reveals Impact of Recombinant Protein Production on Trehalose and Energy Metabolism in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Jordà

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pichia pastoris has been recognized as an effective host for recombinant protein production. In this work, we combine metabolomics and instationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST 13C-MFA using GC-MS and LC-MS/MS to evaluate the potential impact of the production of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol on P. pastoris central carbon metabolism. Higher oxygen uptake and CO2 production rates and slightly reduced biomass yield suggest an increased energy demand for the producing strain. This observation is further confirmed by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. In particular, the flux through the methanol oxidation pathway and the TCA cycle was increased in the Rol-producing strain compared to the reference strain. Next to changes in the flux distribution, significant variations in intracellular metabolite concentrations were observed. Most notably, the pools of trehalose, which is related to cellular stress response, and xylose, which is linked to methanol assimilation, were significantly increased in the recombinant strain.

  2. Metabolic Flux Analysis in Isotope Labeling Experiments Using the Adjoint Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottelet, Stephane; Gaullier, Gil; Sadaka, Georges

    2017-01-01

    Comprehension of metabolic pathways is considerably enhanced by metabolic flux analysis (MFA-ILE) in isotope labeling experiments. The balance equations are given by hundreds of algebraic (stationary MFA) or ordinary differential equations (nonstationary MFA), and reducing the number of operations is therefore a crucial part of reducing the computation cost. The main bottleneck for deterministic algorithms is the computation of derivatives, particularly for nonstationary MFA. In this article, we explain how the overall identification process may be speeded up by using the adjoint approach to compute the gradient of the residual sum of squares. The proposed approach shows significant improvements in terms of complexity and computation time when it is compared with the usual (direct) approach. Numerical results are obtained for the central metabolic pathways of Escherichia coli and are validated against reference software in the stationary case. The methods and algorithms described in this paper are included in the sysmetab software package distributed under an Open Source license at http://forge.scilab.org/index.php/p/sysmetab/.

  3. The epithermal neutron-flux distribution in the reactor RA - Vinca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkov, V.; Bikit, I.; Martinc, R.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J.; Vaderna, S.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of the epithermal neutron flux in the reactor RA - Vinca has been measured by means of Zr - activation detectors. In the channel VK-8 non-homogeneous flux distribution was observed (author) [sr

  4. Isotopically nonstationary metabolic flux analysis (INST-MFA) of photosynthesis and photorespiration in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photorespiration is a central component of photosynthesis; however to better understand its role it should be viewed in the context of an integrated metabolic network rather than a series of individual reactions that operate independently. Isotopically nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST...

  5. Flux-Enabled Exploration of the Role of Sip1 in galactose yeast metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shymansky, Christopher M.; Wang, George; Baidoo, Edward E. K.

    2017-01-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (13C MFA) is an important systems biology technique that has been used to investigate microbial metabolism for decades. The heterotrimer Snf1 kinase complex plays a key role in the preference Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits for glucose over galactose, a phenomenon kn...

  6. Synergizing metabolic flux analysis and nucleotide sugar metabolism to understand the control of glycosylation of recombinant protein in CHO cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burleigh, Susan C

    2011-10-18

    Abstract Background The glycosylation of recombinant proteins can be altered by a range of parameters including cellular metabolism, metabolic flux and the efficiency of the glycosylation process. We present an experimental set-up that allows determination of these key processes associated with the control of N-linked glycosylation of recombinant proteins. Results Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were cultivated in shake flasks at 0 mM glutamine and displayed a reduced growth rate, glucose metabolism and a slower decrease in pH, when compared to other glutamine-supplemented cultures. The N-linked glycosylation of recombinant human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) was also altered under these conditions; the sialylation, fucosylation and antennarity decreased, while the proportion of neutral structures increased. A continuous culture set-up was subsequently used to understand the control of HCG glycosylation in the presence of varied glutamine concentrations; when glycolytic flux was reduced in the absence of glutamine, the glycosylation changes that were observed in shake flask culture were similarly detected. The intracellular content of UDP-GlcNAc was also reduced, which correlated with a decrease in sialylation and antennarity of the N-linked glycans attached to HCG. Conclusions The use of metabolic flux analysis illustrated a case of steady state multiplicity, where use of the same operating conditions at each steady state resulted in altered flux through glycolysis and the TCA cycle. This study clearly demonstrated that the control of glycoprotein microheterogeneity may be examined by use of a continuous culture system, metabolic flux analysis and assay of intracellular nucleotides. This system advances our knowledge of the relationship between metabolic flux and the glycosylation of biotherapeutics in CHO cells and will be of benefit to the bioprocessing industry.

  7. Measurement of neutron flux distribution by semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obradovic, D.; Bosevski, T.

    1964-01-01

    Application of semiconductor detectors for measuring neutron flux distribution is about 10 times faster than measurements by activation foils and demands significantly lower reactor power. Following corrections are avoided: mass of activation foils which influences the self shielding, nuclear decay during activity measurements; counter dead-time. It is possible to control the measured data during experiment and repeat measurements if needed. Precision of the measurement is higher since it is possible to choose the wanted statistics. The method described in this paper is applied for measurements at the RB reactor. It is concluded that the method is suitable for fast measurements but the activation analysis is still indispensable

  8. Co-regulation of metabolic genes is better explained by flux coupling than by network distance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Notebaart

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To what extent can modes of gene regulation be explained by systems-level properties of metabolic networks? Prior studies on co-regulation of metabolic genes have mainly focused on graph-theoretical features of metabolic networks and demonstrated a decreasing level of co-expression with increasing network distance, a naïve, but widely used, topological index. Others have suggested that static graph representations can poorly capture dynamic functional associations, e.g., in the form of dependence of metabolic fluxes across genes in the network. Here, we systematically tested the relative importance of metabolic flux coupling and network position on gene co-regulation, using a genome-scale metabolic model of Escherichia coli. After validating the computational method with empirical data on flux correlations, we confirm that genes coupled by their enzymatic fluxes not only show similar expression patterns, but also share transcriptional regulators and frequently reside in the same operon. In contrast, we demonstrate that network distance per se has relatively minor influence on gene co-regulation. Moreover, the type of flux coupling can explain refined properties of the regulatory network that are ignored by simple graph-theoretical indices. Our results underline the importance of studying functional states of cellular networks to define physiologically relevant associations between genes and should stimulate future developments of novel functional genomic tools.

  9. Deriving metabolic engineering strategies from genome-scale modeling with flux ratio constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Jiun Y; Nazem-Bokaee, Hadi; Freedman, Benjamin G; Athamneh, Ahmad I M; Senger, Ryan S

    2013-05-01

    Optimized production of bio-based fuels and chemicals from microbial cell factories is a central goal of systems metabolic engineering. To achieve this goal, a new computational method of using flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio) was further developed in this research and applied to five case studies to evaluate and design metabolic engineering strategies. The approach was implemented using publicly available genome-scale metabolic flux models. Synthetic pathways were added to these models along with flux ratio constraints by FBrAtio to achieve increased (i) cellulose production from Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) isobutanol production from Saccharomyces cerevisiae; (iii) acetone production from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803; (iv) H2 production from Escherichia coli MG1655; and (v) isopropanol, butanol, and ethanol (IBE) production from engineered Clostridium acetobutylicum. The FBrAtio approach was applied to each case to simulate a metabolic engineering strategy already implemented experimentally, and flux ratios were continually adjusted to find (i) the end-limit of increased production using the existing strategy, (ii) new potential strategies to increase production, and (iii) the impact of these metabolic engineering strategies on product yield and culture growth. The FBrAtio approach has the potential to design "fine-tuned" metabolic engineering strategies in silico that can be implemented directly with available genomic tools. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Influence of the late winter bloom on migrant zooplankton metabolism and its implications on export fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzeys, S.; Yebra, L.; Almeida, C.; Bécognée, P.; Hernández-León, S.

    2011-12-01

    Studies on carbon active fluxes due to diel migrants are scarce and critical for carbon flux models and biogeochemical estimates. We studied the temporal variability and vertical distribution of biomass, indices of feeding and respiration of the zooplanktonic community north off the Canary Islands during the end of the late winter bloom, in order to assess vertical carbon fluxes in this area. Biomass distribution during the day presented two dense layers of organisms at 0-200 m and around 500 m, whereas at night, most of the biomass concentrated in the epipelagic layer. The gut pigment flux (0.05-0.18 mgC·m - 2 ·d - 1 ) represented 0.22% of the estimated passive export flux (POC flux) while potential ingestion represented 3.91% of the POC (1.24-3.40 mgC·m - 2 ·d - 1 ). The active respiratory flux (0.50-1.36 mgC·m - 2 ·d - 1 ) was only 1.57% of the POC flux. The total carbon flux mediated by diel migrants (respiration plus potential ingestion) ranged between 3.37 and 9.22% of the POC flux; which is three-fold higher than calculating ingestion fluxes from gut pigments. Our results suggest that the fluxes by diel migrants play a small role in the downward flux of carbon in the open ocean during the post-bloom period.

  11. SUMOFLUX: A Generalized Method for Targeted 13C Metabolic Flux Ratio Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogadeeva, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic fluxes are a cornerstone of cellular physiology that emerge from a complex interplay of enzymes, carriers, and nutrients. The experimental assessment of in vivo intracellular fluxes using stable isotopic tracers is essential if we are to understand metabolic function and regulation. Flux estimation based on 13C or 2H labeling relies on complex simulation and iterative fitting; processes that necessitate a level of expertise that ordinarily preclude the non-expert user. To overcome this, we have developed SUMOFLUX, a methodology that is broadly applicable to the targeted analysis of 13C-metabolic fluxes. By combining surrogate modeling and machine learning, we trained a predictor to specialize in estimating flux ratios from measurable 13C-data. SUMOFLUX targets specific flux features individually, which makes it fast, user-friendly, applicable to experimental design and robust in terms of experimental noise and exchange flux magnitude. Collectively, we predict that SUMOFLUX's properties realistically pave the way to high-throughput flux analyses. PMID:27626798

  12. MCNP and visualization of neutron flux and power distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, L.; Lengar, I.; Zerovnik, G.; Ravnik, M.

    2009-01-01

    The visualization of neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIG A type research reactor and typical PWR) and one thermonuclear reactor (tokamak type) are treated in the paper. The distributions are calculated with MCNP computer code and presented using Amira and Voxler software. The results in the form of figures are presented in the paper together with comments qualitatively explaining the figures. The remembrance of most of the people is better, if they visualize a process. Therefore a representation of the reactor and neutron transport parameters is a convenient modern educational tool for (nuclear power plant) operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for core and irradiation planning. (authors)

  13. Genealogy profiling through strain improvement by using metabolic network analysis: metabolic flux genealogy of several generations of lysine-producing corynebacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Christoph; Heinzle, Elmar

    2002-12-01

    A comprehensive approach of metabolite balancing, (13)C tracer studies, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, and isotopomer modeling was applied for comparative metabolic network analysis of a genealogy of five successive generations of lysine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. The five strains examined (C. glutamicum ATCC 13032, 13287, 21253, 21526, and 21543) were previously obtained by random mutagenesis and selection. Throughout the genealogy, the lysine yield in batch cultures increased markedly from 1.2 to 24.9% relative to the glucose uptake flux. Strain optimization was accompanied by significant changes in intracellular flux distributions. The relative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux successively increased, clearly corresponding to the product yield. Moreover, the anaplerotic net flux increased almost twofold as a consequence of concerted regulation of C(3) carboxylation and C(4) decarboxylation fluxes to cover the increased demand for lysine formation; thus, the overall increase was a consequence of concerted regulation of C(3) carboxylation and C(4) decarboxylation fluxes. The relative flux through isocitrate dehydrogenase dropped from 82.7% in the wild type to 59.9% in the lysine-producing mutants. In contrast to the NADPH demand, which increased from 109 to 172% due to the increasing lysine yield, the overall NADPH supply remained constant between 185 and 196%, resulting in a decrease in the apparent NADPH excess through strain optimization. Extrapolated to industrial lysine producers, the NADPH supply might become a limiting factor. The relative contributions of PPP and the tricarboxylic acid cycle to NADPH generation changed markedly, indicating that C. glutamicum is able to maintain a constant supply of NADPH under completely different flux conditions. Statistical analysis by a Monte Carlo approach revealed high precision for the estimated fluxes, underlining the

  14. Study of AMPK-Regulated Metabolic Fluxes in Neurons Using the Seahorse XFe Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, Claudia; Kluza, Jérome; Marchetti, Philippe; Buée, Luc; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2018-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is the intracellular master energy sensor and metabolic regulator. AMPK is involved in cell energy homeostasis through the regulation of glycolytic flux and mitochondrial biogenesis. Interestingly, metabolic dysfunctions and AMPK deregulations are observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's. While these deregulations could play a key role in the development of these diseases, the study of metabolic fluxes has remained quite challenging and time-consuming. In this chapter, we describe the Seahorse XFe respirometry assay as a fundamental experimental tool to investigate the role of AMPK in controlling and modulating cell metabolic fluxes in living and intact differentiated primary neurons. The Seahorse XFe respirometry assay allows the real-time monitoring of glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration from different kind of cells, tissues, and isolated mitochondria. Here, we specify a protocol optimized for primary neuronal cells using several energy substrates such as glucose, pyruvate, lactate, glutamine, and ketone bodies. Nevertheless, this protocol can easily be adapted to monitor metabolic fluxes from other types of cells, tissues, or isolated mitochondria by taking into account the notes proposed for each key step of this assay.

  15. Dynamic metabolic flux analysis using B-splines to study the effects of temperature shift on CHO cell metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica S. Martínez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic flux analysis (MFA is widely used to estimate intracellular fluxes. Conventional MFA, however, is limited to continuous cultures and the mid-exponential growth phase of batch cultures. Dynamic MFA (DMFA has emerged to characterize time-resolved metabolic fluxes for the entire culture period. Here, the linear DMFA approach was extended using B-spline fitting (B-DMFA to estimate mass balanced fluxes. Smoother fits were achieved using reduced number of knots and parameters. Additionally, computation time was greatly reduced using a new heuristic algorithm for knot placement. B-DMFA revealed that Chinese hamster ovary cells shifted from 37 °C to 32 °C maintained a constant IgG volume-specific productivity, whereas the productivity for the controls peaked during mid-exponential growth phase and declined afterward. The observed 42% increase in product titer at 32 °C was explained by a prolonged cell growth with high cell viability, a larger cell volume and a more stable volume-specific productivity. Keywords: Dynamic, Metabolism, Flux analysis, CHO cells, Temperature shift, B-spline curve fitting

  16. Random distribution of nucleoli in metabolic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, R.J.; Waterman, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    Hasofer (1974) has studied a probabilistic model for the fusion of nucleoli in metabolic cells. The nucleoli are uniformly distributed at points in the nucleus, assumed to be a sphere. The nucleoli grow from a point to a maximum size during interphase, and fusion is said to occur if the nucleoli touch. For this model, Hasofer calculated the probability of fusion and found it much smaller than experimental data would indicate. Experimental data of this type is taken by use of a microscope where a two-dimensional view or projection of the three-dimensional cell is obtained. Hasofer implicitly assumes that actual fusion can be distinguished from the case where the two nucleoli do not touch but their two-dimensional projections overlap. It is assumed, in this letter, that these two cases cannot be distinguished. The probability obtained by Beckman and Waterman is larger than Hasofer's and a much better fit to the experimental data is obtained. Even if true fusion can be unfailingly distinguished from overlap of the two-dimensional projections, it is hoped that these calculations will allow someone to propose the correct (non-uniform) model. It is concluded, for the assumptions used, that there is not sufficient evidence to reject the hypothesis of uniform distribution of the nucleoli.

  17. OptFlux: an open-source software platform for in silico metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Isabel; Maia, Paulo; Evangelista, Pedro; Vilaça, Paulo; Soares, Simão; Pinto, José P; Nielsen, Jens; Patil, Kiran R; Ferreira, Eugénio C; Rocha, Miguel

    2010-04-19

    Over the last few years a number of methods have been proposed for the phenotype simulation of microorganisms under different environmental and genetic conditions. These have been used as the basis to support the discovery of successful genetic modifications of the microbial metabolism to address industrial goals. However, the use of these methods has been restricted to bioinformaticians or other expert researchers. The main aim of this work is, therefore, to provide a user-friendly computational tool for Metabolic Engineering applications. OptFlux is an open-source and modular software aimed at being the reference computational application in the field. It is the first tool to incorporate strain optimization tasks, i.e., the identification of Metabolic Engineering targets, using Evolutionary Algorithms/Simulated Annealing metaheuristics or the previously proposed OptKnock algorithm. It also allows the use of stoichiometric metabolic models for (i) phenotype simulation of both wild-type and mutant organisms, using the methods of Flux Balance Analysis, Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment or Regulatory on/off Minimization of Metabolic flux changes, (ii) Metabolic Flux Analysis, computing the admissible flux space given a set of measured fluxes, and (iii) pathway analysis through the calculation of Elementary Flux Modes. OptFlux also contemplates several methods for model simplification and other pre-processing operations aimed at reducing the search space for optimization algorithms. The software supports importing/exporting to several flat file formats and it is compatible with the SBML standard. OptFlux has a visualization module that allows the analysis of the model structure that is compatible with the layout information of Cell Designer, allowing the superimposition of simulation results with the model graph. The OptFlux software is freely available, together with documentation and other resources, thus bridging the gap from research in strain optimization

  18. Distribution and metabolism of quaternary amines in salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary M.

    1985-01-01

    Quaternary amines such as glycine betaine (GBT) are common osmotically active solutes in much of the marine biota. GBT is accumulated by various bacteria, algae, higher plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates in response to salinity or water stresses; in some species, GBT occurs at tens to hundreds of millimolar concentrations and can account for a significant fraction of total nitrogen. Initial studies suggest that GBT is readily converted to two potential methane precursors, trimethylamine (TMA) and acetate, in anoxic sediments. TMA is apparently the most important methane precursor in surface sediments containing sulfate reducing bacteria. In salt marshes, the bulk of the methane formed may be due to the metabolism of TMA rather than other substrates. Current research is focussed on testing this hypothesis and on determining the role of quaternary amino osmoregulatory solutes in methane fluxes from marine environments. Preliminary studies have dealt with several problems: (1) determination of GBT concentrations in the dominant flora and fauna of salt marshes; (2) synthesis of radiolabelled GBT for metabolic studies; and (3) determination of fates of BGT in marine sediments using radiotracers. Both GC and HPLC techniques have been used to assay GBT concentrations in plant and animal tissues. S. alterniflora is probably the only significant source of GBT (and indirectly of methane) since the biomass and distribution of most other species is limited. Current estimates suggest that S. alterniflora GBT could account for most of the methane efflux from salt marshes.

  19. IsoDesign: a software for optimizing the design of 13C-metabolic flux analysis experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Pierre; Sokol, Serguei; Letisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    The growing demand for (13) C-metabolic flux analysis ((13) C-MFA) in the field of metabolic engineering and systems biology is driving the need to rationalize expensive and time-consuming (13) C-labeling experiments. Experimental design is a key step in improving both the number of fluxes that can be calculated from a set of isotopic data and the precision of flux values. We present IsoDesign, a software that enables these parameters to be maximized by optimizing the isotopic composition of the label input. It can be applied to (13) C-MFA investigations using a broad panel of analytical tools (MS, MS/MS, (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR, etc.) individually or in combination. It includes a visualization module to intuitively select the optimal label input depending on the biological question to be addressed. Applications of IsoDesign are described, with an example of the entire (13) C-MFA workflow from the experimental design to the flux map including important practical considerations. IsoDesign makes the experimental design of (13) C-MFA experiments more accessible to a wider biological community. IsoDesign is distributed under an open source license at http://metasys.insa-toulouse.fr/software/isodes/ © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in nonstationary metabolic flux analysis: The case of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eHeise

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014. Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labelling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from nonstationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements.

  1. Detection of Metabolic Fluxes of O and H Atoms into Intracellular Water in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Quaroni, Luca; Podlesak, David W.; Zlateva, Theodora; Bollinger, Nikki; McAllister, Aaron; Lott, Michael J.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic processes result in the release and exchange of H and O atoms from organic material as well as some inorganic salts and gases. These fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water result in an isotopic gradient that can be measured experimentally. Using isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, we revealed that slightly over 50% of the H and O atoms in the intracellular water of exponentially-growing cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts were isotopically distinct from growth medium water. We then employed infrared spectromicroscopy to detect in real time the flux of H atoms in these same cells. Importantly, both of these techniques indicate that the H and O fluxes are dependent on metabolic processes; cells that are in lag phase or are quiescent exhibit a much smaller flux. In addition, water extracted from the muscle tissue of rats contained a population of H and O atoms that were isotopically distinct from body water, consistent with the results obtained using the cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts. Together these data demonstrate that metabolic processes produce fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water, and that these fluxes can be detected and measured in both cultured mammalian cells and in mammalian tissue. PMID:22848359

  2. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis for systematic metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for overproduction of fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Ghosh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Efficient redirection of microbial metabolism into the abundant production of desired bioproducts remains non-trivial. Here we used flux-based modeling approaches to improve yields of fatty acids in S. cerevisiae. We combined 13C labeling data with comprehensive genome-scale models to shed light onto microbial metabolism and improve metabolic engineering efforts. We concentrated on studying the balance of acetyl-CoA, a precursor metabolite for the biosynthesis of fatty acids. A genome-wide acetyl-CoA balance study showed ATP citrate lyase from Y. lipolytica as a robust source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA and malate synthase as a desirable target for down-regulation in terms of acetyl-CoA consumption. These genetic modifications were applied to S. cerevisiae WRY2, a strain that is capable of producing 460 mg L of free fatty acids. With the addition of ATP citrate lyase and down-regulation of malate synthase the engineered strain produced 26 per cent more free fatty acids. Further increases in free fatty acid production of 33 per cent were obtained by knocking out the cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which flux analysis had shown was competing for carbon flux upstream with the carbon flux through the acetyl-CoA production pathway in the cytoplasm. In total, the genetic interventions applied in this work increased fatty acid production by 70 per cent.

  3. Metabolic fluxes in the central carbon metabolism of Dinoroseobacter shibae and Phaeobacter gallaeciensis, two members of the marine Roseobacter clade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabus Ralf

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present work the central carbon metabolism of Dinoroseobacter shibae and Phaeobacter gallaeciensis was studied at the level of metabolic fluxes. These two strains belong to the marine Roseobacter clade, a dominant bacterial group in various marine habitats, and represent surface-associated, biofilm-forming growth (P. gallaeciensis and symbiotic growth with eukaryotic algae (D. shibae. Based on information from recently sequenced genomes, a rich repertoire of pathways has been identified in the carbon core metabolism of these organisms, but little is known about the actual contribution of the various reactions in vivo. Results Using 13C labelling techniques in specifically designed experiments, it could be shown that glucose-grown cells of D. shibae catabolise the carbon source exclusively via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, whereas alternative routes of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway are obviously utilised for anabolic purposes only. Enzyme assays confirmed this flux pattern and link the lack of glycolytic flux to the absence of phosphofructokinase activity. The previously suggested formation of phosphoenolpyruvate from pyruvate during mixotrophic CO2 assimilation was found to be inactive under the conditions studied. Moreover, it could be shown that pyruvate carboxylase is involved in CO2 assimilation and that the cyclic respiratory mode of the TCA cycle is utilised. Interestingly, the use of intracellular pathways was highly similar for P. gallaeciensis. Conclusion The present study reveals the first insight into pathway utilisation within the Roseobacter group. Fluxes through major intracellular pathways of the central carbon metabolism, which are closely linked to the various important traits found for the Roseobacter clade, could be determined. The close similarity of fluxes between the two physiologically rather different species might provide the first indication of more general key properties among

  4. C-13 Tracer experiments and metabolite balancing for metabolic flux analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Karsten; Marx, A.; de Graaf, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    performed independently for a wild-type strain of Aspergillus oryzae producing alpha-amylase. Two different nitrogen sources, NH4+ and NO3-, have been used to investigate the influence of the NADPH requirements on the intracellular flux distribution. The two different approaches to the calculation of fluxes...

  5. The role of metabolism in modulating CO2 fluxes in boreal lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Matthew J.; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2016-10-01

    Lake CO2 emissions are increasingly recognized as an important component of the global CO2 cycle, yet the origin of these emissions is not clear, as specific contributions from metabolism and in-lake cycling, versus external inputs, are not well defined. To assess the coupling of lake metabolism with CO2 concentrations and fluxes, we estimated steady state ratios of gross primary production to respiration (GPP:R) and rates of net ecosystem production (NEP = GPP-R) from surface water O2 dynamics (concentration and stable isotopes) in 187 boreal lakes spanning long environmental gradients. Our findings suggest that internal metabolism plays a dominant role in regulating CO2 fluxes in most lakes, but this pattern only emerges when examined at a resolution that accounts for the vastly differing relationships between lake metabolism and CO2 fluxes. Fluxes of CO2 exceeded those from NEP in over half the lakes, but unexpectedly, these effects were most common and typically largest in a subset ( 30% of total) of net autotrophic lakes that nevertheless emitted CO2. Equally surprising, we found no environmental characteristics that distinguished this category from the more common net heterotrophic, CO2 outgassing lakes. Excess CO2 fluxes relative to NEP were best predicted by catchment structure and hydrologic properties, and we infer from a combination of methods that both catchment inputs and internal anaerobic processes may have contributed this excess CO2. Together, our findings show that the link between lake metabolism and CO2 fluxes is often strong but can vary widely across the boreal biome, having important implications for catchment-wide C budgets.

  6. Investigating The Neutron Flux Distribution Of The Miniature Neutron Source Reactor MNSR Type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hoang Hai; Do Quang Binh

    2011-01-01

    Neutron flux distribution is the important characteristic of nuclear reactor. In this article, four energy group neutron flux distributions of the miniature neutron source reactor MNSR type versus radial and axial directions are investigated in case the control rod is fully withdrawn. In addition, the effect of control rod positions on the thermal neutron flux distribution is also studied. The group constants for all reactor components are generated by the WIMSD code, and the neutron flux distributions are calculated by the CITATION code. The results show that the control rod positions only affect in the planning area for distribution in the region around the control rod. (author)

  7. 13C metabolic flux analysis: optimal design of isotopic labeling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2013-12-01

    Measuring fluxes by 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) has become a key activity in chemical and pharmaceutical biotechnology. Optimal design of isotopic labeling experiments is of central importance to 13C-MFA as it determines the precision with which fluxes can be estimated. Traditional methods for selecting isotopic tracers and labeling measurements did not fully utilize the power of 13C-MFA. Recently, new approaches were developed for optimal design of isotopic labeling experiments based on parallel labeling experiments and algorithms for rational selection of tracers. In addition, advanced isotopic labeling measurements were developed based on tandem mass spectrometry. Combined, these approaches can dramatically improve the quality of 13C-MFA results with important applications in metabolic engineering and biotechnology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic-flux analysis of hydrogen production pathway in Citrobacter amalonaticus Y19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Mi-Sun [Bioenergy Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea); Kim, Heung-Joo; Park, Sunghoon [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering and Institute for Environmental Technology and Industry, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea); Ryu, Dewey D.Y. [Biochemical Engineering Program, Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    For the newly isolated chemoheterotrophic bacterium Citrobacter amalonaticus Y19, anaerobic glucose metabolism and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production pathway were studied using batch cultivation and an in silico metabolic-flux analysis. Batch cultivation was conducted under varying initial glucose concentration between 1.5 and 9.5 g/L with quantitative measurement of major metabolites to obtain accurate carbon material balance. The metabolic flux of Y19 was analyzed using a metabolic-pathway model which was constructed from 81 biochemical reactions. The linear optimization program MetaFluxNet was employed for the analysis. When the specific growth rate of cells was chosen as an objective function, the model described the batch culture characteristics of Ci. amalonaticus Y19 reasonably well. When the specific H{sub 2} production rate was selected as an objective function, on the other hand, the achievable maximal H{sub 2} production yield (8.7molH{sub 2}/mol glucose) and the metabolic pathway enabling the high H{sub 2} yield were identified. The pathway involved non-native NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase and H{sub 2} production from NAD(P)H which were supplied at a high rate from glucose degradation through the pentose phosphate pathway. (author)

  9. Towards high resolution analysis of metabolic flux in cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, James K; Manteiga, Sara; Lee, Kyongbum

    2013-10-01

    Metabolism extracts chemical energy from nutrients, uses this energy to form building blocks for biosynthesis, and interconverts between various small molecules that coordinate the activities of cellular pathways. The metabolic state of a cell is increasingly recognized to determine the phenotype of not only metabolically active cell types such as liver, muscle, and adipose, but also other specialized cell types such as neurons and immune cells. This review focuses on methods to quantify intracellular reaction flux as a measure of cellular metabolic activity, with emphasis on studies involving cells of mammalian tissue. Two key areas are highlighted for future development, single cell metabolomics and noninvasive imaging, which could enable spatiotemporally resolved analysis and thereby overcome issues of heterogeneity, a distinctive feature of tissue metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Protein Cost of Metabolic Fluxes: Prediction from Enzymatic Rate Laws and Cost Minimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Noor

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial growth depends crucially on metabolic fluxes, which are limited by the cell's capacity to maintain metabolic enzymes. The necessary enzyme amount per unit flux is a major determinant of metabolic strategies both in evolution and bioengineering. It depends on enzyme parameters (such as kcat and KM constants, but also on metabolite concentrations. Moreover, similar amounts of different enzymes might incur different costs for the cell, depending on enzyme-specific properties such as protein size and half-life. Here, we developed enzyme cost minimization (ECM, a scalable method for computing enzyme amounts that support a given metabolic flux at a minimal protein cost. The complex interplay of enzyme and metabolite concentrations, e.g. through thermodynamic driving forces and enzyme saturation, would make it hard to solve this optimization problem directly. By treating enzyme cost as a function of metabolite levels, we formulated ECM as a numerically tractable, convex optimization problem. Its tiered approach allows for building models at different levels of detail, depending on the amount of available data. Validating our method with measured metabolite and protein levels in E. coli central metabolism, we found typical prediction fold errors of 4.1 and 2.6, respectively, for the two kinds of data. This result from the cost-optimized metabolic state is significantly better than randomly sampled metabolite profiles, supporting the hypothesis that enzyme cost is important for the fitness of E. coli. ECM can be used to predict enzyme levels and protein cost in natural and engineered pathways, and could be a valuable computational tool to assist metabolic engineering projects. Furthermore, it establishes a direct connection between protein cost and thermodynamics, and provides a physically plausible and computationally tractable way to include enzyme kinetics into constraint-based metabolic models, where kinetics have usually been ignored or

  11. Understanding the anisotropic ion distributions within magnetotail dipolarizing flux bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Runov, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Birn, J.

    2017-12-01

    Dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs), earthward-propagating structures with enhanced northward magnetic field (Bz) component, are usually believed to carry a different plasma population from that in the ambient magnetotail plasma sheet. The ion distribution functions within the DFB, however, are recently found to be largely controlled by the ion adiabaticity parameter κ in the ambient plasma sheet outside the DFBs. According to these observations, the ambient κ values of 2-3 usually correspond to a strong perpendicular anisotropy of suprathermal ions within the DFBs, whereas for lower κ values the ions inside the DFBs become more isotropic. Here we utilize a simple, test-particle model to explore the nature of the anisotropy and its dependence on the ambient κ values. We find that the ion anisotropy originates from successive ion reflections and reentries to the DFBs, during which the ions can be consecutively accelerated in the perpendicular direction by the DFB-carried electric field. This acceleration process may be interrupted, however, when the magnetic field lines are highly curved in the ambient plasma sheet. In this case, the ion trajectories are most stochastic outside the DFB region, which makes the reflected ions less likely to return to the DFBs for another cycle of acceleration; as a consequence, the perpendicular ion anisotropy does not appear. Given that the DFB ions are a free energy source for instabilities when they are injected towards Earth, our simple model (that reproduces most observational features on the anisotropic DFB ion distributions) may shed new lights on the coupling process between the magnetotail and the inner magneosphere.

  12. Metabolic flux distribution and mathematical models for dynamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-21

    Mar 21, 2011 ... RNA and DNA), which require NADPH as a redox- equivalent. In Escherichia ...... sleep. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 7(6): 712-713. Hofmann E, Hopperschlager G (1982). ... Effect of cra gene knockout together with edd and iclR genes.

  13. Flux-Enabled Exploration of the Role of Sip1 in Galactose Yeast Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Shymansky

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C MFA is an important systems biology technique that has been used to investigate microbial metabolism for decades. The heterotrimer Snf1 kinase complex plays a key role in the preference Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits for glucose over galactose, a phenomenon known as glucose repression or carbon catabolite repression. The SIP1 gene, encoding a part of this complex, has received little attention, presumably, because its knockout lacks a growth phenotype. We present a fluxomic investigation of the relative effects of the presence of galactose in classically glucose-repressing media and/or knockout of SIP1 using a multi-scale variant of 13C MFA known as 2-Scale 13C metabolic flux analysis (2S-13C MFA. In this study, all strains have the galactose metabolism deactivated (gal1Δ background so as to be able to separate the metabolic effects purely related to glucose repression from those arising from galactose metabolism. The resulting flux profiles reveal that the presence of galactose in classically glucose-repressing conditions, for a CEN.PK113-7D gal1Δ background, results in a substantial decrease in pentose phosphate pathway (PPP flux and increased flow from cytosolic pyruvate and malate through the mitochondria toward cytosolic branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. These fluxomic redistributions are accompanied by a higher maximum specific growth rate, both seemingly in violation of glucose repression. Deletion of SIP1 in the CEN.PK113-7D gal1Δ cells grown in mixed glucose/galactose medium results in a further increase. Knockout of this gene in cells grown in glucose-only medium results in no change in growth rate and a corresponding decrease in glucose and ethanol exchange fluxes and flux through pathways involved in aspartate/threonine biosynthesis. Glucose repression appears to be violated at a 1/10 ratio of galactose-to-glucose. Based on the scientific literature, we may have conducted our experiments

  14. In vivo dynamics of galactose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Metabolic fluxes and metabolite levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of galactose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied by analyzing the metabolic response of the CEN.PK 113-7D wild-type strain when exposed to a galactose pulse during aerobic growth in a galactose-limited steady-state cultivation at a dilution rate of 0.097 h(-1). A fast...

  15. Development of Computational Tools for Metabolic Model Curation, Flux Elucidation and Strain Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranas, Costas D

    2012-05-21

    An overarching goal of the Department of Energy mission is the efficient deployment and engineering of microbial and plant systems to enable biomass conversion in pursuit of high energy density liquid biofuels. This has spurred the pace at which new organisms are sequenced and annotated. This torrent of genomic information has opened the door to understanding metabolism in not just skeletal pathways and a handful of microorganisms but for truly genome-scale reconstructions derived for hundreds of microbes and plants. Understanding and redirecting metabolism is crucial because metabolic fluxes are unique descriptors of cellular physiology that directly assess the current cellular state and quantify the effect of genetic engineering interventions. At the same time, however, trying to keep pace with the rate of genomic data generation has ushered in a number of modeling and computational challenges related to (i) the automated assembly, testing and correction of genome-scale metabolic models, (ii) metabolic flux elucidation using labeled isotopes, and (iii) comprehensive identification of engineering interventions leading to the desired metabolism redirection.

  16. To be certain about the uncertainty: Bayesian statistics for 13 C metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theorell, Axel; Leweke, Samuel; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2017-11-01

    13 C Metabolic Fluxes Analysis ( 13 C MFA) remains to be the most powerful approach to determine intracellular metabolic reaction rates. Decisions on strain engineering and experimentation heavily rely upon the certainty with which these fluxes are estimated. For uncertainty quantification, the vast majority of 13 C MFA studies relies on confidence intervals from the paradigm of Frequentist statistics. However, it is well known that the confidence intervals for a given experimental outcome are not uniquely defined. As a result, confidence intervals produced by different methods can be different, but nevertheless equally valid. This is of high relevance to 13 C MFA, since practitioners regularly use three different approximate approaches for calculating confidence intervals. By means of a computational study with a realistic model of the central carbon metabolism of E. coli, we provide strong evidence that confidence intervals used in the field depend strongly on the technique with which they were calculated and, thus, their use leads to misinterpretation of the flux uncertainty. In order to provide a better alternative to confidence intervals in 13 C MFA, we demonstrate that credible intervals from the paradigm of Bayesian statistics give more reliable flux uncertainty quantifications which can be readily computed with high accuracy using Markov chain Monte Carlo. In addition, the widely applied chi-square test, as a means of testing whether the model reproduces the data, is examined closer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Metabolic flux analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under mixotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagesan, Swathi; Gaudana, Sandeep B; Sinha, Avinash; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2013-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes capable of utilizing solar energy to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide to biomass. Despite several "proof of principle" studies, low product yield is an impediment in commercialization of cyanobacteria-derived biofuels. Estimation of intracellular reaction rates by (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) would be a step toward enhancing biofuel yield via metabolic engineering. We report (13)C-MFA for Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, known for enhanced hydrogen yield under mixotrophic conditions. Rates of reactions in the central carbon metabolism under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions were estimated by monitoring the competitive incorporation of (12)C and (13)C from unlabeled CO2 and uniformly labeled glycerol, respectively, into terminal metabolites such as amino acids. The observed labeling patterns suggest mixotrophic growth under both the conditions, with a larger fraction of unlabeled carbon in nitrate-sufficient cultures asserting a greater contribution of carbon fixation by photosynthesis and an anaplerotic pathway. Indeed, flux analysis complements the higher growth observed under nitrate-sufficient conditions. On the other hand, the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle was greater in nitrate-deficient conditions, possibly to supply the precursors and reducing equivalents needed for nitrogen fixation. In addition, an enhanced flux through fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase possibly suggests the organism's preferred mode under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The (13)C-MFA results complement the reported predictions by flux balance analysis and provide quantitative insight into the organism's distinct metabolic features under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions.

  18. Investigating the impact of uneven magnetic flux density distribution on core loss estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niroumand, Farideh Javidi; Nymand, Morten; Wang, Yiren

    2017-01-01

    is calculated according to an effective flux density value and the macroscopic dimensions of the cores. However, the flux distribution in the core can alter by core shapes and/or operating conditions due to nonlinear material properties. This paper studies the element-wise estimation of the loss in magnetic......There are several approaches for loss estimation in magnetic cores, and all these approaches highly rely on accurate information about flux density distribution in the cores. It is often assumed that the magnetic flux density evenly distributes throughout the core and the overall core loss...

  19. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Geobactermetallireducens during reduction of solubleFe(III)-NTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Garcia-Martin, Hector; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The tracer experiments showed that G. metallireducens containedcomplete biosynthesis pathways for essential metabolism, and this strainmight also have an unusual isoleucine biosynthesis route (usingacetyl-CoA and pyruvate as the precursors). The model indicated that over90 percent of the acetate was completely oxidized to CO2 via a completetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle while reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylaseand phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present under theseconditions, but enzymes in the glyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme wereabsent. Gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway were mainlyemployed for biosynthesis and accounted for less than 3 percent of totalcarbon consumption. The model also indicated surprisingly highreversibility in the reaction between oxoglutarate and succinate. Thisstep operates close to the thermodynamic equilibrium possibly becausesuccinate is synthesized via a transferase reaction, and the conversionof oxoglutarate to succinate is a rate limiting step for carbonmetabolism. These findings enable a better understanding of therelationship between genome annotation and extant metabolic pathways inG. metallireducens.

  20. Distribution Functions of Sizes and Fluxes Determined from Supra-Arcade Downflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, D.; Savage, S.

    2011-01-01

    The frequency distributions of sizes and fluxes of supra-arcade downflows (SADs) provide information about the process of their creation. For example, a fractal creation process may be expected to yield a power-law distribution of sizes and/or fluxes. We examine 120 cross-sectional areas and magnetic flux estimates found by Savage & McKenzie for SADs, and find that (1) the areas are consistent with a log-normal distribution and (2) the fluxes are consistent with both a log-normal and an exponential distribution. Neither set of measurements is compatible with a power-law distribution nor a normal distribution. As a demonstration of the applicability of these findings to improved understanding of reconnection, we consider a simple SAD growth scenario with minimal assumptions, capable of producing a log-normal distribution.

  1. Metabolic flux balance analysis and the in silico analysis of Escherichia coli K-12 gene deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Jeremy S

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing and bioinformatics are producing detailed lists of the molecular components contained in many prokaryotic organisms. From this 'parts catalogue' of a microbial cell, in silico representations of integrated metabolic functions can be constructed and analyzed using flux balance analysis (FBA. FBA is particularly well-suited to study metabolic networks based on genomic, biochemical, and strain specific information. Results Herein, we have utilized FBA to interpret and analyze the metabolic capabilities of Escherichia coli. We have computationally mapped the metabolic capabilities of E. coli using FBA and examined the optimal utilization of the E. coli metabolic pathways as a function of environmental variables. We have used an in silico analysis to identify seven gene products of central metabolism (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, electron transport system essential for aerobic growth of E. coli on glucose minimal media, and 15 gene products essential for anaerobic growth on glucose minimal media. The in silico tpi-, zwf, and pta- mutant strains were examined in more detail by mapping the capabilities of these in silico isogenic strains. Conclusions We found that computational models of E. coli metabolism based on physicochemical constraints can be used to interpret mutant behavior. These in silica results lead to a further understanding of the complex genotype-phenotype relation. Supplementary information: http://gcrg.ucsd.edu/supplementary_data/DeletionAnalysis/main.htm

  2. Flux distribution measurements in the Bruce B Unit 6 reactor using a transportable traveling flux detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, T.C.; Drewell, N.H.; Hall, D.S.; Lopez, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    A transportable traveling flux detector (TFD) system for use in power reactors has been developed and tested at Chalk River Nuclear Labs. in Canada. It consists of a miniature fission chamber, a motor drive mechanism, a computerized control unit, and a data acquisition subsystem. The TFD system was initially designed for the in situ calibration of fixed self-powered detectors in operating power reactors and for flux measurements to verify reactor physics calculations. However, this system can also be used as a general diagnostic tool for the investigation of apparent detector failures and flux anomalies and to determine the movement of reactor internal components. This paper describes the first successful use of the computerized TFD system in an operating Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) power reactor and the results obtained from the flux distribution measurements. An attempt is made to correlate minima in the flux profile with the locations of fuel channels so that future measurements can be used to determine the sag of the channels. Twenty-seven in-core flux detector assemblies in the 855-MW (electric) Unit 6 reactor of the Ontario Hydro Bruce B Generating Station were scanned

  3. Updates to a 13C metabolic flux analysis model for evaluating energy metabolism in cultured cerebellar granule neurons from neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekabsons, Mika B; Gebril, Hoda M; Wang, Yan-Hong; Avula, Bharathi; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-10-01

    A hexose phosphate recycling model previously developed to infer fluxes through the major glucose consuming pathways in cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) from neonatal rats metabolizing [1,2- 13 C 2 ]glucose was revised by considering reverse flux through the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and symmetrical succinate oxidation within the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The model adjusts three flux ratios to effect 13 C distribution in the hexose, pentose, and triose phosphate pools, and in TCA cycle malate to minimize the error between predicted and measured 13 C labeling in exported lactate (i.e., unlabeled, single-, double-, and triple-labeled; M, M1, M2, and M3, respectively). Inclusion of reverse non-oxidative PPP flux substantially increased the number of calculations but ultimately had relatively minor effects on the labeling of glycolytic metabolites. From the error-minimized solution in which the predicted M-M3 lactate differed by 0.49% from that measured by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, the neurons exhibited negligible forward non-oxidative PPP flux. Thus, no glucose was used by the pentose cycle despite explicit consideration of hexose phosphate recycling. Mitochondria consumed only 16% of glucose while 45% was exported as lactate by aerobic glycolysis. The remaining 39% of glucose was shunted to pentose phosphates presumably for de novo nucleotide synthesis, but the proportion metabolized through the oxidative PPP vs. the reverse non-oxidative PPP could not be determined. The lactate exported as M1 (2.5%) and M3 (1.2%) was attributed to malic enzyme, which was responsible for 7.8% of pyruvate production (vs. 92.2% by glycolysis). The updated model is more broadly applicable to different cell types by considering bi-directional flux through the non-oxidative PPP. Its application to cultured neurons utilizing glucose as the sole exogenous substrate has demonstrated substantial oxygen-independent glucose

  4. Flux Balance Analysis of Cyanobacterial Metabolism.The Metabolic Network of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knoop, H.; Gründel, M.; Zilliges, Y.; Lehmann, R.; Hoffmann, S.; Lockau, W.; Steuer, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2013), e1003081-e1003081 ISSN 1553-7358 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0256 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : SP STRAIN PCC-6803 * SP ATCC 51142 * photoautotrophic metabolism * anacystis-nidulans * reconstructions * pathway * plants * models * growth Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2013

  5. Enhancement of magnetic flux distribution in a DC superconducting electric motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, N A; Ewe, L S; Chin, K M

    2013-01-01

    Most motor designs require an air gap between the rotor and stator to enable the armature to rotate freely. The interaction of magnetic flux from rotor and stator within the air gap will provide the thrust for rotational motion. Thus, the understanding of magnetic flux in the vicinity of the air gap is very important to mathematically calculate the magnetic flux generated in the area. In this work, a finite element analysis was employed to study the behavior of the magnetic flux in view of designing a synchronous DC superconducting electric motor. The analysis provides an ideal magnetic flux distribution within the components of the motor. From the flux plot analysis, it indicates that flux losses are mainly in the forms of leakage and fringe effect. The analysis also shows that the flux density is high at the area around the air gap and the rotor. The high flux density will provide a high force area that enables the rotor to rotate. In contrast, the other parts of the motor body do not show high flux density indicating low distribution of flux. Consequently, a bench top model of a DC superconducting motor was developed where by motor with a 2-pole type winding was chosen. Each field coil was designed with a racetrack-shaped double pancake wound using DI-BSCCO Bi-2223 superconducting tapes. The performance and energy efficiency of the superconducting motor was superior when compared to the conventional motor with similar capacity.

  6. Metabolic flux profiling of MDCK cells during growth and canine adenovirus vector production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinhas, Nuno; Pais, Daniel A M; Koshkin, Alexey; Fernandes, Paulo; Coroadinha, Ana S; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2016-03-23

    Canine adenovirus vector type 2 (CAV2) represents an alternative to human adenovirus vectors for certain gene therapy applications, particularly neurodegenerative diseases. However, more efficient production processes, assisted by a greater understanding of the effect of infection on producer cells, are required. Combining [1,2-(13)C]glucose and [U-(13)C]glutamine, we apply for the first time (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) to study E1-transformed Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells metabolism during growth and CAV2 production. MDCK cells displayed a marked glycolytic and ammoniagenic metabolism, and (13)C data revealed a large fraction of glutamine-derived labelling in TCA cycle intermediates, emphasizing the role of glutamine anaplerosis. (13)C-MFA demonstrated the importance of pyruvate cycling in balancing glycolytic and TCA cycle activities, as well as occurrence of reductive alphaketoglutarate (AKG) carboxylation. By turn, CAV2 infection significantly upregulated fluxes through most central metabolism, including glycolysis, pentose-phosphate pathway, glutamine anaplerosis and, more prominently, reductive AKG carboxylation and cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A formation, suggestive of increased lipogenesis. Based on these results, we suggest culture supplementation strategies to stimulate nucleic acid and lipid biosynthesis for improved canine adenoviral vector production.

  7. Mapping cancer cell metabolism with 13 C flux analysis: Recent progress and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Scott Duckwall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The reprogramming of energy metabolism is emerging as an important molecular hallmark of cancer cells. Recent discoveries linking specific metabolic alterations to cancer development have strengthened the idea that altered metabolism is more than a side effect of malignant transformation, but may in fact be a functional driver of tumor growth and progression in some cancers. As a result, dysregulated metabolic pathways have become attractive targets for cancer therapeutics. This review highlights the application of 13 C metabolic flux analysis (MFA to map the flow of carbon through intracellular biochemical pathways of cancer cells. We summarize several recent applications of MFA that have identified novel biosynthetic pathways involved in cancer cell proliferation and shed light on the role of specific oncogenes in regulating these pathways. Through such studies, it has become apparent that the metabolic phenotypes of cancer cells are not as homogeneous as once thought, but instead depend strongly on the molecular alterations and environmental factors at play in each case.

  8. Magnesium - distribution and basic metabolism | Olhaberry | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnesium is extensively distributed in soil, water and plants. It is essential for ehzymatic reactions requiring adenosine triphosphate, and the recommended dietary allowance in man is 5 - 10 mg/kg/d. About 50% of magnesium in man is stored in bone, where it is regulated by parathyroid hormone'and 1,25(OH)2-D3.

  9. Linking high-resolution metabolic flux phenotypes and transcriptional regulation in yeast modulated by the global regulator Gcn4p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moxley, Joel F.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    2009-01-01

    . However, the potential of systems biology approaches is limited by difficulties in integrating metabolic measurements across the functional levels of the cell despite their being most closely linked to cellular phenotype. To address this limitation, we developed a model-based approach to correlate m......RNA and metabolic flux data that combines information from both interaction network models and flux determination models. We started by quantifying 5,764 mRNAs, 54 metabolites, and 83 experimental C-13-based reaction fluxes in continuous cultures of yeast under stress in the absence or presence of global regulator...... of metabolic flux (i.e., use of different reaction pathways) by transcriptional regulation and metabolite interaction density (i.e., level of pairwise metabolite-protein interactions) as a key biosynthetic control determinant. Furthermore, this model predicted flux rewiring in studies of follow...

  10. The nutritional status of Methanosarcina acetivorans regulates glycogen metabolism and gluconeogenesis and glycolysis fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Martínez, Michel Geovanni; Encalada, Rusely; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Reyes-García, Marco Antonio; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    Gluconeogenesis is an essential pathway in methanogens because they are unable to use exogenous hexoses as carbon source for cell growth. With the aim of understanding the regulatory mechanisms of central carbon metabolism in Methanosarcina acetivorans, the present study investigated gene expression, the activities and metabolic regulation of key enzymes, metabolite contents and fluxes of gluconeogenesis, as well as glycolysis and glycogen synthesis/degradation pathways. Cells were grown with methanol as a carbon source. Key enzymes were kinetically characterized at physiological pH/temperature. Active consumption of methanol during exponential cell growth correlated with significant methanogenesis, gluconeogenic flux and steady glycogen synthesis. After methanol exhaustion, cells reached the stationary growth phase, which correlated with the rise in glycogen consumption and glycolytic flux, decreased methanogenesis, negligible acetate production and an absence of gluconeogenesis. Elevated activities of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthetase complex and pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase suggested the generation of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate for glycogen synthesis. In the early stationary growth phase, the transcript contents and activities of pyruvate phosphate dikinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase and glycogen synthase decreased, whereas those of glycogen phosphorylase, ADP-phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase increased. Therefore, glycogen and gluconeogenic metabolites were synthesized when an external carbon source was provided. Once such a carbon source became depleted, glycolysis and methanogenesis fed by glycogen degradation provided the ATP supply. Weak inhibition of key enzymes by metabolites suggested that the pathways evaluated were mainly transcriptionally regulated. Because glycogen metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis are not present in all methanogens, the overall data suggest that glycogen storage might represent an environmental

  11. A procedure for the estimation over time of metabolic fluxes in scenarios where measurements are uncertain and/or insufficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picó Jesús

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An indirect approach is usually used to estimate the metabolic fluxes of an organism: couple the available measurements with known biological constraints (e.g. stoichiometry. Typically this estimation is done under a static point of view. Therefore, the fluxes so obtained are only valid while the environmental conditions and the cell state remain stable. However, estimating the evolution over time of the metabolic fluxes is valuable to investigate the dynamic behaviour of an organism and also to monitor industrial processes. Although Metabolic Flux Analysis can be successively applied with this aim, this approach has two drawbacks: i sometimes it cannot be used because there is a lack of measurable fluxes, and ii the uncertainty of experimental measurements cannot be considered. The Flux Balance Analysis could be used instead, but the assumption of optimal behaviour of the organism brings other difficulties. Results We propose a procedure to estimate the evolution of the metabolic fluxes that is structured as follows: 1 measure the concentrations of extracellular species and biomass, 2 convert this data to measured fluxes and 3 estimate the non-measured fluxes using the Flux Spectrum Approach, a variant of Metabolic Flux Analysis that overcomes the difficulties mentioned above without assuming optimal behaviour. We apply the procedure to a real problem taken from the literature: estimate the metabolic fluxes during a cultivation of CHO cells in batch mode. We show that it provides a reliable and rich estimation of the non-measured fluxes, thanks to considering measurements uncertainty and reversibility constraints. We also demonstrate that this procedure can estimate the non-measured fluxes even when there is a lack of measurable species. In addition, it offers a new method to deal with inconsistency. Conclusion This work introduces a procedure to estimate time-varying metabolic fluxes that copes with the insufficiency of

  12. Measurement and simulation of thermal neutron flux distribution in the RTP core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie B.; Jalal Bayar, Abi Muttaqin B.; Hamzah, Na'im Syauqi B.; Mustafa, Muhammad Khairul Ariff B.; Karim, Julia Bt. Abdul; Zin, Muhammad Rawi B. Mohamed; Ismail, Yahya B.; Hussain, Mohd Huzair B.; Mat Husin, Mat Zin B.; Dan, Roslan B. Md; Ismail, Ahmad Razali B.; Husain, Nurfazila Bt.; Jalil Khan, Zareen Khan B. Abdul; Yakin, Shaiful Rizaide B. Mohd; Saad, Mohamad Fauzi B.; Masood, Zarina Bt.

    2018-01-01

    The in-core thermal neutron flux distribution was determined using measurement and simulation methods for the Malaysian’s PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP). In this work, online thermal neutron flux measurement using Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) has been performed to verify and validate the computational methods for neutron flux calculation in RTP calculations. The experimental results were used as a validation to the calculations performed with Monte Carlo code MCNP. The detail in-core neutron flux distributions were estimated using MCNP mesh tally method. The neutron flux mapping obtained revealed the heterogeneous configuration of the core. Based on the measurement and simulation, the thermal flux profile peaked at the centre of the core and gradually decreased towards the outer side of the core. The results show a good agreement (relatively) between calculation and measurement where both show the same radial thermal flux profile inside the core: MCNP model over estimation with maximum discrepancy around 20% higher compared to SPND measurement. As our model also predicts well the neutron flux distribution in the core it can be used for the characterization of the full core, that is neutron flux and spectra calculation, dose rate calculations, reaction rate calculations, etc.

  13. Critical sizes and flux distributions in the shut down pile; Tailles critiques et cartes de flux a froid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banchereau, A; Berthier, P; Genthon, J P; Gourdon, C; Lattes, R; Martelly, J; Mazancourt, R de; Portes, L; Sagot, M; Schmitt, A P; Tanguy, P; Teste du Bailler, A; Veyssiere, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    An important part of the experiments carried out on the reactor G1 during a period of shut-down has consisted in determinations of critical sizes, and measurements of flux distribution by irradiations of detectors. This report deals with the following points: 1- Critical sizes of the flat pile, the long pile and the uranium-thorium pile. 2- Flux charts of the same piles, and study of an exponential experiment. 3- Determination of the slit effect. 4- Calculation of the anisotropy of the lattice. 5- Description of the experimental apparatus of the irradiation measurements. (author) [French] Une part importante des experiences a froid effectuees sur le reacteur G1 a consiste en des determinations de tailles critiques et des mesures de distributions de flux par irradiations de detecteurs. Le present rapport traite les points suivants: 1- Tailles critiques de la pile plate, de la pile longue, de la pile a uranium-thorium. 2 - Cartes de flux des memes piles et etude d'une experience exponentielle. 3 - Determination de l'effet de fente. 4 - Calcul de l'anisotropie du reseau. 5 - Description de l'appareillage experimental des mesures d'irradiations. (auteur)

  14. Critical sizes and flux distributions in the shut down pile; Tailles critiques et cartes de flux a froid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banchereau, A.; Berthier, P.; Genthon, J.P.; Gourdon, C.; Lattes, R.; Martelly, J.; Mazancourt, R. de; Portes, L.; Sagot, M.; Schmitt, A.P.; Tanguy, P.; Teste du Bailler, A.; Veyssiere, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    An important part of the experiments carried out on the reactor G1 during a period of shut-down has consisted in determinations of critical sizes, and measurements of flux distribution by irradiations of detectors. This report deals with the following points: 1- Critical sizes of the flat pile, the long pile and the uranium-thorium pile. 2- Flux charts of the same piles, and study of an exponential experiment. 3- Determination of the slit effect. 4- Calculation of the anisotropy of the lattice. 5- Description of the experimental apparatus of the irradiation measurements. (author) [French] Une part importante des experiences a froid effectuees sur le reacteur G1 a consiste en des determinations de tailles critiques et des mesures de distributions de flux par irradiations de detecteurs. Le present rapport traite les points suivants: 1- Tailles critiques de la pile plate, de la pile longue, de la pile a uranium-thorium. 2 - Cartes de flux des memes piles et etude d'une experience exponentielle. 3 - Determination de l'effet de fente. 4 - Calcul de l'anisotropie du reseau. 5 - Description de l'appareillage experimental des mesures d'irradiations. (auteur)

  15. Calibration of a distributed hydrology and land surface model using energy flux measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we develop and test a calibration approach on a spatially distributed groundwater-surface water catchment model (MIKE SHE) coupled to a land surface model component with particular focus on the water and energy fluxes. The model is calibrated against time series of eddy flux measure...

  16. The flow distribution in the parallel tubes of the cavity receiver under variable heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Yun; Wang, Yueshe; Hu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An experimental loop is built to find the flow distribution in the parallel tubes. • With the concentration of heat flux, two-phase flow makes distribution more uneven. • The total flow rate is chosen appropriately for a wider heat flux distribution. • A suitable system pressure is essential for the optimization of flow distribution. - Abstract: As an optical component of tower solar thermal power station, the heliostat mirror reflects sunlight to one point of the heated surface in the solar cavity receiver, called as one-point focusing system. The radiation heat flux concentrated in the cavity receiver is always non-uniform temporally and spatially, which may lead to extremely local over-heat on the receiver evaporation panels. In this paper, an electrical heated evaporating experimental loop, including five parallel vertical tubes, is set up to evaluate the hydrodynamic characteristics of evaporation panels in a solar cavity receiver under various non-uniform heat flux. The influence of the heat flux concentration ratio, total flow rate, and system pressure on the flow distribution of parallel tubes is discussed. It is found that the flow distribution becomes significantly worse with the increase of heat flux and concentration ratio; and as the system pressure decreased, the flow distribution is improved. It is extremely important to obtain these interesting findings for the safe and stable operation of solar cavity receiver, and can also provide valuable references for the design and optimization of operating parameters solar tower power station system.

  17. Proposal for a new method of reactor neutron flux distribution determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popic, V R [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-01-15

    A method, based on the measurements of the activity produced in a medium flowing with variable velocity through a reactor, for the determination of the neutron flux distribution inside a reactor is considered theoretically (author)

  18. An analytical transport theory method for calculating flux distribution in slab cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Krim, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    A transport theory method for calculating flux distributions in slab fuel cell is described. Two coupled integral equations for flux in fuel and moderator are obtained; assuming partial reflection at moderator external boundaries. Galerkin technique is used to solve these equations. Numerical results for average fluxes in fuel and moderator and the disadvantage factor are given. Comparison with exact numerical methods, that is for total reflection moderator outer boundaries, show that the Galerkin technique gives accurate results for the disadvantage factor and average fluxes. (orig.)

  19. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of lipid accumulation in the oleaginous fungus Mucor circinelloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Zhang, Huaiyuan; Wang, Liping; Chen, Haiqin; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei; Song, Yuanda

    2015-12-01

    The oleaginous fungus Mucor circinelloides is of industrial interest because it can produce high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acid γ-linolenic acid. M. circinelloides CBS 277.49 is able to accumulate less than 15% of cell dry weight as lipids, while M. circinelloides WJ11 can accumulate lipid up to 36%. In order to better understand the mechanisms behind the differential lipid accumulation in these two strains, tracer experiments with (13)C-glucose were performed with the growth of M. circinelloides and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometric detection of (13)C-patterns in proteinogenic amino acids was carried out to identify the metabolic network topology and estimate intracellular fluxes. Our results showed that the high oleaginous strain WJ11 had higher flux of pentose phosphate pathway and malic enzyme, lower flux in tricarboxylic acid cycle, higher flux in glyoxylate cycle and ATP: citrate lyase, together, it might provide more NADPH and substrate acetyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 3-D flux distribution and criticality calculation of TRIGA Mark-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, B.

    1982-01-01

    In this work, the static calculation of the (I.T.U. TRIGA Mark-II) flux distribution has been made. The three dimensional, r-θ-z, representation of the core has been used. In this representation, for different configuration, the flux distribution has been calculated depending on two group theory. The thermal-hydraulics, the poisoning effects have been ignored. The calculations have been made by using the three dimensional and multigroup code CAN. (author)

  1. iMS2Flux – a high–throughput processing tool for stable isotope labeled mass spectrometric data used for metabolic flux analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poskar C Hart

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic flux analysis has become an established method in systems biology and functional genomics. The most common approach for determining intracellular metabolic fluxes is to utilize mass spectrometry in combination with stable isotope labeling experiments. However, before the mass spectrometric data can be used it has to be corrected for biases caused by naturally occurring stable isotopes, by the analytical technique(s employed, or by the biological sample itself. Finally the MS data and the labeling information it contains have to be assembled into a data format usable by flux analysis software (of which several dedicated packages exist. Currently the processing of mass spectrometric data is time-consuming and error-prone requiring peak by peak cut-and-paste analysis and manual curation. In order to facilitate high-throughput metabolic flux analysis, the automation of multiple steps in the analytical workflow is necessary. Results Here we describe iMS2Flux, software developed to automate, standardize and connect the data flow between mass spectrometric measurements and flux analysis programs. This tool streamlines the transfer of data from extraction via correction tools to 13C-Flux software by processing MS data from stable isotope labeling experiments. It allows the correction of large and heterogeneous MS datasets for the presence of naturally occurring stable isotopes, initial biomass and several mass spectrometry effects. Before and after data correction, several checks can be performed to ensure accurate data. The corrected data may be returned in a variety of formats including those used by metabolic flux analysis software such as 13CFLUX, OpenFLUX and 13CFLUX2. Conclusion iMS2Flux is a versatile, easy to use tool for the automated processing of mass spectrometric data containing isotope labeling information. It represents the core framework for a standardized workflow and data processing. Due to its flexibility

  2. Carbon conversion efficiency and central metabolic fluxes in developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Ana P; Goffman, Fernando D; Ohlrogge, John B; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2007-10-01

    The efficiency with which developing sunflower embryos convert substrates into seed storage reserves was determined by labeling embryos with [U-(14)C6]glucose or [U-(14)C5]glutamine and measuring their conversion to CO2, oil, protein and other biomass compounds. The average carbon conversion efficiency was 50%, which contrasts with a value of over 80% previously observed in Brassica napus embryos (Goffman et al., 2005), in which light and the RuBisCO bypass pathway allow more efficient conversion of hexose to oil. Labeling levels after incubating sunflower embryos with [U-(14)C4]malate indicated that some carbon from malate enters the plastidic compartment and contributes to oil synthesis. To test this and to map the underlying pattern of metabolic fluxes, separate experiments were carried out in which embryos were labeled to isotopic steady state using [1-(13)C1]glucose, [2-(13)C1]glucose, or [U-(13)C5]glutamine. The resultant labeling in sugars, starch, fatty acids and amino acids was analyzed by NMR and GC-MS. The fluxes through intermediary metabolism were then quantified by computer-aided modeling. The resulting flux map accounted well for the labeling data, was in good agreement with the observed carbon efficiency, and was further validated by testing for agreement with gas exchange measurements. The map shows that the influx of malate into oil is low and that flux through futile cycles (wasting ATP) is low, which contrasts with the high rates previously determined for growing root tips and heterotrophic cell cultures.

  3. Flux distribution in single phase, Si-Fe, wound transformer cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loizos, George; Kefalas, Themistoklis; Kladas, Antonios; Souflaris, Thanassis; Paparigas, Dimitris

    2008-01-01

    This paper shows experimental results of longitudinal flux density and its harmonics at the limb, the yoke and the corner as well as normal flux in the step lap joint of a single phase, Si-Fe, wound transformer core. Results show that the flux density as well as the harmonics content is higher in the inner (window) side of the core and reduces gradually towards the outer side. Variations of flux density distribution between the limb and the corner or the yoke of the core were observed. A full record of normal flux around the step lap region of the model core was also obtained. Longitudinal and normal flux findings will enable the development of more accurate numerical models that describe the magnetic behavior of magnetic cores

  4. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high-Tc superconductor in external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2004-01-01

    Various magnetic levitation systems using oxide superconductors are developed as strong pinning forces are obtained in melt-processed bulk. However, the trapped flux of superconductor is moved by flux creep and fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, to examine the internal condition of superconductor, the authors measure the dynamic surface flux density distribution of YBCO bulk. Flux density measurement system has a structure with the air-core coil and the Hall sensors. Ten Hall sensors are arranged in series. The YBCO bulk, which has 25 mm diameter and 13 mm thickness, is field cooled by liquid nitrogen. After that, magnetic field is changed by the air-core coil. This paper describes about the measured results of flux density distribution of YBCO bulk in the various frequencies of air-core coils currents

  5. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high- Tc superconductor in external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2004-10-01

    Various magnetic levitation systems using oxide superconductors are developed as strong pinning forces are obtained in melt-processed bulk. However, the trapped flux of superconductor is moved by flux creep and fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, to examine the internal condition of superconductor, the authors measure the dynamic surface flux density distribution of YBCO bulk. Flux density measurement system has a structure with the air-core coil and the Hall sensors. Ten Hall sensors are arranged in series. The YBCO bulk, which has 25 mm diameter and 13 mm thickness, is field cooled by liquid nitrogen. After that, magnetic field is changed by the air-core coil. This paper describes about the measured results of flux density distribution of YBCO bulk in the various frequencies of air-core coils currents.

  6. Metabolic flux profiling of MDCK cells during growth and canine adenovirus vector production

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno Carinhas; Daniel A. M. Pais; Alexey Koshkin; Paulo Fernandes; Ana S. Coroadinha; Manuel J. T. Carrondo; Paula M. Alves; Ana P. Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Canine adenovirus vector type 2 (CAV2) represents an alternative to human adenovirus vectors for certain gene therapy applications, particularly neurodegenerative diseases. However, more efficient production processes, assisted by a greater understanding of the effect of infection on producer cells, are required. Combining [1,2-13C]glucose and [U-13C]glutamine, we apply for the first time 13C-Metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) to study E1-transformed Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells meta...

  7. OptFlux: an open-source software platform for in silico metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, I.; Maia, P.; Evangelista, P.

    2010-01-01

    to address industrial goals. However, the use of these methods has been restricted to bioinformaticians or other expert researchers. The main aim of this work is, therefore, to provide a user-friendly computational tool for Metabolic Engineering applications. Results: OptFlux is an open-source and modular...... available a number of useful tools. Its open-source nature invites contributions by all those interested in making their methods available for the community. Given its plug-in based architecture it can be extended with new functionalities. Currently, several plug-ins are being developed, including network...

  8. Multi-objective experimental design for (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvin, Jeroen; Cajot, Simon; D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Ampofo-Asiama, Jerry; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan; Geeraerd, Annemie; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2015-10-01

    (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis is an excellent technique to resolve fluxes in the central carbon metabolism but costs can be significant when using specialized tracers. This work presents a framework for cost-effective design of (13)C-tracer experiments, illustrated on two different networks. Linear and non-linear optimal input mixtures are computed for networks for Streptomyces lividans and a carcinoma cell line. If only glucose tracers are considered as labeled substrate for a carcinoma cell line or S. lividans, the best parameter estimation accuracy is obtained by mixtures containing high amounts of 1,2-(13)C2 glucose combined with uniformly labeled glucose. Experimental designs are evaluated based on a linear (D-criterion) and non-linear approach (S-criterion). Both approaches generate almost the same input mixture, however, the linear approach is favored due to its low computational effort. The high amount of 1,2-(13)C2 glucose in the optimal designs coincides with a high experimental cost, which is further enhanced when labeling is introduced in glutamine and aspartate tracers. Multi-objective optimization gives the possibility to assess experimental quality and cost at the same time and can reveal excellent compromise experiments. For example, the combination of 100% 1,2-(13)C2 glucose with 100% position one labeled glutamine and the combination of 100% 1,2-(13)C2 glucose with 100% uniformly labeled glutamine perform equally well for the carcinoma cell line, but the first mixture offers a decrease in cost of $ 120 per ml-scale cell culture experiment. We demonstrated the validity of a multi-objective linear approach to perform optimal experimental designs for the non-linear problem of (13)C-metabolic flux analysis. Tools and a workflow are provided to perform multi-objective design. The effortless calculation of the D-criterion can be exploited to perform high-throughput screening of possible (13)C-tracers, while the illustrated benefit of multi

  9. Vertical distribution and fluxes of ammonia at Great Dun Fell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, M. A.; Perthue, E.; Fowler, D.; Storeton-West, R. L.; Cape, J. N.; Arends, B. G.; Möls, J. J.

    As part of the study of the ammonia budget over Great Dun Fell, measurements of fluxes of gaseous ammonia (NH 3) with the hill surface (grass moorland and blanket bog) were made using micrometeorological techniques, to provide information on NH 3 removal by the hill surface and on vertical concentration gradients. Measurements of vertical concentration, χ, profiles of NH 3 concentration were coupled with turbulent diffusivities to determine fluxes, Fg deposition velocities, and canopy resistances, Rc to uptake by the ground. Consistent with published measurements for this site, NH 3 was generally found to deposit efficiently to the vegetation canopy, with mean Rc of 5 and 27 s m - for example days shown. However, short periods of NH 3 emission from the moorland were also observed at small χ (cloud processing: depletion of χ by in-cloud reaction would be expected to favour NH 3 emission from down-wind agricultural land and moorland, though emission from the hill itself during immersion in cloud is unlikely. Comparison of two measurement techniques to determine air concentrations (batch wet rotating denuder, inlet 0.5 m height; continuous wet denuder, inlets 0.3, 2 m heights) showed acceptable agreement, although because vertical concentration gradients were large (small Rc) the height of sampling had a substantial effect. Vertical gradients are also relevant to the use of the measured concentrations as estimates of NH 3 in the air mass passing over the hill, for modelling atmospheric budgets. Where NH 3 deposition occurs at the maximum rate, concentrations measured at 1 m require a 35% correction in neutral conditions when scaling to a reference height of 10 m.

  10. Nutrient fluxes and net metabolism in a coastal lagoon SW peninsula of Baja California, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Duarte, R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluxes of nutrients and net metabolism were estimated in coastal lagoon Magdalena Bay using LOICZ biogeochemical model. In situ data were obtained from 14 sites in the lagoon and also from a fixed site in the adjacent ocean area. Intense upwelling (February to July and faint upwelling (August to January were analyzed from monthly time series. The Temperature, nitrite + nitrate, ammonium and phosphate within the lagoon showed significant differences (p<0.05 between the two periods. Salinity (p=0.408 was more homogeneous (no significantly different due to mixing processes. During the intense upwelling period, nutrients increased in and out of the lagoon due to the influence of Transitional Water and Subartic Water transported by the California Current. However, during the faint upwelling, from August to January, the Transition Water and Subtropical Surface Water were predominant. Magdalena Bay showed denitrification processes of throughout the year as it occurred in other semi-arid coastal lagoons. It also showed a net autotrophic metabolism during intense upwelling and heterotrophic metabolism during faint upwelling. Understanding nutrient flows and net metabolism through simple biogeochemical models can provide tools for better management of the coastal zone.

  11. Capturing the essence of a metabolic network: a flux balance analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murabito, Ettore; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Smallbone, Kieran; Swinton, Jonathan

    2009-10-07

    As genome-scale metabolic reconstructions emerge, tools to manage their size and complexity will be increasingly important. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a constraint-based approach widely used to study the metabolic capabilities of cellular or subcellular systems. FBA problems are highly underdetermined and many different phenotypes can satisfy any set of constraints through which the metabolic system is represented. Two of the main concerns in FBA are exploring the space of solutions for a given metabolic network and finding a specific phenotype which is representative for a given task such as maximal growth rate. Here, we introduce a recursive algorithm suitable for overcoming both of these concerns. The method proposed is able to find the alternate optimal patterns of active reactions of an FBA problem and identify the minimal subnetwork able to perform a specific task as optimally as the whole. Our method represents an alternative to and an extension of other approaches conceived for exploring the space of solutions of an FBA problem. It may also be particularly helpful in defining a scaffold of reactions upon which to build up a dynamic model, when the important pathways of the system have not yet been well-defined.

  12. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high-T c superconductor in external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, H.; Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the measured results of the two-dimensional flux density distribution of a YBCO bulk under applied AC magnetic fields with various frequency. Melt-processed oxide superconductors have been developed in order to obtain strong pinning forces. Various electric mechanical systems or magnetic levitation systems use those superconductors. The major problem is that cracks occur because the bulk superconductors are brittle. The bulk may break in magnetizing process after cracks make superconducting state instable. The trapped flux density and the permanent current characteristics of bulk superconductors have been analyzed, so as to examine the magnetizing processes or superconducting states of the bulk. In those studies, the two-dimensional surface flux density distributions of the bulk in static fields are discussed. On the other hand, the distributions in dynamic fields are little discussed. We attempted to examine the states of the bulk in the dynamic fields, and made a unique experimental device which has movable sensors synchronized with AC applied fields. As a result, the two-dimensional distributions in the dynamic fields are acquired by recombining the one-dimensional distributions. The dynamic states of the flux of the bulk and the influences of directions of cracks are observed from the distributions. In addition, a new method for measuring two-dimensional flux density distribution under dynamic magnetic fields is suggested

  13. Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    . FLUX betegner en flyden eller strømmen, dvs. dynamik. Forstår man livet som proces og udvikling i stedet for som ting og mekanik, får man et andet billede af det gode liv end det, som den velkendte vestlige mekanicisme lægger op til. Dynamisk forstået indebærer det gode liv den bedst mulige...... kanalisering af den flux eller energi, der strømmer igennem os og giver sig til kende i vore daglige aktiviteter. Skal vores tanker, handlinger, arbejde, samvær og politiske liv organiseres efter stramme og faste regelsæt, uden slinger i valsen? Eller skal de tværtimod forløbe ganske uhindret af regler og bånd...

  14. Metabolic flux analysis of the hydrogen production potential in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, E. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Ciencias de la Computacion, Campus de Teatrinos, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Montagud, A.; Fernandez de Cordoba, P.; Urchueguia, J.F. [Instituto Universitario de Matematica Pura y Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Hydrogen is a promising energy vector; however, finding methods to produce it from renewable sources is essential to allow its wide-scale use. In that line, biological hydrogen production, although it is considered as a possible alternative, requires substantial improvements to overcome its present low yields. In that direction, genetic manipulation probably will play a central role and from that point of view metabolic flux analysis (MFA) constitutes an important tool to guide a priori most suitable genetic modifications oriented to a hydrogen yield increase. In this work MFA has been applied to analyze hydrogen photoproduction of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Flux analysis was carried out based on literature data and several basic fluxes were estimated in different growing conditions of the system. From this analysis, an upper limit for hydrogen photoproduction has been determined indicating a wide margin for improvement. MFA was also used to find a feasible operating space for hydrogen production, which avoids oxygen inhibition, one of the most important limitations to make hydrogen production cost effective. In addition, a set of biotechnological strategies are proposed that would be consistent with the performed mathematical analysis. (author)

  15. Measurement of the thermal flux distribution in the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangari, C.M.; Moreira, J.M.L.; Jerez, R.

    1986-01-01

    The knowledge of the neutron flux distribution in research reactors is important because it gives the power distribution over the core, and it provides better conditions to perform experiments and sample irradiations. The measured neutron flux distribution can also be of interest as a means of comparison for the calculational methods of reactor analysis currently in use at this institute. The thermal neutron flux distribution of the IEA-R1 reactor has been measured with the miniature chamber WL-23292. For carrying out the measurements, it was buit a guide system that permit the insertion of the mini-chamber i between the fuel of the fuel elements. It can be introduced in two diferent positions a fuel element and in each it spans 26 axial positions. With this guide system the thermal neutron flux distribution of the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor can be obtained in a fast and efficient manner. The element measured flux distribution shows clearly the effects of control rods and reflectors in the IEA-R1 reactor. The difficulties encountered during the measurements are mentioned with detail as well as the procedures adopteed to overcome them. (Author) [pt

  16. Metabolic flux ratio analysis and cell staining suggest the existence of C4 photosynthesis in Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, A; Liu, L; Zhao, P; Yang, C; Wang, G C

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms for carbon fixation via photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin were studied recently but there remains a long-standing debate concerning the occurrence of C4 photosynthesis in this species. A thorough investigation of carbon metabolism and the evidence for C4 photosynthesis based on organelle partitioning was needed. In this study, we identified the flux ratios between C3 and C4 compounds in P. tricornutum using (13)C-labelling metabolic flux ratio analysis, and stained cells with various cell-permeant fluorescent probes to investigate the likely organelle partitioning required for single-cell C4 photosynthesis. Metabolic flux ratio analysis indicated the C3/C4 exchange ratios were high. Cell staining indicated organelle partitioning required for single-cell C4 photosynthesis might exist in P. tricornutum. The results of (13)C-labelling metabolic flux ratio analysis and cell staining suggest single-cell C4 photosynthesis exists in P. tricornutum. This study provides insights into photosynthesis patterns of P. tricornutum and the evidence for C4 photosynthesis based on (13)C-labelling metabolic flux ratio analysis and organelle partitioning. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Calculation of flux density distribution on irradiation field of electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ryuichi

    1977-03-01

    The simple equation of flux density distribution in the irradiation field of an ordinary electron accelerator is a function of the physical parameters concerning electron irradiation. Calculation is based on the mean square scattering angle derived from a simple multiple scattering theory, with the correction factors of air scattering, beam scanning and number transmission coefficient. The flux density distribution was measured by charge absorption in a graphite target set in the air. For the calculated mean square scattering angles of 0.089-0.29, the values of calculation agree with those by experiment within about 10% except at large scattering angles. The method is applicable to dose evaluation of ordinary electron accelerators and design of various irradiators for radiation chemical reaction. Applicability of the simple multiple scattering theory in calculation of the scattered flux density and periodical variation of the flux density of scanning beam are also described. (auth.)

  18. The effect of an iron plug on the neutron flux distributions in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfi, A.; Maayouf, R.M.A.; Megahid, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work is concerned with studying both fast and thermal neutron fluxes distribution in water and its perturbation due to the presence of a cylindrical iron plug. The measurements were carried out using a collimated neutron beam emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. The fast neutron fluxes were measured using phosphorus activation detectors, while the thermal neutron ones were measured using fission fragment track detectors from glass. The results show that the presence of an iron plug causes a remarkable change in the intensities of both the fast and thermal neutron fluxes distribution in the water medium surrounding the iron plug. The flux intensities at the peaks, formed beyond the iron plug in case of thermal neutrons, are also compared with values calculated using the available emperical formula

  19. Integrating tracer-based metabolomics data and metabolic fluxes in a linear fashion via Elementary Carbon Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Jon; Rubio, Angel; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos; Cascante, Marta; Planes, Francisco J

    2012-07-01

    Constraints-based modeling is an emergent area in Systems Biology that includes an increasing set of methods for the analysis of metabolic networks. In order to refine its predictions, the development of novel methods integrating high-throughput experimental data is currently a key challenge in the field. In this paper, we present a novel set of constraints that integrate tracer-based metabolomics data from Isotope Labeling Experiments and metabolic fluxes in a linear fashion. These constraints are based on Elementary Carbon Modes (ECMs), a recently developed concept that generalizes Elementary Flux Modes at the carbon level. To illustrate the effect of our ECMs-based constraints, a Flux Variability Analysis approach was applied to a previously published metabolic network involving the main pathways in the metabolism of glucose. The addition of our ECMs-based constraints substantially reduced the under-determination resulting from a standard application of Flux Variability Analysis, which shows a clear progress over the state of the art. In addition, our approach is adjusted to deal with combinatorial explosion of ECMs in genome-scale metabolic networks. This extension was applied to infer the maximum biosynthetic capacity of non-essential amino acids in human metabolism. Finally, as linearity is the hallmark of our approach, its importance is discussed at a methodological, computational and theoretical level and illustrated with a practical application in the field of Isotope Labeling Experiments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Visualization of neutron flux and power distributions in TRIGA Mark II reactor as an educational tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, Luka; Ravnik, Matjaz; Lengar, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Modern Monte Carlo computer codes (e.g. MCNP) for neutron transport allow calculation of detailed neutron flux and power distribution in complex geometries with resolution of ∼1 mm. Moreover they enable the calculation of individual particle tracks, scattering and absorption events. With the use of advanced software for 3D visualization (e.g. Amira, Voxler, etc.) one can create and present neutron flux and power distribution in a 'user friendly' way convenient for educational purposes. One can view axial, radial or any other spatial distribution of the neutron flux and power distribution in a nuclear reactor from various perspectives and in various modalities of presentation. By visualizing the distribution of scattering and absorption events and individual particle tracks one can visualize neutron transport parameters (mean free path, diffusion length, macroscopic cross section, up-scattering, thermalization, etc.) from elementary point of view. Most of the people remember better, if they visualize the processes. Therefore the representation of the reactor and neutron transport parameters is a convenient modern educational tool for the (nuclear power plant) operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. The visualization of neutron flux and power distributions in Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II research reactor is treated in the paper. The distributions are calculated with MCNP computer code and presented using Amira and Voxler software. The results in the form of figures are presented in the paper together with comments qualitatively explaining the figures. (authors)

  1. Magnetic flux distributions in chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Masaru, E-mail: kato@ms.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Fukui, Saoto [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Sato, Osamu [Osaka Prefecture University College of Technology, 26-12, Saiwaicho, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8572 (Japan); Togawa, Yoshihiko [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Vortex states in a chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayer are investigated. • Vortex and anti-vortex appears depending on strength of helimagnet. • Vortex is elongated under a gradient field. • Vortices form a undulated triangular lattice. - Abstarct: Vortex states in a chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayer are investigated numerically, using the Ginzburg–Landau equations with the finite element method. In this bilayer, effect of the chiral helimagnet on the superconductor is taken as an external field. Magnetic field distribution can be controlled by an applied field to the bilayer. It is shown that a single vortex in a gradient field is elongated along the field gradient. In zero applied field, there are up- and down vortices which are parallel or antiparallel to the z-axis, respectively. But increasing the applied field, down-vortices disappear and up-vortices form undulated triangular lattices.

  2. THE X-RAY FLUX DISTRIBUTION OF SAGITTARIUS A* AS SEEN BY CHANDRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilsen, J.; Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands))" data-affiliation=" (Astronomical Institute, Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands))" >Markoff, S.; Nowak, M. A.; Baganoff, F. K.; Dexter, J.; Witzel, G.; Barrière, N.; Li, Y.; Degenaar, N.; Fragile, P. C.; Gammie, C.; Goldwurm, A.; Grosso, N.; Haggard, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray flux distribution of Sgr A* from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's 3 Ms Sgr A* X-ray Visionary Project in 2012. Our analysis indicates that the observed X-ray flux distribution can be decomposed into a steady quiescent component, represented by a Poisson process with rate Q = (5.24 ± 0.08) × 10 –3  counts s –1 , and a variable component, represented by a power law process (dN/dF∝F –ξ , ξ=1.92 −0.02 +0.03 ). This slope matches our recently reported distribution of flare luminosities. The variability may also be described by a log-normal process with a median unabsorbed 2-8 keV flux of 1.8 −0.6 +0.8 ×10 −14  erg s –1  cm –2 and a shape parameter σ = 2.4 ± 0.2, but the power law provides a superior description of the data. In this decomposition of the flux distribution, all of the intrinsic X-ray variability of Sgr A* (spanning at least three orders of magnitude in flux) can be attributed to flaring activity, likely in the inner accretion flow. We confirm that at the faint end, the variable component contributes ∼10% of the apparent quiescent flux, as previously indicated by our statistical analysis of X-ray flares in these Chandra observations. Our flux distribution provides a new and important observational constraint on theoretical models of Sgr A*, and we use simple radiation models to explore the extent to which a statistical comparison of the X-ray and infrared can provide insights into the physics of the X-ray emission mechanism

  3. Foetal distribution and metabolism of N-Nitrosodiethylamine in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brittebo, E.B.; Lindgren, A.; Tjaelve, A.

    1981-01-01

    In pregnant NMRI mice, low-temperature autoradiography was used to study the distribution of N- 14 C-nitrosodiethylamine in foetal tissues, and autoradiography with heated tape-sections was used to trace nonvolatile metabolites. Autoradiography with 14 C-acetate was used to distinquish the part of the radiography which upon the degradation of N- 14 C-nitrosodiethylamine may be incorporated in the normal metabolism of the tissues. The results indicated that the non-metabolized N-nitrosodiethylamine passed to the foetuses with an even distribution in most foetal tissues on all the studied days of gestation (day 12, 14, 16 and 18). The autoradiographic results further indicated a metabolism of the substance in the mucosa of the foetal bronchial tree and in the foetal liver on day 18 of gestation, but not in earlier stages of pregnancy. This was substantiated by studies in vitro, which showed a marked capacity of the 18 day old foetal lung and liver (in contrast to tissues from 16 day old foetuses) to form 14 CO 2 from the N- 14 C-nitrosodiethylamine. Since the lung and liver are target tissues for the transplacental carcinogenesis of N-nitrosodiethylamine in NMRI mice, a causal relationship between metabolic ability and carcinogenesis may exist in these tissues. (Author)

  4. A holistic view of dietary carbohydrate utilization in lobster: digestion, postprandial nutrient flux, and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Perera, Erick; Casuso, Antonio; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Gutierrez, Odilia; Scull, Idania; Carrillo, Olimpia; Martos-Sitcha, Juan A; García-Galano, Tsai; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Crustaceans exhibit a remarkable variation in their feeding habits and food type, but most knowledge on carbohydrate digestion and utilization in this group has come from research on few species. The aim of this study was to make an integrative analysis of dietary carbohydrate utilization in the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. We used complementary methodologies such as different assessments of digestibility, activity measurements of digestive and metabolic enzymes, and post-feeding flux of nutrients and metabolites. Several carbohydrates were well digested by the lobster, but maize starch was less digestible than all other starches studied, and its inclusion in diet affected protein digestibility. Most intense hydrolysis of carbohydrates in the gastric chamber of lobster occurred between 2-6 h after ingestion and afterwards free glucose increased in hemolymph. The inclusion of wheat in diet produced a slow clearance of glucose from the gastric fluid and a gradual increase in hemolymph glucose. More intense hydrolysis of protein in the gastric chamber occurred 6-12 h after ingestion and then amino acids tended to increase in hemolymph. Triglyceride concentration in hemolymph rose earlier in wheat-fed lobsters than in lobsters fed other carbohydrates, but it decreased the most 24 h later. Analyses of metabolite levels and activities of different metabolic enzymes revealed that intermolt lobsters had a low capacity to store and use glycogen, although it was slightly higher in wheat-fed lobsters. Lobsters fed maize and rice diets increased amino acid catabolism, while wheat-fed lobsters exhibited higher utilization of fatty acids. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the type of carbohydrate ingested had a profound effect on overall metabolism. Although we found no evidence of a protein-sparing effect of dietary carbohydrate, differences in the kinetics of their digestion and absorption impacted lobster metabolism determining the fate of other nutrients.

  5. A holistic view of dietary carbohydrate utilization in lobster: digestion, postprandial nutrient flux, and metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Rodríguez-Viera

    Full Text Available Crustaceans exhibit a remarkable variation in their feeding habits and food type, but most knowledge on carbohydrate digestion and utilization in this group has come from research on few species. The aim of this study was to make an integrative analysis of dietary carbohydrate utilization in the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. We used complementary methodologies such as different assessments of digestibility, activity measurements of digestive and metabolic enzymes, and post-feeding flux of nutrients and metabolites. Several carbohydrates were well digested by the lobster, but maize starch was less digestible than all other starches studied, and its inclusion in diet affected protein digestibility. Most intense hydrolysis of carbohydrates in the gastric chamber of lobster occurred between 2-6 h after ingestion and afterwards free glucose increased in hemolymph. The inclusion of wheat in diet produced a slow clearance of glucose from the gastric fluid and a gradual increase in hemolymph glucose. More intense hydrolysis of protein in the gastric chamber occurred 6-12 h after ingestion and then amino acids tended to increase in hemolymph. Triglyceride concentration in hemolymph rose earlier in wheat-fed lobsters than in lobsters fed other carbohydrates, but it decreased the most 24 h later. Analyses of metabolite levels and activities of different metabolic enzymes revealed that intermolt lobsters had a low capacity to store and use glycogen, although it was slightly higher in wheat-fed lobsters. Lobsters fed maize and rice diets increased amino acid catabolism, while wheat-fed lobsters exhibited higher utilization of fatty acids. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the type of carbohydrate ingested had a profound effect on overall metabolism. Although we found no evidence of a protein-sparing effect of dietary carbohydrate, differences in the kinetics of their digestion and absorption impacted lobster metabolism determining the fate of other

  6. A method to calculate flux distribution in reactor systems containing materials with grain structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanek, J.

    1980-01-01

    A method is proposed to compute the neutron flux spatial distribution in slab, spherical or cylindrical systems containing zones with close grain structure of material. Several different types of equally distributed particles embedded in the matrix material are allowed in one or more zones. The multi-energy group structure of the flux is considered. The collision probability method is used to compute the fluxes in the grains and in an ''effective'' part of the matrix material. Then the overall structure of the flux distribution in the zones with homogenized materials is determined using the DPN ''surface flux'' method. Both computations are connected using the balance equation during the outer iterations. The proposed method is written in the code SURCU-DH. Two testcases are computed and discussed. One testcase is the computation of the eigenvalue in simplified slab geometry of an LWR container of one zone with boral grains equally distributed in an aluminium matrix. The second is the computation of the eigenvalue in spherical geometry of the HTR pebble-bed cell with spherical particles embedded in a graphite matrix. The results are compared to those obtained by repeated use of the WIMS Code. (author)

  7. Rocket measurements of relativistic electrons: New features in fluxes, spectra and pitch angle distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero, F.A.; Baker, D.N.; Goldberg, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report new features of precipitating relativistic electron fluxes measured on a spinning sounding rocket payload at midday between altitudes of 70 and 130 km in the auroral region (Poker Flat, Alaska, 65.1 degree N, 147.5 degree W, and L = 5.5). The sounding rocket (NASA 33.059) was launched at 21:29 UT on May 13, 1990 during a relativistic electron enhancement event of modest intensity. Electron fluxes were measured for a total of about 210 seconds at energies from 0.1 to 3.8 MeV, while pitch angle was sampled from 0 degree to 90 degree every spin cycle. Flux levels during the initial 90 seconds were about 5 to 8 times higher than in the next 120 seconds, revealing a time scale of more than 100 seconds for large amplitude intensity variations. A shorter time scale appeared for downward electron bursts lasting 10 to 20 seconds. Electrons with energies below about 0.2 MeV showed isotropic pitch angle distributions during most of the first 90 seconds of data, while at higher energies the electrons had highest fluxes near the mirroring angle (90 degree); when they occurred, the noted downward bursts were seen at all energies. Data obtained during the second half of the flight showed little variation in the shape of the pitch angle distribution for energies greater than 0.5 MeV; the flux at 90 degree was about 100 times the flux at 0 degree. They have compared the low altitude fluxes with those measured at geostationary orbit (L = 6.6), and find that the low altitude fluxes are much higher than expected from a simple mapping of a pancake distribution at high altitudes (at the equator). Energy deposition of this modest event is estimated to increase rapidly above 45 km, already exceeding the cosmic ray background at 45 km

  8. Producing Acetic Acid of Acetobacter pasteurianus by Fermentation Characteristics and Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuefeng; Yao, Hongli; Liu, Qing; Zheng, Zhi; Cao, Lili; Mu, Dongdong; Wang, Hualin; Jiang, Shaotong; Li, Xingjiang

    2018-03-19

    The acetic acid bacterium Acetobacter pasteurianus plays an important role in acetic acid fermentation, which involves oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid through the ethanol respiratory chain under specific conditions. In order to obtain more suitable bacteria for the acetic acid industry, A. pasteurianus JST-S screened in this laboratory was compared with A. pasteurianus CICC 20001, a current industrial strain in China, to determine optimal fermentation parameters under different environmental stresses. The maximum total acid content of A. pasteurianus JST-S was 57.14 ± 1.09 g/L, whereas that of A. pasteurianus CICC 20001 reached 48.24 ± 1.15 g/L in a 15-L stir stank. Metabolic flux analysis was also performed to compare the reaction byproducts. Our findings revealed the potential value of the strain in improvement of industrial vinegar fermentation.

  9. 2-D temperature distribution and heat flux of PFC in 2011 KSTAR campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Eunnam, E-mail: bang14@nfri.re.kr; Hong, Suk-Ho; Yu, Yaowei; Kim, Kyungmin; Kim, Hongtack; Kim, Hakkun; Lee, Kunsu; Yang, Hyunglyul

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The heat flux on PFC tiles of 12 s pulse duration and 630 kA plasma current is about 0.02 MW/m{sup 2}. • When the cryopump is operated, the heat flux of CD is higher than without cryopump. • The more H-mode duration is long, the more heat flux on divertor is high. -- Abstract: KSTAR has reached a plasma current up to 630 kA, plasma duration up to 12 s, and has achieved high confinement mode (H-mode) in 2011 campaign. The heat flux of PFC tile was estimated from the temperature increase of PFC since 2010. The heat flux of PFC tiles increases significantly with higher plasma current and longer pulse duration. The time-averaged heat flux of shots in 2010 campaign (with 3 s pulse durations and I{sub p} of 611 kA) is 0.01 MW/m{sup 2} while that in 2011 campaign (with 12 s pulse duration and I{sub p} of 630 kA) is about 0.02 MW/m{sup 2}. The heat flux at divertor is 1.4–2 times higher than that at inboard limiter or passive stabilizer. With the cryopump operation, the heat flux at the central divertor is higher than that without cryopump. The heat flux at divertor is proportional to, of course, the duration of H-mode. Furthermore, a software tool, which visualizes the 2D temperature distribution of PFC tile and estimates the heat flux in real time, is developed.

  10. Subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment was performed to measure the equilibrium subchannel void and mass flux distribution in a simulated BWR rod bundle. These new equilibrium subchannel data are unique and represent an excellent basis for subchannel ''void drift'' model development and assessment. Equilibrium subchannel void and mass flux distributions have been determined from the data presented herein. While the form of these correlations agree with the results of previous theoretical investigations, they should be generalized with caution since the current data base has been taken at only one (low) system pressure. Clearly there is a need for equilibrium subchannel data at higher system pressures if mechanistic subchannel models are to be developed

  11. Spatial distribution of potential near surface moisture flux at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    An estimate of the areal distribution of present-day surface liquid moisture flux at Yucca Mountain was made using field measured water contents and laboratory measured rock properties. Using available data for physical and hydrologic properties (porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention functions) of the volcanic rocks, surface lithologic units that are hydrologically similar were delineated. Moisture retention and relative permeability functions were assigned to each surface unit based on the similarity of the mean porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the surface unit to laboratory samples of the same lithology. The potential flux into the mountain was estimated for each surface hydrologic unit using the mean saturated hydraulic conductivity for each unit and assuming all matrix flow. Using measured moisture profiles for each of the surface units, estimates were made of the depth at which seasonal fluctuations diminish and steady state downward flux conditions are likely to exist. The hydrologic properties at that depth were used with the current relative saturation of the tuff, to estimate flux as the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This method assumes a unit gradient. The range in estimated flux was 0.02 mm/yr for the welded Tiva Canyon to 13.4 mm/yr for the nonwelded Paintbrush Tuff. The areally averaged flux was 1.4 mm/yr. The major zones of high flux occur to the north of the potential repository boundary where the nonwelded tuffs are exposed in the major drainages

  12. Spatial distribution of potential near surface moisture flux at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    An estimate of the areal distribution of present-day surface liquid moisture flux at Yucca Mountain was made using field measured water contents and laboratory measured rock properties. Using available data for physical and hydrologic properties (porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity moisture retention functions) of the volcanic rocks, surface lithologic units that are hydrologically similar were delineated. Moisture retention and relative permeability functions were assigned to each surface unit based on the similarity of the mean porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the surface unit to laboratory samples of the same lithology. The potential flux into the mountain was estimated for each surface hydrologic unit using the mean saturated hydraulic conductivity for each unit and assuming all matrix flow. Using measured moisture profiles for each of the surface units, estimates were made of the depth at which seasonal fluctuations diminish and steady state downward flux conditions are likely to exist. The hydrologic properties at that depth were used with the current relative saturation of the tuff, to estimate flux as the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This method assumes a unit gradient. The range in estimated flux was 0.02 mm/yr for the welded Tiva Canyon to 13.4 mm/yr for the nonwelded Paintbrush Tuff. The areally averaged flux was 1.4 mm/yr. The major zones of high flux occur to the north of the potential repository boundary where the nonwelded tuffs are exposed in the major drainages

  13. Absorption, tissue distribution, excretion, and metabolism of clothianidin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Tokunori; Mikata, Kazuki; Nagasaki, Hiromi; Ohta, Kazunari

    2003-11-19

    Absorption, distribution, excretion, and metabolism of clothianidin [(E)-1-(2-chloro-1,3-thiazol-5-ylmethyl)-3-methyl-2-nitroguanidine] were investigated after a single oral administration of [nitroimino-(14)C]- or [thiazolyl-2-(14)C]clothianidin to male and female rats at a dose of 5 mg/kg of body weight (bw) (low dose) or 250 mg/kg of bw (high dose). The maximum concentration of carbon-14 in blood occurred 2 h after administration of the low oral dose for both labeled clothianidins, and then the concentration of carbon-14 in blood decreased with a half-life of 2.9-4.0 h. The orally administered carbon-14 was rapidly and extensively distributed to all tissues and organs within 2 h after administration, especially to the kidney and liver, but was rapidly and almost completely eliminated from all tissues and organs with no evidence of accumulation. The orally administered carbon-14 was almost completely excreted into urine and feces within 2 days after administration, and approximately 90% of the administered dose was excreted via urine. The major compound in excreta was clothianidin, accounting for >60% of the administered dose. The major metabolic reactions of clothianidin in rats were oxidative demethylation to form N-(2-chlorothiazol-5-ylmethyl)-N'-nitroguanidine and the cleavage of the carbon-nitrogen bond between the thiazolylmethyl moiety and the nitroguanidine moiety. The part of the molecule containing the nitroguanidine moiety was transformed mainly to N-methyl-N'-nitroguanidine, whereas the thiazol moiety was further metabolized to 2-(methylthio)thiazole-5-carboxylic acid. With the exception of the transiently delayed excretion of carbon-14 at the high-dose level, the rates of biokinetics, excretion, distribution, and metabolism of clothianidin were not markedly influenced by dose level and sex.

  14. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis for Systematic Metabolic Engineering of S. cerevisiae for Overproduction of Fatty Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghosh, Amit; Ando, David; Gin, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Efficient redirection of microbial metabolism into the abundant production of desired bioproducts remains non-trivial. Here, we used flux-based modeling approaches to improve yields of fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We combined 13C labeling data with comprehensive genome-scale models...

  15. A diffusion-theoretical method to calculate the neutron flux distribution in multisphere configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuerrer, F.

    1980-01-01

    For characterizing heterogene configurations of pebble-bed reactors the fine structure of the flux distribution as well as the determination of the macroscopic neutronphysical quantities are of interest. When calculating system parameters of Wigner-Seitz-cells the usual codes for neutron spectra calculation always neglect the modulation of the neutron flux by the influence of neighbouring spheres. To judge the error arising from that procedure it is necessary to determinate the flux distribution in the surrounding of a spherical fuel element. In the present paper an approximation method to calculate the flux distribution in the two-sphere model is developed. This method is based on the exactly solvable problem of the flux determination of a point source of neutrons in an infinite medium, which contains a spherical perturbation zone eccentric to the point source. An iteration method allows by superposing secondary fields and alternately satisfying the conditions of continuity on the surface of each of the two fuel elements to advance to continually improving approximations. (orig.) 891 RW/orig. 892 CKA [de

  16. Effects of drugs in subtoxic concentrations on the metabolic fluxes in human hepatoma cell line Hep G2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niklas, Jens; Noor, Fozia; Heinzle, Elmar

    2009-01-01

    Commonly used cytotoxicity assays assess the toxicity of a compound by measuring certain parameters which directly or indirectly correlate to the viability of the cells. However, the effects of a given compound at concentrations considerably below EC 50 values are usually not evaluated. These subtoxic effects are difficult to identify but may eventually cause severe and costly long term problems such as idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. We determined the toxicity of three hepatotoxic compounds, namely amiodarone, diclofenac and tacrine on the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2 using an online kinetic respiration assay and analysed the effects of subtoxic concentrations of these drugs on the cellular metabolism by using metabolic flux analysis. Several changes in the metabolism could be detected upon exposure to subtoxic concentrations of the test compounds. Upon exposure to diclofenac and tacrine an increase in the TCA-cycle activity was observed which could be a signature of an uncoupling of the oxidative phosphorylation. The results indicate that metabolic flux analysis could serve as an invaluable novel tool for the investigation of the effects of drugs. The described methodology enables tracking the toxicity of compounds dynamically using the respiration assay in a range of concentrations and the metabolic flux analysis permits interesting insights into the changes in the central metabolism of the cell upon exposure to drugs.

  17. Interaction of storage carbohydrates and other cyclic fluxes with central metabolism : A quantitative approach by non-stationary 13C metabolic flux analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suarez-Mendez, C. A.; Hanemaaijer, M.; ten Pierick, Angela; Wolters, J. C.; Heijnen, J.J.; Wahl, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    13C labeling experiments in aerobic glucose limited cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at four different growth rates (0.054; 0.101, 0.207, 0.307 h-1) are used for calculating fluxes that include intracellular cycles (e.g., storage carbohydrate cycles, exchange fluxes with amino acids), which are

  18. Culture engineering examination and metabolism flux distribution system analysis for madding to convert into poly {beta}- hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) using the hydrogen bacteria of organic acid got in liquid-phase oxidation of lignite; Kattan no ekiso sanka de erareru yukisan wo suiso saikin wo riyoshite pori {beta}-hidorokishi rakusan(PHB) ni henkan saseru tameno baiyo kogakuteki kento to taisha ryusoku bunpu shisutemu kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimoto, Kinko; Seki, Suito; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Mae, Kazuhiro; Miura, Koichi

    1999-04-05

    The culture engineering examination for madding to convert into poly {beta} - hydroxy Wisteria (PHB) which glycolic acid. Acetic acid, ant acid, malonic acid got in liquid-phase oxidation of lignite are raw material of biodegradable plastic using hydrogen bacteria Alcaligenes eutrophus was carried out. It was proven that acetic acid was the most efficiently converted into the PHB as a result of cultivating these organic acid as a single carbon source. And, it was utilized to the bacterial cell at the order of ant acid, acetic acid, glycolic acid, when it was cultivated in mixing organic acid, and it was proven to convert into the PHB. Though the malonic acid was not utilized for the bacterial cell breeding, it was indicated that as the result which analyzed metabolism flow distribution by calculating using the culture data, the succinate dehydrogenase of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) circuit received competitive inhibition, when this is added in culture middle point, and that the flux of griot lysyl acid route and gluconeogenesis route lowers. And, it was proven that it was utilized in the route which comes to the PHB synthesis from acetoacetyl CoA with the lowering of the ammonia concentration on NADPH produced from the isocitric acid, though it was prior consumed to the glutamic acid of tricarboxylic acid cycle in the route, if ammonia concentration is high. (translated by NEDO)

  19. Beaver-mediated lateral hydrologic connectivity, fluvial carbon and nutrient flux, and aquatic ecosystem metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Pam; Covino, Tim; Wohl, Ellen

    2017-06-01

    River networks that drain mountain landscapes alternate between narrow and wide valley segments. Within the wide segments, beaver activity can facilitate the development and maintenance of complex, multithread planform. Because the narrow segments have limited ability to retain water, carbon, and nutrients, the wide, multithread segments are likely important locations of retention. We evaluated hydrologic dynamics, nutrient flux, and aquatic ecosystem metabolism along two adjacent segments of a river network in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado: (1) a wide, multithread segment with beaver activity; and, (2) an adjacent (directly upstream) narrow, single-thread segment without beaver activity. We used a mass balance approach to determine the water, carbon, and nutrient source-sink behavior of each river segment across a range of flows. While the single-thread segment was consistently a source of water, carbon, and nitrogen, the beaver impacted multithread segment exhibited variable source-sink dynamics as a function of flow. Specifically, the multithread segment was a sink for water, carbon, and nutrients during high flows, and subsequently became a source as flows decreased. Shifts in river-floodplain hydrologic connectivity across flows related to higher and more variable aquatic ecosystem metabolism rates along the multithread relative to the single-thread segment. Our data suggest that beaver activity in wide valleys can create a physically complex hydrologic environment that can enhance hydrologic and biogeochemical buffering, and promote high rates of aquatic ecosystem metabolism. Given the widespread removal of beaver, determining the cumulative effects of these changes is a critical next step in restoring function in altered river networks.

  20. Metabolic flux rearrangement in the amino acid metabolism reduces ammonia stress in the α1-antitrypsin producing human AGE1.HN cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesnitz, Christian; Niklas, Jens; Rose, Thomas; Sandig, Volker; Heinzle, Elmar

    2012-03-01

    This study focused on metabolic changes in the neuronal human cell line AGE1.HN upon increased ammonia stress. Batch cultivations of α(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) producing AGE1.HN cells were carried out in media with initial ammonia concentrations ranging from 0mM to 5mM. Growth, A1AT production, metabolite dynamics and finally metabolic fluxes calculated by metabolite balancing were compared. Growth and A1AT production decreased with increasing ammonia concentration. The maximum A1AT concentration decreased from 0.63g/l to 0.51g/l. Central energy metabolism remained relatively unaffected exhibiting only slightly increased glycolytic flux at high initial ammonia concentration in the medium. However, the amino acid metabolism was significantly changed. Fluxes through transaminases involved in amino acid degradation were reduced concurrently with a reduced uptake of amino acids. On the other hand fluxes through transaminases working in the direction of amino acid synthesis, i.e., alanine and phosphoserine, were increased leading to increased storage of excess nitrogen in extracellular alanine and serine. Glutamate dehydrogenase flux was reversed increasingly fixing free ammonia with increasing ammonia concentration. Urea production additionally observed was associated with arginine uptake by the cells and did not increase at high ammonia stress. It was therefore not used as nitrogen sink to remove excess ammonia. The results indicate that the AGE1.HN cell line can adapt to ammonia concentrations usually present during the cultivation process to a large extent by changing metabolism but with slightly reduced A1AT production and growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Measurement of thermal neutron distribution of flux in the fuel element cluster - Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krcevinac, S.B.; Takac, S.M.

    1966-12-01

    Relative distribution of thermal neutron flux in the fuel element cluster (19 UO 2 rods with Zr-II cladding, D 2 O moderator and coolant) was measured by newly developed cell perturbation method. The obtained values of mean density ratios are compared to the results obtained by TER-I code using Amouyal - Benoist model [sr

  2. Implementation of drift-flux model in artist and assessment to thetis void distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. C.; Yun, B. J.; Moon, S. K.; Jeong, J. J.; Lee, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    A system transient analysis code, ARTIST, based on the drift-flux model is being developed to enhance capability of predicting two-phase flow void distribution at low pressure and low flow conditions. The governing equations of the ARTIST code consist of three continuity equations (mixture, liquid, and noncondensibles), two energy equations (gas and mixture) and one mixture momentum euqation constituted with the drift-flux model. Area averaged one-dimensional conservation equations are established using the flow quality expressed in terms of the relative velocity. The relative velocity is obtained from the drift flux relationship. The Chexal-Lellouche void fraction correlation is used to provide the drift velocity and the concentration parameter. The implicit one-step method and the block elimination technique are employed as numerical solution scheme for the node-flowpath thermal-hydraulic network. In order to validate the ARIST code, the steady state void distributions of the THETIS boil-off tests are simulated. The axial void distributions calculated by the Chexal-Lellouche fraction correlation at low pressure and low flow are better than those of both the two-fluid model of RELAP5/MOD3 code and the homogeneous model. The drift-flux model of the ARTIST code is an efficient tool in predicting the void distribution of two-phase flow at low pressure and low flow condtions

  3. Determination of neutron flux distribution in an Am-Be irradiator using the MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtejer-Diaz, K; Zamboni, C B; Zahn, G S; Zevallos-Chávez, J Y

    2003-10-01

    A neutron irradiator has been assembled at IPEN facilities to perform qualitative-quantitative analysis of many materials using thermal and fast neutrons outside the nuclear reactor premises. To establish the prototype specifications, the neutron flux distribution and the absorbed dose rates were calculated using the MCNP computer code. These theoretical predictions then allow one to discuss the optimum irradiator design and its performance.

  4. A transmission probability method for calculation of neutron flux distributions in hexagonal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasastjerna, F.; Lux, I.

    1980-03-01

    A transmission probability method implemented in the program TPHEX is described. This program was developed for the calculation of neutron flux distributions in hexagonal light water reactor fuel assemblies. The accuracy appears to be superior to diffusion theory, and the computation time is shorter than that of the collision probability method. (author)

  5. Inverse identification of intensity distributions from multiple flux maps in concentrating solar applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, Ben; Petrasch, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Radiative flux measurements at the focal plane of solar concentrators are typically performed using digital cameras in conjunction with Lambertian targets. To accurately predict flux distributions on arbitrary receiver geometries directional information about the radiation is required. Currently, the directional characteristics of solar concentrating systems are predicted via ray tracing simulations. No direct experimental technique to determine intensities of concentrating solar systems is available. In the current paper, multiple parallel flux measurements at varying distances from the focal plane together with a linear inverse method and Tikhonov regularization are used to identify the directional and spatial intensity distribution at the solution plane. The directional binning feature of an in-house Monte Carlo ray tracing program is used to provide a reference solution. The method has been successfully applied to two-dimensional concentrators, namely parabolic troughs and elliptical troughs using forward Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations that provide the flux maps as well as consistent, associated intensity distribution for validation. In the two-dimensional case, intensity distributions obtained from the inverse method approach the Monte Carlo forward solution. In contrast, the method has not been successful for three dimensional and circular symmetric concentrator geometries.

  6. Flux distribution by neutrons semi-conductors detectors during the startup of the EL4 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuster, S.; Tarabella, A.

    1967-01-01

    The Cea developed neutron semi-conductors detectors which allows a quasi-instantaneous monitoring of neutrons flux distribution, when placed in a reactor during the tests. These detectors have been experimented in the EL4 reactor. The experiment and the results are presented and compared with reference mappings. (A.L.B.)

  7. Neutron flux distribution measurement in the elementary cell of the RB reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takac, S [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1963-04-15

    The distribution of thermal neutrons was measured in the elementary cell with dysprosium foils for different lattice pitches and the results obtained were given. From the distributions measured average fluxes were determined for every single zone. By using the published data concerning effective absorption cross sections thermal utilization factors were calculated and their changes given as functions of lattice pitches: l = 8.0 cm; 11.3 cm and 17.9 cm. (author)

  8. Conical pitch angle distributions of very-low energy ion fluxes observed by ISEE 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, J.L.; Baugher, C.R.; Chappell, C.R.; Shelley, E.G.; Young, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of low-energy ionospheric ions by the plasma composition experiment abroad ISEE 1 often show conical pitch angle distributions, that is, peak fluxes between 0 0 and 90 0 to the directions parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field. Frequently, all three primary ionospheric ion species (H + , He + , and O + ) simultaneously exhibit conical distributions with peak fluxes at essentially the same pitch angle. A distinction is made here between unidirectional, or streaming, distributions, in which ions are traveling essentially from only one hemisphere, and symmetrical distributions, in which significant fluxes are observed traveling from both hemispheres. The orbital coverage for this survey was largely restricted to the night sector, approximately 2100--0600 LT, and moderate geomagnetic latitudes of 20 0 --40 0 . Also, lack of complete pitch angle coverage at all times may have reduced detection for conics with small cone angles. However, we may conclude that the unidirectional conical distributions observed in the northern hemisphere are always observed to be traveling from the northern hemisphere and that they exhibit the following characteristics relative to the symmetric distributions, in that they (1) are typically observed on higher L shells (that is, higher geomagnetic latitudes or larger geocentric distances or both), (2) tend to have significantly larger cone angles, and (3), are associated with higher magnetic activity levels

  9. Interaction of storage carbohydrates and other cyclic fluxes with central metabolism: A quantitative approach by non-stationary 13C metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Mendez, C A; Hanemaaijer, M; Ten Pierick, Angela; Wolters, J C; Heijnen, J J; Wahl, S A

    2016-12-01

    13 C labeling experiments in aerobic glucose limited cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at four different growth rates (0.054; 0.101, 0.207, 0.307 h -1 ) are used for calculating fluxes that include intracellular cycles (e.g., storage carbohydrate cycles, exchange fluxes with amino acids), which are rearranged depending on the growth rate. At low growth rates the impact of the storage carbohydrate recycle is relatively more significant than at high growth rates due to a higher concentration of these materials in the cell (up to 560-fold) and higher fluxes relative to the glucose uptake rate (up to 16%). Experimental observations suggest that glucose can be exported to the extracellular space, and that its source is related to storage carbohydrates, most likely via the export and subsequent extracellular breakdown of trehalose. This hypothesis is strongly supported by 13 C-labeling experimental data, measured extracellular trehalose, and the corresponding flux estimations.

  10. Effects of temperature and UVR on organic matter fluxes and the metabolic activity of Acropora muricata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile Courtial

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching events are predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes depends on many factors, including the magnitude of thermal stress and irradiance. The interactions among these two factors, and in particular with ultra-violet radiation (UVR, the most harmful component of light, are more complex than assumed, and are not yet well understood. This paper explores the individual and combined effects of temperature and UVR on the metabolism of Acropora muricata, one of the most abundant coral species worldwide. Particulate and dissolved organic matter (POM/DOM fluxes and organic matter (OM degradation by the mucus-associated bacteria were also monitored in all conditions. The results show that UVR exposure exacerbated the temperature-induced bleaching, but did not affect OM fluxes, which were only altered by seawater warming. Temperature increase induced a shift from POM release and DOM uptake in healthy corals to POM uptake and DOM release in stressed ones. POM uptake was linked to a significant grazing of pico- and nanoplankton particles during the incubation, to fulfil the energetic requirements of A. muricata in the absence of autotrophy. Finally, OM degradation by mucus-associated bacterial activity was unaffected by UVR exposure, but significantly increased under high temperature. Altogether, our results demonstrate that seawater warming and UVR not only affect coral physiology, but also the way corals interact with the surrounding seawater, with potential consequences for coral reef biogeochemical cycles and food webs.

  11. Critical heat fluxes and liquid distribution in annular channels in the dispersion-annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boltenko, Eh.A.; Pomet'ko, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of using the dependence of intensity of total mass transfer between the flux nucleus and wall film obtained for tubes with uniform heat release and taking into account the peculiarities of mass transfer between the flux nucleus and wall film in annular channels the technique for calculating the liquid distribution and critical capacity of annular channels with internal, external and bilateral heating at uniform and non-uniform heat release over the length is proposed. The calculation of annular channels critical capacity according to the suggested technique is performed. A satisfactory agreement of calculation results with the experimental data is attained

  12. Equilibrium quality and mass flux distributions in an adiabatic three-subchannel test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Maganas, A.

    1993-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the fully-developed quality and mass flux distributions in an adiabatic three-subchannel test section. The three subchannels had the geometrical characteristics of the corner, side, and interior subchannels of a BWR-5 rod bundle. Data collected with Refrigerant-144 at pressures ranging from 7 to 14 bar, simulating operation with water in the range 55 to 103 bar are reported. The average mass flux and quality in the test section were in the ranges 1300 to 1750 kg/m s and -0.03 to 0.25, respectively. The data are analyzed and presented in various forms

  13. Semi-automated curation of metabolic models via flux balance analysis: a case study with Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy J Bautista

    Full Text Available Primarily used for metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, genome-scale metabolic modeling shows tremendous potential as a tool for fundamental research and curation of metabolism. Through a novel integration of flux balance analysis and genetic algorithms, a strategy to curate metabolic networks and facilitate identification of metabolic pathways that may not be directly inferable solely from genome annotation was developed. Specifically, metabolites involved in unknown reactions can be determined, and potentially erroneous pathways can be identified. The procedure developed allows for new fundamental insight into metabolism, as well as acting as a semi-automated curation methodology for genome-scale metabolic modeling. To validate the methodology, a genome-scale metabolic model for the bacterium Mycoplasma gallisepticum was created. Several reactions not predicted by the genome annotation were postulated and validated via the literature. The model predicted an average growth rate of 0.358±0.12[Formula: see text], closely matching the experimentally determined growth rate of M. gallisepticum of 0.244±0.03[Formula: see text]. This work presents a powerful algorithm for facilitating the identification and curation of previously known and new metabolic pathways, as well as presenting the first genome-scale reconstruction of M. gallisepticum.

  14. THE X-RAY FLUX DISTRIBUTION OF SAGITTARIUS A* AS SEEN BY CHANDRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, J. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Markoff, S. [Astronomical Institute, " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nowak, M. A.; Baganoff, F. K. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Dexter, J. [Department of Astronomy, Hearst Field Annex, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Witzel, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Barrière, N. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Li, Y. [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Degenaar, N. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Fragile, P. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Gammie, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Goldwurm, A. [AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, F-75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Grosso, N. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Haggard, D., E-mail: jneilsen@space.mit.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, AC# 2244, Amherst College, Amherst, MA 01002 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray flux distribution of Sgr A* from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's 3 Ms Sgr A* X-ray Visionary Project in 2012. Our analysis indicates that the observed X-ray flux distribution can be decomposed into a steady quiescent component, represented by a Poisson process with rate Q = (5.24 ± 0.08) × 10{sup –3} counts s{sup –1}, and a variable component, represented by a power law process (dN/dF∝F {sup –ξ}, ξ=1.92{sub −0.02}{sup +0.03}). This slope matches our recently reported distribution of flare luminosities. The variability may also be described by a log-normal process with a median unabsorbed 2-8 keV flux of 1.8{sub −0.6}{sup +0.8}×10{sup −14} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} and a shape parameter σ = 2.4 ± 0.2, but the power law provides a superior description of the data. In this decomposition of the flux distribution, all of the intrinsic X-ray variability of Sgr A* (spanning at least three orders of magnitude in flux) can be attributed to flaring activity, likely in the inner accretion flow. We confirm that at the faint end, the variable component contributes ∼10% of the apparent quiescent flux, as previously indicated by our statistical analysis of X-ray flares in these Chandra observations. Our flux distribution provides a new and important observational constraint on theoretical models of Sgr A*, and we use simple radiation models to explore the extent to which a statistical comparison of the X-ray and infrared can provide insights into the physics of the X-ray emission mechanism.

  15. A prediction method of the effect of radial heat flux distribution on critical heat flux in CANDU fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Lan Qin; Yang, Jun; Harrison, Noel

    2014-01-01

    Fuel irradiation experiments to study fuel behaviors have been performed in the experimental loops of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in support of the development of new fuel technologies. Before initiating a fuel irradiation experiment, the experimental proposal must be approved to ensure that the test fuel strings put into the NRU loops meet safety margin requirements in critical heat flux (CHF). The fuel strings in irradiation experiments can have varying degrees of fuel enrichment and burnup, resulting in large variations in radial heat flux distribution (RFD). CHF experiments performed in Freon flow at CRL for full-scale bundle strings with a number of RFDs showed a strong effect of RFD on CHF. A prediction method was derived based on experimental CHF data to account for the RFD effect on CHF. It provides good CHF predictions for various RFDs as compared to the data. However, the range of the tested RFDs in the CHF experiments is not as wide as that required in the fuel irradiation experiments. The applicability of the prediction method needs to be examined for the RFDs beyond the range tested by the CHF experiments. The Canadian subchannel code ASSERT-PV was employed to simulate the CHF behavior for RFDs that would be encountered in fuel irradiation experiments. The CHF predictions using the derived method were compared with the ASSERT simulations. It was observed that the CHF predictions agree well with the ASSERT simulations in terms of CHF, confirming the applicability of the prediction method in fuel irradiation experiments. (author)

  16. Characteristics of ion distribution functions in dipolarizing flux bundles: Event studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runov, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Artemyev, A.; Birn, J.; Pritchett, P. L.; Zhou, X.-Z.

    2017-06-01

    Taking advantage of multipoint observations from a repeating configuration of the five Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probes separated by 1 to 2 Earth radii (RE) along X, Y, and Z in the geocentric solar magnetospheric system (GSM), we study ion distribution functions collected by the probes during three dipolarizing flux bundle (DFB) events observed at geocentric distances 9 energy and twice the thermal energy, although the distribution in the ambient plasma sheet was isotropic. The anisotropic ion distribution in DFBs injected toward the inner magnetosphere may provide the free energy for waves and instabilities, which are important elements of particle energization.

  17. Interaction of storage carbohydrates and other cyclic fluxes with central metabolism: A quantitative approach by non-stationary 13C metabolic flux analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Suarez-Mendez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 13C labeling experiments in aerobic glucose limited cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at four different growth rates (0.054; 0.101, 0.207, 0.307 h−1 are used for calculating fluxes that include intracellular cycles (e.g., storage carbohydrate cycles, exchange fluxes with amino acids, which are rearranged depending on the growth rate. At low growth rates the impact of the storage carbohydrate recycle is relatively more significant than at high growth rates due to a higher concentration of these materials in the cell (up to 560-fold and higher fluxes relative to the glucose uptake rate (up to 16%. Experimental observations suggest that glucose can be exported to the extracellular space, and that its source is related to storage carbohydrates, most likely via the export and subsequent extracellular breakdown of trehalose. This hypothesis is strongly supported by 13C-labeling experimental data, measured extracellular trehalose, and the corresponding flux estimations. Keywords: Non-stationary 13C labeling, Flux estimation, Trehalose, Glycogen, Amino acids

  18. PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION OF LINEAR INDUCTION MOTOR BY EDDY CURRENT AND FLUX DENSITY DISTRIBUTION ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. MANNA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of electromagnetic devices as machines, transformers, heating devices confronts the engineers with several problems. For the design of an optimized geometry and the prediction of the operational behaviour an accurate knowledge of the dependencies of the field quantities inside the magnetic circuits is necessary. This paper provides the eddy current and core flux density distribution analysis in linear induction motor. Magnetic flux in the air gap of the Linear Induction Motor (LIM is reduced to various losses such as end effects, fringes, effect, skin effects etc. The finite element based software package COMSOL Multiphysics Inc. USA is used to get the reliable and accurate computational results for optimization the performance of Linear Induction Motor (LIM. The geometrical characteristics of LIM are varied to find the optimal point of thrust and minimum flux leakage during static and dynamic conditions.

  19. Spatial distribution of neutron flux for the A-711 neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essiet, A. E.; Owolabi, S. A.; Adesanmi, C. A.; Balogun, F. A.

    1996-01-01

    The spatial distribution of neutron flux for the Kaman sciences A-711 neutron generator recently installed at the Centre for Energy Research and Development (CERD), Ile-Ife Nigeria has been determined. At an operational tube current of 2.0 mA and high voltage power supply (HVPS) of 158 kV, the neutron flux increases from 1.608 ± 0.021*10 8 n/cm 2 s at the top of the irradiated plastic vial to 2.640 ± 0.022*10 8 n/cm 2 s at the centre, and then decreases to 1.943 ± 0.02* 8 n/cm 2 s at the bottom. The flux density is strongly dependent on the diameter of deuteron at the tritium target, and within this range a source strength of 10 8 n/s has been measured for the A-711 neutron generator

  20. Effect of thermohydraulic parameter on the flux distribution and the effective multiplication factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, J.C.; Valladares, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of two thermohydraulics parameters; the coolant flow velocity along the reactor channels and the increase of the average water temperature through the core, on the thermal flux distribution and on the effective multiplication factor, was studied in a radioisotopes production reactor. The results show that, for a fixed values of the thermohydraulics parameters reffered above, there are limits for the reactor core volume reduction for each value of the V sub(mod)/V sub(comb) ratio. These thermohydraulics conditions determine the higher termal flux value in the flux-trap and the lower value of the reactor effective multiplication factor. It is also show that there is a V sub(mod)/V sub(comb) ratio value that correspond to the higher value of the lower effective multiplication factor. These results was interpreted and comment using fundamentals concepts and relations of reactor physics. (author)

  1. Two dimensional electron transport in disordered and ordered distributions of magnetic flux vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, M.; Hedegaard, P.

    1994-04-01

    We have considered the conductivity properties of a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in two different kinds of inhomogeneous magnetic fields, i.e. a disordered distribution of magnetic flux vortices, and a periodic array of magnetic flux vortices. The work falls in two parts. In the first part we show how the phase shifts for an electron scattering on an isolated vortex, can be calculated analytically, and related to the transport properties through the differential cross section. In the second part we present numerical results for the Hall conductivity of the 2DEG in a periodic array of flux vortices found by exact diagonalization. We find characteristic spikes in the Hall conductance, when it is plotted against the filling fraction. It is argued that the spikes can be interpreted in terms of ''topological charge'' piling up across local and global gaps in the energy spectrum. (au) (23 refs.)

  2. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Jean M. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-02-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  3. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models

  4. Understanding alternative fluxes/effluxes through comparative metabolic pathway analysis of phylum actinobacteria using a simplified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mansi; Lal, Devi; Saxena, Anjali; Anand, Shailly; Kaur, Jasvinder; Kaur, Jaspreet; Lal, Rup

    2013-12-01

    Actinobacteria are known for their diverse metabolism and physiology. Some are dreadful human pathogens whereas some constitute the natural flora for human gut. Therefore, the understanding of metabolic pathways is a key feature for targeting the pathogenic bacteria without disturbing the symbiotic ones. A big challenge faced today is multiple drug resistance by Mycobacterium and other pathogens that utilize alternative fluxes/effluxes. With the availability of genome sequence, it is now feasible to conduct the comparative in silico analysis. Here we present a simplified approach to compare metabolic pathways so that the species specific enzyme may be traced and engineered for future therapeutics. The analyses of four key carbohydrate metabolic pathways, i.e., glycolysis, pyruvate metabolism, tri carboxylic acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway suggest the presence of alternative fluxes. It was found that the upper pathway of glycolysis was highly variable in the actinobacterial genomes whereas lower glycolytic pathway was highly conserved. Likewise, pentose phosphate pathway was well conserved in contradiction to TCA cycle, which was found to be incomplete in majority of actinobacteria. The clustering based on presence and absence of genes of these metabolic pathways clearly revealed that members of different genera shared identical pathways and, therefore, provided an easy method to identify the metabolic similarities/differences between pathogenic and symbiotic organisms. The analyses could identify isoenzymes and some key enzymes that were found to be missing in some pathogenic actinobacteria. The present work defines a simple approach to explore the effluxes in four metabolic pathways within the phylum actinobacteria. The analysis clearly reflects that actinobacteria exhibit diverse routes for metabolizing substrates. The pathway comparison can help in finding the enzymes that can be used as drug targets for pathogens without effecting symbiotic organisms

  5. The effects of off-center pellets on the temperature distribution and the heat flux distribution of fuel rods in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Muzhang; Xing Jianhua

    1986-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of off-center pellets on the steady state temperature distribution and heat flux distribution of fuel rods in the nuclear reactors, and derives the dimensionless temperature distribution relationships and the dimensionless heat flux distribution relationship from the fuel rods with off-center pellets. The calculated results show that the effects of off-center will result in not only deviations of the highest temperature placement in the fuel pellets, but also the circumferentially nonuniform distributions of the temperatures and heat fluxes of the fuel rod surfaces

  6. Process and equipment for monitoring flux distribution in a nuclear reactor outside the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, K.F.; Gopal, R.

    1977-01-01

    This concerns the monitoring system for axial flux distribution during the whole load operating range lying outside the core of, for example, a PWR. Flux distribution cards can be produced continuously. The core is divided into at least three sections, which are formed by dividing it at right angles to the longitudinal axis, and the flux is measured outside the core using adjacent detectors. Their output signals are calibrated by amplifiers so that the load distribution in the associated sections is reproduced. A summation of the calibrated output signals and the formation of a mean load signal takes place in summing stages. For monitoring, this is compared with a value which corresponds to the maximum permissible load setting. Apart from this the position of the control rods in the core can be taken into account by multiplication of the mean load signals by suitable peak factors. The distribution of monitoring positions or the position of the detectors can be progressive or symmetrical along the axis. (DG) 891 HP [de

  7. Measurements of neutron flux distributions in the core of the Ljubljana TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rant, J.; Ravnik, M.; Mele, I.; Dimic, V.

    2008-01-01

    Recently the Ljubljana TRIGA Mark II Reactor has been refurbished and upgraded to pulsed operation. To verify the core design calculations using TRIGAP and PULSTR1 codes and to obtain necessary data for future irradiation and neutron beam experiments, an extensive experimental program of neutron flux mapping and neutron field characterization was carried out. Using the existing neutron measuring thimbles complete axial and radial distributions in two radial directions were determined for two different core configurations. For one core configuration the measurements were also carried out in the pulsed mode. For flux distributions thin Cu (relative measurements) and diluted Au wires (absolute values) were used. For each radial position the cadmium ratio was determined in two axial levels. The core configuration was rather uniform, well defined (fresh fuel of a single type, including fuelled followers) and compact (no irradiation channels or gaps), offering unique opportunity to test the computer codes for TRIGA reactor calculations. The neutron flux measuring procedures and techniques are described and the experimental results are presented. The agreement between the predicted and measured power peaking factors are within the error limits of the measurements (<±5%) and calculations (±10%). Power peaking occurs in the B ring, and in the A ring (centre) there is a significant flux depression. (authors)

  8. Noninvasive ultrasonic measurements of temperature distribution and heat fluxes in nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Yunlu; Skliar, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of temperature and heat fluxes through structural materials are important in many nuclear systems. One such example is dry storage casks (DSC) that are built to store highly radioactive materials, such as spent nuclear reactor fuel. The temperature inside casks must be maintained within allowable limits of the fuel assemblies and the DSC components because many degradation mechanisms are thermally controlled. In order to obtain direct, real-time measurements of temperature distribution without insertion of sensing elements into harsh environment of storage casks, we are developing noninvasive ultrasound (US) methods for measuring spatial distribution of temperature inside solid materials, such as concrete overpacks, steel casings, thimbles, and rods. The measured temperature distribution can then be used to obtain heat fluxes that provide calorimetric characterisation of the fuel decay, fuel distribution inside the cask, its integrity, and accounting of nuclear materials. The physical basis of the proposed approach is the temperature dependence of the speed of sound in solids. By measuring the time it takes an ultrasound signal to travel a known distance between a transducer and a receiver, the indication about the temperature distribution along the path of the ultrasound propagation may be obtained. However, when temperature along the path of US propagation is non-uniform, the overall time of flight of an ultrasound signal depends on the temperature distribution in a complex and unknown way. To overcome this difficulty, the central idea of our method is to create an US propagation path inside material of interest which incorporates partial ultrasound reflectors (back scatterers) at known locations and use the train of created multiple echoes to estimate the temperature distribution. In this paper, we discuss experimental validation of this approach, the achievable accuracy and spatial resolution of the measured temperature profile, and stress the

  9. The effect of the advanced drift-flux model of ASSERT-PV on critical heat flux, flow and void distributions in CANDU bundle subchannels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, N.; Rao, Y.F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Presentation of the “advanced” drift-flux model of the subchannel code ASSERT-PV. • Study the effect of the drift-flux model of ASSERT on CHF and flow distribution. • Quantify model component effects with flow, quality and dryout power measurements. - Abstract: This paper studies the effect of the drift flux model of the subchannel code ASSERT-PV on critical heat flux (CHF), void fraction and flow distribution across fuel bundles. Numerical experiments and comparison against measurements were performed to examine the trends and relative behaviour of the different components of the model under various flow conditions. The drift flux model of ASSERT-PV is composed of three components: (a) the lateral component or diversion cross-flow, caused by pressure difference between connected subchannels, (b) the turbulent diffusion component or the turbulent mixing through gaps of subchannels, caused by instantaneous turbulent fluctuations or flow oscillations, and (c) the void drift component that occurs due to the two-phase tendency toward a preferred distribution. This study shows that the drift flux model has a significant impact on CHF, void fraction and flow distribution predictions. The lateral component of the drift flux model has a stronger effect on CHF predictions than the axial component, especially for horizontal flow. Predictions of CHF, void fraction and flow distributions are most sensitive to the turbulent diffusion component of the model, followed by the void drift component. Buoyancy drift can be significant, but it does not have as much influence on CHF and flow distribution as the turbulent diffusion and void drift.

  10. Neutron Flux Distribution on Neutron Radiography Facility After Fixing the Collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supandi; Parikin; Mohtar; Sunardi; Roestam, S

    1996-01-01

    The Radiography Neutron Facility consists of an inner collimator, outer collimator, main shutter, second shutter and the sample chamber with 300 mm in diameter. Neutron beam quality depends on the neutron flux intensities distribution, L/D ratio Cd ratio, neutron/gamma ratio. The results show that the neutron flux intensity was 2.83 x 107 n cm-2.s-1, with deviation of + 7.8 % and it was distributed homogeneously at the sample position of 200 mm diameter. The beam characteristics were L/D ratio 98 and Rod 8, and neutron gamma ratio 3.08 x 105n.cm-2.mR-1 and Reactor Power was 20 MW. This technique can be used to examine sample with diameter of < 200 mm

  11. An analog computer method for solving flux distribution problems in multi region nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radanovic, L; Bingulac, S; Lazarevic, B; Matausek, M [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1963-04-15

    The paper describes a method developed for determining criticality conditions and plotting flux distribution curves in multi region nuclear reactors on a standard analog computer. The method, which is based on the one-dimensional two group treatment, avoids iterative procedures normally used for boundary value problems and is practically insensitive to errors in initial conditions. The amount of analog equipment required is reduced to a minimum and is independent of the number of core regions and reflectors. (author)

  12. Distribution of flux vacua around singular points in Calabi-Yau moduli space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Tohru; Tachikawa, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    We study the distribution of type-IIB flux vacua in the moduli space near various singular loci, e.g. conifolds, ADE singularities on P 1 , Argyres-Douglas point etc, using the Ashok-Douglas density det (R+ω). We find that the vacuum density is integrable around each of them, irrespective of the type of the singularities. We study in detail an explicit example of an Argyres-Douglas point embedded in a compact Calabi-Yau manifold

  13. Inverse Estimation of Heat Flux and Temperature Distribution in 3D Finite Domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Nauman Malik

    2009-02-01

    Inverse heat conduction problems occur in many theoretical and practical applications where it is difficult or practically impossible to measure the input heat flux and the temperature of the layer conducting the heat flux to the body. Thus it becomes imperative to devise some means to cater for such a problem and estimate the heat flux inversely. Adaptive State Estimator is one such technique which works by incorporating the semi-Markovian concept into a Bayesian estimation technique thereby developing an inverse input and state estimator consisting of a bank of parallel adaptively weighted Kalman filters. The problem presented in this study deals with a three dimensional system of a cube with one end conducting heat flux and all the other sides are insulated while the temperatures are measured on the accessible faces of the cube. The measurements taken on these accessible faces are fed into the estimation algorithm and the input heat flux and the temperature distribution at each point in the system is calculated. A variety of input heat flux scenarios have been examined to underwrite the robustness of the estimation algorithm and hence insure its usability in practical applications. These include sinusoidal input flux, a combination of rectangular, linearly changing and sinusoidal input flux and finally a step changing input flux. The estimator's performance limitations have been examined in these input set-ups and error associated with each set-up is compared to conclude the realistic application of the estimation algorithm in such scenarios. Different sensor arrangements, that is different sensor numbers and their locations are also examined to impress upon the importance of number of measurements and their location i.e. close or farther from the input area. Since practically it is both economically and physically tedious to install more number of measurement sensors, hence optimized number and location is very important to determine for making the study more

  14. Fast Radio Bursts’ Recipes for the Distributions of Dispersion Measures, Flux Densities, and Fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niino, Yuu

    2018-05-01

    We investigate how the statistical properties of dispersion measure (DM) and apparent flux density/fluence of (nonrepeating) fast radio bursts (FRBs) are determined by unknown cosmic rate density history [ρ FRB(z)] and luminosity function (LF) of the transient events. We predict the distributions of DMs, flux densities, and fluences of FRBs taking account of the variation of the receiver efficiency within its beam, using analytical models of ρ FRB(z) and LF. Comparing the predictions with the observations, we show that the cumulative distribution of apparent fluences suggests that FRBs originate at cosmological distances and ρ FRB increases with redshift resembling the cosmic star formation history (CSFH). We also show that an LF model with a bright-end cutoff at log10 L ν (erg s‑1 Hz‑1) ∼ 34 are favored to reproduce the observed DM distribution if ρ FRB(z) ∝ CSFH, although the statistical significance of the constraints obtained with the current size of the observed sample is not high. Finally, we find that the correlation between DM and flux density of FRBs is potentially a powerful tool to distinguish whether FRBs are at cosmological distances or in the local universe more robustly with future observations.

  15. Phase transitions and flux distributions of SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Yingcai.

    1993-01-01

    The strong interactions between quarks are believed to be described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), which is a non-abelian SU(3) gauge theory. It is known that QCD undergoes a deconfining phase transition at very high temperatures, that is, at low temperatures QCD is in confined phase, at sufficient high temperatures it is in an unconfined phase. Also, quark confinement is believed to be due to string formation. In this dissertation the authors studied SU(2) gauge theory using numerical methods of LGT, which will provide some insights about the properties of QCD because SU(2) is similar to SU(3). They measured the flux distributions of a q bar q pair at various temperatures in different volumes. They find that in the limit of infinite volumes the flux distribution is different in the two phases. In the confined phase strong evidence is found for the string formation, however, in the unconfined phase there is no string formation. On the other hand, in the limit of zero temperature and finite volumes they find a clear signal for string formation in the large volume region, however, the string tension measured in intermediate volumes is due to finite volume effects, there is no intrinsic string formation. The color flux energies (action) of the q bar q pair are described by Michael sum rules. The original Michael sum rules deal with a static q bar q pair at zero temperature in infinite volumes. To check these sum rules with flux data at finite temperatures, they present a complete derivation for the sum rules, thus generalizing them to account for finite temperature effects. They find that the flux data are consistent with the prediction of generalized sum rules. The study elucidates the rich structures of QCD, and provides evidence for quark confinement and string formation. This supports the belief that QCD is a correct theory for strong interactions, and quark confinement can be explained by QCD

  16. Distribution of hydrogen-metabolizing bacteria in alfalfa field soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, S.D.; Kapulnik, Y.; Phillips, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    H 2 evolved by alfalfa root nodules during the process of N 2 fixation may be an important factor influencing the distribution of soil bacteria. To test this hypothesis under field conditions, over 700 bacterial isolates were obtained from fallow soil or from the 3-mm layer of soil surrounding alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) root nodules, alfalfa roots, or bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis L.) roots. Bacteria were isolated under either aerobic or microaerophilic conditions and were tested for their capacity to metabolize H 2 . Isolates showing net H 2 uptake and 3 H 2 incorporation activity under laboratory conditions were assigned a Hup + phenotype, whereas organisms with significant H 2 output capacity were designated as a Hout + phenotype. Under aerobic isolation conditions two Hup + isolates were obtained, whereas under microaerophilic conditions five Hup + and two Hout + isolates were found. The nine isolates differed on the basis of 24 standard bacteriological characteristics or fatty acid composition. Five of the nine organisms were isolated from soil around root nodules, whereas the other four were found distributed among the other three soil environments. On the basis of the microaerophilic isolations, 4.8% of the total procaryotic isolates from soil around root nodules were capable of oxidizing H 2 , and 1.2% could produce H 2 . Two of the Hup + isolates were identified as Rhizobium meliloti by root nodulation tests, but the fact that none of the isolates reduced C 2 H 2 under the assay conditions suggested that the H 2 metabolism traits were associated with various hydrogenase systems rather than with nitrogenase activity

  17. Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Sapra, Rajat; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Myers, Samuel; Reichmuth, David; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-01-20

    A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and istolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Our findings show that glucose metabolism in G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG proceeds via glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle; the Entner?Doudoroff pathway and transhydrogenase activity were not detected. Anaplerotic reactions (including the glyoxylate shunt, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were active, but fluxes through those pathways could not be accuratelydetermined using amino acid labeling. When growth conditions were switched from aerobic to micro-aerobic conditions, fluxes (based on a normalized glucose uptake rate of 100 units (g DCW)-1 h-1) through the TCA cycle and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were reduced from 64+-3 to 25+-2 and from 30+-2 to 19+-2, respectively. The carbon flux under micro-aerobic growth was directed formate. Under fully anerobic conditions, G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG used a mixed acid fermentation process and exhibited a maximum ethanol yield of 0.38+-0.07 mol mol-1 glucose. In silico flux balance modeling demonstrates that lactate and acetate production from G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG reduces the maximum ethanol yieldby approximately threefold, thus indicating that both pathways should be modified to maximize ethanol production.

  18. A recruiting protein of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase controls metabolic flux toward chlorophyll biosynthesis in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Wang, Cheng-Yuan; Gutensohn, Michael; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Dabing; Dudareva, Natalia; Lu, Shan

    2017-06-27

    In plants, geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) is produced by plastidic GGPP synthase (GGPPS) and serves as a precursor for vital metabolic branches, including chlorophyll, carotenoid, and gibberellin biosynthesis. However, molecular mechanisms regulating GGPP allocation among these biosynthetic pathways localized in the same subcellular compartment are largely unknown. We found that rice contains only one functionally active GGPPS, OsGGPPS1, in chloroplasts. A functionally active homodimeric enzyme composed of two OsGGPPS1 subunits is located in the stroma. In thylakoid membranes, however, the GGPPS activity resides in a heterodimeric enzyme composed of one OsGGPPS1 subunit and GGPPS recruiting protein (OsGRP). OsGRP is structurally most similar to members of the geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit type II subfamily. In contrast to members of this subfamily, OsGRP enhances OsGGPPS1 catalytic efficiency and specificity of GGPP production on interaction with OsGGPPS1. Structural biology and protein interaction analyses demonstrate that affinity between OsGRP and OsGGPPS1 is stronger than between two OsGGPPS1 molecules in homodimers. OsGRP determines OsGGPPS1 suborganellar localization and directs it to a large protein complex in thylakoid membranes, consisting of geranylgeranyl reductase (OsGGR), light-harvesting-like protein 3 (OsLIL3), protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (OsPORB), and chlorophyll synthase (OsCHLG). Taken together, genetic and biochemical analyses suggest OsGRP functions in recruiting OsGGPPS1 from the stroma toward thylakoid membranes, thus providing a mechanism to control GGPP flux toward chlorophyll biosynthesis.

  19. Ethanol-metabolizing pathways in deermice. Estimation of flux calculated from isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderman, J.; Takagi, T.; Lieber, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The apparent deuterium isotope effects on Vmax/Km (D(V/K] of ethanol oxidation in two deermouse strains (one having and one lacking hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH] were used to calculate flux through the ADH, microsomal ethanol-oxidizing system (MEOS), and catalase pathways. In vitro, D(V/K) values were 3.22 for ADH, 1.13 for MEOS, and 1.83 for catalase under physiological conditions of pH, temperature, and ionic strength. In vivo, in deermice lacking ADH (ADH-), D(V/K) was 1.20 +/- 0.09 (mean +/- S.E.) at 7.0 +/- 0.5 mM blood ethanol and 1.08 +/- 0.10 at 57.8 +/- 10.2 mM blood ethanol, consistent with ethanol oxidation principally by MEOS. Pretreatment of ADH- animals with the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole did not significantly change D(V/K). ADH+ deermice exhibited D(V/K) values of 1.87 +/- 0.06 (untreated), 1.71 +/- 0.13 (pretreated with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole), and 1.24 +/- 0.13 (after the ADH inhibitor, 4-methylpyrazole) at 5-7 mM blood ethanol levels. At elevated blood ethanol concentrations (58.1 +/- 2.4 mM), a D(V/K) of 1.37 +/- 0.21 was measured in the ADH+ strain. For measured D(V/K) values to accurately reflect pathway contributions, initial reaction conditions are essential. These were shown to exist by the following criteria: negligible fractional conversion of substrate to product and no measurable back reaction in deermice having a reversible enzyme (ADH). Thus, calculations from D(V/K) indicate that, even when ADH is present, non-ADH pathways (mostly MEOS) participate significantly in ethanol metabolism at all concentrations tested and play a major role at high levels

  20. Measured and Predicted Neutron Flux Distributions in a Material Surrounding a Cylindrical Duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, J; Sandlin, R

    1966-03-15

    The radial fast neutron flux attenuations in the material (iron) surrounding ducts of diameters 7, 9, and 15 cm and total duct length of about 1.5 m have been investigated with and without neutron scattering cans filled with D{sub 2}O in the duct. Experimentally the problem was solved by the use of foil activation techniques. Theoretically it was attacked by, in the first place, a Monte Carlo program specially written for this purpose and utilizing an importance sampling technique. In the second place non- and single-scattering removal flux codes were tried, and also simple hand calculations. The Monte Carlo results accounted well for the fast flux attenuation, while the non- and single-scattering methods overestimated the attenuation generally by a factor of 10 or less. Simple hand calculations using three empirical parameters could be fitted to the measured data within a factor of 1.2 - 1.3 at penetration depths greater than 3 - 4 cm. The distribution of the D{sub 2}O-scattered flux could well be described in terms of single scattering.

  1. Spatially Distributed, Coupled Modeling of Plant Growth, Nitrogen and Water Fluxes in an Alpine Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K.

    2001-12-01

    Carbon, water and nitrogen fluxes are closely coupled. They interact and have many feedbacks. Human interference, in particular through land use management and global change strongly modifies these fluxes. Increasing demands and conflicting interests result in an increasing need for regulation targeting different aspects of the system. Without being their main target, many of these measures directly affect water quantity, quality and availability. Improved management and planning of our water resources requires the development of integrated tools, in particular since interactions of the involved environmental and social systems often lead to unexpected or adverse results. To investigate the effect of plant growth, land use management and global change on water fluxes and quality, the PROcess oriented Modular EnvironmenT and Vegetation Model (PROMET-V) was developed. PROMET-V models the spatial patterns and temporal course of water, carbon and nitrogen fluxes using process oriented and mechanistic model components. The hydrological model is based on the Penman-Monteith approach, it uses a plant-physiological model to calculate the canopy conductance, and a multi-layer soil water model. Plant growth for different vegetation is modelled by calculating canopy photosynthesis, respiration, phenology and allocation. Plant growth and water fluxes are coupled directly through photosynthesis and transpiration. Many indirect feedbacks and interactions occur due to their mutual dependency upon leaf area, root distribution, water and nutrient availability for instance. PROMET-V calculates nitrogen fluxes and transformations. The time step used depends upon the modelled process and varies from 1 hour to 1 day. The kernel model is integrated in a raster GIS system for spatially distributed modelling. PROMET-V was tested in a pre-alpine landscape (Ammer river, 709 km**2, located in Southern Germany) which is characterized by small scale spatial heterogeneities of climate, soil and

  2. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan, Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    Flux distribution in central metabolic pathways of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was examined using 13C tracer experiments. Consistent with the current genome annotation and independent evidence from enzyme activity assays, the isotopomer results from both GC-MS and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) indicate the lack of oxidatively functional TCA cycle and an incomplete pentose phosphate pathway. Results from this study suggest that fluxes through both pathways are limited to biosynthesis. The data also indicate that >80 percent of the lactate was converted to acetate and the reactions involved are the primary route of energy production (NAD(P)H and ATP production). Independent of the TCA cycle, direct cleavage of acetyl-CoA to CO and 5,10-methyl-THF also leads to production of NADH and ATP. Although the genome annotation implicates a ferredoxin-dependent oxoglutarate synthase, isotopic evidence does not support flux through this reaction in either the oxidative or reductive mode; therefore, the TCA cycle is incomplete. FT-ICR MS was used to locate the labeled carbon distribution in aspartate and glutamate and confirmed the presence of an atypical enzyme for citrate formation suggested in previous reports (the citrate synthesized by this enzyme is the isotopic antipode of the citrate synthesized by the (S)-citrate synthase). These findings enable a better understanding of the relation between genome annotation and actual metabolic pathways in D. vulgaris, and also demonstrate FT-ICR MS as a powerful tool for isotopomer analysis, overcoming problems in both GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy

  3. Transient critical heat flux under flow coast-down in vertical annulus with non-uniform heat flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, S.K.; Chun, S.Y.; Choi, K.Y.; Yang, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental study on transient critical heat flux (CHF) under flow coast-down has been performed for water flow in a non-uniformly heated vertical annulus under low flow and a wide range of pressure conditions. The objectives of this study are to systematically investigate the effect of the flow transient on the CHF and to compare the transient CHF with steady state CHF. The transient CHF experiments have been performed for three kinds of flow transient modes based on the coast-down data of the Kori 3/4 nuclear power plant reactor coolant pump. Most of the CHFs occurred in the annular-mist flow regime. Thus, it means that the possible CHF mechanism might be the liquid film dryout in the annular-mist flow regime. For flow transient mode with the smallest flow reduction rate, the time-to-CHF is the largest. At the same inlet subcooling, system pressure and heat flux, the effect of the initial mass flux on the critical mass flux can be negligible. However, the effect of the initial mass flux on the time-to-CHF becomes large as the heat flux decreases. Usually, the critical mass flux is large for slow flow reduction. There is a pressure effect on the ratio of the transient CHF data to steady state CHF data. Some conventional correlations show relatively better CHF prediction results for high system pressure, high quality and slow transient modes than for low system pressure, low quality and fast transient modes. (author)

  4. Radar meteors range distribution model. II. Shower flux density and mass distribution index

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecinová, Drahomíra; Pecina, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2007), s. 107-124 ISSN 1335-1842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/03/1405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : physics of meteors * radar meteors * range distribution Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  5. Development of a position-sensitive fission counter and measurement of neutron flux distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Hideshi; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Kakuta, Tsunemi

    2001-08-01

    A position-sensitive fission counter (PSFC) that operates in high neutron flux and high gamma-ray background such as at the side of a power reactor vessel has been developed. Neutron detection using the PSFC with a solenoid electrode is based on a delay-line method. The PSFC that has the outer diameter of 25 mm and the sensitive length of 1000 mm was manufactured for investigation of the performances. The PSFC provided output current pulses that were sufficiently higher than the alpha noise, though the PSFC has a solenoid electrode and large electrode-capacitance. The S/N ratio of PSFC outputs proved to be higher than that of ordinary fission counters with 200 mm sensitive length. A performance test to measure neutron flux distributions by a neutron measuring system with the PSFC was carried out by the side of a graphite pile, W2.4 x H1.4 x L1.2 m, with neutron sources, Am-Be 370 GBq x 2. It was confirmed that the neutron flux distribution was well measured with the system. (author)

  6. Airborne methane remote measurements reveal heavy-tail flux distribution in Four Corners region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberg, C.

    2016-12-01

    Methane (CH4) impacts climate as the second strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gas and air quality by influencing tropospheric ozone levels. Space-based observations have identified the Four Corners region in the Southwest United States as an area of large CH4 enhancements. We conducted an airborne campaign in Four Corners during April 2015 with the next-generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (near-infrared) and Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (thermal infrared) imaging spectrometers to better understand the source of methane by measuring methane plumes at 1- to 3-m spatial resolution. Our analysis detected more than 250 individual methane plumes from fossil fuel harvesting, processing, and distributing infrastructures, spanning an emission range from the detection limit ˜ 2 kg/h to 5 kg/h through ˜ 5,000 kg/h. Observed sources include gas processing facilities, storage tanks, pipeline leaks, natural seeps and well pads, as well as a coal mine venting shaft. Overall, plume enhancements and inferred fluxes follow a lognormal distribution, with the top 10% emitters contributing 49 to 66% to the inferred total point source flux of 0.23 Tg/y to 0.39 Tg/y. We will summarize the campaign results and provide an overview of how airborne remote sensing can be used to detect and infer methane fluxes over widespread geographic areas and how new instrumentation could be used to perform similar observations from space.

  7. Numerical Analysis on Heat Flux Distribution through the Steel Liner of the Ex-vessel Core Catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se Hong; Choi, Choeng Ryul [ELSOLTEC, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Jo; Lee, Kyu Bok [KEPCO, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Do Hyun [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In order to prevent material failure of steel container of the core catcher system due to high temperatures, heat flux through the steel liner wall must be kept below the critical heat flux (CHF), and vapor dry-out of the cooling channel must be avoided. In this study, CFD methodology has been developed to simulate the heat flux distribution in the core catcher system, involving following physical phenomena: natural convection in the corium pool, boiling heat transfer and solidification/melting of the corium. A CFD methodology has been developed to simulate the thermal/hydraulic phenomena in the core catcher system, and a numerical analysis has been carried out to estimate the heat flux through the steel liner of the core catcher. High heat flux values are formed at the free surface of the corium pool. However, the heat flux through the steel liner is maintained below the critical heat flux.

  8. Magneto-optical imaging of magnetic flux distribution in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, K.; Murakamia, H.; Kawayama, I.; Doda, Y.; Tonouchi, M.; Chikumoto, N.

    2004-01-01

    Prototype systems of home-made magneto-optical microscopes were fabricated, and preliminary studies were carried out using Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ single crystals and an YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ superconductor vortex flow transistor. In the study using BSCCO crystals, we succeeded in the observation of magnetic flux penetration into half-peeled thin flake region on the crystal surface, and it was found that the magnetic fluxes penetrate in characteristic one-dimensional alignment almost along the crystal a-axis. On the other hand, in the study using the YBCO device clear changes in the generated magnetic field distribution could be detected corresponding to the current direction

  9. Equilibrium quality and mass flux distributions in an adiabatic three-subchannel test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Maganas, A.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the fully developed quality and mass flux distributions in an adiabatic three-subchannel test section. The three subchannels had the geometrical characteristics of the corner, side, and interior subchannels of a boiling water reactor (BWR-5) rod bundle. Data collected with Refrigerant-114 at pressures ranging from 7 to 14 bars, simulating operation with water in the range 55 to 103 bars are reported. The average mass flux and quality in the test section were in the ranges 1,300 to 1,750 kg/m 2 · s and -0.03 to 0.25, respectively. The data are analyzed and presented in various forms

  10. Prompt neutrino fluxes in the atmosphere with PROSA parton distribution functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzelli, M.V.; Moch, S.; Placakyte, R.; Sigl, G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.

    2016-11-01

    Effects on atmospheric prompt neutrino fluxes of present uncertainties affecting the nucleon composition are studied by using the PROSA fit to parton distribution functions (PDFs). The PROSA fit extends the precision of the PDFs to low x, which is the kinematic region of relevance for high-energy neutrino production, by taking into account LHCb data on charm and bottom hadroproduction. In the range of neutrino energies explored by present Very Large Volume Neutrino Telescopes, it is found that PDF uncertainties are far smaller with respect to those due to renormalization and factorization scale variation and to assumptions on the cosmic ray composition, which at present dominate and limit our knowledge of prompt neutrino fluxes. A discussion is presented on how these uncertainties affect the expected number of atmospheric prompt neutrino events in the analysis of high-energy events characterized by interaction vertices fully contained within the instrumented volume of the detector, performed by the IceCube collaboration.

  11. Electron energy distribution control by fiat: breaking from the conventional flux ratio scaling rules in etch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Alok; Wang, Mingmei; Sherpa, Sonam; Ventzek, Peter

    2015-03-01

    With shrinking critical dimensions, minimizing each of aspect ratio dependent etching (ARDE), bowing, undercut, selectivity, and within die uniformly across a wafer is met by trading off one requirement against another. The problem of trade-offs is especially critical. At the root of the problem is that roles radical flux, ion flux and ion energy play may be both good and bad. Increasing one parameter helps meeting one requirement but hinders meeting the other. Managing process by managing flux ratios and ion energy alone with conventional sources is not adequate because surface chemistry is uncontrollable. At the root of lack of control is that the electron energy distribution function (eedf) has not been controlled. Fortunately the high density surface wave sources control the eedf by fiat. High density surface wave sources are characterized by distinct plasma regions: an active plasma generation region with high electron temperature (Te) and an ionization free but chemistry rich diffusive region (low Te region). Pressure aids is segregating the regions by proving a means for momentum relaxation between the source and downstream region. "Spatial pulsing" allows access to plasma chemistry with reasonably high ion flux, from the active plasma generation region, just above the wafer. Low plasma potential enables precise passivation of surfaces which is critical for atomic layer etch (ALE) or high precision etch where the roles of plasma species can be limited to their purposed roles. High precision etch need not be at the cost of speed and manufacturability. Large ion flux at precisely controlled ion energy with RLSATM realizes fast desorption steps for ALE without compromising process throughput and precision.

  12. Shigella reroutes host cell central metabolism to obtain high-flux nutrient supply for vigorous intracellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentner, David; Martano, Giuseppe; Callon, Morgane; Chiquet, Petra; Brodmann, Maj; Burton, Olga; Wahlander, Asa; Nanni, Paolo; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Grossmann, Jonas; Limenitakis, Julien; Schlapbach, Ralph; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A; Hiller, Sebastian; Bumann, Dirk

    2014-07-08

    Shigella flexneri proliferate in infected human epithelial cells at exceptionally high rates. This vigorous growth has important consequences for rapid progression to life-threatening bloody diarrhea, but the underlying metabolic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we used metabolomics, proteomics, and genetic experiments to determine host and Shigella metabolism during infection in a cell culture model. The data suggest that infected host cells maintain largely normal fluxes through glycolytic pathways, but the entire output of these pathways is captured by Shigella, most likely in the form of pyruvate. This striking strategy provides Shigella with an abundant favorable energy source, while preserving host cell ATP generation, energy charge maintenance, and survival, despite ongoing vigorous exploitation. Shigella uses a simple three-step pathway to metabolize pyruvate at high rates with acetate as an excreted waste product. The crucial role of this pathway for Shigella intracellular growth suggests targets for antimicrobial chemotherapy of this devastating disease.

  13. Experimental data on heat flux distribution from a volumetrically heated pool with frozen boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helle, Maria; Kymaelaeinen, Olli; Tuomisto, Harri

    1999-01-01

    The COPO II experiments are confirmatory experiments and a continuation project to the earlier COPO I experiments. As in COPO 1, a molten corium pool on the lower head of a RPV is simulated by a two - dimensional slice of it in linear scale 1:2. The corium is simulated by water-zinc sulfate solution with volumetric Joule heating. The heat flux distribution on the boundaries and the temperature distribution in the pool are measured. The major new feature in COPO II is the cooling arrangement which is based on circulation of liquid nitrogen on the outside of the pool boundaries. The use of liquid nitrogen leads to formation of ice on the inside of boundaries. Two geometrically different versions of the COPO II facility have been constructed: one with a tori-spherical bottom shape, simulating the RPV of a VVER-440 reactor as COPO I, and another one with semicircular bottom simulating a western PWR such as AP600. The modified Rayleigh number in the COPO II experiments corresponds to the one in a prototypic corium pool (∼ 10 15 ). This paper reports results from the COPO II-Lo and COPO II-AP experiments with homogenous pool. Results indicate that the upward heat fluxes are in agreement with the results of the COPO I experiments. Also, as expected, the time averaged upward heat flux profile was relatively flat. On the other hand, the heat fluxes at the side and bottom boundaries of the pool were slightly higher in COPO II-Lo than in COPO I. In COPO II-AP, the average heat transfer coefficients to the curved boundary were higher than predicted by Jahn's and Mayinger's correlation, but slightly lower than in BALI experiments. (authors)

  14. Tissue distribution, disposition, and metabolism of cyclosporine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, O.; Schreier, E.; Heitz, F.; Maurer, G.

    1987-01-01

    Tissue distribution, disposition, and metabolism of 3 H-cyclosporine were studied in rats after single and repeated oral doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg and after an iv dose of 3 mg/kg. The oral doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg were dissolved in polyethylene glycol 200/ethanol or in olive oil/Labrafil/ethanol. Absorption from both formulations was slow and incomplete, with peak 3 H blood levels at 3-4 hr. Approximately 30% of the radioactive dose was absorbed, which is consistent with oral bioavailability data for cyclosporine. More than 70% of the radioactivity was excreted in feces and up to 15% in urine. Elimination via the bile accounted for 10 and 60% of the oral and iv doses, respectively. Since unchanged cyclosporine predominated in both blood and tissues at early time points, the half-lives of the distribution phases (t 1/2 alpha) of parent drug and of total radioactivity were similar. In blood, kidney, liver, and lymph nodes, t 1/2 alpha of cyclosporine ranged from 6-10 hr. Elimination of radioactivity from the systemic circulation was multiphasic, with a terminal half-life of 20-30 hr. 3 H-Cyclosporine was extensively distributed throughout the body, with highest concentrations in liver, kidney, endocrine glands, and adipose tissue. The concentrations of both total radioactivity and parent drug were greater in tissues than in blood, which is consistent with the high lipid solubility of cyclosporine and some of its metabolites. Skin and adipose tissue were the main storage sites for unchanged cyclosporine. Elimination half-lives were slower for most tissues than for blood and increased with multiple dosing. The amount of unchanged drug was negligible in urine and bile

  15. Implementation of drift-flux correlations in ARTIST and its assessment in comparison with THETIS void distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, B. J.; Kim, H. C.; Moon, S. K.; Lee, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Non-homogeneous, non-equilibrium drift-flux model was developed in ARTIST code to enhance capability of predicting two-phase flow void distribution at low pressure and low flow conditions. The governing equations of ARTIST code consist of three continuity equations (mixture, liquid, and noncondensibles), two energy equations (gas and mixture) and one mixture momentum equation constituted with the drift-flux model. In order to provide the Co and the Vgj of drift-flux model, four drift-flux correlations, which are Chexal-Lellouche, Ohkawa-Lahey, GE Ramp and Dix models, are implemented. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the drift flux correlations, the steady state void distributions of the THETIS boil-off tests are simulated. The results show that the drift-flux model is quite satisfactory in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. Among the four drift-flux correlations, the Chexal-Lellouche model showed wide applicability in the prediction of void fraction from low to high pressure condition. Especially, the axial void distribution at low pressure and low flow is far better than those of both the two-fluid model of RELAP5/MOD3 code and the homogeneous model. Thus, the drift-flux model of the ARTIST code can be used as an efficient tool in predicting the void distribution of two-phase flow at low pressure and low flow conditions

  16. Annual benthic metabolism and organic carbon fluxes in a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay dominated by the macroalgae Caulerpa prolifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eRuiz-Halpern

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas play an important role on carbon cycling. Elucidating the dynamics on the production, transport and fate of organic carbon is relevant to gain a better understanding of the role coastal areas play in the global carbon budget. Here, we assess the metabolic status and associated organic carbon fluxes of a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay supporting a meadow of Caulerpa prolifera. We test whether the EDOC pool is a significant component of the organic carbon pool and associated fluxes in this ecosystem. The Bay of Portocolom was in net metabolic balance on a yearly basis, but heterotrophic during the summer months. Community respiration (CR was positively correlated to C. prolifera biomass, while net community production (NCP had a negative correlation. The benthic compartment represented, on average, 72.6 ± 5.2 % of CR and 86.8 ± 4.5 % of gross primary production (GPP. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC production peaked in summer and was always positive, with the incubations performed in the dark almost doubling the flux of those performed in the light. Exchangeable dissolved organic carbon (EDOC, however, oscillated between production and uptake, being completely recycled within the system and representing around 14% of the DOC flux. The pools of bottom and surface DOC were high for an oligotrophic environment, and were positively correlated to the pool of EDOC. Thus, despite being in metabolic balance, this ecosystem acted as a conduit for organic carbon (OC, as it is able to export OC to adjacent areas derived from allochtonous inputs during heterotrophic conditions. These inputs likely come from groundwater discharge, human activity in the watershed, delivered to the sediments through the high capacity of C. prolifera to remove particles from the water column, and from the air-water exchange of EDOC, demonstrating that these communities are a major contributor to the cycling of OC in coastal embayments.

  17. Community metabolism and air-sea CO[sub 2] fluxes in a coral reef ecosystem (Moorea, French Polynesia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gattuso, J P; Pichon, M; Delesalle, B; Frankignoulle, M [Observatory of European Oceanology (Monaco)

    1993-06-01

    Community metabolism (primary production, respiration and calcification) and air-sea CO[sub 2] fluxes of the 'Tiahura barrier reef' (Moorea, French Polynesia) were investigated in November and December 1991. Gross production and respiration were respectively 640.2 to 753 and 590.4 to 641.5 mmol (O[sub 2] or CO[sub 2]) m[sup 2] d[sup -1] (7.7 to 9.0 and 7.1 to 7.7 g C m)[sup 2] d[sup -1] and the reef displayed a slightly negative excess (net) production. The contribution of planktonic primary production to reef metabolism was negligible (0.15% of total gross production). Net calcification was positive both during the day and at night; its daily value was 243 mmol CaCO[sub 3] m[sup 2] d[sup -1] (24.3 g CaCO)[sub 3] m[sup -2] d[sup -1]. Reef metabolism decreased seawater total CO[sub 2] by 433.3 mmol m[sup 2] d[sup -1]. The air-sea CO[sub 2] fluxes were close to zero in the ocean but displayed a strong daily pattern at the reef front and the back reef. Fluxes were positive (CO[sub 2] evasion) at night, decreased as irradiance increased and were negative during the day (CO[sub 2] invasion). Integration of the fluxes measured during a 24 h experiment at the back reef showed that the reef was a source of CO[sub 2] to the atmosphere (1.5 mmol m[sup 2] d[sup -1]).

  18. Flux-probability distributions from the master equation for radiation transport in stochastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, Brian C.; Prinja, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    We present numerical investigations into the accuracy of approximations in the master equation for radiation transport in discrete binary random media. Our solutions of the master equation yield probability distributions of particle flux at each element of phase space. We employ the Levermore-Pomraning interface closure and evaluate the effectiveness of closures for the joint conditional flux distribution for estimating scattering integrals. We propose a parameterized model for this joint-pdf closure, varying between correlation neglect and a full-correlation model. The closure is evaluated for a variety of parameter settings. Comparisons are made with benchmark results obtained through suites of fixed-geometry realizations of random media in rod problems. All calculations are performed using Monte Carlo techniques. Accuracy of the approximations in the master equation is assessed by examining the probability distributions for reflection and transmission and by evaluating the moments of the pdfs. The results suggest the correlation-neglect setting in our model performs best and shows improved agreement in the atomic-mix limit. (author)

  19. Methane fluxes during the cold season: distribution and mass transfer in the snow cover of bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagin, A. V.; Shnyrev, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    Fluxes and profile distribution of methane in the snow cover and different landscape elements of an oligotrophic West-Siberian bog (Mukhrino Research Station, Khanty-Mansiisk autonomous district) have been studied during a cold season. Simple models have been proposed for the description of methane distribution in the inert snow layer, which combine the transport of the gas and a source of constant intensity on the soil surface. The formation rates of stationary methane profiles in the snow cover have been estimated (characteristic time of 24 h). Theoretical equations have been derived for the calculation of small emission fluxes from bogs to the atmosphere on the basis of the stationary profile distribution parameters, the snow porosity, and the effective methane diffusion coefficient in the snow layer. The calculated values of methane emission significantly (by 2-3 to several tens of times) have exceeded the values measured under field conditions by the closed chamber method (0.008-0.25 mg C/(m2 h)), which indicates the possibility of underestimating the contribution of the cold period to the annual emission cycle of bog methane.

  20. Computational Flux Balance Analysis Predicts that Stimulation of Energy Metabolism in Astrocytes and their Metabolic Interactions with Neurons Depend on Uptake of K+ Rather than Glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Maraviglia, Bruno; Mangia, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Brain activity involves essential functional and metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes. The importance of astrocytic functions to neuronal signaling is supported by many experiments reporting high rates of energy consumption and oxidative metabolism in these glial cells. In the brain, almost all energy is consumed by the Na + /K + ATPase, which hydrolyzes 1 ATP to move 3 Na + outside and 2 K + inside the cells. Astrocytes are commonly thought to be primarily involved in transmitter glutamate cycling, a mechanism that however only accounts for few % of brain energy utilization. In order to examine the participation of astrocytic energy metabolism in brain ion homeostasis, here we attempted to devise a simple stoichiometric relation linking glutamatergic neurotransmission to Na + and K + ionic currents. To this end, we took into account ion pumps and voltage/ligand-gated channels using the stoichiometry derived from available energy budget for neocortical signaling and incorporated this stoichiometric relation into a computational metabolic model of neuron-astrocyte interactions. We aimed at reproducing the experimental observations about rates of metabolic pathways obtained by 13 C-NMR spectroscopy in rodent brain. When simulated data matched experiments as well as biophysical calculations, the stoichiometry for voltage/ligand-gated Na + and K + fluxes generated by neuronal activity was close to a 1:1 relationship, and specifically 63/58 Na + /K + ions per glutamate released. We found that astrocytes are stimulated by the extracellular K + exiting neurons in excess of the 3/2 Na + /K + ratio underlying Na + /K + ATPase-catalyzed reaction. Analysis of correlations between neuronal and astrocytic processes indicated that astrocytic K + uptake, but not astrocytic Na + -coupled glutamate uptake, is instrumental for the establishment of neuron-astrocytic metabolic partnership. Our results emphasize the importance of K + in stimulating the activation of

  1. Measurement of neutron flux distribution by semiconductor detector; merenje raspodele neutronskog fluksa poluprovodnickim detektorom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obradovic, D; Bosevski, T [Institut za nuklearne nauke Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1964-07-01

    Application of semiconductor detectors for measuring neutron flux distribution is about 10 times faster than measurements by activation foils and demands significantly lower reactor power. Following corrections are avoided: mass of activation foils which influences the self shielding, nuclear decay during activity measurements; counter dead-time. It is possible to control the measured data during experiment and repeat measurements if needed. Precision of the measurement is higher since it is possible to choose the wanted statistics. The method described in this paper is applied for measurements at the RB reactor. It is concluded that the method is suitable for fast measurements but the activation analysis is still indispensable.

  2. Effects of some structural materials on the reactivity and flux distributions in a pressurised water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, A.M.W.; Mannan, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the structural materials of the guide tubes, spacer grids and the shroud on the reactivity and the flux distribution of a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) has been studied. Group constants of different cells of guide tubes, spacer grids, shroud and the fuel have been calculated using the cell codes LEOPARD, PANTHER and METHUSELAH. Core calculations have been performed using the diffusion code EQUIPOISE. It has been found for a PWR of 1300 MWe of Kraftwork Union design for Iron that the total change in reactivity due to the presence of guide tubes, spacer grids and the shroud is about -2.48x10 -2 . (author)

  3. Fast neutron flux and intracranial dose distribution at a neutron irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo; Aizawa, Otohiko; Nozaki, Tetsuya

    1981-01-01

    A head phantom filled with water was used to measure the fast neutron flux using 115 In(n, n')sup(115m)In and 103 Rh(n, n')sup(103m)Rh reactions. γ-ray from sup(115m)In and x-ray from sup(103m)Rh were detected by a Ge(Li) and a Na(Tl)I counter, respectively. TLD was used to investigate the γ-dose rate distribution inside the phantom. Flux of fast neutron inside the phantom was about 1 x 10 6 n/cm 2 sec, which was 3 order smaller than that of thermal neutron. The fast neutron flux decreased to 1/10 at 15 cm depth, and γ-dose rate was about 200 R/h at 100 kW inside the phantom. Total dose at the surface was 350 rad/h, to which, fast neutrons contributed more than γ-rays. The rate of fast neutron dose was about 10% of thermal neutron's in Kerma dose unit (rad), however, the rate was highly dependent on RBE value. (Nakanishi, T.)

  4. Characterizing the Lyman-alpha forest flux probability distribution function using Legendre polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka; Slosar, Anze

    2018-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha forest has become a powerful cosmological probe at intermediate redshift. It is a highly non-linear field with much information present beyond the power spectrum. The flux probability flux distribution (PDF) in particular has been a successful probe of small scale physics. However, it is also sensitive to pixel noise, spectrum resolution, and continuum fitting, all of which lead to possible biased estimators. Here we argue that measuring the coefficients of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the PDF offers several advantages over measuring the binned values as is commonly done. Since the n-th Legendre coefficient can be expressed as a linear combination of the first n moments of the field, this allows for the coefficients to be measured in the presence of noise and allows for a clear route towards marginalization over the mean flux. Additionally, in the presence of noise, a finite number of these coefficients are well measured with a very sharp transition into noise dominance. This compresses the information into a small amount of well-measured quantities. Finally, we find that measuring fewer quasars with high signal-to-noise produces a higher amount of recoverable information.

  5. Flux distribution in phantom for biomedical use of beam-type thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kanda, Keiji; Kimura, Itsuro

    1985-01-01

    For boron neutron capture therapy, the thermal neutron beam is worth using as therapeutic neutron irradiation without useless and unfavorable exposure of normal tissues around tumor and for microanalysis system to measure ppm-order 10 B concentrations in tissue and to search for the location of the metastasis of tumor. In the present study, the thermal neutron flux distribution in a phantom, when beam-type thermal neutrons were incident on it, was measured at the KUR Neutron Guide Tube. The measurements were carried out by two different methods using indium foil. The one is an ordinary foil activation technique by using the 115 In(n, γ) 116m 1 In reactions, while the other is to detect γ-rays from the 115 In(n, γ) 116m 2 In reactions during neutron irradiations with a handy-type Ge detector. The calculations with DOT 3.5 were performed to examine thermal neutron flux in the phantom for various beam size and phantom size. The experimental and calculated results are in good agreement and it is shown that the second type measurement has a potential for practical application as a new monitoring system of the thermal neutron flux in a living body for boron neutron capture therapy. (author)

  6. Control of fluxes towards antibiotics and the role of primary metabolism in production of antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Nina; Eliasson Lantz, Anna; Nielsen, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Yield improvements in antibiotic-producing strains have classically been obtained through random mutagenesis and screening. An attractive alternative to this strategy is the rational design of producer strains via metabolic engineering, an approach that offers the possibility to increase yields...... in the metabolic network. Here we describe and discuss available methods for identification of these steps, both in antibiotic biosynthesis pathways and in the primary metabolism, which serves as the supplier of precursors and cofactors for the secondary metabolism. Finally, the importance of precursor...... and cofactor supply from primary metabolism in the biosynthesis of different types of antibiotics is discussed and recent developments in metabolic engineering towards increased product yields in antibiotic producing strains are reviewed....

  7. Testicular Metabolic Reprogramming in Neonatal Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats Impairs Glycolytic Flux and Promotes Glycogen Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato, L.; Alves, M. G.; Dias, T. R.; Cavaco, J. E.; Oliveira, Pedro F.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in testicular metabolism are directly implicated with male infertility, but most of the mechanisms associated with type 2 diabetes- (T2DM) induced male infertility remain unknown. We aimed to evaluate the effects of T2DM on testicular glucose metabolism by using a neonatal-streptozotocin- (n-STZ) T2DM animal model. Plasma and testicular hormonal levels were evaluated using specific kits. mRNA and protein expression levels were assessed by real-time PCR and Western Blot, respectively. Testicular metabolic profile was assessed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. T2DM rats showed increased glycemic levels, impaired glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia. Both testicular and serum testosterone levels were decreased, whereas those of 17β-estradiol were not altered. Testicular glycolytic flux was not favored in testicles of T2DM rats, since, despite the increased expression of both glucose transporters 1 and 3 and the enzyme phosphofructokinase 1, lactate dehydrogenase activity was severely decreased contributing to lower testicular lactate content. However, T2DM enhanced testicular glycogen accumulation, by modulating the availability of the precursors for its synthesis. T2DM also affected the reproductive sperm parameters. Taken together these results indicate that T2DM is able to reprogram testicular metabolism by enhancing alternative metabolic pathways, particularly glycogen synthesis, and such alterations are associated with impaired sperm parameters. PMID:26064993

  8. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high-T{sub c} superconductor in external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torii, S.; Yuasa, K

    2004-10-01

    Various magnetic levitation systems using oxide superconductors are developed as strong pinning forces are obtained in melt-processed bulk. However, the trapped flux of superconductor is moved by flux creep and fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, to examine the internal condition of superconductor, the authors measure the dynamic surface flux density distribution of YBCO bulk. Flux density measurement system has a structure with the air-core coil and the Hall sensors. Ten Hall sensors are arranged in series. The YBCO bulk, which has 25 mm diameter and 13 mm thickness, is field cooled by liquid nitrogen. After that, magnetic field is changed by the air-core coil. This paper describes about the measured results of flux density distribution of YBCO bulk in the various frequencies of air-core coils currents.

  9. Flux Balance Analysis Inspired Bioprocess Upgrading for Lycopene Production by a Metabolically Engineered Strain of Yarrowia lipolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komi Nambou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome-scale metabolic models embody a significant advantage of systems biology since their applications as metabolic flux simulation models enable predictions for the production of industrially-interesting metabolites. The biotechnological production of lycopene from Yarrowia lipolytica is an emerging scope that has not been fully scrutinized, especially for what concerns cultivation conditions of newly generated engineered strains. In this study, by combining flux balance analysis (FBA and Plackett-Burman design, we screened chemicals for lycopene production from a metabolically engineered strain of Y. lipolytica. Lycopene concentrations of 126 and 242 mg/L were achieved correspondingly from the FBA-independent and the FBA-assisted designed media in fed-batch cultivation mode. Transcriptional studies revealed upregulations of heterologous genes in media designed according to FBA, thus implying the efficiency of model predictions. Our study will potentially support upgraded lycopene and other terpenoids production from existing or prospect bioengineered strains of Y. lipolytica and/or closely related yeast species.

  10. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in the Fe(III)-reducing organism Geobacter metallireducens via 13C isotopiclabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Martin, Hector Garcia; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-08-13

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The model indicated that over 90 percent of the acetate wascompletely oxidized to CO2 via a complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cyclewhile reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase were present under these conditions, but enzymes in theglyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and thepentose phosphate pathway were mainly employed for biosynthesis andaccounted for less than 3 percent of total carbon consumption. The modelalso indicated surprisingly high reversibility in the reaction betweenoxoglutarate and succinate. This step operates close to the thermodynamicequilibrium possibly because succinate is synthesized via a transferasereaction, and its product, acetyl-CoA, inhibits the conversion ofoxoglutarate to succinate. These findings enable a better understandingof the relationship between genome annotation and extant metabolicpathways in G. metallireducens.

  11. Analysis of Neutron Flux Distribution in Rsg-Gas Reactor With U-Mo Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taswanda Taryo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of U-Mo fuels in research reactors seems to be promising and, recently, world researchers have carried out these such activities actively. The National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN which owns RSG-GAS reactor available in Serpong Research Center for Atomic Energy should anticipate this trend. It is, therefore, this research work on the use of U-Mo fuels in RSG-GAS reactor should be carried out. The work was focused on the analysis of neutron flux distribution in the RSG-GAS reactor using different content of molybdenum in U-Mo fuels. To begin with, RSG-GAS reactor core model was developed and simulated into X, Y and Z dimensions. Cross section of materials based on the developed cells of standard and control fuels was then generated using WIMS-D5-B. The criticality calculations were finally carried out applying BATAN-2DIFF code. The results showed that the neutron flux distribution obtained in U-Mo-fuel-based RSG-GAS core is very similar to those achieved in the 300-gram sillicide-fuel-based RSG-GAS reactor core. Indeed, the utilization of the U-Mo RSG-GAS core can be very similar to that of the high-density sillicide reactor core and even could be better in the future.

  12. Magnetic Flux Distribution of Linear Machines with Novel Three-Dimensional Hybrid Magnet Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Yao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose a novel tubular linear machine with hybrid permanent magnet arrays and multiple movers, which could be employed for either actuation or sensing technology. The hybrid magnet array produces flux distribution on both sides of windings, and thus helps to increase the signal strength in the windings. The multiple movers are important for airspace technology, because they can improve the system’s redundancy and reliability. The proposed design concept is presented, and the governing equations are obtained based on source free property and Maxwell equations. The magnetic field distribution in the linear machine is thus analytically formulated by using Bessel functions and harmonic expansion of magnetization vector. Numerical simulation is then conducted to validate the analytical solutions of the magnetic flux field. It is proved that the analytical model agrees with the numerical results well. Therefore, it can be utilized for the formulation of signal or force output subsequently, depending on its particular implementation.

  13. MCT1 and MCT4 expression and lactate flux activity increase during white and brown adipogenesis and impact adipocyte metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Charlotte; Nielsen, Mette D.; Andersen, Elise S.

    2017-01-01

    RNA and protein levels of the lactate-H+ transporter MCT1 and the Na+,HCO3 - cotransporter NBCe1 were upregulated in mouse interscapular brown and inguinal white adipose tissue upon cold induction of thermogenesis and browning. MCT1, MCT4, and NBCe1 were furthermore strongly upregulated at the mRNA and protein...... level upon differentiation of cultured pre-adipocytes. Adipocyte differentiation was accompanied by increased plasma membrane lactate flux capacity, which was reduced by MCT inhibition and by MCT1 knockdown. Finally, in differentiated brown adipocytes, glycolysis (assessed as ECAR), and after...... noradrenergic stimulation also oxidative metabolism (OCR), was decreased by MCT inhibition. We suggest that upregulation of MCT1- and MCT4-mediated lactate flux capacity and NBCe1-mediated HCO3 -/pH homeostasis are important for the physiological function of mature adipocytes....

  14. Reconstructing 3D profiles of flux distribution in array of unshunted Josephson junctions from 2D scanning SQUID microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, F.M.; Sergeenkov, S.; Araujo-Moreira, F.M.

    2012-01-01

    By using a specially designed algorithm (based on utilizing the so-called Hierarchical Data Format), we report on successful reconstruction of 3D profiles of local flux distribution within artificially prepared arrays of unshunted Nb-AlO x -Nb Josephson junctions from 2D surface images obtained via the scanning SQUID microscope. The analysis of the obtained results suggest that for large sweep areas, the local flux distribution significantly deviates from the conventional picture and exhibits a more complicated avalanche-type behavior with a prominent dendritic structure. -- Highlights: ► The penetration of external magnetic field into an array of Nb-AlO x -Nb Josephson junctions is studied. ► Using Scanning SQUID Microscope, 2D images of local flux distribution within array are obtained. ► Using specially designed pattern recognition algorithm, 3D flux profiles are reconstructed from 2D images.

  15. Calculation of the magnetic flux density distribution in type-II superconductors with finite thickness and well-defined geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forkl, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of the critical current density j c (r) in hard type-II superconductors depends strongly on their sample geometry. Rules are given for the construction of j c (r). Samples with homogeneous thickness are divided into cakelike regions with a unique current direction. The spatial magnetic flux density distribution and the magnetic polarization of such a cakelike unit cell with homogeneous current density are calculated analytically. The magnetic polarization and magnetic flux density distribution of a superconductor in the mixed state is then given by an adequate superposition of the unit cell solutions. The theoretical results show good agreement with magneto-optically determined magnetic flux density distributions of a quadratic thin superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x film. The current density distribution is discussed for several sample geometries

  16. A method for accounting for maintenance costs in flux balance analysis improves the prediction of plant cell metabolic phenotypes under stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C Y Maurice; Williams, Thomas C R; Poolman, Mark G; Fell, David A; Ratcliffe, R George; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2013-09-01

    Flux balance models of metabolism generally utilize synthesis of biomass as the main determinant of intracellular fluxes. However, the biomass constraint alone is not sufficient to predict realistic fluxes in central heterotrophic metabolism of plant cells because of the major demand on the energy budget due to transport costs and cell maintenance. This major limitation can be addressed by incorporating transport steps into the metabolic model and by implementing a procedure that uses Pareto optimality analysis to explore the trade-off between ATP and NADPH production for maintenance. This leads to a method for predicting cell maintenance costs on the basis of the measured flux ratio between the oxidative steps of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis. We show that accounting for transport and maintenance costs substantially improves the accuracy of fluxes predicted from a flux balance model of heterotrophic Arabidopsis cells in culture, irrespective of the objective function used in the analysis. Moreover, when the new method was applied to cells under control, elevated temperature and hyper-osmotic conditions, only elevated temperature led to a substantial increase in cell maintenance costs. It is concluded that the hyper-osmotic conditions tested did not impose a metabolic stress, in as much as the metabolic network is not forced to devote more resources to cell maintenance. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A simulation model of distributions of radiational flux at leaf surfaces in crowns of fruit trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, T.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-model was constructed for estimating distributions with time of radiational fluxes at leaf surfaces throughout fruit tree canopies in which leaves did not distribute uniformely in three dimensional space. Several assumptions were set up to construct the model for approximation of using solid geometry. For irregular distribution of leaf area in three dimensional space data were used in the simulation as number of leaves per internal cubic bloc of a cubic grid (n-divided per side). Several main parameters used were peculiar to fruit species which contain parameters (λ, ν) of Beta function to calculate both probability density function of leaf area distribution with respect to inclination angle and leaf extinction coefficient for parallel beam by leaves parameters (A, R i ) to calculate stem extinction coefficient for parallel beam, and parameters (D i ) to calculate leaf extinction coefficient of downward transmission and downward reflection. With these data and parameters solid geometry and Lambert-Beer's law constituted this model

  18. Measurement of the neutron flux distributions, epithermal index, Westcott thermal neutron flux in the irradiation capsules of hydraulic conveyer (Hyd) and pneumatic tubes (Pn) facilities of the KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Hiroshi

    2001-05-01

    The reactions of Au(n, γ) 198 Au and Ti(n, p) 47 or 48 Sc were used for the measurements of the thermal and epithermal (thermal + epithermal) and the fast neutron flux distributions, respectively. In the case of Hyd (Hydraulic conveyer), the thermal + epithermal and fast neutron flux distributions in the horizontal direction in the capsule are especially flat; the distortion of the fluxes are 0.6% and 5.4%, respectively. However, these neutron fluxes in the vertical direction are low at the top and high at the bottom of the capsule. These differences between the top and bottom are 14% for both distributions. On the other hand, in polyethylene capsules of Pn-1, 2, 3 (Pneumatic tubes Nos. 1, 2, 3), in contrast with Hyd, these neutron flux distributions in the horizontal direction have gradients of 8 - 18% per 2.5 cm diameter, and those on the vertical axis have a distortion of approximately 5%. The strength of the epithermal dE/E component relative to the neutron density including both thermal and epithermal neutrons, i.e., the epithermal index, for the hydraulic conveyer (Hyd) and pneumatic tube No.2 (Pn-2), in which the irradiation experiments can be achieved, are determined by the multiple foil activation method using the reactions of Au(n, γ) 198 Au and Co(n, γ) 60(m+g) Co. The epithermal index observed in an aluminum capsule of Hyd is 0.034-0.04, and the Westcott thermal neutron flux is 1.2x10 14 cm -2 sec -1 at approximately 1 cm above the bottom. The epithermal index in a Pn-2 polyethylene capsule was measured by not only the multiple foil activation method but also the Cd-ratio method in which the Au(n, γ) 198 Au reaction in a cadmium cover is also used. The epithermal index is 0.045 - 0.055, and the thermal neutron flux is 1.8x10 13 cm -2 sec -1 . (J.P.N.)

  19. Distribution, regional sources and deposition fluxes of organochlorine pesticides in precipitation in Guangzhou, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, De-Yin; Peng, Ping'an; Xu, Yi-Gang; Sun, Cui-Xiang; Deng, Hong-Mei; Deng, Yun-Yun

    2010-07-01

    We analyzed rainwater collected from multiple sites, Guangzhou, China, from March to August 2005, with the aim to characterize the distribution, regional sources and deposition fluxes of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in South China. Eight species of organochlorine pesticide were detected, including hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and endosulfans. Volume-weighted mean monthly total concentrations varied from 3.65 ± 0.95 to 9.37 ± 2.63 ng L - 1 , and the estimated total wet deposition flux was about 11.43 ± 3.27 µg m - 2 during the monitoring period. Pesticides were mainly detected in the dissolved phase. Distribution coefficients between particulate and dissolved phases in March and April were generally higher than in other months. HCHs, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT in precipitation were attributed to both the residues and present usage of insecticides in Pearl River Delta. The concentrations of p,p'-DDD + p,p'-DDT were relatively high from April to August, which were related to the usage of antifouling paints containing DDT for fishing ships in seaports of the South China Sea in summer. In contrast, endosulfans were relatively high in March, which was related to their seasonal atmospheric transport from cotton fields in eastern China by the Asian winter monsoon. The consistency of the variation of endosulfans, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT concentrations with the alternation of summer and winter monsoon suggested that the Asian monsoon played an important role in the long-range transport of OCPs. In addition, the wet deposition of OCPs may influence not only Pearl River water but also the surface land distributions of pesticides in the Guangzhou area, especially for endosulfans, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT.

  20. Characterizing the Lyα forest flux probability distribution function using Legendre polynomials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Slosar, Anže, E-mail: acieplak@bnl.gov, E-mail: anze@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg 510, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The Lyman-α forest is a highly non-linear field with considerable information available in the data beyond the power spectrum. The flux probability distribution function (PDF) has been used as a successful probe of small-scale physics. In this paper we argue that measuring coefficients of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the PDF offers several advantages over measuring the binned values as is commonly done. In particular, the n -th Legendre coefficient can be expressed as a linear combination of the first n moments, allowing these coefficients to be measured in the presence of noise and allowing a clear route for marginalisation over mean flux. Moreover, in the presence of noise, our numerical work shows that a finite number of coefficients are well measured with a very sharp transition into noise dominance. This compresses the available information into a small number of well-measured quantities. We find that the amount of recoverable information is a very non-linear function of spectral noise that strongly favors fewer quasars measured at better signal to noise.

  1. Characterizing the Lyα forest flux probability distribution function using Legendre polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Slosar, Anže

    2017-10-01

    The Lyman-α forest is a highly non-linear field with considerable information available in the data beyond the power spectrum. The flux probability distribution function (PDF) has been used as a successful probe of small-scale physics. In this paper we argue that measuring coefficients of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the PDF offers several advantages over measuring the binned values as is commonly done. In particular, the n-th Legendre coefficient can be expressed as a linear combination of the first n moments, allowing these coefficients to be measured in the presence of noise and allowing a clear route for marginalisation over mean flux. Moreover, in the presence of noise, our numerical work shows that a finite number of coefficients are well measured with a very sharp transition into noise dominance. This compresses the available information into a small number of well-measured quantities. We find that the amount of recoverable information is a very non-linear function of spectral noise that strongly favors fewer quasars measured at better signal to noise.

  2. On the analytical flux distribution modeling of an axial-flux surface-mounted permanent magnet motor for control applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.-T.; Lin, S.-C.; Chiang, T.-S.

    2004-01-01

    By combining the recoil line characteristics of permanent magnet and the equivalent operational magnetic circuits at various rotor positions, a systematic procedure for developing the desired analytical model of an axial-flux surface-mounted permanent magnet motor can be devised. Supported by detailed three-dimensional finite element analysis results and statistical evaluations, accuracies of the developed analytical model can be guaranteed. With such well developed system model, the relative high-precision controls and operations of the motor can then be conveniently realized

  3. Effect of feed flow pattern on the distribution of permeate fluxes in desalination by direct contact membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Soukane, Sofiane

    2017-05-31

    The current study aims to highlight the effect of flow pattern on the variations of permeate fluxes over the membrane surface during desalination in a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) flat module. To do so, a three dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model with embedded pore scale calculations is implemented to predict flow, heat and mass transfer in the DCMD module. Model validation is carried out in terms of average permeate fluxes with experimental data of seawater desalination using two commercially available PTFE membranes. Average permeate fluxes agree within 6% and less with experimental values without fitting parameters. Simulation results show that the distribution of permeate fluxes and seawater salinity over the membrane surface are strongly dependent on momentum and heat transport and that temperature and concentration polarization follow closely the flow distribution. The analysis reveals a drastic effect of recirculation loops and dead zones on module performance and recommendations to improve MD flat module design are drawn consequently.

  4. SU-G-TeP3-10: Radiation Induces Prompt Live-Cell Metabolic Fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, D [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Peeters, W; Bussink, J [Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, GA (United States); Nickel, K [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Burkel, B; Kimple, R; Kogel, A van der; Eliceiri, K [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Kissick, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare metabolic dynamics and HIF-1α expression following radiation between a cancerous cell line (UM-SCC-22B) and a normal, immortalized cell line, NOK (Normal Oral Keratinocyte). HIF-1 is a key factor in metabolism and radiosensitivity. A better understanding of how radiation affects the interplay of metabolism and HIF-1 might give a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for radiosensitivity. Methods: Changes in cellular metabolism in response to radiation are tracked by fluorescence lifetime of NADH. Expression of HIF-1α was measured by immunofluorescence for both cell lines with and without irradiation. Radiation response is also monitored with additional treatment of a HIF-1α inhibitor (chrysin) as well as a radical scavenger (glutathione). Changes in oxygen consumption and respiratory capacity are also monitored using the Seahorse XF analyzer. Results: An increase in HIF-1α was found to be in response to radiation for the cancer cell line, but not the normal cell line. Radiation was found to shift metabolism toward glycolytic pathways in cancer cells as measured by oxygen consumption and respiratory capacity. Radiation response was found to be muted by addition of glutathione to cell media. HIF-1α inhibition similarly muted radiation response in cancer. Conclusion: The HIF-1 protein complex is a key regulator cellular metabolism through the regulation of glycolysis and glucose transport enzymes. Moreover, HIF-1 has shown radio-protective effects in tumor vascular endothelia, and has been implicated in metastatic aggression. Monitoring interplay between metabolism and the HIF-1 protein complex can give a more fundamental understanding of radiotherapy response.

  5. SU-G-TeP3-10: Radiation Induces Prompt Live-Cell Metabolic Fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, D; Peeters, W; Bussink, J; Nickel, K; Burkel, B; Kimple, R; Kogel, A van der; Eliceiri, K; Kissick, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare metabolic dynamics and HIF-1α expression following radiation between a cancerous cell line (UM-SCC-22B) and a normal, immortalized cell line, NOK (Normal Oral Keratinocyte). HIF-1 is a key factor in metabolism and radiosensitivity. A better understanding of how radiation affects the interplay of metabolism and HIF-1 might give a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for radiosensitivity. Methods: Changes in cellular metabolism in response to radiation are tracked by fluorescence lifetime of NADH. Expression of HIF-1α was measured by immunofluorescence for both cell lines with and without irradiation. Radiation response is also monitored with additional treatment of a HIF-1α inhibitor (chrysin) as well as a radical scavenger (glutathione). Changes in oxygen consumption and respiratory capacity are also monitored using the Seahorse XF analyzer. Results: An increase in HIF-1α was found to be in response to radiation for the cancer cell line, but not the normal cell line. Radiation was found to shift metabolism toward glycolytic pathways in cancer cells as measured by oxygen consumption and respiratory capacity. Radiation response was found to be muted by addition of glutathione to cell media. HIF-1α inhibition similarly muted radiation response in cancer. Conclusion: The HIF-1 protein complex is a key regulator cellular metabolism through the regulation of glycolysis and glucose transport enzymes. Moreover, HIF-1 has shown radio-protective effects in tumor vascular endothelia, and has been implicated in metastatic aggression. Monitoring interplay between metabolism and the HIF-1 protein complex can give a more fundamental understanding of radiotherapy response.

  6. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, D.; Gota, H.; Hayashi, R.; Kiyashko, V.; Morehouse, M.; Primavera, S.; Bolte, N.; Marsili, P.; Roche, T.; Wessel, F.

    2010-01-01

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  7. Calculations of Neutron Flux Distributions by Means of Integral Transport Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlvik, I

    1967-05-15

    Flux distributions have been calculated mainly in one energy group, for a number of systems representing geometries interesting for reactor calculations. Integral transport methods of two kinds were utilised, collision probabilities (CP) and the discrete method (DIT). The geometries considered comprise the three one-dimensional geometries, planes, sphericals and annular, and further a square cell with a circular fuel rod and a rod cluster cell with a circular outer boundary. For the annular cells both methods (CP and DIT) were used and the results were compared. The purpose of the work is twofold, firstly to demonstrate the versatility and efficacy of integral transport methods and secondly to serve as a guide for anybody who wants to use the methods.

  8. The Martian hydrologic cycle - Effects of CO2 mass flux on global water distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    The Martian CO2 cycle, which includes the seasonal condensation and subsequent sublimation of up to 30 percent of the planet's atmosphere, produces meridional winds due to the consequent mass flux of CO2. These winds currently display strong seasonal and hemispheric asymmetries due to the large asymmetries in the distribution of insolation on Mars. It is proposed that asymmetric meridional advection of water vapor on the planet due to these CO2 condensation winds is capable of explaining the observed dessication of Mars' south polar region at the current time. A simple model for water vapor transport is used to verify this hypothesis and to speculate on the effects of changes in orbital parameters on the seasonal water cycle.

  9. Spatial fluxes and energy distributions of reactor fast neutrons in two types of heat resistant concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akki, T.S.; Benayad, S.A.; Megahid, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements have been carried out to study the spatial fluxes and energy distributions of reactor fast neutrons transmitted through two types of heat resistant concretes, serpentine concrete and magnetic lemonite concrete. The physical, chemical and mechanical properties of these concretes were checked by well known techniques. In addition, the effect of heating at temperatures up to 500deg C on the crystaline water content was checked by the method of differential thermal analysis. Measurements were performed using a collimated beam of reactor neutrons emitted from a 10 MW research reactor. The neutron spectra transmitted through concrete barriers of different thickness were measured by a scintillation spectrometer with NE-213 liquid organic scintillator. Discrimination against undesired pulses due to gamma-rays was achieved by a method based on pulse shape discrimination technique. The operating principle of this technique is based on the comparison of two weighted time integrals of the detector signal. The measured pulse amplitude distribution was converted to neutron energy distribution by a computational code based on double differentiation technique. The spectrometer workability and the accuracy of the unfolding technique were checked by measuring the neutron spectra of neutrons from Pu-α-Be and 252 Cf neutron sources. The obtained neutron spectra for the two concretes were used to derive the total cross sections for neutrons of different energies. (orig.)

  10. The Key to Acetate: Metabolic Fluxes of Acetic Acid Bacteria under Cocoa Pulp Fermentation-Simulating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Philipp; Frey, Lasse Jannis; Berger, Antje; Bolten, Christoph Josef; Hansen, Carl Erik

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role during cocoa fermentation, as their main product, acetate, is a major driver for the development of the desired cocoa flavors. Here, we investigated the specialized metabolism of these bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions. A carefully designed combination of parallel 13C isotope labeling experiments allowed the elucidation of intracellular fluxes in the complex environment of cocoa pulp, when lactate and ethanol were included as primary substrates among undefined ingredients. We demonstrate that AAB exhibit a functionally separated metabolism during coconsumption of two-carbon and three-carbon substrates. Acetate is almost exclusively derived from ethanol, while lactate serves for the formation of acetoin and biomass building blocks. Although this is suboptimal for cellular energetics, this allows maximized growth and conversion rates. The functional separation results from a lack of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzymes, typically present in bacteria to interconnect metabolism. In fact, gluconeogenesis is driven by pyruvate phosphate dikinase. Consequently, a balanced ratio of lactate and ethanol is important for the optimum performance of AAB. As lactate and ethanol are individually supplied by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the initial phase of cocoa fermentation, respectively, this underlines the importance of a well-balanced microbial consortium for a successful fermentation process. Indeed, AAB performed the best and produced the largest amounts of acetate in mixed culture experiments when lactic acid bacteria and yeasts were both present. PMID:24837393

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals for Assessment of Altered Metabolism and Biometal Fluxes in Brain Aging and Alzheimer's Disease with Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang; Peng, Fangyu

    2017-01-01

    Aging is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). There are changes of brain metabolism and biometal fluxes due to brain aging, which may play a role in pathogenesis of AD. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a versatile tool for tracking alteration of metabolism and biometal fluxes due to brain aging and AD. Age-dependent changes in cerebral glucose metabolism can be tracked with PET using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG), a radiolabeled glucose analogue, as a radiotracer. Based on different patterns of altered cerebral glucose metabolism, 18F-FDG PET was clinically used for differential diagnosis of AD and Frontotemporal dementia (FTD). There are continued efforts to develop additional radiopharmaceuticals or radiotracers for assessment of age-dependent changes of various metabolic pathways and biometal fluxes due to brain aging and AD with PET. Elucidation of age-dependent changes of brain metabolism and altered biometal fluxes is not only significant for a better mechanistic understanding of brain aging and the pathophysiology of AD, but also significant for identification of new targets for the prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of AD.

  12. Human taurine metabolism: fluxes and fractional extraction rates of the gut, liver, and kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stijn, Mireille F. M.; Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Siroen, Michiel P. C.; Wong, Leanne N.; van den Tol, M. Petrousjka; Ligthart-Melis, Gerdien C.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is involved in numerous biological processes. However, taurine plasma level decreases in response to pathological conditions, suggesting an increased need. Knowledge on human taurine metabolism is scarce and only described by arterial-venous differences across a single organ. Here we present

  13. Transcriptional and metabolic flux profiling of triadimefon effects on cultured hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Vidya V.; Ovacik, Meric A.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Roth, Charles M.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.

    2010-01-01

    Conazoles are a class of azole fungicides used to prevent fungal growth in agriculture, for treatment of fungal infections, and are found to be tumorigenic in rats and/or mice. In this study, cultured primary rat hepatocytes were treated to two different concentrations (0.3 and 0.15 mM) of triadimefon, which is a tumorigenic conazole in rat and mouse liver, on a temporal basis with daily media change. Following treatment, cells were harvested for microarray data ranging from 6 to 72 h. Supernatant was collected daily for three days, and the concentrations of various metabolites in the media and supernatant were quantified. Gene expression changes were most significant following exposure to 0.3 mM triadimefon and were characterized mainly by metabolic pathways related to carbohydrate, lipid and amino acid metabolism. Correspondingly, metabolic network flexibility analysis demonstrated a switch from fatty acid synthesis to fatty acid oxidation in cells exposed to triadimefon. It is likely that fatty acid oxidation is active in order to supply energy required for triadimefon detoxification. In 0.15 mM triadimefon treatment, the hepatocytes are able to detoxify the relatively low concentration of triadimefon with less pronounced changes in hepatic metabolism.

  14. Flux balance analysis of genome-scale metabolic model of rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... biologists are also trying to understand the plant's systems level biochemistry ... metabolism to observe the effect of intracellular transporters' transport ..... [The information about this pathway and associated genes in .... 2013 A method for accounting for mainte- ... Biological control of rice diseases pp 1–11.

  15. Enzyme allocation problems in kinetic metabolic networks: Optimal solutions are elementary flux modes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, Stefan; Regensburger, G.; Steuer, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 347, APR 2014 (2014), s. 182-190 ISSN 0022-5193 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0256 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : metabolic optimization * enzyme kinetics * oriented matroid * elementary vector * conformal sum Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.116, year: 2014

  16. {sup 13}C dynamic nuclear polarization for measuring metabolic flux in endothelial progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Nathalie; Laustsen, Christoffer; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde, E-mail: Lotte@clin.au.dk

    2016-11-15

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) represent a heterogeneous cell population that is believed to be involved in vasculogenesis. With the purpose of enhancing endothelial repair, EPCs could have a potential for future cell therapies. Due to the low amount of EPCs in the peripheral circulating blood, in vitro expansion is needed before administration to recipients and the effects of in vitro culturing is still an under-evaluated field with little knowledge of how the cells change over time in culture. The aim of this study was to use hyperpolarised carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy to profile important metabolic pathways in a population of progenitor cells and to show that cell culturing in 3D scaffolds seem to block the metabolic processes that leads to cell senescence. The metabolic breakdown of hyperpolarized [1-{sup 13}C]pyruvate was followed after injection of the substrate to a bioreactor system with EPCs either adhered to 3D printed scaffolds or kept in cell suspension. The pyruvate-to-lactate conversion was elevated in suspension of EPCs compared to the EPCs adhered to scaffolds. Furthermore in the setup with EPCs in suspension, an increase in lactate production was seen over time indicating that the older the cultures of EPCs was before using the cells for cell suspension experiments, the more lactate they produce, compared to a constant lactate level in the cells adhered to scaffolds. It could therefore be stated that cells grown first in 2D culture and subsequent prepared for cell suspension show a metabolism with higher lactate production consistent with cells senescence processes compared to cells grown first at 2D culture and subsequent in the 3D printed scaffolds, where metabolism shows no sign of metabolic shifting during the monitored period. - Highlights: • Hyperpolarized 13C MRS detects EPCs metabolic changes associated with ageing and cultivating conditions. • Increased lactate production in EPC’s correlates positively with aging.

  17. The Distribution and Flux of Fish in the Forebay of The Dalles Dam in 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Hanks, Michael E.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Skalski, John R.; Dillingham, Peter W.

    2005-04-29

    In spring and summer 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory led a team that conducted mobile and fixed hydroacoustic surveys in the forebay of The Dalles Dam for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District, for the Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program. The surveys provided information on the distribution and movement of smolt-sized fish relative to ambient factors such as flow, bathymetry, or diel cycle in the forebay at The Dalles Dam. This information is intended to provide baseline data for the development of a surface bypass alternative for juvenile salmon at The Dalles Dam. We sampled the forebay of The Dallas Dam one day and night each week for six weeks in the spring and another six weeks in the summer. In general, during the day in the spring, the greatest densities of smolt-sized fish were observed in the thalweg of the main channel from the Washington bank, to the east side of the powerhouse, along the powerhouse, and concentrated in the areas next to the sluiceway. Fish density was lower on the Washington side of the river and west of mid-powerhouse (north spillway side). The spring night distribution was similar, with a few notable differences. The density of fish was high on the east side of the powerhouse and along the face of the powerhouse, and more fish were detected on the north spillway side. The distribution of sub-yearling sized fish in summer followed the same general patterns as spring, except that summer fish had a greater presence on the east side of the powerhouse and on the north spillway side. The vertical distribution of fish was also determined. In spring 80% of fish were above 5.6 m of depth during the day and above 4.7 m in the night. The summer fish were similarly distributed in the day and night with 80% of the fish in the upper 4.5 m and 4.7 m of the water column respectively. In general the smolt-sized fish were distributed deeper in the water column in the center of the channel than near the edges. The net

  18. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by β-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nault, Rance; Abdul-Fattah, Hiba; Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Moon, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist β-naphthoflavone (βNF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na + /K + -ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 μM βNF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na + /K + -ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: • Energetic costs of AhR activation by βNF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. • Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. • Exposure to βNF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. • Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism

  19. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by β-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nault, Rance, E-mail: naultran@msu.edu [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Abdul-Fattah, Hiba [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Moon, Thomas W. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2013-08-15

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist β-naphthoflavone (βNF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 μM βNF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: • Energetic costs of AhR activation by βNF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. • Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. • Exposure to βNF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. • Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism.

  20. Development of a screening approach for exploring cell factory potential through metabolic flux analysis and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Thykær, Jette

    2012-01-01

    The recent developments within the field of metabolic engineering have significantly increased the speed by which fungal recombinant strains are being constructed, pushing focus towards physiological characterisation and analysis. This raises demand for a tool for diligent analysis of the recombi......The recent developments within the field of metabolic engineering have significantly increased the speed by which fungal recombinant strains are being constructed, pushing focus towards physiological characterisation and analysis. This raises demand for a tool for diligent analysis...... of the validation, already well described fungal strains were selected and tested using the described method and the developed method was subsequently used to test recombinant fungal strains producing the model polyketide 6-methylsalicylic acid. Diligent application of this strategy significantly reduces the cost...

  1. Heat tranfer decrease during water boiling in a tube for the heat flux step distribution by the tube length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remizov, O.V.; Sergeev, V.V.; Yurkov, Yu.I.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the heat flux distribution along the circular tube length on supercritical convective heat transfer at parameters typical for steam generators heated by liquid metal is studied. The effect of conditions in a under- and a supercritical zones of a vertical tube with independently heated lower and upper sections on supercritical convective heat transfer is studied on a water circulation loop at 9.8-17.7 MPa pressure and 330-1000 kg/m 2 s mass velocities. The experimental heat fluxes varied within the following limits: at the upper section from 0 to 474 kW/m 2 , at the lower section from 190 to 590 kW/m 2 . Analysis of the obtained data shows that when heat flux changes in the supercritical zone rewetting of the heated surface and simultaneous existence of two critical zones are observed. The effect of heat flux in the supercritical zone on convective heat transfer is ambiguous: the heat flux growth up to 60-100 kW/m 2 leads to increasing minimum values of the heat transfer factor in the supercritical zone, and a further heat flux growth - to their reduction. The conclusion is made that the value of heat flux in the undercritical zone affects convective heat transfer in the supercritical zone mainly through changing the value of critical vapour content

  2. Feasibility study of Self Powered Neutron Detectors in Fast Reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jammes, Christian; Filliatre, Philippe; Verma, Vasudha; Hellesen, Carl; Jacobsson Svard, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor system. Diverse possibilities of detector systems installation have to be investigated with respect to practicality and feasibility according to the detection parameters. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution. We show that the gamma contribution from fission products decay in the fuel and activation of structural materials is very small compared to the fission gammas. Thus, it is possible for the in-core SPND signal to follow changes in local neutron flux as they are proportional to each other. This implies that the signal from an in-core SPND can provide dynamic information on the neutron flux perturbations occurring inside the reactor core. (authors)

  3. Feasibility study of Self Powered Neutron Detectors in Fast Reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammes, Christian; Filliatre, Philippe [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance, (France); Verma, Vasudha; Hellesen, Carl; Jacobsson Svard, Staffan [Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala, (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor system. Diverse possibilities of detector systems installation have to be investigated with respect to practicality and feasibility according to the detection parameters. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution. We show that the gamma contribution from fission products decay in the fuel and activation of structural materials is very small compared to the fission gammas. Thus, it is possible for the in-core SPND signal to follow changes in local neutron flux as they are proportional to each other. This implies that the signal from an in-core SPND can provide dynamic information on the neutron flux perturbations occurring inside the reactor core. (authors)

  4. Distribution and metabolism of galactitol in Euonymus japonica L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersig, M.R.; Negm, F.B.

    1987-01-01

    Metabolism of [ 14 C]-galactitol was studied in immature and mature leaves of Euonymus japonica L. The highest rates of galactitol metabolism occurred in young expanding leaves. After a 12 h incubation in [ 14 C]-galactitol, the proportions of label remaining in galactitol were 82 and 96% in immature and mature tissues, respectively. A NAD dependent galactitol dehydrogenase reaction was demonstrated in extracts from immature leaves. The product of this reaction was the aldose sugar, galactose. Label from [ 14 C]-galactitol was detected in two unidentified carbohydrates as well as in sucrose, glucose, fructose and galactose. When incubated with [ 14 C]-galactose, immature and mature leaf strips, respectively, accumulated 1 and 22% of the label in the form of galactitol

  5. Four energy group neutron flux distribution in the Syrian miniature neutron source reactor using the WIMSD4 and CITATION code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Omar, H.; Ghazi, N.

    2009-01-01

    A 3-D (R, θ , Z) neutronic model for the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) was developed earlier to conduct the reactor neutronic analysis. The group constants for all the reactor components were generated using the WIMSD4 code. The reactor excess reactivity and the four group neutron flux distributions were calculated using the CITATION code. This model is used in this paper to calculate the point wise four energy group neutron flux distributions in the MNSR versus the radius, angle and reactor axial directions. Good agreement is noticed between the measured and the calculated thermal neutron flux in the inner and the outer irradiation site with relative difference less than 7% and 5% respectively. (author)

  6. The flux distribution from a 1.25m2 target aligned heliostat: comparison of ray tracing and experimental results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maliage, M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to validate SolTrace for concentrating solar investigations at CSIR by means of a test case: the comparison of the flux distribution in the focal spot of a 1.25 m2 target aligned heliostat predicted by the ray tracing...

  7. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase I), I-V, Part V, Determining the fine flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1962-07-01

    Mono energetic neutron transport equation was solved by Carlson numerical method in cylindrical geometry. S n code was developed for the digital computer ZUSE Z23. Neutron flux distribution was determined for the RA reactor cell by applying S 4 approximation. Reactor cell was treated as D 2 O-U-D 2 O system. Time of iteration was 185 s [sr

  8. A New Stellar Atmosphere Grid and Comparisons with HST /STIS CALSPEC Flux Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlin, Ralph C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Gordon, Karl D.; Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Mészáros, Szabolcs; Kovács, József [ELTE Gothard Astrophysical Observatory, H-9700 Szombathely, Szent Imre Herceg St. 112 (Hungary)

    2017-05-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph has measured the spectral energy distributions for several stars of types O, B, A, F, and G. These absolute fluxes from the CALSPEC database are fit with a new spectral grid computed from the ATLAS-APOGEE ATLAS9 model atmosphere database using a chi-square minimization technique in four parameters. The quality of the fits are compared for complete LTE grids by Castelli and Kurucz (CK04) and our new comprehensive LTE grid (BOSZ). For the cooler stars, the fits with the MARCS LTE grid are also evaluated, while the hottest stars are also fit with the NLTE Lanz and Hubeny OB star grids. Unfortunately, these NLTE models do not transition smoothly in the infrared to agree with our new BOSZ LTE grid at the NLTE lower limit of T {sub eff} = 15,000 K. The new BOSZ grid is available via the Space Telescope Institute MAST archive and has a much finer sampled IR wavelength scale than CK04, which will facilitate the modeling of stars observed by the James Webb Space Telescope . Our result for the angular diameter of Sirius agrees with the ground-based interferometric value.

  9. Heat flux distribution on an optimised limiter surface and structure of the scrape-off-layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denner, T.

    1998-12-01

    The heat load on plasma-facing components is a key issue for forthcoming fusion experiments. In this work the heat flux on the pump limiter in TEXTOR-94 is measured by a newly developed digital thermography system and these results are compared with theoretical models. The limiter is shaped in such a way as to keep the heat load of the plasma-wetted area low; this is achieved by reducing the angle of incidence of the magnetic field lines with respect to the limiter surface to less than 1 for the first 10 mm of the scrape-off-layer (SOL). This small angle of incidence enhances all effects of toroidal non-uniformity as given e.g. by the magnetic field ripple. Extensive modelling explains well the observed heating pattern on the limiter surface due to the ripple effect. In contrast to expectations from density and temperature distributions in the SOL and at the edge of the confined region, an excessive power density is deposited on the first few millimetres near the roof tip of the limiter. Physical effects which could cause this phenomenon are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Vacuolar Chloride Fluxes Impact Ion Content and Distribution during Early Salinity Stress1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baetz, Ulrike; Tohge, Takayuki; Martinoia, Enrico; De Angeli, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control the cytoplasmic environment is a prerequisite for plants to cope with changing environmental conditions. During salt stress, for instance, Na+ and Cl− are sequestered into the vacuole to help maintain cytosolic ion homeostasis and avoid cellular damage. It has been observed that vacuolar ion uptake is tied to fluxes across the plasma membrane. The coordination of both transport processes and relative contribution to plant adaptation, however, is still poorly understood. To investigate the link between vacuolar anion uptake and whole-plant ion distribution during salinity, we used mutants of the only vacuolar Cl− channel described to date: the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ALMT9. After 24-h NaCl treatment, almt9 knock-out mutants had reduced shoot accumulation of both Cl− and Na+. In contrast, almt9 plants complemented with a mutant variant of ALMT9 that exhibits enhanced channel activity showed higher Cl− and Na+ accumulation. The altered shoot ion contents were not based on differences in transpiration, pointing to a vacuolar function in regulating xylem loading during salinity. In line with this finding, GUS staining demonstrated that ALMT9 is highly expressed in the vasculature of shoots and roots. RNA-seq analysis of almt9 mutants under salinity revealed specific expression profiles of transporters involved in long-distance ion translocation. Taken together, our study uncovers that the capacity of vacuolar Cl− loading in vascular cells plays a crucial role in controlling whole-plant ion movement rapidly after onset of salinity. PMID:27503602

  11. A New Stellar Atmosphere Grid and Comparisons with HST/STIS CALSPEC Flux Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlin, Ralph C.; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Fleming, Scott W.; Gordon, Karl D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Kovács, József

    2017-05-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph has measured the spectral energy distributions for several stars of types O, B, A, F, and G. These absolute fluxes from the CALSPEC database are fit with a new spectral grid computed from the ATLAS-APOGEE ATLAS9 model atmosphere database using a chi-square minimization technique in four parameters. The quality of the fits are compared for complete LTE grids by Castelli & Kurucz (CK04) and our new comprehensive LTE grid (BOSZ). For the cooler stars, the fits with the MARCS LTE grid are also evaluated, while the hottest stars are also fit with the NLTE Lanz & Hubeny OB star grids. Unfortunately, these NLTE models do not transition smoothly in the infrared to agree with our new BOSZ LTE grid at the NLTE lower limit of T eff = 15,000 K. The new BOSZ grid is available via the Space Telescope Institute MAST archive and has a much finer sampled IR wavelength scale than CK04, which will facilitate the modeling of stars observed by the James Webb Space Telescope. Our result for the angular diameter of Sirius agrees with the ground-based interferometric value.

  12. Fructan biosynthesis and degradation as part of plant metabolism controlling sugar fluxes during durum wheat kernel maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eCimini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Wheat kernels contain fructans, fructose based oligosaccharides with prebiotic properties, in levels between 2 and 35 weight % depending on the developmental stage of the kernel. To improve knowledge on the metabolic pathways leading to fructan storage and degradation, carbohydrate fluxes occurring during durum wheat kernel development were analyzed. Kernels were collected at various developmental stages and quali-quantitative analysis of carbohydrates (mono- and di-saccharides, fructans, starch was performed, alongside analysis of the activities and gene expression of the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and hydrolysis. High resolution HPAEC-PAD of fructan contained in durum wheat kernels revealed that fructan content is higher at the beginning of kernel development, when fructans with higher DP, such as bifurcose and 1,1-nystose, were mainly found. The changes in fructan pool observed during kernel maturation might be part of the signaling pathways influencing carbohydrate metabolism and storage in wheat kernels during development. During the first developmental stages fructan accumulation may contribute to make kernels more effective Suc sinks and to participate in osmotic regulation while the observed decrease in their content may mark the transition to later developmental stages, transition that is also orchestrated by changes in redox balance.

  13. Measurement of two-dimensional thermal neutron flux in a water phantom and evaluation of dose distribution characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kumada, Hiroaki; Kishi, Toshiaki; Torii, Yoshiya; Horiguchi, Yoji

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate nitrogen dose, boron dose and gamma-ray dose occurred by neutron capture reaction of the hydrogen at the medical irradiation, two-dimensional distribution of the thermal neutron flux is very important because these doses are proportional to the thermal neutron distribution. This report describes the measurement of the two-dimensional thermal neutron distribution in a head water phantom by neutron beams of the JRR-4 and evaluation of the dose distribution characteristic. Thermal neutron flux in the phantom was measured by gold wire placed in the spokewise of every 30 degrees in order to avoid the interaction. Distribution of the thermal neutron flux was also calculated using two-dimensional Lagrange's interpolation program (radius, angle direction) developed this time. As a result of the analysis, it was confirmed to become distorted distribution which has annular peak at outside of the void, though improved dose profile of the deep direction was confirmed in the case which the radiation field in the phantom contains void. (author)

  14. Spatial distribution of the neutron flux in the IEA-R1 reactor core obtained by means of foil activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestnik Filho, J.

    1979-01-01

    A three-dimensional distribution of the neutron flux in IEA-R1 reactor, obtained by activating gold foils, is presented. The foils of diameter 8mm and thickness 0,013mm were mounted on lucite plates and located between the fuel element plates. Foil activities were measured using a 3x3 inches Nal(Tl) scintilation detector calibrated against a 4πβγ coincidence detector. Foil positions were chosen to minimize the errors of measurement; the overall estimated error on the measured flux is 5%. (Author) [pt

  15. Inverse heat transfer analysis of a functionally graded fin to estimate time-dependent base heat flux and temperature distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Haw-Long; Chang, Win-Jin; Chen, Wen-Lih; Yang, Yu-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Time-dependent base heat flux of a functionally graded fin is inversely estimated. ► An inverse algorithm based on the conjugate gradient method and the discrepancy principle is applied. ► The distributions of temperature in the fin are determined as well. ► The influence of measurement error and measurement location upon the precision of the estimated results is also investigated. - Abstract: In this study, an inverse algorithm based on the conjugate gradient method and the discrepancy principle is applied to estimate the unknown time-dependent base heat flux of a functionally graded fin from the knowledge of temperature measurements taken within the fin. Subsequently, the distributions of temperature in the fin can be determined as well. It is assumed that no prior information is available on the functional form of the unknown base heat flux; hence the procedure is classified as the function estimation in inverse calculation. The temperature data obtained from the direct problem are used to simulate the temperature measurements. The influence of measurement errors and measurement location upon the precision of the estimated results is also investigated. Results show that an excellent estimation on the time-dependent base heat flux and temperature distributions can be obtained for the test case considered in this study.

  16. Rational Design of a Corynebacterium glutamicum Pantothenate Production Strain and Ins Characterization by Metabolic Flux Analysis and Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hüser, A.T.; Chassagnole, Ch.; Lindley, N.D.; Merkamm, M.; Guyonvarch, A.; Elišáková, Veronika; Pátek, Miroslav; Kalinowski, J.; Brune, I.; Pühler, A.; Tauch, A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 6 (2005), s. 3255-3268 ISSN 0099-2240 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : corynebacterium glutamicum * metabolic flux Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.818, year: 2005

  17. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism: Biogeochemistry and controls of nutrient flux dynamics to fresh waters. Technical progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, R.G.

    1992-12-31

    The land-water interface region consists of two major components: the wetland, and the down-gradient adjacent littoral floating-leaved and submersed, macrophyte communities. Because of the importance of very high production and nutrient turnover of attached microbiota, a major emphasis of this investigation was placed upon these biota and their metabolic capacities for assimilation and release of organic compounds and nutrient retention and cycling. Examination of the capacities of wetland littoral communities to regulate fluxes of nutrients and organic compounds often has been limited to input-output analyses. These input-output data are an integral part of these investigations, but most of the research effort concentrated on the biotic and metabolic mechanisms that control fluxes and retention capacities and their effects upon biota in the down-gradient waters. The important regulatory capacities of dissolved organic compounds on enzyme reactivity was examined experimentally and coupled to the wetland-littoral organic carbon flux budgets.

  18. Joint Bayesian Estimation of Quasar Continua and the Lyα Forest Flux Probability Distribution Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, Anna-Christina; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2017-08-01

    We present a new Bayesian algorithm making use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling that allows us to simultaneously estimate the unknown continuum level of each quasar in an ensemble of high-resolution spectra, as well as their common probability distribution function (PDF) for the transmitted Lyα forest flux. This fully automated PDF regulated continuum fitting method models the unknown quasar continuum with a linear principal component analysis (PCA) basis, with the PCA coefficients treated as nuisance parameters. The method allows one to estimate parameters governing the thermal state of the intergalactic medium (IGM), such as the slope of the temperature-density relation γ -1, while marginalizing out continuum uncertainties in a fully Bayesian way. Using realistic mock quasar spectra created from a simplified semi-numerical model of the IGM, we show that this method recovers the underlying quasar continua to a precision of ≃ 7 % and ≃ 10 % at z = 3 and z = 5, respectively. Given the number of principal component spectra, this is comparable to the underlying accuracy of the PCA model itself. Most importantly, we show that we can achieve a nearly unbiased estimate of the slope γ -1 of the IGM temperature-density relation with a precision of +/- 8.6 % at z = 3 and +/- 6.1 % at z = 5, for an ensemble of ten mock high-resolution quasar spectra. Applying this method to real quasar spectra and comparing to a more realistic IGM model from hydrodynamical simulations would enable precise measurements of the thermal and cosmological parameters governing the IGM, albeit with somewhat larger uncertainties, given the increased flexibility of the model.

  19. Effect of Magnetic Flux Density and Applied Current on Temperature, Velocity and Entropy Generation Distributions in MHD Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kiyasatfar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, simulation of steady state, incompressible and fully developed laminar flow has been conducted in a magneto hydrodynamic (MHD pump. The governing equations are solved numerically by finite-difference method. The effect of the magnetic flux density and current on the flow and temperature distributions in a MHD pump is investigated. The obtained results showed that controlling the flow and the temperature is possible through the controlling of the applied current and the magnetic flux. Furthermore, the effects of the magnetic flux density and current on entropy generation in MHD pump are considered. Our presented numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data showed in literature.

  20. Seasonal variability in distribution and fluxes of methane in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patra, P.K.; Lal, S.; Venkataramani, S.; Gauns, M.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.

    Methane, a biogeochemically important gas in Earth's atmosphere was measured in the water column and air in the Arabian Sea in different seasons, viz., northeast monsoon, intermonsoon, and southwest monsoon, as part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux...

  1. Distribution and flux of 226Ra and 228Ra in the Amazon River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, R.M.; Sarmiento, J.L.; Stallard, R.F.; Moore, W.S.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of 226 Ra and 228 Ra in the Amazon River estuary show that desorption from riverborne suspended particulate matter in the estuary increases the riverine flux of both isotopes to the ocean by a factor of approximately 5 over the flux attributable to radium dissolved in the river water alone. The total Amazon flux supplies approximately 0.20% of the 226 Ra and approximately 2.6% of the 228 Ra standing crops in the near-surface Atlantic (0-200 m). Diffusive flux from estuarine and shelf sediments and desorption from resuspended sediments in the region of the estuary approximately double the estuarine 226 Ra concentration and quadruple the estuarine 228 Ra concentration above that caused by the dissolved and desorbed river components alone

  2. Co-factor engineering in lactobacilli: Effects of uncoupled ATPase activity on metabolic fluxes in Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum and L. sakei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, Ida; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2008-01-01

    The hydrolytic F-1-part of the F1F0-ATPase was over-expressed in Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum NC8 and L. sakei Lb790x during fermentation of glucose or ribose, in order to study how changes in the intracellular levels of ATP and ADP affect the metabolic fluxes. The uncoupled ATPase activity...... resulted in a decrease in intracellular energy level (ATP/ADP ratio), biomass yield and growth rate. Interestingly, the glycolytic and ribolytic flux increased in L. plantarum with uncoupled ATPase activity compared to the reference strain by up to 20% and 50%, respectively. The ATP demand was estimated...... to have approximately 80% control on both the glycolytic and ribolytic flux in L. plantarum under these conditions. In contrast, the glycolytic and ribolytic flux decreased in L. sakei with uncoupled ATPase activity. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  3. Thermal neutron flux distribution in ET-RR-2 reactor thermal column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Mahmoud M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal column in the ET-RR-2 reactor is intended to promote a thermal neutron field of high intensity and purity to be used for following tasks: (a to provide a thermal neutron flux in the neutron transmutation silicon doping, (b to provide a thermal flux in the neutron activation analysis position, and (c to provide a thermal neutron flux of high intensity to the head of one of the beam tubes leading to the room specified for boron thermal neutron capture therapy. It was, therefore, necessary to determine the thermal neutron flux at above mentioned positions. In the present work, the neutron flux in the ET-RR-2 reactor system was calculated by applying the three dimensional diffusion depletion code TRITON. According to these calculations, the reactor system is composed of the core, surrounding external irradiation grid, beryllium block, thermal column and the water reflector in the reactor tank next to the tank wall. As a result of these calculations, the thermal neutron fluxes within the thermal column and at irradiation positions within the thermal column were obtained. Apart from this, the burn up results for the start up core calculated according to the TRITION code were compared with those given by the reactor designer.

  4. Estimating the amount and distribution of radon flux density from the soil surface in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo Weihai; Guo Qiuju; Chen Bo; Cheng Guan

    2008-01-01

    Based on an idealized model, both the annual and the seasonal radon ( 222 Rn) flux densities from the soil surface at 1099 sites in China were estimated by linking a database of soil 226 Ra content and a global ecosystems database. Digital maps of the 222 Rn flux density in China were constructed in a spatial resolution of 25 km x 25 km by interpolation among the estimated data. An area-weighted annual average 222 Rn flux density from the soil surface across China was estimated to be 29.7 ± 9.4 mBq m -2 s -1 . Both regional and seasonal variations in the 222 Rn flux densities are significant in China. Annual average flux densities in the southeastern and northwestern China are generally higher than those in other regions of China, because of high soil 226 Ra content in the southeastern area and high soil aridity in the northwestern one. The seasonal average flux density is generally higher in summer/spring than winter, since relatively higher soil temperature and lower soil water saturation in summer/spring than other seasons are common in China

  5. Calculation of neutron flux distribution of thermal neutrons from microtron converter in a graphite moderator with water reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrejsek, K.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation is made of the thermal neutron flux in the moderator and reflector by solving the neutron diffusion equation using the four-group theory. The correction for neutron absorption in the moderator was carried out using the perturbation theory. The calculation was carried out for four groups with the following energy ranges: the first group 2 MeV to 3 keV, the second group 3 keV to 5 eV, the third group 5 eV to 0.025 eV and the fourth group 0.025 eV. The values of the macroscopic cross section of capture and scattering, of the diffusion coefficient, the macroscopic cross section of the moderator, of the neutron age and the extrapolation length for the water-graphite moderator used in the calculations are given. The spatial distribution of the thermal neutron flux is graphically represented for graphite of a 30, 40, and 50 cm radius and for graphite of a 30 and 40 cm radius with a 10 cm water reflector; a graphic comparison is made of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in water and in graphite, both 40 cm in radius. The system of graphite with reflector proved to be the best and most efficient system for raising the flux density of thermal neutrons. (J.P.)

  6. Determination and analysis of neutron flux distribution on radial Piercing beam port for utilization of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widarto

    2002-01-01

    Determination and analysis of neutron flux measurements on radial piercing beam port have been done as completion experimental data document and progressing on utilization of the Kartini research reactor purposes. The analysis and determination of the neutron flux have been carried out by using Au foils detector neutron activation analysis method which put on the radius of cross section (19 cm) and a long of radial piercing beam port (310 cm) Based on the calculation, distribution of the thermal neutron flux is around (8.3 ± 0.9) x 10 5 ncm -2 s -1 to (6.8 ± 0.5) x 10 7 ncm -2 s -1 and fast neutron is (5.0 ± 0.2) x 10 5 ncm -2 s -1 to (1.43 ± 0.6) x 10 7 ncm -2 s -1 . Analyzing by means of curve fitting method could be concluded that the neutron flux distribution on radial piercing beam port has profiled as a polynomial curve. (author)

  7. Metabolism of cerium 144 in rat. Distribution - elimination - dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remy, Jacques

    1959-01-01

    This academic report concerns a study during which cerium 144 has been intravenously injected to three-month old rats under the form of cerium chloride in aqueous solution with pH of 9,5. Rats have then been sacrificed at different times after the injection, and organ or tissue samplings have been performed to study the isotope distribution in their bodies. This allowed the calculation of internal irradiation doses locally received by the animal, and also to identify critical organs with respect to cerium 144. Thus, until the twentieth day after injection, liver is the critical organ. After, it is the skeleton, for the rest of the animal's life. The bone internal irradiation is the highest danger for an internal cerium 144 contamination, due to threats on body hematopoietic functions [fr

  8. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruoss, Stephen; Stahl, Claudia; Weigand, Markus; Schuetz, Gisela [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Intelligente Systeme, Stuttgart (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The penetration of magnetic flux into the high-temperature superconductor YBCO has been observed using a new high-resolution technique based on X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Superconductors coated with thin soft magnetic layers of CoFeB are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope providing cooling of the sample down to 83 K under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electrical currents create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor which leads to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. X-ray absorption measurements with circular polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor via the ferromagnetic layer. In this work we present first images taken at 83K with high spatial resolution in the nanoscale.

  9. Validation of the doubly-labeled water (H3H18O) method for measuring water flux and energy metabolism in tenebrionid beetles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    Doubly-labeled water (H 3 H 18 O) has been used to determine water flux and energy metabolism in a variety of vertebrates. This study examines the applicability of this technique to arthropods. The theory of the technique depends upon the assumption that doubly-labeled water introduced into the animal's body water equilibrates with water and carbon dioxide by the action of carbonic anhydrase. Tritium ( 3 H) is lost from the animal only with water while oxygen-18 is lost with both water and carbon dioxide. The difference bwtween the rates of loss of the two isotopes is proportional to CO 2 loss rate. Validation of the use of tritiated water for measuring water flux was accomplished by comparing gravimetric measurements of water gain with flux rates determined by loss of tritiated water. At room humidity, an overestimate for influx calculated from labeled water calculations was found, averaging 12 mg H 2 O (g.d) -1 . Comparison of CO 2 loss rate determined isotopically with rates of CO 2 loss determined by standard metabolic rates also yielded overestimates for the isotopic technique, overestimates ranging between 20 and 30%. The relevance of this for studies using labeled water for studying water fluxes and free metabolism of free-ranging arthropods is discussed

  10. Survey of the thermal and fast neutron flux distribution in the core of IPR-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, R.R.R.; Santoro, C.A.B.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology to obtain the neutron flux distribution inside the core is presented, aiming to analize the project of reactor increasing power. The technique of measures by activation with irradiation of steel eletrodes of 700 mm of lenght, put in acrylic rods was used. In the detection process and in the counting of activation product, a Ge(Li) detector with high resolution and a scanning mechanical system, constructed and projected in CDTN (Nuclear Technology Development Center) were used. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Survey of the thermal and fast neutron flux distribution in the core of IPR-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, R.R.R.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology to obtain the neutron flux distribution inside the core of a reactor is presented, aiming to analyze specifications for increasing reactor power. The activation measurement technique with irradiation of steel eletrodes of 700 mm of lenght, put in acrylic rods was used. In the detection process and in the counting of activation product, a Ge (Li) detector with high resolution and a scanning mechanical system, constructed and projected in CDTN (Nuclear Technology Development Center) were used. (E.G.) [pt

  12. Revised methane emissions factors and spatially distributed annual carbon fluxes for global livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Julie; Asrar, Ghassem R; West, Tristram O

    2017-09-29

    Livestock play an important role in carbon cycling through consumption of biomass and emissions of methane. Recent research suggests that existing bottom-up inventories of livestock methane emissions in the US, such as those made using 2006 IPCC Tier 1 livestock emissions factors, are too low. This may be due to outdated information used to develop these emissions factors. In this study, we update information for cattle and swine by region, based on reported recent changes in animal body mass, feed quality and quantity, milk productivity, and management of animals and manure. We then use this updated information to calculate new livestock methane emissions factors for enteric fermentation in cattle, and for manure management in cattle and swine. Using the new emissions factors, we estimate global livestock emissions of 119.1 ± 18.2 Tg methane in 2011; this quantity is 11% greater than that obtained using the IPCC 2006 emissions factors, encompassing an 8.4% increase in enteric fermentation methane, a 36.7% increase in manure management methane, and notable variability among regions and sources. For example, revised manure management methane emissions for 2011 in the US increased by 71.8%. For years through 2013, we present (a) annual livestock methane emissions, (b) complete annual livestock carbon budgets, including carbon dioxide emissions, and (c) spatial distributions of livestock methane and other carbon fluxes, downscaled to 0.05 × 0.05 degree resolution. Our revised bottom-up estimates of global livestock methane emissions are comparable to recently reported top-down global estimates for recent years, and account for a significant part of the increase in annual methane emissions since 2007. Our results suggest that livestock methane emissions, while not the dominant overall source of global methane emissions, may be a major contributor to the observed annual emissions increases over the 2000s to 2010s. Differences at regional and local scales may help

  13. (13)C metabolic flux analysis in neurons utilizing a model that accounts for hexose phosphate recycling within the pentose phosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebril, Hoda M; Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A; Jekabsons, Mika B

    2016-02-01

    Glycolysis, mitochondrial substrate oxidation, and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) are critical for neuronal bioenergetics and oxidation-reduction homeostasis, but quantitating their fluxes remains challenging, especially when processes such as hexose phosphate (i.e., glucose/fructose-6-phosphate) recycling in the PPP are considered. A hexose phosphate recycling model was developed which exploited the rates of glucose consumption, lactate production, and mitochondrial respiration to infer fluxes through the major glucose consuming pathways of adherent cerebellar granule neurons by replicating [(13)C]lactate labeling from metabolism of [1,2-(13)C2]glucose. Flux calculations were predicated on a steady-state system with reactions having known stoichiometries and carbon atom transitions. Non-oxidative PPP activity and consequent hexose phosphate recycling, as well as pyruvate production by cytoplasmic malic enzyme, were optimized by the model and found to account for 28 ± 2% and 7.7 ± 0.2% of hexose phosphate and pyruvate labeling, respectively. From the resulting fluxes, 52 ± 6% of glucose was metabolized by glycolysis, compared to 19 ± 2% by the combined oxidative/non-oxidative pentose cycle that allows for hexose phosphate recycling, and 29 ± 8% by the combined oxidative PPP/de novo nucleotide synthesis reactions. By extension, 62 ± 6% of glucose was converted to pyruvate, the metabolism of which resulted in 16 ± 1% of glucose oxidized by mitochondria and 46 ± 6% exported as lactate. The results indicate a surprisingly high proportion of glucose utilized by the pentose cycle and the reactions synthesizing nucleotides, and exported as lactate. While the in vitro conditions to which the neurons were exposed (high glucose, no lactate or other exogenous substrates) limit extrapolating these results to the in vivo state, the approach provides a means of assessing a number of metabolic fluxes within the context of hexose phosphate recycling in the PPP from a

  14. Measurement and analysis of neutron flux distribution of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murazaki, Minoru; Uno, Yuichi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    We have measured neutron flux distribution around the core tank of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) to develop the method to measure reactivity for subcritical systems. The neutron flux distribution data in the position accuracy of {+-}13 mm have been obtained in the range of uranium concentration of 50g/L to 210g/L both in critical and in subcritical state. The prompt neutron decay constant, {alpha}, was evaluated from the measurement data of pulsed neutron source experiments. We also calculated distribution of neutron flux and {sup 3}He reaction rates at the location of PSPC by using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP. The measurement data was compared with the calculation results. As results of comparison, calculated values agreed generally with measurement data of PSPC with Cd cover in the region above half of solution height, but the difference between calculated value and measurement data was large in the region below half of solution height. On the other hand, calculated value agreed well with measurement data of PSPC without Cd cover. (author)

  15. Measurement and analysis of neutron flux distribution of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter. Contract research

    CERN Document Server

    Murazaki, M; Uno, Y

    2003-01-01

    We have measured neutron flux distribution around the core tank of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) to develop the method to measure reactivity for subcritical systems. The neutron flux distribution data in the position accuracy of +-13 mm have been obtained in the range of uranium concentration of 50g/L to 210g/L both in critical and in subcritical state. The prompt neutron decay constant, alpha, was evaluated from the measurement data of pulsed neutron source experiments. We also calculated distribution of neutron flux and sup 3 He reaction rates at the location of PSPC by using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP. The measurement data was compared with the calculation results. As results of comparison, calculated values agreed generally with measurement data of PSPC with Cd cover in the region above half of solution height, but the difference between calculated value and measurement data was large in the region below half of solution height. On the other hand, ...

  16. Fieldable computer system for determining gamma-ray pulse-height distributions, flux spectra, and dose rates from Little Boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Our system consists of a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system with a built-in CAMAC crate and eight bismuth-germanate detectors 7.62 cm in diameter and 7.62 cm long. Gamma-ray pulse-height distributions are acquired simultaneously for up to eight positions. The system was very carefully calibrated and characterized from 0.1 to 8.3 MeV using gamma-ray spectra from a variety of radioactive sources. By fitting the pulse-height distributions from the sources with a function containing 17 parameters, we determined theoretical repsonse functions. We use these response functions to unfold the distributions to obtain flux spectra. A flux-to-dose-rate conversion curve based on the work of Dimbylow and Francis is then used to obtain dose rates. Direct use of measured spectra and flux-to-dose-rate curves to obtain dose rates avoids the errors that can arise from spectrum dependence in simple gamma-ray dosimeter instruments. We present some gamma-ray doses for the Little Boy assembly operated at low power. These results can be used to determine the exposures of the Hiroshima survivors and thus aid in the establishment of radation exposure limits for the nuclear industry

  17. Effect of the geometrical parameters of an optical integrator on the unformity of the radiation flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnyakova, T.P.; Klychev, Sh.I.

    1992-01-01

    The use of optical mixers in the optical irradiators of simulators of direct and concentrated solar radiation has been proposed. In this paper, the parameters of an optical mixer are calculated geometrically, and the effect of the parameters of the optical mixer on the unformity of the irradiance distribution η of the radiation flux on the detector is investigated. These investigations show that the light distribution from an optical mixer is close to the characteristics of an ideal uniform emitter within the region from 0 to the limit of α. 5 refs., 4 figs

  18. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953......-dimensional simulations of standing waves have also been made by application of a general purpose Navier-Stokes solver. The results agree well with those obtained by the boundary layer analysis. Wave reflection from a plane sloping wall is also investigated by using the same numerical model and by physical laboratory...

  19. Determination of neutron flux with an arbitrary energy distribution by measurement of irradiated foils activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.; Milosevic, M.

    2003-01-01

    A procedure for the neutron flux determination in a neutron field with an arbitrary energy spectrum, based on the using of standard methods for the measurement of irradiated foils activity and on the application of the SCALE-4.4a code system for averaged cross section calculation is described in this paper. Proposed procedure allows to include the energy spectrum of neutron flux reestablished in the location of irradiated foils and the resonance self-shielding effects in the foils also. Example application of this procedure is given for the neutron flux determination inside the neutron filter with boron placed in the centre of heavy water critical assembly RB at the Vinca Institute (author)

  20. Systematic assembly homogenization and local flux reconstruction for nodal method calculations of fast reactor power distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorning, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    A simultaneous pin lattice cell and fuel bundle homogenization theory has been developed for use with nodal diffusion calculations of practical reactors. The theoretical development of the homogenization theory, which is based on multiple-scales asymptotic expansion methods carried out through fourth order in a small parameter, starts from the transport equation and systematically yields: a cell-homogenized bundled diffusion equation with self-consistent expressions for the cell-homogenized cross sections and diffusion tensor elements; and a bundle-homogenized global reactor diffusion equation with self-consistent expressions for the bundle-homogenized cross sections and diffusion tensor elements. The continuity of the angular flux at cell and bundle interfaces also systematically yields jump conditions for the scaler flux or so-called flux discontinuity factors on the cell and bundle interfaces in terms of the two adjacent cell or bundle eigenfunctions. The expressions required for the reconstruction of the angular flux or the 'de-homogenization' theory were obtained as an integral part of the development; hence the leading order transport theory angular flux is easily reconstructed throughout the reactor including the regions in the interior of the fuel bundles or computational nodes and in the interiors of the pin lattice cells. The theoretical development shows that the exact transport theory angular flux is obtained to first order from the whole-reactor nodal diffusion calculations, done using the homogenized nuclear data and discontinuity factors, is a product of three computed quantities: a ''cell shape function''; a ''bundle shape function''; and a ''global shape function''. 10 refs

  1. Modelisation and distribution of neutron flux in radium-beryllium source (226Ra-Be)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didi, Abdessamad; Dadouch, Ahmed; Jai, Otman

    2017-09-01

    Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP-6), to analyze the thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes, of 3 millicuries of radium-beryllium, for determine the qualitative and quantitative of many materials, using method of neutron activation analysis. Radium-beryllium source of neutron is established to practical work and research in nuclear field. The main objective of this work was to enable us harness the profile flux of radium-beryllium irradiation, this theoretical study permits to discuss the design of the optimal irradiation and performance for increased the facility research and education of nuclear physics.

  2. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavar, A.R.; Sarmani, S.B.; Wood, A.K.; Fadzil, S.M.; Radir, M.H.; Khoo, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f fast ) and fast neutron flux (φ fast ) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f fast and subsequently φ fast were determined using the absolute method. The f fast ranged from 48 to 155, and the φ fast was found in the range 1.03x10 10 -4.89x10 10 n cm -2 s -1 . These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  3. Applications of computational modeling in metabolic engineering of yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    a preferred flux distribution. These methods point to strategies for altering gene expression; however, fluxes are often controlled by post-transcriptional events. Moreover, GEMs are usually not taking into account metabolic regulation, thermodynamics and enzyme kinetics. To facilitate metabolic engineering......, it is necessary to expand the modeling of metabolism to consider kinetics of individual processes. This review will give an overview about models available for metabolic engineering of yeast and discusses their applications....

  4. Viscous flux flow velocity and stress distribution in the Kim model of a long rectangular slab superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Chai, Xueguang

    2018-05-01

    When a bulk superconductor endures the magnetization process, enormous mechanical stresses are imposed on the bulk, which often leads to cracking. In the present work, we aim to resolve the viscous flux flow velocity υ 0/w, i.e. υ 0 (because w is a constant) and the stress distribution in a long rectangular slab superconductor for the decreasing external magnetic field (B a ) after zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) using the Kim model and viscous flux flow equation simultaneously. The viscous flux flow velocity υ 0/w and the magnetic field B* at which the body forces point away in all of the slab volumes during B a reduction, are determined by both B a and the decreasing rate (db a /dt) of the external magnetic field normalized by the full penetration field B p . In previous studies, υ 0/w obtained by the Bean model with viscous flux flow is only determined by db a /dt, and the field B* that is derived only from the Kim model is a positive constant when the maximum external magnetic field is chosen. This means that the findings in this paper have more physical contents than the previous results. The field B* stress changing with decreasing field B a after ZFC if B* ≤ 0. The effect of db a /dt on the stress is significant in the cases of both ZFC and FC.

  5. Transport calculation of neutron flux distribution in reflector of PW reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remec, I.

    1982-01-01

    Two-dimensional transport calculation of the neutron flux and spectrum in the equatorial plain of PW reactor, using computer program DOT 3, is presented. Results show significant differences between neutron fields in which test samples and reactor vessel are exposed. (author)

  6. Measurement of thermal neutron flux spatial distribution in the IEA-R1 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Utra Bitelli, U.

    1993-01-01

    This work presents the spatial thermal neutron flux in IEA-R1 reactor obtained by activation foils methods. These measurements were made in 27 fuel elements of the reactor core (165 B configuration). The results are important to compare with theoretical values, power calibration and safety analysis. (author)

  7. β-distribution for Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux in relaxation turbulent boundary layer of compression ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, YanChao; Bi, WeiTao; Li, ShiYao; She, ZhenSu

    2017-12-01

    A challenge in the study of turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) is to understand the non-equilibrium relaxation process after sep-aration and reattachment due to shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction. The classical boundary layer theory cannot deal with the strong adverse pressure gradient, and hence, the computational modeling of this process remains inaccurate. Here, we report the direct numerical simulation results of the relaxation TBL behind a compression ramp, which reveal the presence of intense large-scale eddies, with significantly enhanced Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux. A crucial finding is that the wall-normal profiles of the excess Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux obey a β-distribution, which is a product of two power laws with respect to the wall-normal distances from the wall and from the boundary layer edge. In addition, the streamwise decays of the excess Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux also exhibit power laws with respect to the streamwise distance from the corner of the compression ramp. These results suggest that the relaxation TBL obeys the dilation symmetry, which is a specific form of self-organization in this complex non-equilibrium flow. The β-distribution yields important hints for the development of a turbulence model.

  8. Effects of experimental nitrogen fertilization on planktonic metabolism and CO2 flux in a hypereutrophic hardwater lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Bogard

    Full Text Available Hardwater lakes are common in human-dominated regions of the world and often experience pollution due to agricultural and urban effluent inputs of inorganic and organic nitrogen (N. Although these lakes are landscape hotspots for CO2 exchange and food web carbon (C cycling, the effect of N enrichment on hardwater lake food web functioning and C cycling patterns remains unclear. Specifically, it is unknown if different eutrophication scenarios (e.g., modest non point vs. extreme point sources yield consistent effects on auto- and heterotrophic C cycling, or how biotic responses interact with the inorganic C system to shape responses of air-water CO2 exchange. To address this uncertainty, we induced large metabolic gradients in the plankton community of a hypereutrophic hardwater Canadian prairie lake by adding N as urea (the most widely applied agricultural fertilizer at loading rates of 0, 1, 3, 8 or 18 mg N L-1 week-1 to 3240-L, in-situ mesocosms. Over three separate 21-day experiments, all treatments of N dramatically increased phytoplankton biomass and gross primary production (GPP two- to six-fold, but the effects of N on autotrophs plateaued at ~3 mg N L-1. Conversely, heterotrophic metabolism increased linearly with N fertilization over the full treatment range. In nearly all cases, N enhanced net planktonic uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, and increased the rate of CO2 influx, while planktonic heterotrophy and CO2 production only occurred in the highest N treatments late in each experiment, and even in these cases, enclosures continued to in-gas CO2. Chemical effects on CO2 through calcite precipitation were also observed, but similarly did not change the direction of net CO2 flux. Taken together, these results demonstrate that atmospheric exchange of CO2 in eutrophic hardwater lakes remains sensitive to increasing N loading and eutrophication, and that even modest levels of N pollution are capable of enhancing autotrophy and CO

  9. Regional patterns of labile organic carbon flux in North American Arctic Margin (NAAM) as reflected by redox sensitive-elements distributions in sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeil, C.; Kuzyk, Z. Z. A.; Goni, M. A.; Macdonald, R. W.

    2016-02-01

    Concentrations of elements (S, Mn, Mo, U, Cd, Re) providing insights on organic C metabolized through oxidative processes at the sea floor were measured in 27 sediment cores collected along a section extending from the North Bering Sea to Davis Strait via the Canadian Archipelago. Sedimentary distributions and accumulation rates of these elements were used to i) document the relative importance of aerobic versus anaerobic degradation of organic C in NAAM sediments, ii) infer variations in water column carbon flux and iii) estimate the importance of this margin as a sink for key elements in the Arctic and global ocean. Distributions of Mn, total S and reduced inorganic S demonstrated that most sediments along the NAAM had relatively thick (>1 cm) surface oxic layers, underlain by sediments with weakly reducing conditions and limited sulphate reduction. Strongly reducing conditions accompanied by substantial sedimentary pyrite burial occurred only in certain subregions, including the Bering-Chukchi Shelves, shallow portions of Barrow Canyon. Estimated accumulation rates of authigenic S, Mo, Cd and U, and total Re displayed marked spatial variability that was related to sedimentary redox conditions induced by the supply of labile C to the seabed, as shown by significant relationships between the accumulation rates and vertical C flux, estimated from regional primary production values and water depth at the coring sites. High primary production combined with shallow water columns drive elevated rates of authigenic trace element accumulation in sediments from the Bering-Chukchi Shelves whereas low production combined with moderately deep conditions drive low rates of accumulation in sediments in the Beaufort Shelf, Davis Strait and Canadian Archipelago. Using the average authigenic trace element accumulation rates in sediments from the various regions, we submit that the shelves along the NAAM margin are important sinks in global marine biogeochemical budgets.

  10. ¹³C metabolic flux analysis identifies an unusual route for pyruvate dissimilation in mycobacteria which requires isocitrate lyase and carbon dioxide fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany J V Beste

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires the enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL for growth and virulence in vivo. The demonstration that M. tuberculosis also requires ICL for survival during nutrient starvation and has a role during steady state growth in a glycerol limited chemostat indicates a function for this enzyme which extends beyond fat metabolism. As isocitrate lyase is a potential drug target elucidating the role of this enzyme is of importance; however, the role of isocitrate lyase has never been investigated at the level of in vivo fluxes. Here we show that deletion of one of the two icl genes impairs the replication of Mycobacterium bovis BCG at slow growth rate in a carbon limited chemostat. In order to further understand the role of isocitrate lyase in the central metabolism of mycobacteria the effect of growth rate on the in vivo fluxes was studied for the first time using ¹³C-metabolic flux analysis (MFA. Tracer experiments were performed with steady state chemostat cultures of BCG or M. tuberculosis supplied with ¹³C labeled glycerol or sodium bicarbonate. Through measurements of the ¹³C isotopomer labeling patterns in protein-derived amino acids and enzymatic activity assays we have identified the activity of a novel pathway for pyruvate dissimilation. We named this the GAS pathway because it utilizes the Glyoxylate shunt and Anapleurotic reactions for oxidation of pyruvate, and Succinyl CoA synthetase for the generation of succinyl CoA combined with a very low flux through the succinate--oxaloacetate segment of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We confirm that M. tuberculosis can fix carbon from CO₂ into biomass. As the human host is abundant in CO₂ this finding requires further investigation in vivo as CO₂ fixation may provide a point of vulnerability that could be targeted with novel drugs. This study also provides a platform for further studies into the metabolism of M. tuberculosis using ¹³C-MFA.

  11. Enhanced production of resveratrol derivatives in tobacco plants by improving the metabolic flux of intermediates in the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yu Jeong; An, Chul Han; Woo, Su Gyeong; Park, Ji Hye; Lee, Ki-Won; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Rim, Yeonggil; Jeong, Hyung Jae; Ryu, Young Bae; Kim, Cha Young

    2016-09-01

    The biosynthesis of flavonoids such as anthocyanin and stilbenes has attracted increasing attention because of their potential health benefits. Anthocyanins and stilbenes share common phenylpropanoid precursor pathways. We previously reported that the overexpression of sweetpotato IbMYB1a induced anthocyanin pigmentation in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. In the present study, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum SR1) plants (STS-OX and ROST-OX) expressing the RpSTS gene encoding stilbene synthase from rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L. cv. Jangyeop) and the RpSTS and VrROMT genes encoding resveratrol O-methyltransferase from frost grape (Vitis riparia) were generated under the control of 35S promoter. Phenotypic alterations in floral organs, such as a reduction in floral pigments and male sterility, were observed in STS-OX transgenic tobacco plants. However, we failed to obtain STS-OX and ROST-OX plants with high levels of resveratrol compounds. Therefore, to improve the production of resveratrol derivatives in plants, we cross-pollinated flowers of STS-OX or ROST-OX and IbMYB1a-OX transgenic lines (SM and RSM). Phenotypic changes in vegetative and reproductive development of SM and RSM plants were observed. Furthermore, by HPLC and LC-MS analyses, we found enhanced production of resveratrol derivatives such as piceid, piceid methyl ether, resveratrol methyl ether O-hexoside, and 5-methyl resveratrol-3,4'-O-β-D-diglucopyranoside in SM and RSM cross-pollinated lines. Here, total contents of trans- and cis-piceids ranged from approximately 104-240 µg/g fresh weight in SM (F2). Collectively, we suggest that coexpression of RpSTS and IbMYB1a via cross-pollination can induce enhanced production of resveratrol compounds in plants by increasing metabolic flux into stilbenoid biosynthesis.

  12. Effects of ocean acidification and hydrodynamic conditions on carbon metabolism and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes in seagrass populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Luis G; Jiménez-Ramos, Rocío; Hernández, Ignacio; Bouma, Tjeerd J; Brun, Fernando G

    2018-01-01

    Global change has been acknowledged as one of the main threats to the biosphere and its provision of ecosystem services, especially in marine ecosystems. Seagrasses play a critical ecological role in coastal ecosystems, but their responses to ocean acidification (OA) and climate change are not well understood. There have been previous studies focused on the effects of OA, but the outcome of interactions with co-factors predicted to alter during climate change still needs to be addressed. For example, the impact of higher CO2 and different hydrodynamic regimes on seagrass performance remains unknown. We studied the effects of OA under different current velocities on productivity of the seagrass Zostera noltei, using changes in dissolved oxygen as a proxy for the seagrass carbon metabolism, and release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in a four-week experiment using an open-water outdoor mesocosm. Under current pH conditions, increasing current velocity had a positive effect on productivity, but this depended on shoot density. However, this positive effect of current velocity disappeared under OA conditions. OA conditions led to a significant increase in gross production rate and respiration, suggesting that Z. noltei is carbon-limited under the current inorganic carbon concentration of seawater. In addition, an increase in non-structural carbohydrates was found, which may lead to better growing conditions and higher resilience in seagrasses subjected to environmental stress. Regarding DOC flux, a direct and positive relationship was found between current velocity and DOC release, both under current pH and OA conditions. We conclude that OA and high current velocity may lead to favourable growth scenarios for Z. noltei populations, increasing their productivity, non-structural carbohydrate concentrations and DOC release. Our results add new dimensions to predictions on how seagrass ecosystems will respond to climate change, with important implications for the

  13. Effects of ocean acidification and hydrodynamic conditions on carbon metabolism and dissolved organic carbon (DOC fluxes in seagrass populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G Egea

    Full Text Available Global change has been acknowledged as one of the main threats to the biosphere and its provision of ecosystem services, especially in marine ecosystems. Seagrasses play a critical ecological role in coastal ecosystems, but their responses to ocean acidification (OA and climate change are not well understood. There have been previous studies focused on the effects of OA, but the outcome of interactions with co-factors predicted to alter during climate change still needs to be addressed. For example, the impact of higher CO2 and different hydrodynamic regimes on seagrass performance remains unknown. We studied the effects of OA under different current velocities on productivity of the seagrass Zostera noltei, using changes in dissolved oxygen as a proxy for the seagrass carbon metabolism, and release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in a four-week experiment using an open-water outdoor mesocosm. Under current pH conditions, increasing current velocity had a positive effect on productivity, but this depended on shoot density. However, this positive effect of current velocity disappeared under OA conditions. OA conditions led to a significant increase in gross production rate and respiration, suggesting that Z. noltei is carbon-limited under the current inorganic carbon concentration of seawater. In addition, an increase in non-structural carbohydrates was found, which may lead to better growing conditions and higher resilience in seagrasses subjected to environmental stress. Regarding DOC flux, a direct and positive relationship was found between current velocity and DOC release, both under current pH and OA conditions. We conclude that OA and high current velocity may lead to favourable growth scenarios for Z. noltei populations, increasing their productivity, non-structural carbohydrate concentrations and DOC release. Our results add new dimensions to predictions on how seagrass ecosystems will respond to climate change, with important

  14. Numerical simulation of a fractional model of temperature distribution and heat flux in the semi infinite solid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Choudhary

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fractional model for the computation of temperature and heat flux distribution in a semi-infinite solid is discussed which is subjected to spatially decomposing, time-dependent laser source. The apt dimensionless parameters are identified and the reduced temperature and heat flux as a function of these parameters are presented in a numerical form. Some special cases of practical interest are also discussed. The solution is derived by the application of the Laplace transform, the Fourier sine transform and their derivatives. Also, we developed an alternative solution of it by using the Sumudu transform, the Fourier transform and their derivatives. These results are received in compact and graceful forms in terms of the generalized Mittag-Leffler function, which are suitable for numerical computation.

  15. A dynamic metabolic flux analysis of ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, with riboflavin as a by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinhe; Kasbi, Mayssa; Chen, Jingkui; Peres, Sabine; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2017-12-01

    The present study reveals that supplementing sodium acetate (NaAc) strongly stimulates riboflavin production in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 with xylose as carbon source. Riboflavin production increased from undetectable concentrations to ∼0.2 g L -1 (0.53 mM) when supplementing 60 mM NaAc. Of interest, solvents production and biomass yield were also promoted with fivefold acetone, 2.6-fold butanol, and 2.4-fold biomass adding NaAc. A kinetic metabolic model, developed to simulate ABE biosystem, with riboflavin production, revealed from a dynamic metabolic flux analysis (dMFA) simultaneous increase of riboflavin (ribA) and GTP (precursor of riboflavin) (PurM) synthesis flux rates under NaAc supplementation. The model includes 23 fluxes, 24 metabolites, and 72 kinetic parameters. It also suggested that NaAc condition has first stimulated the accumulation of intracellular metabolite intermediates during the acidogenic phase, which have then fed the solventogenic phase leading to increased ABE production. In addition, NaAc resulted in higher intracellular levels of NADH during the whole culture. Moreover, lower GTP-to-adenosine phosphates (ATP, ADP, AMP) ratio under NaAc supplemented condition suggests that GTP may have a minor role in the cell energetic metabolism compared to its contribution to riboflavin synthesis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavar, A.R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sarmani, S.B. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Wood, A.K. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Fadzil, S.M. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Radir, M.H. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Khoo, K.S., E-mail: khoo@ukm.m [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-05-15

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f{sub fast}) and fast neutron flux ({phi}{sub fast}) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f{sub fast} and subsequently {phi}{sub fast} were determined using the absolute method. The f{sub fast} ranged from 48 to 155, and the {phi}{sub fast} was found in the range 1.03x10{sup 10}-4.89x10{sup 10} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  17. A simplified method for power-law modelling of metabolic pathways from time-course data and steady-state flux profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Ayako; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Nakayama, Yoichi; Tomita, Masaru

    2006-07-17

    In order to improve understanding of metabolic systems there have been attempts to construct S-system models from time courses. Conventionally, non-linear curve-fitting algorithms have been used for modelling, because of the non-linear properties of parameter estimation from time series. However, the huge iterative calculations required have hindered the development of large-scale metabolic pathway models. To solve this problem we propose a novel method involving power-law modelling of metabolic pathways from the Jacobian of the targeted system and the steady-state flux profiles by linearization of S-systems. The results of two case studies modelling a straight and a branched pathway, respectively, showed that our method reduced the number of unknown parameters needing to be estimated. The time-courses simulated by conventional kinetic models and those described by our method behaved similarly under a wide range of perturbations of metabolite concentrations. The proposed method reduces calculation complexity and facilitates the construction of large-scale S-system models of metabolic pathways, realizing a practical application of reverse engineering of dynamic simulation models from the Jacobian of the targeted system and steady-state flux profiles.

  18. A simplified method for power-law modelling of metabolic pathways from time-course data and steady-state flux profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimoto Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to improve understanding of metabolic systems there have been attempts to construct S-system models from time courses. Conventionally, non-linear curve-fitting algorithms have been used for modelling, because of the non-linear properties of parameter estimation from time series. However, the huge iterative calculations required have hindered the development of large-scale metabolic pathway models. To solve this problem we propose a novel method involving power-law modelling of metabolic pathways from the Jacobian of the targeted system and the steady-state flux profiles by linearization of S-systems. Results The results of two case studies modelling a straight and a branched pathway, respectively, showed that our method reduced the number of unknown parameters needing to be estimated. The time-courses simulated by conventional kinetic models and those described by our method behaved similarly under a wide range of perturbations of metabolite concentrations. Conclusion The proposed method reduces calculation complexity and facilitates the construction of large-scale S-system models of metabolic pathways, realizing a practical application of reverse engineering of dynamic simulation models from the Jacobian of the targeted system and steady-state flux profiles.

  19. Detrimental and protective fat: body fat distribution and its relation to metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Andrea; Magnuson, Aaron; Foster, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is linked to numerous comorbidities that include, but are not limited to, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular disease. Current evidence suggests, however, obesity itself is not an exclusive predictor of metabolic dysregulation but rather adipose tissue distribution. Obesity-related adverse health consequences occur predominately in individuals with upper body fat accumulation, the detrimental distribution, commonly associated with visceral obesity. Increased lower body subcutaneous adipose tissue, however, is associated with a reduced risk of obesity-induced metabolic dysregulation and even enhanced insulin sensitivity, thus, storage in this region is considered protective. The proposed mechanisms that causally relate the differential outcomes of adipose tissue distribution are often attributed to location and/or adipocyte regulation. Visceral adipose tissue effluent to the portal vein drains into the liver where hepatocytes are directly exposed to its metabolites and secretory products, whereas the subcutaneous adipose tissue drains systemically. Adipose depots are also inherently different in numerous ways such as adipokine release, immunity response and regulation, lipid turnover, rate of cell growth and death, and response to stress and sex hormones. Proximal extrinsic factors also play a role in the differential drive between adipose tissue depots. This review focuses on the deleterious mechanisms postulated to drive the differential metabolic response between central and lower body adipose tissue distribution.

  20. Uptake, Translocation, Metabolism, and Distribution of Glyphosate in Nontarget Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengmeng; Gao, Wanjun; Jiao, Weiting; Zhou, Jie; Li, Yeyun; He, Lili; Hou, Ruyan

    2017-09-06

    The uptake, translocation, metabolism, and distribution behavior of glyphosate in nontarget tea plant were investigated. The negative effects appeared to grown tea saplings when the nutrient solution contained glyphosate above 200 mg L -1 . Glyphosate was highest in the roots of the tea plant, where it was also metabolized to aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). The glyphosate and AMPA in the roots were transported through the xylem or phloem to the stems and leaves. The amount of AMPA in the entire tea plant was less than 6.0% of the amount of glyphosate. The glyphosate level in fresh tea shoots was less than that in mature leaves at each day. These results indicated that free glyphosate in the soil can be continuously absorbed by, metabolized in, and transported from the roots of the tea tree into edible leaves, and therefore, free glyphosate residues in the soil should be controlled to produce teas free of glyphosate.

  1. Determination of homogenization factors in the simulation in the azymuthal flux unit distribution in the control ring of a experimental fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jachic, J.

    1987-01-01

    The azimuthal neutronic flux distribution in the control ring region for a low power fast reactor is simulated using a plate and rectangular smash models for one dimensional calculations under periodic boundary conditions in the frontier. (E.G.) [pt

  2. Analytical Calculation of the Magnetic Field distribution in a Flux-Modulated Permanent-Magnet Brushless Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a rapid approach to compute the magnetic field distribution in a flux-modulated permanent-magnet brushless motor. Partial differential equations are used to describe the magnet field behavior in terms of magnetic vector potentials. The whole computational domain is divided...... into several regions, i.e., magnet, air-gaps, slot-openings, and slots. The numerical solution could be obtained by applying the boundary constraints on the interfaces between these regions. The accuracy of the proposed analytical model is verified by comparing the no-load magnetic field and armature reaction...... magnetic field with those calculated by finite element method....

  3. A one-dimensional, one-group absorption-production nodal method for neutron flux and power distributions calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented the absorption-production nodal method for steady and dynamical calculations in one-dimension and one group energy. It was elaborated the NOD1D computer code (in FORTRAN-IV language). Calculations of neutron flux and power distributions, burnup, effective multiplication factors and critical boron concentration were made with the NOD1D code and compared with results obtained through the CITATION code, which uses the finite difference method. The nuclear constants were produced by the LEOPARD code. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. A DETERMINATION OF THE FLUX DENSITY IN CORE OF DISTRIBUTION TRANSFORMERS, WHAT BUILT WITH THE COMMON USING OF GRAIN AND NON GRAIN ORIENTED MAGNETIC STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Pentegov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of calculation method to determinate the flux densities in different parts of the magnetic cores of distribution transformers, what built from different types magnetic steel (mixed core. Methodology. The method is based on the scientific positions of Theoretical Electrical Engineering – the theory of the electromagnetic field in nonlinear mediums to determine the distribution of magnetic flux in mixed core of transformer, what are using different types of steel what have the different magnetic properties. Results. The developed method gives possible to make calculation of the flux density and influence of skin effect in different parts of the magnetic cores of distribution transformer, where are used mix of grain oriented (GO and non grain oriented (NGO steels. Was determinate the general basic conditions for the calculation of flux density in the laminations from grain and non grain oriented steels of the magnetic core: the strength of magnetic field for the laminations of particular part of mixed core is the same; the sum of the magnetic fluxes in GO and NGO steels in particular part of mixed core is equal with the designed magnetic flux in this part of mixed core. Discover, the magnetic flux in mixed core of the transformer has specific distribution between magnetic steels. The flux density is higher in laminations from GO steel and smaller in laminations from the NGO steel. That is happened because for magnetic flux is easier pass through laminations from GO steel, what has better magnetic conductance than laminations from NGO steel. Originality. The common using of different types of magnetic steels in cores for distribution transformers gives possibility to make design of transformer with low level of no load losses, high efficiency and with optimal cost. Practical value. The determination of the flux density in different parts of magnetic core with GO and NGO steels gives possibility make accurate calculation of

  5. Measurement of angular distribution of neutron flux for the 6 MeV race-track microtron based pulsed neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, B.J., E-mail: bjp@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Chavan, S.T.; Pethe, S.N.; Krishnan, R. [SAMEER, IIT Powai Campus, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-09-15

    The 6 MeV race track microtron based pulsed neutron source has been designed specifically for the elemental analysis of short lived activation products, where the low neutron flux requirement is desirable. Electrons impinges on a e-{gamma} target to generate bremsstrahlung radiations, which further produces neutrons by photonuclear reaction in {gamma}-n target. The optimisation of these targets along with their spectra were estimated using FLUKA code. The measurement of neutron flux was carried out by activation of vanadium at different scattering angles. Angular distribution of neutron flux indicates that the flux decreases with increase in the angle and are in good agreement with the FLUKA simulation.

  6. Two dimensional analysis for magnetic flux distribution in electromagnet used for MHD applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.V.; Venkatramani, N.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic flux densities in air and iron region of iron core MHD electromagnet, are calculated based on concept of magnetic vector potential. Numerical solution to the problem is obtained by converting partial differential equations into finite difference form with simplifying assumptions. A computer progrm is developed, giving solution by finite difference method. Over-relaxation technique based on Stoke's theorem is applied. Magnetic induction along the transverse axis of the magnet and plot for magnetic induction lines for current = 2420 A is presented. (author)

  7. Prediction of Flow and Temperature Distributions in a High Flux Research Reactor Using the Porous Media Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanfang Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High thermal neutron fluxes are needed in some research reactors and for irradiation tests of materials. A High Flux Research Reactor (HFRR with an inverse flux trap-converter target structure is being developed by the Reactor Engineering Analysis Lab (REAL at Tsinghua University. This paper studies the safety of the HFRR core by full core flow and temperature calculations using the porous media approach. The thermal nonequilibrium model is used in the porous media energy equation to calculate coolant and fuel assembly temperatures separately. The calculation results show that the coolant temperature keeps increasing along the flow direction, while the fuel temperature increases first and decreases afterwards. As long as the inlet coolant mass flow rate is greater than 450 kg/s, the peak cladding temperatures in the fuel assemblies are lower than the local saturation temperatures and no boiling exists. The flow distribution in the core is homogeneous with a small flow rate variation less than 5% for different assemblies. A large recirculation zone is observed in the outlet region. Moreover, the porous media model is compared with the exact model and found to be much more efficient than a detailed simulation of all the core components.

  8. Zenith distribution and flux of atmospheric muons measured with the 5-line ANTARES detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Albert, A.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Jesus, A. C. Assis; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubertg, J. -J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Berting, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunnerg, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Castel, D.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenweing, J. -P.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kretschmer, W.; Loehner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The ANTARES high-energy neutrino telescope is a three-dimensional array of about 900 photomultipliers distributed over 12 mooring lines installed in the Mediterranean Sea. Between February and November 2007 it acquired data in a 5-line configuration. The zenith angular distribution of the

  9. Distribution and metabolism of selenite and selenomethionine in the Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan, Yasumi; Ohbo, Ai; Tani, Yuta; Hatakeyama, Yoshiko; Yawata, Ayako; Ogra, Yasumitsu

    2012-05-01

    Compared to the many studies on the physiological and toxicological effects of selenium (Se) in mammals, avian Se metabolism is still an unexplored topic. Some birds are useful as poultry for human nutrition. Moreover, birds belong to higher trophic levels in the biosphere and thus may play an important role in Se circulation in the ecosystem in the same way as mammals do. In this study, we analyzed the distribution and metabolism of Se in an experimental bird, the Japanese quail, which was fed drinking water containing sodium selenite or selenomethionine (SeMet). The highest concentration of Se was detected in the pancreas, followed by down feathers, liver, and kidneys. SeMet was more efficiently incorporated into the quail than selenite. The specific and preferable distribution of Se to the high molecular weight fraction in the serum of the quail was observed only in the SeMet-ingestion group. As in mammals, selenosugar and trimethylselenonium were the major metabolites in quail excreta. Three unknown Se metabolites were detected by HPLC-ICP-MS. Although part of the metabolic pathway of Se in the Japanese quail fed selenite and SeMet was the same as that observed in mammals, the bird also showed certain avian-specific metabolic process for Se.

  10. Flux coupling and transcriptional regulation within the metabolic network of the photosynthetic bacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagud, Arnau; Zelezniak, Aleksej; Navarro, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    networks, surrounded by a stable core of pathways leading to biomass building blocks. This analysis identified potential bottlenecks for hydrogen and ethanol production. Integration of transcriptomic data with the Synechocystis flux coupling networks lead to identification of reporter flux coupling pairs...

  11. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  12. Vertical Distribution and Flux of Nutrients in the Sediments of the Mangrove Reclamation Region of Muara Angke Kapuk, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ida Sunaryo Purwiyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The reclaimed mangrove estuary in Muara Angke Kapuk is a reclaimed area that has not evaded the impacted of pollution and waste in the areas surrounding Cengkareng, Jakarta. This is apparent from the fact that almost all sediments under the mangrove trees are buried under heaps of plastic trash. However, the reclaimed region still has variety of organism, which indicating that the region still has an internal carrying capacity, especially nutrients from sediment. The purpose of this research was to examine the condition of sediment nutrients in this mangrove reclamation region. The research was conducted by taking water samples using a modification of the stratified cup at a sediment depth of 0-15 cm with depth intervals of 2.5 cm, and taking sediment samples using the sediment ring. Pore water samples were measured for dissolved oxygen (DO and concentrations of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate. Sediment samples were used to obtain porosity values. The data obtained is used to make vertical concentration profiles and analysis of vertical nutrient flux. Vertical nutrient flux analysis was performed with the aid of QUAL2K software version 2.11. The results showed different vertical distributions and flux of nutrients, where influx for ammonia and phosphate and an increase in line with increasing sediment depth, while nitrate efflux and a decreased concentration. The flux calculation of nitrite as transitory nutrient was not done, but the concentration decreased after a depth of 2.5 cm. This indicates that the high contamination on the surface does not prevent the natural chemical processes so the reclaimed region can still provide nutritional support for its organism.

  13. Estimation of In-canopy Flux Distributions of Reactive Nitrogen and Sulfur within a Mixed Hardwood Forest in Southern Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z.; Walker, J. T.; Chen, X.; Oishi, A. C.; Duman, T.

    2017-12-01

    Estimating the source/sink distribution and vertical fluxes of air pollutants within and above forested canopies is critical for understanding biological, physical, and chemical processes influencing the soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange. The vertical source-sink profiles of reactive nitrogen and sulfur were examined using multiple inverse modeling methods in a mixed hardwood forest in the southern Appalachian Mountains where the ecosystem is highly sensitive to loads of pollutant from atmospheric depositions. Measurements of the vertical concentration profiles of ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), and sulfate (SO42-) in PM2.5 were measured during five study periods between May 2015 and August 2016. The mean concentration of NH3 decreased with height in the upper canopy and increased below the understory toward the forest floor, indicating that the canopy was a sink for NH3 but the forest floor was a source. All other species exhibited patterns of monotonically decreasing concentration from above the canopy to the forest floor. Using the measured concentration profiles, we simulated the within-canopy flow fields and estimated the vertical source-sink flux profiles using three inverse approaches: a Eulerian high-order closure model (EUL), a Lagrangian localized near-field (LNF) model, and a new full Lagrangian stochastic model (LSM). The models were evaluated using the within- and above-canopy eddy covariance flux measurements of heat, CO2 and H2O. Differences between models were analyzed and the flux profiles were used to investigate the origin and fate of reactive nitrogen and sulfur compounds within the canopy. The knowledge gained in this study will benefit the development of soil-vegetation-atmosphere models capable of partitioning canopy-scale deposition of nitrogen and sulfur to specific ecosystem compartments.

  14. Axial and radial distribution of neutron fluxes in the irradiation channels of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 using foil activation analysis and Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrefah, G.R.

    2009-02-01

    The Monte-Carlo method and experimental methods were used to determine the neutron fluxes in the irradiation channels of the Ghana Research Reactor -1. The MCNP5 code was used for this purpose to simulate the radial and axial distribution of the neutron fluxes within all the ten irradiation channels. The results obtained were compared with the experimental results. After the MCNP simulation and experimental procedure, it was observed that axially, the fluxes rise to a peak before falling and then finally leveling out. Axially and radially, it was also observed that the fluxes in the centre of the channels were lower than on the sides. Radially, the fluxes dip in the centre while it increases steadily towards the sides of the channels. The results have shown that there are flux variations within the irradiation channels both axially and radially. (au)

  15. Complex interactions between dietary and genetic factors impact lycopene metabolism and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy E.; Erdman, John W.; Clinton, Steven K.

    2013-01-01

    Intake of lycopene, a red, tetraterpene carotenoid found in tomatoes is epidemiologically associated with a decreased risk of chronic disease processes, and lycopene has demonstrated bioactivity in numerous in vitro and animal models. However, our understanding of absorption, tissue distribution, and biological impact in humans remains very limited. Lycopene absorption is strongly impacted by dietary composition, especially the amount of fat. Concentrations of circulating lycopene in lipoproteins may be further influenced by a number of variations in genes related to lipid absorption and metabolism. Lycopene is not uniformly distributed among tissues, with adipose, liver, and blood being the major body pools, while the testes, adrenals, and liver have the greatest concentrations compared to other organs. Tissue concentrations of lycopene are likely dictated by expression of and genetic variation in lipoprotein receptors, cholesterol transporters, and carotenoid metabolizing enzymes, thus impacting lycopene accumulation at target sites of action. The novel application of genetic evaluation in concert with lycopene tracers will allow determination of which genes and polymorphisms define individual lycopene metabolic phenotypes, response to dietary variables, and ultimately determine biological and clinical outcomes. A better understanding of the relationship between diet, genetics, and lycopene distribution will provide necessary information to interpret epidemiological findings more accurately and to design effective, personalized clinical nutritional interventions addressing hypotheses regarding health outcomes. PMID:23845854

  16. PAH distribution and mass fluxes in the Three Gorges Reservoir after impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyerling, Dominik; Wang, Jingxian; Hu, Wei; Westrich, Bernhard; Peng, Chengrong; Bi, Yonghong; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-09-01

    Mass fluxes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were calculated for the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) in China, based on concentration and discharge data from the Yangtze River. Virtual Organisms (VOs) have been applied during four campaigns in 2008, 2009 (twice) and 2011 at sampling sites distributed from Chongqing to Maoping. The total PAH mass fluxes ranged from 110 to 2,160 mg s(-1). Highest loads were determined at Chongqing with a decreasing trend towards Maoping in all four sampling campaigns. PAH remediation capacity of the TGR was found to be high as the mass flux reduced by more than half from upstream to downstream. Responsible processes are thought to be adsorption of PAH to suspended particles, dilution and degradation. Furthermore, the dependence of PAH concentration upon water depth was investigated at Maoping in front of the Three Gorges Dam. Although considerable differences could be revealed, there was no trend observable. Sampling of water with self-packed filter cartridges confirmed more homogenous PAH depth distribution. Moreover, PAH content of suspended particles was estimated from water concentrations gathered by VOs based on a water-particle separation model and subsequently compared to PAH concentration measured in water and in filter cartridges. It could be shown that the modeled data predicts the concentration caused by particle-bound PAHs to be about 6 times lower than PAHs dissolved in water. Besides, the model estimates the proportions of 5- and 6-ring PAHs being higher than in water phase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimation of subcriticality and fuel concentration by using 'pattern matching' of neutron flux distribution under non uniformed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitani, Kazuki; Yamane, Yoshihiro

    1999-01-01

    In nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, monitoring the spatial profile of neutron flux to infer subcriticality and distribution of fuel concentration using detectors such as PSPC, is very beneficial in sight of criticality safety. In this paper a method of subcriticality and fuel concentration estimation which is supposed to use under non-uniformed system is proposed. Its basic concept is the pattern matching between measured neutron flux distribution and beforehand calculated one. In any kind of subcriticality estimation, we can regard that measured neutron counts put any kind of black box, and then this black box outputs subcriticality. We proposed the use of artificial neural network or 'pattern matching' as black box which have no theoretical clear base. These method are wholly based on the calculated value as recently advancement of computer code accuracy for criticality safety. The most difference between indirect bias estimation method and our method is that our new approach target are the unknown non-uniform system. (J.P.N.)

  18. A genetic screen for increasing metabolic flux in the isoprenoid pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Isolation of SPT15 mutants using the screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wadhwa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A genetic screen to identify mutants that can increase flux in the isoprenoid pathway of yeast has been lacking. We describe a carotenoid-based visual screen built with the core carotenogenic enzymes from the red yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides. Enzymes from this yeast displayed the required, higher capacity in the carotenoid pathway. The development also included the identification of the metabolic bottlenecks, primarily phytoene dehydrogenase, that was subjected to a directed evolution strategy to yield more active mutants. To further limit phytoene pools, a less efficient version of GGPP synthase was employed. The screen was validated with a known flux increasing gene, tHMG1. New mutants in the TATA binding protein SPT15 were isolated using this screen that increased the yield of carotenoids, and an alternate isoprenoid, α-Farnesene confirming increase in overall flux. The findings indicate the presence of previously unknown links to the isoprenoid pathway that can be uncovered using this screen. Keywords: Metabolic engineering, Carotenoids, Isoprenoids, α-Farnesene, Rhodosporidium toruloides, SPT15

  19. Flux and energy deposition distribution studies inside the irradiation room of the portuguese 60Co irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portugal, Luis; Oliveira, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In December 2003 the irradiator of the Portuguese 60 Co irradiation facility, UTR, was replenished. Eighteen new sources were loaded and the older ones (156) were rearranged. The result was an irradiator with about 10.2 P Bq of total activity. The active area of the irradiator has also increased. Now it uses twenty five of the thirty tubes of the source rack, nine more than in the previous geometry. This facility was designed mainly for sterilisation of medical devices. However it is also used for the irradiation of other products such as cork stoppers, plastics and a limited number of food and feed. The purpose of this work is to perform dosimetric studies inside the irradiation room of a 60 Co irradiation facility, particularly, the flux and energy deposition distributions. The MCNPX code was used for the simulation of the facility. The track average mesh tally capabilities of MCNPX were used to plot the photon flux and energy deposition distributions. This tool provides a fast way for flux and energy deposition mapping. The absorbed dose distribution near the walls of the irradiation room was also calculated. Instead of using meshtallys as before, the average absorbed dose inside boxes lined with the walls was determined and afterwards a plot of its distribution was made. The absorbed dose rates obtained ranged from 5 to 500 Gy.h -1 depending on material being irradiated in process and the location on the wall. These positions can be useful for fixed irradiation purposes. Both dosimetric studies were done considering two different materials being irradiated in the process: cork stoppers and water, materials with quite different densities (0.102 and 1 g.cm-3, respectively). These studies showed some important characteristics of the radiation fields inside the irradiation room, namely its spatial heterogeneity. Tunnelling and shadow effects were enhanced when the product boxes increases its density. Besides a deeper dosimetric understanding of the

  20. Transport-distance specific SOC distribution: Does it skew erosion induced C fluxes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yaxian; Berbe, Asmerat Asefaw; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The net effect of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), is determined by the spatial (re-)distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC), and the dynamic replacement of eroded C by the production of new photosynthate. The depositi......Abstract The net effect of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), is determined by the spatial (re-)distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC), and the dynamic replacement of eroded C by the production of new photosynthate...... the actual movement of eroded soil fractions along hillslopes, let alone the re-distribution pattern of SOC fractions. Eroding sandy soils and sediment were sampled after a series of rainfall events along a slope on a freshly seeded cropland in Jutland, Denmark. All the soil samples were fractionated...... into five settling classes using a settling tube apparatus. The spatial distribution of soil settling classes shows a coarsening effect immediately below the eroding slope, followed by a fining trend at the slope tail. These findings support the validity of the conceptual model proposed by Starr et al...

  1. 13C based proteinogenic amino acid (PAA and metabolic flux ratio analysis of Lactococcus lactis reveals changes in pentose phosphate (PP pathway in response to agitation and temperature related stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalrul Azlan Azizan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is an important starter culture for dairy fermentation. During industrial fermentations, L. lactis is constantly exposed to stresses that affect the growth and performance of the bacterium. Although the response of L. lactis to several stresses has been described, the adaptation mechanisms at the level of in vivo fluxes have seldom been described. To gain insights into cellular metabolism, 13C metabolic flux analysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS were used to measure the flux ratios of active pathways in the central metabolism of L. lactis when subjected to three conditions varying in temperature (30°C, 37°C and agitation (with and without agitation at 150 rpm. Collectively, the concentrations of proteinogenic amino acids (PAAs and free fatty acids (FAAs were compared, and Pearson correlation analysis (r was calculated to measure the pairwise relationship between PAAs. Branched chain and aromatic amino acids, threonine, serine, lysine and histidine were correlated strongly, suggesting changes in flux regulation in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate (PP pathway, malic enzyme and anaplerotic reaction catalysed by pyruvate carboxylase (pycA. Flux ratio analysis revealed that glucose was mainly converted by glycolysis, highlighting the stability of L. lactis’ central carbon metabolism despite different conditions. Higher flux ratios through oxaloacetate (OAA from pyruvate (PYR reaction in all conditions suggested the activation of pyruvate carboxylate (pycA in L. lactis, in response to acid stress during exponential phase. Subsequently, more significant flux ratio differences were seen through the oxidative and non-oxidative pentose phosphate (PP pathways, malic enzyme, and serine and C1 metabolism, suggesting NADPH requirements in response to environmental stimuli. These reactions could play an important role in optimization strategies for metabolic engineering in L. lactis. Overall

  2. 13C based proteinogenic amino acid (PAA) and metabolic flux ratio analysis of Lactococcus lactis reveals changes in pentose phosphate (PP) pathway in response to agitation and temperature related stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizan, Kamalrul Azlan; Ressom, Habtom W; Mendoza, Eduardo R; Baharum, Syarul Nataqain

    2017-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is an important starter culture for dairy fermentation. During industrial fermentations, L. lactis is constantly exposed to stresses that affect the growth and performance of the bacterium. Although the response of L. lactis to several stresses has been described, the adaptation mechanisms at the level of in vivo fluxes have seldom been described. To gain insights into cellular metabolism, 13 C metabolic flux analysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to measure the flux ratios of active pathways in the central metabolism of L. lactis when subjected to three conditions varying in temperature (30°C, 37°C) and agitation (with and without agitation at 150 rpm). Collectively, the concentrations of proteinogenic amino acids (PAAs) and free fatty acids (FAAs) were compared, and Pearson correlation analysis ( r ) was calculated to measure the pairwise relationship between PAAs. Branched chain and aromatic amino acids, threonine, serine, lysine and histidine were correlated strongly, suggesting changes in flux regulation in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, malic enzyme and anaplerotic reaction catalysed by pyruvate carboxylase (pycA). Flux ratio analysis revealed that glucose was mainly converted by glycolysis, highlighting the stability of L. lactis' central carbon metabolism despite different conditions. Higher flux ratios through oxaloacetate (OAA) from pyruvate (PYR) reaction in all conditions suggested the activation of pyruvate carboxylate (pycA) in L. lactis , in response to acid stress during exponential phase. Subsequently, more significant flux ratio differences were seen through the oxidative and non-oxidative pentose phosphate (PP) pathways, malic enzyme, and serine and C1 metabolism, suggesting NADPH requirements in response to environmental stimuli. These reactions could play an important role in optimization strategies for metabolic engineering in L. lactis . Overall, the

  3. 13C based proteinogenic amino acid (PAA) and metabolic flux ratio analysis of Lactococcus lactis reveals changes in pentose phosphate (PP) pathway in response to agitation and temperature related stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is an important starter culture for dairy fermentation. During industrial fermentations, L. lactis is constantly exposed to stresses that affect the growth and performance of the bacterium. Although the response of L. lactis to several stresses has been described, the adaptation mechanisms at the level of in vivo fluxes have seldom been described. To gain insights into cellular metabolism, 13C metabolic flux analysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to measure the flux ratios of active pathways in the central metabolism of L. lactis when subjected to three conditions varying in temperature (30°C, 37°C) and agitation (with and without agitation at 150 rpm). Collectively, the concentrations of proteinogenic amino acids (PAAs) and free fatty acids (FAAs) were compared, and Pearson correlation analysis (r) was calculated to measure the pairwise relationship between PAAs. Branched chain and aromatic amino acids, threonine, serine, lysine and histidine were correlated strongly, suggesting changes in flux regulation in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, malic enzyme and anaplerotic reaction catalysed by pyruvate carboxylase (pycA). Flux ratio analysis revealed that glucose was mainly converted by glycolysis, highlighting the stability of L. lactis’ central carbon metabolism despite different conditions. Higher flux ratios through oxaloacetate (OAA) from pyruvate (PYR) reaction in all conditions suggested the activation of pyruvate carboxylate (pycA) in L. lactis, in response to acid stress during exponential phase. Subsequently, more significant flux ratio differences were seen through the oxidative and non-oxidative pentose phosphate (PP) pathways, malic enzyme, and serine and C1 metabolism, suggesting NADPH requirements in response to environmental stimuli. These reactions could play an important role in optimization strategies for metabolic engineering in L. lactis. Overall, the

  4. Flux and power distributions in BWR multi-bundle fuel arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.

    1976-02-01

    Multi-bundle calculations have been performed in order to shed some light on an abnormal TIP trace recently discovered in a BWR/3. Transport theory was employed to perform the calculations with ENDF/B-IV data. The results indicate that a strong variation of the TIP reading does exist along the narrow water gap of a BWR due to the steep gradient of the thermal neutron flux; the maxima occurring at the intersections of the water gaps and the minima in between. Using this characteristic behavior of the TIP reading, together with the observed normal TIP trace, the abnormal behavior of the affected TIP trace exhibiting three peaks along the channel was roughly simulated. The calculations confirmed that the observed TIP trace anomaly was caused by the severe bending of the affected instrument tube as was actually discovered. The effect of hot water intrusion into the TIP guide tube, as well as that of loading the new 8 x 8 reload bundles, was also evaluated

  5. Thermal neutron flux distribution in the ET R R-1 reactor core as experimentally measured and theoretically calculated by the code triton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imam, M [National center for nuclear safety and radiation control, atomic energy authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal neutron flux distributions that were measured earlier at the ET-R R-1 reactor are compared with those calculated by the three dimensional diffusion code Triton. This comparison was made for the horizontal and vertical flux distributions. The horizontal thermal flux distributions considered in this comparison were along the core diagonals at two planes of different heights from core bottom, where one at a level passing through the control rod at core center and the other at a level below this control rod. In the meantime all the control rods were taken into consideration. The effect of the existence of a water cavity inside the core as well as the influence of the control rods on the thermal flux are illustrated in this work. The vertical thermal flux distributions considered in the comparison were at two positions in core namely; one along the core height the horizontal reactor power distribution along the core height and the horizontal reactor power distribution along the core diagonal as calculated by the code Triton are also given this work. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Visualisation of flux distributions in high-temperature superconductors. Final report; Sichtbarmachung der Flussverteilung in Hochtemperatursupraleitern nach verschiedenen Mikrostrukturaenderungen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, H.; Kronmueller, H.

    1998-05-01

    Theoretical calculation models for current, magnetic and electric field distributions in thin superconductors of arbitrary shape in perpendicular magnetic field were developed. Calculations were done for inhomogeneous and anisotropic critical currents and compared with magnetooptical observations of flux penetration. Nice agreement of theory and experiment was found. Flux-line depinning and motion in superconductors with linear defects was investigated by magneto-optics. Depinning mechanisms were deduced from observations of high-temperature superconductors which are irradiated with swift heavy ions parallel and crosswisely at various angles to the surface normal. Magneto-optical investigations of flux penetration into (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10+{delta}} multifilament tapes showed a strong dependence of the current capability on the microstructure of single filaments. The different filament textures which are caused by the inhomogeneous deformation of the tape during thermomechanical treatment results in critical current densities varying by about one order of magnitude. (orig.) [Deutsch] Theoretische Modelle zur Berechnung von Strom-, Magnet- und elektrischen Feldverteilungen wurden fuer duenne Supraleiter beliebiger Geometrie mit inhomogener und anisotroper kritischer Stromdichte im senkrechten Magnetfeld entwickelt und mit magnetooptischen Beobachtungen des Flusseindringens verglichen, wobei eine hervorragende Uebereinstimmung zwischen Theorie und Experiment erzielt wurde. Mit Hilfe von magnetooptischen Untersuchungen des Flusseindringens in schwerionenbestrahlte Hochtemperatursupraleiter, die unter verschiedenen Winkeln zur Oberflaechennormalen parallel und kreuzweise bestrahlt wurden, konnten Bewegungs- und Entankerungsmechanismen von Flusslinien in Supraleitern mit linearen Defekten abgeleitet werden. Magnetooptische Untersuchungen des Flusseindringens in (Bi, Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10+{delta

  7. Neutron flux distribution measurement in the Fort St. Vrain initial core (results of Fort St. Vrain start-up test A-7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.; Brown, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a test to measure the axial flux distribution at several radial locations in the Fort St. Vrain core representing unrodded, rodded, and partially rodded regions. The measurements were intended to verify the calculational accuracy of the three-dimensional calculational model used to compute axial power distributions for the Fort St. Vrain core. (U.S.)

  8. Effects of pole flux distribution in a homopolar linear synchronous machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balchin, M. J.; Eastham, J. F.; Coles, P. C.

    1994-05-01

    Linear forms of synchronous electrical machine are at present being considered as the propulsion means in high-speed, magnetically levitated (Maglev) ground transportation systems. A homopolar form of machine is considered in which the primary member, which carries both ac and dc windings, is supported on the vehicle. Test results and theoretical predictions are presented for a design of machine intended for driving a 100 passenger vehicle at a top speed of 400 km/h. The layout of the dc magnetic circuit is examined to locate the best position for the dc winding from the point of view of minimum core weight. Measurements of flux build-up under the machine at different operating speeds are given for two types of secondary pole: solid and laminated. The solid pole results, which are confirmed theoretically, show that this form of construction is impractical for high-speed drives. Measured motoring characteristics are presented for a short length of machine which simulates conditions at the leading and trailing ends of the full-sized machine. Combination of the results with those from a cylindrical version of the machine make it possible to infer the performance of the full-sized traction machine. This gives 0.8 pf and 0.9 efficiency at 300 km/h, which is much better than the reported performance of a comparable linear induction motor (0.52 pf and 0.82 efficiency). It is therefore concluded that in any projected high-speed Maglev systems, a linear synchronous machine should be the first choice as the propulsion means.

  9. Calculation of the radial and axial flux and power distribution for a CANDU 6 reactor with both the MCNP6 and Serpent codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Bonin, H.W.; Lewis, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    The most recent versions of the Monte Carlo-based probabilistic transport code MCNP6 and the continuous energy reactor physics burnup calculation code Serpent allow for a 3-D geometry calculation accounting for the detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. These two codes are used to calculate the axial and radial flux and power distributions for a CANDU6 GENTILLY-2 nuclear reactor core with 37-element fuel bundles. The multiplication factor, actual flux distribution and power density distribution were calculated by using a tally combination for MCNP6 and detector analysis for Serpent. Excellent agreement was found in the calculated flux and power distribution. The Serpent code is most efficient in terms of the computational time. (author)

  10. Calculation of the radial and axial flux and power distribution for a CANDU 6 reactor with both the MCNP6 and Serpent codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, M.S.; Bonin, H.W., E-mail: mohamed.hussein@rmc.ca, E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada); Lewis, B.J., E-mail: Brent.Lewis@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The most recent versions of the Monte Carlo-based probabilistic transport code MCNP6 and the continuous energy reactor physics burnup calculation code Serpent allow for a 3-D geometry calculation accounting for the detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. These two codes are used to calculate the axial and radial flux and power distributions for a CANDU6 GENTILLY-2 nuclear reactor core with 37-element fuel bundles. The multiplication factor, actual flux distribution and power density distribution were calculated by using a tally combination for MCNP6 and detector analysis for Serpent. Excellent agreement was found in the calculated flux and power distribution. The Serpent code is most efficient in terms of the computational time. (author)

  11. Comparison between measured and computed magnetic flux density distribution of simulated transformer core joints assembled from grain-oriented and non-oriented electrical steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Shahrouzi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The flux distribution in an overlapped linear joint constructed in the central region of an Epstein Square was studied experimentally and results compared with those obtained using a computational magnetic field solver. High permeability grain-oriented (GO and low permeability non-oriented (NO electrical steels were compared at a nominal core flux density of 1.60 T at 50 Hz. It was found that the experimental results only agreed well at flux densities at which the reluctance of different paths of the flux are similar. Also it was revealed that the flux becomes more uniform when the working point of the electrical steel is close to the knee point of the B-H curve of the steel.

  12. The effect of cadmium shielding on the spatial neutron flux distribution inside one of the outer irradiation sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, I.

    2009-06-01

    A permanent epithermal neutron irradiation facility was designed in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) by using the cadmium (cylindrical vial 1.0 mm in thickness, 38.50 mm in diameter and 180 mm in length) as thermal neutron shielding material, for a permanent epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA). This site was designed by shielding the internal surface of the aluminum tube of the first outer irradiation site in the MNSR reactor. I was used the activation detectors 0.1143% Au-Al alloy foils with 0.1 mm thickness and 2.0 mm diameter for measurement the thermal neutron flux, epithermal and R c d=A b are/A c over ratio in the outer irradiation site. Distribution of the thermal neutron flux in the outer irradiation capsule has been found numerically using MCNP-4C code with and without cadmium shield, and experimentally by irradiating five copper wires using the outer irradiation capsule. Good agreements were obtained between the calculated and the measured results. (author)

  13. Development of low angle grain boundaries in lightly deformed superconducting niobium and their influence on hydride distribution and flux perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Z.-H.; Wang, M.; Polyanskii, A. A.; Santosh, C.; Balachandran, S.; Compton, C.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Bieler, T. R.; Lee, P. J.

    2017-05-01

    This study shows that low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) can be created by small 5% strains in high purity (residual resistivity ratio ≥ 200) superconducting radio frequency (SRF)-grade single crystalline niobium (Nb) and that these boundaries act as hydrogen traps as indicated by the distribution of niobium hydrides (Nb1-xHx). Nb1-xHx is detrimental to SRF Nb cavities due to its normal conducting properties at cavity operating temperatures. By designing a single crystal tensile sample extracted from a large grain (>5 cm) Nb ingot slice for preferred slip on one slip plane, LAGBs and dense dislocation boundaries developed. With chemical surface treatments following standard SRF cavity fabrication practice, Nb1-xHx phases were densely precipitated at the LAGBs upon cryogenic cooling (8-10 K/min). Micro-crystallographic analysis confirmed heterogeneous hydride precipitation, which included significant hydrogen atom accumulation in LAGBs. Magneto-optical imaging analysis showed that these sites can then act as sites for both premature flux penetration and eventually flux trapping. However, this hydrogen related degradation at LAGBs did not completely disappear even after an 800 °C/2 h anneal typically used for hydrogen removal in SRF Nb cavities. These findings suggest that hydride precipitation at an LAGB is facilitated by a non-equilibrium concentration of vacancy-hydrogen (H) complexes aided by mechanical deformation and the hydride phase interferes with the recovery process under 800 °C annealing.

  14. A model for the self-organization of vesicular flux and protein distributions in the Golgi apparatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iaroslav Ispolatov

    Full Text Available The generation of two non-identical membrane compartments via exchange of vesicles is considered to require two types of vesicles specified by distinct cytosolic coats that selectively recruit cargo, and two membrane-bound SNARE pairs that specify fusion and differ in their affinities for each type of vesicles. The mammalian Golgi complex is composed of 6-8 non-identical cisternae that undergo gradual maturation and replacement yet features only two SNARE pairs. We present a model that explains how distinct composition of Golgi cisternae can be generated with two and even a single SNARE pair and one vesicle coat. A decay of active SNARE concentration in aging cisternae provides the seed for a cis[Formula: see text]trans SNARE gradient that generates the predominantly retrograde vesicle flux which further enhances the gradient. This flux in turn yields the observed inhomogeneous steady-state distribution of Golgi enzymes, which compete with each other and with the SNAREs for incorporation into transport vesicles. We show analytically that the steady state SNARE concentration decays exponentially with the cisterna number. Numerical solutions of rate equations reproduce the experimentally observed SNARE gradients, overlapping enzyme peaks in cis, medial and trans and the reported change in vesicle nature across the Golgi: Vesicles originating from younger cisternae mostly contain Golgi enzymes and SNAREs enriched in these cisternae and extensively recycle through the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER, while the other subpopulation of vesicles contains Golgi proteins prevalent in older cisternae and hardly reaches the ER.

  15. In vivo metabolism of organophosphate flame retardants and distribution of their main metabolites in adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guowei; Chen, Hanyan; Du, Zhongkun; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2017-07-15

    Understanding the metabolism of chemicals as well as the distribution and depuration of their main metabolites in tissues are essential for evaluating their fate and potential toxicity in vivo. Herein, we investigated the metabolism of six typical organophosphate (OP) flame retardants (tripropyl phosphate (TPRP), tri-n-butyl phosphate (TNBP), tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and tri-p-cresyl phosphate (p-TCP)) in adult zebrafish in laboratory at three levels (0, 1/150 LC 50 (environmentally relevant level), and 1/30 LC 50 per OP analog). Twenty main metabolites were detected in the liver of OPs-exposed zebrafish using high resolution mass spectrometry (Q-TOF). The reaction pathways involving scission of the ester bond (hydrolysis), cleavage of the ether bond, oxidative hydroxylation, dechlorination, and coupling with glucuronic acid were proposed, and were further confirmed by the frontier electron density and point charge calculations. Tissue distribution of the twenty metabolites revealed that liver and intestine with the highest levels of metabolites were the most active organs for OPs biotransformation among the studied tissues of intestine, liver, roe, brain, muscle, and gill, which showed the importance of hepatobiliary system (liver-bile-intestine) in the metabolism and excretion of OPs in zebrafish. Fast depuration of metabolites from tissues indicated that the formed metabolites might be not persistent in fish, and easily released into water. This study provides comprehensive information on the metabolism of OPs in the tissue of zebrafish, which might give some hints for the exploration of their toxic mechanism in aquatic life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Computational Flux Balance Analysis Predicts that Stimulation of Energy Metabolism in Astrocytes and their Metabolic Interactions with Neurons Depend on Uptake of K(+) Rather than Glutamate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    obtained by (13)C-NMR spectroscopy in rodent brain. When simulated data matched experiments as well as biophysical calculations, the stoichiometry for voltage/ligand-gated Na(+) and K(+) fluxes generated by neuronal activity was close to a 1:1 relationship, and specifically 63/58 Na(+)/K(+) ions per...

  17. Tissue distribution and metabolism of triadimefon and triadimenol enantiomers in Chinese lizards (Eremias argus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jitong; Wang, Yinghuan; Li, Wei; Xu, Peng; Guo, Baoyuan; Li, Jianzhong; Wang, Huili

    2017-08-01

    Triadimefon (TF, S-(+)-TF, R-(-)-TF) and its metabolite triadimenol (TN, TN-A1, A2 and TN-B1, B2) are two systemic fungicides and both of them are chiral pharmaceuticals which are widely used in agricultural industry. Many researches focused on the toxicity effects of triadimefon on mammals, while the ecotoxicological data of tiradimefon on reptiles is limited. In order to understand the toxicity mechanism of triadimefon in reptiles, the current study administrated S-(+)-TF or R-(-)-TF traidimefon (50mg/kg bw ) to Chinese lizards (Eremias argus) respectively, the absorption, distribution of triadimefon and the formation of triadimenol were analysed at different sampling times. The metabolic pathways were demonstrated through relative gene expression using quantitative real-time PCR reaction. During the experiment time, triadimefon was quickly peaked to the maximum concentration within 12h in liver, brain, kidney, and plasma, eliminated slowly. The biotransformation in kidney was the lowest and fat possessed the worst degradation ability among others. The metabolite, triadimenol was detected in blood in 2h and reached to a plateau at about 12h in most organs (fat excepted), while the process of metabolism is stereoselective. The mainly metabolite in R-(-)-TF treated group was TN-B1, and TN-A2 in S-(+)-TF group which showed the selective metabolism to other species caused by environmental conditions, differences in the animal models and concentration of TF. The related gene expression of cyp1a1, cyp3a1 and hsd11β mRNA level in lizards showed different metabolic pathways in the liver and brain. Both P450s enzymes and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase participated in metabolic reaction in liver, while no 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase pathway observed in brain. This diversity in liver and brain may cause different degradation rate and ecotoxicological effect in different organs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Water track distribution and effects on carbon dioxide flux in an eastern Siberian upland tundra landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curasi, Salvatore R; Loranty, Michael M; Natali, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Shrub expansion in tundra ecosystems may act as a positive feedback to climate warming, the strength of which depends on its spatial extent. Recent studies have shown that shrub expansion is more likely to occur in areas with high soil moisture and nutrient availability, conditions typically found in sub-surface water channels known as water tracks. Water tracks are 5–15 m wide channels of subsurface water drainage in permafrost landscapes and are characterized by deeper seasonal thaw depth, warmer soil temperatures, and higher soil moisture and nutrient content relative to adjacent tundra. Consequently, enhanced vegetation productivity, and dominance by tall deciduous shrubs, are typical in water tracks. Quantifying the distribution of water tracks may inform investigations of the extent of shrub expansion and associated impacts on tundra ecosystem carbon cycling. Here, we quantify the distribution of water tracks and their contribution to growing season CO 2 dynamics for a Siberian tundra landscape using satellite observations, meteorological data, and field measurements. We find that water tracks occupy 7.4% of the 448 km 2 study area, and account for a slightly larger proportion of growing season carbon uptake relative to surrounding tundra. For areas inside water tracks dominated by shrubs, field observations revealed higher shrub biomass and higher ecosystem respiration and gross primary productivity relative to adjacent upland tundra. Conversely, a comparison of graminoid-dominated areas in water tracks and inter-track tundra revealed that water track locations dominated by graminoids had lower shrub biomass yet increased net uptake of CO 2 . Our results show water tracks are an important component of this landscape. Their distribution will influence ecosystem structural and functional responses to climate, and is therefore of importance for modeling. (letter)

  19. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lin), which signals cells to increase their anabolic activities. Metabolism is a complicated chemical process, so it's not ... how those enzymes or hormones work. When the metabolism of body chemicals is ... Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism ...

  20. Using a spatially-distributed hydrologic biogeochemistry model with nitrogen transport to study the spatial variation of carbon stocks and fluxes in a Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Eissenstat, D. M.; He, Y.; Davis, K. J.

    2017-12-01

    Most current biogeochemical models are 1-D and represent one point in space. Therefore, they cannot resolve topographically driven land surface heterogeneity (e.g., lateral water flow, soil moisture, soil temperature, solar radiation) or the spatial pattern of nutrient availability. A spatially distributed forest biogeochemical model with nitrogen transport, Flux-PIHM-BGC, has been developed by coupling a 1-D mechanistic biogeochemical model Biome-BGC (BBGC) with a spatially distributed land surface hydrologic model, Flux-PIHM, and adding an advection dominated nitrogen transport module. Flux-PIHM is a coupled physically based model, which incorporates a land-surface scheme into the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM). The land surface scheme is adapted from the Noah land surface model, and is augmented by adding a topographic solar radiation module. Flux-PIHM is able to represent the link between groundwater and the surface energy balance, as well as land surface heterogeneities caused by topography. In the coupled Flux-PIHM-BGC model, each Flux-PIHM model grid couples a 1-D BBGC model, while nitrogen is transported among model grids via surface and subsurface water flow. In each grid, Flux-PIHM provides BBGC with soil moisture, soil temperature, and solar radiation, while BBGC provides Flux-PIHM with spatially-distributed leaf area index. The coupled Flux-PIHM-BGC model has been implemented at the Susquehanna/Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory. The model-predicted aboveground vegetation carbon and soil carbon distributions generally agree with the macro patterns observed within the watershed. The importance of abiotic variables (including soil moisture, soil temperature, solar radiation, and soil mineral nitrogen) in predicting aboveground carbon distribution is calculated using a random forest. The result suggests that the spatial pattern of aboveground carbon is controlled by the distribution of soil mineral nitrogen. A Flux-PIHM-BGC simulation

  1. Distribution of carbon flux within fatty acid utilization during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellis, S.H.; Liedtke, A.J.; Renstrom, B.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-nine intact, working pig hearts were extracorporeally perfused and divided into two study groups (16 Aerobic and 13 Ischemic/Reflow hearts). Step function, equilibrium labeling with [14C]palmitate was used to develop uptake and washout curves of radioactive fatty acid products contained in coronary effluent during either aerobic perfusion or reperfusion after ischemia (60% reduction in left anterior descending coronary flow for 30 minutes). Left anterior descending control flows were slightly overperfused in Aerobic hearts (18% higher than in Ischemic/Reflow hearts); otherwise, circumflex and right coronary flows, left ventricular pressure, and serum fatty acids and blood sugar levels were comparable between groups. As expected in Ischemic/Reflow hearts, recovery of regional systolic shortening and myocardial oxygen consumption in reperfusion was only modestly impaired (-20% and -19%, respectively, not significant and p less than 0.011 compared with preischemic values, not significant from Aerobic hearts). The only significant metabolized product to be released from labeled fatty acid utilization in either group was 14CO2. A smaller fatty acid pool also was measured and accounted for by that contained in the coronary intravascular volume. The authors could determine no significant back diffusion of fatty acids from myocardium in either perfusion condition. Uptake time constants of the early phase of 14CO2 production also were virtually identical in both groups (19.9 ± 3.2 versus 16.7 ± 3.2 minutes in Aerobic and Ischemic/Reflow hearts, respectively) and strongly correlated with hemodynamics as described by heart rate. In washout studies, tissue radioactivity in the aqueous soluble and fatty acid pools declined in both study groups, and counts in complex lipids and cholesterol/cholesteryl esters remained steady, whereas those in triacylglycerols varied

  2. The effect of temperature and the control rod position on the spatial neutron flux distribution in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Omar, H.; Ghazi, N.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of water and fuel temperature increase and changes in the control rod positions on the spatial neutron flux distribution in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) is discussed. The cross sections of all the reactor components at different temperatures are generated using the WIMSD4 code. These group constants are used then in the CITATION code to calculate the special neutron flux distribution using four energy groups. This work shows that water and fuel temperature increase in the reactor during the reactor daily operating time does not affect the spatial neutron flux distribution in the reactor. Changing the control rod position does not affect as well the spatial neutron flux distribution except in the region around the control rod position. This stability in the spatial neutron flux distribution, especially in the inner and outer irradiation sites, makes MNSR as a good tool for the neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique and production of radioisotopes with medium or short half lives during the reactor daily operating time. (author)

  3. Flux and distribution of methane (CH4) in the Gunsan Basin of the southeastern Yellow Sea, off the Western Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Woo, Han Jun; Son, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Moonkoo; Lee, Dong-Hun; Tsunogai, Urumu; Jeong, Kap-Sik

    2018-04-16

    The flux and distribution of methane (CH 4 ) was investigated in the seawater column at 14 stations in the Gunsan Basin, the southeastern part of Yellow Sea from 2013 to 2015. Here CH 4 is concentrated 2.4-4.7 (3.4 ± 0.7) nM in the surface and 2.5-7.4 (5.2 ± 1.7) nM in the bottom layer. The CH 4 saturation ratios ranged from 65.5% to 295.5% (162.6 ± 68.7), comprising the mean sea-to-air CH 4 flux of 3.8 to 25.3 (15.6 ± 5.5) µM m -2 d -1 . Methane concentration was largely different in the upper and the lower seawater layers that is separated by the thermocline of which depth is variable (20-60 m) depending on the time of sampling. The concentration of seawater dissolved CH 4 is high between the bottom surface of the thermocline layer and the sea floor. Generally it tends to decrease from the south-westernmost part of the basin toward the west coast of Korea. This distribution pattern of CH 4 seems to result from the CH 4 supply by decomposition of organic matters produced in the upper seawater layer that is superimposed by the larger supply from the underlying sediment layer especially beneath the thermocline. The latter is manifested by ubiquitous CH 4 seeps from the seafloor sediments.

  4. Regulation of amino-acid metabolism controls flux to lipid accumulation in Yarrowia lipolytica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Pomraning, Kyle R.; Baker, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica is a promising microbial cell factory for the production of lipids to be used as fuels and chemicals, but there are few studies on regulation of its metabolism. Here we performed the first integrated data analysis of Y. lipolytica grown in carbon and nitrogen limited chemostat...... is similar to the overflow metabolism observed in many other microorganisms, e.g. ethanol production by Sacchromyces cerevisiae at nitrogen limitation....

  5. Estrogenic activity of flavonoids in mice. The importance of estrogen receptor distribution, metabolism and bioavailability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke; Hossaini, A.; Svendsen, Gitte W.

    2000-01-01

    The in vivo estrogenic potential of the flavonoids apigenin, kaempferol, genistein and equol was investigated in immature female mice. Genistein and equol, administered by gavage for 4 consecutive days [post-natal day (PND) 17-20, 100 mg/kg body weight], was found to significantly increase uterine...... or lower potency. Bioavailability, metabolism, the ability to alter ER alpha distribution in the uterus and the estrogenic potential of parent compound and metabolites may thus contribute to the differences in in vivo estrogenicity of dietary flavonoids....

  6. Nitrate addition to groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuel accelerates ethanol removal and mitigates the associated metabolic flux dilution and inhibition of BTEX biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corseuil, Henry Xavier; Gomez, Diego E.; Schambeck, Cássio Moraes; Ramos, Débora Toledo; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.

    2015-03-01

    A comparison of two controlled ethanol-blended fuel releases under monitored natural attenuation (MNA) versus nitrate biostimulation (NB) illustrates the potential benefits of augmenting the electron acceptor pool with nitrate to accelerate ethanol removal and thus mitigate its inhibitory effects on BTEX biodegradation. Groundwater concentrations of ethanol and BTEX were measured 2 m downgradient of the source zones. In both field experiments, initial source-zone BTEX concentrations represented less than 5% of the dissolved total organic carbon (TOC) associated with the release, and measurable BTEX degradation occurred only after the ethanol fraction in the multicomponent substrate mixture decreased sharply. However, ethanol removal was faster in the nitrate amended plot (1.4 years) than under natural attenuation conditions (3.0 years), which led to faster BTEX degradation. This reflects, in part, that an abundant substrate (ethanol) can dilute the metabolic flux of target pollutants (BTEX) whose biodegradation rate eventually increases with its relative abundance after ethanol is preferentially consumed. The fate and transport of ethanol and benzene were accurately simulated in both releases using RT3D with our general substrate interaction module (GSIM) that considers metabolic flux dilution. Since source zone benzene concentrations are relatively low compared to those of ethanol (or its degradation byproduct, acetate), our simulations imply that the initial focus of cleanup efforts (after free-product recovery) should be to stimulate the degradation of ethanol (e.g., by nitrate addition) to decrease its fraction in the mixture and speed up BTEX biodegradation.

  7. Distribution of flux-pinning energies in YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+delta) from flux noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, M. J.; Johnson, Mark; Wellstood, Frederick C.; Clarke, John; Mitzi, D.

    1990-01-01

    The spectral density of the magnetic flux noise measured in high-temperature superconductors in low magnetic fields scales approximately as the inverse of the frequency and increases with temperature. The temperature and frequency dependence of the noise are used to determine the pinning energies of individual flux vortices in thermal equilibrium. The distribution of pinning energies below 0.1 eV in YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) and near 0.2 eV in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta). The noise power is proportional to the ambient magnetic field, indicating that the vortex motion is uncorrelated.

  8. Distribution of flux-pinning energies in YBa2Cu3O7-δ and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ from flux noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, M.J.; Johnson, M.; Wellstood, F.C.; Clarke, J.; Mitzi, D.; Rosenthal, P.A.; Eom, C.B.; Geballe, T.H.; Kapitulnik, A.; Beasley, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The spectral density of the magnetic flux noise measured in high-temperature superconductors in low magnetic fields scales approximately as the inverse of the frequency and increases with temperature. We use the temperature and frequency dependence of the noise to determine the pinning energies of individual flux vortices in thermal equilibrium. The distribution of pinning energies peaks below 0.1 eV in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ and near 0.2 eV in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ . The noise power is proportional to the ambient magnetic field, indicating that the vortex motion is uncorrelated

  9. Distribution Patterns of Polyphosphate Metabolism Pathway and Its Relationships With Bacterial Durability and Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP is a linear polymer of orthophosphate residues. It is reported to be present in all life forms. Experimental studies showed that polyP plays important roles in bacterial durability and virulence. Here we investigated the relationships of polyP with bacterial durability and virulence theoretically. Bacterial lifestyle, environmental persistence, virulence factors (VFs, and species evolution are all included in the analysis. The presence of seven genes involved in polyP metabolism (ppk1, ppk2, pap, surE, gppA, ppnK, and ppgK and 2595 core VFs were verified in 944 bacterial reference proteomes for distribution patterns via HMMER. Proteome size and VFs were compared in terms of gain and loss of polyP pathway. Literature mining and phylogenetic analysis were recruited to support the study. Our analyzes revealed that the presence of polyP metabolism is positively correlated with bacterial proteome size and the number of virulence genes. A potential relationship of polyP in bacterial lifestyle and environmental durability is suggested. Evolutionary analysis shows that polyP genes are randomly lost along the phylogenetic tree. In sum, based on our theoretical analysis, we confirmed that bacteria with polyP metabolism are associated with high environmental durability and more VFs.

  10. Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of 3-MCPD 1-Monopalmitate after Oral Administration in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Boyan; Liu, Man; Huang, Guoren; Zhang, Zhongfei; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Thomas T Y; Zhang, Yaqiong; Liu, Jie; Yu, Liangli

    2017-03-29

    Fatty acid esters of monochloropropane 1,2-diol (3-MCPD) are processing-induced toxicants and have been detected in several food categories. This study investigated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of 3-MCPD esters in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats using 3-MCPD 1-monopalmitate as the probe compound. The kinetics of 3-MCPD 1-monopalmitate in plasma was investigated using SD rats, and the results indicated that 3-MCPD 1-monopalmitate was absorbed directly in vivo and metabolized. Its primary metabolites in the liver, kidney, testis, brain, plasma, and urine were tentatively identified and measured at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after oral administration. Structures were proposed for eight metabolites. 3-MCPD 1-monopalmitate was converted to free 3-MCPD, which formed the phase II metabolites. All of the metabolites were chlorine-related chemical components; most of them existed in urine, reflecting the excretion pattern of 3-MCPD esters. Understanding the metabolism of 3-MCPD esters in vivo is critical for assessing their toxicities.

  11. The use of thallium diethyldithiocarbamate for mapping CNS potassium metabolism and neuronal activity: Tl+ -redistribution, Tl+ -kinetics and Tl+ -equilibrium distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanger, Tim; Scheich, Henning; Ohl, Frank W; Goldschmidt, Jürgen

    2012-07-01

    The potassium (K(+)) analogue thallium (Tl(+)) can be used as a tracer for mapping neuronal activity. However, because of the poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) K(+) -permeability, only minute amounts of Tl(+) enter the brain after systemic injection of Tl(+) -salts like thallium acetate (TlAc). We have recently shown that it is possible to overcome this limitation by injecting animals with the lipophilic chelate complex thallium diethyldithiocarbamate (TlDDC), that crosses the BBB and releases Tl(+) prior to neuronal or glial uptake. TlDDC can thus be used for mapping CNS K(+) metabolism and neuronal activity. Here, we analyze Tl(+) -kinetics in the rodent brain both experimentally and using simple mathematical models. We systemically injected animals either with TlAc or with TlDDC. Using an autometallographic method we mapped the brain Tl(+) -distribution at various time points after injection. We show that the patterns and kinetics of Tl(+) -redistribution in the brain are essentially the same irrespective of whether animals have been injected with TlAc or TlDDC. Data from modeling and experiments indicate that transmembrane Tl(+) -fluxes in cells within the CNS in vivo equilibrate at similar rates as K(+) -fluxes in vitro. This equilibration is much faster than and largely independent of the equilibration of Tl(+) -fluxes across the BBB. The study provides further proof-of-concept for the use of TlDDC for mapping neuronal activity and CNS K(+) -metabolism. A theoretical guideline is given for the use of K(+) -analogues for imaging neuronal activity with general implications for the use of metal ions in neuroimaging. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Anthropogenic radionuclide fluxes and distribution in bottom sediments of the cooling basin of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marčiulionienė, D.; Mažeika, J.; Lukšienė, B.; Jefanova, O.; Mikalauskienė, R.; Paškauskas, R.

    2015-01-01

    anthropogenic factors resulting in mixing, resuspension and remobilization of sediments and radionuclides. The associated with particles 137 Cs flux was 129 Bq/(m 2  year). The 137 Cs transfer rate from water into bottom sediments was 14.3 year −1 (or, the removal time was 25 days). The K d value for 137 Cs in situ estimated from trap material was 80 m 3 /kg. The associated with particles 60 Co flux was 21 Bq/(m 2  year), when 60 Co activity concentration in sediment trap particles was 15.7 ± 5 Bq/kg. 60 Co activity concentration in soluble form was less than the minimum detectable activity (MDA = 1.3 Bq/m 3 ). Then, the conservatively derived K d value for 60 Co was >90 m 3 /kg. - Highlights: • Radionuclides activity concentrations in bottom sediments were studied during the entire operational period of the INPP. • Activation products ( 60 Co and 54 Mn) were already observed in the impact zones of effluent channels in 1988. • 137 Cs was distributed quite evenly in the bottom sediments at the investigated monitoring stations. • The highest activity concentrations of 137 Cs in 1988–1989 may have been the result of inputs from the Chernobyl accident. • The vertical distribution of radionuclides in bottom sediments revealed complicated sedimentation features

  13. An overview of techniques for the measurement of calcium distribution, calcium fluxes, and cytosolic free calcium in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borle, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    An array of techniques can be used to study cell calcium metabolism that comprises several calcium compartments and many types of transport systems such as ion channels, ATP-dependent pumps, and antiporters. The measurement of total call calcium brings little information of value since 60 to 80% of total cell calcium is actually bound to the extracellular glycocalyx. Cell fractionation and differential centrifugation have been used to study intracellular Ca 2+ compartmentalization, but the methods suffer from the possibility of Ca 2+ loss or redistribution among cell fractions. Steady-state kinetic analyses of 45 Ca uptake or desaturation curves have been used to study the distribution of Ca 2+ among various kinetic pools in living cells and their rate of Ca 2+ exchange, but the analyses are constrained by many limitations. Nonsteady-state tracer studies can provide information about rapid changes in calcium influx or efflux in and out of the cell. Zero-time kinetics of 45 Ca uptake can detect instantaneous changes in calcium influx, while 45 Ca fractional efflux ratio, can detect rapid stimulations or inhibitions of calcium efflux out of cells. The best strategy to study cell calcium metabolism is to use several different methods that focus on a specific problem from widely different angles

  14. PM2.5-bound metal metabolic distribution and coupled lipid abnormality at different developmental windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Tingting; Zhang, Yingying; Ji, Xiaotong; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2017-09-01

    Atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) is a serious threat to human health. As a toxicant constituent, metal leads to significant health risks in a population, but exposure to PM 2.5 -bound metals and their biological impacts are not fully understood. In this study, we determined the metal contents of PM 2.5 samples collected from a typical coal-burning city and then investigated the metabolic distributions of six metals (Zn, Pb, Mn, As, Cu, and Cd) following PM 2.5 inhalation in mice in different developmental windows. The results indicate that fine particles were mainly deposited in the lung, but PM 2.5 -bound metals could reach and gather in secondary off-target tissues (the lung, liver, heart and brain) with a developmental window-dependent property. Furthermore, elevations in triglycerides and cholesterol levels in sensitive developmental windows (the young and elderly stages) occurred, and significant associations between metals (Pb, Mn, As and Cd) and cholesterol in the heart, brain, liver and lung were observed. These findings suggest that PM 2.5 inhalation caused selective metal metabolic distribution in tissues with a developmental window-dependent property and that the effects were associated with lipid alterations. This provides a foundation for the underlying systemic toxicity following PM 2.5 exposure based on metal components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermal neutron diffusion parameters dependent on the flux energy distribution in finite hydrogenous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdowicz, K.

    1999-01-01

    Macroscopic parameters for a description of the thermal neutron transport in finite volumes are considered. A very good correspondence between the theoretical and experimental parameters of hydrogenous media is attained. Thermal neutrons in the medium possess an energy distribution, which is dependent on the size (characterized by the geometric buckling) and on the neutron transport properties of the medium. In a hydrogenous material the thermal neutron transport is dominated by the scattering cross section which is strongly dependent on energy. A monoenergetic treatment of the thermal neutron group (admissible for other materials) leads in this case to a discrepancy between theoretical and experimental results. In the present paper the theoretical definitions of the pulsed thermal neutron parameters (the absorption rate, the diffusion coefficient, and the diffusion cooling coefficient) are based on Nelkin's analysis of the decay of a neutron pulse. Problems of the experimental determination of these parameters for a hydrogenous medium are discussed. A theoretical calculation of the pulsed parameters requires knowledge of the scattering kernel. For thermal neutrons it is individual for each hydrogenous material because neutron scattering on hydrogen nuclei bound in a molecule is affected by the molecular dynamics (characterized with internal energy modes which are comparable to the incident neutron energy). Granada's synthetic model for slow-neutron scattering is used. The complete up-dated formalism of calculation of the energy transfer scattering kernel after this model is presented in the paper. An influence of some minor variants within the model on the calculated differential and integral neutron parameters is shown. The theoretical energy-dependent scattering cross section (of Plexiglas) is compared to experimental results. A particular attention is paid to the calculation of the diffusion cooling coefficient. A solution of an equation, which determines the

  16. Squeezing Flux Out of Fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Merging transcriptomics or metabolomics data remains insufficient for metabolic flux estimation. Ramirez et al. integrate a genome-scale metabolic model with extracellular flux data to predict and validate metabolic differences between white and brown adipose tissue. This method allows both metab...

  17. Zooplankton biomass and metabolism through image analysis systems: from the development and testing of metabolic equations to the assessment of carbon fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Garijo, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Programa de Doctorado en Oceanografía Zooplankton plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. Due to their central position in the ocean’s food web, they recycle and redistribute energy and matter, not only at different levels of the trophic web, but also horizontally and vertically in the water column. Understanding the role of zooplankton in the biological pump and the ocean carbon cycle requires accurate estimates of community biomass and metabolism at large spati...

  18. Changes of in vivo fluxes through central metabolic pathways during the production of nystatin by Streptomyces noursei in batch culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsbu, E.; Christensen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The central carbon metabolism of the nystatin-producing strain Streptomyces noursei ATCC 11455 was evaluated by C-13-labelling experiments. A batch fermentation was examined during the idiophase by GC-MS measurements of the labelling patterns of amino acids in the biomass. The labelling patterns...

  19. Physiological response to extreme fasting in subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) pups: metabolic rates, energy reserve utilization, and water fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Delphine; Groscolas, René; Guinet, Christophe; Arnould, John P Y

    2009-11-01

    Surviving prolonged fasting requires various metabolic adaptations, such as energy and protein sparing, notably when animals are simultaneously engaged in energy-demanding processes such as growth. Due to the intermittent pattern of maternal attendance, subantarctic fur seal pups have to repeatedly endure exceptionally long fasting episodes throughout the 10-mo rearing period while preparing for nutritional independence. Their metabolic responses to natural prolonged fasting (33.4 +/- 3.3 days) were investigated at 7 mo of age. Within 4-6 fasting days, pups shifted into a stage of metabolic economy characterized by a minimal rate of body mass loss (0.7%/day) and decreased resting metabolic rate (5.9 +/- 0.1 ml O(2)xkg(-1)xday(-1)) that was only 10% above the level predicted for adult terrestrial mammals. Field metabolic rate (289 +/- 10 kJxkg(-1)xday(-1)) and water influx (7.9 +/- 0.9 mlxkg(-1)xday(-1)) were also among the lowest reported for any young otariid, suggesting minimized energy allocation to behavioral activity and thermoregulation. Furthermore, lean tissue degradation was dramatically reduced. High initial adiposity (>48%) and predominant reliance on lipid catabolism likely contributed to the exceptional degree of protein sparing attained. Blood chemistry supported these findings and suggested utilization of alternative fuels, such as beta-hydroxybutyrate and de novo synthesized glucose from fat-released glycerol. Regardless of sex and body condition, pups tended to adopt a convergent strategy of extreme energy and lean body mass conservation that appears highly adaptive for it allows some tissue growth during the repeated episodes of prolonged fasting they experience throughout their development.

  20. SMALL-SCALE AND GLOBAL DYNAMOS AND THE AREA AND FLUX DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACTIVE REGIONS, SUNSPOT GROUPS, AND SUNSPOTS: A MULTI-DATABASE STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Windmueller, John C.; Amouzou, Ernest C.; Longcope, Dana W. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Senkpeil, Ryan R. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Tlatov, Andrey G. [Kislovodsk Mountain Astronomical Station of the Pulkovo Observatory, Kislovodsk 357700 (Russian Federation); Nagovitsyn, Yury A. [Pulkovo Astronomical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation); Pevtsov, Alexei A. [National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Chapman, Gary A.; Cookson, Angela M. [San Fernando Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Yeates, Anthony R. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Watson, Fraser T. [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Balmaceda, Laura A. [Institute for Astronomical, Terrestrial and Space Sciences (ICATE-CONICET), San Juan (Argentina); DeLuca, Edward E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Martens, Petrus C. H., E-mail: munoz@solar.physics.montana.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    In this work, we take advantage of 11 different sunspot group, sunspot, and active region databases to characterize the area and flux distributions of photospheric magnetic structures. We find that, when taken separately, different databases are better fitted by different distributions (as has been reported previously in the literature). However, we find that all our databases can be reconciled by the simple application of a proportionality constant, and that, in reality, different databases are sampling different parts of a composite distribution. This composite distribution is made up by linear combination of Weibull and log-normal distributions—where a pure Weibull (log-normal) characterizes the distribution of structures with fluxes below (above) 10{sup 21}Mx (10{sup 22}Mx). Additionally, we demonstrate that the Weibull distribution shows the expected linear behavior of a power-law distribution (when extended to smaller fluxes), making our results compatible with the results of Parnell et al. We propose that this is evidence of two separate mechanisms giving rise to visible structures on the photosphere: one directly connected to the global component of the dynamo (and the generation of bipolar active regions), and the other with the small-scale component of the dynamo (and the fragmentation of magnetic structures due to their interaction with turbulent convection)

  1. Apparatus for the measurement of the distribution of neutron flux (band and wire continuous recorders); Appareillage pour la mesure des repartitions de flux neutroniques (derouleurs a bandes et a fils)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, H; Lemerle, Y [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The apparatus of which we describe the principles and the operation, makes it possible to know the thermal neutron flux distribution in a pile channel or along a fuel element by the measurement of the {beta} activity of continuous detectors. It is also possible thereby to show the presence of a very localised sudden discontinuity in the distribution curve. (authors) [French] Les appareils dont nous decrivons le principe et le fonctionnement, permettent de connaitre la repartition du flux de neutrons thermiques dans un canal de pile ou le long d'un element combustible, par la mesure de l'activite {beta} de detecteurs continus. Ils permettent en outre de mettre en evidence un accident brutal, tres localise, de la courbe de repartition. (auteurs)

  2. Thirteen years of Aeolian dust dynamics in a desert region (Negev desert, Israel): analysis of horizontal and vertical dust flux, vertical dust distribution and dust grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2004-01-01

    At Sede Boqer (northern Negev desert, Israel), aeolian dust dynamics have been measured during the period 1988–2000. This study focuses on temporal records of the vertical and horizontal dust flux, the vertical distribution of the dust particles in the atmosphere, and the grain size of the

  3. Predictions of ion energy distributions and radical fluxes in radio frequency biased inductively coupled plasma etching reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Robert J.; Kushner, Mark J.

    1996-03-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactors are being developed for low gas pressure (radio frequency (rf) bias is applied to the substrate. One of the goals of these systems is to independently control the magnitude of the ion flux by the inductively coupled power deposition, and the acceleration of ions into the substrate by the rf bias. In high plasma density reactors the width of the sheath above the wafer may be sufficiently thin that ions are able to traverse it in approximately 1 rf cycle, even at 13.56 MHz. As a consequence, the ion energy distribution (IED) may have a shape typically associated with lower frequency operation in conventional reactive ion etching tools. In this paper, we present results from a computer model for the IED incident on the wafer in ICP etching reactors. We find that in the parameter space of interest, the shape of the IED depends both on the amplitude of the rf bias and on the ICP power. The former quantity determines the average energy of the IED. The latter quantity controls the width of the sheath, the transit time of ions across the sheath and hence the width of the IED. In general, high ICP powers (thinner sheaths) produce wider IEDs.

  4. Atmospheric Inversion of the Global Surface Carbon Flux with Consideration of the Spatial Distributions of US Crop Production and Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Jonathan Winston

    Carbon dioxide is taken up by crops during production and released back to the atmosphere at different geographical locations through respiration of consumed crop commodities. In this study, spatially distributed county-level US cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, changes in soil carbon, and human and livestock consumption data were integrated into the prior terrestrial biosphere flux generated by the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS). A global time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversion with a nested focus on North America was carried out based on CO2 observations at 210 stations. Overall, the inverted annual North American CO2 sink weakened by 6.5% over the period from 2002 to 2007 compared to simulations disregarding US crop statistical data. The US Midwest is found to be the major sink of 0.36±0.13 PgC yr-1 whereas the large sink in the US Southeast forests weakened to 0.16±0.12 PgC yr-1 partly due to local CO2 sources from crop consumption.

  5. Association of erythrocyte deformability with red blood cell distribution width in metabolic diseases and thalassemia trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayá, Amparo; Alis, Rafael; Suescún, Marta; Rivera, Leonor; Murado, Julian; Romagnoli, Marco; Solá, Eva; Hernandez-Mijares, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Increased red blood distribution width (RDW) in anemia is related to disturbances in the cellular surface/volume ratio, usually accompanied by morphological alterations, while it has been shown in inflammatory diseases that the activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines disturbing erythropoiesis increases RDW. Recently it has been reported that higher RDW is related with decreased erythrocyte deformability, and that it could be related with the association of RDW and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. In order to analyze the influence of morphological alterations and proinflammatory status on the relationship between RDW and erythrocyte deformability, we analyzed erythrocyte deformability along with RDW and other hematological and biochemical parameters in 36 α-thalassemia, 20 β-thalassemia, 20 δβ-thalassemia trait carriers, 61 metabolic syndrome patients and 76 morbidly obese patients. RDW correlated inversely with erythrocyte deformability in minor β-thalassemia (r =-0.530, p thalassemia is often accompanied by more marked cell-shaped perturbations than other thalassemia traits. This could be the reason for this negative association only in this setting. Higher anisocytosis seems to be associated with greater morphologic alterations (shape/volume), which reduce erythrocyte deformability. The proinflammatory profile in metabolic patients can be related to the positive association of RDW with erythrocyte deformability found in these patients. However, further research is needed to explain the mechanisms underlying this association.

  6. MTBE inhaled alone and in combination with gasoline vapor: uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, J M; Barr, E B; Krone, J R

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of these studies was to extend previous evaluation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)* tissue distribution, metabolism, and excretion in rats to include concentrations more relevant to human exposure (4 and 40 ppm) and to determine the effects of coinhalation of the volatile fraction of unleaded gasoline on the tissue distribution, metabolism, and excretion of MTBE. Groups of male F344 rats were exposed nose-only for 4 hours to 4, 40, or 400 ppm 14C-MTBE or to 20 or 200 ppm of the light fraction of unleaded gasoline (LFG) containing 4 or 40 ppm 14C-MTBE, respectively. To evaluate the effects of repeated inhalation of LFG on MTBE tissue distribution, metabolism, and excretion, rats were exposed for 4 hours on each of 7 consecutive days to 20 or 200 ppm LFG with MTBE (4 or 40 ppm) followed on the eighth day by a similar exposure to LFG containing 14C-MTBE. Subgroups of rats were evaluated for respiratory parameters, initial body burdens, rates and routes of excretion, and tissue distribution and elimination. The concentrations of MTBE and its chief metabolite, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), were measured in blood and kidney immediately after exposure, and the major urinary metabolites-2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (IBA) and 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol (2MePD)-were measured in urine. Inhalation of MTBE alone or as a component of LFG had no concentration-dependent effect on respiratory minute volume. The initial body burdens of MTBE equivalents achieved after 4 hours of exposure to MTBE did not increase linearly with exposure concentration. MTBE equivalents rapidly distributed to all tissues examined, with the largest percentages distributed to liver. The observed initial body burden did not increase linearly between 4 and 400 ppm. At 400 ppm, elimination half-times of MTBE equivalents from liver increased and from lung, kidney, and testes decreased compared with the two smaller doses. Furthermore, at 400 ppm the elimination half-time for volatile organic compounds (VOCs

  7. Neutron flux distribution inside the cylindrical core of minor excess of reactivity in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor and comparison with citation code and MCNP- 5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aredes, Vitor Ottoni; Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C.; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to determine the distribution of thermal neutron flux in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor core assembled with cylindrical core configuration of minor excess of reactivity with 568 fuel rods (28 fuel rods in diameter). The thermal neutron flux at the positions of irradiation derive from the method of reaction rate using gold foils. The experiment consists in inserting gold activations foils with and without cadmium coverage (cadmium boxes with 0.0502 cm thickness) in several positions throughout the active core. After irradiation, activity induced by nuclear reaction rates over gold foils is assessed by gamma ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Experimental results are compared to those derived from calculations performed using a three dimensional CITATION diffusion code and MCNP-5 code and a proper nuclear data library. While calculated neutron flux data shows good agreement with experimental values in regions with little disturbance in the neutron flux, also showing that in the region of the reflectors of neutrons and near the control rods, the diffusion theory is not very precise. The average value of thermal neutron flux obtained experimentally compared to the calculated value by CITATION code and MCNP-5 code respectively show a difference of 1.18% and 0.84% at a nuclear power level of 74.65 ± 3.28 % watts. The average measured value of thermal neutron flux is 4.10 10{sup 8} ± 5.25% n/cm{sup 2}s. (author)

  8. Neutron flux distribution inside the cylindrical core of minor excess of reactivity in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor and comparison with citation code and MCNP- 5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aredes, Vitor Ottoni; Bitelli, Ulysses d'Utra; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C.; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the distribution of thermal neutron flux in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor core assembled with cylindrical core configuration of minor excess of reactivity with 568 fuel rods (28 fuel rods in diameter). The thermal neutron flux at the positions of irradiation derive from the method of reaction rate using gold foils. The experiment consists in inserting gold activations foils with and without cadmium coverage (cadmium boxes with 0.0502 cm thickness) in several positions throughout the active core. After irradiation, activity induced by nuclear reaction rates over gold foils is assessed by gamma ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Experimental results are compared to those derived from calculations performed using a three dimensional CITATION diffusion code and MCNP-5 code and a proper nuclear data library. While calculated neutron flux data shows good agreement with experimental values in regions with little disturbance in the neutron flux, also showing that in the region of the reflectors of neutrons and near the control rods, the diffusion theory is not very precise. The average value of thermal neutron flux obtained experimentally compared to the calculated value by CITATION code and MCNP-5 code respectively show a difference of 1.18% and 0.84% at a nuclear power level of 74.65 ± 3.28 % watts. The average measured value of thermal neutron flux is 4.10 10 8 ± 5.25% n/cm 2 s. (author)

  9. GreenLITE™: a novel approach for quantification of atmospheric methane concentrations, 2-D spatial distribution, and flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, J. T.; Blume, N.; Pernini, T.; Zaccheo, T. S.; Braun, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Greenhouse Gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE™) was originally developed by Harris and Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) under a cooperative agreement with the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the Department of Energy. The system, initially conceived in 2013, used a pair of high-precision intensity modulated continuous wave (IMCW) transceivers and a series of retroreflectors to generate overlapping atmospheric density measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) for continuous monitoring of ground carbon storage sites. The overlapping measurements provide an estimate of the two-dimensional (2-D) spatial distribution of the gas within the area of interest using sparsely sampled tomography methods. GreenLITE™ is a full end-to-end system that utilizes standard 4G connectivity and an all cloud-based data storage, processing, and dissemination suite to provide autonomous, near-real-time data via a web-based user interface. The system has been demonstrated for measuring and mapping CO2 over areas from approximately 0.04 km2 to 25 km2 ( 200 m X 200 m, up to 5 km X 5 km), including a year-long demonstration over the city of Paris, France. In late 2016, the GreenLITE™ system was converted by Harris and AER to provide similar measurement capabilities for methane (CH4). Recent experiments have shown that GreenLITE™ CH4 retrieved concentrations agree with a Picarro cavity ring-down spectrometer, calibrated with World Meteorological Organization traceable gas, to within approximately 0.5% of background or 10-15 parts per billion. The system has been tested with several controlled releases over the past year, including a weeklong experiment at an industrial oil and gas facility. Recent experiments have been exploring the use of a box model-based approach for estimating flux, and the initial results are very promising. We will present a description of the instrument, share some recent methane experimental results, and describe the flux

  10. Metabolic flux analysis of the phenylpropanoid pathway in wound-healing potato tuber tissue using stable isotope-labeled tracer and LC-MS spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Fumio; Morino, Keiko; Miyashita, Masahiro; Miyagawa, Hisashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Department of Agriculture

    2003-05-01

    The metabolic flux of two phenylpropanoid metabolites, N-p-coumaroyloctopamine (p-CO) and chlorogenic acid (CGA), in the wound-healing potato tuber tissue was quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed method based upon the tracer experiment using stable isotope-labeled compounds and LC-MS. Tuber disks were treated with aqueous solution of L-phenyl-d{sub 5}-alanine, and the change in the ratio of stable isotope-labeled compound to non-labeled (isotope abundance) was monitored for p-CO and CGA in the tissue extract by LC-MS. The time-dependent change in the isotope abundance of each metabolite was fitted to an equation that was derived from the formation and conversion kinetics of each compound. Good correlations were obtained between the observed and calculated isotope abundances for both p-CO and CGA. The rates of p-CO formation and conversion (i.e. fluxes) were 1.15 and 0.96 nmol (g FW){sup -1}h{sup -1}, respectively, and for CGA, the rates 4.63 and 0.42 nmol (g FW){sup -1}h{sup -1}, respectively. This analysis enabled a direct comparison of the biosynthetic activity between these two compounds. (author)

  11. Flux response of glycolysis and storage metabolism during rapid feast/famine conditions in Penicillium chrysogenum using dynamic (13)C labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Lodewijk; Buijs, Nicolaas A A; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M; Abate, Alessandro; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2014-03-01

    The scale-up of fermentation processes frequently leads to a reduced productivity compared to small-scale screening experiments. Large-scale mixing limitations that lead to gradients in substrate and oxygen availability could influence the microorganism performance. Here, the impact of substrate gradients on a penicillin G producing Penicillium chrysogenum cultivation was analyzed using an intermittent glucose feeding regime. The intermittent feeding led to fluctuations in the extracellular glucose concentration between 400 μM down to 6.5 μM at the end of the cycle. The intracellular metabolite concentrations responded strongly and showed up to 100-fold changes. The intracellular flux changes were estimated on the basis of dynamic (13) C mass isotopomer measurements during three cycles of feast and famine using a novel hybrid modeling approach. The flux estimations indicated a high turnover of internal and external storage metabolites in P. chrysogenum under feast/famine conditions. The synthesis and degradation of storage requires cellular energy (ATP and UTP) in competition with other cellular functions including product formation. Especially, 38% of the incoming glucose was recycled once in storage metabolism. This result indicated that storage turnover is increased under dynamic cultivation conditions and contributes to the observed decrease in productivity compared to reference steady-state conditions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Flight muscle enzymes and metabolic flux rates during hovering flight of the nectar bat, Glossophaga soricina: further evidence of convergence with hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, R K; Welch, K C; Hanna, S K; Herrera M, L G

    2009-06-01

    Given their high metabolic rates, nectarivorous diet, and ability to directly fuel their energetically-expensive flight using recently-ingested sugar, we tested the hypothesis that Pallas long tongued nectar bats (Glossophaga soricina) possess flight muscles similar to those of hummingbirds with respect to enzymatic flux capacities in bioenergetic pathways. In addition, we compared these biochemical capacities with flux rates achieved in vivo during hovering flight. Rates of oxygen consumption (V(O(2))) were measured during hover-feeding and used to estimate rates of ATP turnover, glucose and long-chain fatty acid oxidation per unit mass of flight muscle. Enzyme V(max) values at key steps in glucose and fatty acid oxidation obtained in vitro from pectoralis muscle samples exceed those found in the locomotory muscles of other species of small mammals and resemble data obtained from hummingbird flight muscles. The ability of nectar bats and hummingbirds to hover in fed and fasted states, fueled almost exclusively by carbohydrate or fat, respectively, allowed the estimation of fractional velocities (v/V(max)) at both the hexokinase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-2 steps in glucose and fatty acid oxidation, respectively. The results further support the hypothesis of convergent evolution in biochemical and physiological traits in nectar bats and hummingbirds.

  13. Whole-system metabolism and CO2 fluxes in a Mediterranean Bay dominated by seagrass beds (Palma Bay, NW Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gazeau

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic and benthic incubations (bare and Posidonia oceanica vegetated sediments were performed at monthly intervals from March 2001 to October 2002 in a seagrass vegetated area of the Bay of Palma (Mallorca, Spain. Results showed a contrast between the planktonic compartment, which was on average near metabolic balance (−4.6±5.9 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 and the benthic compartment, which was autotrophic (17.6±8.5 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. During two cruises in March and June 2002, planktonic and benthic incubations were performed at several stations in the bay to estimate the whole-system metabolism and to examine its relationship with partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 and apparent oxygen utilisation (AOU spatial patterns. Moreover, during the second cruise, when the residence time of water was long enough, net ecosystem production (NEP estimates based on incubations were compared, over the Posidonia oceanica meadow, to rates derived from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and oxygen (O2 mass balance budgets. These budgets provided NEP estimates in fair agreement with those derived from direct metabolic estimates based on incubated samples over the Posidonia oceanica meadow. Whereas the seagrass community was autotrophic, the excess organic carbon production therein could only balance the planktonic heterotrophy in shallow waters relative to the maximum depth of the bay (55 m. This generated a horizontal gradient from autotrophic or balanced communities in the shallow seagrass-covered areas, to strongly heterotrophic communities in deeper areas of the bay. It seems therefore that, on an annual scale in the whole bay, the organic matter production by the Posidonia oceanica may not be sufficient to fully compensate the heterotrophy of the planktonic compartment, which may require external organic carbon inputs, most likely from land.

  14. Vertical nutrient fluxes, turbulence and the distribution of chlorophyll a in the north-eastern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtsen, Jørgen; Richardson, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    During summer the northern North Sea is characterized by nutrient rich bottom water masses and nutrient poor surface layers. This explains the distribution of chlorophyll a in the water column where a subsurface maximum, referred to as the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM), often is present during the growth season. Vertical transport of nutrients between bottom water masses and the well lit surface layer stimulates phytoplankton growth and this generally explains the location of the DCM. However, a more specific understanding of the interplay between vertical transports, nutrient fluxes and phytoplankton abundance is required for identifying the nature of the vertical transport processes, e.g the role of advection versus vertical turbulent diffusion or the role of localized mixing associated with mesoscale eddies. We present results from the VERMIX study in the north-eastern North Sea where nutrients, chlorophyll a and turbulence profiles were measured along five north-south directed transects in July 2016. A high-resolution sampling program, with horizontal distances of 1-10 km between CTD-stations, resolved the horizontal gradients of chlorophyll a across the steep bottom slope from the relatively shallow central North Sea ( 50-80 m) towards the deep Norwegian Trench (>700 m). Low oxygen concentrations in the bottom water masses above the slope indicated enhanced biological production where vertical mixing would stimulate phytoplankton growth around the DCM. Measurements of variable fluorescence (Fv/Fm) showed elevated values in the DCM which demonstrates a higher potential for electron transport in the Photosystem II in the phytoplankton cells, i.e. an indication of nutrient-rich conditions favorable for phytoplankton production. Profiles of the vertical shear and microstructure of temperature and salinity were measured by a VMP-250 turbulence profiler and the vertical diffusion of nutrients was calculated from the estimated vertical turbulent diffusivity and the

  15. Common variants near MC4R in relation to body fat, body fat distribution, metabolic traits and energy expenditure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kring, Sofia Inez Iqbal; Holst, C; Toubro, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Common variants near melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) have been related to fatness and type 2 diabetes. We examined the associations of rs17782313 and rs17700633 in relation to body fat, body fat distribution, metabolic traits, weight development and energy expenditure.......Common variants near melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) have been related to fatness and type 2 diabetes. We examined the associations of rs17782313 and rs17700633 in relation to body fat, body fat distribution, metabolic traits, weight development and energy expenditure....

  16. High resolution isotope data and ensemble modelling reveal ecohydrological controls on catchment storage-discharge relationships and flux travel time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulsby, C.; Kuppel, S.; Smith, A.; Tetzlaff, D.

    2017-12-01

    The dynamics of water storage in a catchment provides a fundamental insight into the interlinkages between input and output fluxes, and how these are affected by environmental change. Such dynamics also mediate, and help us understand, the fundamental difference of the rapid celerity of the rainfall-runoff (minutes to hours) response of catchments and the much slower velocity of water particles (months to decades) as they are transported through catchment systems. In this contribution we report an intensive, long-term (>10year), multi-scale isotope study in the Scottish Highlands that has sought to better understand these issues. We have integrated empirical data collection with diverse modelling approaches to quantify the dynamics and residence times of storage in different compartments of the hydrological system (vegetation canopies, soils, ground waters etc.) and their relationship between the magnitude and travel time distributions of output fluxes (stream flow, transpiration and evaporation). Use of conceptual, physically-based and probabilistic modelling approaches give broadly consistent perspectives on the storage-discharge relationships and the preferential selection of younger waters in runoff, evaporation and transpiration; while older waters predominate in groundwater. The work also highlighted the importance role vegetation plays in regulating fluxes in evaporation and transpiration and how this contributes to the differential ageing of water in mobile and bulk waters in the soil compartment. A separate case study shows how land use change can affect storage distributions in a catchment and radically change travel time distributions in output fluxes.

  17. Uptake, tissue distribution and metabolism of the insecticide endosulfan in Jenynsia multidentata (Anablepidae, Cyprinodontiformes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros, M.L.; Gonzalez, M.; Wunderlin, D.A.; Bistoni, M.A.; Miglioranza, K.S.B.

    2011-01-01

    The study reports the accumulation, distribution and metabolism of technical endosulfan in Jenynsia multidentata. Adult females were exposed to acute sublethal concentrations (0.072, 0.288 and 1.4 μg L -1 ). After 24 h, fish were sacrificed and gills, liver, brain, intestine and muscle were removed. Results show that both isomers of technical-grade endosulfan (α- and β-) are accumulated in fish tissues and biotransformation to endosulfan sulfate occurs at all concentrations tested. Significantly differences in endosulfan accumulation were only found at 1.4 μg L -1 but not between the lowest concentrations. However a similar distribution pattern was observed at all exposure levels where liver, intestine and brain had the highest levels of α-, β-endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate. Moreover, liver and brain showed the highest endosulfan sulfate:α-endosulfan ratios due to high biotransfomation capacity. J. multidentata demonstrated to be a sensitive species under exposure to technical endosulfan and, therefore, could be used to assess aquatic pollution. - Highlights: → Acute exposure of Jenynsia multidentata to technical-grade endosulfan. → Endosulfan bioaccumulation in different organs of Jenynsia multidentata. → Technical-grade endosulfan biotransformation to endosulfan sulfate. - Endosulfan is accumulated in organs of J. multidentata as well as biotransformed to endosulfan sulfate, which relative abundance points out the time from exposure.

  18. Uptake, tissue distribution and metabolism of the insecticide endosulfan in Jenynsia multidentata (Anablepidae, Cyprinodontiformes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, M.L., E-mail: mlballesteros@efn.uncor.edu [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Fisicas y Naturales, Catedra Diversidad Animal II, Av. Velez Sarsfield 299, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Gonzalez, M. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Wunderlin, D.A. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de Cordoba-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Dto. Quimica Organica-CIBICI, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Bistoni, M.A. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Fisicas y Naturales, Catedra Diversidad Animal II, Av. Velez Sarsfield 299, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Miglioranza, K.S.B. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2011-06-15

    The study reports the accumulation, distribution and metabolism of technical endosulfan in Jenynsia multidentata. Adult females were exposed to acute sublethal concentrations (0.072, 0.288 and 1.4 {mu}g L{sup -1}). After 24 h, fish were sacrificed and gills, liver, brain, intestine and muscle were removed. Results show that both isomers of technical-grade endosulfan ({alpha}- and {beta}-) are accumulated in fish tissues and biotransformation to endosulfan sulfate occurs at all concentrations tested. Significantly differences in endosulfan accumulation were only found at 1.4 {mu}g L{sup -1} but not between the lowest concentrations. However a similar distribution pattern was observed at all exposure levels where liver, intestine and brain had the highest levels of {alpha}-, {beta}-endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate. Moreover, liver and brain showed the highest endosulfan sulfate:{alpha}-endosulfan ratios due to high biotransfomation capacity. J. multidentata demonstrated to be a sensitive species under exposure to technical endosulfan and, therefore, could be used to assess aquatic pollution. - Highlights: > Acute exposure of Jenynsia multidentata to technical-grade endosulfan. > Endosulfan bioaccumulation in different organs of Jenynsia multidentata. > Technical-grade endosulfan biotransformation to endosulfan sulfate. - Endosulfan is accumulated in organs of J. multidentata as well as biotransformed to endosulfan sulfate, which relative abundance points out the time from exposure.

  19. Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of 14C-chlorphenesin carbamate in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozu, Takashi; Aoyagi, Tadao; Setoyama, Kageyoshi; Suwa, Toshio; Tanaka, Ichiro

    1977-01-01

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of chlorphenesin carbamate (CPC), a central acting muscle relaxant, were investigated in rats by use of 14 C-labeled CPC. After oral administration, 14 C-CPC was well absorbed from gastrointestinal tract and about 90% of the given radioactivity was excreted in urine and 5% in feces during 5 days. Approximately 36% was recovered in bile during 8 hr after oral administration. The highest blood level of 14 C was observed at 3-8 hr after oral administration and decreased slowly. The radioactivity was distributed widely in almost all tissues. The highest concentration of 14 C was observed in the liver and the higher was detected in the brain and spinal cord, suggesting a pharmacological effect of CPC. In pregnant rats given 14 C-CPC orally, the radioactivity in the fetuses was below 0.8% of the dose at 1-24 hr. The major metabolites in 48 hr urine was identified as CPC-glucuronide and the acidic metabolites, p-chlorophenoxylactic acid, p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and p-chlorophenol, were also detected. After intravenous injection of the 14 C-labeled acidic metabolites, the radioactivity was not detected in the central nervous system and excreted rapidly. In the case of repeated administration of CPC and 14 C-CPC for 21 days, the radioactivity did not accumulated in any tissue of rats. (auth.)

  20. Computational Platform for Flux Analysis Using 13C-Label Tracing- Phase I SBIR Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dien, Stephen J.

    2005-04-12

    Isotopic label tracing is a powerful experimental technique that can be combined with metabolic models to quantify metabolic fluxes in an organism under a particular set of growth conditions. In this work we constructed a genome-scale metabolic model of Methylobacterium extorquens, a facultative methylotroph with potential application in the production of useful chemicals from methanol. A series of labeling experiments were performed using 13C-methanol, and the resulting distribution of labeled carbon in the proteinogenic amino acids was determined by mass spectrometry. Algorithms were developed to analyze this data in context of the metabolic model, yielding flux distributions for wild-type and several engineered strains of M. extorquens. These fluxes were compared to those predicted by model simulation alone, and also integrated with microarray data to give an improved understanding of the metabolic physiology of this organism.

  1. Spatial distribution of mechanical forces and ionic flux in electro-kinetic instability near a permselective membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnico, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the numerical investigation of electro-kinetic instability in a polarization layer next to a cation-exchange membrane. An analysis of some properties of the electro-kinetic instability is followed by a detailed description of the fluid flow structure and of the spatial distribution of the ionic flux. In this aim, the Stokes-Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation set is solved until the Debye length scale. The results show that the potential threshold of the marginal instability and the current density depend on the logarithm of the concentration at the membrane surface. The size of the stable vortices seems to be an increasing function of the potential drop. The fluid motion is induced by the electric force along the maximum concentration in the extended space charge (ESC) region and by the pressure force in the region around the inner edge of the ESC layer. Two spots of kinetic energy are located in the ESC region and between the vortices. The cationic motion, controlled by the electric field and the convection, presents counter-rotating vortices in the stagnation zone located in the fluid ejection region. The anion transport is also characterized by two independent layers which contain counter-rotating vortices. The first one is in contact with the stationary reservoir. In the second layer against the membrane, the convection, and the electric field control, the transversal motion, the Fickian diffusion, and the convection are dominant in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the longitudinal disequilibrium of potential and pressure along the membrane is analyzed.

  2. Magnetized retarding field energy analyzer measuring the particle flux and ion energy distribution of both positive and negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane; Dudin, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a magnetized retarding field energy analyzer (MRFEA) used for positive and negative ion analysis. The two-stage analyzer combines a magnetic electron barrier and an electrostatic ion energy barrier allowing both positive and negative ions to be analyzed without the influence of electrons (co-extracted or created downstream). An optimal design of the MRFEA for ion-ion beams has been achieved by a comparative study of three different MRFEA configurations, and from this, scaling laws of an optimal magnetic field strength and topology have been deduced. The optimal design consists of a uniform magnetic field barrier created in a rectangular channel and an electrostatic barrier consisting of a single grid and a collector placed behind the magnetic field. The magnetic barrier alone provides an electron suppression ratio inside the analyzer of up to 6000, while keeping the ion energy resolution below 5 eV. The effective ion transparency combining the magnetic and electrostatic sections of the MRFEA is measured as a function of the ion energy. It is found that the ion transparency of the magnetic barrier increases almost linearly with increasing ion energy in the low-energy range (below 200 eV) and saturates at high ion energies. The ion transparency of the electrostatic section is almost constant and close to the optical transparency of the entrance grid. We show here that the MRFEA can provide both accurate ion flux and ion energy distribution measurements in various experimental setups with ion beams or plasmas run at low pressure and with ion energies above 10 eV

  3. Distribution, Community Composition, and Potential Metabolic Activity of Bacterioplankton in an Urbanized Mediterranean Sea Coastal Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richa, Kumari; Balestra, Cecilia; Piredda, Roberta; Benes, Vladimir; Borra, Marco; Passarelli, Augusto; Margiotta, Francesca; Saggiomo, Maria; Biffali, Elio; Sanges, Remo; Scanlan, David J; Casotti, Raffaella

    2017-09-01

    Bacterioplankton are fundamental components of marine ecosystems and influence the entire biosphere by contributing to the global biogeochemical cycles of key elements. Yet, there is a significant gap in knowledge about their diversity and specific activities, as well as environmental factors that shape their community composition and function. Here, the distribution and diversity of surface bacterioplankton along the coastline of the Gulf of Naples (GON; Italy) were investigated using flow cytometry coupled with high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Heterotrophic bacteria numerically dominated the bacterioplankton and comprised mainly Alphaproteobacteria , Gammaproteobacteria , and Bacteroidetes Distinct communities occupied river-influenced, coastal, and offshore sites, as indicated by Bray-Curtis dissimilarity, distance metric (UniFrac), linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe), and multivariate analyses. The heterogeneity in diversity and community composition was mainly due to salinity and changes in environmental conditions across sites, as defined by nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations. Bacterioplankton communities were composed of a few dominant taxa and a large proportion (92%) of rare taxa (here defined as operational taxonomic units [OTUs] accounting for coastal zones is of critical importance, considering that these areas are highly productive and anthropogenically impacted. Their richness and evenness, as well as their potential activity, are very important to assess ecosystem health and functioning. Here, we investigated bacterial distribution, community composition, and potential metabolic activity in the GON, which is an ideal test site due to its heterogeneous environment characterized by a complex hydrodynamics and terrestrial inputs of varied quantities and quality. Our study demonstrates that bacterioplankton communities in this region are highly diverse and strongly regulated by a combination of different environmental

  4. Scanning micro-Hall probe mapping of magnetic flux distributions and current densities in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, W.; Heinrich, B. [Simon Fraser Univ., British Columbia (Canada); Zhou, H. [CTF Systems, Inc., British Columbia (Canada)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Mapping of the magnetic flux density B{sub z} (perpendicular to the film plane) for a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin-film sample was carried out using a scanning micro-Hall probe. The sheet magnetization and sheet current densities were calculated from the B{sub z} distributions. From the known sheet magnetization, the tangential (B{sub x,y}) and normal components of the flux density B were calculated in the vicinity of the film. It was found that the sheet current density was mostly determined by 2B{sub x,y}/d, where d is the film thickness. The evolution of flux penetration as a function of applied field will be shown.

  5. Assessment of 12 CHF prediction methods, for an axially non-uniform heat flux distribution, with the RELAP5 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrouk, M. [Laboratoire du Genie Physique des Hydrocarbures, University of Boumerdes, Boumerdes 35000 (Algeria)], E-mail: m_ferrouk@yahoo.fr; Aissani, S. [Laboratoire du Genie Physique des Hydrocarbures, University of Boumerdes, Boumerdes 35000 (Algeria); D' Auria, F.; DelNevo, A.; Salah, A. Bousbia [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Universita di Pisa (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    The present article covers the evaluation of the performance of twelve critical heat flux methods/correlations published in the open literature. The study concerns the simulation of an axially non-uniform heat flux distribution with the RELAP5 computer code in a single boiling water reactor channel benchmark problem. The nodalization scheme employed for the considered particular geometry, as modelled in RELAP5 code, is described. For this purpose a review of critical heat flux models/correlations applicable to non-uniform axial heat profile is provided. Simulation results using the RELAP5 code and those obtained from our computer program, based on three type predictions methods such as local conditions, F-factor and boiling length average approaches were compared.

  6. Bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function in the vicinity of the last closed flux surface in fusion plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popov, T.S.V.K.; Dimitrova, Miglena; Pedrosa, M. A.; López-Bruna, D.; Horáček, Jan; Kovačič, J.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Stöckel, Jan; Aftanas, Milan; Böhm, Petr; Bílková, Petra; Hidalgo, C.; Pánek, Radomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 11 (2015), č. článku 115011. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/12/2327; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : COMPASS tokamak, parallel power flux density * TJ-II stellarator * bi-Maxwellian EEDF * last closed flux surface * SOL * parallel power flux density Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.404, year: 2015

  7. Stage-Specific Fatty Acid Fluxes Play a Regulatory Role in Glycerolipid Metabolism during Seed Development in Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, Bharatula Sri Krishna; Kumar, Sumit; Kaki, Shiva Shanker; Balakrishna, Marrapu; Karuna, Mallampalli Sri Lakshmi; Prasad, Rachapudi Badari Narayana; Sastry, Pidaparty Seshadri; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2015-12-23

    The present study describes the changes in lipid profile as well as fatty acid fluxes during seed development in Jatropha curcas L. Endosperm from 34, 37, and 40 days after anthesis (DAA), incubated with [(14)C]acetate, showed significant synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) at seed maturation. The fatty acid methyl ester profile showed PC from 34 DAA was rich in palmitic acid (16:0), whereas PC from 37 and 40 DAA was rich in oleic acid (18:1n-9). Molecular species analysis of diacylglycerol (DAG) indicated DAG (16:0/18:2n-6) was in abundance at 34 DAA, whereas DAG (18:1n-9/18:2n-6) was significantly high at 40 DAA. Triacylglycerol (TAG) analysis revealed TAG (16:0/18:2n-6/16:0) was abundant at 34 DAA, whereas TAG (18:1n-9/18:2n-6/18:1n-9) formed the majority at 40 DAA. Expression of two types of diacylglycerol acyltransferases varied with seed maturation. These data demonstrate stage-specific distinct pools of PC and DAG synthesis during storage TAG accumulation in Jatropha seed.

  8. Topographical body fat distribution links to amino acid and lipid metabolism in healthy obese women [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois-Pierre J Martin

    Full Text Available Visceral adiposity is increasingly recognized as a key condition for the development of obesity related disorders, with the ratio between visceral adipose tissue (VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT reported as the best correlate of cardiometabolic risk. In this study, using a cohort of 40 obese females (age: 25-45 y, BMI: 28-40 kg/m(2 under healthy clinical conditions and monitored over a 2 weeks period we examined the relationships between different body composition parameters, estimates of visceral adiposity and blood/urine metabolic profiles. Metabonomics and lipidomics analysis of blood plasma and urine were employed in combination with in vivo quantitation of body composition and abdominal fat distribution using iDXA and computerized tomography. Of the various visceral fat estimates, VAT/SAT and VAT/total abdominal fat ratios exhibited significant associations with regio-specific body lean and fat composition. The integration of these visceral fat estimates with metabolic profiles of blood and urine described a distinct amino acid, diacyl and ether phospholipid phenotype in women with higher visceral fat. Metabolites important in predicting visceral fat adiposity as assessed by Random forest analysis highlighted 7 most robust markers, including tyrosine, glutamine, PC-O 44∶6, PC-O 44∶4, PC-O 42∶4, PC-O 40∶4, and PC-O 40∶3 lipid species. Unexpectedly, the visceral fat associated inflammatory profiles were shown to be highly influenced by inter-days and between-subject variations. Nevertheless, the visceral fat associated amino acid and lipid signature is proposed to be further validated for future patient stratification and cardiometabolic health diagnostics.

  9. Regional blood flow distribution and oxygen metabolism during mesenteric ischemia and congestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ruy J; Garrido, Alejandra G; Ribeiro, Cristiane M F; Harada, Tomoyuki; Rocha-e-Silva, Mauricio

    2010-06-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is a potentially fatal vascular emergency with mortality rates ranging between 60% and 80%. Several studies have extensively examined the hemodynamic and metabolic effects of superior mesenteric artery occlusion. On the other hand, the cardiocirculatory derangement and the tissue damage induced by intestinal outflow obstruction have not been investigated systematically. For these reasons we decided to assess the initial impact of venous mesenteric occlusion on intestinal blood flow distribution, and correlate these findings with other systemic and regional perfusion markers. Fourteen mongrel dogs were subjected to 45 min of superior mesenteric artery (SMAO) or vein occlusion (SMVO), and observed for 120 min after reperfusion. Systemic hemodynamics were evaluated using Swan-Ganz and arterial catheters. Regional blood flow (ultrasonic flow probes), intestinal O(2)-derived variables, and mesenteric-arterial and tonometric-arterial pCO(2) gradients (D(mv-a)pCO(2) and D(t-a)pCO(2)) were also calculated. SMVO was associated with hypotension and low cardiac output. A significant increase in the regional pCO(2) gradients was also observed in both groups during the ischemic period. After reperfusion, a progressive reduction in D(mv-a)pCO(2) occurred in the SMVO group; however, no improvement in D(t-a)pCO(2) was observed. The histopathologic injury scores were 2.7 +/- 0.5 and 4.8 +/- 0.2 for SMAO and SMVO, respectively. SMV occlusion promoted early and significant hemodynamic and metabolic derangement at systemic and regional levels. Additionally, systemic pCO(2) gradient is not a reliable parameter to evaluate the local intestinal oxygenation. Finally, the D(t-a)pCO(2) correlates with histologic changes during intestinal congestion or ischemia. However, minor histologic changes cannot be detected using this methodology. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Graphical method for determination of critical dimensions and neutron flux distribution in multi zone nuclear reactors; Graficka metoda za odredjivanje kriticnih dimenzija i raspodele fluksa kod multiregionalnih nuklearnih reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radanovic, Lj; Bingulac, S; Lazarevic, B; Matausek, M [The Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1964-07-01

    This paper describes the graphical method for calculating the neutron flux distribution by using normalized Riccati equations. It was shown that the solutions of adequately normalized Riccati equations could be used as standard curves for determining the critical dimensions and radial flux distribution in multi zone nuclear reactors. the methos is applicable irrelevant of the number and position of the region in the core.

  11. A Distributed Lag Autoregressive Model of Geostationary Relativistic Electron Fluxes: Comparing the Influences of Waves, Seed and Source Electrons, and Solar Wind Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Laura; Engebretson, Mark; Clilverd, Mark; Rodger, Craig; Lessard, Marc; Gjerloev, Jesper; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2018-05-01

    Relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit depends on enhancement and loss processes driven by ultralow frequency (ULF) Pc5, chorus, and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, seed electron flux, magnetosphere compression, the "Dst effect," and substorms, while solar wind inputs such as velocity, number density, and interplanetary magnetic field Bz drive these factors and thus correlate with flux. Distributed lag regression models show the time delay of highest influence of these factors on log10 high-energy electron flux (0.7-7.8 MeV, Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites). Multiple regression with an autoregressive term (flux persistence) allows direct comparison of the magnitude of each effect while controlling other correlated parameters. Flux enhancements due to ULF Pc5 and chorus waves are of equal importance. The direct effect of substorms on high-energy electron flux is strong, possibly due to injection of high-energy electrons by the substorms themselves. Loss due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is less influential. Southward Bz shows only moderate influence when correlated processes are accounted for. Adding covariate compression effects (pressure and interplanetary magnetic field magnitude) allows wave-driven enhancements to be more clearly seen. Seed electrons (270 keV) are most influential at lower relativistic energies, showing that such a population must be available for acceleration. However, they are not accelerated directly to the highest energies. Source electrons (31.7 keV) show no direct influence when other factors are controlled. Their action appears to be indirect via the chorus waves they generate. Determination of specific effects of each parameter when studied in combination will be more helpful in furthering modeling work than studying them individually.

  12. Effect of feed flow pattern on the distribution of permeate fluxes in desalination by direct contact membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Soukane, Sofiane; Naceur, Mohamed W.; Francis, Lijo; Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem; Ghaffour, NorEddine

    2017-01-01

    The current study aims to highlight the effect of flow pattern on the variations of permeate fluxes over the membrane surface during desalination in a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) flat module. To do so, a three dimensional (3D

  13. Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Mitsunobu, E-mail: okuda.m-ky@nhk.or.jp; Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto [NHK Science and Technology Research Laboratories, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20 μm and 150 nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

  14. Establishing research strategies, methodologies and technologies to link genomics and proteomics to seagrass productivity, community metabolism, and ecosystem carbon fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, Silvia; Björk, M; Beer, S; Felisberto, P; Gobert, S; Procaccini, G; Runcie, J; Silva, J; Borges, A V; Brunet, C; Buapet, P; Champenois, W; Costa, M M; D'Esposito, D; Gullström, M; Lejeune, P; Lepoint, G; Olivé, I; Rasmusson, L M; Richir, J; Ruocco, M; Serra, I A; Spadafora, A; Santos, Rui

    2013-01-01

    A complete understanding of the mechanistic basis of marine ecosystem functioning is only possible through integrative and interdisciplinary research. This enables the prediction of change and possibly the mitigation of the consequences of anthropogenic impacts. One major aim of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action ES0609 "Seagrasses productivity. From genes to ecosystem management," is the calibration and synthesis of various methods and the development of innovative techniques and protocols for studying seagrass ecosystems. During 10 days, 20 researchers representing a range of disciplines (molecular biology, physiology, botany, ecology, oceanography, and underwater acoustics) gathered at The Station de Recherches Sous-marines et Océanographiques (STARESO, Corsica) to study together the nearby Posidonia oceanica meadow. STARESO is located in an oligotrophic area classified as "pristine site" where environmental disturbances caused by anthropogenic pressure are exceptionally low. The healthy P. oceanica meadow, which grows in front of the research station, colonizes the sea bottom from the surface to 37 m depth. During the study, genomic and proteomic approaches were integrated with ecophysiological and physical approaches with the aim of understanding changes in seagrass productivity and metabolism at different depths and along daily cycles. In this paper we report details on the approaches utilized and we forecast the potential of the data that will come from this synergistic approach not only for P. oceanica but for seagrasses in general.

  15. Establishing research strategies, methodologies and technologies to link genomics and proteomics to seagrass productivity, community metabolism and ecosystem carbon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eMazzuca

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A complete understanding of the mechanistic basis of marine ecosystem functioning is only possible through integrative and interdisciplinary research. This enables the prediction of change and possibly the mitigation of the consequences of anthropogenic impacts. One major aim of the COST Action ES0609 Seagrasses productivity. From genes to ecosystem management, is the calibration and synthesis of various methods and the development of innovative techniques and protocols for studying seagrass ecosystems.During ten days, twenty researchers representing a range of disciplines (molecular biology, physiology, botany, ecology, oceanography, underwater acoustics gathered at the marine station of STARESO (Corsica to study together the nearby Posidonia oceanica meadow. The Station de Recherches Sous-marine et Océanographiques (STARESO is located in an oligotrophic area classified as "pristine site" where environmental disturbances caused by anthropogenic pressure are exceptionally low. The healthy P. oceanica meadow, that grows in front of the lab, colonizes the sea bottom from the surface to 37 m depth. During the study, genomic and proteomic approaches were integrated with ecophysiological and physical approaches with the aim of understanding changes in seagrass productivity and metabolism at different depths and along daily cycles. In this paper we report details on the approaches utilized and we forecast the potential of the data that will come from this synergistic approach not only for P. oceanica but for seagrasses in general.

  16. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase II), I-V, Part V, Determining the fine neutron flux distribution by Pn method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1962-10-01

    Expression for spherical harmonic moments were applied. They were obtained by spherical harmonics expansion of monoenergetic transport equation. This report presents the procedure for calculating the neutron flux distribution in the nine-zone reactor cell of the RA reactor in Vinca. The procedure was modelled for digital computer ZUSE Z-23 by expansion of the diagram of the automated P 3 code, which is adequate for P n code with minor changes. The needed subroutines were developed. The most important ones were those for modified first and second order Bessel functions of n-th order. Computer Z-23 was operating only 15 hours during three months, and thus only the subroutines for modified Bessel functions could be tested and the obtained results were excellent. For the mentioned reason the neutron flux distribution will be calculated in the forthcoming period [sr

  17. Distinct clinical and metabolic deficits in PCA and AD are not related to amyloid distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, M H; Alkalay, A; Agarwal, N; Baker, S L; O'Neil, J P; Janabi, M; Yen, I V; Growdon, M; Jang, J; Madison, C; Mormino, E C; Rosen, H J; Gorno-Tempini, M L; Weiner, M W; Miller, B L; Jagust, W J; Rabinovici, G D

    2011-05-24

    Patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) often have Alzheimer disease (AD) at autopsy, yet are cognitively and anatomically distinct from patients with clinical AD. We sought to compare the distribution of β-amyloid and glucose metabolism in PCA and AD in vivo using Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) and FDG-PET. Patients with PCA (n = 12, age 57.5 ± 7.4, Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] 22.2 ± 5.1), AD (n = 14, age 58.8 ± 9.6, MMSE 23.8 ± 6.7), and cognitively normal controls (NC, n = 30, age 73.6 ± 6.4) underwent PiB and FDG-PET. Group differences in PiB distribution volume ratios (DVR, cerebellar reference) and FDG uptake (pons-averaged) were assessed on a voxel-wise basis and by comparing binding in regions of interest (ROIs). Compared to NC, both patients with AD and patients with PCA showed diffuse PiB uptake throughout frontal, temporoparietal, and occipital cortex (p PCA and AD even after correcting for atrophy. FDG patterns in PCA and AD were distinct: while both groups showed hypometabolism compared to NC in temporoparietal cortex and precuneus/posterior cingulate, patients with PCA further showed hypometabolism in inferior occipitotemporal cortex compared to both NC and patients with AD (p PCA. Fibrillar amyloid deposition in PCA is diffuse and similar to AD, while glucose hypometabolism extends more posteriorly into occipital cortex. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanisms of selective network degeneration in focal variants of AD.

  18. Strain improvement and metabolic flux analysis in the wild-type and a mutant Lactobacillus lactis strain for L(+)-lactic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Dong-Mei; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Li, Xin-Gang; Xu, Shi-Min

    2004-12-20

    The effects of initial glucose concentration and calcium lactate concentration on the lactic acid production by the parent strain, Lactobacillus lactis BME5-18, were studied. The results of the experiments indicated that glucose and lactate repressed the cell growth and the lactic acid production by Lactobacillus lactis BME5-18. A L(+)-lactic acid overproducing strain, Lactobacillus lactis BME5-18M, was screened by mutagenizing the parent strain with ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation and selecting the high glucose and lactate calcium concentration repression resistant mutant. Starting with a concentration of 100g L(-1) glucose, the mutant produced 98.6 g L(-1) lactic acid after 60 h in flasks, 73.9% higher than that of the parent strain. The L(+)-lactic acid purity was 98.1% by weight based on the amount of total lactic acid. The culture of the parent strain could not be analyzed well by conventional metabolic flux analysis techniques, since some pyruvate were accumulated intracellularly. Therefore, a revised flux analysis method was proposed by introducing intracellular pyruvate pool. Further studies demonstrate that there is a high level of NADH oxidase activity (12.11 mmol mg(-1) min(-1)) in the parent strain. The molecular mechanisms of the strain improvement were proposed, i.e., the high level of NADH oxidase activity was eliminated and the uptake rate of glucose was increased from 82.1 C-mmol (g DW h)(-1) to 98.9 C-mmol (g DW h)(-1) by mutagenizing the parent strain with UV, and therefore the mutant strain converts mostly pyruvate to lactic acid with a higher productivity (1.76 g L(-1) h(-1)) than the parent strain (0.95 g L(-1) h(-1)).

  19. Elimination, distribution and metabolism of lindane (gamma Hexachloro cyclohexane) in male goat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elozargani, Gaafar A.; Elfahal, Rihab Ali

    2001-01-01

    Elimination, distribution in tissues and metabolic degradation of lindane insecticide (gamma hexachlorocyclohexane) were studied in male Nubian goat (Cappara aegagrus Hircus). The goat was dosed orally with 262.76 mg 14 C-lindane equivalent to one fourth of its lethal dose (LD50). Urine and faeces were collected for two weeks following the application date and the radioactivity was measured in order to determine the rate of the insecticide elimination from the animal body. Lindane elimination was found to be initially fairly rapid, principally via urine (19.6% of the applied dose was detected in urine and 3.1% in faeces). However, it was observed that total recovery of the insecticide via faeces and urine is low. After two weeks, the animal was sacrificed and samples of the brain, liver, kidneys, heart, lungs, legs muscles, and abdominal fat were collected. The percentage of the total radioactivity detected in all tissue sample was 0.29% of the applied radioactive Lindane. The fat contained 48.25% of this percentage, 29.78% was detected in the liver, 9.05% in the lungs and 8.72% in the heart. Smaller percentages were detected in the other tissues. Urine and faeces extracted, analysed and their contents of lindane metabolites were Identified using autoradiography. It was found that 23% of the labeled lindane detected in urine was extracted unchanged. A nonpolar compound possibly a trichlorophenol represented 26% of the radioactivity detected in urine, while 51% was represented in highly polar compound and conjugates

  20. Visualization of Magnetic Flux Distribution at Soft Magnetic Composite(Special Issue to the Asia-Pacific Symposium on Applied Electromagnetics and Mechanics (APSAEM06))

    OpenAIRE

    Z. W., Lin; J. G., Zhu; Y. G., Guo; J. J., Zhong; W. Y., Yu; Centre for Electrical Machines and Power Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Technology; Centre for Electrical Machines and Power Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Technology; Centre for Electrical Machines and Power Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Technology; Centre for Electrical Machines and Power Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Technology; Baosteel Group Shanghai Iron and Steel Research Institute

    2007-01-01

    Soft magnetic composite (SMC), as one of soft magnetic materials, is being used increasingly in electromagnetic devices due to its magnetic isotropy, high electrical resistivity and easy formation. This paper presents the magnetic field distribution at the compressing surface of SMC by means of magneto-optical imaging technique. It is found that the flux density is non-uniform inside the sample, even within one particle region. Although there are interactions between neighbouring particles, t...

  1. Study on the method of determining the sub-criticality of a reactor via the measurement of core neutron flux spatial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Aifeng; Jiang Xiaofeng; Zhang Shaohong

    2007-01-01

    A new methodology based on rigorous reactor physics theory astead of the point reactor assumption was proposed to determine or monitor the sub-criticality ora reactor, especially the sub-critical reactor of ADS, via the measurement of in-core flux spatial distribution. Preliminary numerical studies on the 1st ADS sub-critical experimental facilities-Venus No.1 in China have demonstrated the feasibility of this new method. Related discussions pointed out the potential applications of the method. (authors)

  2. Mono-Heteromeric Configurations of Gap Junction Channels Formed by Connexin43 and Connexin45 Reduce Unitary Conductance and Determine both Voltage Gating and Metabolic Flux Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Zhong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In cardiac tissues, the expression of multiple connexins (Cx40, Cx43, Cx45, and Cx30.2 is a requirement for proper development and function. Gap junctions formed by these connexins have distinct permeability and gating mechanisms. Since a single cell can express more than one connexin isoform, the formation of hetero-multimeric gap junction channels provides a tissue with an enormous repertoire of combinations to modulate intercellular communication. To study further the perm-selectivity and gating properties of channels containing Cx43 and Cx45, we studied two monoheteromeric combinations in which a HeLa cell co-transfected with Cx43 and Cx45 was paired with a cell expressing only one of these connexins. Macroscopic measurements of total conductance between cell pairs indicated a drastic reduction in total conductance for mono-heteromeric channels. In terms of Vj dependent gating, Cx43 homomeric connexons facing heteromeric connexons only responded weakly to voltage negativity. Cx45 homomeric connexons exhibited no change in Vj gating when facing heteromeric connexons. The distributions of unitary conductances (γj for both mono-heteromeric channels were smaller than predicted, and both showed low permeability to the fluorescent dyes Lucifer yellow and Rhodamine123. For both mono-heteromeric channels, we observed flux asymmetry regardless of dye charge: flux was higher in the direction of the heteromeric connexon for MhetCx45 and in the direction of the homomeric Cx43 connexon for MhetCx43. Thus, our data suggest that co-expression of Cx45 and Cx43 induces the formation of heteromeric connexons with greatly reduced permeability and unitary conductance. Furthermore, it increases the asymmetry for voltage gating for opposing connexons, and it favors asymmetric flux of molecules across the junction that depends primarily on the size (not the charge of the crossing molecules.

  3. Mono-Heteromeric Configurations of Gap Junction Channels Formed by Connexin43 and Connexin45 Reduce Unitary Conductance and Determine both Voltage Gating and Metabolic Flux Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guoqiang; Akoum, Nazem; Appadurai, Daniel A.; Hayrapetyan, Volodya; Ahmed, Osman; Martinez, Agustin D.; Beyer, Eric C.; Moreno, Alonso P.

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac tissues, the expression of multiple connexins (Cx40, Cx43, Cx45, and Cx30.2) is a requirement for proper development and function. Gap junctions formed by these connexins have distinct permeability and gating mechanisms. Since a single cell can express more than one connexin isoform, the formation of hetero-multimeric gap junction channels provides a tissue with an enormous repertoire of combinations to modulate intercellular communication. To study further the perm-selectivity and gating properties of channels containing Cx43 and Cx45, we studied two monoheteromeric combinations in which a HeLa cell co-transfected with Cx43 and Cx45 was paired with a cell expressing only one of these connexins. Macroscopic measurements of total conductance between cell pairs indicated a drastic reduction in total conductance for mono-heteromeric channels. In terms of Vj dependent gating, Cx43 homomeric connexons facing heteromeric connexons only responded weakly to voltage negativity. Cx45 homomeric connexons exhibited no change in Vj gating when facing heteromeric connexons. The distributions of unitary conductances (γj) for both mono-heteromeric channels were smaller than predicted, and both showed low permeability to the fluorescent dyes Lucifer yellow and Rhodamine123. For both mono-heteromeric channels, we observed flux asymmetry regardless of dye charge: flux was higher in the direction of the heteromeric connexon for MhetCx45 and in the direction of the homomeric Cx43 connexon for MhetCx43. Thus, our data suggest that co-expression of Cx45 and Cx43 induces the formation of heteromeric connexons with greatly reduced permeability and unitary conductance. Furthermore, it increases the asymmetry for voltage gating for opposing connexons, and it favors asymmetric flux of molecules across the junction that depends primarily on the size (not the charge) of the crossing molecules. PMID:28611680

  4. Satellite-Derived Distributions, Inventories and Fluxes of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matter Along the Northeastern U.S. Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, A.; Hooker, S. B.; Hyde, K.; Novak, M. G.; Pan, X.; Friedrichs, M.; Cahill, B.; Wilkin, J.

    2011-01-01

    Estuaries and the coastal ocean experience a high degree of variability in the composition and concentration of particulate and dissolved organic matter (DOM) as a consequence of riverine and estuarine fluxes of terrigenous DOM, sediments, detritus and nutrients into coastal waters and associated phytoplankton blooms. Our approach integrates biogeochemical measurements, optical properties and remote sensing to examine the distributions and inventories of organic carbon in the U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Maine. Algorithms developed to retrieve colored DOM (CDOM), Dissolved (DOC) and Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) from NASA's MODIS-Aqua and SeaWiFS satellite sensors are applied to quantify the distributions and inventories of DOC and POC. Horizontal fluxes of DOC and POC from the continental margin to the open ocean are estimated from SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua distributions of DOC and POC and horizontal divergence fluxes obtained from the Northeastern North Atlantic ROMS model. SeaWiFS and MODIS imagery reveal the importance of estuarine outflow to the export of CDOM and DOC to the coastal ocean and a net community production of DOC on the shelf.

  5. A preliminary assessment of the effects of heat flux distribution and penetration on the creep rupture of a reactor vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.; Simpson, R.; Witt, R.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the Lower Head Failure (LHF) Experiment Program is to experimentally investigate and characterize the failure of the reactor vessel lower head due to thermal and pressure loads under severe accident conditions. The experiment is performed using 1/5-scale models of a typical PWR pressure vessel. Experiments are performed for various internal pressure and imposed heat flux distributions with and without instrumentation guide tube penetrations. The experimental program is complemented by a modest modeling program based on the application of vessel creep rupture codes developed in the TMI Vessel Investigation Project. The first three experiments under the LHF program investigated the creep rupture of simulated reactor pressure vessels without penetrations. The heat flux distributions for the three experiments are uniform (LHF-1), center-peaked (LHF-2), and side-peaked (LHF-3), respectively. For all the experiments, appreciable vessel deformation was observed to initiate at vessel wall temperatures above 900K and the vessel typically failed at approximately 1000K. The size of failure was always observed to be smaller than the heated region. For experiments with non-uniform heat flux distributions, failure typically occurs in the region of peak temperature. A brief discussion of the effect of penetration is also presented

  6. Applications of computational modeling in metabolic engineering of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-02-01

    Generally, a microorganism's phenotype can be described by its pattern of metabolic fluxes. Although fluxes cannot be measured directly, inference of fluxes is well established. In biotechnology the aim is often to increase the capacity of specific fluxes. For this, metabolic engineering methods have been developed and applied extensively. Many of these rely on balancing of intracellular metabolites, redox, and energy fluxes, using genome-scale models (GEMs) that in combination with appropriate objective functions and constraints can be used to predict potential gene targets for obtaining a preferred flux distribution. These methods point to strategies for altering gene expression; however, fluxes are often controlled by post-transcriptional events. Moreover, GEMs are usually not taking into account metabolic regulation, thermodynamics and enzyme kinetics. To facilitate metabolic engineering, tools from synthetic biology have emerged, enabling integration and assembly of naturally nonexistent, but well-characterized components into a living organism. To describe these systems kinetic models are often used and to integrate these systems with the standard metabolic engineering approach, it is necessary to expand the modeling of metabolism to consider kinetics of individual processes. This review will give an overview about models available for metabolic engineering of yeast and discusses their applications. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  7. SVD identifies transcript length distribution functions from DNA microarray data and reveals evolutionary forces globally affecting GBM metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Bertagnolli

    Full Text Available To search for evolutionary forces that might act upon transcript length, we use the singular value decomposition (SVD to identify the length distribution functions of sets and subsets of human and yeast transcripts from profiles of mRNA abundance levels across gel electrophoresis migration distances that were previously measured by DNA microarrays. We show that the SVD identifies the transcript length distribution functions as "asymmetric generalized coherent states" from the DNA microarray data and with no a-priori assumptions. Comparing subsets of human and yeast transcripts of the same gene ontology annotations, we find that in both disparate eukaryotes, transcripts involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism are significantly shorter than typical, and in particular, significantly shorter than those involved in glucose metabolism. Comparing the subsets of human transcripts that are overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM or normal brain tissue samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we find that GBM maintains normal brain overexpression of significantly short transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism, but suppresses normal overexpression of significantly longer transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in glucose metabolism and brain activity. These global relations among transcript length, cellular metabolism and tumor development suggest a previously unrecognized physical mode for tumor and normal cells to differentially regulate metabolism in a transcript length-dependent manner. The identified distribution functions support a previous hypothesis from mathematical modeling of evolutionary forces that act upon transcript length in the manner of the restoring force of the harmonic oscillator.

  8. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,γ)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Association mapping of starch chain length distribution and amylose content in pea (Pisum sativum L.) using carbohydrate metabolism candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Margaret A; Shaw, Martin; Cooper, Rebecca D; Frew, Tonya J; Butler, Ruth C; Murray, Sarah R; Moya, Leire; Coyne, Clarice J; Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail M

    2017-08-01

    Although starch consists of large macromolecules composed of glucose units linked by α-1,4-glycosidic linkages with α-1,6-glycosidic branchpoints, variation in starch structural and functional properties is found both within and between species. Interest in starch genetics is based on the importance of starch in food and industrial processes, with the potential of genetics to provide novel starches. The starch metabolic pathway is complex but has been characterized in diverse plant species, including pea. To understand how allelic variation in the pea starch metabolic pathway affects starch structure and percent amylose, partial sequences of 25 candidate genes were characterized for polymorphisms using a panel of 92 diverse pea lines. Variation in the percent amylose composition of extracted seed starch and (amylopectin) chain length distribution, one measure of starch structure, were characterized for these lines. Association mapping was undertaken to identify polymorphisms associated with the variation in starch chain length distribution and percent amylose, using a mixed linear model that incorporated population structure and kinship. Associations were found for polymorphisms in seven candidate genes plus Mendel's r locus (which conditions the round versus wrinkled seed phenotype). The genes with associated polymorphisms are involved in the substrate supply, chain elongation and branching stages of the pea carbohydrate and starch metabolic pathways. The association of polymorphisms in carbohydrate and starch metabolic genes with variation in amylopectin chain length distribution and percent amylose may help to guide manipulation of pea seed starch structural and functional properties through plant breeding.

  10. Polycrystalline semiconductor probes for monitoring the density distribution of an intense thermal neutron flux in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graul, J.; Mueller, R.G.; Wagner, E.

    1975-05-01

    The applicability of semiconductor detectors for high thermal neutron flux densities is theoretically estimated and experimentally examined. For good thermal stability and low radiation capture rate silicon carbide is used as semiconductor material, produced in polycristalline layers to achieve high radiation resistance. The relations between crystallinity, photoelectric sensitivity and radiation resistance are shown. The radiation resistance of polycrystalline SiC-probes is approximately 100 times greater than that of conventional single crystal radiation detectors. For thermal neutron measurement they can be used in the flux range of approx. 10 10 13 (cm -2 sec -1 ) with operation times of 1.6 a >= tsub(b,max) >= 30 d, resp. (orig.) [de

  11. Effect of density distribution of cathode emission on the flux character in a strong-current electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matora, I.M.; Merkulov, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect is considered of two kinds of a dependence of the emission density from the electric field voltage on the emitter surface of a strong-current electron gun (the Schottky law and the ''3/2'' law) upon the choice of a form for the meridional cross section of this emitter at the condition of electron flux laminarity. A calculation example is given for electron gun with close to laminar flow assuming the validity of the Schottky law. The results of calculation of varying the laminar flux character are given which appears when varying parameters of the gun at the voltage 500 kV and current 250 A

  12. Predicted Water and Carbon Fluxes as well as Vegetation Distribution on the Korean Peninsula in the Future with the Ecosystem Demography Model version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. B.; Kim, Y.

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates how the water and carbon fluxes as well as vegetation distribution on the Korean peninsula would vary with climate change. Ecosystem Demography (ED) Model version 2 (ED2) is used in this study, which is an integrated terrestrial biosphere model that can utilize a set of size- and age- structured partial differential equations that track the changing structure and composition of the plant canopy. With using the vegetation distribution data of Jeju Island, located at the southern part of the Korean Peninsula, ED2 is setup and driven for the past 10 years. Then the results of ED2 are evaluated and adjusted with observed forestry data, i.e., growth and mortality, and the flux tower and MODIS satellite data, i.e., evapotranspiration (ET) and gross primary production (GPP). This adjusted ED2 are used to simulate the water and carbon fluxes as well as vegetation dynamics in the Korean Peninsula for the historical period with evaluating the model against the MODIS satellite data. Finally, the climate scenarios of RCP 2.6 and 6.0 are used to predict the fluxes and vegetation distribution of the Korean Peninsula in the future. With using the state-of-art terrestrial ecosystem model, this study would provide us better understanding of the future ecosystem vulnerability of the Korean Peninsula. AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (2015R1C1A2A01054800) and by the Korea Meteorological Administration R&D Program under Grant KMIPA 2015-6180. This work was also supported by the Yonsei University Future-leading Research Initiative of 2015(2016-22-0061).

  13. Formulation of the energetic spectral distribution of in pile neutron flux (energies greater than a few hundred electron volts) (1963); Formulation des repartitions spectrales energetiques de flux neutroniques en pile (energies superieures a quelques centaines d'electrons-volts) (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genthon, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In the present report an expression is deduced for the spectral distribution of flux of over a few hundred electron volts; it is valid for most cases of thermal neutron reactors. This expression is: {psi}(E) = K [{psi}{sub o}(E) + h {psi}{sub e}(E)] {psi}{sub o}(E) is the so-called 'homogeneous' constituent of the flux; it corresponds approximately to the case of an infinite homogeneous medium; it is of the type: Y(V - E) e{sup (b{radical}}{sup E)}/E + Y(E-V) F E{sup {upsilon}} e{sup -{beta}}{sup E} The parameters V and F are such that {psi}{sub o}(E) and its derivative are continuous at the junction energy V. {psi}{sub e}(E) is the 'heterogeneous' constituent of the flux; it is of the type: E{sup {upsilon}} e{sup -{beta}}{sup E}. The various parameters of {psi}(E) are on the one hand characteristic of the nature of the reactor moderator, and on the other hand determined by a resonant flux measurement and one, or possibly two, measurements using a fast neutron threshold detector. We have been led furthermore to define an expression for the threshold reaction section which is more exact than the conventional transition function. (author) [French] Il est etabli, dans le present rapport, une formulation {psi}(E) des repartitions spectrales de flux au-dessus de quelques centaines d'electron-s volts, valable dans la majeure partie des cas de piles dites a neutrons thermiques. Cette formulation s'exprime: {psi}(E) = K [{psi}{sub o}(E) + h {psi}{sub e}(E)] {psi}{sub o}(E) est la composante dite 'homogene' du flux; elle correspond a peu pres au cas d'un milieu infini homogene; elle est du type: Y(V - E) e{sup (b{radical}}{sup E)}/E + Y(E-V) F E{sup {upsilon}} e{sup -{beta}}{sup E} les parametres V et F sont tels que {psi}{sub o}(E) et sa derivee soient continues a l'energie de jonction V. {psi}{sub e} est la composante dite 'heterogene' du flux ; elle est du type: E{sup {upsilon}} e{sup -{beta}}{sup E}. Les differents parametres de {psi}(E) sont, d'une part

  14. Distribution and Metabolism of Bt-Cry1Ac Toxin in Tissues and Organs of the Cotton Bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuoya Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Crystal (Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt have been widely used in transgenic crops due to their toxicity against insect pests. However, the distribution and metabolism of these toxins in insect tissues and organs have remained obscure because the target insects do not ingest much toxin. In this study, several Cry1Ac-resistant strains of Helicoverpa armigera, fed artificial diets containing high doses of Cry1Ac toxin, were used to investigate the distribution and metabolism of Cry1Ac in their bodies. Cry1Ac was only detected in larvae, not in pupae or adults. Also, Cry1Ac passed through the midgut into other tissues, such as the hemolymph and fat body, but did not reach the larval integument. Metabolic tests revealed that Cry1Ac degraded most rapidly in the fat body, followed by the hemolymph, peritrophic membrane and its contents. The toxin was metabolized slowly in the midgut, but was degraded in all locations within 48 h. These findings will improve understanding of the functional mechanism of Bt toxins in target insects and the biotransfer and the bioaccumulation of Bt toxins in arthropod food webs in the Bt crop ecosystem.

  15. Linking carbon and nitrogen metabolism to depth distribution of submersed macrophytes using high ammonium dosing tests and a lake survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guixiang; Cao, Te; Fu, Hui; Ni, Leyi; Zhang, Xiaolin; Li, Wei; Song, Xin; Xie, Ping; Jeppesen, Erik

    2013-12-01

    Strategies of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilisation are among the factors determining plant distribution. It has been argued that submersed macrophytes adapted to lower light environments are more efficient in maintaining C metabolic homeostasis due to their conservative C strategy and ability to balance C shortage. We studied how depth distributions of 12 submersed macrophytes in Lake Erhai, China, were linked to their C-N metabolic strategies when facing acute [Formula: see text] dosing.[Formula: see text] dosing changed C-N metabolism significantly by decreasing the soluble carbohydrate (SC) content and increasing the [Formula: see text]-N and free amino acid (FAA) content of plant tissues.The proportional changes in SC contents in the leaves and FAA contents in the stems induced by [Formula: see text] dosing were closely correlated (positive for SC and negative for FAA) with the colonising water depths of the plants in Lake Erhai, the plants adapted to lower light regimes being more efficient in maintaining SC and FAA homeostasis.These results indicate that conservative carbohydrate metabolism of submersed macrophytes allowed the plants to colonise greater water depths in eutrophic lakes, where low light availability in the water column diminishes carbohydrate production by the plants.

  16. Estimating spatially distributed turbulent heat fluxes from high-resolution thermal imagery acquired with a UAV system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Claire; Thiem, Christina Elisabeth; Wizemann, Hans-Dieter; Bernhardt, Matthias; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-05-19

    In this study, high-resolution thermal imagery acquired with a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is used to map evapotranspiration (ET) at a grassland site in Luxembourg. The land surface temperature (LST) information from the thermal imagery is the key input to a one-source and two-source energy balance model. While the one-source model treats the surface as a single uniform layer, the two-source model partitions the surface temperature and fluxes into soil and vegetation components. It thus explicitly accounts for the different contributions of both components to surface temperature as well as turbulent flux exchange with the atmosphere. Contrary to the two-source model, the one-source model requires an empirical adjustment parameter in order to account for the effect of the two components. Turbulent heat flux estimates of both modelling approaches are compared to eddy covariance (EC) measurements using the high-resolution input imagery UAVs provide. In this comparison, the effect of different methods for energy balance closure of the EC data on the agreement between modelled and measured fluxes is also analysed. Additionally, the sensitivity of the one-source model to the derivation of the empirical adjustment parameter is tested. Due to the very dry and hot conditions during the experiment, pronounced thermal patterns developed over the grassland site. These patterns result in spatially variable turbulent heat fluxes. The model comparison indicates that both models are able to derive ET estimates that compare well with EC measurements under these conditions. However, the two-source model, with a more complex treatment of the energy and surface temperature partitioning between the soil and vegetation, outperformed the simpler one-source model in estimating sensible and latent heat fluxes. This is consistent with findings from prior studies. For the one-source model, a time-variant expression of the adjustment parameter (to account for the difference between

  17. In vivo 13C MRS in the mouse brain at 14.1 Tesla and metabolic flux quantification under infusion of [1,6-13C2]glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Marta; Lanz, Bernard; Poitry-Yamate, Carole; Romero, Jackeline F; Berset, Corina M; Cudalbu, Cristina; Gruetter, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    In vivo 13 C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) enables the investigation of cerebral metabolic compartmentation while, e.g. infusing 13 C-labeled glucose. Metabolic flux analysis of 13 C turnover previously yielded quantitative information of glutamate and glutamine metabolism in humans and rats, while the application to in vivo mouse brain remains exceedingly challenging. In the present study, 13 C direct detection at 14.1 T provided highly resolved in vivo spectra of the mouse brain while infusing [1,6- 13 C 2 ]glucose for up to 5 h. 13 C incorporation to glutamate and glutamine C4, C3, and C2 and aspartate C3 were detected dynamically and fitted to a two-compartment model: flux estimation of neuron-glial metabolism included tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux in astrocytes (V g  = 0.16 ± 0.03 µmol/g/min) and neurons (V TCA n  = 0.56 ± 0.03 µmol/g/min), pyruvate carboxylase activity (V PC  = 0.041 ± 0.003 µmol/g/min) and neurotransmission rate (V NT  = 0.084 ± 0.008 µmol/g/min), resulting in a cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMR glc ) of 0.38 ± 0.02 µmol/g/min, in excellent agreement with that determined with concomitant 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 FDG PET).We conclude that modeling of neuron-glial metabolism in vivo is accessible in the mouse brain from 13 C direct detection with an unprecedented spatial resolution under [1,6- 13 C 2 ]glucose infusion.

  18. The influence of a spatial displacement of hydrogen on the reactivity and neutron flux density distribution in a ZrH-moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doehler, J.; Bartsch, G.

    1975-08-01

    The effect of changes of the hydrogen concentration in uranium zirconium hydride resulting from spatially varying temperatures on the reactivity and neutron flux distribution of the BER-II core (power 2.2 MW) are shown. Furthermore, in general, the influence of the hydrogen concentration on important reactor parameters of a fuel cell of BER-II is calculated and presented. A comparison of the diffusion calculation with spatially constant hydrogen concentrations shows a decrease of the thermal neutron flux density in regions with a low hydrogen content (high temperature) and inversely an increase for high hydrogen concentrations. Furthermore, a change of the effective multiplication factor by 0.6% was found in the case of a spatially varying hydrogen concentration as compared with the calculation for a constant concentration. (orig.) [de

  19. Using open source computational tools for predicting human metabolic stability and additional absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rishi R; Gifford, Eric M; Liston, Ted; Waller, Chris L; Hohman, Moses; Bunin, Barry A; Ekins, Sean

    2010-11-01

    Ligand-based computational models could be more readily shared between researchers and organizations if they were generated with open source molecular descriptors [e.g., chemistry development kit (CDK)] and modeling algorithms, because this would negate the requirement for proprietary commercial software. We initially evaluated open source descriptors and model building algorithms using a training set of approximately 50,000 molecules and a test set of approximately 25,000 molecules with human liver microsomal metabolic stability data. A C5.0 decision tree model demonstrated that CDK descriptors together with a set of Smiles Arbitrary Target Specification (SMARTS) keys had good statistics [κ = 0.43, sensitivity = 0.57, specificity = 0.91, and positive predicted value (PPV) = 0.64], equivalent to those of models built with commercial Molecular Operating Environment 2D (MOE2D) and the same set of SMARTS keys (κ = 0.43, sensitivity = 0.58, specificity = 0.91, and PPV = 0.63). Extending the dataset to ∼193,000 molecules and generating a continuous model using Cubist with a combination of CDK and SMARTS keys or MOE2D and SMARTS keys confirmed this observation. When the continuous predictions and actual values were binned to get a categorical score we observed a similar κ statistic (0.42). The same combination of descriptor set and modeling method was applied to passive permeability and P-glycoprotein efflux data with similar model testing statistics. In summary, open source tools demonstrated predictive results comparable to those of commercial software with attendant cost savings. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of open source descriptors and the opportunity for their use as a tool for organizations to share data precompetitively, avoiding repetition and assisting drug discovery.

  20. Split core experiments; Part I. Axial neutron flux distribution measurements in the reactor core with a central horizontal reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strugar, P; Raisic, N; Obradovic, D; Jovanovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1965-05-01

    A series of critical experiments were performed on the RB reactor in order to determine the thermal neutron flux increase in the central horizontal reflector formed by a split reactor core. The objectives of these experiments were to study the possibilities of improving the thermal neutron flux characteristics of the neutron beam in the horizontal beam tube of the RA research reactor. The construction of RA reactor enables to split the core in two, to form a central horizontal reflector in front of the beam tube. This is achieved by replacing 2% enriched uranium slugs in the fuel channel by dummy aluminium slugs. The purpose of the first series of experiments was to study the gain in thermal neutron component inside the horizontal reflector and the loss of reactivity as a function of the lattice pitch and central reflector thickness.

  1. Flocculation alters the distribution and flux of melt-water supplied sediments and nutrients in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge

    In the Arctic, thawing permafrost and increased melting of glaciers are important drivers for changes in fine-grained sediment supply and biogeochemical fluxes from land to sea. Flocculation of particles is a controlling factor for the magnitude of fluxes and deposition rates in the marine...... environment but comparatively little is known about the flocculation processes in the Arctic. We investigated flocculation dynamics from a melt-water river in the inner Disko Fjord, West Greenland. A novel, laser-illuminated camera system significantly improved the particle size measurement capabilities...... and settling tubes were sampled to enable sub-sampling of different floc size fractions. Flocculation was observed during periods with low turbulent shear and also at the front of the fresh water plume resulting in significant volumes of large sized flocs at depth below the plume. The floc sizes and volumes...

  2. Study on the radiation flux and temperature distributions of the concentrator-receiver system in a solar dish/Stirling power facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhigang; Tang Dawei; Du Jinglong; Li Tie

    2011-01-01

    Uniform heater temperature and high optical-thermal efficiency are crucial for the reliable and economical operation of a Solar Dish/Stirling engine facility. The Monte-Carlo ray-tracing method is utilized to predict the radiation flux distributions of the concentrator-receiver system. The ray-tracing method is first validated by experiment, then the radiation flux profiles on the solar receiver surface for faceted real concentrator and ideal paraboloidal concentrator, irradiated by Xe-arc lamps and real sun, for different aperture positions and receiver shapes are analyzed, respectively. The resulted radiation flux profiles are subsequently transferred to a CFD code as boundary conditions to numerically simulate the fluid flow and conjugate heat transfer in the receiver cavity by coupling the radiation, natural convection and heat conduction together, and the CFD method is also validated through experiment. The results indicate that a faceted concentrator in combination with a solar simulator composed of 12 Xe-arc lamps is advantageous to drive the solar Stirling engine for all-weather indoor tests. Based on the simulation results, a solar receiver-Stirling heater configuration is designed to achieve a considerably uniform temperature distribution on the heater head tubes while maintaining a high efficiency of 60.7%. - Highlights: → Radiation flux in Dish/Stirling system is analyzed by validated ray-tracing method. → Temperature field on the solar receiver is analyzed by a validated CFD method. → Effects of Xe-arc lamp solar simulator and faceted real concentrator are analyzed. → Effects of different receiver positions and receiver shapes are investigated. → A Stirling heater configuration is presented with uniform temperature field.

  3. Modeling and analysis of flux distributions in the two branches of the phosphotransferase system in Pseudomonas putida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremling, A.; Plufger-Grau, K.; Silva-Rocha, R.; Puchalka, J.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.; Lorenzo, de V.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Signal transduction plays a fundamental role in the understanding of cellular physiology. The bacterialphosphotransferase system (PTS) together with the PEP/pyruvate node in central metabolism represents asignaling unit that acts as a sensory element and measures the activity of the

  4. Modulating the distribution of fluxes among respiration and fermentation by overexpression of HAP4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maris, A.J.A.; Bakker, B.M.; Brandt, M.; Boorsma, A.; Teixeira de Mattos, M.J.; Grivell, L.A.; Pronk, J.T.

    2001-01-01

    The tendency of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to favor alcoholic fermentation over respiration is a complication in aerobic, biomass-directed applications of this yeast. Overproduction of Hap4p, a positive transcriptional regulator of genes involved in respiratory metabolism, has been reported to

  5. Chemistry, distribution, and metabolism of tomato carotenoids and their impact on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachik, Frederick; Carvalho, Lorena; Bernstein, Paul S; Muir, Garth J; Zhao, Da-You; Katz, Nikita B

    2002-11-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that the consumption of tomatoes and tomato-based food products reduce the risk of prostate cancer in humans. This protective effect has been attributed to carotenoids, which are one of the major classes of phytochemicals in this fruit. The most abundant carotenoid in tomato is lycopene, followed by phytoene, phytofluene, zeta-carotene, gamma-carotene, beta-carotene, neurosporene, and lutein. The distribution of lycopene and related carotenoids in tomatoes and tomato-based food products has been determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography-UV/Visible photodiode array detection. Detailed qualitative and quantitative analysis of human serum, milk, and organs, particularly prostate, have revealed the presence of all the aforementioned carotenoids in biologically significant concentrations. Two oxidative metabolites of lycopene, 2,6-cyclolycopene-1,5-diols A and B, which are only present in tomatoes in extremely low concentrations, have been isolated and identified in human serum, milk, organs (liver, lung, breast, liver, prostate, colon) and skin. Carotenoids may also play an important role in the prevention of age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, and other blinding disorders. Among 25 dietary carotenoids and nine metabolites routinely found in human serum, mainly (3R,3'R,6'R)-lutein, (3R,3'R)-zeaxanthin, lycopene, and their metabolites were detected in ocular tissues. In this review we identified and quantified the complete spectrum of carotenoids from pooled human retinal pigment epithelium, ciliary body, iris, lens, and in the uveal tract and in other tissues of the human eye to gain a better insight into the metabolic pathways of ocular carotenoids. Although (3R,3'R,6'R)-lutein, (3R,3'R)-zeaxanthin, and their metabolites constitute the major carotenoids in human ocular tissues, lycopene and a wide range of dietary carotenoids have been detected in high concentrations in ciliary body and

  6. Neutronic characterization of cylindrical core of minor excess reactivity in the nuclear reactor IPEN/MB-01 from the measure of spatial and energetic distribution of neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aredes, Vitor Ottoni Garcia

    2014-01-01

    In this work was conducted the mapping of the thermal and epithermal neutrons flux and the energy spectrum of the neutrons in the reactor core IPEN/MB-01 for a cylindrical core configuration with minor excess reactivity, which is 28 x 28 fuel rods arranged in north-south and east-west directions. The calibration of control rods for this configuration determined their excess reactivity. The lower excess reactivity in the core decreased neutron flux disturbance caused by the neutron absorbing rods , given that the nuclear reactor was operated with the rods almost completely removed . Was used the 'Activation Analysis Technique' with the thin foil activation detectors ( infinitely diluted and hyper-pure), of different materials that work in different energy ranges, to calculate the saturation activity, used for determining the neutron flux and in the SANDBP code as input for the calculation of the neutrons energy spectrum. To discriminate thermal and epithermal flux , was used the 'Cadmium RatioTechnique' . The activation detectors were distributed in a total of 140 radial and axial positions in the reactor core and 16 irradiation, with bare and covered with cadmium activation foils. A model of this configuration was simulated by MCNP-5 code to determine the cadmium correction factor and comparison of the results obtained experimentally. The cylindrical configuration desired, with 17% less fuel than the standard rectangular configuration (28 x 26 fuel rods), reached criticality with the control rods approximately 90% removed, which decreased considerably the disturbance in neutron flux. Given the highest power density of the 28 x 28 cylindrical core, the neutron flux increased by over 50% in the central regions of the core compared to the values of the 28 x 26 standard rectangular core. (author)

  7. Framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis to investigate the perturbed metabolic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale metabolic network models have contributed to elucidating biological phenomena, and predicting gene targets to engineer for biotechnological applications. With their increasing importance, their precise network characterization has also been crucial for better understanding of the cellular physiology. Results We herein introduce a framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis (FMB to investigate organism’s metabolism under perturbation. FMB reveals direction of influences among metabolic modules, in which reactions with similar or positively correlated flux variation patterns are clustered, in response to specific perturbation using metabolic flux data. With metabolic flux data calculated by constraints-based flux analysis under both control and perturbation conditions, FMB, in essence, reveals the effects of specific perturbations on the biological system through network modularization and Bayesian network analysis at metabolic modular level. As a demonstration, this framework was applied to the genetically perturbed Escherichia coli metabolism, which is a lpdA gene knockout mutant, using its genome-scale metabolic network model. Conclusions After all, it provides alternative scenarios of metabolic flux distributions in response to the perturbation, which are complementary to the data obtained from conventionally available genome-wide high-throughput techniques or metabolic flux analysis.

  8. Framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis to investigate the perturbed metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic network models have contributed to elucidating biological phenomena, and predicting gene targets to engineer for biotechnological applications. With their increasing importance, their precise network characterization has also been crucial for better understanding of the cellular physiology. We herein introduce a framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis (FMB) to investigate organism's metabolism under perturbation. FMB reveals direction of influences among metabolic modules, in which reactions with similar or positively correlated flux variation patterns are clustered, in response to specific perturbation using metabolic flux data. With metabolic flux data calculated by constraints-based flux analysis under both control and perturbation conditions, FMB, in essence, reveals the effects of specific perturbations on the biological system through network modularization and Bayesian network analysis at metabolic modular level. As a demonstration, this framework was applied to the genetically perturbed Escherichia coli metabolism, which is a lpdA gene knockout mutant, using its genome-scale metabolic network model. After all, it provides alternative scenarios of metabolic flux distributions in response to the perturbation, which are complementary to the data obtained from conventionally available genome-wide high-throughput techniques or metabolic flux analysis.

  9. Calculation of the fine neutron flux distribution in the multi-zone reactor cell by spherical harmonics method; Odredjivanje fine raspodele fluksa u viseregionalnoj celiji reaktora primenom metode sfernih harmonika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jockovic, M; Stefanovic, D; Barucija, M [The Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-07-01

    This presentation contains development and application of method for calculating the neutron flux distribution by P{sub 3} approximation. A computer codes was developed for the ZUSE-Z-23 computer. Some typical results are included.

  10. Contribution to the qualification of calculation methods of reactivity and of flux and power distributions in nuclear pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abit, K.

    1984-01-01

    The last stage of the creation computer methods and calculations consists of verifying the running and qualifying the results obtained. The work of the present thesis consisted of improving a coupling method between radial and axial phenomena in a PWR core, refering to three-dimensional calculations, while ensuring a perfect coherence between the programmed physical models. The calculation results have been compared to measurements of reactivity and of flux distributions realized during start-up tests. Thus, the methods have been applied to the calculation of the evolution of a burnable poison (gadolinium) in view of