WorldWideScience

Sample records for mesoscopic structure conditions

  1. Mesoscopic structure conditions the emergence of cooperation on social networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, S.; Arenas, A.; Sanchez, A.

    2008-12-01

    We study the evolutionary Prisoner's Dilemma on two social networks substrates obtained from actual relational data. We find very different cooperation levels on each of them that cannot be easily understood in terms of global statistical properties of both networks. We claim that the result can be understood at the mesoscopic scale, by studying the community structure of the networks. We explain the dependence of the cooperation level on the temptation parameter in terms of the internal structure of the communities and their interconnections. We then test our results on community-structured, specifically designed artificial networks, finding a good agreement with the observations in both real substrates. Our results support the conclusion that studies of evolutionary games on model networks and their interpretation in terms of global properties may not be sufficient to study specific, real social systems. Further, the study allows us to define new quantitative parameters that summarize the mesoscopic structure of any network. In addition, the community perspective may be helpful to interpret the origin and behavior of existing networks as well as to design structures that show resilient cooperative behavior.

  2. NMR Probe for Electrons in Semiconductor Mesoscopic Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-11-14

    Nov 14, 2009 ... NMR Probe for Electrons in. Semiconductor. Mesoscopic Structures. Vikram Tripathi. TIFR, Mumbai. IInd Platinum Jubilee Meeting. Indian Academy of Sciences. Bangalore ... We showed NMR techniques can be very useful in such circumstances. .... Exploit the main physical difference. Low energy (long ...

  3. The interplay between microscopic and mesoscopic structures in complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Reichardt

    Full Text Available Understanding a complex network's structure holds the key to understanding its function. The physics community has contributed a multitude of methods and analyses to this cross-disciplinary endeavor. Structural features exist on both the microscopic level, resulting from differences between single node properties, and the mesoscopic level resulting from properties shared by groups of nodes. Disentangling the determinants of network structure on these different scales has remained a major, and so far unsolved, challenge. Here we show how multiscale generative probabilistic exponential random graph models combined with efficient, distributive message-passing inference techniques can be used to achieve this separation of scales, leading to improved detection accuracy of latent classes as demonstrated on benchmark problems. It sheds new light on the statistical significance of motif-distributions in neural networks and improves the link-prediction accuracy as exemplified for gene-disease associations in the highly consequential Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database.

  4. Mesoscopic layered structure in conducting polymer thin film fabricated by potential-programmed electropolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujitsuka, Mamoru (Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Nakahara, Reiko (Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Iyoda, Tomokazu (Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Shimidzu, Takeo (Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Tomita, Shigehisa (Toray Research Center Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan)); Hatano, Yayoi (Toray Research Center Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan)); Soeda, Fusami (Toray Research Center Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan)); Ishitani, Akira (Toray Research Center Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan)); Tsuchiya, Hajime (Nitto Technical Information Center Co., Ltd., Shimohozumi Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)); Ohtani, Akira (Central Research Lab., Nitto Denko Co., Ltd., Shimohozumi Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan))

    1992-11-01

    Mesoscopic layered structures in conducting polymer thin films are fabricated by the potential-programmed electropolymerization method. High lateral quality in the layered structure is realized by the improvement of polymerization conditions, i.e., a mixture of pyrrole and bithiophene as monomers, a silicon single-crystal wafer as a working electrode and propylene carbonate as a solvent. SIMS depth profiling of the resulting layered films indicates a significant linear correlation between the electric charge passed and the thickness of the individual layers on a 100 A scale. (orig.)

  5. Electronic properties of mesoscopic graphene structures: Charge confinement and control of spin and charge transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhkov, A.V., E-mail: arozhkov@gmail.co [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412, Moscow (Russian Federation); Giavaras, G. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bliokh, Yury P. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Freilikher, Valentin [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This brief review discusses electronic properties of mesoscopic graphene-based structures. These allow controlling the confinement and transport of charge and spin; thus, they are of interest not only for fundamental research, but also for applications. The graphene-related topics covered here are: edges, nanoribbons, quantum dots, pn-junctions, pnp-structures, and quantum barriers and waveguides. This review is partly intended as a short introduction to graphene mesoscopics.

  6. Small-angle scattering study of mesoscopic structures in charged gel and their evolution on dehydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Annaka, Masahiko; Hara, Kazuhiro

    2003-01-01

    reveal that, depending upon the [NIPA]/[SA] ratio, the dehydrated NIPA-SA gel shows two mesoscopic structures: one consists of randomly distributed SA-rich islands in NIPA matrix, while the other is a microphase-separated structure, composed of NIPA-rich and SA-rich domains. In addition, the SANS...... experiments reveal the mesoscopic structural features during the dehydration process. As the concentration of the network polymers increases, NIPA-rich and water-rich domains segregate in the gel. Then, an electrostatic interaction between the segregated domains induces a microphase-separated structure...... in the limit of the dehydrated NIPA-SA gel....

  7. Contribution of mesoscopic modeling for flows prediction in cracked concrete buildings in condition of severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.

    2010-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis aims at characterising and modeling the mechanical behavior of concrete at the mesoscopic scale. The more general scope of this study is the development of mesoscopic model for concrete; this model is to represent the concrete as a heterogeneous medium, taking into account the difference between aggregate and cement paste respecting the grading curve, the model parameters describe the mechanical and thermal behavior of cement paste and aggregates. We are interested in understanding the concrete behaviour, considered one structure. A program of random granular structure valid in 2D and 3D has been developed. This program is interfaced with the Finite Element code CAST3M in order to compute the numerical simulations. A method for numerical representation of the inclusions of concrete was also developed and validated by projection of the geometry on the shape functions, thus eliminating the problems of meshing that made the representation of all aggregates skeleton almost impossible, particularly in 3D. Firstly, the model is studied in two-dimensional and three-dimensional in order to optimize the geometrical model of the inner structure of concrete in terms of the meshing strategy and the smallest size of the aggregate to be taken into account. The results of the 2D and 3D model are analyzed and compared in the case of uniaxial tension and uniaxial compression. The model used is an isotropic unilateral damage model from Fichant [Fichant et al., 1999]. The model allows to simulate both the macroscopic behavior but also with the local studies of the distribution of crack and crack opening. The model shows interesting results on the transition from diffuse to localized damage and is able to reproduce dilatancy in compression. Finally, the mesoscopic model is applied to three simulations: the calculation of the permeability of cracked concrete; the simulation of the hydration of concrete at early age and finally the scale effect illustrated by bending

  8. Probing mesoscopic structures in hierarchically structured materials and porous media by small-angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, D.

    2010-01-01

    Small-angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray scattering (SAXS) are powerful techniques to investigate structural features of inhomogeneities i.e., the density fluctuations in condensed matter, on a length scale ranging from one nanometer up to one micron. 'Structural features' include size or size distribution, shape, dimensionality, inter-particle spatial correlation etc. Mesoscopic structure in hierarchically structured materials, where density fluctuations exist over a wide length scale, may be probed by combined usage of small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron or X-ray scattering. Such hierarchically structured micrometric grains may be synthesized by evaporation induced self assembly of nanoparticles. Rate of drying and physico-chemical properties of the virgin colloidal suspension are important aspects in determining the morphology of the grains as well as the inter-particle interactions within grains. Meso/macro pores can be templated in such grains by adding soft template materials and followed by calcinations. In this lecture, applications of SANS/SAXS on such hierarchically structured grains, synthesized by spray drying technique, will be discussed. In addition, a few applications of SANS/SAXS to probe porous materials and non-Euclidean systems will also be elaborated. In some cases, Monte Carlo based simulations have been performed in order to understand the observations from the scattering experiments and these will also be talked about. (author)

  9. Mesoscopic surface roughness of ice crystals pervasive across a wide range of ice crystal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, N. B.; Miller, A.; Amaral, M.; Cumiskey, A.

    2014-11-01

    Here we show high-magnification images of hexagonal ice crystals acquired by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Most ice crystals were grown and sublimated in the water vapor environment of an FEI-Quanta-200 ESEM, but crystals grown in a laboratory diffusion chamber were also transferred intact and imaged via ESEM. All of these images display prominent mesoscopic topography including linear striations, ridges, islands, steps, peaks, pits, and crevasses; the roughness is not observed to be confined to prism facets. The observations represent the most highly magnified images of ice surfaces yet reported and expand the range of conditions in which rough surface features are known to be conspicuous. Microscale surface topography is seen to be ubiquitously present at temperatures ranging from -10 °C to -40 °C, in supersaturated and subsaturated conditions, on all crystal facets, and irrespective of substrate. Despite the constant presence of surface roughness, the patterns of roughness are observed to be dramatically different between growing and sublimating crystals, and transferred crystals also display qualitatively different patterns of roughness. Crystals are also demonstrated to sometimes exhibit inhibited growth in moderately supersaturated conditions following exposure to near-equilibrium conditions, a phenomenon interpreted as evidence of 2-D nucleation. New knowledge about the characteristics of these features could affect the fundamental understanding of ice surfaces and their physical parameterization in the context of satellite retrievals and cloud modeling. Links to supplemental videos of ice growth and sublimation are provided.

  10. NMR Probe for Electrons in Semiconductor Mesoscopic Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-11-14

    Nov 14, 2009 ... Strongly correlated electron systems: Overview. Problem: How to detect the electronic state in nanoscale structures. Two examples where the usual methods don't work. Solution: We showed NMR techniques can be very useful in such circumstances. Outline ...

  11. Predicting protein folding pathways at the mesoscopic level based on native interactions between secondary structure elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since experimental determination of protein folding pathways remains difficult, computational techniques are often used to simulate protein folding. Most current techniques to predict protein folding pathways are computationally intensive and are suitable only for small proteins. Results By assuming that the native structure of a protein is known and representing each intermediate conformation as a collection of fully folded structures in which each of them contains a set of interacting secondary structure elements, we show that it is possible to significantly reduce the conformation space while still being able to predict the most energetically favorable folding pathway of large proteins with hundreds of residues at the mesoscopic level, including the pig muscle phosphoglycerate kinase with 416 residues. The model is detailed enough to distinguish between different folding pathways of structurally very similar proteins, including the streptococcal protein G and the peptostreptococcal protein L. The model is also able to recognize the differences between the folding pathways of protein G and its two structurally similar variants NuG1 and NuG2, which are even harder to distinguish. We show that this strategy can produce accurate predictions on many other proteins with experimentally determined intermediate folding states. Conclusion Our technique is efficient enough to predict folding pathways for both large and small proteins at the mesoscopic level. Such a strategy is often the only feasible choice for large proteins. A software program implementing this strategy (SSFold is available at http://faculty.cs.tamu.edu/shsze/ssfold.

  12. Modifications of the Mesoscopic Structure of Cellulose in Paper Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missori, Mauro; Bicchieri, Marina; Mondelli, Claudia; De Spirito, Marco; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Papi, Massimiliano; Castellano, Carlo; Castellano, Agostina Congiu; Schweins, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Paper is the main component of a huge quantity of cultural heritage. It is primarily composed of cellulose that undergoes significant degradation with the passage of time. By using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), we investigated cellulose's supramolecular structure, which allows access to degradation agents, in ancient and modern samples. For the first time, SANS data were interpreted in terms of water-filled pores, with their sizes increasing from 1.61 nm up to 1.97 nm in natural and artificially aged papers. The protective effect of gelatine sizing was also observed

  13. Mesoscopic structure prediction of nanoparticle assembly and coassembly: Theoretical foundation

    KAUST Repository

    Hur, Kahyun

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical framework that unifies polymer field theory and density functional theory in order to efficiently predict ordered nanostructure formation of systems having considerable complexity in terms of molecular structures and interactions. We validate our approach by comparing its predictions with previous simulation results for model systems. We illustrate the flexibility of our approach by applying it to hybrid systems composed of block copolymers and ligand coated nanoparticles. We expect that our approach will enable the treatment of multicomponent self-assembly with a level of molecular complexity that approaches experimental systems. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  14. CHAIRMEN'S FOREWORD: The Seventh International Conference on New Phenomena in Mesoscopic Structures & The Fifth International Conference on Surfaces and Interfaces of Mesoscopic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Yoshinobu; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2006-05-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the proceedings of the joint Seventh International Conference on New Phenomena in Mesoscopic Structures and Fifth International Conference on Surfaces and Interfaces of Mesoscopic Devices, which was held from November 27th - December 2nd, 2005, at the Ritz Carlton Kapalua, Maui, Hawaii. The string of these conferences dates back to the first one in 1989. Of special importance is that this year's conference was dedicated to Professor Gottfried Landwehr, in recognition of his many outstanding contributions to semiconductor physics. A personal tribute to Prof Landwehr by Dr K von Klitzing leads off this issue. The scope of NPMS-7/SIMD-5 spans nano-fabrication through complex phase coherent mesoscopic systems including nano-transistors and nano-scale characterization. Topics of interest include: •Nanoscale fabrication: high-resolution electron lithography, FIB nano-patterning, scanning- force-microscopy (SFM) lithography, SFM-stimulated growth, novel patterning, nano-imprint lithography, special etching, and self-assembled monolayers •Nanocharacterization: SFM characterization, ballistic-electron emission microscopy (BEEM), optical studies of nanostructures, tunneling, properties of discrete impurities, phase coherence, noise, THz studies, and electro-luminescence in small structures •Nanodevices: ultra-scaled FETs, quantum single-electron transistors (SETS), resonant tunneling diodes, ferromagnetic and spin devices, superlattice arrays, IR detectors with quantum dots and wires, quantum point contacts, non-equilibrium transport, simulation, ballistic transport, molecular electronic devices, carbon nanotubes, spin selection devices, spin-coupled quantum dots, and nanomagnetics •Quantum-coherent transport: the quantum Hall effect, ballistic quantum systems, quantum-computing implementations and theory, and magnetic spin systems •Mesoscopic structures: quantum wires and dots, quantum chaos

  15. Mesoscopic Structural Observations of Cores from the Chelungpu Fault System, Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project Hole-A, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural characteristics of fault rocks distributed within major fault zones provide basic information in understanding the physical aspects of faulting. Mesoscopic structural observations of the drilledcores from Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Hole-A are reported in this article to describe and reveal the distribution of fault rocks within the Chelungpu Fault System.

  16. Mesoscopic structures reveal the network between the layers of multiplex data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Wu, Zhihao; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-10-01

    Multiplex networks describe a large variety of complex systems, whose elements (nodes) can be connected by different types of interactions forming different layers (networks) of the multiplex. Multiplex networks include social networks, transportation networks, or biological networks in the cell or in the brain. Extracting relevant information from these networks is of crucial importance for solving challenging inference problems and for characterizing the multiplex networks microscopic and mesoscopic structure. Here we propose an information theory method to extract the network between the layers of multiplex data sets, forming a "network of networks." We build an indicator function, based on the entropy of network ensembles, to characterize the mesoscopic similarities between the layers of a multiplex network, and we use clustering techniques to characterize the communities present in this network of networks. We apply the proposed method to study the Multiplex Collaboration Network formed by scientists collaborating on different subjects and publishing in the American Physical Society journals. The analysis of this data set reveals the interplay between the collaboration networks and the organization of knowledge in physics.

  17. Nonlinearity and isotope effect in temporal evolution of mesoscopic structure during hydration of cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, S.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of cement is still in its infancy despite the fact that cement is ubiquitous material which is indispensable in the construction industry, in nuclear energy programs for immobilization of non heat-generating low-level radioactive waste, and in the petroleum industry to line oil wells by pumping cement slurry to isolate productive zones and with global production exceeding that of any other material of technological importance. The total world consumption of cement in 2008 was about 2.5 billion metric tons almost double of that of steel. Manufacturing of cement contributes about 4% of global and 5-7% of the total man-made CO 2 emissions. The understanding of the mechanism of its hydration and evolution of cement-water mixtures into a material of high compressive strength is paramount to improve its life time and other macroscopic properties such as compressive strength, permeability, elastic modulus etc. The mechanism of hydration of cement and evolution of cement-water mixtures into gels of high compressive strength is poorly understood, despite extensive research over the past century. Recent investigations, based on neutron scattering measurements, aims at unraveling this enigma and outlines, for the first time, the evolution of the mesoscopic structure of the cement paste which exhibits temporal oscillations, strongly dependent on the scale of observation and on the medium of hydration (light or heavy water). While the formation of hydration products is synchronous for hydration with H 2 O, the process is non-synchronous for hydration with D 2 O. The reason why morphological patterns of domains at different times look dissimilar, as seen before, for different hydration media emerges as a natural consequence of this finding. Mesoscopic structure of cement paste exhibits isotope effect. The structures arise from well- characterised chemical reactions as water diffuses through the porous material to bring about the water-surface interactions within

  18. Mesoscopic Modeling of Concrete under Different Moisture Conditions and Loading Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie

    2013-01-01

    We present a mesoscopic finite element model for simulating the rate- and moisture-dependent material behavior of concrete. The idealized mesostructure consists of aggregates surrounded by an interfacial transition zone embedded in the bulk material. We examine the influence of the most significa....... The results indicate that the loading rate has a stronger influence than the saturation level on fracture processes and global strength....

  19. Investigation of structure formation mechanism of a mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolite by mesoscopic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanqun; Liu, Baoyu; Kiryutina, Tatyana; Xi, Hongxia; Qian, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Amphiphilic surfactant molecules have a profound influence in directing zeolite crystallization, while the self-assembly process between the functionalized surfactant and aluminosilicate species is the key factor in determining the structure of zeolites. However, such a complex process is extremely difficult to be characterized experimentally. A novel mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolite with hexagonal mesostructures and crystalline microporous frameworks has been synthesized in our previous work. In present research, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), a mesoscopic simulation method, has been used to investigate the self-assembly process of a surfactant/tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS)/water system in order to explore the structure formation mechanism of a mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolite. The simulation results show that under a certain composition, the specially designed bifunctional triquaternary ammonium-type surfactant and TEOS can form spherical core-shell micelles. The core (inner section) of a spherical micelle is occupied by hydrophobic beads, while the shell (outer section) is formed by hydrophilic beads. Besides, an ordered, uniform mesophase can be formed under a constant shear rate and transformed into mesoscale structure. The simulation results are consistent with the corresponding experimental results. Overall, the DPD simulation is a valuable tool to investigate the porogenic mechanism of surfactants. The present approach may open a window for investigating the formation mechanism of mesoporous zeolites that involves the surfactant-driven synthesis process.

  20. Mesoscopic Community Structure of Financial Markets Revealed by Price and Sign Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, Assaf; Besamusca, Ferry; MacMahon, Mel; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The mesoscopic organization of complex systems, from financial markets to the brain, is an intermediate between the microscopic dynamics of individual units (stocks or neurons, in the mentioned cases), and the macroscopic dynamics of the system as a whole. The organization is determined by "communities" of units whose dynamics, represented by time series of activity, is more strongly correlated internally than with the rest of the system. Recent studies have shown that the binary projections of various financial and neural time series exhibit nontrivial dynamical features that resemble those of the original data. This implies that a significant piece of information is encoded into the binary projection (i.e. the sign) of such increments. Here, we explore whether the binary signatures of multiple time series can replicate the same complex community organization of the financial market, as the original weighted time series. We adopt a method that has been specifically designed to detect communities from cross-correlation matrices of time series data. Our analysis shows that the simpler binary representation leads to a community structure that is almost identical with that obtained using the full weighted representation. These results confirm that binary projections of financial time series contain significant structural information.

  1. Mesoscopic Community Structure of Financial Markets Revealed by Price and Sign Fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Almog

    Full Text Available The mesoscopic organization of complex systems, from financial markets to the brain, is an intermediate between the microscopic dynamics of individual units (stocks or neurons, in the mentioned cases, and the macroscopic dynamics of the system as a whole. The organization is determined by "communities" of units whose dynamics, represented by time series of activity, is more strongly correlated internally than with the rest of the system. Recent studies have shown that the binary projections of various financial and neural time series exhibit nontrivial dynamical features that resemble those of the original data. This implies that a significant piece of information is encoded into the binary projection (i.e. the sign of such increments. Here, we explore whether the binary signatures of multiple time series can replicate the same complex community organization of the financial market, as the original weighted time series. We adopt a method that has been specifically designed to detect communities from cross-correlation matrices of time series data. Our analysis shows that the simpler binary representation leads to a community structure that is almost identical with that obtained using the full weighted representation. These results confirm that binary projections of financial time series contain significant structural information.

  2. Biomineralization of struvite crystals by Proteus mirabilis from artificial urine and their mesoscopic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prywer, J. [Institute of Physics, Technical University of Lodz, ul. Wolczanska 219, 93-005 Lodz (Poland); Torzewska, A. [Department of Immunobiology of Bacteria, Institute of Microbiology, Biotechnology and Immunology, University of Lodz, ul. Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2010-12-15

    In order to investigate the mineralization of struvite we performed the experiment of struvite growth process from artificial urine. The crystallization process was induced by Proteus mirabilis, as these bacteria are mainly isolated from infectious stones. The crystallization process occurred at conditions mimicking the real urinary tract infection. Our results show that struvite exhibits polar properties. This feature of struvite crystals is potentially very important in the case of binding additives which may either enhance or inhibit crystallization process. It seems also that the differences in the polarity of opposite faces of c-axis play important role in directing the struvite mesoscopic arrangement. We also described recent developments concerning curcumin - pigment extracted from the roots of turmeric commonly known as a spice added to various food preparations. Curcumin exhibited the effect against Proteus mirabilis inhibiting the activity of urease and consequently decreasing the efficiency of struvite growth. Therefore, curcumin belongs to phytoterapheutic components, which may be the alternative with relation to the antibiotic therapy. The paper concludes with a future outlook and goals in this field of research. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. ... National Center for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, UAS-GKVK Campus, Bangalore 560 065, India ...

  4. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in ...

  5. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in biological ...

  6. Linear optical absorption spectra of mesoscopic structures in intense THz fields: Free-particle properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    We theoretically study the effect of THz radiation on the linear optical absorption spectra of semiconductor structures. A general theoretical framework, based on nonequilibrium Green functions, is formulated and applied to the calculation of linear optical absorption spectrum for several...... stable steps appear in the absorption spectrum when conditions for dynamical localization are met. [S0163-1829(95)03412-2]....

  7. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Phospholipids are the main components of biological membranes and dissolved in water these molecules self-assemble into closed structures, of which bilayers are the most relevant from a biological point of view. Lipid bilayers are often used, both in experimental and by theoretical investigations...... to coarse grain a biological membrane. The conclusion of this comparison is that there can be many valid different strategies, but that the results obtained by the various mesoscopic models are surprisingly consistent. A second objective of this review is to illustrate how mesoscopic models can be used...

  8. Absence of bacterial imprints on struvite-containing kidney stones: a structural investigation at the mesoscopic and atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Dominique; André, Gilles; Weil, Raphael; Matzen, Guy; Emmanuel, Veron; Carpentier, Xavier; Daudon, M

    2012-04-01

    Bacterial imprints are always observed on highly carbonated apatite kidney stones but not struvite kidney stones. Struvite and carbonated apatite stones with a high CO(3)(2-)/PO(4)(3-) rate are believed to develop from infections, but their structural differences at the mesoscopic scale lack explanation. We investigated 17 urinary calculi composed mainly of struvite or carbonated apatite by Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy, and powder neutron diffraction techniques. Carbonated apatite but not struvite stones showed bacterial imprints. If the same stone contained both carbonated apatite and struvite components, bacterial imprints were observed on the carbonated apatite but not the struvite part. Moreover, neutron powder diffraction experiments revealed the crystal size of struvite stones were larger than that of carbonated apatite stones (250 ± 50 vs 50 nm). Bacterial imprints may appear more easily on kidney stones with small nanocrystals, such as carbonated apatite than with large nanocrystals, such as struvite. This approach may help identify bacteria contributing to stone formation, perhaps with negative results of urine culture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vortex-antivortex patterns in mesoscopic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teniers, Gerd; Moshchalkov, V.V.; Chibotaru, L.F.; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the nucleation of superconductivity in mesoscopic structures of different shape (triangle, square and rectangle). This was made possible by using an analytical gauge transformation for the vector potential A which gives A n =0 for the normal component along the boundary line of the rectangle. As a consequence the superconductor-vacuum boundary condition reduces to the Neumann boundary condition. By solving the linearized Ginzburg-Landau equation with this boundary condition we have determined the field-temperature superconducting phase boundary and the corresponding vortex patterns. The comparison of these patterns for different structures demonstrates that the critical parameters of a superconductor can be manipulated and fine-tuned through nanostructuring

  10. Porous grains of assembled ceria nanoparticles using evaporative drying: synthesis and mesoscopic structural investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, D.; Bahadur, J.; Mazumder, S.; Melo, J.S.; D'Souza, S.F.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2010-01-01

    Ceria is one of the most important catalytic materials that can play multiple roles owing to its ability to release and uptake oxygen under catalytic reaction conditions and thus has potential for the treatment of emissions from automobiles. In this connection, synthesis of meso/macro porous ceria grains attracts a great deal of attention. Spray drying, an indispensable method for food industry, has re-embellished itself in science and technology mainly due to two reasons: (i) to understand the evaporation induced self-assembly of nanoparticles at various physicochemical and thermodynamical conditions; (ii) to synthesize novel nanocomposites, colloidal crystals, ordered mesoporous materials etc

  11. Mesoscopic multiphase structures and the interfaces of block and graft copolymers in bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Yushu

    1996-01-01

    Microphase-separated structures of copolymers with various architectures and their polymer/polymer interfaces were studied. They are SP diblock, PSP triblock, and SPP graft copolymers, where S and P denote polystyrene and poly(2-vinylpyridine), respectively. Morphological observations were carried out by means of transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. Chain dimensions of component polymers were measured by small-angle neutron scattering and microphase-separated interfaces were observed by neutron reflectivity measurements using deuterium-labeled samples. It was clarified that morphological phase transitions among thermodynamically equilibrium structures for SP diblock and PSP triblock copolymers occur at almost the same compositions; however, those of SPP graft copolymers tend to occur at higher volume fraction of polystyrene, φ s , than those for block copolymers. As for alternating lamellar structures it turned out to be clear that lamellar domain spacings, D's, were scaled as the 2/3 power of the molecular weight of polymers irrespective of their architectures. S block chains of SP diblock and PSP triblock copolymers in lamellar structures were both confirmed to be deformed toward the direction perpendicular to the lamellar interfaces, but it revealed that their volumes were preserved. Further, S/P interfacial thicknesses of SP and PSP were essentially the same to each other and the values defined as the FWHM of the error functions which express the segment density distributions of the interfaces were determined to be about 4 nm. (author)

  12. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Phospholipids are the main components of biological membranes and dissolved in water these molecules self-assemble into closed structures, of which bilayers are the most relevant from a biological point of view. Lipid bilayers are often used, both in experimental and by theoretical investigations......, as model systems to understand the fundamental properties of biomembranes. The properties of lipid bilayers can be studied at different time and length scales. For some properties it is sufficient to envision a membrane as an elastic sheet, while for others it is important to take into account the details...... to coarse grain a biological membrane. The conclusion of this comparison is that there can be many valid different strategies, but that the results obtained by the various mesoscopic models are surprisingly consistent. A second objective of this review is to illustrate how mesoscopic models can be used...

  13. Core-shell structure in (La/Ce)CrO3 nanoparticles: evidences from macroscopic, microscopic and mesoscopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, P.K.; Yusuf, S.M.; Mukadam, M.D.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental properties of a magnetic material vary considerably at the nanoscale as compared to its bulk counterpart. This is often ascribed to the presence of disordered spins at the surface of the nanoparticles. The magnetic behavior of these surface-spins is different from the core-spins, and hence we can consider such nanoparticles as a core-shell type. However, it is difficult to get an evidence of this shell in a 'bare' nanoparticle system, because the magnetization-contributions of core and shell become indistinguishable in most cases. We have used a combination of microscopic neutron diffraction, mesoscopic polarized neutron small angle scattering (SANSPOL), and macroscopic dc-magnetization techniques to investigate core-shell structure in 'bare' La 0.2 Ce 0.8 CrO 3 nanoparticles, synthesized by using a two-step method. It is noteworthy to mention here that, in our study, the La 0.2 Ce 0.8 CrO 3 nanoparticles showed a novel coexistence of magnetization and exchange-bias-field sign-reversal, which might have an application in designing volatile and thermally assisted magnetic memory elements. The first evidence of a possible core-shell structure was obtained from the presence of surface roughness/defects in the high resolution transmission electron microscopy images. Microscopic neutron diffraction study depicted that these nanoparticles are antiferromagnetic in nature. However, the SANSPOL data at 2.5 K under a 3.5-T magnetic field show the presence of a pronounced asymmetric scattering in the iso-intensity plot signifying the presence of a strong interference between nuclear and magnetic scattering amplitudes. It has been argued that the presence of such asymmetric scattering in the SANSPOL data of these antiferromagnetic nanoparticles arises from the shell. The mean core diameter and shell thickness are found to be 12.3 ± 1.1, and 2.8 ± 0.4 nm, respectively. The net magnetization (observed from the dc magnetization study), arising from the shell of

  14. Mean field theories and dual variation mathematical structures of the mesoscopic model

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Mean field approximation has been adopted to describe macroscopic phenomena from microscopic overviews. It is still in progress; fluid mechanics, gauge theory, plasma physics, quantum chemistry, mathematical oncology, non-equilibirum thermodynamics.  spite of such a wide range of scientific areas that are concerned with the mean field theory, a unified study of its mathematical structure has not been discussed explicitly in the open literature.  The benefit of this point of view on nonlinear problems should have significant impact on future research, as will be seen from the underlying features of self-assembly or bottom-up self-organization which is to be illustrated in a unified way. The aim of this book is to formulate the variational and hierarchical aspects of the equations that arise in the mean field theory from macroscopic profiles to microscopic principles, from dynamics to equilibrium, and from biological models to models that arise from chemistry and physics.

  15. Probabilistic conditional independence structures

    CERN Document Server

    Studeny, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Probabilistic Conditional Independence Structures provides the mathematical description of probabilistic conditional independence structures; the author uses non-graphical methods of their description, and takes an algebraic approach.The monograph presents the methods of structural imsets and supermodular functions, and deals with independence implication and equivalence of structural imsets.Motivation, mathematical foundations and areas of application are included, and a rough overview of graphical methods is also given.In particular, the author has been careful to use suitable terminology, and presents the work so that it will be understood by both statisticians, and by researchers in artificial intelligence.The necessary elementary mathematical notions are recalled in an appendix.

  16. Quantum Transport in Mesoscopic Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    988. RESONANCE │ November 2010. GENERAL │ ARTICLE. Quantum Transport in Mesoscopic Systems. CoulombBlockadeandKondoEffect. Navinder Singh. Keywords. Quantum transport, mesoscopic systems, Coulomb blockade,. Kondo effect. Navinder Singh works in the Physical Research. Laboratory, Ahmedabad.

  17. Mesoscopic electronics beyond DC transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Carlo, Leonardo

    Since the inception of mesoscopic electronics in the 1980's, direct current (dc) measurements have underpinned experiments in quantum transport. Novel techniques complementing dc transport are becoming paramount to new developments in mesoscopic electronics, particularly as the road is paved toward quantum information processing. This thesis describes seven experiments on GaAs/AlGaAs and graphene nanostructures unified by experimental techniques going beyond traditional dc transport. Firstly, dc current induced by microwave radiation applied to an open chaotic quantum dot is investigated. Asymmetry of mesoscopic fluctuations of induced current in perpendicular magnetic field is established as a tool for separating the quantum photovoltaic effect from classical rectification. A differential charge sensing technique is next developed using integrated quantum point contacts to resolve the spatial distribution of charge inside a double quantum clot. An accurate method for determining interdot tunnel coupling and electron temperature using charge sensing is demonstrated. A two-channel system for detecting current noise in mesoscopic conductors is developed, enabling four experiments where shot noise probes transmission properties not available in dc transport and Johnson noise serves as an electron thermometer. Suppressed shot noise is observed in quantum point contacts at zero parallel magnetic field, associated with the 0.7 structure in conductance. This suppression evolves with increasing field into the shot-noise signature of spin-lifted mode degeneracy. Quantitative agreement is found with a phenomenological model for density-dependent mode splitting. Shot noise measurements of multi-lead quantum-dot structures in the Coulomb blockade regime distill the mechanisms by which Coulomb interaction and quantum indistinguishability correlate electron flow. Gate-controlled sign reversal of noise cross correlation in two capacitively-coupled dots is observed, and shown to

  18. Mesoscopic photon heat transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojanen, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir-Wingreen-Landauer-typ......We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir......-Wingreen-Landauer-type of conductance formula, which gives the photonic heat current through an arbitrary circuit element coupled to two dissipative reservoirs at finite temperatures. As an illustration we present an exact solution for the case when the intermediate circuit can be described as an electromagnetic resonator. We discuss...

  19. The role of mesoscopic structuring on the intermixing of spin-polarised conduction channels in thin-film ferromagnets for spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcer, D.; Atkinson, D.

    2017-09-01

    The separation of spin-up and spin-down conduction channels is fundamental to electronic transport in ferromagnets and essential for spintronic functionality. The spin states available for conduction are defined by the ferromagnetic material, but additional physical factors can affect scattering and modify the spin-dependence of conduction. Here the effect of mesoscopic structuring, arising during the growth of ferromagnetic thin films, on the electronic transport was investigated. Resistivity and anisotropic magnetoresistance were measured in a series of Ni80Fe20 thin films as a function of nominal film thickness from 3 {nm} up to 20 {nm}. The observed thickness dependence of the resisivity and magnetic anisotropy of resistivity are interpreted using a model that accounts for the macroscopic structuring from the growth of the films and incorporates a structural dependence of the spin-flip scattering. The model shows good agreement for both the thickness dependence of the resistivity and the reduction of the anisotropic magnetoresistivity. The latter indicating that increasing mixing of the conducting spin channels occurs in ultra-thin films, mainly a consequence of macroscopic structuring of the films.

  20. Fiscal 1997 report on the results of the technical development of super metal under consignment from NEDO. Technology to create ferrous mesoscopic structure control materials; Super metal no gijutsu kaihatsu (tetsukei mesoscopic soshiki seigyo zairyo sosei gijutsu) seika hokokusho (1997 nendo). Shin Energy Sangyo Gijutsu Sogo Kaihatsu Kiko (NEDO) itaku kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The fiscal 1997 results were reported of the project on the technical development of super metal which draws out limit performance of ferrous metal and improves the recyclability. In the study of large-strain deformation, a study was carried out with the use of large-strain deformation of more than 50% per 1 pass (strain rate: 0.7 or more) and multi-phase structure. By the crystal microstructuring technology, a level was reached where approximately 1{mu}m crystal size can be obtained. In the study of high magnetic field utilization, the course of study of the structure control and microstructuring was chosen in the preliminary experiment using the existing 8 tesla magnet, and the design and fabrication of a new 12 tesla large-diameter magnet were conducted. In the study of material structure prediction, modeling of microstructuring by recrystallization and establishment of a material predicting method of micro/multi-phase/mixed-grain structures were made the subjects. In the analysis of the mesoscopic structure, the mesoscopic analysis was made of the 0.3C-9Ni steel microstructured by the large-strain deformation thermal processing, and it was shown that the reflective electronic image measured by varying accelerating voltage gives new structural information. 111 refs., 135 figs., 35 tabs.

  1. X-ray diffraction from mesoscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Press, W.; Bahr, D.; Tolan, M.; Burandt, B.; Mueller, M.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.; Nitz, V.; Stettner, J.

    1994-01-01

    Two activities of our group concerning structures on mesoscopic length scales are presented: (1) CoSi 2 layers buried in Si-wafers have been studied with many scattering geometries; the emphasis is on diffuse scattering from rough interfaces and diffuse scattering from atomic scale defects. (2) The other example is an investigation of laterally structured surfaces in the region of total external reflection and around Bragg peaks. In both cases extensions of the presently available models are necessary. ((orig.))

  2. Quantum Transport in Mesoscopic Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A short introduction to the quantum transport in mesoscopic systems is given, and various regim- es of quantum transport such as diffusive, ballis- tic, and adiabatic are explained. The effect of interactions and inelastic scattering along with the characteristic coherent effects of mesoscopic systems give interesting new ...

  3. Mesoscopic phenomena in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Altshuler, BL; Webb, RA

    1991-01-01

    The physics of disordered systems has enjoyed a resurgence of interest in the last decade. New concepts such as weak localization, interaction effects and Coulomb gap, have been developed for the transport properties of metals and insulators. With the fabrication of smaller and smaller samples and the routine availability of low temperatures, new physics has emerged from the studies of small devices. The new field goes under the name ""mesoscopic physics"" and has rapidly developed, both experimentally and theoretically. This book is designed to review the current status of the field.

  4. Contact Geometry of Mesoscopic Thermodynamics and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Grmela

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The time evolution during which macroscopic systems reach thermodynamic equilibrium states proceeds as a continuous sequence of contact structure preserving transformations maximizing the entropy. This viewpoint of mesoscopic thermodynamics and dynamics provides a unified setting for the classical equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and statistical mechanics. One of the illustrations presented in the paper is a new version of extended nonequilibrium thermodynamics with fluxes as extra state variables.

  5. Universal mesoscopic conductance fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evangelou, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of conductance fluctuations in disordered metallic systems with size large compared to the mean free path of the electron but small compared to localization length is considered. It is demonstrates that fluctuations have an universal character and are due to repulsion between levels and spectral rigidity. The basic fluctuation measures for the energy spectrum in the mesoscopic regime of disordered systems are consistent with the Gaussian random matrix ensemble predictions. Although our disordered electron random matrix ensemble does not belong to the Gaussian ensemble the two ensembles turn out to be essentially similar. The level repulsion and the spectral rigidity found in nuclear spectra should also be observed in the metallic regime of Anderson localization. 7 refs. (orig.)

  6. Stationary transport in mesoscopic hybrid structures with contacts to superconducting and normal wires. A Green's function approach for multiterminal setups

    OpenAIRE

    Arrachea, Liliana

    2008-01-01

    We generalize the representation of the real time Green's functions introduced by Langreth and Nordlander [Phys. Rev. B 43 2541 (1991)] and Meir and Wingreen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 68 2512 (1992)] in stationary quantum transport in order to study problems with hybrid structures containing normal (N) and superconducting (S) pieces. We illustrate the treatment in a S-N junction under a stationary bias and investigate in detail the behavior of the equilibrium currents in a normal ring threaded by a m...

  7. Semiclassical approaches to mesoscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brack, M.

    2001-01-01

    We review semiclassical methods of determining both average trends and quantum shell effects in the properties of finite fermion systems. I. Extended Thomas-Fermi model (ETF): the average, self-consistent mean field can be determined by density variational calculations using the semiclassical gradient-expanded ETF density functional for the kinetic energy. From this, average ground-state properties such as binding energies, densities, separation energies, etc. can be derived. II. Periodic orbit theory (POT): quantum oscillations in a mean-field system can be obtained from the semiclassical trace formula that expresses the quantum-mechanical density of states in terms of the periodic orbits of the corresponding classical system. Only the shortest periodic orbits with highest degeneracy are important for the coarse-grained level density, i.e., for the gross shell effects. Particular uniform approximations are required to treat systems with mixed classical dynamics due to the effects of symmetry breaking and orbit bifurcations. Ill. Local-current approximation (LCA): the collective dynamics of the fermions can be described in linear-response theory, approximating the particle-hole excitation operators semi-classically by local current distributions. The method is suitable in combination with both the ETF density variational approach or with the Kohn-Sham density functional approach for the ground state, and allows one to describe optic response properties such as static polarizabilities and plasmon resonances. Applications of all methods to metal clusters and various mesoscopic nano-structures are given. (author)

  8. Stationary transport in mesoscopic hybrid structures with contacts to superconducting and normal wires: A Green's function approach for multiterminal setups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana

    2009-03-01

    We generalize the representation of the real-time Green’s functions introduced by Langreth and Nordlander [Phys. Rev. B 43, 2541 (1991)] and Meir and Wingreen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 2512 (1992)] in stationary quantum transport in order to study problems with hybrid structures containing normal (N) and superconducting (S) pieces without introducing Nambu representation. We illustrate the treatment in a S-N junction under a stationary bias. We derive expressions for the normal and Andreev transmission functions, and we show the equivalence between these expressions and Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk formulation. Finally, we investigate in detail the behavior of the equilibrium currents in a normal ring threaded by a magnetic flux with attached superconducting wires at equilibrium. We analyze the flux sensitivity of the Andreev states, and we show that their response is equivalent to the one corresponding to the Cooper pairs with momentum q=0 in an isolated superconducting ring.

  9. Mesoscopic quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molotkov, S. N., E-mail: sergei.molotkov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Since a strictly single-photon source is not yet available, in quantum cryptography systems, one uses, as information quantum states, coherent radiation of a laser with an average number of photons of μ ≈ 0.1–0.5 in a pulse, attenuated to the quasi-single-photon level. The linear independence of a set of coherent quasi-single-photon information states leads to the possibility of unambiguous measurements that, in the presence of losses in the line, restrict the transmission range of secret keys. Starting from a certain value of critical loss (the length of the line), the eavesdropper knows the entire key, does not make errors, and is not detected—the distribution of secret keys becomes impossible. This problem is solved by introducing an additional reference state with an average number of photons of μ{sub cl} ≈ 10{sup 3}–10{sup 6}, depending on the length of the communication line. It is shown that the use of a reference state does not allow the eavesdropper to carry out measurements with conclusive outcome while remaining undetected. A reference state guarantees detecting an eavesdropper in a channel with high losses. In this case, information states may contain a mesoscopic average number of photons in the range of μ{sub q} ≈ 0.5–10{sup 2}. The protocol proposed is easy to implement technically, admits flexible adjustment of parameters to the length of the communication line, and is simple and transparent for proving the secrecy of keys.

  10. Distributed Dynamic Condition Response Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    We present distributed dynamic condition response structures as a declarative process model inspired by the workflow language employed by our industrial partner and conservatively generalizing labelled event structures. The model adds to event structures the possibility to 1) finitely specify...... repeated, possibly infinite behavior, 2) finitely specify fine-grained acceptance conditions for (possibly infinite) runs based on the notion of responses and 3) distribute events via roles. We give a graphical notation inspired by related work by van der Aalst et al and formalize the execution semantics...... as a labelled transition system. Exploration of the relationship between dynamic condition response structures and traditional models for concurrency, application to more complex scenarios, and further extensions of the model is left to future work....

  11. Mesoscopic quantum coherence in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock; Alsing; Deutsch; Grondalski; Jessen

    2000-10-16

    We observe the quantum coherent dynamics of atomic spinor wave packets in the double-well potentials of a far-off-resonance optical lattice. With appropriate initial conditions the system Rabi oscillates between the left and right localized states of the ground doublet, and at certain times the wave packet corresponds to a coherent superposition of these mesoscopically distinct quantum states. The atom/optical double-well potential is a flexible and powerful system for further study of quantum coherence, quantum control, and the quantum/classical transition.

  12. Integral equation technique for scatterers with mesoscopic insertions: Application to a carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuba, M. V.; Melnikov, A. V.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Slepyan, G. Y.; Boag, A.; Conte, A. Mosca; Pulci, O.; Bellucci, S.

    2017-11-01

    We present the electromagnetic scattering theory for a finite-length nanowire with an embedded mesoscopic object. The theory is based on a synthesis of the integral equation technique of classical electrodynamics and the quantum transport formalism. We formulate Hallén-type integral equations, where the canonical integral operators from wire antenna theory are combined with special terms responsible for the mesoscopic structure. The theory is applied to calculate the polarizability of a finite-length single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) with a short low-conductive section (LCS) in the microwave and subterahertz ranges. The LCS is modeled as a multichannel two-electrode mesoscopic system. The effective resistive sheet impedance boundary conditions for the scattered field are applied on the CNT surface. It is shown that the imaginary part of the polarizability spectrum has three peaks. Two of them are in the terahertz range, while the third is in the gigahertz range. The polarizability spectrum of the CNT with many LCSs has only one gigahertz peak, which shifts to low frequencies as the number of LCSs increases. The physical nature of these peaks is explained, and potential applications of nanoantennas are proposed.

  13. Statewide mesoscopic simulation for Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This study developed a mesoscopic simulator which is capable of representing both city-level and statewide roadway : networks. The key feature of such models are the integration of (i) a traffic flow model which is efficient enough to : scale to larg...

  14. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the ...

  15. Quantum Transport in Mesoscopic Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 11. Quantum Transport in Mesoscopic Systems - Coulomb Blockade and Kondo Effect ... Author Affiliations. Navinder Singh1. Room No 457 Theoretical Physics Division Physical Research Laboratory Navrangpura Ahmedabad 380 009 ...

  16. Kondo effect and mesoscopic fluctuations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Slave boson/fermion mean-field approach. A complete solution of this problem would presumably involve developing a Fermi liquid theory 'à la Nozières' [15] taking properly into account the mesoscopic fluctuations. A first step in this direction is to use a mean-field treatment based on the slave boson/fermion technique [1] ...

  17. Strain induced anomalous red shift in mesoscopic iron oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Nano magnetic oxides are promising candidates for high density magnetic storage and other appli- cations. Nonspherical mesoscopic iron oxide particles are also candidate materials for studying the shape, size and strain induced modifications of various physical properties viz. optical, magnetic and structural.

  18. Mesoscopic model for binary fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, C.; Tucci, K.; Alvarez-Llamoza, O.; Orozco-Guillén, E. E.; Morales, M.; Cosenza, M. G.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a model for studying binary fluids based on the mesoscopic molecular simulation technique known as multiparticle collision, where the space and state variables are continuous, and time is discrete. We include a repulsion rule to simulate segregation processes that does not require calculation of the interaction forces between particles, so binary fluids can be described on a mesoscopic scale. The model is conceptually simple and computationally efficient; it maintains Galilean invariance and conserves the mass and energy in the system at the micro- and macro-scale, whereas momentum is conserved globally. For a wide range of temperatures and densities, the model yields results in good agreement with the known properties of binary fluids, such as the density profile, interface width, phase separation, and phase growth. We also apply the model to the study of binary fluids in crowded environments with consistent results.

  19. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  20. Mesoscopic and continuum modelling of angiogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Spill, F.

    2014-03-11

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones in response to chemical signals secreted by, for example, a wound or a tumour. In this paper, we propose a mesoscopic lattice-based model of angiogenesis, in which processes that include proliferation and cell movement are considered as stochastic events. By studying the dependence of the model on the lattice spacing and the number of cells involved, we are able to derive the deterministic continuum limit of our equations and compare it to similar existing models of angiogenesis. We further identify conditions under which the use of continuum models is justified, and others for which stochastic or discrete effects dominate. We also compare different stochastic models for the movement of endothelial tip cells which have the same macroscopic, deterministic behaviour, but lead to markedly different behaviour in terms of production of new vessel cells. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. Mesoscopic effects in the quantum Hall regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 2 ... Mesoscopic effects; quantum Hall transitions; finite-size scaling. ... When band mixing between multiple Landau levels is present, mesoscopic effects cause a crossover from a sequence of quantum Hall transitions for weak disorder to classical behavior ...

  2. Nanomembrane-based mesoscopic superconducting hybrid junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmer, Dominic J; Bof Bufon, Carlos Cesar; Deneke, Christoph; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2010-09-08

    A new method for combining top-down and bottom-up approaches to create superconductor-normal metal-superconductor niobium-based Josephson junctions is presented. Using a rolled-up semiconductor nanomembrane as scaffolding, we are able to create mesoscopic gold filament proximity junctions. These are created by electromigration of gold filaments after inducing an electric field mediated breakdown in the semiconductor nanomembrane, which can generate nanometer sized structures merely using conventional optical lithography techniques. We find that the created point contact junctions exhibit large critical currents of a few milliamps at 4.2 K and an I(c)R(n) product placing their characteristic frequency in the terahertz region. These nanometer-sized filament devices can be further optimized and integrated on a chip for their use in superconductor hybrid electronics circuits.

  3. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anupam

    2001-02-01

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the space of magnetic fields, known as diabolical points. This phenomena is explained in terms of two approaches, one based on spin-coherent-state path integrals, and the other on a generalization of the phase integral (or WKB) method to difference equations. Explicit formulas for the diabolical points are obtained for a model Hamiltonian.

  4. Dynamics of mesoscopic systems: Non-equilibrium Green's functions approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špička, Václav; Kalvová, Anděla; Velický, B.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2010), s. 525-538 ISSN 1386-9477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0361 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : mesoscopic systems * NGF * initial condition * correlations * Ward identities * transients Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.304, year: 2010

  5. Liquid lubrication in sheet metal forming at mesoscopic scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Bay, Niels

    2012-01-01

    The lubricant entrapment and escape phenomena in metal forming are studied experimentally as well as numerically. Experiments are carried out in strip reduction of aluminium sheet applying a transparent die to study the fluid flow between mesoscopic cavities. The numerical strategy is based...... on a weak fluid/structure coupling involving the Finite Element Method and analytical calculations. It allows to quantify the final shape of the lubricant pockets...

  6. Vortex chirality control in mesoscopic disk magnets observed by PEEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniuchi, T.; Oshima, M.; Akinaga, H.; Ono, K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: We present the magnetic vortex chirality control in mesoscopic disk magnets observed by photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM). Magnetic vortex structure specific to mesoscopic magnet attracts consider- able attention because of the importance in ultrahigh density data storage technologies such as hard disk drives (HDDs) or magnetic random access memories (MRAMs). The current hot topic is the vortex chirality control, that is, to control clockwise or counter-clockwise magnetic flux circulation in a vortex. We have designed a chirality-controllable mesoscopic device (Fig. 1a) based on micromagnetic simulation results. PEEM has a capability for the direct real-space observation of magnetic moments combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Since there is no stray magnetic ld from vortices with closed magnetic flux, PEEM is considered as one of the best techniques to observe the vortex chirality. The PEEM experiments were performed at the NE1B of PF-AR ring. Magnetic field was applied in the atmosphere before the measurement. PEEM images shown in Fig. 1b clearly indicate that the vortex chirality is successfully controlled by the external magnetic fields

  7. Fabrication of mesoscopic floating Si wires by introducing dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motohashi, Mitsuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Niwa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated a mesoscopic Si wire by introducing dislocations in a silicon wafer before HF anodization. The dislocations formed along the (111) crystal plane. The outline of the dislocation line was an inverted triangle. The resulting wire floated on a bridge girder and had a hybrid structure consisting of a porous layer and crystalline Si. The cross section of the wire had an inverted triangle shape. The wire formation mechanism is discussed in terms of carrier transport, crystal structure, and dislocation formation during anodization. (paper)

  8. Fabrication of mesoscopic floating Si wires by introducing dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Mitsuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Niwa, Masaaki

    2014-12-01

    We fabricated a mesoscopic Si wire by introducing dislocations in a silicon wafer before HF anodization. The dislocations formed along the (111) crystal plane. The outline of the dislocation line was an inverted triangle. The resulting wire floated on a bridge girder and had a hybrid structure consisting of a porous layer and crystalline Si. The cross section of the wire had an inverted triangle shape. The wire formation mechanism is discussed in terms of carrier transport, crystal structure, and dislocation formation during anodization.

  9. Quantum switching of polarization in mesoscopic ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa de Melo, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    A single domain of a uniaxial ferroelectric grain may be thought of as a classical permanent memory. At the mesoscopic level this system may experience considerable quantum fluctuations due to tunneling between two possible memory states, thus destroying the classical permanent memory effect. To study these quantum effects the concrete example of a mesoscopic uniaxial ferroelectric grain is discussed, where the orientation of the electric polarization determines two possible memory states. The possibility of quantum switching of the polarization in mesoscopic uniaxial ferroelectric grains is thus proposed. To determine the degree of memory loss, the tunneling rate between the two polarization states is calculated at zero temperature both in the absence and in the presence of an external static electric field. In addition, a discussion of crossover temperature between thermally activated behavior and quantum tunneling behavior is presented. And finally, environmental effects (phonons, defects, and surfaces) are also considered. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drug between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... means such as perturbation theory or random matrix theory. The physics of Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime is very different from Coulomb drag between extended electron systems. In the mesoscopic regime we in general find fluctuations of the drag comparable to the mean value. Examples are vanishing...... average drag for chaotic 2D-systems and dominating fluctuations of drag between quasi-ballistic wires with almost ideal transmission....

  11. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N.A.; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... means such as perturbation theory or random matrix theory. The physics of Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime is very different from Coulomb drag between extended electron systems. In the mesoscopic regime we in general find fluctuations of the drag comparable to the mean value. Examples are vanishing...... average drag for chaotic 2D-systems and dominating fluctuations of drag between quasi-ballistic wires with almost ideal transmission....

  12. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means, such as th......We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means...

  13. Mesoscopic Rydberg Gate Based on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.; Lesanovsky, I.; Zoller, P.; Weimer, H.; Buechler, H. P.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically a parallelized C-NOT gate which allows us to entangle a mesoscopic ensemble of atoms with a single control atom in a single step, with high fidelity and on a microsecond time scale. Our scheme relies on the strong and long-ranged interaction between Rydberg atoms triggering electromagnetically induced transparency. By this we can robustly implement a conditional transfer of all ensemble atoms between two logical states, depending on the state of the control atom. We outline a many-body interferometer which allows a comparison of two many-body quantum states by performing a measurement of the control atom.

  14. Introduction to wave scattering, localization, and mesoscopic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Ping

    1995-01-01

    This book gives readers a coherent picture of waves in disordered media, including multiple scattered waves. The book is intended to be self-contained, with illustrated problems and solutions at the end of each chapter to serve the double purpose of filling out the technical and mathematical details and giving the students exercises if used as a course textbook.The study of wave behavior in disordered media has applications in:Condensed matter physics (semi and superconductor nanostructures and mesoscopic phenomena)Materials science/analytical chemistry (analysis of composite and crystalline structures and properties)Optics and electronics (microelectronic and optoelectronic devices)Geology (seismic exploration of Earths subsurface)

  15. Recent trends in mesoscopic solar cells based on molecular and nanopigment light harvesters

    KAUST Repository

    Grätzel, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Mesoscopic solar cells are one of the most promising photovoltaic technologies among third generation photovoltaics due to their low cost and high efficiency. The morphology of wide-band semiconductors, sensitized with molecular or nanosized light harvesters, used as electron collectors contribute substantially to the device performance. Recent developments in the use of organic-inorganic layer structured perovskites as light absorbers and as electron or hole transport materials allows reduction in the thickness of photoanodes to the submicron level and have raised the power conversion efficiency of solid state mesoscopic solar cells above the 10% level.

  16. Electric charges in superconducting mesoscopic samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yampolskii, S. V.; Baelus, P.; Peeters, F. M.; Koláček, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 2 (2002), s. 303-306 ISSN 0011-4626 Grant - others:GA-(XX) FWO-VI; GA-(BE) IUAP-VI; GA-(BE) GOA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : mesoscopic superconductor * Meissner state * vortex charge Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  17. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF CONDITIONAL PREPARATION IN JUDO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Obadov

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Conditional preparation is a constituent part of overall sports preparation. Conditional training might be defined as a process of improvement of a sportsman’s functional and motor abilities, morphological characteristics, health, as well as the required motor knowledge. Conditional preparation can be might be classified as: general, basic and situational conditional preparation. Programs of the conditional training might be classified as: developing, resuming, recovering, preventive and recovering ones. High level of the general physical preparation enables maximum demonstration of the physical abilities of a sportsman during the stage of improvement of the specific motor abilities. Good general preparation of a sportsman enables him to push beyond his functional limits in order to cope with heavy loads easier, which subsequently enables him to achieve top performance level. Basic conditional preparation assumes the development of the most important judo abilities. Specific conditional preparation is related directly to the execution of different structural elements under the conditional requirements. Situational conditional preparation enables integration of the tactical and conditional training.

  18. Integrating structural health and condition monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Allan; Thöns, Sebastian; McMillan, David

    2015-01-01

    There is a large financial incentive to minimise operations and maintenance (O&M) costs for offshore wind power by optimising the maintenance plan. The integration of condition monitoring (CM) and structural health monitoring (SHM) may help realise this. There is limited work on the integration...

  19. Structure, composition, and condition of overstory trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel A. Yaussy; Todd F. Hutchinson; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland

    2003-01-01

    The structure, composition, and condition of overstory trees in the four study areas prior to prescribed fire treatments are summarized. Stand initiation dates were similar among the study areas (ca. 1885), and coincided with the decline of the charcoal iron industry in southern Ohio. Tree basal area averaged 26.8m²/ha and was not significantly different among...

  20. Mesoscopic Numerical Computation of Compressive Strength and Damage Mechanism of Rubber Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of both macroscopic and mesoscopic strengths of materials have been the topic of a great deal of recent research. This paper presents the results of a study, based on the Walraven equation of the production of a mesoscopic random aggregate structure containing various rubber contents and aggregate sizes. On a mesoscopic scale, the damage mechanism in the rubber concrete and the effects of the rubber content and aggregate-mortar interface on the rubber concrete’s compressive resistance property were studied. The results indicate that the random aggregate structural model very closely approximates the experimental results in terms of the fracture distribution and damage characteristics under uniaxial compression. The aggregate-mortar interface mechanical properties have a substantial impact on the test sample’s strength and fracture distribution. As the rubber content increases, the compressive strength and elastic modulus of the test sample decrease proportionally. This paper presents graphics of the entire process from fracture propagation to structural failure of the test piece by means of the mesoscopic finite-element method, which provides a theoretical reference for studying the damage mechanism in rubber concrete and performing parametric calculations.

  1. Numerical simulation of lubrication mechanisms at mesoscopic scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, C.; Bay, Niels; Christiansen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of liquid lubrication in metal forming are studied at a mesoscopic scale, adopting a 2D sequential fluid-solid weak coupling approach earlier developed in the first author's laboratory. This approach involves two computation steps. The first one is a fully coupled fluid-structure F......The mechanisms of liquid lubrication in metal forming are studied at a mesoscopic scale, adopting a 2D sequential fluid-solid weak coupling approach earlier developed in the first author's laboratory. This approach involves two computation steps. The first one is a fully coupled fluid......'s equation, at the asperity level, in order to quantify the fluid leakage in the cavity/plateau network using the lubricant pressure computed previously. The numerical simulation is validated by experimental tests in plane strain strip reduction of aluminium sheet provided with model cavities in form......PlastoHydroDynamic Lubrication (MPHDL) as well as cavity shrinkage due to lubricant compression and escape and strip deformation....

  2. Mesoscopic colonization of a spectral band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertola, M; Lee, S Y; Mo, M Y

    2009-01-01

    We consider the unitary matrix model in the limit where the size of the matrices becomes infinite and in the critical situation when a new spectral band is about to emerge. In previous works, the number of expected eigenvalues in the neighborhood of the band was fixed and finite, a situation that was termed 'birth of a cut' or 'first colonization'. We now consider the transitional regime where this microscopic population in the new band grows without bounds but at a slower rate than the size of the matrix. The local population in the new band organizes in a 'mesoscopic' regime, in between the macroscopic behavior of the full system and the previously studied microscopic one. The mesoscopic colony may form a finite number of new bands, with a maximum number dictated by the degree of criticality of the original potential. We describe the delicate scaling limit that realizes and controls the mesoscopic colony. The method we use is the steepest descent analysis of the Riemann-Hilbert problem that is satisfied by the associated orthogonal polynomials.

  3. Coherent X-ray diffraction studies of mesoscopic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, Anatoly

    2015-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to three separate projects, which can be considered as independent. First, the dynamical scattering effects in the Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI) method are discussed. Based on the simulation results, a straightforward method for correction for the refraction and absorption artifacts in the Bragg CXDI reconstruction is suggested. The second part summarizes the results of an Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging experiment with a single colloidal crystal grain. A remarkable result is that positions of individual particles in the crystal lattice have been resolved in three dimensions. The third project is devoted to X-ray diffraction experimental studies of structural evolution of colloidal crystalline films upon incremental heating. Based on the results of the analysis a model of structural evolution of a colloidal crystal upon heating on nanoscopic and mesoscopic length scales is suggested.

  4. High Yield Synthesis of Mesoscopic Conductive and Dispersible Carbon Nanostructures via Ultrasonication of Commercial Precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vikram K [ORNL; Quinlan, Ronald [ORNL; Agapov, Alexander L [ORNL; Kisliuk, Alexander [ORNL; Bhat, Gajanan [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01

    The need to produce large quantities of graphenic materials displaying excellent conductivity, thermal resistance, and tunable properties for industrial applications has spurred interest in new techniques for exfoliating graphite. In this paper, sonication-assisted exfoliation of graphitic precursors in the presence of chloroform is shown to produce chemically and structurally unique exfoliated graphitic materials in high yields. These exfoliated graphites, referred to as mesographite and mesographene, respectively, exhibit unique properties which depend on the number of layers and exfoliation conditions. Structural characterization of mesographene reveals the presence of nanoscale two-dimensional graphene layers, and threedimensional carbon nanostructures sandwiched between layers, similar to those found in ball-milled and intercalated graphites. The conductivities of mesographite and mesographene are 2700 and 2000 S/m, respectively, indicating high conductivity despite flake damage. Optical absorption measurements of mesographite sonicated in various solvents showed significant changes in dispersion characteristics, and also indicated significant changes to mesoscopic colloidal behavior. A mechanism for functionalization and formation of capped carbon nanostructures is proposed by integrating the chemical and structural characterization in relation to the various carbon structures observed by electron microscopy. Composites based on common polymers were prepared by solution processing, and changes in thermal properties indicate improved dispersion of mesographite in polar polymers.

  5. Interfacial nanorheology: Probing molecular mobility in mesoscopic polymeric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Scott E.

    Investigating the finite size limited structural relaxations in mesoscopic polymer systems is central to nanotechnological applications involving thin films, complex structures, and nanoscale phase-separated systems; for example, polymer electrolyte membranes, optoelectronic devices, and ultrahigh-density thermomechanical data storage (terabit recording). In such systems, bulk statistical averaging and continuum models are jeopardized. Interfacial constraints lead to bulk-deviating molecular dynamics and dictate material and transport properties. The objective of this dissertation is to provide insight to the exotic mesoscopic behaviors in thin films by developing novel rheological and tribological analytical methods based on scanning probe microscopy (SPM). Activation energies are deduced for the molecular motions associated with internal friction dissipation, and the temperature resolved length scale for cooperative motion during the glass transition is directly obtained for polystyrene. These results confirm the dynamical heterogeneity of the glass transition and reveal a crossover from intra- to inter-molecular relaxation in the transition regime. The impact of dimensional constraints on molecular mobility in ultrathin polymer films is explored through interfacial glass-transition profiles. With these profiles, a structural model of the rheological changes near interfacial boundaries is constructed as function of molecular weight and crosslinking density. The manifestation of interfacial constraints in nanotechnological applications is illustrated for thermomechanical recording, where rheological gradients near the substrate dictate the contact pressure and strain shielding at the substrate compromises film stability. A foundation for the critical aspects of interfacial stability is developed, and mechanically graded interfaces and modulus-matching techniques are explored as a means of improving the stability, durability, and stress transmission characteristics

  6. Manipulating mesoscopic multipartite entanglement with atom-light interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasinska, J.; Rodo, C.; Paganelli, S.; Birkl, G.; Sanpera, A.

    2009-01-01

    Entanglement between two macroscopic atomic ensembles induced by measurement on an ancillary light system has proven to be a powerful method for engineering quantum memories and quantum state transfer. Here we investigate the feasibility of such methods for generation, manipulation, and detection of genuine multipartite entanglement (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and clusterlike states) between mesoscopic atomic ensembles without the need of individual addressing of the samples. Our results extend in a nontrivial way the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement between two macroscopic gas samples reported experimentally in [B. Julsgaard, A. Kozhekin, and E. Polzik, Nature (London) 413, 400 (2001)]. We find that under realistic conditions, a second orthogonal light pulse interacting with the atomic samples, can modify and even reverse the entangling action of the first one leaving the samples in a separable state.

  7. What is novel in quantum transport for mesoscopics?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The understanding of mesoscopic transport has now attained an ultimate simplicity. Indeed, orthodox quantum kinetics would seem to say little about mesoscopics that has not been revealed – nearly effortlessly – by more popular means. Such is far from the case, however. The fact that kinetic theory remains very much in ...

  8. Role of mesoscopic morphology in charge transport of doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 2. Role of mesoscopic morphology in charge transport of doped polyaniline ... In doped polyaniline (PANI), the charge transport properties are determined by mesoscopic morphology, which in turn is controlled by the molecular recognition interactions among ...

  9. Mesoscopic analysis of drying shrinkage damage in a cementitious material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moonen, P.; Pedersen, R.R.; Simone, A.

    2008-01-01

    Concrete and cement-based materials exhibit shrinkage when exposed to drying. Structural effects and inhomogeneity of material properties adverse free shrinkage, hereby inducing stress concentrations and possibly damage. In this contribution, the magnitude of shrinkage- induced damage during...... a typical sample preparation procedure is assessed. To this extent, a coupled hygro-thermo-mechanical model, incorporating rate-effects, is developed. The constitutive model is applied at a mesoscopic level where the aggregates and the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) are explicitly modelled. Two drying...... temperatures are considered: 35 °C and 50 °C. Significantly more micro-damage and higher internal stresses are found for the latter, revealing the importance of drying shrinkage damage, even at laboratory scale....

  10. Quantum gambling using mesoscopic ring qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakula, Ireneusz

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Game Theory provides us with new tools for practising games and some other risk related enterprices like, for example, gambling. The two party gambling protocol presented by Goldenberg et al. is one of the simplest yet still hard to implementapplications of Quantum Game Theory. We propose potential physical realisation of the quantum gambling protocol with use of three mesoscopic ring qubits. We point out problems in implementation of such game. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Probing eukaryotic cell mechanics via mesoscopic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkin, Igor V.; Lykov, Kirill; Nematbakhsh, Yasaman; Shang, Menglin; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2017-11-01

    We developed a new mesoscopic particle based eukaryotic cell model which takes into account cell membrane, cytoskeleton and nucleus. The breast epithelial cells were used in our studies. To estimate the viscoelastic properties of cells and to calibrate the computational model, we performed micropipette aspiration experiments. The model was then validated using data from microfluidic experiments. Using the validated model, we probed contributions of sub-cellular components to whole cell mechanics in micropipette aspiration and microfluidics experiments. We believe that the new model will allow to study in silico numerous problems in the context of cell biomechanics in flows in complex domains, such as capillary networks and microfluidic devices.

  12. Quantum Spin Transport in Mesoscopic Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein W. A.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Spin-dependent conductance of ballistic mesoscopic interferometer is investigated. The quantum interferometer is in the form of ring, in which a quantum dot is embedded in one arm. This quantum dot is connected to one lead via tunnel barrier. Both Aharonov- Casher and Aharonov-Bohm e ects are studied. Our results confirm the interplay of spin-orbit coupling and quantum interference e ects in such confined quantum systems. This investigation is valuable for spintronics application, for example, quantum information processing.

  13. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means......, such as the random matrix theory, or by numerical simulations. We show that Coulomb drag is sensitive to localized states. which usual transport measurements do not probe. For chaotic 2D systems we find a vanishing average drag, with a nonzero variance. Disordered 1D wires show a finite drag, with a large variance...

  14. Mesoscopic organization reveals the constraints governing Caenorhabditis elegans nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar Pan

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges in biology is to understand how activity at the cellular level of neurons, as a result of their mutual interactions, leads to the observed behavior of an organism responding to a variety of environmental stimuli. Investigating the intermediate or mesoscopic level of organization in the nervous system is a vital step towards understanding how the integration of micro-level dynamics results in macro-level functioning. The coordination of many different co-occurring processes at this level underlies the command and control of overall network activity. In this paper, we have considered the somatic nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, for which the entire neuronal connectivity diagram is known. We focus on the organization of the system into modules, i.e., neuronal groups having relatively higher connection density compared to that of the overall network. We show that this mesoscopic feature cannot be explained exclusively in terms of considerations such as, optimizing for resource constraints (viz., total wiring cost and communication efficiency (i.e., network path length. Even including information about the genetic relatedness of the cells cannot account for the observed modular structure. Comparison with other complex networks designed for efficient transport (of signals or resources implies that neuronal networks form a distinct class. This suggests that the principal function of the network, viz., processing of sensory information resulting in appropriate motor response, may be playing a vital role in determining the connection topology. Using modular spectral analysis we make explicit the intimate relation between function and structure in the nervous system. This is further brought out by identifying functionally critical neurons purely on the basis of patterns of intra- and inter-modular connections. Our study reveals how the design of the nervous system reflects several constraints, including

  15. Mesoscopic hydro-thermodynamics of phonons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea R. Vasconcellos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A generalized Hydrodynamics, referred to as Mesoscopic Hydro-Thermodynamics, of phonons in semiconductors is presented. It involves the descriptions of the motion of the quasi-particle density and of the energy density. The hydrodynamic equations, which couple both types of movement via thermo-elastic processes, are derived starting with a generalized Peierls-Boltzmann kinetic equation obtained in the framework of a Non-Equilibrium Statistical Ensemble Formalism, providing such Mesoscopic Hydro-Thermodynamics. The case of a contraction in first order is worked out in detail. The associated Maxwell times are derived and discussed. The densities of quasi-particles and of energy are found to satisfy coupled Maxwell-Cattaneo-like (hyperbolic equations. The analysis of thermo-elastic effects is done and applied to investigate thermal distortion in silicon mirrors under incidence of high intensity X-ray pulses in FEL facilities. The derivation of a generalized Guyer-Krumhansl equation governing the flux of heat and the associated thermal conductivity coefficient is also presented.

  16. PbS/CdS-sensitized mesoscopic SnO2 solar cells for enhanced infrared light harnessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Anower; Koh, Zhen Yu; Wang, Qing

    2012-05-28

    Metal oxide semiconductors with lower lying conduction band minimum and superior electron mobility are essential for efficient charge separation and collection in PbS-sensitized solar cells. In the present study, mesoscopic SnO(2) was investigated as an alternative photoanode to the commonly used TiO(2) and examined comprehensively in PbS-sensitized liquid junction solar cells. To exploit the capability of PbS in an optimized structure, cascaded nPbS/nCdS and alternate n(PbS/CdS) layers deposited by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method were systematically scrutinized. It was observed that the surface of SnO(2) has greater affinity to the growth of PbS compared with TiO(2), giving rise to much enhanced light absorption. In addition, the deposition of a CdS buffer layer and a ZnS passivation layer before and after a PbS layer was found to be beneficial for efficient charge separation. Under optimized conditions, cascaded PbS/CdS-sensitized SnO(2) exhibited an unprecedented photocurrent density of 17.38 mA cm(-2) with pronounced infrared light harvesting extending beyond 1100 nm, and a power conversion efficiency of 2.23% under AM 1.5, 1 sun illumination. In comparison, TiO(2) cells fabricated under similar conditions showed much inferior performance owing to the less efficient light harnessing of long wavelength photons. We anticipate that the systematic study of PbS-sensitized solar cells utilizing different metal oxide semiconductors as electron transporters would provide useful insights and promote the development of semiconductor-sensitized mesoscopic solar cells employing panchromatic sensitizers.

  17. The local temperature and chemical potential inside a mesoscopic device driven out of equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Pei

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a method for calculating the local temperature and chemical potential inside a mesoscopic device out of equilibrium. We show how to check the conditions of local thermal equilibrium when the whole system is out of equilibrium. In particular, we study the on-site chemical potentials inside a chain coupled to two reservoirs at a finite voltage bias. We observe in the presence of disorder a large fluctuation in on-site chemical potentials, which can be suppressed by the electron–electron interaction. By taking the average with respect to the configurations of the disorder, we recover the classical picture where the voltage drops monotonically through the resistance wire. We prove the existence of local intensive variables in a mesoscopic device which is in equilibrium or not far from equilibrium

  18. Transport properties of mesoscopic graphene rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, N.; Ding, J.W.; Wang, B.L.; Shi, D.N.; Sun, H.Q.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a recursive Green's function method, we investigate the conductance of mesoscopic graphene rings in the presence of disorder, in the limit of phase coherent transport. Two models of disorder are considered: edge disorder and surface disorder. Our simulations show that the conductance decreases exponentially with the edge disorder and the surface disorder. In the presence of flux, a clear Aharonov-Bohm conductance oscillation with the period Φ 0 (Φ 0 =h/e) is observed. The edge disorder and the surface disorder have no effect on the period of AB oscillation. The amplitudes of AB oscillations vary with gate voltage and flux, which is consistent with the previous results. Additionally, ballistic rectification and negative differential resistance are observed in I-V curves, with on/off characteristic.

  19. Equilibrium and shot noise in mesoscopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, T.

    1994-10-01

    Within the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the study of noise in Mesoscopic devices, both experimentally and theoretically. Noise in solid state devices can have different origins: there is 1/f noise, which is believed to arise from fluctuations in the resistance of the sample due to the motion of impurities. On top of this contribution is a frequency independent component associated with the stochastic nature of electron transport, which will be the focus of this paper. If the sample considered is small enough that dephasing and inelastic effects can be neglected, equilibrium (thermal) and excess noise can be completely described in terms of the elastic scattering properties of the sample. As mentioned above, noise arises as a consequence of random processes governing the transport of electrons. Here, there are two sources of randomness: first, electrons incident on the sample occupy a given energy state with a probability given by the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. Secondly, electrons can be transmitted across the sample or reflected in the same reservoir where they came from with a probability given by the quantum mechanical transmission/reflection coefficients. Equilibrium noise refers to the case where no bias voltage is applied between the leads connected to the sample, where thermal agitation alone allows the electrons close to the Fermi level to tunnel through the sample. In general, equilibrium noise is related to the conductance of the sample via the Johnson-Nyquist formula. In the presence of a bias, in the classical regime, one expects to recover the full shot noise < {Delta}{sup 2}I >= 2I{Delta}{mu} as was observed a long time ago in vacuum diodes. In the Mesoscopic regime, however, excess noise is reduced below the shot noise level. The author introduces a more intuitive picture, where the current passing through the device is a superposition of pulses, or electron wave packets, which can be transmitted or reflected.

  20. Vortex 'puddles' and magic vortex numbers in mesoscopic superconducting disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, M R; Milosevic, M V; Bending, S J [Department of Physics, University of Bath - Claverton Down, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Clem, J R [Ames Laboratory Department of Physics and Astronomy - Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3160 (United States); Tamegai, T, E-mail: mrc61@cam.ac.u [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo - Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8627 (Japan)

    2009-03-01

    The magnetic properties of a superconducting disk change dramatically when its dimensions become mesoscopic. Unlike large disks, where the screening currents induced by an applied magnetic field are strong enough to force vortices to accumulate in a 'puddle' at the centre, in a mesoscopic disk the interaction between one of these vortices and the edge currents can be comparable to the intervortex repulsion, resulting in a destruction of the ordered triangular vortex lattice structure at the centre. Vortices instead form clusters which adopt polygonal and shell-like structures which exhibit magic number states similar to those of charged particles in a confining potential, and electrons in artificial atoms. We have fabricated mesoscopic high temperature superconducting Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+delta} disks and investigated their magnetic properties using magneto-optical imaging (MOI) and high resolution scanning Hall probe microscopy (SHPM). The temperature dependence of the vortex penetration field measured using MOI is in excellent agreement with models of the thermal excitation of pancake vortices over edge barriers. The growth of the central vortex puddle has been directly imaged using SHPM and magic vortex numbers showing higher stability have been correlated with abrupt jumps in the measured local magnetisation curves.

  1. From Dynamic Condition Response Structures to Büchi Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have presented distributed dynamic condition response structures (DCR structures) as a declarative process model conservatively generalizing labelled event structures to allow for finite specifications of repeated, possibly infinite behavior. The key ideas are to split the causality r...... and show how to characterise the execution of DCR structures and the acceptance condition for infinite runs by giving a map to Bu ̈chi-automata. This is the first step towards automatic verification of processes specified as DCR structures....

  2. Structural Conditions of Reform-oriented Pedagogics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Niklas; Schorr, Karl Eberhard

    1988-01-01

    Describes educational reforms as structural necessities in a differentiated system; not simply historical events or recurrent pushes of dissatisfied idealism. Stating that the current system can increase in complexity but not in excellence, the authors suggest the following distinctions be used to improve its pedagogy: system--environment,…

  3. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filaments under Extreme Conditions and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao

    Intermediate filaments are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected to large-deformation as well as participate in signal transduction. However, it is still poorly understood how the nanoscopic structure, as well as the biochemical properties of these protein molecules contribute to their biomechanical functions. In this research we investigate the material function of intermediate filaments under various extreme mechanical conditions as well as disease states. We use a full atomistic model and study its response to mechanical stresses. Learning from the mechanical response obtained from atomistic simulations, we build mesoscopic models following the finer-trains-coarser principles. By using this multiple-scale model, we present a detailed analysis of the mechanical properties and associated deformation mechanisms of intermediate filament network. We reveal the mechanism of a transition from alpha-helices to beta-sheets with subsequent intermolecular sliding under mechanical force, which has been inferred previously from experimental results. This nanoscale mechanism results in a characteristic nonlinear force-extension curve, which leads to a delocalization of mechanical energy and prevents catastrophic fracture. This explains how intermediate filament can withstand extreme mechanical deformation of > 1 00% strain despite the presence of structural defects. We combine computational and experimental techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, a premature aging disease. We find that the mutated lamin tail .domain is more compact and stable than the normal one. This altered structure and stability may enhance the association of intermediate filaments with the nuclear membrane, providing a molecular mechanism of the disease. We study the nuclear membrane association

  4. Aggregation of Frenkel defects under irradiation: a mesoscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soppe, W.; Kotomin, E.

    1993-08-01

    The radiation-induced aggregation of Frenkel defects in solids is studied in terms of a mesoscopic approach. The asymmetry in elastic interactions between mobile interstitials (I-I) and between interstitials and vacancies (I-V) plays a decisive role in the aggregation of similar defects. The conditions for defect aggregation are studied in detail for NaCl crystals. The critical dose rate for aggregation has been calculated as a function of the temperature as well as the aggregation rate as a function of temperature and dose rate. Furthermore, the role of deep traps (like impurities and di-vacancies), reducing the mobility of interstitials, and the role of dislocations serving as sinks for interstitials, are studied. The aggregation appears to reach a maximum at a distinct temperature which is in agreement both with experiment and the Jain-Lidiard theory. The model also predicts a shift of this maximum towards lower temperatures if the dose rate is decreased. The consequences of the model for the disposal of nuclear waste in rock salt formations, are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  5. Vision based condition assessment of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, Tadeusz; Kohut, Piotr; Holak, Krzysztof; Krupinski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a vision-based method for measuring a civil engineering construction's in-plane deflection curves is presented. The displacement field of the analyzed object which results from loads was computed by means of a digital image correlation coefficient. Image registration techniques were introduced to increase the flexibility of the method. The application of homography mapping enabled the deflection field to be computed from two images of the structure, acquired from two different points in space. An automatic shape filter and a corner detector were implemented to calculate the homography mapping between the two views. The developed methodology, created architecture and the capabilities of software tools, as well as experimental results obtained from tests made on a lab set-up and civil engineering constructions, are discussed.

  6. Vision based condition assessment of structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, Tadeusz; Kohut, Piotr; Holak, Krzysztof; Krupinski, Krzysztof, E-mail: tuhl@agh.edu.pl, E-mail: pko@agh.edu.pl, E-mail: holak@agh.edu.pl, E-mail: krzysiek.krupinski@wp.pl [Department of Robotics and Mechatronics, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al.Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    2011-07-19

    In this paper, a vision-based method for measuring a civil engineering construction's in-plane deflection curves is presented. The displacement field of the analyzed object which results from loads was computed by means of a digital image correlation coefficient. Image registration techniques were introduced to increase the flexibility of the method. The application of homography mapping enabled the deflection field to be computed from two images of the structure, acquired from two different points in space. An automatic shape filter and a corner detector were implemented to calculate the homography mapping between the two views. The developed methodology, created architecture and the capabilities of software tools, as well as experimental results obtained from tests made on a lab set-up and civil engineering constructions, are discussed.

  7. What can we learn from noise? - Mesoscopic nonequilibrium statistical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Mesoscopic systems - small electric circuits working in quantum regime - offer us a unique experimental stage to explorer quantum transport in a tunable and precise way. The purpose of this Review is to show how they can contribute to statistical physics. We introduce the significance of fluctuation, or equivalently noise, as noise measurement enables us to address the fundamental aspects of a physical system. The significance of the fluctuation theorem (FT) in statistical physics is noted. We explain what information can be deduced from the current noise measurement in mesoscopic systems. As an important application of the noise measurement to statistical physics, we describe our experimental work on the current and current noise in an electron interferometer, which is the first experimental test of FT in quantum regime. Our attempt will shed new light in the research field of mesoscopic quantum statistical physics.

  8. Evaluating Functional and Structural Condition Based Maintenances of Airfield Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarefder R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates airfield pavements’ functional- and structural-condition to determine the most economical maintenance method. As a part of the analysis, Pavement Condition Index (PCI for several runways, taxiways, and aprons has been determined by MicroPAVER. Structural evaluation of airport pavements has been performed by Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD test. Evaluation of Layer Moduli and Overlay Design (ELMOD also determines the required overlay thickness based on the E-values, i.e. FWD data analysis. Damage analysis determines the time of repeated overlay application. In addition, functional parameters have been included to determine the time of functional maintenance. Maintenance and rehabilitation alternatives have been selected to develop different program strategies. Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA has been performed to determine the maintenance cost. Structural condition based maintenance cost is compared to functional condition based maintenance cost. Comparison shows that structural condition based approach yields cheaper maintenance strategies than functional condition based maintenance approach.

  9. On Hydroelastic Body-Boundary Condition of Floating Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jinzhu

    1996-01-01

    A general linear body boundary condition of hydroelastic analysis of arbitrary shaped floating structures generalizes the classic kinematic rigid-body (Timman-Newman) boundary condition for seakeeping problems. The new boundary condition is consistent with the existing theories under certain...

  10. Development of structural condition thresholds for TSD measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Shivesh

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents (a) results of a field evaluation of the Traffic Speed Deflectometer (TSD) in the United States (b) deflection thresholds to classify the pavement structural condition obtained from the TSD for a small subset of the Pennsylvania secondary road network. The results of the field evaluation included: (1) repeatability of the TSD, (2) ability of the TSD to identify pavement sections with varying structural conditions, and (3) consistency between the structural number (SNeff) ...

  11. Magnetic response of superconducting mesoscopic-size YBCO powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deimling, C.V. [Grupo de Supercondutividade e Magnetismo, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: cesard@df.ufscar.br; Motta, M.; Lisboa-Filho, P.N. [Laboratorio de Materiais Supercondutores, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Bauru, SP Brazil (Brazil); Ortiz, W.A. [Grupo de Supercondutividade e Magnetismo, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-15

    In this work it is reported the magnetic behavior of submicron and mesoscopic-size superconducting YBCO powders, prepared by a modified polymeric precursors method. The grain size and microstructure were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Measurements of magnetization and AC-susceptibility as a function of temperature were performed with a quantum design SQUID magnetometer. Our results indicated significant differences on the magnetic propreties, in connection with the calcination temperature and the pressure used to pelletize the samples. This contribution is part of an effort to study vortex dynamics and magnetic properties of submicron and mesoscopic-size superconducting samples.

  12. Mesoscopic Modeling and Simulation of the Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Simone, A.; Sluys, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    of the most significant constitutive model parameters on global and local response. Different distributions and shapes of the aggregate grains are tested. Three model parameter sets, corresponding to different moisture conditions, are employed in the analysis of two specimens in which the applied loading rate......We present a two-dimensional mesoscopic finite element model for simulating the rate- and moisture-dependent material behavior of concrete. The idealized mesostructure consists of aggregate grains surrounded by an interfacial transition zone embedded in the bulk material. We examine the influence...

  13. Magnetic response and critical current properties of mesoscopic-size YBCO superconducting samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisboa-Filho, P N [UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Bauru (Brazil); Deimling, C V; Ortiz, W A, E-mail: plisboa@fc.unesp.b [Grupo de Supercondutividade e Magnetismo, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    In this contribution superconducting specimens of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} were synthesized by a modified polymeric precursor method, yielding a ceramic powder with particles of mesoscopic-size. Samples of this powder were then pressed into pellets and sintered under different conditions. The critical current density was analyzed by isothermal AC-susceptibility measurements as a function of the excitation field, as well as with isothermal DC-magnetization runs at different values of the applied field. Relevant features of the magnetic response could be associated to the microstructure of the specimens and, in particular, to the superconducting intra- and intergranular critical current properties.

  14. Comparison of the conditioning of High Gradient Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Giner Navarro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MV/m, at very low breakdown rates, have been successfully achieved in numerous CLIC prototype accelerating structures. The conditioning and operational histories of several structures, tested at KEK and CERN, have been compared and there is clear evidence that the conditioning progresses with the number of RF pulses and not the number of breakdowns. This observation opens the possibility that the optimum conditioning strategy, which minimizes the total number of breakdowns the structure is subject to without increasing conditioning time, may be to never exceed the breakdown rate target for operation. The result is also likely to have a strong impact on efforts to understand the physical mechanism underlying conditioning and may lead to preparation procedures which reduce conditioning time.

  15. Core-shell heterostructured metal oxide arrays enable superior light-harvesting and hysteresis-free mesoscopic perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Swain, Bhabani Sankar; Amassian, Aram

    2015-07-01

    To achieve highly efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the structure and properties of an electron transport layer (ETL) or material (ETM) have been shown to be of supreme importance. Particularly, the core-shell heterostructured mesoscopic ETM architecture has been recognized as a successful electrode design, because of its large internal surface area, superior light-harvesting efficiency and its ability to achieve fast charge transport. Here we report the successful fabrication of a hysteresis-free, 15.3% efficient PSC using vertically aligned ZnO nanorod/TiO2 shell (ZNR/TS) core-shell heterostructured ETMs for the first time. We have also added a conjugated polyelectrolyte polymer into the growth solution to promote the growth of high aspect ratio (AR) ZNRs and substantially improve the infiltration of the perovskite light absorber into the ETM. The PSCs based on the as-synthesized core-shell ZnO/TiO2 heterostructured ETMs exhibited excellent performance enhancement credited to the superior light harvesting capability, larger surface area, prolonged charge-transport pathways and lower recombination rate. The unique ETM design together with minimal hysteresis introduces core-shell ZnO/TiO2 heterostructures as a promising mesoscopic electrode approach for the fabrication of efficient PSCs.To achieve highly efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the structure and properties of an electron transport layer (ETL) or material (ETM) have been shown to be of supreme importance. Particularly, the core-shell heterostructured mesoscopic ETM architecture has been recognized as a successful electrode design, because of its large internal surface area, superior light-harvesting efficiency and its ability to achieve fast charge transport. Here we report the successful fabrication of a hysteresis-free, 15.3% efficient PSC using vertically aligned ZnO nanorod/TiO2 shell (ZNR/TS) core-shell heterostructured ETMs for the first time. We have also added a

  16. Lattice Boltzmann model capable of mesoscopic vorticity computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that standard lattice Boltzmann (LB) models allow the strain-rate components to be computed mesoscopically (i.e., through the local particle distributions) and as such possess a second-order accuracy in strain rate. This is one of the appealing features of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) which is of only second-order accuracy in hydrodynamic velocity itself. However, no known LB model can provide the same quality for vorticity and pressure gradients. In this paper, we design a multiple-relaxation time LB model on a three-dimensional 27-discrete-velocity (D3Q27) lattice. A detailed Chapman-Enskog analysis is presented to illustrate all the necessary constraints in reproducing the isothermal Navier-Stokes equations. The remaining degrees of freedom are carefully analyzed to derive a model that accommodates mesoscopic computation of all the velocity and pressure gradients from the nonequilibrium moments. This way of vorticity calculation naturally ensures a second-order accuracy, which is also proven through an asymptotic analysis. We thus show, with enough degrees of freedom and appropriate modifications, the mesoscopic vorticity computation can be achieved in LBM. The resulting model is then validated in simulations of a three-dimensional decaying Taylor-Green flow, a lid-driven cavity flow, and a uniform flow passing a fixed sphere. Furthermore, it is shown that the mesoscopic vorticity computation can be realized even with single relaxation parameter.

  17. Role of mesoscopic morphology in charge transport of doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In doped polyaniline (PANI), the charge transport properties are determined by mesoscopic morphology, which in turn is controlled by the molecular recognition interactions among polymer chain, dopant and solvent. Molecular recognition plays a significant role in chain conformation and charge delocalization.

  18. What is novel in quantum transport for mesoscopics?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indeed, orthodox quantum kinetics would seem to say little about mesoscopics that has not been revealed – nearly effortlessly – by more popular means. Such is far from the case, however. The fact that kinetic theory remains very much in charge is best appreciated through the physics of a quantum point contact.

  19. Charge densities and charge noise in mesoscopic conductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We introduce a hierarchy of density of states to characterize the charge distribution in a mesoscopic conductor. At the bottom of this hierarchy are the partial density of states which represent the contribution to the local density of states if both the incident and the out-going scattering channel is prescribed. The partial density ...

  20. Novel interference effects and a new quantum phase in mesoscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aharonov–Bohm ring geometry due to spin-flip scattering in one of the arms. Several experimental manifestations of these phenomena and their applications are given. Keywords. Mesoscopic systems; coherence; Aharonov–Bohm effect; persistent currents; parity. PACS Nos 73.23.-b; 72.10.-d; 05.60.Gg; 03.65.Bz. 1.

  1. Characterizing the nonclassicality of mesoscopic optical twin-beam states

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allevi, A.; Lamperti, M.; Bondani, M.; Peřina ml., Jan; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, O.; Machulka, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 6 (2013), "063807-1"-"063807-9" ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : mesoscopic optical twin-beam states * photon-number domain Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.991, year: 2013

  2. Lattice Boltzmann model capable of mesoscopic vorticity computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that standard lattice Boltzmann (LB) models allow the strain-rate components to be computed mesoscopically (i.e., through the local particle distributions) and as such possess a second-order accuracy in strain rate. This is one of the appealing features of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) which is of only second-order accuracy in hydrodynamic velocity itself. However, no known LB model can provide the same quality for vorticity and pressure gradients. In this paper, we design a multiple-relaxation time LB model on a three-dimensional 27-discrete-velocity (D3Q27) lattice. A detailed Chapman-Enskog analysis is presented to illustrate all the necessary constraints in reproducing the isothermal Navier-Stokes equations. The remaining degrees of freedom are carefully analyzed to derive a model that accommodates mesoscopic computation of all the velocity and pressure gradients from the nonequilibrium moments. This way of vorticity calculation naturally ensures a second-order accuracy, which is also proven through an asymptotic analysis. We thus show, with enough degrees of freedom and appropriate modifications, the mesoscopic vorticity computation can be achieved in LBM. The resulting model is then validated in simulations of a three-dimensional decaying Taylor-Green flow, a lid-driven cavity flow, and a uniform flow passing a fixed sphere. Furthermore, it is shown that the mesoscopic vorticity computation can be realized even with single relaxation parameter.

  3. Transmission gaps, trapped modes and Fano resonances in Aharonov-Bohm connected mesoscopic loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrabti, T.; Labdouti, Z.; El Abouti, O.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Fethi, F.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2018-03-01

    A simple mesoscopic structure consisting of a double symmetric loops coupled by a segment of length d0 in the presence of an Aharonov-Bohm flux is designed to obtain transmission band gaps and Fano resonances. A general analytical expression for the transmission coefficient and the density of states (DOS) are obtained for various systems of this kind within the framework of the Green's function method in the presence of the magnetic flux. In this work, the amplitude of the transmission and DOS are discussed as a function of the wave vector. We show that the transmission spectrum of the whole structure may exhibit a band gap and a resonance of Fano type without introducing any impurity in one arm of the loop. In particular, we show that for specific values of the magnetic flux and the lengths of the arms constituting the loops, the Fano resonance collapses giving rise to the so-called trapped states or bound in continuum (BIC) states. These states appear when the width of the Fano resonance vanishes in the transmission coefficient as well as in the density of states. Also, we show that the shape of the Fano resonances and the width of the band gaps are very sensitive to the value of the magnetic flux and the geometry of the structure. These results may have important applications for electronic transport in mesoscopic systems.

  4. 42 CFR 485.627 - Condition of participation: Organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... participation: Organizational structure. (a) Standard: Governing body or responsible individual. The CAH has a... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Organizational structure. 485.627 Section 485.627 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. Condition Indicators for Inspection Planning of Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Michael Havbro; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous work by the authors a Bayesian formulation of condition indicators is developed further whereby in conjunction with a systems modelling of concrete structures the experience and expertise of the inspection personnel may be fully utilized. It is shown how the predicted evolution...... of the deterioration of the structure may be consistently updated based on inspection results. This facilitates that inspection results may be used in the long term planning of inspection and maintenance of structures. The approach is illustrated on an example considering half-cell measurement inspections...... of a concrete structure subject to corrosion due to ingress of chlorides....

  6. An effective rate equation approach to reaction kinetics in small volumes: theory and application to biochemical reactions in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, R

    2010-07-21

    Chemical master equations provide a mathematical description of stochastic reaction kinetics in well-mixed conditions. They are a valid description over length scales that are larger than the reactive mean free path and thus describe kinetics in compartments of mesoscopic and macroscopic dimensions. The trajectories of the stochastic chemical processes described by the master equation can be ensemble-averaged to obtain the average number density of chemical species, i.e., the true concentration, at any spatial scale of interest. For macroscopic volumes, the true concentration is very well approximated by the solution of the corresponding deterministic and macroscopic rate equations, i.e., the macroscopic concentration. However, this equivalence breaks down for mesoscopic volumes. These deviations are particularly significant for open systems and cannot be calculated via the Fokker-Planck or linear-noise approximations of the master equation. We utilize the system-size expansion including terms of the order of Omega(-1/2) to derive a set of differential equations whose solution approximates the true concentration as given by the master equation. These equations are valid in any open or closed chemical reaction network and at both the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. In the limit of large volumes, the effective mesoscopic rate equations become precisely equal to the conventional macroscopic rate equations. We compare the three formalisms of effective mesoscopic rate equations, conventional rate equations, and chemical master equations by applying them to several biochemical reaction systems (homodimeric and heterodimeric protein-protein interactions, series of sequential enzyme reactions, and positive feedback loops) in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions. In all cases, we find that the effective mesoscopic rate equations can predict very well the true concentration of a chemical species. This provides a useful method by which one can quickly determine the

  7. Superlattice band structure: New and simple energy quantification condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiz, F., E-mail: fethimaiz@gmail.com [University of Cartage, Nabeul Engineering Preparatory Institute, Merazka, 8000 Nabeul (Tunisia); King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-10-01

    Assuming an approximated effective mass and using Bastard's boundary conditions, a simple method is used to calculate the subband structure for periodic semiconducting heterostructures. Our method consists to derive and solve the energy quantification condition (EQC), this is a simple real equation, composed of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, and does not need any programming effort or sophistic machine to solve it. For less than ten wells heterostructures, we have derived and simplified the energy quantification conditions. The subband is build point by point; each point presents an energy level. Our simple energy quantification condition is used to calculate the subband structure of the GaAs/Ga{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.5}As heterostructures, and build its subband point by point for 4 and 20 wells. Our finding shows a good agreement with previously published results.

  8. Mesoscopic segregation of excitation and inhibition in a brain network model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Malagarriga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the brain are known to operate under a careful balance of excitation and inhibition, which maintains neural microcircuits within the proper operational range. How this balance is played out at the mesoscopic level of neuronal populations is, however, less clear. In order to address this issue, here we use a coupled neural mass model to study computationally the dynamics of a network of cortical macrocolumns operating in a partially synchronized, irregular regime. The topology of the network is heterogeneous, with a few of the nodes acting as connector hubs while the rest are relatively poorly connected. Our results show that in this type of mesoscopic network excitation and inhibition spontaneously segregate, with some columns acting mainly in an excitatory manner while some others have predominantly an inhibitory effect on their neighbors. We characterize the conditions under which this segregation arises, and relate the character of the different columns with their topological role within the network. In particular, we show that the connector hubs are preferentially inhibitory, the more so the larger the node's connectivity. These results suggest a potential mesoscale organization of the excitation-inhibition balance in brain networks.

  9. Mesoscopic modeling and parameter estimation of a lithium-ion battery based on LiFePO4/graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokar, Ali; Désilets, Martin; Lacroix, Marcel; Zaghib, Karim

    2018-03-01

    A novel numerical model for simulating the behavior of lithium-ion batteries based on LiFePO4(LFP)/graphite is presented. The model is based on the modified Single Particle Model (SPM) coupled to a mesoscopic approach for the LFP electrode. The model comprises one representative spherical particle as the graphite electrode, and N LFP units as the positive electrode. All the SPM equations are retained to model the negative electrode performance. The mesoscopic model rests on non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions and uses a non-monotonic open circuit potential for each unit. A parameter estimation study is also carried out to identify all the parameters needed for the model. The unknown parameters are the solid diffusion coefficient of the negative electrode (Ds,n), reaction-rate constant of the negative electrode (Kn), negative and positive electrode porosity (εn&εn), initial State-Of-Charge of the negative electrode (SOCn,0), initial partial composition of the LFP units (yk,0), minimum and maximum resistance of the LFP units (Rmin&Rmax), and solution resistance (Rcell). The results show that the mesoscopic model can simulate successfully the electrochemical behavior of lithium-ion batteries at low and high charge/discharge rates. The model also describes adequately the lithiation/delithiation of the LFP particles, however, it is computationally expensive compared to macro-based models.

  10. Core–shell heterostructured metal oxide arrays enable superior light-harvesting and hysteresis-free mesoscopic perovskite solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    To achieve highly efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the structure and properties of an electron transport layer (ETL) or material (ETM) have been shown to be of supreme importance. Particularly, the core-shell heterostructured mesoscopic ETM architecture has been recognized as a successful electrode design, because of its large internal surface area, superior light-harvesting efficiency and its ability to achieve fast charge transport. Here we report the successful fabrication of a hysteresis-free, 15.3% efficient PSC using vertically aligned ZnO nanorod/TiO2 shell (ZNR/TS) core-shell heterostructured ETMs for the first time. We have also added a conjugated polyelectrolyte polymer into the growth solution to promote the growth of high aspect ratio (AR) ZNRs and substantially improve the infiltration of the perovskite light absorber into the ETM. The PSCs based on the as-synthesized core-shell ZnO/TiO2 heterostructured ETMs exhibited excellent performance enhancement credited to the superior light harvesting capability, larger surface area, prolonged charge-transport pathways and lower recombination rate. The unique ETM design together with minimal hysteresis introduces core-shell ZnO/TiO2 heterostructures as a promising mesoscopic electrode approach for the fabrication of efficient PSCs. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Mesoscopic Fluctuations for the Thinned Circular Unitary Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Tomas; Duits, Maurice

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we study the asymptotic behavior of mesoscopic fluctuations for the thinned Circular Unitary Ensemble. The effect of thinning is that the eigenvalues start to decorrelate. The decorrelation is stronger on the larger scales than on the smaller scales. We investigate this behavior by studying mesoscopic linear statistics. There are two regimes depending on the scale parameter and the thinning parameter. In one regime we obtain a CLT of a classical type and in the other regime we retrieve the CLT for CUE. The two regimes are separated by a critical line. On the critical line the limiting fluctuations are no longer Gaussian, but described by infinitely divisible laws. We argue that this transition phenomenon is universal by showing that the same transition and their laws appear for fluctuations of the thinned sine process in a growing box. The proofs are based on a Riemann-Hilbert problem for integrable operators.

  12. Role of mesoscopic morphology in charge transport of doped polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A. K.; Menon, Reghu

    2002-02-01

    In doped polyaniline (PANI), the charge transport properties are determined by mesoscopic morphology, which in turn is controlled by the molecular recognition interactions among polymer chain, dopant and solvent Molecular recognition plays a significant role in chain conformation and charge delocalization. The resistivity of PANI doped by camphor sulfonic acid (CSA)/2-acrylo-amido-1-propane sulfonic acid (AMPSA)/dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) is around 0.02 W cm. PANI-CSA and PANI-AMPSA show a metallic positive temperature coefficient of resistivity above 150 K, with a finite value of conductivity at 1.4 K; whereas, PANI-DBSA shows hopping transport at low temperatures. The magnetoresistance is positive (negative) for PANI-CSA (PANI-AMPSA); and PANI-DBSA has a large positive MR. The behavior of MR suggests subtle variations in mesoscopic morphology between PANI-CSA and PANI-AMPSA.

  13. A suite of optical fibre sensors for structural condition monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Carlton, J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper is to review the research activities at City University London in the development of a range of fibre Bragg grating (FBG)-based sensors, including strain, temperature, relative humidity, vibration and acoustic sensors, with an aim to meet the increasing demands from industry for structural condition monitoring. As a result, arrays of optical fibre sensors have been instrumented into various types of structures, including concrete, limestone, marine propellers, pantograph and electrical motors, allowing for both static and dynamic monitoring and thus enhanced structural reliability and integrity.

  14. Insight or illusion? seeing inside the cell with mesoscopic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2008-01-01

    The expulsion of material from a cell by fusion of vesicles at the plasma membrane, and the entry of a virus by membrane invagination are complex membrane-associatedprocesses whose control is crucial to cell survival. Our ability to visualize the dynamics of such processes experimentally is limit...... paying because mesoscopic simulations can generate new insight into the complex, dynamic life of a cell....

  15. Time-dependent reliability analysis and condition assessment of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Structures generally play a passive role in assurance of safety in nuclear plant operation, but are important if the plant is to withstand the effect of extreme environmental or abnormal events. Relative to mechanical and electrical components, structural systems and components would be difficult and costly to replace. While the performance of steel or reinforced concrete structures in service generally has been very good, their strengths may deteriorate during an extended service life as a result of changes brought on by an aggressive environment, excessive loading, or accidental loading. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures can be developed using time-dependent structural reliability analysis methods. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process

  16. Modulation of endothelial glycocalyx structure under inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolářová, Hana; Ambrůzová, Barbora; Svihálková Šindlerová, Lenka; Klinke, Anna; Kubala, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The glycocalyx of the endothelium is an intravascular compartment that creates a barrier between circulating blood and the vessel wall. The glycocalyx is suggested to play an important role in numerous physiological processes including the regulation of vascular permeability, the prevention of the margination of blood cells to the vessel wall, and the transmission of shear stress. Various theoretical models and experimental approaches provide data about changes to the structure and functions of the glycocalyx under various types of inflammatory conditions. These alterations are suggested to promote inflammatory processes in vessels and contribute to the pathogenesis of number of diseases. In this review we summarize current knowledge about the modulation of the glycocalyx under inflammatory conditions and the consequences for the course of inflammation in vessels. The structure and functions of endothelial glycocalyx are briefly discussed in the context of methodological approaches regarding the determination of endothelial glycocalyx and the uncertainty and challenges involved in glycocalyx structure determination. In addition, the modulation of glycocalyx structure under inflammatory conditions and the possible consequences for pathogenesis of selected diseases and medical conditions (in particular, diabetes, atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, and sepsis) are summarized. Finally, therapeutic strategies to ameliorate glycocalyx dysfunction suggested by various authors are discussed.

  17. Modulation of Endothelial Glycocalyx Structure under Inflammatory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Kolářová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glycocalyx of the endothelium is an intravascular compartment that creates a barrier between circulating blood and the vessel wall. The glycocalyx is suggested to play an important role in numerous physiological processes including the regulation of vascular permeability, the prevention of the margination of blood cells to the vessel wall, and the transmission of shear stress. Various theoretical models and experimental approaches provide data about changes to the structure and functions of the glycocalyx under various types of inflammatory conditions. These alterations are suggested to promote inflammatory processes in vessels and contribute to the pathogenesis of number of diseases. In this review we summarize current knowledge about the modulation of the glycocalyx under inflammatory conditions and the consequences for the course of inflammation in vessels. The structure and functions of endothelial glycocalyx are briefly discussed in the context of methodological approaches regarding the determination of endothelial glycocalyx and the uncertainty and challenges involved in glycocalyx structure determination. In addition, the modulation of glycocalyx structure under inflammatory conditions and the possible consequences for pathogenesis of selected diseases and medical conditions (in particular, diabetes, atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, and sepsis are summarized. Finally, therapeutic strategies to ameliorate glycocalyx dysfunction suggested by various authors are discussed.

  18. An investigation of algebraic quantum dynamics for mesoscopic coupled electric circuits with mutual inductance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahlavani, H.; Kolur, E. Rahmanpour

    2016-01-01

    Based on the electrical charge discreteness, the Hamiltonian operator for the mutual inductance coupled quantum mesoscopic LC circuits has been found. The persistent current on two driven coupled mesoscopic electric pure L circuits (two quantum loops) has been obtained by using algebraic quantum dynamic approach. The influence of the mutual inductance on energy spectrum and quantum fluctuations of the charge and current for two coupled quantum electric mesoscopic LC circuits have been investigated.

  19. Guaranteeing robustness of structural condition monitoring to environmental variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buren, Kendra; Reilly, Jack; Neal, Kyle; Edwards, Harry; Hemez, François

    2017-01-01

    Advances in sensor deployment and computational modeling have allowed significant strides to be recently made in the field of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). One widely used SHM strategy is to perform a vibration analysis where a model of the structure's pristine (undamaged) condition is compared with vibration response data collected from the physical structure. Discrepancies between model predictions and monitoring data can be interpreted as structural damage. Unfortunately, multiple sources of uncertainty must also be considered in the analysis, including environmental variability, unknown model functional forms, and unknown values of model parameters. Not accounting for these sources of uncertainty can lead to false-positives or false-negatives in the structural condition assessment. To manage the uncertainty, we propose a robust SHM methodology that combines three technologies. A time series algorithm is trained using "baseline" data to predict the vibration response, compare predictions to actual measurements collected on a potentially damaged structure, and calculate a user-defined damage indicator. The second technology handles the uncertainty present in the problem. An analysis of robustness is performed to propagate this uncertainty through the time series algorithm and obtain the corresponding bounds of variation of the damage indicator. The uncertainty description and robustness analysis are both inspired by the theory of info-gap decision-making. Lastly, an appropriate "size" of the uncertainty space is determined through physical experiments performed in laboratory conditions. Our hypothesis is that examining how the uncertainty space changes throughout time might lead to superior diagnostics of structural damage as compared to only monitoring the damage indicator. This methodology is applied to a portal frame structure to assess if the strategy holds promise for robust SHM. (Publication approved for unlimited, public release on October-28

  20. The persistent current and energy spectrum on a driven mesoscopic LC-circuit with Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavanias, Hassan

    2018-03-01

    The quantum theory for a mesoscopic electric circuit including a Josephson junction with charge discreteness is studied. By considering coupling energy of the mesoscopic capacitor in Josephson junction device, a Hamiltonian describing the dynamics of a quantum mesoscopic electric LC-circuit with charge discreteness is introduced. We first calculate the persistent current on a quantum driven ring including Josephson junction. Then we obtain the persistent current and energy spectrum of a quantum mesoscopic electrical circuit which includes capacitor, inductor, time-dependent external source and Josephson junction.

  1. Mesoscopic models for DNA stretching under force: New results and comparison with experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghi, Manoel; Destainville, Nicolas; Palmeri, John

    2012-10-01

    Single-molecule experiments on double-stranded B-DNA stretching have revealed one or two structural transitions, when increasing the external force. They are characterized by a sudden increase of DNA contour length and a decrease of the bending rigidity. The nature and the critical forces of these transitions depend on DNA base sequence, loading rate, salt conditions and temperature. It has been proposed that the first transition, at forces of 60-80 pN, is a transition from B to S-DNA, viewed as a stretched duplex DNA, while the second one, at stronger forces, is a strand peeling resulting in single-stranded DNAs (ssDNA), similar to thermal denaturation. But due to experimental conditions these two transitions can overlap, for instance for poly(dA-dT). In an attempt to propose a coherent picture compatible with this variety of experimental observations, we derive an analytical formula using a coupled discrete worm-like chain-Ising model. Our model takes into account bending rigidity, discreteness of the chain, linear and non-linear (for ssDNA) bond stretching. In the limit of zero force, this model simplifies into a coupled model already developed by us for studying thermal DNA melting, establishing a connection with previous fitting parameter values for denaturation profiles. Our results are summarized as follows: i) ssDNA is fitted, using an analytical formula, over a nano-Newton range with only three free parameters, the contour length, the bending modulus and the monomer size; ii) a surprisingly good fit on this force range is possible only by choosing a monomer size of 0.2 nm, almost 4 times smaller than the ssDNA nucleobase length; iii) mesoscopic models are not able to fit B to ssDNA (or S to ss) transitions; iv) an analytical formula for fitting B to S transitions is derived in the strong force approximation and for long DNAs, which is in excellent agreement with exact transfer matrix calculations; v) this formula fits perfectly well poly(dG-dC) and

  2. Mechanism and conditions of the chessboard structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Yong; Khachaturyan, Armen G.

    2008-01-01

    The observations of the pseudo-periodical chessboard (CB) microstructure in metal and ceramic solid solutions indicate that this is a general phenomenon. We propose a theory and three-dimensional (3-D) computational modeling explaining the origin of the CB microstructure in the cubic → tetragonal decomposition. The 3-D modeling demonstrates that the formation of two-phase CB structures is contingent on the formation of a compositionally stabilized precursor state with the tweed structure that is spontaneously formed at the initial stage of the transformation. The modeling has shown that this tweed structure is a distribution of spatially correlated tetragonal nanodomains whose spatial arrangement has the CB topological features. This precursor tweed structure serves as a template for the precipitation of the equilibrium cubic phase. The CB-like tweed template channels the microstructure evolution towards the two-phase CB structure whose complex and detailed 3-D geometry is in excellent agreement with electron microscopic observations. The thermodynamic analysis and obtained evolution sequences allow us to formulate the necessary thermodynamic, structural and kinetic conditions for the CB structure formation. Reasons for its relative stability are discussed. It is also shown that the coherency between the cubic and tetragonal phases comprising the CB structure produces the stress-induced tetragonality of the cubic phase, orthorhombicity of the tetragonal phase, and rotations of cubic phase rods. These effects should diminish and disappear upon lifting of coherency

  3. Emerging Evidences of Mesoscopic-Scale Complexity in Neat Ionic Liquids and Their Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russina, Olga; Lo Celso, Fabrizio; Plechkova, Natalia V; Triolo, Alessandro

    2017-03-16

    Ionic liquids (ILs) represent a blooming class of continuously developing advanced materials, with the aiming of a green chemical industry. Their appealing physical and chemical properties are largely influenced by their micro- and mesoscopic structure that is known to possess a high degree of hierarchical organization. High-impact application fields are largely affected by the complex morphology of neat ionic liquids and their mixtures. This Perspective highlights new arising research directions that point to an enhanced level of structural complexity in several IL-based systems, including mixtures. The latter represent a change in paradigm in the approach to formulate new, task-specific IL-based media, and the reported phenomenology has the potential to further expand their range of applications by calling for a revisitation of the nature of interactions in these exciting media.

  4. Structural Evaluation on HIC Transport Packaging under Accident Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Sung Hwan; Kim, Duck Hoi; Jung, Jin Se; Yang, Ke Hyung; Lee, Heung Young

    2005-01-01

    HIC transport packaging to transport a high integrity container(HIC) containing dry spent resin generated from nuclear power plants is to comply with the regulatory requirements of Korea and IAEA for Type B packaging due to the high radioactivity of the content, and to maintain the structural integrity under normal and accident conditions. It must withstand 9 m free drop impact onto an unyielding surface and 1 m drop impact onto a mild steel bar in a position causing maximum damage. For the conceptual design of a cylindrical HIC transport package, three dimensional dynamic structural analysis to ensure that the integrity of the package is maintained under all credible loads for 9 m free drop and 1 m puncture conditions were carried out using ABAQUS code.

  5. APPLICABILITY OF SIMILARITY CONDITIONS TO ANALOGUE MODELLING OF TECTONIC STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Goncharov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The publication is aimed at comparing concepts of V.V. Belousov and M.V. Gzovsky, outstanding researchers who established fundamentals of tectonophysics in Russia, specifically similarity conditions in application to tectonophysical modeling. Quotations from their publications illustrate differences in their views. In this respect, we can reckon V.V. Belousov as a «realist» as he supported «the liberal point of view» [Methods of modelling…, 1988, p. 21–22], whereas M.V. Gzovsky can be regarded as an «idealist» as he believed that similarity conditions should be mandatorily applied to ensure correctness of physical modeling of tectonic deformations and structures [Gzovsky, 1975, pp. 88 and 94].Objectives of the present publication are (1 to be another reminder about desirability of compliance with similarity conditions in experimental tectonics; (2 to point out difficulties in ensuring such compliance; (3 to give examples which bring out the fact that similarity conditions are often met per se, i.e. automatically observed; (4 to show that modeling can be simplified in some cases without compromising quantitative estimations of parameters of structure formation.(1 Physical modelling of tectonic deformations and structures should be conducted, if possible, in compliance with conditions of geometric and physical similarity between experimental models and corresponding natural objects. In any case, a researcher should have a clear vision of conditions applicable to each particular experiment.(2 Application of similarity conditions is often challenging due to unavoidable difficulties caused by the following: a Imperfection of experimental equipment and technologies (Fig. 1 to 3; b uncertainties in estimating parameters of formation of natural structures, including main ones: structure size (Fig. 4, time of formation (Fig. 5, deformation properties of the medium wherein such structures are formed, including, first of all, viscosity (Fig. 6

  6. Photovoltaic performance and long-term stability of dye-sensitized mesoscopic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratzel, M.

    2006-01-01

    The efficiency of electric power generation by dye-sensitized mesoscopic photovoltaic cells has been progressing steadily over the last years reaching now 11% in full sunlight. An important question for practical applications concerns the stability of these devices under prolonged exposure to light or heat. Strikingly stable operation can be obtained by judicious selection of the sensitizer, electrolyte and sealant rendering feasible a service life of at least 20 years under normal outdoor conditions. The sensitizer playing a central role in the light energy conversion process, we analyze the kinetic requirements for it to sustain the required one hundred million turnovers. We also review recent results on the use of self-assembled monolayers of amphiphilic sensitizers and co-adsorbents to enhance the thermal robustness of the device. (author)

  7. Robust depth selectivity in mesoscopic scattering regimes using angle-resolved measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, P; Kim, A D; Moscoso, M

    2013-03-01

    We study optical imaging of tissues in the mesoscopic scattering regime in which light multiply scatters in tissues but is not fully diffusive. We use the radiative transport equation to model light propagation and an ℓ1-optimization method to solve the inverse source problem. We show that recovering the location and strength of several point-like sources that are close to each other is not possible when using angle-averaged measurements. The image reliability is limited by a spatial scale that is on the order of the transport mean-free path, even under the most ideal conditions. However, by using just a few angle-resolved measurements, the proposed method is able to overcome this limitation.

  8. Quantum transport through mesoscopic disordered interfaces, junctions, and multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, Branislav K.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores perpendicular transport through macroscopically inhomogeneous three-dimensional disordered conductors using mesoscopic methods (the real-space Green function technique in a two-probe measuring geometry). The nanoscale samples (containing ∼ 1000 atoms) are modelled by a tight-binding Hamiltonian on a simple cubic lattice where disorder is introduced in the on-site potential energy. I compute the transport properties of: disordered metallic junctions formed by concatenating two homogeneous samples with different kinds of microscopic disorder, a single strongly disordered interface, and multilayers composed of such interfaces and homogeneous layers characterized by different strengths of the same type of microscopic disorder. This allows us to: contrast the resistor model (semiclassical) approach with a fully quantum description of dirty mesoscopic multilayers; study the transmission properties of dirty interfaces (where the Schep-Bauer distribution of transmission eigenvalues is confirmed for a single interface, as well as for a stack of such interfaces that is thinner than the localization length); and elucidate the effect of coupling to ideal leads ('measuring apparatus') on the conductance of both bulk conductors and dirty interfaces. When a multilayer contains a ballistic layer in between two interfaces, its disorder-averaged conductance oscillates as a function of the Fermi energy. I also address some fundamental issues in quantum transport theory - the relationship between the Kubo formula in the exact state representation and the 'mesoscopic Kubo formula' (which gives the exact zero-temperature conductance of a finite-size sample attached to two semi-infinite ideal leads) is thoroughly re-examined by comparing their outcomes for both the junctions and homogeneous samples. (author)

  9. Conditional Random Fields for Pattern Recognition Applied to Structured Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Burr

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition uses measurements from an input domain, X, to predict their labels from an output domain, Y. Image analysis is one setting where one might want to infer whether a pixel patch contains an object that is “manmade” (such as a building or “natural” (such as a tree. Suppose the label for a pixel patch is “manmade”; if the label for a nearby pixel patch is then more likely to be “manmade” there is structure in the output domain that can be exploited to improve pattern recognition performance. Modeling P(X is difficult because features between parts of the model are often correlated. Therefore, conditional random fields (CRFs model structured data using the conditional distribution P(Y|X = x, without specifying a model for P(X, and are well suited for applications with dependent features. This paper has two parts. First, we overview CRFs and their application to pattern recognition in structured problems. Our primary examples are image analysis applications in which there is dependence among samples (pixel patches in the output domain. Second, we identify research topics and present numerical examples.

  10. Hysteresis in mesoscopic superconducting disks: The Bean-Livingston barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha Deo, P.; Schweigert, V. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    1999-03-01

    Depending on the size of mesoscopic superconducting disks, the magnetization can show hysteretic behavior which we explain by using the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory and properly taking into account the demagnetization effects due to geometrical form factors. In large disks the hysteresis is due to the Bean-Livingston surface barrier while in small disks it is the volume barrier which is responsible for it. Although the sample magnetization is diamagnetic (negative) we show that the measured magnetization can be positive at certain fields as observed experimentally and which is a consequence of both the demagnetization effect and the experimental setup.

  11. Mesoscopic Modeling of Multiphysicochemical Transport Phenomena in Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinjun Kang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our recent progress on mesoscopic modeling of multiphysicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method. Simulation examples include injection of CO2-saturated brine into a limestone rock, two-phase behavior and flooding phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and electroosmosis in homogeneously charged porous media. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann method can account for multiple, coupled physicochemical processes in these systems and can shed some light on the underlying physics occurring at the fundamental scale. Therefore, it can be a potential powerful numerical tool to analyze multiphysicochemical processes in various energy, earth, and environmental systems.

  12. Superconducting proximity effect in mesoscopic superconductor/normal-metal junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, H; Toyoda, E

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting proximity effect is discussed in mesoscopic superconductor/normal-metal junctions. The newly-developed theory shows long-range phase-coherent effect which explaines early experimental results of giant magnetoresistance oscillations in an Andreev interferometer. The theory also shows that the proximity correction to the conductance (PCC) has a reentrant behavior as a function of energy. The reentrant behavior is systematically studied in a gated superconductor-semiconductor junction. A negative PCC is observed in the case of a weak coupling between the normal metal and the external reservoir. Phase coherent ac effect is also observed when rf is irradiated to the junction.

  13. S-matrix formulation of mesoscopic systems and evanescent modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sheelan Sengupta; Deo, P Singha; Jayannavar, A M; Manninen, M

    2010-01-13

    Validity of the Landauer-Buttiker formalism for studying linear transport in mesoscopic systems is well established theoretically as well as experimentally. Akkermans et al (1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 66 76) have shown that the formalism can be extended to study thermodynamic properties like persistent currents. This extension was verified for simple one-dimensional systems. We study the applicability of Akkermans et al' s formula for quasi-one-dimensional systems with several conducting channels. In the case that all modes are propagating the formula is still valid but in the case of evanescent modes it requires reinterpretation.

  14. Near-Field Effects in Mesoscopic Light Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani Naraghi, R; Sukhov, S; Sáenz, J J; Dogariu, A

    2015-11-13

    In dense multiple scattering media, optical fields evolve through both homogeneous and evanescent waves. New regimes of light transport emerge because of the near-field coupling between individual scattering centers at mesoscopic scales. We present a novel propagation model that is developed in terms of measurable far- and near-field scattering cross sections. Our quantitative description explains the increase of total transmission in dense scattering media and its accuracy is established through both full-scale numerical calculations and enhanced backscattering experiments.

  15. Quantum Effect in a Diode Included Nonlinear Inductance-Capacitance Mesoscopic Circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhanyuan; Zhang Xiaohong; Ma Jinying

    2009-01-01

    The mesoscopic nonlinear inductance-capacitance circuit is a typical anharmonic oscillator, due to diodes included in the circuit. In this paper, using the advanced quantum theory of mesoscopic circuits, which based on the fundamental fact that the electric charge takes discrete value, the diode included mesoscopic circuit is firstly studied. Schroedinger equation of the system is a four-order difference equation in p-circumflex representation. Using the extended perturbative method, the detail energy spectrum and wave functions are obtained and verified, as an application of the results, the current quantum fluctuation in the ground state is calculated. Diode is a basis component in a circuit, its quantization would popularize the quantum theory of mesoscopic circuits. The methods to solve the high order difference equation are helpful to the application of mesoscopic quantum theory.

  16. Canonical structure of dynamical fluctuations in mesoscopic nonequilibrium steady states

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maes, C.; Netočný, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 3 (2008), 30003/1-30003/6 ISSN 0295-5075 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC202/07/J051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nonequilibrium fluctuations * steady state * Onsager- Machlup theory Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 2.203, year: 2008

  17. Structure of wall-bounded flows at transcritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peter C.; Yang, Xiang I. A.; Ihme, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    At transcritical conditions, the transition of a fluid from a liquidlike state to a gaslike state occurs continuously, which is associated with significant changes in fluid properties. Therefore, boiling in its conventional sense does not exist and the phase transition at transcritical conditions is known as "pseudoboiling." In this work, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a channel flow at transcritical conditions are conducted in which the bottom and top walls are kept at temperatures below and above the pseudoboiling temperature, respectively. Over this temperature range, the density changes by a factor of 18 between both walls. Using the DNS data, the usefulness of the semilocal scaling and the Townsend attached-eddy hypothesis are examined in the context of flows at transcritical conditions—both models have received much empirical support from previous studies. It is found that while the semilocal scaling works reasonably well near the bottom cooled wall, where the fluid density changes only moderately, the same scaling has only limited success near the top wall. In addition, it is shown that the streamwise velocity structure function follows a logarithmic scaling and the streamwise energy spectrum exhibits an inverse wave-number scaling, thus providing support to the attached-eddy model at transcritical conditions.

  18. Analysis of ADU structure obtained under different precipitation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramella, Jose L.; Esteban, Adolfo; Mendez De Leo, Lucia P.; Sassone, Ariel; Novara, Oscar E.; Boero, Norma L.; Leyva, Ana G.

    1999-01-01

    ADU is the nominal name for ammonium poly uranate. It is a very complex compound of polymeric structure, which may have, according to precipitation conditions, different chemical composition and crystallographic structure. ADU is used as uranium oxide precursor in the manufacture of fuel elements. In former papers it was proved that if ultrasound is applied during precipitation and digestion the characteristics of the final product (U 3 O 8 UO 2 ) improve. By studying ADU thermal decomposition obtained by ultrasonic application, it was intended to obtain its composition. Therefore, differential thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analyses were performed. Samples were taken from special points and analyzed by X-ray diffraction, infra-red spectroscopy and scanning. An experiment was also designed to identify the products released during heating. Results and conclusions obtained are presented in this work. (author)

  19. Structural characterization of lipidic systems under nonequilibrium conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yaghmur, Anan; Rappolt, Michael

    2012-01-01

    manipulation techniques including, for instance, stop-flow mixing or rapid temperature-jump perturbation is given. Second, our recent synchrotron SAXS findings on the dynamic structural response of gold nanoparticle-loaded vesicles upon exposure to an ultraviolet light source, the impact of rapidly mixing...... and the possible formation of intermediate states in the millisecond to second range. The need for investigating self-assembled systems, mainly stimuli-responsive drug nanocarriers, under nonequilibrium conditions is discussed. For pharmaceutically relevant applications, it is essential to combine...

  20. Charge and spin transport in mesoscopic superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Wolf

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-equilibrium charge transport in superconductors has been investigated intensely in the 1970s and 1980s, mostly in the vicinity of the critical temperature. Much less attention has been paid to low temperatures and the role of the quasiparticle spin.Results: We report here on nonlocal transport in superconductor hybrid structures at very low temperatures. By comparing the nonlocal conductance obtained by using ferromagnetic and normal-metal detectors, we discriminate charge and spin degrees of freedom. We observe spin injection and long-range transport of pure, chargeless spin currents in the regime of large Zeeman splitting. We elucidate charge and spin transport by comparison to theoretical models.Conclusion: The observed long-range chargeless spin transport opens a new path to manipulate and utilize the quasiparticle spin in superconductor nanostructures.

  1. Structural performance of HEPA filters under simulated tornado conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, H.L.; Gregory, W.S.; Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.

    1982-02-01

    This report contains the results of structural tests to determine the response of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters to simulated tornado conditions. The data include the structural limits of the filters, their resistance at high flow rates, and the effects of filter design features and tornado parameters. Considering all the filters tested, the mean break pressure or structural limit was found to be 2.35 pse (16.2 kPa). The maximum value was 2.87 psi (19.8 kPa), and the low value found was 1.31 psi (9.0 kPa). The type of failure was usually a medium break of the downstream filter fold. The type of filters that were evaluated were nuclear grade with design flow rates of 1000 cfm (0.472 m 3 /s), standard separators, and folded medium design. The parameters evaluated that are characteristic of the filter included manufacturer, separator type, faceguards, pack tightness, and aerosol loading. Manufacturer and medium properties were found to have a large effect on the structural limits

  2. Mesoscopic simulation of recrystallization and grain growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollett, A.D.

    2000-01-01

    A brief summary of simulation techniques for recrystallization and grain growth is given. The available methods include surface evolver, front tracking (including finite element methods and vertex methods), networks of curves, phase field, cellular automata, and Monte Carlo. Two of the models that use a regular lattice, the Potts model and the Cellular Automaton (CA) model, have proved to be very useful. Microstructure is represented on a discrete lattice where the value of the field at each point represents the local orientation of the material and boundaries exist between points of unlike orientation. Two issues are discussed: one is a hybrid approach to combining the standard Monte Carlo and cellular automata algorithms for recrystallization modeling. The second is adaptation of the MC method for modeling grain growth (and recrystallization) with physically based boundary properties. Both models have significant limitations in their standard forms. The CA model is very useful and efficient for simulating recrystallization with deterministic motion of the recrystallization fronts. It can be adapted to simulate curvature driven migration provided that multiple sub-lattices are used with a probabilistic switching rule. The Potts model is very successful in modeling curvature driven boundary migration and grain growth. It does not simulate the proportionality between boundary velocity and a stored energy driving force, however, unless rather restricted conditions of stored energy (in relation to the grain boundary energy) and lattice temperature are satisfied. A new approach based on a hybrid of the Potts model (MC) and the Cellular Automaton (CA) model has been developed to obtain the desired limiting behavior for both curvature-driven and stored energy-driven grain boundary migration. The combination of methods is achieved by interleaving the two different types of reorientation event in time. The results show that the hybrid algorithm models the Gibbs

  3. Mesoscopic Iron-Oxide Nanorod Polymer Nanocomposite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Robert; Ohno, Kohji; Composto, Russell

    2012-02-01

    Dispersion of nanostructures in polymer matrices is required in order to take advantage of the unique properties of the nano-sized filler. This work investigates the dispersion of mesoscopic (200 nm long) iron-oxide rods (FeNRs) grafted with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes having molecular weights (MWs) of 3.7K, 32K and 160K. These rods were then dispersed in either a poly(methyl methacrylate) or poly(oxyethylene) (PEO) matrix film so that the matrix/brush interaction is either entropic (PMMA matrix) or enthalpic and entropic (PEO matrix). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to determine the dispersion of the FeNRs in the polymer matrix. The results show that the FeNRs with the largest brush were always dispersed in the matrix, whereas the rods with the shorter brushes always aggregated in the matrix. This suggests that the brush MW is a critical parameter to achieve dispersion of these mesoscopic materials. This work can be extended to understand the dispersion of other types of mesocopic particles

  4. Coherent current states in mesoscopic four-terminal Josephson junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareyan, M.; Omelyanchouk, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    A theory is offered for the ballistic 4-terminal Josephson junction. The studied system consist of a mesoscopic two-dimensional normal rectangular layer which is attached on each side to the bulk superconducting banks (terminals). A relation is obtained between the currents through the different terminals, that is valid for arbitrary temperatures and junction sizes. The nonlocal coupling of the supercurrent leads to a new effect, specific for the mesoscopic weak link between two superconducting rings; an applied magnetic flux through one of the rings produces a magnetic flux in the other ring even in the absence of an external flux through the other one. The phase dependent distributions of the local density of Andreev states, of the supercurrents and of the induced order parameter are obtained. The 'interference pattern' for the anomalous average inside the two-dimensional region cam be regulated by the applied magnetic fluxes or the transport currents. For some values of the phase differences between the terminals, the current vortex state and two-dimensional phase slip center appear

  5. METAL STRUCTURES SURVIVABILITY ASSESSMENT WHEN SIMULATING SERVICE CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Gibalenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research is aimed at improving the quality and reliability of measures of primary and secondary protection of metal structures at manufacturing companies, to prolong the service life of cyclically loaded structures of production facilities taking into account the corrosion level of danger. Methodology. Authors proposed to use the principles of process approach for statement and realization of management problems of operational service life in corrosion environments. The principles of ensuring reliability on the level of corrosion danger include justification of stages sequence for survivability assessment of a structural metalwork based on the strategy of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control: definitions, measurements, analysis, improvement and monitoring of measures of primary and secondary corrosion protection. Findings. Providing control measures from corrosion according to the criterion of corrosion danger allows providing requirements of reliability of structural metalwork based on calculated provisions of the limiting conditions method and solving the problems of management in technological safety during the expected service life of structural objects. Originality. The developed strategy of maintenance of the industrial facilities on an actual state includes the process approach to resource management by creation of system for the account and the functional controlling, risk analysis and regulation of technological safety in production facilities of the enterprises. Realization of the principles of process approach to management of technological safety at the object level is directed to perfecting of tools and methods of anticorrosive protection, extension of a resource taking into account indexes of survivability (, and justification of program measures to ensure the reliability of enterprises(PER. Practical value. On the basis of process approach to quality and reliability management, generalizations of the

  6. Segment-scale, force-level theory of mesoscopic dynamic localization and entropic elasticity in entangled chain polymer liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Zachary E.; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2017-04-01

    We develop a segment-scale, force-based theory for the breakdown of the unentangled Rouse model and subsequent emergence of isotropic mesoscopic localization and entropic elasticity in chain polymer liquids in the absence of ergodicity-restoring anisotropic reptation or activated hopping motion. The theory is formulated in terms of a conformational N-dynamic-order-parameter generalized Langevin equation approach. It is implemented using a universal field-theoretic Gaussian thread model of polymer structure and closed at the level of the chain dynamic second moment matrix. The physical idea is that the isotropic Rouse model fails due to the dynamical emergence, with increasing chain length, of time-persistent intermolecular contacts determined by the combined influence of local uncrossability, long range polymer connectivity, and a self-consistent treatment of chain motion and the dynamic forces that hinder it. For long chain melts, the mesoscopic localization length (identified as the tube diameter) and emergent entropic elasticity predictions are in near quantitative agreement with experiment. Moreover, the onset chain length scales with the semi-dilute crossover concentration with a realistic numerical prefactor. Distinctive novel predictions are made for various off-diagonal correlation functions that quantify the full spatial structure of the dynamically localized polymer conformation. As the local excluded volume constraint and/or intrachain bonding spring are softened to allow chain crossability, the tube diameter is predicted to swell until it reaches the radius-of-gyration at which point mesoscopic localization vanishes in a discontinuous manner. A dynamic phase diagram for such a delocalization transition is constructed, which is qualitatively consistent with simulations and the classical concept of a critical entanglement degree of polymerization.

  7. Simulation studies of protein-induced bilayer deformations, and lipid-induced protein tilting, on a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Smit, B.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2005-01-01

    in membranes, we considered proteins of different hydrophobic length ( as well as different sizes). We studied the cooperative behavior of the lipid-protein system at mesoscopic time-and lengthscales. In particular, we correlated in a systematic way the protein-induced bilayer perturbation, and the lipid......Biological membranes are complex and highly cooperative structures. To relate biomembrane structure to their biological function it is often necessary to consider simpler systems. Lipid bilayers composed of one or two lipid species, and with embedded proteins, provide a model system for biological...... membranes. Here we present a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins, which we have studied with the help of the dissipative particle dynamics simulation technique. Because hydrophobic matching is believed to be one of the main physical mechanisms regulating lipid-protein interactions...

  8. Structural performance of HEPA filters under simulated tornado conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, H. L.; Gregory, W. S.; Ricketts, C. I.; Smith, P. R.

    1982-02-01

    The response of high efficiency particulate air filters to simulated tornado conditions was determined. The data include the structural limits of the filters, their resistance at high flow rates, and the effects of filter design features and tornado parameters. Considering all the filters tested, the mean break pressure or structural limit was found to be 2.35 pse (16.2 kPa). The maximum value was 2.87 psi (19.8 kPa), and the low value found was 1.31 psi (9.0 kPa). The type of failure was usually a medium break of the downstream filter fold. The types of filters that were evaluated were nuclear grade with design flow rates of 1000 cfm (0.472 cu m/s), standard separators, and folded medium design. The parameters evaluated that are characteristic of the filter included manufacturer, separator type, face-guards, pack tightness, and aerosol loading. Manufacturer and medium properties were found to have a large effect on the structural limits.

  9. Preparation of gluten-free bread using a meso-structured whey protein particle system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsdijk, van L.E.; Goot, van der A.J.; Hamer, R.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a novel method for making gluten-free bread using mesoscopically structured whey protein. The use of the meso-structured protein is based on the hypothesis that the gluten structure present in a developed wheat dough features a particle structure on a mesoscopic length scale

  10. Chemical Structures of Novel Maillard Reaction Products under Hyperglycemic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imahori, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kojima, Naoto; Hasei, Tomohiro; Sumii, Megumi; Sumida, Taishi; Yamashita, Masayuki; Watanabe, Tetsushi

    2018-01-01

    Two novel and two known compounds, 4-quinolylaldoxime and indole-3-aldehyde, were isolated from a reaction mixture consisting of D-glucose and L-tryptophan at physiological temperature and pH. The chemical structures of the two novel compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis such as X-ray crystallography. One of the novel compound and the indole-3-aldehyde showed mutagenicity toward Salmonella typhimurium YG1024 with S9 mix. Furthermore, 4-quinolylaldoxime was detected from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat plasma by LC-MS/MS analysis; however, the isolated compounds were not detected in rat diet extracts. To our knowledge, this is the first report in which 4-quinolylaldoxime was detected in rat plasma. These results suggest that amino-carbonyl reaction products may be formed in diabetic condition and induce genetic damage.

  11. Thermodynamically consistent mesoscopic model of the ferro/paramagnetic transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benešová, Barbora; Kružík, Martin; Roubíček, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, Č. 1 (2013), s. 1-28 ISSN 0044-2275 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802; GA ČR GA106/09/1573; GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA106/08/1397; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06052 Program:GA; LC Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : ferro-para-magnetism * evolution * thermodynamics Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics; BA - General Mathematics (UT-L) Impact factor: 1.214, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/kruzik-thermodynamically consistent mesoscopic model of the ferro-paramagnetic transition.pdf

  12. Wetting of Heterogeneous Surfaces at the Mesoscopic Scale

    CERN Document Server

    De Coninck, J; Ruiz, J

    2003-01-01

    We consider the problem of wetting on a heterogeneous wall with mesoscopic defects: i.e.\\ defects of order $L^{\\varepsilon}$, $0<\\varepsilon<1$, where $L$ is some typical length--scale of the system. In this framework, we extend several former rigorous results which were shown for walls with microscopic defects \\cite{DMR,DMR2}. Namely, using statistical techniques applied to a suitably defined semi-infinite Ising-model, we derive a generalization of Young's law for rough and heterogeneous surfaces, which is known as the generalized Cassie-Wenzel's equation. In the homogeneous case, we also show that for a particular geometry of the wall, the model can exhibit a surface phase transition between two regimes which are either governed by Wenzel's or by Cassie's law.

  13. Simulating mesoscopic reaction-diffusion systems using the Gillespie algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, David

    2004-12-12

    We examine an application of the Gillespie algorithm to simulating spatially inhomogeneous reaction-diffusion systems in mesoscopic volumes such as cells and microchambers. The method involves discretizing the chamber into elements and modeling the diffusion of chemical species by the movement of molecules between neighboring elements. These transitions are expressed in the form of a set of reactions which are added to the chemical system. The derivation of the rates of these diffusion reactions is by comparison with a finite volume discretization of the heat equation on an unevenly spaced grid. The diffusion coefficient of each species is allowed to be inhomogeneous in space, including discontinuities. The resulting system is solved by the Gillespie algorithm using the fast direct method. We show that in an appropriate limit the method reproduces exact solutions of the heat equation for a purely diffusive system and the nonlinear reaction-rate equation describing the cubic autocatalytic reaction.

  14. Collective excitability in a mesoscopic neuronal model of epileptic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedynak, Maciej; Pons, Antonio J.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    At the mesoscopic scale, the brain can be understood as a collection of interacting neuronal oscillators, but the extent to which its sustained activity is due to coupling among brain areas is still unclear. Here we address this issue in a simplified situation by examining the effect of coupling between two cortical columns described via Jansen-Rit neural mass models. Our results show that coupling between the two neuronal populations gives rise to stochastic initiations of sustained collective activity, which can be interpreted as epileptic events. For large enough coupling strengths, termination of these events results mainly from the emergence of synchronization between the columns, and thus it is controlled by coupling instead of noise. Stochastic triggering and noise-independent durations are characteristic of excitable dynamics, and thus we interpret our results in terms of collective excitability.

  15. Reaction-Transport Systems Mesoscopic Foundations, Fronts, and Spatial Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Horsthemke, Werner; Mendez, Vicenc

    2010-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems, with a focus on fronts and stationary spatial patterns. Emphasis is on systems that are non-standard in the sense that either the transport is not simply classical diffusion (Brownian motion) or the system is not homogeneous. A important feature is the derivation of the basic phenomenological equations from the mesoscopic system properties. Topics addressed include transport with inertia, described by persistent random walks and hyperbolic reaction-transport equations and transport by anomalous diffusion, in particular subdiffusion, where the mean square displacement grows sublinearly with time. In particular reaction-diffusion systems are studied where the medium is in turn either spatially inhomogeneous, compositionally heterogeneous or spatially discrete. Applications span a vast range of interdisciplinary fields and the systems considered can be as different as human or animal groups migrating under external influences, population...

  16. Hulls and structural material waste conditioning by high pressure compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frotscher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1986 KfK is developing a conditioning process. Main subjects of the investigations were the development of the production technique and the planning of the most important equipments of the process under remote conditions. The process is based on an extensive program of experiments. Inactive bulks of hulls and structural material components were compacted using maximum axial pressure load of about 300 MPa. The product density as function of press force was experimentally determinated. The mechanical loads of the press and tools were estimated for the design of these equipments. The hydraulic press consists a horizontal four-cylinder press. The maximum force of the press is 25 MN. The main advantage is the modular design of the press which is open on all sides. Especially the free accessibility from top is ensured. The report also represents relevant radiological data of the alternative product. Co-60 is the dominating activity of the product due to the effects of the heat production. An amount of 10 kg hull waste or 25 kg top and bottom pieces of the spent fuel assemblies per package is already beyond the Co-60 limit of the KONRAD regulations. The nuclear thermal power of a filled container is approximately sixty times lower compared with a vitrified HLW-container. Since the product shows thermal stability beyond 200 0 C, this it is suited for a combined disposal together with vitrified HLW-containers in salt bore holes of a geological disposal. The preliminary cost evaluation is based on a reprocessing throughput of 500 t HM per year and volume reduction factor of 5.3. Accordingly there are produced 300 waste packages with hulls only or 625 units with hulls and top and bottom pieces which require 1.6 or 2.3 millions DM respectively

  17. Ac transport properties of electrons in parallel-plate mesoscopic capacitors in series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuen, J.; Wang, J. H.

    2017-10-01

    In a self-consistent manner by taking into account three aspects: the frequency of the bias, geometry of the capacitor (e.g. plate separation) and the Fermi energy of the system, ac transport properties of electrons in parallel-plate mesoscopic capacitor in series under an bias are discussed. The charge density, the internal characteristic potential caused by electrons interaction and the size-dependent mesoscopic capacitance are calculated. Results show that these quantities are complex number with very small finite imaginary part in mesoscopic scale, and the current conservation is satisfied in our numerical calculation. Moreover, when the plate separation is large enough, the mesoscopic capacitance approaches to the geometric capacitance, and the imaginary parts vanish. When the plate separation is small, there are some differences between them.

  18. Quantum bit string commitment protocol using polarization of mesoscopic coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Fabio Alencar; Ramos, Rubens Viana

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum bit string commitment protocol using polarization of mesoscopic coherent states. The protocol is described and its security against brute force and quantum cloning machine attack is analyzed

  19. Quantum bit string commitment protocol using polarization of mesoscopic coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Fábio Alencar; Ramos, Rubens Viana

    2008-02-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum bit string commitment protocol using polarization of mesoscopic coherent states. The protocol is described and its security against brute force and quantum cloning machine attack is analyzed.

  20. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  1. The effect of geometric scattering on the oscillatory magnetoconductance in multiply connected disordered mesoscopic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, C.; Gu Benyuan.

    1994-12-01

    We present the quantum mechanical calculations on the conductance of a quantum waveguide consisting of multiply connected mesoscopic rings with disordered ring-circumferences and ballistic lead connections between the rings with the transfer matrix approach. The profiles of the conductance as functions of the magnetic flux and the Fermi wave number of electrons depend on the number of rings as also on the geometric configuration of the system. The conductance spectrum of this system for disordered ring circumferences, disordered ring intervals and disordered magnetic flux is examined in detail. Studying the effect of geometric scattering and the two different length scales involved in the network, namely, the ring circumference and the ballistic lead connections on the conductance profile, we find that there exist two kinds of mini-bands, one originating from the bound states of the rings, i.e. the intrinsic mini-bands, and the other associated with the connecting leads between the adjacent rings, which are the extra mini-bands. These two kinds of mini-bands respond differently to external perturbations in parameters. Unlike the system of potential scatterers, this system of geometric scatterers show complete band formations at all energies even for finite systems and there is a preferential decay of the energy states depending upon the type of disorder introduced. The conductance band structures strongly depend on the geometric configuration of the network and so by controlling the geometric parameters, the conductance band structures can be artificially tailored. (author). 18 refs, 6 figs

  2. Mesoscopic Effects in an Agent-Based Bargaining Model in Regular Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poza, David J.; Santos, José I.; Galán, José M.; López-Paredes, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    The effect of spatial structure has been proved very relevant in repeated games. In this work we propose an agent based model where a fixed finite population of tagged agents play iteratively the Nash demand game in a regular lattice. The model extends the multiagent bargaining model by Axtell, Epstein and Young [1] modifying the assumption of global interaction. Each agent is endowed with a memory and plays the best reply against the opponent's most frequent demand. We focus our analysis on the transient dynamics of the system, studying by computer simulation the set of states in which the system spends a considerable fraction of the time. The results show that all the possible persistent regimes in the global interaction model can also be observed in this spatial version. We also find that the mesoscopic properties of the interaction networks that the spatial distribution induces in the model have a significant impact on the diffusion of strategies, and can lead to new persistent regimes different from those found in previous research. In particular, community structure in the intratype interaction networks may cause that communities reach different persistent regimes as a consequence of the hindering diffusion effect of fluctuating agents at their borders. PMID:21408019

  3. A Mesoscopic Analytical Model to Predict the Onset of Wrinkling in Plain Woven Preforms under Bias Extension Shear Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Hosseini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A mesoscopic analytical model of wrinkling of Plain-Woven Composite Preforms (PWCPs under the bias extension test is presented, based on a new instability analysis. The analysis is aimed to facilitate a better understanding of the nature of wrinkle formation in woven fabrics caused by large in-plane shear, while it accounts for the effect of fabric and process parameters on the onset of wrinkling. To this end, the mechanism of wrinkle formation in PWCPs in mesoscale is simplified and an equivalent structure composed of bars and different types of springs is proposed, mimicking the behavior of a representative PWCP element at the post-locking state. The parameters of this equivalent structure are derived based on geometric and mechanical characteristics of the PWCP. The principle of minimum total potential energy is employed to formluate the model, and experimental validation is carried out to reveal the effectiveness of the derived wrinkling prediction equation.

  4. Effect of support conditions on structural response under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, T.; Memon, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    In design practice, dynamic structural analysis is carried out with base of structure considered as fixed; this means that foundation is placed on rock like soil material. While conducting this type of analyses the role of foundation and soil behaviour is totally neglected. The actions in members and loads transferred at foundation level obtained in this manner do not depict the true structural behaviour. FEM (Finite Element Methods) analysis where both superstructure and foundation soil are coupled together is quite complicated and expensive for design environments. A simplified model is required to depict dynamic response of structures with foundations based on flexible soils. The primary purpose of this research is to compare the superstructure dynamic responses of structural systems with fixed base to that of simple soil model base. The selected simple soil model is to be suitable for use in a design environment to give more realistic results. For this purpose building models are idealized with various heights and structural systems in both 2D (Two Dimensional) and 3D (Three Dimensional) space. These models are then provided with visco-elastic supports representing three soil bearing capacities and the analysis results are compared to that of fixed supports models. The results indicate that fixed support system underestimates natural time period of the structures. Dynamic behavior and force response of visco-elastic support is different from fixed support model. Fixed support models result in over designed base columns and under designed beams. (author)

  5. Quantum Coherence and Random Fields at Mesoscopic Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Thomas F. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We seek to explore and exploit model, disordered and geometrically frustrated magnets where coherent spin clusters stably detach themselves from their surroundings, leading to extreme sensitivity to finite frequency excitations and the ability to encode information. Global changes in either the spin concentration or the quantum tunneling probability via the application of an external magnetic field can tune the relative weights of quantum entanglement and random field effects on the mesoscopic scale. These same parameters can be harnessed to manipulate domain wall dynamics in the ferromagnetic state, with technological possibilities for magnetic information storage. Finally, extensions from quantum ferromagnets to antiferromagnets promise new insights into the physics of quantum fluctuations and effective dimensional reduction. A combination of ac susceptometry, dc magnetometry, noise measurements, hole burning, non-linear Fano experiments, and neutron diffraction as functions of temperature, magnetic field, frequency, excitation amplitude, dipole concentration, and disorder address issues of stability, overlap, coherence, and control. We have been especially interested in probing the evolution of the local order in the progression from spin liquid to spin glass to long-range-ordered magnet.

  6. Mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelstrup, S; Rubi, J M; Pagonabarraga, I; Bedeaux, D

    2013-11-28

    We show that the kinetics of a molecular motor fueled by ATP and operating between a deactivated and an activated state can be derived from the principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics applied to the mesoscopic domain. The activation by ATP, the possible slip of the motor, as well as the forward stepping carrying a load are viewed as slow diffusion along a reaction coordinate. Local equilibrium is assumed in the reaction coordinate spaces, making it possible to derive the non-equilibrium thermodynamic description. Using this scheme, we find expressions for the velocity of the motor, in terms of the driving force along the spacial coordinate, and for the chemical reaction that brings about activation, in terms of the chemical potentials of the reactants and products which maintain the cycle. The second law efficiency is defined, and the velocity corresponding to maximum power is obtained for myosin movement on actin. Experimental results fitting with the description are reviewed, giving a maximum efficiency of 0.45 at a myosin headgroup velocity of 5 × 10(-7) m s(-1). The formalism allows the introduction and test of meso-level models, which may be needed to explain experiments.

  7. Mesoscopic kinetic basis of macroscopic chemical thermodynamics: A mathematical theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2016-11-01

    Gibbs' macroscopic chemical thermodynamics is one of the most important theories in chemistry. Generalizing it to mesoscaled nonequilibrium systems is essential to biophysics. The nonequilibrium stochastic thermodynamics of chemical reaction kinetics suggested a free energy balance equation dF^{(meso)}/dt=E_{in}-e_{p} in which the free energy input rate E_{in} and dissipation rate e_{p} are both non-negative, and E_{in}≤e_{p}. We prove that in the macroscopic limit by merely allowing the molecular numbers to be infinite, the generalized mesoscopic free energy F^{(meso)} converges to φ^{ss}, the large deviation rate function for the stationary distributions. This generalized macroscopic free energy φ^{ss} now satisfies a balance equation dφ^{ss}(x)/dt=cmf(x)-σ(x), in which x represents chemical concentration. The chemical motive force cmf(x) and entropy production rate σ(x) are both non-negative, and cmf(x)≤σ(x). The balance equation is valid generally in isothermal driven systems and is different from mechanical energy conservation and the first law; it is actually an unknown form of the second law. Consequences of the emergent thermodynamic quantities and equalities are further discussed. The emergent "law" is independent of underlying kinetic details. Our theory provides an example showing how a macroscopic law emerges from a level below.

  8. Grid synchronization structure for wind converters under grid fault conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Jose Ignacio; Candela García, José Ignacio; Luna Alloza, Álvaro; Catalan, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a grid synchronization structure for three-phase electric power systems based on the use of a filtered quadrature signal generator (FQSG) and a phase-locked loop (PLL) structure, named Adaptive Vector Grid Synchronization system (AVGS). This system estimates the magnitude, frequency and phase of a signal, specially three-phase voltages and currents, and allows fast and accurate detection of the symmetrical components meet with the transient operating requirements imposed b...

  9. Influence of gamma-irradiation on thermally-induced mesoscopic gelation of degalactosylated xyloglucans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todaro, S.; Sabatino, M.A.; Walo, M.; Mangione, M.R.; Bulone, D.; Dispenza, C.

    2014-01-01

    Thermoresponsive degalactosylated xyloglucans have been already proposed as in situ gelling scaffolds for tissue engineering, due to their reversible macroscopic thermal gelation at body temperature and biodegradability. The highly branched, hydroxyl group-rich molecular structure renders xyloglucans interesting raw materials also in the form of micro/nanoparticles for application as nanoscalar drug delivery devices in cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations. Owing to their natural source, xyloglucans show high average molecular weight, broad molecular weight distribution and poor water solubility, as large and compact aggregates usually form via inter-molecular hydrogen bonding. 60 Co γ-irradiation has been here applied to reduce the molecular weight. The aqueous solutions of irradiated xyloglucan were characterized by dynamic light scattering measurements and gel filtration chromatography. The aggregation kinetics at 37 °C were studied by dynamic light scattering measurements to confirm the temperature-responsive behavior of this polymer even when dispersed in water at low concentration after γ-irradiation. Irradiation dose–molecular properties relationship has been sought. - Highlights: • Influence of γ-irradiation on a partially degalactosylated xyloglucan is investigated. • Molecular weight reduction is observed in the investigated dose range. • Modification of the temperature-induced mesoscopic gelation kinetics is evidenced

  10. Direct experimental observation of mesoscopic fluorous domains in fluorinated room temperature ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Celso, F.; Yoshida, Y.; Castiglione, F.; Ferro, M.; Mele, A.; Jafta, C.J.; Triolo, A.; Russina, O. (Meijo); (Rome); (CNRS-UMR); (ISDM-Italy)

    2017-01-01

    Fluorinated room temperature ionic liquids (FRTILs) represent a class of solvent media that are attracting great attention due to their IL-specific properties as well as features stemming from their fluorous nature. Medium-to-long fluorous tails constitute a well-defined apolar moiety in the otherwise polar environment. Similarly to the case of alkyl tails, such chains are expected to result in the formation of self-assembled fluorous domains. So far, however, no direct experimental observation has been made of the existence of such structural heterogeneities on the nm scale. We report here the first experimental evidence of the existence of mesoscopic spatial segregation of fluorinated domains, on the basis of highly complementary X-ray and neutron scattering data sets (highlighting the importance of the latter probe) and NMR spectroscopy. Data are interpreted using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, emphasizing the existence of a self-assembly mechanism that delivers segregated fluorous domains, where preferential solubilisation of fluorinated compounds can occur, thus paving the way for several smart applications.

  11. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J.; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm2 cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional ‘Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ∼1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities. PMID:26139568

  12. Time-evolution of photon heat current through series coupled two mesoscopic Josephson junction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Hong-Kang; Wang, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Photon heat current tunneling through a series coupled two mesoscopic Josephson junction (MJJ) system biased by dc voltages has been investigated by employing the nonequilibrium Green’s function approach. The time-oscillating photon heat current is contributed by the superposition of different current branches associated with the frequencies of MJJs ω j (j = 1, 2). Nonlinear behaviors are exhibited to be induced by the self-inductance, Coulomb interaction, and interference effect relating to the coherent transport of Cooper pairs in the MJJs. Time-oscillating pumping photon heat current is generated in the absence of temperature difference, while it becomes zero after time-average. The combination of ω j and Coulomb interactions in the MJJs determines the concrete heat current configuration. As the external and intrinsic frequencies ω j and ω 0 of MJJs match some specific combinations, resonant photon heat current exhibits sinusoidal behaviors with large amplitudes. Symmetric and asymmetric evolutions versus time t with respect to ω 1 t and ω 2 t are controlled by the applied dc voltages of V 1 and V 2. The dc photon heat current formula is a special case of the general time-dependent heat current formula when the bias voltages are settled to zero. The Aharonov-Bohm effect has been investigated, and versatile oscillation structures of photon heat current can be achieved by tuning the magnetic fluxes threading through separating MJJs.

  13. Multidimensional Anodized Titanium Foam Photoelectrode for Efficient Utilization of Photons in Mesoscopic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Soo; Choi, Hyelim; Kim, Jin; Park, Hyeji; Kim, Jae-Yup; Choi, Jung-Woo; Yu, Seung-Ho; Lee, Kyung Jae; Kang, Yun Sik; Park, Sun Ha; Cho, Yong-Hun; Yum, Jun-Ho; Dunand, David C; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2017-09-01

    Mesoscopic solar cells based on nanostructured oxide semiconductors are considered as a promising candidates to replace conventional photovoltaics employing costly materials. However, their overall performances are below the sufficient level required for practical usages. Herein, this study proposes an anodized Ti foam (ATF) with multidimensional and hierarchical architecture as a highly efficient photoelectrode for the generation of a large photocurrent. ATF photoelectrodes prepared by electrochemical anodization of freeze-cast Ti foams have three favorable characteristics: (i) large surface area for enhanced light harvesting, (ii) 1D semiconductor structure for facilitated charge collection, and (iii) 3D highly conductive metallic current collector that enables exclusion of transparent conducting oxide substrate. Based on these advantages, when ATF is utilized in dye-sensitized solar cells, short-circuit photocurrent density up to 22.0 mA cm -2 is achieved in the conventional N719 dye-I 3 - /I - redox electrolyte system even with an intrinsically inferior quasi-solid electrolyte. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2015-07-03

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm(2) cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional 'Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ∼1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities.

  15. Stability of Ruddlesden-Popper-structured oxides in humid conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtimäki, M.; Yamauchi, H.; Karppinen, M.

    2013-08-01

    Some of layered transition-metal oxides are known to react with atmospheric humidity to form through topotactic intercalation reactions new water-containing layered structures. Here we investigate the influence of oxygen content (7-δ) of the Ruddlesden-Popper-structured Sr3FeMO7-δ (M=Ni, Mn, Ti) oxides on the water-intercalation reaction. It is found that their oxygen contents influence greatly the reactivity of the phases with water. Other factors possibly affecting the reactivity are discussed on the basis of the present data in combination with a comprehensive review of previous works on Ruddlesden-Popper and related layered oxide phases.

  16. A Mesoscopic Model for Protein-Protein Interactions in Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Mikael; Jönsson, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Protein self-association may be detrimental in biological systems, but can be utilized in a controlled fashion for protein crystallization. It is hence of considerable interest to understand how factors like solution conditions prevent or promote aggregation. Here we present a computational model describing interactions between protein molecules in solution. The calculations are based on a molecular description capturing the detailed structure of the protein molecule using x-ray or nuclear ma...

  17. The Dependence Structure of Conditional Probabilities in a Contingency Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joarder, Anwar H.; Al-Sabah, Walid S.

    2002-01-01

    Conditional probability and statistical independence can be better explained with contingency tables. In this note some special cases of 2 x 2 contingency tables are considered. In turn an interesting insight into statistical dependence as well as independence of events is obtained.

  18. Mangrove change detection, structure and condition in a protected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Given the high dependence of coastal communities on natural resources, mangrove conservation is a challenge in Mozambique, even within several types of marine protected areas. This study assesses the condition of a mangrove forest in the Quirimbas National Park (QNP), where use by the local community is allowed ...

  19. Adjoint Techniques for Topology Optimization of Structures Under Damage Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to seek computationally efficient ways to optimize aerospace structures subject to damage tolerance criteria. Optimization was to involve sizing as well as topology optimization. The work was done in collaboration with Steve Scotti, Chauncey Wu and Joanne Walsh at the NASA Langley Research Center. Computation of constraint sensitivity is normally the most time-consuming step of an optimization procedure. The cooperative work first focused on this issue and implemented the adjoint method of sensitivity computation (Haftka and Gurdal, 1992) in an optimization code (runstream) written in Engineering Analysis Language (EAL). The method was implemented both for bar and plate elements including buckling sensitivity for the latter. Lumping of constraints was investigated as a means to reduce the computational cost. Adjoint sensitivity computation was developed and implemented for lumped stress and buckling constraints. Cost of the direct method and the adjoint method was compared for various structures with and without lumping. The results were reported in two papers (Akgun et al., 1998a and 1999). It is desirable to optimize topology of an aerospace structure subject to a large number of damage scenarios so that a damage tolerant structure is obtained. Including damage scenarios in the design procedure is critical in order to avoid large mass penalties at later stages (Haftka et al., 1983). A common method for topology optimization is that of compliance minimization (Bendsoe, 1995) which has not been used for damage tolerant design. In the present work, topology optimization is treated as a conventional problem aiming to minimize the weight subject to stress constraints. Multiple damage configurations (scenarios) are considered. Each configuration has its own structural stiffness matrix and, normally, requires factoring of the matrix and solution of the system of equations. Damage that is expected to be tolerated is local

  20. Structural damage monitoring of harbor caissons with interlocking condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, Thanh Canh; Lee, So Young; Nauyen, Khac Duy; Kim, Jeong Tae [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    The objective of this study is to monitor the health status of harbor caissons which have potential foundation damage. To obtain the objective, the following approaches are performed. Firstly, a structural damage monitoring(SDM) method is designed for interlocked multiple caisson structures. The SDM method utilizes the change in modal strain energy to monitor the foundation damage in a target caisson unit. Secondly, a finite element model of a caisson system which consists of three caisson units is established to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. In the finite element simulation, the caisson units are constrained each other by shear key connections. The health status of the caisson system against various levels of foundation damage is monitored by measuring relative modal displacements between the adjacent caissons.

  1. Structural damage monitoring of harbor caissons with interlocking condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh, Thanh Canh; Lee, So Young; Nauyen, Khac Duy; Kim, Jeong Tae

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to monitor the health status of harbor caissons which have potential foundation damage. To obtain the objective, the following approaches are performed. Firstly, a structural damage monitoring(SDM) method is designed for interlocked multiple caisson structures. The SDM method utilizes the change in modal strain energy to monitor the foundation damage in a target caisson unit. Secondly, a finite element model of a caisson system which consists of three caisson units is established to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. In the finite element simulation, the caisson units are constrained each other by shear key connections. The health status of the caisson system against various levels of foundation damage is monitored by measuring relative modal displacements between the adjacent caissons

  2. Physical Conditions in the Source Region of a Zebra Structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yasnov, L. V.; Karlický, Marian; Stupishin, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 7 (2016), s. 2037-2047 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0103 Grant - others:EC(XE) 606862 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : radio emission * zebra fine structure * radio diagnostics of solar flares Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016

  3. Mesoscopics of ultrasound and seismic waves: application to passive imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larose, É.

    2006-05-01

    This manuscript deals with different aspects of the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in heterogeneous media, both simply and multiply scattering ones. After a short introduction on conventional imaging techniques, we describe two observations that demonstrate the presence of multiple scattering in seismic records: the equipartition principle, and the coherent backscattering effect (Chap. 2). Multiple scattering is related to the mesoscopic nature of seismic and acoustic waves, and is a strong limitation for conventional techniques like medical or seismic imaging. In the following part of the manuscript (Chaps. 3 5), we present an application of mesoscopic physics to acoustic and seismic waves: the principle of passive imaging. By correlating records of ambient noise or diffuse waves obtained at two passive sensors, it is possible to reconstruct the impulse response of the medium as if a source was placed at one sensor. This provides the opportunity of doing acoustics and seismology without a source. Several aspects of this technique are presented here, starting with theoretical considerations and numerical simulations (Chaps. 3, 4). Then we present experimental applications (Chap. 5) to ultrasound (passive tomography of a layered medium) and to seismic waves (passive imaging of California, and the Moon, with micro-seismic noise). Physique mésoscopique des ultrasons et des ondes sismiques : application à l'imagerie passive. Cet article de revue rassemble plusieurs aspects fondamentaux et appliqués de la propagation des ondes acoustiques et élastiques dans les milieux hétérogènes, en régime de diffusion simple ou multiple. Après une introduction sur les techniques conventionelles d'imagerie sismique et ultrasonore, nous présentons deux expériences qui mettent en évidence la présence de diffusion multiple dans les enregistrements sismologiques : l'équipartition des ondes, et la rétrodiffusion cohérente (Chap. 2). La diffusion multiple des

  4. Influence of etching processes on electronic transport in mesoscopic InAs/GaSb quantum well devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atindra Nath Pal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the electronic characterization of mesoscopic Hall bar devices fabricated from coupled InAs/GaSb quantum wells sandwiched between AlSb barriers, an emerging candidate for two-dimensional topological insulators. The electronic width of the etched structures was determined from the low field magneto-resistance peak, a characteristic signature of partially diffusive boundary scattering in the ballistic limit. In case of dry-etching the electronic width was found to decrease with electron density. In contrast, for wet etched devices it stayed constant with density. Moreover, the boundary scattering was found to be more specular for wet-etched devices, which may be relevant for studying topological edge states.

  5. Influence of etching processes on electronic transport in mesoscopic InAs/GaSb quantum well devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Atindra Nath; Müller, Susanne; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Tschirky, Thomas; Charpentier, Christophe; Wegscheider, Werner [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich - 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    We report the electronic characterization of mesoscopic Hall bar devices fabricated from coupled InAs/GaSb quantum wells sandwiched between AlSb barriers, an emerging candidate for two-dimensional topological insulators. The electronic width of the etched structures was determined from the low field magneto-resistance peak, a characteristic signature of partially diffusive boundary scattering in the ballistic limit. In case of dry-etching the electronic width was found to decrease with electron density. In contrast, for wet etched devices it stayed constant with density. Moreover, the boundary scattering was found to be more specular for wet-etched devices, which may be relevant for studying topological edge states.

  6. Mesoscopic kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of organic photovoltaic device characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Robin G. E.; Wright, Edward N.; O'Kane, Simon E. J.; Walker, Alison B.; Blakesley, James C.

    2012-12-01

    Measured mobility and current-voltage characteristics of single layer and photovoltaic (PV) devices composed of poly{9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bis[N,N'-(4-butylphenyl)]bis(N,N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylene)diamine} (PFB) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) have been reproduced by a mesoscopic model employing the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) approach. Our aim is to show how to avoid the uncertainties common in electrical transport models arising from the need to fit a large number of parameters when little information is available, for example, a single current-voltage curve. Here, simulation parameters are derived from a series of measurements using a self-consistent “building-blocks” approach, starting from data on the simplest systems. We found that site energies show disorder and that correlations in the site energies and a distribution of deep traps must be included in order to reproduce measured charge mobility-field curves at low charge densities in bulk PFB and F8BT. The parameter set from the mobility-field curves reproduces the unipolar current in single layers of PFB and F8BT and allows us to deduce charge injection barriers. Finally, by combining these disorder descriptions and injection barriers with an optical model, the external quantum efficiency and current densities of blend and bilayer organic PV devices can be successfully reproduced across a voltage range encompassing reverse and forward bias, with the recombination rate the only parameter to be fitted, found to be 1×107 s-1. These findings demonstrate an approach that removes some of the arbitrariness present in transport models of organic devices, which validates the KMC as an accurate description of organic optoelectronic systems, and provides information on the microscopic origins of the device behavior.

  7. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-28

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t(-1/2) and t(-3/2) power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  8. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t^{-1/2} and t^{-3/2} power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  9. Effect of mesoscopic fluctuations on equation of state in cluster-forming systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ciach

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Equation of state for systems with particles self-assembling into aggregates is derived within a mesoscopic theory combining density functional and field-theoretic approaches. We focus on the effect of mesoscopic fluctuations in the disordered phase. The pressure - volume fraction isotherms are calculated explicitly for two forms of the short-range attraction long-range repulsion potential. Mesoscopic fluctuations lead to an increased pressure in each case, except for very small volume fractions. When large clusters are formed, the mechanical instability of the system is present at much higher temperature than found in mean-field approximation. In this case phase separation competes with the formation of periodic phases (colloidal crystals. In the case of small clusters, no mechanical instability associated with separation into dilute and dense phases appears.

  10. Primary thermometry triad at 6 mK in mesoscopic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftikhar, Z.; Anthore, A.; Jezouin, S.; Parmentier, F. D.; Jin, Y.; Cavanna, A.; Ouerghi, A.; Gennser, U.; Pierre, F.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum physics emerge and develop as temperature is reduced. Although mesoscopic electrical circuits constitute an outstanding platform to explore quantum behaviour, the challenge in cooling the electrons impedes their potential. The strong coupling of such micrometre-scale devices with the measurement lines, combined with the weak coupling to the substrate, makes them extremely difficult to thermalize below 10 mK and imposes in situ thermometers. Here we demonstrate electronic quantum transport at 6 mK in micrometre-scale mesoscopic circuits. The thermometry methods are established by the comparison of three in situ primary thermometers, each involving a different underlying physics. The employed combination of quantum shot noise, quantum back action of a resistive circuit and conductance oscillations of a single-electron transistor covers a remarkably broad spectrum of mesoscopic phenomena. The experiment, performed in vacuum using a standard cryogen-free dilution refrigerator, paves the way towards the sub-millikelvin range with additional thermalization and refrigeration techniques.

  11. Stability of Ruddlesden–Popper-structured oxides in humid conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtimäki, M.; Yamauchi, H.; Karppinen, M., E-mail: maarit.karppinen@aalto.fi

    2013-08-15

    Some of layered transition-metal oxides are known to react with atmospheric humidity to form through topotactic intercalation reactions new water-containing layered structures. Here we investigate the influence of oxygen content (7−δ) of the Ruddlesden–Popper-structured Sr{sub 3}FeMO{sub 7−δ} (M=Ni, Mn, Ti) oxides on the water-intercalation reaction. It is found that their oxygen contents influence greatly the reactivity of the phases with water. Other factors possibly affecting the reactivity are discussed on the basis of the present data in combination with a comprehensive review of previous works on Ruddlesden–Popper and related layered oxide phases. - Graphical abstract: Many of the Ruddlesden–Popper-structured A{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 7−δ} oxides readily react with water via intercalation reactions. Three possible factors affecting the water intercalation are identified: oxygen content of the phase, ionic radius of cation A and valence state of cation B. The resultant layered water-derivative phases can be categorised into two groups, depending on the crystal symmetry of the phase. Highlights: • Ruddlesden–Popper oxides A{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 7−δ} often accommodate water via intercalation reaction. • The lower the oxygen content 7−δ is the more readily the intercalation reaction occurs. • The second factor promoting the reaction is the large size of cation A. • The third possible factor is the high valence state of cation B. • Resultant water-derivatives can be categorised into two groups depending on symmetry.

  12. Stability of Ruddlesden–Popper-structured oxides in humid conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtimäki, M.; Yamauchi, H.; Karppinen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Some of layered transition-metal oxides are known to react with atmospheric humidity to form through topotactic intercalation reactions new water-containing layered structures. Here we investigate the influence of oxygen content (7−δ) of the Ruddlesden–Popper-structured Sr 3 FeMO 7−δ (M=Ni, Mn, Ti) oxides on the water-intercalation reaction. It is found that their oxygen contents influence greatly the reactivity of the phases with water. Other factors possibly affecting the reactivity are discussed on the basis of the present data in combination with a comprehensive review of previous works on Ruddlesden–Popper and related layered oxide phases. - Graphical abstract: Many of the Ruddlesden–Popper-structured A 3 B 2 O 7−δ oxides readily react with water via intercalation reactions. Three possible factors affecting the water intercalation are identified: oxygen content of the phase, ionic radius of cation A and valence state of cation B. The resultant layered water-derivative phases can be categorised into two groups, depending on the crystal symmetry of the phase. Highlights: • Ruddlesden–Popper oxides A 3 B 2 O 7−δ often accommodate water via intercalation reaction. • The lower the oxygen content 7−δ is the more readily the intercalation reaction occurs. • The second factor promoting the reaction is the large size of cation A. • The third possible factor is the high valence state of cation B. • Resultant water-derivatives can be categorised into two groups depending on symmetry

  13. Significance of Operating Environment in Condition Monitoring of Large Civil Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas Alampalli

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Success of remote long-term condition monitoring of large civil structures and developing calibrated analytical models for damage detection, depend significantly on establishing accurate baseline signatures and their sensitivity. Most studies reported in the literature concentrated on the effect of structural damage on modal parameters without emphasis on reliability of modal parameters. Thus, a field bridge structure was studied for the significance of operating conditions in relation to baseline signatures. Results indicate that in practice, civil structures should be monitored for at least one full cycle of in-service environmental changes before establishing baselines for condition monitoring or calibrating finite-element models. Boundary conditions deserve special attention.

  14. Condition Based Maintenance of Space Exploration Vehicles Using Structural Health Monitoring, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Acellent Technologies proposes to develop an autonomous and automated diagnostic system for condition based maintenance (CBM) of safety critical structures for space...

  15. Condition Based Maintenance of Space Exploration Vehicles Using Structural Health Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Acellent Technologies proposes to develop an autonomous and automated diagnostic system for condition based maintenance (CBM) of safety critical structures for space...

  16. Mesoscopic fluctuations in the critical current in InAs-coupled Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Hansen, J.B.; Nitta, Junsaku

    1994-01-01

    Mesoscopic fluctuations were confirmed for the critical current in a p-type InAs-coupled Josephson junction. The critical current was measured as a function of the gate voltage corresponding to the change in the Fermi energy. The critical current showed a mesoscopic fluctuation and its behavior was the same as that of the conductance measured at the same time in both the weak and strong localization regimes. The magnitude and the typical period of the fluctuation are discussed and compared to theoretical predictions. ((orig.))

  17. Self-organization of mesoscopic silver wires by electrochemical deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Long, straight mesoscale silver wires have been fabricated from AgNO3 electrolyte via electrodeposition without the help of templates, additives, and surfactants. Although the wire growth speed is very fast due to growth under non-equilibrium conditions, the wire morphology is regular and uniform in diameter. Structural studies reveal that the wires are single-crystalline, with the [112] direction as the growth direction. A possible growth mechanism is suggested. Auger depth profile measurements show that the wires are stable against oxidation under ambient conditions. This unique system provides a convenient way for the study of self-organization in electrochemical environments as well as for the fabrication of highly-ordered, single-crystalline metal nanowires.

  18. Mesoscopic Strains Maps in Woven Composite Laminas During Off-axis Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletto G.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanics of woven carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites is influenced by the complex architecture of the reinforcement phase. Computational (i.e. finite element based approaches have been used increasingly to model not only the global laminate stiffness, but also damage evolution and laminate strength. The modeling combines the identification of the architectural unit cell (UC, the selection of suitable constitutive models of the different phases, the creation of a fine discretization of the UC in finite elements, the application of an incremental solution procedure that solves iteratively for the stresses and strains in the UC, [1]. The experimental validation of computational models is carried out mainly at the macroscopical level, i.e. simulation of the macroscopic stress-strain curve. Damage, however, is a localized, straindependent phenomenon and therefore only accurate strain distribution within the UC (at the mesolevel can identify critical conditions in terms of damage location, extension and evolution. The validation of computational damage procedures is a key task and full-field optical strain analysis methods appear the ideal instrument. However, only limited examples of direct finte element method (FEM vs experimental strain correlation are found because of the limited sensitivity and spatial resolution of some techniques and the complexity and applicative difficulty of others. The aim of the present paper is to present the application of the digital image correlation (DIC technique, [2], to the full-field strain analysis at the mesoscopic level (i.e. within the UC of a woven CFRP lamina when the direction of loading forms an angle to the material direction. The material under consideration is a woven carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite. Orthogonal yarns, each made of of several thousand fibers, are woven according the twill-weave architecture is shown in Fig. 1a. Single-ply laminas were manufactured and tested to

  19. Mesoscopic Strains Maps in Woven Composite Laminas During Off-axis Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzelotti, G.; Nicoletto, G.; Riva, E.

    2010-06-01

    The mechanics of woven carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites is influenced by the complex architecture of the reinforcement phase. Computational (i.e. finite element based) approaches have been used increasingly to model not only the global laminate stiffness, but also damage evolution and laminate strength. The modeling combines the identification of the architectural unit cell (UC), the selection of suitable constitutive models of the different phases, the creation of a fine discretization of the UC in finite elements, the application of an incremental solution procedure that solves iteratively for the stresses and strains in the UC, [1]. The experimental validation of computational models is carried out mainly at the macroscopical level, i.e. simulation of the macroscopic stress-strain curve. Damage, however, is a localized, straindependent phenomenon and therefore only accurate strain distribution within the UC (at the mesolevel) can identify critical conditions in terms of damage location, extension and evolution. The validation of computational damage procedures is a key task and full-field optical strain analysis methods appear the ideal instrument. However, only limited examples of direct finte element method (FEM) vs experimental strain correlation are found because of the limited sensitivity and spatial resolution of some techniques and the complexity and applicative difficulty of others. The aim of the present paper is to present the application of the digital image correlation (DIC) technique, [2], to the full-field strain analysis at the mesoscopic level (i.e. within the UC) of a woven CFRP lamina when the direction of loading forms an angle to the material direction. The material under consideration is a woven carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite. Orthogonal yarns, each made of of several thousand fibers, are woven according the twill-weave architecture is shown in Fig. 1a. Single-ply laminas were manufactured and tested to eliminate

  20. Conceptual density functional theory for electron transfer and transport in mesoscopic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Paulo R; Miranda, David A

    2017-02-22

    Molecular and supramolecular systems are essentially mesoscopic in character. The electron self-exchange, in the case of energy fluctuations, or electron transfer/transport, in the case of the presence of an externally driven electrochemical potential, between mesoscopic sites is energetically driven in such a manner where the electrochemical capacitance (C [small mu, Greek, macron] ) is fundamental. Thus, the electron transfer/transport through channels connecting two distinct energetic (ΔE [small mu, Greek, macron] ) and spatially separated mesoscopic sites is capacitively modulated. Remarkably, the relationship between the quantum conductance (G) and the standard electrochemical rate constant (k r ), which is indispensable to understanding the physical and chemical characteristics governing electron exchange in molecular scale systems, was revealed to be related to C [small mu, Greek, macron] , that is, C [small mu, Greek, macron] = G/k r . Accordingly, C [small mu, Greek, macron] is the proportional missing term that controls the electron transfer/transport in mesoscopic systems in a wide-range, and equally it can be understood from first principles density functional quantum mechanical approaches. Indeed the differences in energy between states is calculated (or experimentally accessed) throughout the electrochemical capacitance as ΔE [small mu, Greek, macron] = β/C [small mu, Greek, macron] , and thus constitutes the driving force for G and/or k r , where β is only a proportional constant that includes the square of the unit electron charge times the square of the number of electron particles interchanged.

  1. Vortex pinning by mesoscopic defects. A way to levitation at liquid oxygen temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muralidhar, M.; Sakai, N.; Jirsa, Miloš; Koshizuka, N.; Murakami, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 24 (2003), s. 5005-5007 ISSN 0003-6951 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : vortex pinning * mesoscopic defects * levitation * (Nd,Eu,Gd)BaCuO y * liquid oxygen Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.049, year: 2003

  2. Incompatibility of strains and its application to mesoscopic studies of plasticity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gröger, Roman; Lookman, T.; Saxena, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 14 (2010), Art. No. 144104 ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : incompatibility * dislocation * mesoscopic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.772, year: 2010

  3. Continuous pumping and control of mesoscopic superposition state in a lossy QED cavity

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, M. C.; Moussa, M. H. Y.; Mizrahi, S. S.

    2000-01-01

    Here we consider the continuous pumping of a dissipative QED cavity and derive the time-dependent density operator of the cavity field prepared initially as a superposition of mesoscopic coherent states. The control of the coherence of this superposition is analyzed considering the injection of a beam of two-level Rydberg atoms through the cavity. Our treatment is compared to other approaches.

  4. Dispersion of PMMA-grafted, mesoscopic iron-oxide rods in polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Robert C; Huang, Yun; Ohno, Kohji; Composto, Russell J

    2016-03-07

    This study investigates the parameters that affect the dispersion of polymer grafted mesoscopic iron-oxide rods (FeMRs) in polymer matrices. FeMRs (212 nm long by 36 nm in diameter) are grafted with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) at three different brush molecular weights: 3.7 kg mol(-1), 32 kg mol(-1), and 160 kg mol(-1). Each FeMR sample was cast in a polymer thin film consisting of either PMMA or poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) each at a molecular weight much higher or much lower than the brush molecular weight. We find that the FeMRs with 160 kg mol(-1) brush disperse in all matrices while the FeMRs with 32 kg mol(-1) and 3.7 kg mol(-1) brushes aggregate in all matrices. We perform simple free energy calculations, taking into account steric repulsion from the brush and van der Waals attraction between FeMRs. We find that there is a barrier for aggregation for the FeMRs with the largest brush, while there is no barrier for the other FeMRs. Therefore, for these mesoscopic particles, the brush size is the main factor that determines the dispersion state of FeMRs in polymer matrices with athermal or weakly attractive brush-matrix interactions. These studies provide new insight into the mechanisms that affect dispersion in polymer matrices of mesoscopic particles and therefore guide the design of composite films with well-dispersed mesoscopic particles.

  5. Orbital Effects of In-Plane Magnetic Fields Probed by Mesoscopic Conductance Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zumbuhl, D.; Miller, Jessica; M. Marcus, C.

    2003-01-01

    We use the high sensitivity to magnetic flux of mesoscopic conductance fluctuations in large quantum dots to investigate changes in the two-dimensional electron dispersion caused by an in-plane magnetic field. In particular, changes in effective mass and the breaking of momentum reversal symmetry...

  6. Structural Researches in the Eastern Carpathians (in Romanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Balintoni

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Structural Researches in the Eastern Carpathians. The Alpine mesoscopic lineations in the East Carpathians metamorphics, are NW-SE orientated. A few lineations, nearly E-W orientated, could be proved as pre-Alpine in age. Within the Ditrău Massif, is conserved a pre-Alpine attitude of foliations, as frozen magmatic flow, along the metamorphic pre-Triassic fabric. The lineation directions were conditioned by the Cretaceous-Tertiary contractional elimination of the External Carpathian Flysch Basin.

  7. Fractal structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes in biologically relevant conditions: role of chirality vs. media conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Iftheker A; Aich, Nirupam; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Flora, Joseph R V; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2013-11-01

    Aggregate structure of covalently functionalized chiral specific semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was systematically studied employing static light scattering (SLS). Fractal dimensions (Df) of two specific chirality SWNTs-SG65 and SG76 with (6, 5) and (7, 6) chiral enrichments-were measured under four biological exposure media conditions, namely: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 medium, and 0.9% saline solution. The SWNTs exhibited chiral dependence on Df with SG65 showing more fractal or loosely bound aggregate structures, i.e., lower Df values (range of 2.24±0.03 to 2.64±0.05), compared to the SG76 sample (range of 2.58±0.13 to 2.90±0.08). All the Df values reported are highly reproducible, measured from multiple SLS runs and estimated with 'random block-effects' statistical analysis that yielded all p values to be fractal aggregates. Moreover, presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), used to mimic the in vitro cell culture condition, reduced the Df values, i.e., created more fractal structures. Steric hindrance to aggregation was identified as the key mechanism for creating the fractal structures. Also, increase in FBS concentration from 1% to 10% resulted in increasingly lower Df values. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Directed self-assembly of mesoscopic components for led applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Anton

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) constitute a rapidly evolving and fast growing technology that promises to replace incandescent bulbs and compact fluorescent lights in many illumination applications. Large-area LED luminaires have a capability to transform lighting by providing a venue for development of smart lighting systems with additional benefits, such as visible light communications, sensing, health and productivity improvement through color temperature control, capability of creating "virtual sky" ceiling, and many others. The objective of this work is to explore directed self-assembly (DSA) approaches suitable for cost-effective assembly of large amount of LEDs and other mesoscopic (i.e. millimeter and sub-millimeter) electronic components and thus to enable manufacturing of smart lighting luminaires. Existing alternative approaches for assembly of semiconductor dies are examined including transfer printing, laser-assisted die transfer, and various directed self-assembly approaches using shape-recognition, magnetic and capillary forces, etc. After comparing their advantages and limitations, we developed two approaches to magnetic force-assisted DSA of LEDs on a large-area substrate in liquid and air medium. The first approach involves pick-up of buoyant and magnetic dies from the liquid surface onto the flexible substrate in a roll-to-roll process. The possibility of high-speed assembly of LED dies is demonstrated, but with a low yield due to the influence of the capillary force of the carrier liquid and the difficulty in ensuring reliable supply of dies to the assembly interface. To overcome the aforementioned challenges this process was modified to assemble the dies by sinking them onto the receiving substrate with a stencil mask on top, demonstrating LED assembly with a very low error rate but at a lower speed. A solder-assisted self-alignment is used to further improve placement precision and to ensure the proper orientation of the dies. The second

  9. Environmental Effects on Quantum Reversal of Mesoscopic Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, R.; Chiorescu, I.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Barbara, B.; Jansen, A. G. M.; Caneschi, A.; Mueller, A.; Tkachuk, A. M.

    2002-10-01

    extension of these studies beyond molecular magnetism. Single-ion slow quantum relaxation is observed in rare-earth Ho3+ ions highly diluted in an insulating matrix LiYF4. This relaxation is due to the coherent tunneling of individual Ho3+ spins strongly coupled to their nuclear spins, leading to electro-nuclear entangled states at avoided level crossings. In fact tunneling of the spin system is induced by the hyperfine coupling. Together with the important role of the "spin bath", the roles of cross-spin and spin-phonon relaxations are also considered. All these results confirm the emergence of a new field of research: "mesoscopic magnetism".

  10. Influence of Chemical Conditions on the Nanoporous Structure of Silicate Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Sinkó

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica or various silicate aerogels can be characterized by highly porous, open cell, low density structures. The synthesis parameters influence the three-dimensional porous structures by modifying the kinetics and mechanism of hydrolysis and condensation processes. Numerous investigations have shown that the structure of porous materials can be tailored by variations in synthesis conditions (e.g., the type of precursors, catalyst, and surfactants; the ratio of water/precursor; the concentrations; the medium pH; and the solvent. The objectives of this review are to summarize and elucidate the effects of chemical conditions on the nanoporous structure of sol-gel derived silicate aerogels.

  11. Jatropha Developments in Mozambique: Analysis of Structural Conditions Influencing Niche-Regime Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingerland, M.A.; Schut, M.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the transition dynamics related to Jatropha developments in Mozambique. The analysis focuses on how structural conditions (infrastructure, institutions, interaction and collaboration and capabilities and resources) enable or constrain interactions between niche-level

  12. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ping

    celebrated Marcus' inversion and Kramers' turnover behaviors, the new theory also shows some distinct quantum solvation effects that can alter the ET mechanism. Moreover, the present theory predicts further for the ET reaction thermodynamics, such as equilibrium Gibbs free-energy and entropy, some interesting solvent-dependent features that are calling for experimental verification. In Chapter 6, we discuss the constructed QDTs, in terms of their unified mathematical structure that supports a linear dynamics space, and thus facilitates their applications to various physical problems. The involving details are exemplified with the CODDE form of QDT. As the linear space is concerned, we identify the Schrodinger versus Heisenberg picture and the forward versus backward propagation of the reduced, dissipative Liouville dynamics. For applications we discuss the reduced linear response theory and the optimal control problems, in which the correlated effects of non-Markovian dissipation and field driving are shown to be important. In Chapter 7, we turn to quantum transport, i.e., electric current through molecular or mesoscopic systems under finite applied voltage. By viewing the nonequilibrium transport setup as a quantum open system, we develop a reduced-density-matrix approach to quantum transport. The resulting current is explicitly expressed in terms of the molecular reduced density matrix by tracing out the degrees of freedom of the electrodes at finite bias and temperature. We propose a conditional quantum master equation theory, which is an extension of the conventional (or unconditional) QDT by tracing out the well-defined bath subsets individually, instead of the entire bath degrees of freedom. Both the current and the noise spectrum can be conveniently analyzed in terms of the conditional reduced density matrix dynamics. By far, the QDT (including the conditional one) has only been exploited in second-order form. A self-consistent Born approximation for the system

  13. The occurrence of macro- and mesoscopic methane hydrate in the eastern margin of Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, R.; Kakuwa, Y.; Tanahashi, M.; Hiruta, A.

    2016-12-01

    Shallow methane hydrate is known to occur in muddy sediments that were deposited in the eastern margin of Japan Sea. In such settings, the hydrate occurs just below the seabed or is exposed directly on the seabed. Its presence is quite different from the pore-filling type of hydrate typically found in sandstone of the Pacific Ocean side of the Japanese islands. This presentation focuses on categorizing the distribution of gas hydrate in Japan Sea which, until recently, has been poorly understood. Macroscopic occurrence: Numerous gas chimney structures, which are characterized by an acoustic blanking on sub-bottom profiler images, have been discovered in the eastern margin of Japan Sea. We carried out seafloor drilling at several topographic highs that showed gas chimney structures. The results confirm that, while methane hydrate does not occur in the well-stratified part of SBP images, it does occur uniquely in the gas chimney structure-bearing mounds and pockmarks. Several horizons of methane hydrate-concentrated layers are identified by our LWD data and are traceable over lateral distances of as much as a kilometer.. In another case, the methane hydrate-concentrated layers occur stratigraphically in a regular manner with methane-derived carbonate nodules. We interpret the second case as one in which methane gas was supplied by regularly repeated movements of active fault(s). Mesoscopic occurrence: Methane hydrate is classified into 5 types that are readily observable in drilled cores: granular, nodular, platy, veiny and massive. The granular type is common over shallower intervals, while platy and veiny types are more common in the deeper intervals. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of the granular type may have possibly originated from the destruction and dissociation of other types during drilling and recovery. The massive type hydrate that characterizes highly-concentrated layers transitions to other types laterally as methane hydrate becomes poorly

  14. Studies on reinforced concrete structures behavior in accidental conditions in D.E.M.T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, A.; Berriaud, C.; Millard, A.; Avet-Flancard, R.

    1982-06-01

    Some models used for the calculation of reinforced concrete structures under accidental conditions are proposed: they are either global models, using a moment-curvature law for various membrane loads or local models enabling an accurate description of plasticity in the structure. Some applications are presented, like perforation of plates, internal explosion, tests on beams and posts

  15. Calculation of condition indices for road structures using a deduct points method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, MP

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ) and relevancy (R) rating. The DER-rating method has been included in the Draft TMH19 Manual for the Visual Assessment of Road Structures. The D, E, and R ratings are used to calculate condition indices for road structures. The method used is a deduct...

  16. Self-Template Synthesis of Porous Perovskite Titanate Solid and Hollow Submicrospheres for Photocatalytic Oxygen Evolution and Mesoscopic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jia Hong; Shen, Chao; Ivanova, Irina; Zhou, Na; Wang, Xingzhu; Tan, Wee Chong; Xu, Qing-Hua; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Wang, Qing

    2015-07-15

    We describe a general synthesis strategy, which combines sol-gel and hydrothermal processes, for the large-scale synthesis of porous perovskite titanates spheres with tunable particle size and inner structures. Amorphous hydrous TiO2 solid spheres (AHTSS) are first synthesized by a sol-gel method and are then used as precursor and template for the subsequent hydrothermal reaction with alkaline earth metal ions in an alkaline medium. This strategy can be generalized to synthesize porous spheres of various perovskite titanates (i.e., SrTiO3, BaTiO3, and CaTiO3) consisting of single-crystalline nanocubes. By controlling the textural properties (i.e., size, porosity, and structure) of AHTSS, perovskite titanates with tunable size and inner structures are selectively synthesized. The underlying formation mechanism is manifested by XRD and TEM to involve in situ crystallization or Ostwald ripening during the hydrothermal process. The obtained porous SrTiO3 spheres present superior performance in photocatalytic oxygen evolution and CdSe-sensitized mesoscopic solar cells.

  17. The Step-Type Contrast Structure for High Dimensional Tikhonov System with Neumann Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aifeng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the step-type contrast structure for high dimensional Tikhonov system with Neumann boundary conditions. We not only propose a key condition with the existence of the number of mutually independent first integrals under which there exists a step-type contrast structure, but also determine where an internal transition time is. Using the method of boundary function, we construct the formal asymptotic solution and give the analytical expression for the higher order terms. At the same time, the uniformly valid asymptotic expansion and the existence of such an available step-type contrast structure are obtained by sewing connection method.

  18. Hole-Conductor-Free Mesoscopic TiO2/CH3NH3PbI3 Heterojunction Solar Cells Based on Anatase Nanosheets and Carbon Counter Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yaoguang; Ku, Zhiliang; Mei, Anyi; Liu, Tongfa; Xu, Mi; Ko, Songguk; Li, Xiong; Han, Hongwei

    2014-06-19

    A hole-conductor-free fully printable mesoscopic TiO2/CH3NH3PbI3 heterojunction solar cell was developed with TiO2 nanosheets containing high levels of exposed (001) facets. The solar cell embodiment employed a double layer of mesoporous TiO2 and ZrO2 as a scaffold infiltrated by perovskite as a light harvester. No hole conductor or Au reflector was employed. Instead, the back contact was simply a printable carbon layer. The perovskite was infiltrated from solution through the porous carbon layer. The high reactivity of (001) facets in TiO2 nanosheets improved the interfacial properties between the perovskite and the electron collector. As a result, photoelectric conversion efficiency of up to 10.64% was obtained with the hole-conductor-free fully printable mesoscopic TiO2/CH3NH3PbI3 heterojunction solar cell. The advantages of fully printable technology and the use of low-cost carbon-materials-based counter electrode and hole-conductor-free structure provide this design a promising prospect to approach low-cost photovoltaic devices.

  19. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  20. Statistical wave scattering: from the atomic nucleus to mesoscopic systems to microwave cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, P.A. [IFUNAM, 01000 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2007-12-15

    Universal statistical aspects of wave scattering by a variety of physical systems ranging from atomic nuclei to mesoscopic systems and microwave cavities are described. A statistical model for the scattering matrix is employed to address the problem of quantum chaotic scattering. The model, introduced in the past in the context of nuclear physics, discusses the problem in terms of a prompt and an equilibrated component: it incorporates the average value of the scattering matrix to account for the prompt processes and satisfies the requirements of flux conservation, causality and ergodicity. The main application of the model is the analysis of electronic transport through ballistic mesoscopic cavities whose classical dynamics is chaotic, although it can be applied to the propagation of microwaves through cavities of a similar shape. The model describes well the results from the numerical solutions of the Schrodinger equation for two-dimensional cavities. (Author)

  1. Multiparticle Correlations in Mesoscopic Scattering: Boson Sampling, Birthday Paradox, and Hong-Ou-Mandel Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Juan-Diego; Kuipers, Jack; Matsumoto, Sho; Hummel, Quirin; Richter, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The interplay between single-particle interference and quantum indistinguishability leads to signature correlations in many-body scattering. We uncover these with a semiclassical calculation of the transmission probabilities through mesoscopic cavities for systems of noninteracting particles. For chaotic cavities we provide the universal form of the first two moments of the transmission probabilities over ensembles of random unitary matrices, including weak localization and dephasing effects. If the incoming many-body state consists of two macroscopically occupied wave packets, their time delay drives a quantum-classical transition along a boundary determined by the bosonic birthday paradox. Mesoscopic chaotic scattering of Bose-Einstein condensates is, then, a realistic candidate to build a boson sampler and to observe the macroscopic Hong-Ou-Mandel effect.

  2. Optofluidic trapping and delivery of massive mesoscopic matters using mobile vortex array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianxin; Li, Zongbao; Wang, Haiyan; Zhu, Debin; Cai, Xiang; Cheng, Yupeng; Chen, Mingyu; Hu, Xiaowen; Xing, Xiaobo

    2017-11-01

    The realization of directional and controllable delivery of massive mesoscopic matters is of great significance in the field of microfluidics. Here, the mobile thermocapillary vortex array has achieved the enrichment and transport of massive mesoscopic matters in free or limited space. The ability of the vortex array to confine objects in the center ensures the controllability of particle trajectory. We also simulated the delivery process to reveal the stability of the mobile vortex. Owing to the distance between the vortex center and the heat source, the method provides the ability to protect trapped matters, including organisms and living cells. The mobile vortex array has opened the exciting possibilities of realizing that bridges the gap between remote optofluidics and lab on a chip.

  3. Structural acoustic control of plates with variable boundary conditions: design methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprofera, Joseph D; Cabell, Randolph H; Gibbs, Gary P; Clark, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    A method for optimizing a structural acoustic control system subject to variations in plate boundary conditions is provided. The assumed modes method is used to build a plate model with varying levels of rotational boundary stiffness to simulate the dynamics of a plate with uncertain edge conditions. A transducer placement scoring process, involving Hankel singular values, is combined with a genetic optimization routine to find spatial locations robust to boundary condition variation. Predicted frequency response characteristics are examined, and theoretically optimized results are discussed in relation to the range of boundary conditions investigated. Modeled results indicate that it is possible to minimize the impact of uncertain boundary conditions in active structural acoustic control by optimizing the placement of transducers with respect to those uncertainties.

  4. Universal shape characteristics for the mesoscopic star-shaped polymer via dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyuzhnyi, O.; Ilnytskyi, J. M.; Holovatch, Yu.; von Ferber, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we study the shape characteristics of star-like polymers in various solvent quality using a mesoscopic level of modeling. The dissipative particle dynamics simulations are performed for the homogeneous and four different heterogeneous star polymers with the same molecular weight. We analyse the gyration radius and asphericity at the bad, good and $\\theta$-solvent regimes. Detailed explanation based on interplay between enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy and ...

  5. Multiparticle correlations in mesoscopic scattering: boson sampling, birthday paradox, and Hong-Ou-Mandel profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Urbina, Juan-Diego; Kuipers, Jack; Hummel, Quirin; Matsumoto, Sho; Richter, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between single-particle interference and quantum indistinguishability leads to signature correlations in many-body scattering. We uncover these with a semiclassical calculation of the transmission probabilities through mesoscopic cavities for systems of noninteracting particles. For chaotic cavities we provide the universal form of the first two moments of the transmission probabilities over ensembles of random unitary matrices, including weak localization and dephasing effects....

  6. Study of a fluctuation-dissipation relation of a dissipative driven mesoscopic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, L.; Cugliandolo, L. F.

    2005-06-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of a mesoscopic metallic ring threaded by a time-dependent magnetic field and coupled to an electronic reservoir. We analyze the relation between the (nonstationary) real-time Keldysh and retarded Green functions and we argue that, in the linear-response regime with weak heat transfer to the environment, an effective temperature accounts for the modification of the equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation. We discuss possible extensions of this analysis.

  7. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green’s function reaction dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Bolhuis, Peter G.; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green’s Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level

  8. Convergence of methods for coupling of microscopic and mesoscopic reaction–diffusion simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, Mark B.

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. In this paper, three multiscale methods for coupling of mesoscopic (compartment-based) and microscopic (molecular-based) stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations are investigated. Two of the three methods that will be discussed in detail have been previously reported in the literature; the two-regime method (TRM) and the compartment-placement method (CPM). The third method that is introduced and analysed in this paper is called the ghost cell method (GCM), since it works by constructing a "ghost cell" in which molecules can disappear and jump into the compartment-based simulation. Presented is a comparison of sources of error. The convergent properties of this error are studied as the time step δ. t (for updating the molecular-based part of the model) approaches zero. It is found that the error behaviour depends on another fundamental computational parameter h, the compartment size in the mesoscopic part of the model. Two important limiting cases, which appear in applications, are considered:. (i)δt→0 and h is fixed;(ii)δt→0 and h→0 such that δt/h is fixed. The error for previously developed approaches (the TRM and CPM) converges to zero only in the limiting case (ii), but not in case (i). It is shown that the error of the GCM converges in the limiting case (i). Thus the GCM is superior to previous coupling techniques if the mesoscopic description is much coarser than the microscopic part of the model.

  9. Mesoscopic Interactions and Species Coexistence in Evolutionary Game Dynamics of Cyclic Competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongyan; Yao, Nan; Huang, Zi-Gang; Park, Junpyo; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary dynamical models for cyclic competitions of three species (e.g., rock, paper, and scissors, or RPS) provide a paradigm, at the microscopic level of individual interactions, to address many issues in coexistence and biodiversity. Real ecosystems often involve competitions among more than three species. By extending the RPS game model to five (rock-paper-scissors-lizard-Spock, or RPSLS) mobile species, we uncover a fundamental type of mesoscopic interactions among subgroups of species. In particular, competitions at the microscopic level lead to the emergence of various local groups in different regions of the space, each involving three species. It is the interactions among the groups that fundamentally determine how many species can coexist. In fact, as the mobility is increased from zero, two transitions can occur: one from a five- to a three-species coexistence state and another from the latter to a uniform, single-species state. We develop a mean-field theory to show that, in order to understand the first transition, group interactions at the mesoscopic scale must be taken into account. Our findings suggest, more broadly, the importance of mesoscopic interactions in coexistence of great many species. PMID:25501627

  10. Assessment of inservice conditions of safety-related nuclear plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashar, H.; Bagchi, G.

    1995-06-01

    The report is a compilation from a number of sources of information related to the condition Of structures and civil engineering features at operating nuclear power plants in the United States. The most significant information came from the hands-on inspection of the six old plants (licensed prior to 1977) performed by the staff of the Civil Engineering and Geosciences Branch (ECGB) in the Division of Engineering of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. For the containment structures, most of the information related to the degraded conditions came from the licensees as part of the Licensing Event Report System (10 CFR 50.73), or as part of the requirement under limiting condition of operation of the plant-specific Technical Specifications. Most of the information related to the degradation of other Structures and civil engineering features was extracted from the industry survey, the reported incidents, and the plant visits. The report discusses the condition of the structures and civil engineering features at operating nuclear power plants and provides information that would help detect, alleviate, and correct the degraded conditions of the structures and civil engineering features

  11. Appeals to consumer responsibility and improving structural conditions as means to promote sustainable consumer behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    Environmental policy-makers increasingly emphasize consumers' responsibility for environmental side effects of their acts, but is this justified? This paper investigates which is the most important limiting factor for sustainable consumption: (a) the extent to which consumers assume responsibility...... for their acts or (b) structural conditions determined by governments? In field experiments with large samples of ordinary consumers, the behavioral effects of perceptions of responsibility/personal moral norms and of altering an important structural condition are quantified by measuring a relevant behavior......-developed public transit service. The results suggest that there is often more to gain from changing structural conditions to be more facilitating for the desired behavior than from a campaign targeting consumer feelings of responsibility....

  12. Bundling into the future - Structural conditions for business model design in new ICT services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Godø, Helge

    Based on a case study of multi-play and mobile voice over IP (MVoIP) in primarily Denmark and Norway, the paper presents an analysis of the structural conditions for the design of business models regarding new information and communication services. Multi-play and MVoIP represent different kinds...... of services in terms of structural conditions market-wise and in regulatory terms. As the two service categories are relatively new on the market, dominating business model designs have not yet settled and the strategic choices of companies are still open. Being on the market, the discussion on the business...

  13. Review of parameters influencing the structural response of a submerged body under cavitation conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Escaler, X; De La Torre, O; Farhat, M

    2015-01-01

    Submerged structures that operate under extreme flows are prone to suffer large scale cavitation attached to thei r surfaces. Under such conditions the added mass effects differ from the expected ones in pure liquids. Moreover, the existence of small gaps between the structure and surrounding bodies filled with fluid also influence the dynamic response. A series of experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out with a truncated NACA0009 hydrofoil mounted as a cantilever beam at t...

  14. First Principles Prediction of Structure, Structure Selectivity, and Thermodynamic Stability under Realistic Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceder, Gerbrand [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials and Engineering

    2018-01-28

    Novel materials are often the enabler for new energy technologies. In ab-initio computational materials science, method are developed to predict the behavior of materials starting from the laws of physics, so that properties can be predicted before compounds have to be synthesized and tested. As such, a virtual materials laboratory can be constructed, saving time and money. The objectives of this program were to develop first-principles theory to predict the structure and thermodynamic stability of materials. Since its inception the program focused on the development of the cluster expansion to deal with the increased complexity of complex oxides. This research led to the incorporation of vibrational degrees of freedom in ab-initio thermodynamics, developed methods for multi-component cluster expansions, included the explicit configurational degrees of freedom of localized electrons, developed the formalism for stability in aqueous environments, and culminated in the first ever approach to produce exact ground state predictions of the cluster expansion. Many of these methods have been disseminated to the larger theory community through the Materials Project, pymatgen software, or individual codes. We summarize three of the main accomplishments.

  15. Structural changes in slenderized yak hair induced by heat-humidity conditions using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. L.; Zhao, B. Y.; Yu, W. D.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, estimation of structure was accomplished with the use of deconvolution, secondary derivation and curve-fitting. The structural changes of slenderized yak hair treated by heat-humidity conditions were quantified by analyzing the disulfide bond (S-S), amide I and amide III regions. The results showed that the amount of the disulphide bond in the yak hair decreases with the increase of treating time. The secondary structure of yak hair transforms from the α-helix and β pleated to the disordered conformation during the heat humidity processing.

  16. Buckling of Monopod Bucket Foundations – Influence of Boundary Conditions and Soil-structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren; Pinna, Rodney; Randolph, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Using large monopod bucket foundations as an alternative to monopiles for offshore wind turbines offers the potential for large cost savings compared to typical piled foundations. In this paper, numerical simulations are carried out to assess the risk of structural buckling during installation of...... is investigated. The effects of including soil restraint and soil–structure interaction on the buckling analysis are also addressed.......Using large monopod bucket foundations as an alternative to monopiles for offshore wind turbines offers the potential for large cost savings compared to typical piled foundations. In this paper, numerical simulations are carried out to assess the risk of structural buckling during installation...... of large-diameter bucket foundations. Since shell structures are generally sensitive to initially imperfect geometries, eigenmode-affine imperfections are introduced in a nonlinear finite-element analysis. The influence of modelling the real lid structure compared to classic boundary conditions...

  17. 76 FR 39763 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... 611 of Public Law 92-574, the ``Noise Control Act of 1972.'' The FAA issues special conditions, as... Structures, Electronic Flight Control System-Control Surface Awareness, High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF..., electronic flight control system control surface awareness, HIRF protection, limit engine torque loads for...

  18. Probing the local, electronic and magnetic structure of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torchio, R.; Boccato, S.; Cerantola, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present recent achievements in the field of investigation of the local, electronic and magnetic structure of the matter under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. These results were obtained thanks to the coupling of a compact laser heating system to the energy-dispersive...

  19. No evidence for general condition-dependence of structural plumage colour in blue tits: an experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, A.; Kurvers, R.H.J.M.; Roberts, M.L.; Delhey, K.

    2011-01-01

    Condition-dependence is a central but contentious tenet of evolutionary theories on the maintenance of ornamental traits, and this is particularly true for structural plumage colour. By providing diets of different nutritional quality to moulting male and female blue tits, we experimentally

  20. Hippocampal Structural Plasticity Accompanies the Resulting Contextual Fear Memory Following Stress and Fear Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachero, Marcelo; Calfa, Gaston D.; Molina, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research investigated the resulting contextual fear memory and structural plasticity changes in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) following stress and fear conditioning. This combination enhanced fear retention and increased the number of total and mature dendritic spines in DH. Intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion of midazolam prior to…

  1. Condition dependence of male and female genital structures in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayetano, L; Bonduriansky, R

    2015-07-01

    Theory predicts that costly secondary sexual traits will evolve heightened condition dependence, and many studies have reported strong condition dependence of signal and weapon traits in a variety of species. However, although genital structures often play key roles in intersexual interactions and appear to be subject to sexual or sexually antagonistic selection, few studies have examined the condition dependence of genital structures, especially in both sexes simultaneously. We investigated the responses of male and female genital structures to manipulation of larval diet quality (new versus once-used mung beans) in the bruchid seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. We quantified effects on mean relative size and static allometry of the male aedeagus, aedeagal spines, flap and paramere and the female reproductive tract and bursal spines. None of the male traits showed a significant effect of diet quality. In females, we found that longer bursal spines (relative to body size) were expressed on low-quality diet. Although the function of bursal spines is poorly understood, we suggest that greater bursal spine length in low-condition females may represent a sexually antagonistic adaptation. Overall, we found no evidence that genital traits in C. maculatus are expressed to a greater extent when nutrients are more abundant. This suggests that, even though some genital traits appear to function as secondary sexual traits, genital traits do not exhibit heightened condition dependence in this species. We discuss possible reasons for this finding. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  2. Review of parameters influencing the structural response of a submerged body under cavitation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaler, X; De La Torre, O; Farhat, M

    2015-01-01

    Submerged structures that operate under extreme flows are prone to suffer large scale cavitation attached to their surfaces. Under such conditions the added mass effects differ from the expected ones in pure liquids. Moreover, the existence of small gaps between the structure and surrounding bodies filled with fluid also influence the dynamic response. A series of experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out with a truncated NACA0009 hydrofoil mounted as a cantilever beam at the LMH-EPFL cavitation tunnel. The three first modes of vibration have been determined and analysed under various hydrodynamic conditions ranging from air and still water to partial cavitation and supercavitation. A remote nonintrusive excitation system with piezoelectric patches has been used for the experiments. The effects of the cavity properties and the lateral gap size on the natural frequencies and mode shapes have been determined. As a result, the significance of several parameters in the design of such structures is discussed. (paper)

  3. Detection of structural damage using novelty detection algorithm under variational environmental and operational conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mountassir, M.; Yaacoubi, S.; Dahmene, F.

    2015-07-01

    Novelty detection is a widely used algorithm in different fields of study due to its capabilities to recognize any kind of abnormalities in a specific process in order to ensure better working in normal conditions. In the context of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), this method is utilized as damage detection technique because the presence of defects can be considered as abnormal to the structure. Nevertheless, the performance of such a method could be jeopardized if the structure is operating in harsh environmental and operational conditions (EOCs). In this paper, novelty detection statistical technique is used to investigate the detection of damages under various EOCs. Experiments were conducted with different scenarios: damage sizes and shapes. EOCs effects were simulated by adding stochastic noise to the collected experimental data. Different levels of noise were studied to determine the accuracy and the performance of the proposed method.

  4. Detection of structural damage using novelty detection algorithm under variational environmental and operational conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountassir, M El; Yaacoubi, S; Dahmene, F

    2015-01-01

    Novelty detection is a widely used algorithm in different fields of study due to its capabilities to recognize any kind of abnormalities in a specific process in order to ensure better working in normal conditions. In the context of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), this method is utilized as damage detection technique because the presence of defects can be considered as abnormal to the structure. Nevertheless, the performance of such a method could be jeopardized if the structure is operating in harsh environmental and operational conditions (EOCs). In this paper, novelty detection statistical technique is used to investigate the detection of damages under various EOCs. Experiments were conducted with different scenarios: damage sizes and shapes. EOCs effects were simulated by adding stochastic noise to the collected experimental data. Different levels of noise were studied to determine the accuracy and the performance of the proposed method. (paper)

  5. Review of parameters influencing the structural response of a submerged body under cavitation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaler, X.; De La Torre, O.; Farhat, M.

    2015-12-01

    Submerged structures that operate under extreme flows are prone to suffer large scale cavitation attached to their surfaces. Under such conditions the added mass effects differ from the expected ones in pure liquids. Moreover, the existence of small gaps between the structure and surrounding bodies filled with fluid also influence the dynamic response. A series of experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out with a truncated NACA0009 hydrofoil mounted as a cantilever beam at the LMH-EPFL cavitation tunnel. The three first modes of vibration have been determined and analysed under various hydrodynamic conditions ranging from air and still water to partial cavitation and supercavitation. A remote nonintrusive excitation system with piezoelectric patches has been used for the experiments. The effects of the cavity properties and the lateral gap size on the natural frequencies and mode shapes have been determined. As a result, the significance of several parameters in the design of such structures is discussed.

  6. Incubation under fluid dynamic conditions markedly improves the structural preservation in vitro of explanted skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Carton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Explanted organs and tissues represent suitable experimental systems mimicking the functional and structural complexity of the living organism, with positive ethical and economic impact on research activities. However, their preservation in culture is generally limited, thus hindering their application as experimental models for biomedical research. In the present study, we investigated the potential of an innovative fluid dynamic culture system to improve the structural preservation in vitro of explanted mouse skeletal muscles (soleus. We used light and transmission electron microscopy to compare the morphological features of muscles maintained either in multiwell plates under conventional conditions or in a bioreactor mimicking the flow of physiological fluids. Our results demonstrate that fluid dynamic conditions markedly slowed the progressive structural deterioration of the muscle tissue occurring during the permanence in the culture medium, prolonging the preservation of some organelles such as mitochondria up to 48 h.

  7. Incubation under fluid dynamic conditions markedly improves the structural preservation in vitro of explanted skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Flavia; Calderan, Laura; Malatesta, Manuela

    2017-11-28

    Explanted organs and tissues represent suitable experimental systems mimicking the functional and structural complexity of the living organism, with positive ethical and economic impact on research activities. However, their preservation in culture is generally limited, thus hindering their application as experimental models for biomedical research. In the present study, we investigated the potential of an innovative fluid dynamic culture system to improve the structural preservation in vitro of explanted mouse skeletal muscles (soleus). We used light and transmission electron microscopy to compare the morphological features of muscles maintained either in multiwell plates under conventional conditions or in a bioreactor mimicking the flow of physiological fluids. Our results demonstrate that fluid dynamic conditions markedly slowed the progressive structural deterioration of the muscle tissue occurring during the permanence in the culture medium, prolonging the preservation of some organelles such as mitochondria up to 48 h.

  8. Effect of moisture conditions and transfers on alkali silica reaction damaged structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multon, Stephane; Toutlemonde, Francois

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to point out the water driving effect on the alkali silica reaction (ASR) expansion and particularly when modifications of moisture conditions occur. After being submitted to a unidirectional moisture gradient during 14 months, the upper faces of ASR reactive beams were covered by water for 9 months. This late water supply on the upper face rapidly produced large expansions, which mainly occurred along the transverse and the vertical directions resulting in large longitudinal cracks. Companion nonreactive specimens were kept in the same environmental conditions in order to quantify the basic characteristics of moisture-dependent expansive behaviour of the material. The paper focuses on the effects of late water supply or late drying on already ASR-damaged concrete, which is a significant concern for real-life structures. Both structural effects of late water supply on ASR progress in already damaged structures and interpretation of such phenomena are described.

  9. dc-Response of a Dissipative Driven Mesoscopic Ring

    OpenAIRE

    Arrachea, Liliana

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of the dc-component of the current along a quantum loop of tight-binding electrons threaded by a magnetic flux that varies linearly in time Phi_M(t)= Phi t is investigated. We analize the electron transport in different kinds of one-dimensional structures bended into a ring geometry: a clean one-dimensional metal, a chain with a two-band structure and a disordered chain. Inelastic scattering events are introduced through the coupling to a particle reservoir. We use a theoretical ...

  10. dc response of a dissipative driven mesoscopic ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana

    2004-10-01

    The behavior of the dc component of the current along a quantum loop of tight-binding electrons threaded by a magnetic flux that varies linearly in time ΦM(t)=Φt is investigated. We analyze the electron transport in different kinds of one-dimensional structures bended into a ring geometry: a clean one-dimensional metal, a chain with a two-band structure, and a disordered chain. Inelastic scattering events are introduced through the coupling to a particle reservoir. We use a theoretical treatment based in Baym-Kadanoff-Keldysh nonequilibrium Green’s function, which allows us to solve the problem exactly.

  11. Numerical simulation of lubrication mechanisms at mesoscopic scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, C.; Bay, Niels; Christiansen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    -structure Finite Element computation, where cavities in the surface are plastically deformed leading to the pressurization of the entrapped fluid. The second step computes the fluid exchange between cavities through the plateaus, one cavity at a time. This second step consists in solution of the local Couette...

  12. Strain induced anomalous red shift in mesoscopic iron oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    iron oxide particles are synthesized employing a novel technique and using starch/water/ethylene glycol as com- plexing agents. Their structural, magnetic and optical properties are evaluated. Emphasis is laid in studying the shape induced optical properties of gamma iron oxide nanoparticles. Thermogravimetric (TG) and ...

  13. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  14. Surface science. Adhesion and friction in mesoscopic graphite contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Elad; Lörtscher, Emanuel; Rawlings, Colin; Knoll, Armin W; Duerig, Urs

    2015-05-08

    The weak interlayer binding in two-dimensional layered materials such as graphite gives rise to poorly understood low-friction characteristics. Accurate measurements of the adhesion forces governing the overall mechanical stability have also remained elusive. We report on the direct mechanical measurement of line tension and friction forces acting in sheared mesoscale graphite structures. We show that the friction is fundamentally stochastic in nature and is attributable to the interaction between the incommensurate interface lattices. We also measured an adhesion energy of 0.227 ± 0.005 joules per square meter, in excellent agreement with theoretical models. In addition, bistable all-mechanical memory cell structures and rotational bearings have been realized by exploiting position locking, which is provided solely by the adhesion energy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Dendritic structural plasticity in the basolateral amygdala after fear conditioning and its extinction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Stephen C; Leite-Morris, Kimberly A; Guy, Marsha D; Goldberg, Lisa R; Young, Angela J; Kaplan, Gary B

    2013-07-01

    Previous research suggests that morphology and arborization of dendritic spines change as a result of fear conditioning in cortical and subcortical brain regions. This study uniquely aims to delineate these structural changes in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) after both fear conditioning and fear extinction. C57BL/6 mice acquired robust conditioned fear responses (70-80% cued freezing behavior) after six pairings with a tone cue associated with footshock in comparison to unshocked controls. During fear acquisition, freezing behavior was significantly affected by both shock exposure and trial number. For fear extinction, mice were exposed to the conditioned stimulus tone in the absence of shock administration and behavioral responses significantly varied by shock treatment. In the retention tests over 3 weeks, the percentage time spent freezing varied with the factor of extinction training. In all treatment groups, alterations in dendritic plasticity were analyzed using Golgi-Cox staining of dendrites in the BLA. Spine density differed between the fear conditioned group and both the fear extinction and control groups on third order dendrites. Spine density was significantly increased in the fear conditioned group compared to the fear extinction group and controls. Similarly in Sholl analyses, fear conditioning significantly increased BLA spine numbers and dendritic intersections while subsequent extinction training reversed these effects. In summary, fear extinction produced enduring behavioral plasticity that is associated with a reversal of alterations in BLA dendritic plasticity produced by fear conditioning. These neuroplasticity findings can inform our understanding of structural mechanisms underlying stress-related pathology can inform treatment research into these disorders. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Fragmenting networks by targeting collective influencers at a mesoscopic level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Teruyoshi; Masuda, Naoki

    2016-11-01

    A practical approach to protecting networks against epidemic processes such as spreading of infectious diseases, malware, and harmful viral information is to remove some influential nodes beforehand to fragment the network into small components. Because determining the optimal order to remove nodes is a computationally hard problem, various approximate algorithms have been proposed to efficiently fragment networks by sequential node removal. Morone and Makse proposed an algorithm employing the non-backtracking matrix of given networks, which outperforms various existing algorithms. In fact, many empirical networks have community structure, compromising the assumption of local tree-like structure on which the original algorithm is based. We develop an immunization algorithm by synergistically combining the Morone-Makse algorithm and coarse graining of the network in which we regard a community as a supernode. In this way, we aim to identify nodes that connect different communities at a reasonable computational cost. The proposed algorithm works more efficiently than the Morone-Makse and other algorithms on networks with community structure.

  17. Mesoscopic superstructures of flexible porous coordination polymers synthesizedviacoordination replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Kenji; Moitra, Nirmalya; Reboul, Julien; Fukumoto, Shotaro; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Kanamori, Kazuyoshi; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The coordination replication technique is employed for the direct conversion of a macro- and mesoporous Cu(OH) 2 -polyacrylamide composite to three-dimensional superstructures consisting of the flexible porous coordination polymers, Cu 2 (bdc) 2 (MeOH) 2 and Cu 2 (bdc) 2 (bpy) (bdc 2- = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate, bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine). Detailed characterization of the replicated systems reveals that the structuralization plays an important role in determining the adsorptive properties of the replicated systems, and that the immobilization of the crystals within a higher-order architecture also affects its structural and dynamic properties. The polyacrylamide polymer is also found to be crucial for maintaining the structuralization of the monolithic systems, and in providing the mechanical robustness required for manual handling. In all, the results discussed here demonstrate a significant expansion in the scope of the coordination replication strategy, and further confirms its utility as a highly versatile platform for the preparation of functional three-dimensional superstructures of porous coordination polymers.

  18. Structuring of nanomodified concrete cured in different temperature and humidity conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronin Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues on the influence of the curing conditions on the formation of structure and properties of the concrete with nanomodifiers. Mechanochemically activated waste generated by the production of mineral fertilizers was used as nanomodified additives. It was established that providing favorable conditions for the initial structuring of concrete was the purpose of erecting structures made of concrete mix with said nanomodified additives in different temperature and humidity environments. It is provided that different types of production waste gaining the properties of efficient additives for binders, concrete mixes and compositions made on their basis as the result of the corresponding processing will be used as mineral fillers. Production waste is generally characterized by a heterogeneous composition and structure, by impurity content and by low chemical activity. Thus, one of the methods for increasing the efficiency of the waste is mechanical, chemical or physical activation. As the result of such activation, nanosizeparticles appear, and additional defects of mineral lattices are generated, which leads to accelerating the elementary interaction of the surface layer particles. Data on the research of macro- and microstructure of concrete and composites with nanomodifiers cured in different temperature and humidity conditions is given in the table.

  19. Evaluating stress analysis and failure criteria for offshore structures for Pechora Sea conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesic, S.; Donskoy, Y.; Zolotukhin, A.

    2017-12-01

    Development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources has faced many challenges due to sensitive environmental conditions including low temperatures, ice cover and terrestrial permafrost and extreme seasonal variation in sunlight. Russian offshore field development in Arctic region is usually associated with annual ice cover, which can cause serious damage on the offshore platforms. The Pechora Sea has claimed as one of the most perspective oil and gas region of the Russian Arctic with seven discovered oil and gas fields and several dozens of structures. Our rough assessment, based on in-place hydrocarbon volumes and recovery factor evaluation concept, indicates that Pechora Sea alone has in-place volumes amounting to ca. 20 billion barrel oil equivalent (BOE). This quantity is enough to secure produced volumes by 2040 exceeding 3 billion BOE [1] that indicates huge resource potential of the region. The environmental conditions are primarily function of water dynamics and ice cover. The sea is covered by the ice for greatest part of the year. In this article, the ice load simulations were performed using explicit dynamic analysis system in ANSYS software to determine best shape and size of an offshore platform for the Pechora Sea ice conditions. Different gravity based structures (GBS) were analyzed: artificial island, hollow cylindrical and conical concrete structures and four-leg GBS. Relationships between the stress, deformations and time were analyzed and important observations from the simulation results were a basis for selecting the most preferable structures.

  20. Transducer placement for robustness to variations in boundary conditions for active structural acoustic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprofera, Joseph D.; Clark, Robert L.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-10-01

    The study of control strategies aimed at the reduction of turbulent boundary layer noise transmission into the fuselage of an aircraft has been a topic of academic and industrial research for several years. In this work we focus on an approach that will attempt to address a practical application issue: the impact of uncertainty in boundary conditions on the choice of actuator and sensor locations for structural acoustic control. The selection of an optimized set of transducers and the creation of a suitably adjustable test system is used to demonstrate that robustness to bounded variations in boundary conditions of a plate is achievable in active structural acoustic control. This robustness is achieved through the optimization of transducer placement with respect to maximizing control of structural acoustic radiation over the desired range of boundary conditions. This project incorporates energy based modeling of the structure, electromechanical piezo coupling, radiation filter modeling, and control analysis through the use of Hankel Singular Value (HSV) estimates and optimization based upon the genetic algorithm. Testing in a transmission loss facility will be used to validate the selected transducer placements and demonstrate a reduction in radiated sound power. [Work supported by NASA.

  1. Quantification of site-city interaction effects on the response of structure under double resonance condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Narayan, Jay Prakash

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the site-city interaction (SCI) effects on the response of closely spaced structures under double resonance condition (F_{02{{D}}}^{{S}} = F_{02{{D}}}^{{B}}), where F_{02{{D}}}^{{S}} and F_{02{{D}}}^{{B}} are fundamental frequencies of 2-D structure and 2-D basin, respectively. This paper also presents the development of empirical relations to predict the F_{02{{D}}}^{{B}} of elliptical and trapezoidal basins for both the polarizations of the S wave. Simulated results revealed that F_{02{{D}}}^{{B}} of a 2-D basin very much depends on its geometry, shape ratio and polarization of the incident S wave. The obtained spectral amplification factor (SAF) at F_{02{{D}}}^{{S}} of a standalone structure in a 2-D basin is greater than that in the 1-D case under double resonance condition. A considerable reduction of the fundamental resonance frequency of structures due to the SCI effects is observed for both the polarizations of the S wave. The SAFs at F_{02{{D}}}^{{S}} of closely spaced structures due to SCI effects is larger in the case of SV than SH waves. A splitting of the fundamental-mode frequency bandwidth along with the drastic decrease of SAF due to the SCI effects is obtained. The findings of this paper raise the question concerning the validity of the predicted response of standalone structure based on soil-structure interaction for the design of structures in a 2-D small basin, in an urban environment.

  2. Mesoscopic CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 /TiO 2 Heterojunction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Etgar, Lioz

    2012-10-24

    We report for the first time on a hole conductor-free mesoscopic methylammonium lead iodide (CH 3NH 3PbI 3) perovskite/TiO 2 heterojunction solar cell, produced by deposition of perovskite nanoparticles from a solution of CH 3NH 3I and PbI 2 in γ-butyrolactone on a 400 nm thick film of TiO 2 (anatase) nanosheets exposing (001) facets. A gold film was evaporated on top of the CH 3NH 3PbI 3 as a back contact. Importantly, the CH 3NH 3PbI 3 nanoparticles assume here simultaneously the roles of both light harvester and hole conductor, rendering superfluous the use of an additional hole transporting material. The simple mesoscopic CH 3NH 3PbI 3/TiO 2 heterojunction solar cell shows impressive photovoltaic performance, with short-circuit photocurrent J sc= 16.1 mA/cm 2, open-circuit photovoltage V oc = 0.631 V, and a fill factor FF = 0.57, corresponding to a light to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5.5% under standard AM 1.5 solar light of 1000 W/m 2 intensity. At a lower light intensity of 100W/m 2, a PCE of 7.3% was measured. The advent of such simple solution-processed mesoscopic heterojunction solar cells paves the way to realize low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Mesoscopic objects, porous layers and nanocomposites-Possibilities of sol-gel chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwonski, Ireneusz

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to prepare mesoscopic objects, thin porous films and nanocomposite coatings with the use of sol-gel technique. Silica nanotubes, titania nanoparticles, porous titania and zirconia coatings as well as titania nanocomposites were successfully synthesized by changing the type of sol-gel precursor, sol composition and applying dip-coating deposition procedure in order to obtain thin films or coatings. All materials were visualized and characterized by the Atomic Force Microcscopy (AFM) technique. Moreover, characterization of titania nanocomposites was extended to the tribological tests performed by means of microtribometer operating in normal loads range of 30-100 mN. The AFM analysis of mesoscopic objects and nanoparticles showed that the diameter of synthesized silica nanotubes was 60-70 nm and the size of titania nanoparticles was 43 nm. In case of porous layers the pore size in titania and zirconia coatings oscillated between 100 and 240 nm, however their shape and distribution were irregular. Microtribological studies of nanocomposites revealed the moderate decrease of the coefficient of friction for samples containing 5, 15 and 5 wt.% of zirconia nanoparticles in titania coatings annealed at 100, 500 and 1000 deg. C respectively. An enhancement of antiwear properties was already observed for 1 wt.% of nanophase content, except the sample annealed at 500 deg. C. It was also found that the annealing at high temperatures is a primary factor which affects the reduction of friction and wear of titania coatings while the presence of nanoparticles has secondary effect. Investigations in this study carried out with the use of the AFM technique highlighted the potential and flexibility of sol-gel approach in designing of various types of advanced materials in a form of mesoscopic objects, porous coatings and composite layers. Results collected in this study clearly demonstrated that sol-gel technique can be applied effectively in preparation of

  4. Critical behavior of a two-dimensional complex fluid: Macroscopic and mesoscopic views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Madhumita; Datta, Alokmay

    2016-04-01

    Liquid disordered (Ld) to liquid ordered (Lo) phase transition in myristic acid [MyA, CH3(CH2) 12COOH ] Langmuir monolayers was studied macroscopically as well as mesoscopically to locate the critical point. Macroscopically, isotherms of the monolayer were obtained across the 20 ∘C-38 ∘Ctemperature (T ) range and the critical point was estimated, primarily from the vanishing of the order parameter, at ≈38 ∘C. Mesoscopically, domain morphology in the Ld-Lo coexistence regime was imaged using the technique of Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) as a function of T and the corresponding power spectral density function (PSDF) obtained. Monolayer morphology passed from stable circular domains and a sharp peak in PSDF to stable dendritic domains and a divergence of the correlation length as the critical point was approached from below. The critical point was found to be consistent at ≈38 ∘Cfrom both isotherm and BAM results. In the critical regime the scaling behavior of the transition followed the two-dimensional Ising model. Additionally, we obtained a precritical regime, over a temperature range of ≈8 ∘C below Tc, characterized by fluctuations in the order parameter at the macroscopic scale and at the mesoscopic scale characterized by unstable domains of fingering or dendritic morphology as well as proliferation of a large number of small sized domains, multiple peaks in the power spectra, and a corresponding fluctuation in the peak q values with T . Further, while comparing temperature studies on an ensemble of MyA monolayers with those on a single monolayer, the system was found to be not strictly ergodic in that the ensemble development did not strictly match with the time development in the system. In particular, the critical temperature was found to be lowered in the latter. These results clearly show that the critical behavior in fatty acid monolayer phase transitions have features of both complex and nonequilibrium systems.

  5. Entropy production in mesoscopic stochastic thermodynamics: nonequilibrium kinetic cycles driven by chemical potentials, temperatures, and mechanical forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hong; Kjelstrup, Signe; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-04-20

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics (NET) investigates processes in systems out of global equilibrium. On a mesoscopic level, it provides a statistical dynamic description of various complex phenomena such as chemical reactions, ion transport, diffusion, thermochemical, thermomechanical and mechanochemical fluxes. In the present review, we introduce a mesoscopic stochastic formulation of NET by analyzing entropy production in several simple examples. The fundamental role of nonequilibrium steady-state cycle kinetics is emphasized. The statistical mechanics of Onsager's reciprocal relations in this context is elucidated. Chemomechanical, thermomechanical, and enzyme-catalyzed thermochemical energy transduction processes are discussed. It is argued that mesoscopic stochastic NET in phase space provides a rigorous mathematical basis of fundamental concepts needed for understanding complex processes in chemistry, physics and biology. This theory is also relevant for nanoscale technological advances.

  6. Zinc tin oxide as high-temperature stable recombination layer for mesoscopic perovskite/silicon monolithic tandem solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Jérémie

    2016-12-05

    Perovskite/crystalline silicon tandem solar cells have the potential to reach efficiencies beyond those of silicon single-junction record devices. However, the high-temperature process of 500 °C needed for state-of-the-art mesoscopic perovskite cells has, so far, been limiting their implementation in monolithic tandem devices. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of zinc tin oxide as a recombination layer and show its electrical and optical stability at temperatures up to 500 °C. To prove the concept, we fabricate monolithic tandem cells with mesoscopic top cell with up to 16% efficiency. We then investigate the effect of zinc tin oxide layer thickness variation, showing a strong influence on the optical interference pattern within the tandem device. Finally, we discuss the perspective of mesoscopic perovskite cells for high-efficiency monolithic tandem solar cells. © 2016 Author(s)

  7. Entropy production in mesoscopic stochastic thermodynamics: nonequilibrium kinetic cycles driven by chemical potentials, temperatures, and mechanical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hong; Kjelstrup, Signe; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-04-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics (NET) investigates processes in systems out of global equilibrium. On a mesoscopic level, it provides a statistical dynamic description of various complex phenomena such as chemical reactions, ion transport, diffusion, thermochemical, thermomechanical and mechanochemical fluxes. In the present review, we introduce a mesoscopic stochastic formulation of NET by analyzing entropy production in several simple examples. The fundamental role of nonequilibrium steady-state cycle kinetics is emphasized. The statistical mechanics of Onsager’s reciprocal relations in this context is elucidated. Chemomechanical, thermomechanical, and enzyme-catalyzed thermochemical energy transduction processes are discussed. It is argued that mesoscopic stochastic NET in phase space provides a rigorous mathematical basis of fundamental concepts needed for understanding complex processes in chemistry, physics and biology. This theory is also relevant for nanoscale technological advances.

  8. Storage Conditions of Skin Affect Tissue Structure and Subsequent in vitro Percutaneous Penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Plasencia Gil, Maria Inés; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2011-01-01

    fluorescence microscopy) and in vitro percutaneous penetration of caffeine under four different storage conditions using skin samples from the same donors: fresh skin, skin kept at -20°C for 3 weeks (with or without the use of polyethylene glycol) and at -80°C. Our results show a correlation between increasing...... permeation of caffeine and tissue structural damage caused by the storage conditions, most so after skin storage at -80°C. The presented approach, which combines imaging techniques with studies on percutaneous penetration, enables the link between tissue damage at selected depths and penetration...

  9. Structural framework conditions and the case history of public participation in the GKN-2 reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloede, F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines the structural framework conditions of the GKN-2 project, which include the fundamental decision for a peaceful use of nuclear energy, the onset of the nuclear controversy in the early 1970s, and its shift to administrative procedures. The author shows that these general conditions already had an impact on the forerunner project, GKN-1, and the site-specific conflict of interests involved. The review concludes that the procedures have to be designed so as to be adequate to the problems or conflicts involved, and this in the fields of development of political objectives, administration, and adjucation. (orig./HSCH) [de

  10. A structural evaluation of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel for transport impact conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, M.C.; Chou, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, is being decommissioned and dismantled. This government-leased property will be returned, in a radiologically safe condition, to its owner. All radioactive material is being removed from the Shippingport Station and transported for burial to the DOE Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) will be transported by barge to Hanford. This paper describes an evaluation of the structural response of the RPV to the normal and accident impact test conditions as required by the Code of Federal Regulations. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Signatures of non-universal large scales in conditional structure functions from various turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Daniel B; Voth, Greg A; Bewley, Gregory P; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gibert, Mathieu; Xu Haitao; Gylfason, Ármann; Mydlarski, Laurent; Yeung, P K

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic comparison of conditional structure functions in nine turbulent flows. The flows studied include forced isotropic turbulence simulated on a periodic domain, passive grid wind tunnel turbulence in air and in pressurized SF 6 , active grid wind tunnel turbulence (in both synchronous and random driving modes), the flow between counter-rotating discs, oscillating grid turbulence and the flow in the Lagrangian exploration module (in both constant and random driving modes). We compare longitudinal Eulerian second-order structure functions conditioned on the instantaneous large-scale velocity in each flow to assess the ways in which the large scales affect the small scales in a variety of turbulent flows. Structure functions are shown to have larger values when the large-scale velocity significantly deviates from the mean in most flows, suggesting that dependence on the large scales is typical in many turbulent flows. The effects of the large-scale velocity on the structure functions can be quite strong, with the structure function varying by up to a factor of 2 when the large-scale velocity deviates from the mean by ±2 standard deviations. In several flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are similar at all the length scales we measured, indicating that the large-scale effects are scale independent. In a few flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are larger on the smallest length scales. (paper)

  12. Mesoscopic Diffusion of Poly(ethylene oxide) in Pure and Mixed Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Anisimov, Mikhail A; Sengers, Jan V; He, Maogang

    2018-04-05

    We present results from an experimental dynamic light-scattering study of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in both a pure solvent (water) and a mixed solvent (tert-butanol + water). The concentration dependence of the diffusive relaxation of the PEO molecules is found to be typical of polymers in a good solvent. However, the mesoscopic diffusive behavior of PEO in the mixed solvent is very different, indicating an initial collapse and subsequent reswelling of PEO caused by co-nonsolvency. Furthermore, in the solutions of PEO with very large molecular weights, we found additional hydrodynamic modes indicating the presence of PEO clusters and aggregates similar to those found by some other investigators.

  13. Mesoscopic analyses of porous concrete under static compression and drop weight impact tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agar Ozbek, A.S.; Pedersen, R.R.; Weerheijm, J.

    2008-01-01

    was considered as a four-phase material incorporating aggregates, bulk cement paste, interfacial transition zones and meso-size air pores. The stress-displacement relations obtained from static compression tests, the stress values, and the corresponding damage levels provided by the drop weight impact tests were......The failure process in highly porous concrete was analyzed experimentally and numerically. A triaxial visco-plastic damage model and a mesoscale representation of the material composition were considered to reproduce static compression and drop weight impact tests. In the mesoscopic model, concrete...

  14. Mesoscopic fluctuations in disordered superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Shinsei; Furusaki, Akira; Ludwig, Andreas; Mudry, Christopher

    2005-03-01

    The mesoscopic regime in the problem of Anderson localization is a scaling regime in which disorder effects remain weak. It can be realized in quasi-one and higher dimensional systems. Fluctuations in the global density of states, the local density of states, as well as in the conductance were first studied for conventional metals in the pioneering works of Stone and Lee on the one hand, and Altshuler, Kravtsov, and Lerner, on the other hand. Here we extend the analysis of the conductance fluctuations by Altshuler, Kravtsov, and Lerner to dirty superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry in near two spatial dimensions.

  15. Mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Qinjin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lichtner, Peter C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present our recent progress on mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method. Simulation examples include injection of CO{sub 2} saturated brine into a limestone rock, two-phase behavior and flooding phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and electroosmosis in homogeneously charged porous media. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann method can account for multiple, coupled physicochemical processes in these systems and can shed some light on the underlying physics occuning at the fundamental scale. Therefore, it can be a potential powerful numerical tool to analyze multi-physicochemical processes in various energy, earth, and environmental systems.

  16. Mesoscopic self-collimation and slow light in all-positive index layered photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlandis, Julien; Centeno, Emmanuel; Pollès, Rémi; Moreau, Antoine; Campos, Julien; Gauthier-Lafaye, Olivier; Monmayrant, Antoine

    2012-01-20

    We demonstrate a mesoscopic self-collimation effect in photonic crystal superlattices consisting of a periodic set of all-positive index 2D photonic crystal and homogeneous layers. We develop an electromagnetic theory showing that diffraction-free beams are observed when the curvature of the optical dispersion relation is properly compensated for. This approach allows us to combine slow-light regime together with self-collimation in photonic crystal superlattices presenting an extremely low filling ratio in air. © 2012 American Physical Society

  17. CONDITIONS AND ORGANIZATION OF THE TRANSITION TO BASIC TECHNOLOGIES OF A NEW TECHNOLOGICAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Bourov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With due account for the coming new (VI-th world technological structure, future creation of new types of industrial production is both possible and necessary. Economic environment conditions favorable for such development are designated. In reference to Russian technological environment particulars, self-developing economic-technological microenvironment of a new quality level should be created in zones where controlled «technological chains» function. Possibilities of creation of the VI-th technological structure level basic technologies are shown for industrial and household waste processing techniques as an example.

  18. CONDITIONS AND ORGANIZATION OF THE TRANSITION TO BASIC TECHNOLOGIES OF A NEW TECHNOLOGICAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Bourov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With due account for the coming new (VI-th world technological structure, future creation of new types of industrial production is both possible and necessary. Economic environment conditions favorable for such development are designated. In reference to Russian technologicalenvironment particulars, self-developing economic-technological microenvironment of a new quality level should be created in zones where controlled «technological chains» function. Possibilities of creation of the VI-th technological structure level basic technologies are shown for industrial and household waste processing techniques as an example.

  19. Analyses of a steel containment vessel with an outer contact structure under severe internal overpressurization conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, V.L.

    1994-01-01

    Many Mark-I and Mark-II BWR plants are designed with a steel vessel as the primary containment. Typically, the steel containment vessel (SCV) is enclosed within a reinforced concrete shield building with only a small gap (74-90 mm) separating the two structures. This paper describes finite element analyses performed to evaluate the effects of contact and friction between a steel containment vessel and an outer contact structure when the containment vessel is subjected to large internal pressures. These computations were motivated by a joint program on containment integrity involving the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories for testing model containments. Under severe accident loading conditions, the steel containment vessel in a typical Mark-I or Mark-II plant may deform under internal pressurization such that it contacts the inner surface of a shield building wall. (Thermal expansion from increasing accident temperatures would also close the gap between the SCV and the shield building, but temperature effects are not considered in these analyses.) The amount and location of contact and the pressure at which it occurs all affect how the combined structure behaves. A preliminary finite element model has been developed to analyze a model of a typical steel containment vessel con-ling into contact with an outer structure. Both the steel containment vessel and the outer contact structure were modelled with axisymmetric shell finite elements. Of particular interest are the influence that the contact structure has on deformation and potential failure modes of the containment vessel. Furthermore, the coefficient of friction between the two structures was varied to study its effects on the behavior of the containment vessel and on the uplift loads transmitted to the contact structure. These analyses show that the material properties of an outer contact structure and the amount

  20. Maltreatment Exposure, Brain Structure, and Fear Conditioning in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A; Sheridan, Margaret A; Gold, Andrea L; Duys, Andrea; Lambert, Hilary K; Peverill, Matthew; Heleniak, Charlotte; Shechner, Tomer; Wojcieszak, Zuzanna; Pine, Daniel S

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in learning processes and the neural circuitry that supports fear conditioning and extinction represent mechanisms through which trauma exposure might influence risk for psychopathology. Few studies examine how trauma or neural structure relates to fear conditioning in children. Children (n=94) aged 6-18 years, 40.4% (n=38) with exposure to maltreatment (physical abuse, sexual abuse, or domestic violence), completed a fear conditioning paradigm utilizing blue and yellow bells as conditioned stimuli (CS+/CS-) and an aversive alarm noise as the unconditioned stimulus. Skin conductance responses (SCR) and self-reported fear were acquired. Magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from 60 children. Children without maltreatment exposure exhibited strong differential conditioning to the CS+ vs CS-, based on SCR and self-reported fear. In contrast, maltreated children exhibited blunted SCR to the CS+ and failed to exhibit differential SCR to the CS+ vs CS- during early conditioning. Amygdala and hippocampal volume were reduced among children with maltreatment exposure and were negatively associated with SCR to the CS+ during early conditioning in the total sample, although these associations were negative only among non-maltreated children and were positive among maltreated children. The association of maltreatment with externalizing psychopathology was mediated by this perturbed pattern of fear conditioning. Child maltreatment is associated with failure to discriminate between threat and safety cues during fear conditioning in children. Poor threat-safety discrimination might reflect either enhanced fear generalization or a deficit in associative learning, which may in turn represent a central mechanism underlying the development of maltreatment-related externalizing psychopathology in children.

  1. Investigating performance of microchannel evaporators for automobile air conditioning with different port structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Microchannel evaporator has been widely applied in automobile air conditioning, while it faces the problem of refrigerant maldistribution which deteriorates the thermal performance of evaporator. In this study, the performances of microchannel evaporators with different port structures are experimentally investigated for purpose of reducing evaporator pressure drop. Four evaporator samples with different port number and hydraulic diameter are made for this study. The performances of the evaporator samples are tested on a psychometric calorimeter test bench with the refrigerant R-134A at a real automobile air conditioning. The results on the variations of the evaporator pressure drop and evaporator surface temperature distribution are presented and analyzed. By studying the performance of an evaporator, seeking proper port structure is an approach to reduce refrigerant pressure drop as well as improve refrigerant distribution.

  2. Hippocampal structural plasticity accompanies the resulting contextual fear memory following stress and fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachero, Marcelo; Calfa, Gaston D; Molina, Victor A

    2013-10-15

    The present research investigated the resulting contextual fear memory and structural plasticity changes in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) following stress and fear conditioning. This combination enhanced fear retention and increased the number of total and mature dendritic spines in DH. Intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion of midazolam prior to stress prevented both the enhancement of fear retention and an increase in the density of total and mature dendritic spines in DH. These findings emphasize the role of the stress-induced attenuation of GABAergic neurotransmission in BLA in the promoting influence of stress on fear memory and on synaptic remodeling in DH. In conclusion, the structural remodeling in DH accompanied the facilitated fear memory following a combination of fear conditioning and stressful stimulation.

  3. Sus scrofa: Population Structure, Reproduction and Condition in Tropical North Eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NELSON, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Three feral pig populations inhabiting contrasting environments along the north easterncoast of Australia have been investigated with respect to population structure, individual condition andreproduction. The population on Prince of Wales Island contains a large proportion of juvenile andsub-adult pigs but lacks pigs in the higher age classes. Individuals also breed at an earlier age thananimals of the mainland populations. Pig populations on Cape York Peninsula show a largerproportion of older animals and feral pigs living in rainforest habitats show a low proportion ofanimals in very young and very old age classes. Pigs from the lowland rainforest population are inbetter condition than those of the other populations for most of the year, reflecting the availability offood all year round in this environment. Differences in the population structure of the threepopulations are discussed with respect to fecundity and several mortality factors such as predation anddiseases/parasites.

  4. The thermal effect on the left-handedness of the mesoscopic composite right-Left handed transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Jing; Zhao, Shun-Cai; Guo, Hong-Wei

    2017-10-01

    Starting from the quantum fluctuation of current in the mesoscopic composite right-left handed transmission line (CRLH-TL) in the thermal Fock state, we investigate the left-handedness dependent of the frequencies, intensity and quantum fluctuations of the current field in the CRLH-TL under different thermal environment. The results show that the intensity and quantum fluctuations of current field in lower frequency bands affect the left-handedness distinctly under different thermal environment. The thermal effect on the left-handedness in the mesoscopic CRLH-TL deserves further experimental investigation in its miniaturization application.

  5. CONDITIONS AND ORGANIZATION OF THE TRANSITION TO BASIC TECHNOLOGIES OF A NEW TECHNOLOGICAL STRUCTURE

    OpenAIRE

    B. L. Bourov; E. S. Dashut; N. I. Komkov

    2011-01-01

    With due account for the coming new (VI-th) world technological structure, future creation of new types of industrial production is both possible and necessary. Economic environment conditions favorable for such development are designated. In reference to Russian technologicalenvironment particulars, self-developing economic-technological microenvironment of a new quality level should be created in zones where controlled «technological chains» function. Possibilities of creation of the VI-th ...

  6. Spin injection from a normal metal into a mesoscopic superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Michael J.; Kolenda, Stefan [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Huebler, Florian [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Center for Functional Nanostructures, KIT, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Loehneysen, Hilbert v. [Center for Functional Nanostructures, KIT, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, KIT, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Beckmann, Detlef [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Center for Functional Nanostructures, KIT, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We report on nonlocal transport in superconductor hybrid structures, with ferromagnetic as well as normal-metal tunnel junctions attached to the superconductor. In the presence of a strong Zeeman splitting of the density of states, both charge and spin imbalance is injected into the superconductor. While previous experiments demonstrated spin injection from ferromagnetic electrodes, we show that spin imbalance is also created for normal-metal injector contacts. Using the combination of ferromagnetic and normal-metal detectors allows us to directly discriminate between charge and spin injection, and demonstrate a complete separation of charge and spin imbalance. The relaxation length of the spin imbalance is of the order of several μm and is found to increase with a magnetic field, but is independent of temperature. We further discuss possible relaxation mechanisms for the explanation of the spin relaxation length.

  7. Structural Damage Detection with Different Objective Functions in Noisy Conditions Using an Evolutionary Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Shabbir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic properties such as natural frequencies and mode shapes are directly affected by damage in structures. In this paper, changes in natural frequencies and mode shapes were used as the input to various objective functions for damage detection. Objective functions related to natural frequencies, mode shapes, modal flexibility and modal strain energy have been used, and their performances have been analyzed in varying noise conditions. Three beams were analyzed: two of which were simulated beams with single and multiple damage scenarios and one was an experimental beam. In order to do this, SAP 2000 (v14, Computers and Structures Inc., Berkeley, CA, United States, 2009 is linked with MATLAB (r2015, The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA, United States, 2015. The genetic algorithm (GA, an evolutionary algorithm (EA, was used to update the damaged structure for damage detection. Due to the degradation of the performance of objective functions in varying noisy conditions, a modified objective function based on the concept of regularization has been proposed, which can be effectively used in combination with EA. All three beams were used to validate the proposed procedure. It has been found that the modified objective function gives better results even in noisy and actual experimental conditions.

  8. Attractor of Beam Equation with Structural Damping under Nonlinear Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danxia Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneously, considering the viscous effect of material, damping of medium, and rotational inertia, we study a kind of more general Kirchhoff-type extensible beam equation utt-uxxtt+uxxxx-σ(∫0l‍(ux2dxuxx-ϕ(∫0l‍(ux2dxuxxt=q(x, in  [0,L]×R+ with the structural damping and the rotational inertia term. Little attention is paid to the longtime behavior of the beam equation under nonlinear boundary conditions. In this paper, under nonlinear boundary conditions, we prove not only the existence and uniqueness of global solutions by prior estimates combined with some inequality skills, but also the existence of a global attractor by the existence of an absorbing set and asymptotic compactness of corresponding solution semigroup. In addition, the same results also can be proved under the other nonlinear boundary conditions.

  9. Structural Variations of Human Glucokinase Glu256Lys in MODY2 Condition Using Molecular Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Kumar Yellapu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GK is the predominant hexokinase that acts as glucose sensor and catalyses the formation of Glucose-6-phosphate. The mutations in GK gene influence the affinity for glucose and lead to altered glucose levels in blood causing maturity onset diabetes of the young type 2 (MODY2 condition, which is one of the prominent reasons of type 2 diabetic condition. In view of the importance of mutated GK resulting in hyperglycemic condition, in the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in intact and 256 E-K mutated GK structures and their energy values and conformational variations were correlated. Energy variations were observed in mutated GK (3500 Kcal/mol structure with respect to intact GK (5000 Kcal/mol, and it showed increased γ-turns, decreased β-turns, and more helix-helix interactions that affected substrate binding region where its volume increased from 1089.152 Å2 to 1246.353 Å2. Molecular docking study revealed variation in docking scores (intact = −12.199 and mutated = −8.383 and binding mode of glucose in the active site of mutated GK where the involvement of A53, S54, K56, K256, D262 and Q286 has resulted in poor glucose binding which probably explains the loss of catalytic activity and the consequent prevailing of high glucose levels in MODY2 condition.

  10. SHM experiences of monuments in different structural use and environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modena, C.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades the need for an effective seismic protection and vulnerability reduction of strategic structures and particularly the architectural heritage determined a growing interest in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) as measure of passive mitigation of earthquake effects. The object of monitoring is to identify, locate and classify type and severity of damage induced by external actions or degradation phenomena and to assess their effects on the structural performance. In this way it is possible to take appropriate measures to reduce the danger of collapse and, when necessary, perform straightening interventions to improve the structural and seismic capacity. Motivated by the above reasons, the paper provide a contribution to the application of integrated methodologies and techniques, based on SHM, for the assessment and protection of Cultural Heritage (CH) buildings and monuments. Selected case studies, equipped with distributed sensors and acquisition systems. allowed the definition and successive validation of SHM as a knowledge-based assessment tool, implemented to evaluate intervention needs, following an incremental approach during their execution, and to control the damage states of buildings in a post-seismic scenario. In order to maximize the benefits of SHM and optimize the entire process, dedicated software for static monitoring and automated algorithms for modal parameters identification have been developed, able to provide almost real time information on the health state of the monitored structure. Finally integrated procedures based on robust statistical and numerical models have been implemented to interpret and exploit SHM outputs to assess the structural conditions of the investigated CH buildings.

  11. Atomic and electronic structure transformations of silver nanoparticles under rapid cooling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, I.; Rojas, J.; Landauro, C. V.; Torres, J.

    2009-02-01

    The structural evolution and dynamics of silver nanodrops Ag2869 (4.4 nm in diameter) under rapid cooling conditions have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and electronic density of state calculations. The interaction of silver atoms is modelled by a tight-binding semiempirical interatomic potential proposed by Cleri and Rosato. The pair correlation functions and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural transition in the process of solidification. It is shown that Ag nanoparticles evolve into different nanostructures under different cooling processes. At a cooling rate of 1.5625 × 1013 K s-1 the nanoparticles preserve an amorphous-like structure containing a large amount of 1551 and 1541 pairs which correspond to icosahedral symmetry. For a lower cooling rate (1.5625 × 1012 K s-1), the nanoparticles transform into a crystal-like structure consisting mainly of 1421 and 1422 pairs which correspond to the face centred cubic and hexagonal close packed structures, respectively. The variations of the electronic density of states for the differently cooled nanoparticles are small, but in correspondence with the structural changes.

  12. Atomic and electronic structure transformations of silver nanoparticles under rapid cooling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobato, I; Rojas, J; Landauro, C V; Torres, J

    2009-01-01

    The structural evolution and dynamics of silver nanodrops Ag 2869 (4.4 nm in diameter) under rapid cooling conditions have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and electronic density of state calculations. The interaction of silver atoms is modelled by a tight-binding semiempirical interatomic potential proposed by Cleri and Rosato. The pair correlation functions and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural transition in the process of solidification. It is shown that Ag nanoparticles evolve into different nanostructures under different cooling processes. At a cooling rate of 1.5625 x 10 13 K s -1 the nanoparticles preserve an amorphous-like structure containing a large amount of 1551 and 1541 pairs which correspond to icosahedral symmetry. For a lower cooling rate (1.5625 x 10 12 K s -1 ), the nanoparticles transform into a crystal-like structure consisting mainly of 1421 and 1422 pairs which correspond to the face centred cubic and hexagonal close packed structures, respectively. The variations of the electronic density of states for the differently cooled nanoparticles are small, but in correspondence with the structural changes.

  13. Atomic and electronic structure transformations of silver nanoparticles under rapid cooling conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, I; Rojas, J [Instituto Peruano de EnergIa Nuclear, Avenida Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Landauro, C V; Torres, J [Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, P.O. box 14-0149, Lima 14 (Peru)], E-mail: jrojast@unmsm.edu.pe

    2009-02-04

    The structural evolution and dynamics of silver nanodrops Ag{sub 2869} (4.4 nm in diameter) under rapid cooling conditions have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and electronic density of state calculations. The interaction of silver atoms is modelled by a tight-binding semiempirical interatomic potential proposed by Cleri and Rosato. The pair correlation functions and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural transition in the process of solidification. It is shown that Ag nanoparticles evolve into different nanostructures under different cooling processes. At a cooling rate of 1.5625 x 10{sup 13} K s{sup -1} the nanoparticles preserve an amorphous-like structure containing a large amount of 1551 and 1541 pairs which correspond to icosahedral symmetry. For a lower cooling rate (1.5625 x 10{sup 12} K s{sup -1}), the nanoparticles transform into a crystal-like structure consisting mainly of 1421 and 1422 pairs which correspond to the face centred cubic and hexagonal close packed structures, respectively. The variations of the electronic density of states for the differently cooled nanoparticles are small, but in correspondence with the structural changes.

  14. The Condition of and Structural Changes in the Energy Sector of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miliutin Hlib V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the analysis of the condition of Ukraine’s energy sector and its structural changes in the period 2000-2016. The dynamics of electric power production in Ukraine and the world, as well as the capacity utilization factor are studied. There analyzed the structure of capacities and electric power production in Ukraine by types of generation: those of thermal power plants, nuclear power plants, combined heat and power plants, hydroelectric power plants, and renewable energy sources. The lifetime of the existing capacities is studied. Structural changes in the capacities and electric power production in Ukraine are investigated. It is proven that a tendency to reduce the electric power production in Ukraine, with a simultaneous increase in the world production, was observed; and that most of production capacities in the nuclear, thermal and hydropower sector have expired their design lifetime and require replacement or modernization. It is determined that the structural changes in capacities and electric power production in Ukraine in the period 2000-2016 were very low with the largest structural change in capacities and electric power production in the period under review taking place in the production of electricity from renewable energy sources, and a significant negative structural change – in the production of electricity in thermal power plants.

  15. Argument structure effects in action verb naming in static and dynamic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Ouden, Dirk-Bart; Fix, Steve; Parrish, Todd B; Thompson, Cynthia K

    2009-03-01

    Argument structure, as in the participant roles entailed within the lexical representation of verbs, affects verb processing. Recent neuroimaging studies show that when verbs are heard or read, the posterior temporoparietal region shows increased activation for verbs with greater versus lesser argument structure complexity, usually bilaterally. In addition, patients with agrammatic aphasia show verb production deficits, graded based on argument structure complexity. In the present study, we used fMRI to examine the neural correlates of verb production in overt action naming conditions. In addition, we tested the differential effects of naming when verbs were presented dynamically in video segments versus statically in line drawings. Results showed increased neuronal activity associated with production of transitive as compared to intransitive verbs not only in posterior regions, but also in left inferior frontal cortex. We also found significantly greater activation for transitive versus intransitive action naming for videos compared to pictures in the right inferior and superior parietal cortices, areas associated with object manipulation. These findings indicate that verbs with greater argument structure density engender graded activation of both anterior and posterior portions of the language network and support verb naming deficit patterns reported in lesion studies. In addition, the similar findings derived under video and static picture naming conditions provide validity for using videos in neuroimaging studies, which are more naturalistic and perhaps ecologically valid than using static pictures to investigate action naming.

  16. Impacts of operating conditions and solution chemistry on osmotic membrane structure and performance

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Mavis C.Y.

    2012-02-01

    Herein, we report on changes in the performance of a commercial cellulose triacetate (CTA) membrane, imparted by varied operating conditions and solution chemistries. Changes to feed and draw solution flow rate did not significantly alter the CTA membrane\\'s water permeability, salt permeability, or membrane structural parameter when operated with the membrane skin layer facing the draw solution (PRO-mode). However, water and salt permeability increased with increasing feed or draw solution temperature, while the membrane structural parameter decreased with increasing draw solution, possibly due to changes in polymer intermolecular interactions. High ionic strength draw solutions may de-swell the CTA membrane via charge neutralization, which resulted in lower water permeability, higher salt permeability, and lower structural parameter. This observed trend was further exacerbated by the presence of divalent cations which tends to swell the polymer to a greater extent. Finally, the calculated CTA membrane\\'s structural parameter was lower and less sensitive to external factors when operated in PRO-mode, but highly sensitive to the same factors when the skin layer faced the feed solution (FO-mode), presumably due to swelling/de-swelling of the saturated porous substructure by the draw solution. This is a first attempt aimed at systematically evaluating the changes in performance of the CTA membrane due to operating conditions and solution chemistry, shedding new insight into the possible advantages and disadvantages of this material in certain applications. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Influence of carbonization conditions on micro-pore structure of foundry formed coke produced with char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun Qiao; Jianjun Wu; Jingru Zu; Zhiyuan Gao; Guoli Zhou

    2009-07-01

    There are few studies on coke's micro-pore structure in recent years, however, micro-pore structure of foundry coke determines its macroscopically quality index and reactivity in cupola furnace. Effect of such factors on micro-pore structure were investigated under different carbonization conditions with certain ratio of raw materials and material forming process in this article as charging temperature (A); braised furnace time (B); heating rate of the first stage (C)and the second stage (D) and holding time of ultimate temperature (E). Research showed that charging temperature was the most influential factor on the coke porosity, pore volume, pore size and specific surface area. It is suggested that formation of plastic mass and releasing rate of volatile during carbonization period are two main factors on microstructure of foundry coke while charging temperature contributes most to the above factors. 6 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Transformations of griseofulvin in strong acidic conditions--crystal structures of 2'-demethylgriseofulvin and dimerized griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewska, Barbara; Jebors, Said; Coleman, Anthony W; Suwińska, Kinga

    2012-03-01

    The structure of griseofulvic acid, C16H15ClO6, at 100 K has orthorhombic (P2(1)2(1)2) symmetry. It is of interest with respect to biological activity. The structure displays intermolecular O-H...O, C-H...O hydrogen bonding as well as week C-H...pi and pi...pi interactions. In strong acidic conditions the griseofulvin undergoes dimerization. The structure of dimerized griseofulvin, C34H32C12O12 x C2H6O x H2O, at 100 K has monoclinic (P2(1)) symmetry. The molecule crystallized as a solvate with one ethanol and one water molecule. The dimeric molecules form intermolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds to solvents molecules only but they interact via week C-H...O, C-H...pi, C-Cl...pi and pi...pi interactions with other dimerized molecules.

  19. Graph-structured Conditional Random Fields for Named Entity Categorization in Wikipedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yotaro; Asahara, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Yuji

    This paper presents a method for categorizing named entities in Wikipedia. In Wikipedia, an anchor text is glossed in a linked HTML text. We formalize named entity categorization as a task of categorizing anchor texts with linked HTML texts which glosses a named entity. Using this representation, we introduce a graph structure in which anchor texts are regarded as nodes. In order to incorporate HTML structure on the graph, three types of cliques are defined based on the HTML tree structure. We propose a method with Conditional Random Fields (CRFs) to categorize the nodes on the graph. Since the defined graph may include cycles, the exact inference of CRFs is computationally expensive. We introduce an approximate inference method using Tree-based Reparameterization (TRP) to reduce computational cost. In experiments, our proposed model obtained significant improvements compare to baseline models that use Support Vector Machines.

  20. Diffusion under water-saturated conditions in PFA/OPC-based structural concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.W.; Nickerson, A.K.

    1990-05-01

    A substantial proportion of the volume of the UK radioactive waste repository is likely to be composed of materials based on hydraulic cements. This includes the structural components, which are likely to be manufactured from concrete. The mass transport characteristics of dissolved species for a typical structural concrete, based on a mixture of pulverised fuel ash and ordinary Portland cement, have been measured in a water-saturated condition. Both the water permeability and the diffusion parameters (for caesium, strontium and iodide ion and tritiated water diffusion) are low compared to values obtained for other structural concretes. The intrinsic diffusion coefficients for iodide and caesium ions are in the range 2-5x10 -14 m 2 s -1 . There is no evidence of significant sorption of any of the diffusants studied. (author)

  1. Mesoscopic dispersion of colloidal agglomerate in a complex fluid modelled by a hybrid fluid-particle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A

    2002-03-15

    The dispersion of the agglomerating fluid process involving colloids has been investigated at the mesoscale level by a discrete particle approach--the hybrid fluid-particle model (FPM). Dynamical processes occurring in the granulation of colloidal agglomerate in solvents are severely influenced by coupling between the dispersed microstructures and the global flow. On the mesoscale this coupling is further exacerbated by thermal fluctuations, particle-particle interactions between colloidal beds, and hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal beds and the solvent. Using the method of FPM, we have tackled the problem of dispersion of a colloidal slab being accelerated in a long box filled with a fluid. Our results show that the average size of the agglomerated fragments decreases with increasing shearing rate gamma, according to the power law A x gamma(k), where k is around 2. For larger values of gamma, the mean size of the agglomerate S(avg) increases slowly with gamma from the collisions between the aggregates and the longitudinal stretching induced by the flow. The proportionality constant A increases exponentially with the scaling factor of the attractive forces acting between the colloidal particles. The value of A shows a rather weak dependence on the solvent viscosity. But A increases proportionally with the scaling factor of the colloid-solvent dissipative interactions. Similar type of dependence can be found for the mixing induced by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities involving the colloidal agglomerate and the solvent. Three types of fragmentation structures can be identified, which are called rupture, erosion, and shatter. They generate very complex structures with multiresolution character. The aggregation of colloidal beds is formed by the collisions between aggregates, which are influenced by the flow or by the cohesive forces for small dispersion energies. These results may be applied to enhance our understanding concerning the nonlinear complex

  2. The influence of mesoscopic confinement on the dynamics of imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids in polyether sulfone membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Joseph E.; Bailey, Heather E.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2017-11-01

    The structural dynamics of a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (CnmimNTf2, n = 2, 4, 6, 10: ethyl—Emim; butyl—Bmim; hexyl—Hmim; decyl—Dmim) room temperature ionic liquids confined in the pores of polyether sulfone (PES 200) membranes with an average pore size of ˜350 nm and in the bulk liquids were studied. Time correlated single photon counting measurements of the fluorescence of the fluorophore coumarin 153 (C153) were used to observe the time-dependent Stokes shift (solvation dynamics). The solvation dynamics of C153 in the ionic liquids are multiexponential decays. The multiexponential functional form of the decays was confirmed as the slowest decay component of each bulk liquid matches the slowest component of the liquid dynamics measured by optical heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) experiments, which is single exponential. The fact that the slowest component of the Stokes shift matches the OHD-OKE data in all four liquids identifies this component of the solvation dynamics as arising from the complete structural randomization of the liquids. Although the pores in the PES membranes are large, confinement on the mesoscopic length scale results in substantial slowing of the dynamics, a factor of ˜4, for EmimNTf2, with the effect decreasing as the chain length increases. By DmimNTf2, the dynamics are virtually indistinguishable from those in the bulk liquid. The rotation relaxation of C153 in the four bulk liquids was also measured and showed strong coupling between the C153 probe and its environment.

  3. Dynamics of skyrmions and edge states in the resistive regime of mesoscopic p-wave superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández Becerra, V., E-mail: VictorLeonardo.FernandezBecerra@uantwerpen.be; Milošević, M.V., E-mail: milorad.milosevic@uantwerpen.be

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Voltage–current characterization of a mesoscopic p-wave superconducting sample. • Skyrmions and edge states are stabilized with an out-of-plane applied magnetic field. • In the resistive regime, moving skyrmions and the edge state behave distinctly different from the conventional kinematic vortices. - Abstract: In a mesoscopic sample of a chiral p-wave superconductor, novel states comprising skyrmions and edge states have been stabilized in out-of-plane applied magnetic field. Using the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau equations we shed light on the dynamic response of such states to an external applied current. Three different regimes are obtained, namely, the superconducting (stationary), resistive (non-stationary) and normal regime, similarly to conventional s-wave superconductors. However, in the resistive regime and depending on the external current, we found that moving skyrmions and the edge state behave distinctly different from the conventional kinematic vortex, thereby providing new fingerprints for identification of p-wave superconductivity.

  4. Functional energy nanocomposites surfaces based on mesoscopic microspheres, polymers and graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, S. A.; Dmitriev, A. S.; Dmitriev, A. A.; Makarov, P. G.; Mikhailova, I. A.

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in the development and creation of new functional energy materials, including for improving the energy efficiency of power equipment and for effectively removing heat from energy devices, microelectronics and optoelectronics (power micro electronics, supercapacitors, cooling of processors, servers and Data centers). In this paper, the technology of obtaining a new nanocomposite based on mesoscopic microspheres, polymers and graphene flakes is considered. The methods of sequential production of functional materials from graphite flakes of different volumetric concentration using polymers based on epoxy resins and polyimide, as well as the addition of a mesoscopic medium in the form of monodisperse microspheres are described. The data of optical and electron microscopy of such nanocomposites are presented, the main problems in the appearance of defects in such materials are described, the possibilities of their elimination by the selection of different concentrations and sizes of the components. Data are given on the measurement of the hysteresis of the contact angle and the evaporation of droplets on similar substrates. The results of studying the mechanical, electrophysical and thermal properties of such nanocomposites are presented. Particular attention is paid to the investigation of the thermal conductivity of these nanocomposites with respect to the creation of thermal interface materials for cooling devices of electronics, optoelectronics and power engineering.

  5. Detailed Simulation of Complex Hydraulic Problems with Macroscopic and Mesoscopic Mathematical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Biscarini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation of fast-moving fronts originating from dam or levee breaches is a challenging task for small scale engineering projects. In this work, the use of fully three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (NS equations and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is proposed for testing the validity of, respectively, macroscopic and mesoscopic mathematical models. Macroscopic simulations are performed employing an open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD code that solves the NS combined with the volume of fluid (VOF multiphase method to represent free-surface flows. The mesoscopic model is a front-tracking experimental variant of the LBM. In the proposed LBM the air-gas interface is represented as a surface with zero thickness that handles the passage of the density field from the light to the dense phase and vice versa. A single set of LBM equations represents the liquid phase, while the free surface is characterized by an additional variable, the liquid volume fraction. Case studies show advantages and disadvantages of the proposed LBM and NS with specific regard to the computational efficiency and accuracy in dealing with the simulation of flows through complex geometries. In particular, the validation of the model application is developed by simulating the flow propagating through a synthetic urban setting and comparing results with analytical and experimental laboratory measurements.

  6. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-05

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Formation, molecular structure, and morphology of humins in biomass conversion: influence of feedstock and processing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zandvoort, Ilona; Wang, Yuehu; Rasrendra, Carolus B; van Eck, Ernst R H; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Heeres, Hero J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2013-09-01

    Neither the routes through which humin byproducts are formed, nor their molecular structure have yet been unequivocally established. A better understanding of the formation and physicochemical properties of humins, however, would aid in making biomass conversion processes more efficient. Here, an extensive multiple-technique-based study of the formation, molecular structure, and morphology of humins is presented as a function of sugar feed, the presence of additives (e.g., 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene), and the applied processing conditions. Elemental analyses indicate that humins are formed through a dehydration pathway, with humin formation and levulinic acid yields strongly depending on the processing parameters. The addition of implied intermediates to the feedstocks showed that furan and phenol compounds formed during the acid-catalyzed dehydration of sugars are indeed included in the humin structure. IR spectra, sheared sum projections of solid-state 2DPASS (13) C NMR spectra, and pyrolysis GC-MS data indicate that humins consist of a furan-rich polymer network containing different oxygen functional groups. The structure is furthermore found to strongly depend on the type of feedstock. A model for the molecular structure of humins is proposed based on the data presented. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Influence of pyrolysis conditions on the structure and gasification reactivity of biomass chars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Cetin; B. Moghtaderi; R. Gupta; T.F. Wall [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). Discipline of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Engineering

    2004-11-01

    The physical and chemical structure as well as gasification reactivities of chars generated from several biomass species (i.e. pinus radiata, eucalyptus maculata and sugar cane bagasse) were studied to gain insight into the role of heating rate and pressure on the gasification characteristics of biomass chars. Char samples were generated in a suite of reactors including a wire mesh reactor, a tubular reactor, and a drop tube furnace. Scanning electron microscopy analysis, X-ray diffractometry, digital cinematography and surface area analysis were employed to determine the impact of operating conditions on the char structure. The global gasification reactivities of char samples were also determined for a range of pressures between 1 and 20 bar using pressurised thermogravimetric analysis technique. Char reactivities were found to increase with increasing pyrolysis heating rates and decreasing pyrolysis pressure. It was found that under high heating rates the char particles underwent plastic deformation (i.e. melted) developing a structure different to that of the virgin biomass. Pressure was also found to influence the physical and chemical structures of char particles. The difference in the gasification reactivities of biomass chars at pressure was found to correlate well with the effect of pyrolysis pressure on the graphitisation process in the biomass char structure. 29 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. The doubly conditioned frequency spectrum does not distinguish between ancient population structure and hybridization

    KAUST Repository

    Eriksson, Anders

    2014-03-13

    Distinguishing between hybridization and population structure in the ancestral species is a key challenge in our understanding of how permeable species boundaries are to gene flow. The doubly conditioned frequency spectrum (dcfs) has been argued to be a powerful metric to discriminate between these two explanations, and it was used to argue for hybridization between Neandertal and anatomically modern humans. The shape of the observed dcfs for these two species cannot be reproduced by a model that represents ancient population structure in Africa with two populations, while adding hybridization produces realistic shapes. In this letter, we show that this result is a consequence of the spatial coarseness of the demographic model and that a spatially structured stepping stone model can generate realistic dcfs without hybridization. This result highlights how inferences on hybridization between recently diverged species can be strongly affected by the choice of how population structure is represented in the underlying demographic model. We also conclude that the dcfs has limited power in distinguishing between the signals left by hybridization and ancient structure. 2014 The Author.

  10. Structure of mangrove meiofaunal assemblages associated with local sediment conditions in subtropical eastern australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Maizah M.; Lee, S. Y.

    2017-11-01

    Meiofauna are ubiquitous but poorly-studied components of soft-bottom marine habitats around the world, including mangroves. The dynamic environmental conditions and heterogeneous sediments of mangroves present challenges to understanding the structure of mangrove meiofaunal assemblages at various spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we investigated the meiofaunal assemblage structure of sediments colonised by three mangrove species, namely, Avicennia marina, Rhizophora stylosa and Aegiceras corniculatum, at three locations in subtropical eastern Australia. Spatial and temporal variations were tested by sampling at the three mangrove locations (i.e. Tallebudgera, Currumbin and Terranora) in autumn, with samplings repeated at Tallebudgera at two other times broadly representing during dry/cool winter and wet/hot summer seasons. We examined the variability of the sediment environments within each of the different mangrove species, and investigated how meiofaunal assemblages would respond to the particular changes in their habitats to result in differences in assemblage structure between and within sites. Total meiofaunal density was highest in Tallebudgera and Currumbin and lowest in Terranora (mean density of 424, 393 and 239 ind.10 cm-2, respectively). In Tallebudgera, the density was higher in winter and summer (mean density of 546 and 530 ind.10 cm-2, respectively). The meiofaunal assemblage in this study shows a trend and association with the environmental variables. High availability of food proxies such phaeopigments, Chl a or TOC, with moderate tannin content and appropriate habitat structure (sediment particle size, belowground root biomass and/or moisture content provide the best condition for the meiofauna to achieve the highest density. However, given the complex dynamic habitats and the spatial heterogeneity of the mangrove environments across different locations and seasons, no clear generalization could be made regarding the key environmental

  11. Survivability of integrated PVDF film sensors to accelerated ageing conditions in aeronautical/aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, E.; Cugnoni, J.; Gmür, T.; Bonhôte, P.; Schorderet, A.

    2013-06-01

    This work validates the use of integrated polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film sensors for dynamic testing, even after being subjected to UV-thermo-hygro-mechanical accelerated ageing conditions. The verification of PVDF sensors’ survivability in these environmental conditions, typically confronted by civil and military aircraft, is the main concern of the study. The evaluation of survivability is made by a comparison of dynamic testing results provided by the PVDF patch sensors subjected to an accelerated ageing protocol, and those provided by neutral non-aged sensors (accelerometers). The available measurements are the time-domain response signals issued from a modal analysis procedure, and the corresponding frequency response functions (FRF). These are in turn used to identify the constitutive properties of the samples by extraction of the modal parameters, in particular the natural frequencies. The composite specimens in this study undergo different accelerated ageing processes. After several weeks of experimentation, the samples exhibit a loss of stiffness, represented by a decrease in the elastic moduli down to 10%. Despite the ageing, the integrated PVDF sensors, subjected to the same ageing conditions, are still capable of providing reliable data to carry out a close followup of these changes. This survivability is a determinant asset in order to use integrated PVDF sensors to perform structural health monitoring (SHM) in the future of full-scale composite aeronautical structures.

  12. Numerical Verification Of Geotechnical Structure In Unfavourable Geological Conditions – Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drusa Marián

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modelling represents a powerful tool not only for special geotechnical calculations in cases of complicated and difficult structure design or their foundation conditions, but also for regular tasks of structure foundation. Finite element method is the most utilized method of numerical modelling. This method was used for calculations of the retaining wall monitored during 5 years after construction. Retaining wall of the parking lot with the facing from gabion blocks was chosen for numerical model. Besides the unfavourable geological conditions, a soft nature of the facing was also a difficult part of the modelling. This paper presents the results of the modelling when exact geometry, material characteristics and construction stages were simulated. The results capture the trend of displacements even though the basic material models were utilized. The modelling proved the ability of the finite element method to model the retaining structure with sufficient accuracy as well as reasonable demand on quality and quantity of input data. This method can then be used as a regular design tool during project preparation.

  13. Structural Statics and Dynamics of the Economy of Transcarpathia under Pre-Crisis and Crisis Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slava Svitlana S.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Under current conditions in Ukraine, when the vector is directed at increasing self-sufficiency of the regions, diagnostics of structural transformations in their economic systems is a mandatory and necessary component to identify potential points of the region development. Accordingly, the purpose of the article is to study the structural trends in the economy of the Transcarpathian region and identify its leading sectors under the pre-crisis and crisis conditions, balance in dynamics of the main indicators — the volume of sales, regional value added, capital investment and the number of employees, as well as formation of the main directions in development of the regional economy. It has been revealed that for the past ten years the restructuring of the region economic did not go on too rapidly and it is still difficult to speak about a clear trend of transition to a post-industrial system. Given the current characteristics of the economy of Transcarpathia, the article defined the basic problematic aspects of its structural transformation. It allowed to determine the long-term, according to the authors, ways of “modernization” of economic processes in terms of attracting investments, increasing innovation, business activity, formation of a complete production cycle, use of alternative energy sources, implementation of the EU requirements.

  14. Primary structure and solution conditions determine conformational ensemble properties of intrinsically disordered proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hsuan-Han Alberto

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a class of proteins that do not exhibit well-defined three-dimensional structures. The absence of structure is intrinsic to their amino acid sequences, which are characterized by low hydrophobicity and high net charge per residue compared to folded proteins. Contradicting the classic structure-function paradigm, IDPs are capable of interacting with high specificity and affinity, often acquiring order in complex with protein and nucleic acid binding partners. This phenomenon is evident during cellular activities involving IDPs, which include transcriptional and translational regulation, cell cycle control, signal transduction, molecular assembly, and molecular recognition. Although approximately 30% of eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, the nature of IDP conformational ensembles remains unclear. In this dissertation, we describe relationships connecting characteristics of IDP conformational ensembles to their primary structures and solution conditions. Using molecular simulations and fluorescence experiments on a set of base-rich IDPs, we find that net charge per residue segregates conformational ensembles along a globule-to-coil transition. Speculatively generalizing this result, we propose a phase diagram that predicts an IDP's average size and shape based on sequence composition and use it to generate hypotheses for a broad set of intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Simulations reveal that acid-rich IDRs, unlike their oppositely charged base-rich counterparts, exhibit disordered globular ensembles despite intra-chain repulsive electrostatic interactions. This apparent asymmetry is sensitive to simulation parameters for representing alkali and halide salt ions, suggesting that solution conditions modulate IDP conformational ensembles. We refine the ion parameters using a calibration procedure that relies exclusively on crystal lattice properties. Simulations with these parameters recover swollen

  15. Using Models at the Mesoscopic Scale in Teaching Physics: Two Experimental Interventions in Solid Friction and Fluid Statics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; Viennot, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the didactic suitability of introducing models at an intermediate (i.e. mesoscopic) scale in teaching certain subjects, at an early stage. The design and evaluation of two short sequences based on this rationale will be outlined: one bears on propulsion by solid friction, the other on fluid statics in the presence of gravity.…

  16. Structural analysis of porous rock reservoirs subjected to conditions of compressed air energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friley, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations are described which were performed to assess the structural behavior of porous rock compressed air energy storage (CAES) reservoirs subjected to loading conditions of temperature and pressure felt to be typical of such an operation. Analyses performed addressed not only the nominal or mean reservoir response but also the cyclic response due to charge/discharge operation. The analyses were carried out by assuming various geometrical and material related parameters of a generic site. The objective of this study was to determine the gross response of a generic porous reservoir. The site geometry for this study assumed a cylindrical model 122 m in dia and 57 m high including thicknesses for the cap, porous, and base rock formations. The central portion of the porous zone was assumed to be at a depth of 518 m and at an initial temperature of 20/sup 0/C. Cyclic loading conditions of compressed air consisted of pressure values in the range of 4.5 to 5.2 MPa and temperature values between 143 and 204/sup 0/C.Various modes of structural behavior were studied. These response modes were analyzed using loading conditions of temperature and pressure (in the porous zone) corresponding to various operational states during the first year of simulated site operation. The results of the structural analyses performed indicate that the most severely stressed region will likely be in the wellbore vicinity and hence highly dependent on the length of and placement technique utilized in the well production length. Analyses to address this specific areas are currently being pursued.

  17. An FFT-accelerated fdtd scheme with exact absorbing conditions for characterizing axially symmetric resonant structures

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    An accurate and efficient finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for characterizing transient waves interactions on axially symmetric structures is presented. The method achieves its accuracy and efficiency by employing localized and/or fast Fourier transform (FFT) accelerated exact absorbing conditions (EACs). The paper details the derivation of the EACs, discusses their implementation and discretization in an FDTD method, and proposes utilization of a blocked-FFT based algorithm for accelerating the computation of temporal convolutions present in nonlocal EACs. The proposed method allows transient analyses to be carried for long time intervals without any loss of accuracy and provides reliable numerical data pertinent to physical processes under resonant conditions. This renders the method highly useful in characterization of high-Q microwave radiators and energy compressors. Numerical results that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method are presented.

  18. A biological condition gradient model for historical assessment of estuarine habitat structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumchenia, Emily J; Pelletier, Marguerite C; Cicchetti, Giancarlo; Davies, Susan; Pesch, Carol E; Deacutis, Christopher F; Pryor, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are affected by ever-increasing natural and human pressures. Because the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics unique to estuarine ecosystems control the ways that biological resources respond to ecosystem stressors, we present a flexible and adaptable biological assessment method for estuaries. The biological condition gradient (BCG) is a scientific framework of biological response to increasing anthropogenic stress that is comprehensive and ecosystem based and evaluates environmental conditions and the status of ecosystem services in order to identify, communicate, and prioritize management action. Using existing data, we constructed the first estuarine BCG framework that examines changes in habitat structure through time. Working in a New England (U.S.) estuary with a long history of human influence, we developed an approach to define a reference level, which we described as a "minimally disturbed" range of conditions for the ecosystem, anchored by observations before 1850 AD. Like many estuaries in the U.S., the relative importance of environmental stressors changed over time, but even qualitative descriptions of the biological indicators' status provided useful information for defining condition levels. This BCG demonstrated that stressors rarely acted alone and that declines in one biological indicator influenced the declines of others. By documenting the biological responses to cumulative stressors, the BCG inherently suggests an ecosystem-based approach to management. Additionally, the BCG process initiates thinking over long time scales and can be used to inspire scientists, managers, and the public toward environmental action.

  19. Effect of boundary conditions on magnetocapacitance effect in a ring-type magnetoelectric structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juanjuan

    2017-12-01

    By considering the nonlinear magneto-elastic coupling relationships of magnetostrictive materials, an analytical model is proposed. The resonance frequencies can be accurately predicted by this theoretical model, and they are in good agreement with experimental data. Subsequently, the magnetocapacitance effect in a ring-type magnetoelectric (ME) structure with different boundary conditions is investigated, and it is found that various mechanical boundaries, the frequency, the magnetic field, the geometric size, and the interface bonding significantly affect the capacitance of the ME structure. Further, additional resonance frequencies can be predicted by considering appropriate imperfect interface bonding. Finally, the influence of an external force on the capacitance is studied. The result shows that an external force on the boundary changes the capacitance, but has only a weak influence on the resonance frequency.

  20. External conditions and structure development in the Norwegian electricity supply; Rammebetingelser og strukturutvikling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thommessen; Krefting; Greve; Lund

    1997-12-31

    In Norway, an act of 1996 implied a total reform of the taxation system for electricity suppliers. Publicly owned utilities are also subject to this act. The problem discussed in this report is whether energy political goals about fewer and larger units are weakened or strengthened because of today`s taxation rules. The taxation rules are considered only in relation to any structural changes. The external conditions that can affect the structural development are: (1) duties and licences, (2) concessionary rules, (3) regulation of network tariffs, (4) judicial problems of competition, (5) judicial problems of company. They are discussed in detail. The general conclusion is that the design and practice of public regulations strongly interfere with and affect the incentives and possibility for a restructuring of the power sector. 1 table

  1. Influence of the condition of the airfield pavement structures on the operation safety of aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesołowski Mariusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the airfield pavement is a set of layers, whose task is to take over and transfer loads from moving aircraft to a ground subsoil in a safety manner. Airfield pavements are designed for a specific period of operation, assuming the forecasted intensity and the structure of the air traffic. The safety of air operations executed by the aircraft on airfield pavements depends primarily on the condition of their structure’s load capacity. In order to assess the load capacity of airfield pavements, the method ACN-PCN, which was introduced by the International Civil Aviation Organization ICAO and according to which the load capacity of the airfield pavement is expressed with the PCN index, is applied.

  2. Tunable dynamic moduli of magnetic elastomers: from characterization by x-ray micro-computed tomography to mesoscopic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessot, Giorgio; Schümann, Malte; Gundermann, Thomas; Odenbach, Stefan; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2018-03-01

    Ferrogels and magnetorheological elastomers are composite materials obtained by embedding magnetic particles of mesoscopic size in a crosslinked polymeric matrix. They combine the reversible elastic deformability of polymeric materials with the high responsivity of ferrofluids to external magnetic fields. These materials stand out, for example, for significant magnetostriction as well as a pronounced increase of the elastic moduli in the presence of external magnetic fields. By means of x-ray micro-computed tomography, the position and size of each magnetic particle can be measured with a high degree of accuracy. We here use data extracted from real magnetoelastic samples as input for coarse-grained dipole-spring modeling and calculations to investigate internal restructuring, stiffening, and changes in the normal modes spectrum. More precisely, we assign to each particle a dipole moment proportional to its volume and set a randomized network of springs between them that mimics the behavior of the polymeric elastic matrix. Extending our previously developed methods, we compute the resulting structural changes in the systems as well as the frequency-dependent elastic moduli when magnetic interactions are turned on. Particularly, with increasing magnetization, we observe the formation of chain-like aggregates. Interestingly, the static elastic moduli can first show a slight decrease with growing amplitude of the magnetic interactions, before a pronounced increase appears upon the chain formation. The change of the dynamic moduli with increasing magnetization depends on the frequency and can even feature nonmonotonic behavior. Overall, we demonstrate how theory and experiments can complement each other to learn more about the dynamic behavior of this interesting class of materials.

  3. Specialists’ Meeting on Demonstration of Structural Integrity under Normal and Faulted Conditions. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on ''Demonstration of Structural Integrity under Normal and Faulted Conditions'' was held at Chester, United Kingdom on 3-5 June 1980. The meeting was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Past Reactors (IWGFR). Twenty-one participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the United States of America and two international organizations, CEC and IAEA, attended. The purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss methods for assessing the integrity of the LMFBR safety-related structures during normal and abnormal operation, especially in the presence of defects, and to recommend future development. The technical sessions were divided into four topical sessions as follows: 1. National Review Presentations on Demonstration of Structural Integrity; 2. Material Properties; 3. Structural Analysis; 4. Design Approaches and Assessment Experience. During the meeting papers were presented by the participants on behalf of their countries or organizations. Each presentation was followed by an open discussion in the subject covered by the paper and subsequently, session summaries were drafted. After the formal sessions were completed, a final discussion session was held and general conclusions and recommendations were reached by consensus. Session summaries, general conclusions and recommendations, national review papers presented during the first session as well as the agenda of the meeting and the list of participants are given

  4. Importance of initial buoyancy field on evolution of mantle thermal structure: Implications of surface boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Glišović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there has been significant progress in the seismic imaging of mantle heterogeneity, the outstanding issue that remains to be resolved is the unknown distribution of mantle temperature anomalies in the distant geological past that give rise to the present-day anomalies inferred by global tomography models. To address this question, we present 3-D convection models in compressible and self-gravitating mantle initialised by different hypothetical temperature patterns. A notable feature of our forward convection modelling is the use of self-consistent coupling of the motion of surface tectonic plates to the underlying mantle flow, without imposing prescribed surface velocities (i.e., plate-like boundary condition. As an approximation for the surface mechanical conditions before plate tectonics began to operate we employ the no-slip (rigid boundary condition. A rigid boundary condition demonstrates that the initial thermally-dominated structure is preserved, and its geographical location is fixed during the evolution of mantle flow. Considering the impact of different assumed surface boundary conditions (rigid and plate-like on the evolution of thermal heterogeneity in the mantle we suggest that the intrinsic buoyancy of seven superplumes is most-likely resolved in the tomographic images of present-day mantle thermal structure. Our convection simulations with a plate-like boundary condition reveal that the evolution of an initial cold anomaly beneath the Java-Indonesian trench system yields a long-term, stable pattern of thermal heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle that resembles the present-day Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs, especially below the Pacific. The evolution of subduction zones may be, however, influenced by the mantle-wide flow driven by deeply-rooted and long-lived superplumes since Archean times. These convection models also detect the intrinsic buoyancy of the Perm Anomaly that has been identified as a unique

  5. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    beam where the scattering and gradient light forces on the particle are balanced thus cre- ating a harmonic potential. A typical micron scale particle can be confined in a potential of ~ 150KBT using a 100 mW infrared laser. These methods, with sub-picoN forces and nanometer scale displacement resolution, enable the ...

  6. Mesoscopic Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Sowa, Artur

    2003-01-01

    This article is concerned with the existence, status and description of the so-called emergent phenomena believed to occur in certain principally planar electronic systems. In fact, two distinctly different if inseparable tasks are accomplished. First, a rigorous mathematical model is proposed of emergent character, which is conceptually bonded with Quantum Mechanics while apparently non-derivable from the many-body Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. I call the resulting conceptual framework the Mesos...

  7. Structure and work process in primary care and hospitalizations for sensitive conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleska Regina Machado Araujo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to investigate whether the characteristics of the structure of primary health units and the work process of primary care teams are associated with the number of hospitalizations for primary care sensitive conditions. METHODS In this ecological study, we have analyzed data of Brazilian municipalities related to sociodemographic characteristics, coverage of care programs, structure of primary health units, and work process of primary care teams. We have obtained the data from the first cycle of the Brazilian Program for Improving Access and Quality of the Primary Care, of the Department of Information Technology of the Brazilian Unified Health System, the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, and the United Nations Development Programme. The associations have been estimated using negative binomial regression coefficients (β and respective 95% confidence intervals, with a hierarchical approach in three levels (alpha = 5%. RESULTS In the adjusted analysis for the outcome in 2013, in the distal level, the coverage of the Bolsa Família Program (β = -0.001 and private insurance (β = -0.01 had a negative association, and the human development index (β = 1.13, the proportion of older adults (β = 0.05 and children under the age of five (β = 0.05, and the coverage of the Community Health Agent Strategy (β = 0.002 showed positive association with hospitalizations for primary care sensitive conditions. In the intermediate level, minimum hours (β = -0.14 and availability of vaccines (β = -0.16 showed a negative association, and availability of medications showed a positive association (β = 0.16. In the proximal level, only the variable of matrix support (β = 0.10 showed a positive association. The variables in the adjusted analysis of the number of hospitalizations for primary care sensitive conditions in 2014 presented the same association as in 2013. CONCLUSIONS The characteristics of

  8. Physical aging and structural recovery in a colloidal glass subjected to volume-fraction jump conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoguang; McKenna, Gregory B.

    2016-04-01

    Three important kinetic phenomena have been cataloged by Kovacs in the investigation of molecular glasses during structural recovery or physical aging. These are responses to temperature-jump histories referred to as intrinsic isotherms, asymmetry of approach, and memory effect. Here we use a thermosensitive polystyrene-poly (N -isopropylacrylamide)-poly (acrylic acid) core-shell particle-based dispersion as a colloidal model and by working at a constant number concentration of particles we use temperature changes to create volume-fraction changes. This imposes conditions similar to those defined by Kovacs on the colloidal system. We use creep experiments to probe the physical aging and structural recovery behavior of colloidal glasses in the Kovacs-type histories and compare the results with those seen in molecular glasses. We find that there are similarities in aging dynamics between molecular glasses and colloidal glasses, but differences also persist. For the intrinsic isotherms, the times teq needed for relaxing or evolving into the equilibrium (or stationary) state are relatively insensitive to the volume fraction and the values of teq are longer than the α -relaxation time τα at the same volume fraction. On the other hand, both of these times grow at least exponentially with decreasing temperature in molecular glasses. For the asymmetry of approach, similar nonlinear behavior is observed for both colloidal and molecular glasses. However, the equilibration time teq is the same for both volume-fraction up-jump and down-jump experiments, different from the finding in molecular glasses that it takes longer for the structure to evolve into equilibrium for the temperature up-jump condition than for the temperature down-jump condition. For the two-step volume-fraction jumps, a memory response is observed that is different from observations of structural recovery in two-step temperature histories in molecular glasses. The concentration dependence of the dynamics

  9. 77 FR 28533 - Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 737-800; Large Non-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ...-0499; Notice No. 25-12-01-SC] Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 737-800; Large Non-Structural Glass in... associated with the installation of large non-structural glass items in the cabin area of an executive... non-structural glass items in the cabin area of the executive interior occupied by passengers and crew...

  10. Effect of Alcohol Structure on the Optimum Condition for Novozym 435-Catalyzed Synthesis of Adipate Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Basyaruddin Abdul Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B, Novozym 435, was used as the biocatalyst in the esterification of adipic acid with four different isomers of butanol (n-butanol, sec-butanol, iso-butanol, and tert-butanol. Optimum conditions for the synthesis of adipate esters were obtained using response surface methodology approach with a four-factor-five-level central composite design concerning important reaction parameters which include time, temperature, substrate molar ratio, and amount of enzyme. Reactions under optimized conditions has yielded a high percentage of esterification (>96% for n-butanol, iso-butanol, and sec-butanol, indicating that extent of esterification is independent of the alcohol structure for primary and secondary alcohols at the optimum conditions. Minimum reaction time (135 min for achieving maximum ester yield was obtained for iso-butanol. The required time for attaining maximum yield and also the initial rates in the synthesis of di-n-butyl and di-sec-butyl adipate were nearly the same. Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B was also capable of esterifying tert-butanol with a maximum yield of 39.1%. The enzyme is highly efficient biocatalyst for the synthesis of adipate esters by offering a simple production process and a high esterification yield.

  11. Investigation of heat treatment conditions of structural material for blanket fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Takanori; Suzuki, Satoshi; Akiba, Masato; Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Sawai, Tomotsugu; Jitsukawa, Shiro

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents recent results of thermal hysteresis effects on ceramic breeder blanket structural material. Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAF) steel is the leading candidates for the first wall structural materials of breeding blankets. RAF steel demonstrates superior resistance to high dose neutron irradiation, because the steel has tempered martensite structure which contains the number of sink site for radiation defects. This microstructure obtained by two-step heat treatment, first is normalizing at temperature above 1200 K and the second is tempering at temperature below 1100 K. Recent study revealed the thermal hysteresis has significant impacts on the post-irradiation mechanical properties. The breeding blanket has complicated structure, which consists of tungsten armor and thin first wall with cooling pipe. The blanket fabrication requires some high temperature joining processes. Especially hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is examined as a near-net-shape fabrication process for this structure. The process consists of heating above 1300 K and isostatic pressing at the pressure above 150 MPa followed by tempering. Moreover ceramics pebbles are packed into blanket module and the module is to be seamed by welding followed by post weld heat treatment in the final assemble process. Therefore the final microstructural features of RAFs strongly depend on the blanket fabrication process. The objective of this work is to evaluate the effects of thermal hysteresis corresponding to blanket fabrication process on RAFs microstructure in order to establish appropriate blanket fabrication process. Japanese RAFs F82H (Fe-0.1C-8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.05Ta) was investigated by metallurgical method after isochronal heat treatment up to 1473 K simulating high temperature bonding process. Although F82H showed significant grain growth after conventional solid HIP conditions (1313 K x 2 hr.), this coarse grained microstructure was refined by the post HIP normalizing at

  12. Surface (glyco-)proteins: primary structure and crystallization under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, H.; Akca, E.; Schultz, N.; Karbach, G.; Schlott, B.; Debaerdemaeker, T.; De Clercq, J.-P.; König, H.

    2001-08-01

    The Archaea comprise microorganisms that live under environmental extremes, like high temperature, low pH value or high salt concentration. Their cells are often covered by a single layer of (glyco)protein subunits (S-layer) in hexagonal arrangement. In order to get further hints about the molecular mechanisms of protein stabilization we compared the primary and secondary structures of archaeal S-layer (glyco)proteins. We found an increase of charged amino acids in the S-layer proteins of the extreme thermophilic species compared to their mesophilic counterparts. Our data and those of other authors suggest that ionic interactions, e.g., salt bridges seem to be played a major role in protein stabilization at high temperatures. Despite the differences in the growth optima and the predominance of some amino acids the primary structures of S-layers revealed also a significant degree of identity between phylogenetically related archaea. These obervations indicate that protein sequences of S-layers have been conserved during the evolution from extremely thermophilic to mesophilic life. To support these findings the three-dimensional structure of the S-layer proteins has to be elucidated. Recently, we described the first successful crystallization of an extreme thermophilic surface(glyco)protein under microgravity conditions.

  13. Biomass Chars: The Effects of Pyrolysis Conditions on Their Morphology, Structure, Chemical Properties and Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamseddine Guizani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid char is a product of biomass pyrolysis. It contains a high proportion of carbon, and lower contents of H, O and minerals. This char can have different valorization pathways such as combustion for heat and power, gasification for Syngas production, activation for adsorption applications, or use as a soil amendment. The optimal recovery pathway of the char depends highly on its physical and chemical characteristics. In this study, different chars were prepared from beech wood particles under various pyrolysis operating conditions in an entrained flow reactor (500–1400 °C. Their structural, morphological, surface chemistry properties, as well as their chemical compositions, were determined using different analytical techniques, including elementary analysis, Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX, Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR, and Raman Spectroscopy. The biomass char reactivity was evaluated in air using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The yield, chemical composition, surface chemistry, structure, morphology and reactivity of the chars were highly affected by the pyrolysis temperature. In addition, some of these properties related to the char structure and chemical composition were found to be correlated to the char reactivity.

  14. Sexual health of Latino migrant day labourers under conditions of structural vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organista, Kurt C; Worby, Paula A; Quesada, James; Arreola, Sonya G; Kral, Alex H; Khoury, Sahar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the context of the sexual health of Latino migrant day labourers in the USA, challenges to sexual health and ways of coping, with attention to conditions of structural vulnerability permeating the lives of this unique Latino population. Given the limited information about this topic and population, ethnographic research employing in-depth semi-structured interviews with 51 labourers, recruited through purposive sampling in the San Francisco Bay Area, was utilised. The sexual health aspirations of the men are deeply embedded in the core value and practice of Latino familismo or, in this case, the central goal of securing a family headed by men as providers and present husbands/fathers. However, such goals are frequently thwarted by the poverty engendering work and prolonged separations from home that characterise predominantly undocumented day labour in the USA. Resulting goal frustration, combined with pent up sexual urges, often lead to sexual risk in spite of efforts to cope with challenges to sexual health. Unless community-, state- and national-level interventions are developed to mitigate the pronounced structural vulnerability of migrant day labourers, individual level interventions to promote sexual health, and decrease risk and distress, are likely to have diminishing returns.

  15. Variable speed limit strategies analysis with mesoscopic traffic flow model based on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Bin; Cao, Dan-Ni; Dang, Wen-Xiu; Zhang, Lin

    As a new cross-discipline, the complexity science has penetrated into every field of economy and society. With the arrival of big data, the research of the complexity science has reached its summit again. In recent years, it offers a new perspective for traffic control by using complex networks theory. The interaction course of various kinds of information in traffic system forms a huge complex system. A new mesoscopic traffic flow model is improved with variable speed limit (VSL), and the simulation process is designed, which is based on the complex networks theory combined with the proposed model. This paper studies effect of VSL on the dynamic traffic flow, and then analyzes the optimal control strategy of VSL in different network topologies. The conclusion of this research is meaningful to put forward some reasonable transportation plan and develop effective traffic management and control measures to help the department of traffic management.

  16. Whispering-gallery acoustic sensing: Characterization of mesoscopic films and scanning probe microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Andres H.; Li, Nan; Fernandez, Rodolfo; Wang, Xiaohua; Nordstrom, Richard; Padigi, S. K.

    2011-09-01

    Full understanding of the physics underlying the striking changes in viscoelasticity, relaxation time, and phase transitions that mesoscopic fluid-like films undergo at solid-liquid interfaces, or under confinement between two sliding solid boundaries, constitutes one of the major challenges in condensed matter physics. Their role in the imaging process of solid substrates by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is also currently controversial. Aiming at improving the reliability and versatility of instrumentation dedicated to characterize mesoscopic films, a noninvasive whispering-gallery acoustic sensing (WGAS) technique is introduced; its application as feedback control in SPM is also demonstrated. To illustrate its working principle and potential merits, WGAS has been integrated into a SPM that uses a sharp tip attached to an electrically driven 32-kHz piezoelectric tuning fork (TF), the latter also tighten to the operating microscope's frame. Such TF-based SPMs typically monitor the TF's state of motion by electrical means, hence subjected to the effects caused by the inherent capacitance of the device (i.e., electrical resonance differing from the probe's mechanical resonance). Instead, the novelty of WGAS resides in exploiting the already existent microscope's frame as an acoustic cavity (its few centimeter-sized perimeter closely matching the operating acoustic wavelength) where standing-waves (generated by the nanometer-sized oscillations of the TF's tines) are sensitively detected by an acoustic transducer (the latter judiciously placed around the microscope's frame perimeter for attaining maximum detection). This way, WGAS is able to remote monitoring, via acoustic means, the nanometer-sized amplitude motion of the TF's tines. (This remote-detection method resembles the ability to hear faint, but still clear, levels of sound at the galleries of a cathedral, despite the extraordinary distance location of the sound source.) In applications aiming at

  17. Semiclassical approach to mesoscopic systems classical trajectory correlations and wave interference

    CERN Document Server

    Waltner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This volume describes mesoscopic systems with classically chaotic dynamics using semiclassical methods which combine elements of classical dynamics and quantum interference effects. Experiments and numerical studies show that Random Matrix Theory (RMT) explains physical properties of these systems well. This was conjectured more than 25 years ago by Bohigas, Giannoni and Schmit for the spectral properties. Since then, it has been a challenge to understand this connection analytically.  The author offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. He extends previous semiclassical approaches that treated spectral and conductance properties. He shows that RMT results can in general only be obtained semiclassically when taking into account classical configurations not considered previously, for example those containing multiply traversed periodic orbits. Furthermore, semiclassics is capable of describing effects beyond RMT. In this context he studies the effect of a non-zero Eh...

  18. Band and Correlated Insulators of Cold Fermions in a Mesoscopic Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrat, Martin; Grišins, Pjotrs; Husmann, Dominik; Häusler, Samuel; Corman, Laura; Giamarchi, Thierry; Brantut, Jean-Philippe; Esslinger, Tilman

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the transport properties of neutral, fermionic atoms passing through a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. The lattice is realized by projecting individually controlled, thin optical barriers on top of a ballistic conductor. Building an increasingly longer lattice, one site after another, we observe and characterize the emergence of a band insulating phase, demonstrating control over quantum-coherent transport. We explore the influence of atom-atom interactions and show that the insulating state persists as contact interactions are tuned from moderately to strongly attractive. Using bosonization and classical Monte Carlo simulations, we analyze such a model of interacting fermions and find good qualitative agreement with the data. The robustness of the insulating state supports the existence of a Luther-Emery liquid in the one-dimensional wire. Our work realizes a tunable, site-controlled lattice Fermi gas strongly coupled to reservoirs, which is an ideal test bed for nonequilibrium many-body physics.

  19. p-type Mesoscopic nickel oxide/organometallic perovskite heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo-Chin; Jeng, Jun-Yuan; Shen, Po-Shen; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Tsai, Cheng-Hung; Chao, Tzu-Yang; Hsu, Hsu-Cheng; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chen, Peter; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Wen, Ten-Chin

    2014-04-23

    In this article, we present a new paradigm for organometallic hybrid perovskite solar cell using NiO inorganic metal oxide nanocrystalline as p-type electrode material and realized the first mesoscopic NiO/perovskite/[6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) heterojunction photovoltaic device. The photo-induced transient absorption spectroscopy results verified that the architecture is an effective p-type sensitized junction, which is the first inorganic p-type, metal oxide contact material for perovskite-based solar cell. Power conversion efficiency of 9.51% was achieved under AM 1.5 G illumination, which significantly surpassed the reported conventional p-type dye-sensitized solar cells. The replacement of the organic hole transport materials by a p-type metal oxide has the advantages to provide robust device architecture for further development of all-inorganic perovskite-based thin-film solar cells and tandem photovoltaics.

  20. Modeling of electrical and mesoscopic circuits at quantum nanoscale from heat momentum operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2018-04-01

    We develop a new method to study electrical circuits at quantum nanoscale by introducing a heat momentum operator which reproduces quantum effects similar to those obtained in Suykens's nonlocal-in-time kinetic energy approach for the case of reversible motion. The series expansion of the heat momentum operator is similar to the momentum operator obtained in the framework of minimal length phenomenologies characterized by the deformation of Heisenberg algebra. The quantization of both LC and mesoscopic circuits revealed a number of motivating features like the emergence of a generalized uncertainty relation and a minimal charge similar to those obtained in the framework of minimal length theories. Additional features were obtained and discussed accordingly.

  1. Dynamics of vortex-antivortex creation and annihilation in current-driven mesoscopic superconducting squares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-Meng; Zha, Guo-Qiao

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory, we study the dynamics of vortex-antivortex (V-Av) pairs in a mesoscopic superconducting square with a small hole under applied bias currents. For the sample with a centered hole, a V-Av pair can nucleate at the hole edges and moves in opposite directions perpendicular to applied constant DC drive. The influence of the external magnetic field on the (anti)vortex velocity and the lifetime of V-Av pairs is mainly investigated. Different modes in the dynamical process of the V-Av collision and annihilation are identified. Moreover, in the case when the hole is displaced from the center of the square, the V-Av dynamics behaves quite differently from the symmetric case due to the shift of the V-Av creation point.

  2. Probabilistic Fatigue Life Prediction of Bridge Cables Based on Multiscaling and Mesoscopic Fracture Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxiang Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue fracture of bridge stay-cables is usually a multiscale process as the crack grows from micro-scale to macro-scale. Such a process, however, is highly uncertain. In order to make a rational prediction of the residual life of bridge cables, a probabilistic fatigue approach is proposed, based on a comprehensive vehicle load model, finite element analysis and multiscaling and mesoscopic fracture mechanics. Uncertainties in both material properties and external loads are considered. The proposed method is demonstrated through the fatigue life prediction of cables of the Runyang Cable-Stayed Bridge in China, and it is found that cables along the bridge spans may have significantly different fatigue lives, and due to the variability, some of them may have shorter lives than those as expected from the design.

  3. Mesoscopic Metal-Insulator Transition at Ferroelastic Domain Walls in VO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith M [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Kolmakov, Andrei [ORNL; Luk' yanchuk, Prof. Igor A. [University of Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens, France; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; Shelton Jr, William Allison [ORNL; Strelcov, Evgheni [Southern Illinois University; Tselev, Alexander [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The novel phenomena induced by symmetry breaking at homointerfaces between ferroic variants in ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials have attracted recently much attention. Using variable temperature scanning microwave microscopy, we demonstrate the mesoscopic strain-induced metal-insulator phase transitions in the vicinity of ferroelastic domain walls in the semiconductive VO2 that nucleated at temperatures as much as 10-12 C below bulk transition, resulting in the formation of conductive channels in the material. Density functional theory is used to rationalize the process low activation energy. This behavior, linked to the strain inhomogeneity inherent in ferroelastic materials, can strongly affect interpretation of phase-transition studies in VO2 and similar materials with symmetry-lowering transitions, and can also be used to enable new generations of electronic devices though strain engineering of conductive and semiconductive regions.

  4. Analysing improvements to on-street public transport systems: a mesoscopic model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvardson, Jesper Bláfoss; Kornerup Jensen, Jonas; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2017-01-01

    Light rail transit and bus rapid transit have shown to be efficient and cost-effective in improving public transport systems in cities around the world. As these systems comprise various elements, which can be tailored to any given setting, e.g. pre-board fare-collection, holding strategies...... a mesoscopic model which makes it possible to evaluate public transport operations in details, including dwell times, intelligent traffic signal timings and holding strategies while modelling impacts from other traffic using statistical distributional data thereby ensuring simplicity in use and fast...... and other advanced public transport systems (APTS), the attractiveness of such systems depends heavily on their implementation. In the early planning stage it is advantageous to deploy simple and transparent models to evaluate possible ways of implementation. For this purpose, the present study develops...

  5. Monazite-type ceramics for conditioning of minor actinides. Structural characterization and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babelot, Carole

    2013-07-01

    . Structural and morphological characteristics (using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM)) combined with physical and thermal properties of samples (using thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and dilatometry) are realized in order to study the behavior of monazite-type powder and pellets. The access to short-range-order spectroscopy (time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS)) permits to understand the structure of ceramic waste forms at the molecular level. La-monazite matrices being doped with Eu (III) (as a non-radioactive chemical homologue for Am (III)) and Cm (III), TRLFS is used to explore the local structural environment of Eu and Cm within the monazite crystal structure. Eu (III) and Cm (III) are substituted on the La site of LaPO{sub 4}. The single site of Cm (III) is found in four slightly different environments which is assumed to be due to a difference in the four La sites within a LaPO4 unit cell. Structural parameters of the Eu (III) species were also analyzed by EXAFS. The nearest neighbors of Eu (III) are modeled as 9.5 oxygen atoms (N{sub O1} = 4 at r(EuO1) = 2.37 Aa, N{sub O2} = 4 at r(Eu-O2) = 2.53 Aa, and N{sub O3} = 1.5 at r(Eu-O3) = 2.83 Aa). An essential parameter that describes the stability of the host phases is their dissolution rate obtained under conditions of relevance for final repositories. In this context, a set-up is developed and tested on crushed pellets. Normalized weight losses of lanthanumphosphates and europium-doped lanthanum-phosphates, measured in acidic media at 90 C, are interpreted and compared against the previous findings from the literature. The normalized dissolution rate for La and Eu within (La, Eu)PO{sub 4} is between 1.10{sup -5} and 1.10{sup -4} g.m{sup -2}.d{sup -1}, whereas the rate of Na, Cs and Sr in phosphate glass at room temperature in deionized water is about 1.10{sup -2} g.m{sup -2}.d{sup -1}. Another

  6. Synthesis, Structure, Characterization, and Decomposition of Nickel Dithiocarbamates: Effect of Precursor Structure and Processing Conditions on Solid-State Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Kulis, Michael J.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Duffy, Norman V.; Hoops, Michael D.; Gorse, Elizabeth; Fanwick, Philip E.; Masnovi, John; Cowen, Jonathan E.; Dominey, Raymond N.

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal X-ray structures of four nickel dithiocarbamate complexes, the homoleptic mixed-organic bis-dithiocarbamates Ni[S2CN(isopropyl)(benzyl)]2, Ni[S2CN(ethyl)(n-butyl)]2, and Ni[S2CN(phenyl)(benzyl)]2, as well as the heteroleptic mixed-ligand complex NiCl[P(phenyl)3][(S2CN(phenyl)(benzyl)], were determined. Synthetic, spectroscopic, structural, thermal, and sulfide materials studies are discussed in light of prior literature. The spectroscopic results are routine. A slightly distorted square-planar nickel coordination environment was observed for all four complexes. The organic residues adopt conformations to minimize steric interactions. Steric effects also may determine puckering, if any, about the nickel and nitrogen atoms, both of which are planar or nearly so. A trans-influence affects the Ni-S bond distances. Nitrogen atoms interact with the CS2 carbons with a bond order of about 1.5, and the other substituents on nitrogen display transoid conformations. There are no strong intermolecular interactions, consistent with prior observations of the volatility of nickel dithiocarbamate complexes. Thermogravimetric analysis of the homoleptic species under inert atmosphere is consistent with production of 1:1 nickel sulfide phases. Thermolysis of nickel dithiocarbamates under flowing nitrogen produced hexagonal or -NiS as the major phase; thermolysis under flowing forming gas produced millerite (-NiS) at 300 C, godlevskite (Ni9S8) at 325 and 350 C, and heazlewoodite (Ni3S2) at 400 and 450 C. Failure to exclude oxygen results in production of nickel oxide. Nickel sulfide phases produced seem to be primarily influenced by processing conditions, in agreement with prior literature. Nickel dithiocarbamate complexes demonstrate significant promise to serve as single-source precursors to nickel sulfides, a quite interesting family of materials with numerous potential applications.

  7. Evolution of self-organization in nano-structured PVD coatings under extreme tribological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox-Rabinovich, G., E-mail: gfox@mcmaster.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Kovalev, A. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Aguirre, M.H. [Laboratory of Advanced Microscopy, Institute of Nanoscience of Aragón, University of Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Yamamoto, K. [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel Ltd, 1-5-5 Takatsuda-dai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271, Hyogo (Japan); Veldhuis, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Gershman, I. [All-Russian Railway Research Institute, 10 Third Mytishchinskaya Street, Moscow 29851 (Russian Federation); Rashkovskiy, A. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Endrino, J.L. [Albengoa Research, Energia Solar 1, Palmas Altas, Seville 41014 (Spain); Beake, B. [Micro Materials Limited, Willow House, Yale Business Village, Ellice Way, Wrexham LL13 7YL (United Kingdom); Dosbaeva, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Wainstein, D. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Yuan, Junifeng; Bunting, J.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • The evolution of self-organization under extreme frictional conditions has been studied. • Comprehensive characterization of the tribo-films was made using various surface analytical techniques. • During the running-in stage, mullite tribo-ceramics predominate on the surface of the nano-multilayer coating, establishing a functional hierarchy within the layer of tribo-films. • It is possible to control tribo-film evolution during self-organization by means of an increase in structural complexity and the non-equilibrium state of the surface engineered layer. - Abstract: The evolution of the self-organization process where dissipative structures are formed under the extreme frictional conditions associated with high performance dry machining of hardened steels has been studied in detail. The emphasis was on the progressive studies of surface transformations within multilayer and monolayer TiAlCrSiYN-based PVD coatings during the running-in stage of wear when self-organization process occurs. The coating layer was characterized by high resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). It is shown that the nano-multilayer coating possesses higher non-equilibrium structure in comparison to the monolayer. Comprehensive studies of the tribo-films (dissipative structures) formed on the friction surface were made using a number of advanced surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). The data obtained for the tribo-films was combined with the detailed TEM studies of the structural and phase transformations within the underlying coating layer. This data was related to the micro-mechanical characteristics of the coating layer and its wear resistance. It was demonstrated that the evolution of the self-organization process is strongly controlled by the characteristics of the tribo-films formed at different stages of the wear process. Within running-in stage (after

  8. Improvement of the Assignment Methodology of the Approach Embankment Design to Highway Structures in Difficult Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyy, Y.; Kuzakhmetova, E.; Fazilova, Z.; Tsukanova, O.

    2018-03-01

    Design issues of junction of bridges and overhead road with approach embankment are studied. The reasons for the formation of deformations in the road structure are indicated. Activities to ensure sustainability and acceleration of the shrinkage of a weak subgrade approach embankment are listed. The necessity of taking into account the man-made impact of the approach embankment on the subgrade behavior is proved. Modern stabilizing agents to improve the properties of used soils in the embankment and the subgrade are suggested. Clarified methodology for determining an active zone of compression in the subgrade under load from the weight of the embankment is described. As an additional condition to the existing methodology for establishing the lower bound of the active zone of compression it is offered to accept the accuracy of evaluation of soil compressibility and determine shrinkage.

  9. Benchmarking Close-range Structure from Motion 3D Reconstruction Software under Varying Capturing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Ivan Adriyanov; Madsen, Claus B.

    2016-01-01

    . In this paper we analyse the state of the art of these software applications, by comparing the resultant 3D meshes qualitatively and quantitatively. We propose a number of testing scenarios using different lighting conditions, camera positions and image acquisition methods for the best in-depth analysis......Structure from Motion 3D reconstruction has become widely used in recent years in a number of fields such as industrial surface in- inspection, archeology, cultural heritage preservation and geomapping. A number of software solutions have been released using variations of this technique...... and discuss the results, the overall performance and the problems present in each software. We employ distance and roughness metrics for evaluating the final reconstruction results....

  10. Structure and frame conditions for power exchange agreements with the Continent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedswang, R.

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper relates to the obtained agreements between Norway and the Continent on the exchange of electric power. The paper discusses the structure and frame conditions for the ELSAM, PreussenElektra, SEP and EuroStrom agreements. ELSAM covers the agreement with Denmark which started on 27 July 1995. The PreussenElektra agreement includes the exchange of power with the German PreussenElektra AG which starts on 1 October 1998. SEP covers the agreement with the Netherlands which is planned to start on 1 October 2001, and the EuroStrom agreement with the German EST EuroStrom Trading GmbH in Hamburg which is planned to start on 1 January 2003. 8 figs

  11. Mesoporous Structure Control of Silica in Room-Temperature Synthesis under Basic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Wook Seo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of mesoporous silica, such as continuous cubic-phase MCM-48, hexagonal-phase MCM-41, and layer-phase spherical silica particles, have been synthesized at room temperature using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a surfactant, ethanol as a cosurfactant, tetraethyl orthosilicate as a silica precursor, and ammonia as a condensation agent. Special care must be taken both in the filtering of the resultant solid products and in the drying process. In the drying process, further condensation of the silica after filtering was induced. As the surfactant and cosurfactant concentrations in the reaction mixture increased and the NH3 concentration decreased, under given conditions, continuous cubic MCM-48 and layered silica became the dominant phases. A cooperative synthesis mechanism, in which both the surfactant and silica were involved in the formation of mesoporous structures, provided a good explanation of the experimental results.

  12. Performance of diagonal control structures at different operating conditions for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Maria; Husar, Attila; Feroldi, Diego; Riera, Jordi [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C. Llorens i Artigas 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-08-25

    This work is focused on the selection of operating conditions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. It analyses efficiency and controllability aspects, which change from one operating point to another. Specifically, several operating points that deliver the same amount of net power are compared, and the comparison is done at different net power levels. The study is based on a complex non-linear model, which has been linearised at the selected operating points. Different linear analysis tools are applied to the linear models and results show important controllability differences between operating points. The performance of diagonal control structures with PI controllers at different operating points is also studied. A method for the tuning of the controllers is proposed and applied. The behaviour of the controlled system is simulated with the non-linear model. Conclusions indicate a possible trade-off between controllability and optimisation of hydrogen consumption. (author)

  13. Conditions and factors of structural modernization of a regional industrial system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Aleksandrovna Romanova

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes various points of view on understanding the industry as a system. It is shown that in a globalized economy the creation of industries that are closely related to each other, lead to an erosion of their borders. This allowed the use of the emerging new vision of macroindustry creation, the so-called concept of "strategic re-engineering", as the basis for the concept of the new industrial system proposed in this paper. Conditions of formation of a new industrial system are illustrated in relation to the economy of one of the largest industrial regions of Russia - the Ural Federal District. Among them are: investment climate, structural imbalance, damped trend of post-crisis reconstruction, failure to involve the modernization component of the implemented economic growth model etc. Determining factor to form a new industrial system, which is the industrial policy, was defined. It was confirmed on specific examples that for the upgrading of the industrial system of the Urals the appropriate tools are such as industrial policy selection of "backbone" companies at the regional level and formation of not only federal but also regional technological platforms. The expediency of forming clusters to be used as a tool for determining the formation of a new industrial system has been substantiated. A special significance for the economy not only of the Urals but the country as a whole, formation of the rare earth cluster was displayed. A draft of the Federal Law "On the regional industrial policy in Russia" was proposed. It is proven that industrial policy based on a common legal framework in the presence of "external" conditions of modernization will be a major factor in the structural modernization of the industrial system of a region.

  14. Deterioration of mechanical properties of high strength structural steel S460N under transient state fire condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Xuhong; Bijlaard, Frans S.K.; Kolstein, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mechanical properties of S460N under transient state fire condition are obtained. ► Elevated-temperature mechanical properties of steels are dependent on steel grades. ► No design standard is applicable to HSS S460N under transient state fire condition. ► Specific statements on various HSS in fire should be proposed in design standards. ► Research results offer accurate material property for structural design engineers. -- Abstract: 911 World Trade Centre Tragedy put fire safety of constructional steel structures into question. Since then, more and more research attention has been paid to the elevated-temperature mechanical properties of structural steels, which is a critical basis of evaluating the fire performance of steel structures. In the literature the available mechanical properties of structural steels under fire conditions were mainly obtained from steady state test method, as steady state test method is easier to perform than transient state test method and offers stress–strain curves directly. However, the transient state fire condition is considered to be more realistic to represent the real condition when constructions are exposed to fire. In order to reveal the deterioration of mechanical properties of the commonly used high strength structural steel S460N under transient state fire condition, tensile tests were conducted under various constant stress levels up to 800 MPa. The reduction factors of elastic modulus, yield and ultimate strengths of S460N under transient state fire condition were obtained and compared with current leading design standards and available literature. The application of such accurate elevated-temperature mechanical properties reduction factors of S460N can ensure a safe fire-resistance design and evaluation of steel structures with high strength steel S460N under transient state fire condition. This experimental study also supports other relative research on fire performance of steel structures with

  15. Structural Health Monitoring of Steel Pipes under Different Boundary Conditions and Choice of Signal Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rais Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave technique is an efficient method for monitoring structural integrity by detecting and forecasting possible damages in distributed pipe networks. Efficient detection depends on appropriate selection of guided wave modes as well as signal processing techniques. Fourier analysis and wavelet analysis are two popular signal processing techniques that provide a flexible set of tools for solving various fundamental problems in science and engineering. In this paper, effective ways of using Fourier and Wavelet analyses on guided wave signals for detecting defects in steel pipes are discussed for different boundary conditions. This research investigates the effectiveness of Fourier transforms and Wavelet analysis in detecting defects in steel pipes. Cylindrical Guided waves are generated by piezo-electric transducers and propagated through the pipe wall boundaries in a pitch-catch system. Fourier transforms of received signals give information regarding the propagating guided wave modes which helps in detecting defects by selecting appropriate modes that are affected by the presence of defects. Continuous wavelet coefficients are found to be sensitive to defects. Several types of mother wavelet functions such as Daubechies, Symlet, and Meyer have been used for the continuous wavelet transform to investigate the most suitable wavelet function for defect detection. This research also investigates the effect of different boundary conditions on wavelet transforms for different mother wavelet functions.

  16. Aspects of structural health and condition monitoring of offshore wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, I.; Dervilis, N.; Papatheou, E.; Maguire, A. E.; Worden, K.

    2015-01-01

    Wind power has expanded significantly over the past years, although reliability of wind turbine systems, especially of offshore wind turbines, has been many times unsatisfactory in the past. Wind turbine failures are equivalent to crucial financial losses. Therefore, creating and applying strategies that improve the reliability of their components is important for a successful implementation of such systems. Structural health monitoring (SHM) addresses these problems through the monitoring of parameters indicative of the state of the structure examined. Condition monitoring (CM), on the other hand, can be seen as a specialized area of the SHM community that aims at damage detection of, particularly, rotating machinery. The paper is divided into two parts: in the first part, advanced signal processing and machine learning methods are discussed for SHM and CM on wind turbine gearbox and blade damage detection examples. In the second part, an initial exploration of supervisor control and data acquisition systems data of an offshore wind farm is presented, and data-driven approaches are proposed for detecting abnormal behaviour of wind turbines. It is shown that the advanced signal processing methods discussed are effective and that it is important to adopt these SHM strategies in the wind energy sector. PMID:25583864

  17. Structural safety analysis based on seismic service conditions for butterfly valves in a nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Uk; Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Lee, Myeong-Gon; Lee, Kwon-Hee; Han, Seung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The structural integrity of valves that are used to control cooling waters in the primary coolant loop that prevents boiling within the reactor in a nuclear power plant must be capable of withstanding earthquakes or other dangerous situations. In this study, numerical analyses using a finite element method, that is, static and dynamic analyses according to the rigid or flexible characteristics of the dynamic properties of a 200A butterfly valve, were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. An experimental vibration test was also carried out in order to verify the results from the modal analysis, in which a validated finite element model was obtained via a model-updating method that considers changes in the in situ experimental data. By using a validated finite element model, the equivalent static load under SSE conditions stipulated by the KEPIC MFA gave a stress of 135 MPa that occurred at the connections of the stem and body. A larger stress of 183 MPa was induced when we used a CQC method with a design response spectrum that uses 2% damping ratio. These values were lower than the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and, therefore, its structural safety met the KEPIC MFA requirements.

  18. Structure of a Novel Enzyme That Catalyzes Acyl Transfer to Alcohols in Aqueous Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, I.; Soltis, M.; Saldajeno, M.; Ganshaw, G.; Sala, R.; Weyler, W.; Cervin, M.A.; Whited, G.; Bott, R.

    2009-06-03

    The unusual architecture of the enzyme (MsAcT) isolated from Mycobacterium smegmatis forms the mechanistic basis for favoring alcoholysis over hydrolysis in water. Unlike hydrolases that perform alcoholysis only under anhydrous conditions, MsAcT demonstrates alcoholysis in substantially aqueous media and, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, has a perhydrolysis:hydrolysis ratio 50-fold greater than that of the best lipase tested. The crystal structures of the apoenzyme and an inhibitor-bound form have been determined to 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. MsAcT is an octamer in the asymmetric unit and forms a tightly associated aggregate in solution. Relative to other structurally similar monomers, MsAcT contains several insertions that contribute to the oligomerization and greatly restrict the shape of the active site, thereby limiting its accessibility. These properties create an environment by which MsAcT can catalyze transesterification reactions in an aqueous medium and suggests how a serine hydrolase can be engineered to be an efficient acyltransferase.

  19. Diamonds on Diamond: structural studies at extreme conditions on the Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M I

    2015-03-06

    Extreme conditions (EC) research investigates how the structures and physical and chemical properties of materials change when subjected to extremes of pressure and temperature. Pressures in excess of one million times atmospheric pressure can be achieved using a diamond anvil cell, and, in combination with high-energy, micro-focused radiation from a third-generation synchrotron such as Diamond, detailed structural information can be obtained using either powder or single-crystal diffraction techniques. Here, I summarize some of the research drivers behind international EC research, and then briefly describe the techniques by which high-quality diffraction data are obtained. I then highlight the breadth of EC research possible on Diamond by summarizing four examples from work conducted on the I15 and I19 beamlines, including a study which resulted in the first research paper from Diamond. Finally, I look to the future, and speculate as to the type of EC research might be conducted at Diamond over the next 10 years. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Norwegian general practitioners' collaboration with municipal care providers - a qualitative study of structural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steihaug, Sissel; Paulsen, Bård; Melby, Line

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the structural mechanisms that facilitate or counteract collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and other providers of municipal healthcare. Good collaboration between these actors is crucial for high-quality care, especially for persons in need of coordinated services. The study is based on semistructured interviews with 12 healthcare providers in four Norwegian municipalities: four GPs, six nurses and two physiotherapists. GPs are key collaborating partners in the healthcare system. Their ability to collaborate is affected by a number of structural conditions. Mostly, this leads to GPs being too little involved in potential collaborative efforts: (i) individual GPs prioritize with whom they want to collaborate among many possible collaborative partners, (ii) inter-municipal constraints hamper GPs in contacting collaboration partners and (iii) GPs fall outside the hospital-municipality collaboration. We argue a common leadership for primary care services is needed. Furthermore, inter-professional work must be a central focus in the planning of primary care services. However, a dedicated staff, sufficient resources, adequate time and proper meeting places are needed to accomplish good collaboration.

  1. Implication of changing loading conditions on structural health monitoring utilising guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohabuth, Munawwar; Kotousov, Andrei; Ng, Ching-Tai; Rose, L. R. Francis

    2018-02-01

    Structural health monitoring systems based on guided waves typically utilise a network of embedded or permanently attached sensors, allowing for the continuous detection of damage remote from a sensor location. The presence of damage is often diagnosed by analysing the residual signals from the structure after subtracting damage-free reference data. However, variations in environmental and operational conditions such as temperature, humidity, applied or thermally-induced stresses affect the measured residuals. A previously developed acoustoelastic formulation is here extended and employed as the basis for a simplified analytical model to estimate the effect of applied or thermally-induced stresses on the propagation characteristics of the fundamental Lamb wave modes. It is noted that there are special combinations of frequency, biaxial stress ratio and direction of wave propagation for which there is no change in the phase velocity of the fundamental anti-symmetric mode. The implication of these results in devising effective strategies to mitigate the effect of stress induced variations in guided-wave damage diagnostics is briefly discussed.

  2. A Deep-Structured Conditional Random Field Model for Object Silhouette Tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Shafiee

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce a deep-structured conditional random field (DS-CRF model for the purpose of state-based object silhouette tracking. The proposed DS-CRF model consists of a series of state layers, where each state layer spatially characterizes the object silhouette at a particular point in time. The interactions between adjacent state layers are established by inter-layer connectivity dynamically determined based on inter-frame optical flow. By incorporate both spatial and temporal context in a dynamic fashion within such a deep-structured probabilistic graphical model, the proposed DS-CRF model allows us to develop a framework that can accurately and efficiently track object silhouettes that can change greatly over time, as well as under different situations such as occlusion and multiple targets within the scene. Experiment results using video surveillance datasets containing different scenarios such as occlusion and multiple targets showed that the proposed DS-CRF approach provides strong object silhouette tracking performance when compared to baseline methods such as mean-shift tracking, as well as state-of-the-art methods such as context tracking and boosted particle filtering.

  3. Heat transfer and convective structure of evaporating films under pressure-modulated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pons, Juan Carlos; Hermanson, James; Allen, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    The interfacial stability, convective structure, and evaporation rate of upward-facing, thin liquid films were studied experimentally. Dichloromethane films approximately 2 mm thick were subjected to impulsive, time-varying superheating. The films resided on a temperature controlled, copper surface in a closed, initially degassed test chamber. Superheating was achieved by modulating the pressure of the saturated pure vapor in the test chamber. The dynamic film thickness was measured at multiple points using ultrasound, and the convective structure information was visualized by schlieren imaging. Two distinct raises in heat transfer rate under unsteady conditions were observed. The first transition appears to be associated with conduction within the film only; the second, to a change in the pattern of convection within the film. Different pressure-modulation cycles were studied to capture one or both of the observed rises in heat transfer. The total film thickness change over multiple cycles, as indicated by ultrasound, allowed determination of the total heat rejected into the evaporating films. Results suggest that there are cycle combinations that lead to an elevation in the average rate of heat transfer compared to films undergoing quasi-steady evaporation. This work was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Cooperative Agreement NNX09AL02G.

  4. The Structural Properties and Stability of Monoclonal Antibodies at Freezing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevozchikova, Tatiana; Zarraga, Isidro; Scherer, Thomas; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    2013-03-01

    Monoclonal Antibodies (MAb) have become a crucial therapeutic agent in a number of anti-cancer treatments. Due to the inherent unstable nature of proteins in an aqueous formulation, a freeze-drying method has been developed to maintain long-term stability of biotherapeutics. The microstructural changes in Mabs during freezing, however, remain not fully described, and it was proposed that the formed morphology of freeze drying samples could affect the final product quality after reconstitution. Furthermore, it is well known that proteins tend to aggregate during the freezing process if a careful processing procedure is not formulated. Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a powerful tool to investigate the structural properties and interactions of Mabs during various stages of lyophilization in situ. Here we present the SANS results of freeze-thaw studies on two MAbs at several different freezing temperatures. While the chosen proteins share a significant sequence homology, their freezing properties are found to be strikingly distinctive. We also show the effect of excipients, concentration and quenching speed on the final morphology of the frozen samples. These findings provide critical information for more effective lyophilization schemes for therapeutic proteins, as well as increase our understanding on structural properties of proteins under cryogenic conditions.

  5. Non-Markovian decay and lasing condition in an optical microcavity coupled to a structured reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    The decay dynamics of the classical electromagnetic field in a leaky optical resonator supporting a single mode coupled to a structured continuum of modes (reservoir) is theoretically investigated, and the issue of threshold condition for lasing in presence of an inverted medium is comprehensively addressed. Specific analytical results are given for a single-mode microcavity resonantly coupled to a coupled resonator optical waveguide, which supports a band of continuous modes acting as decay channels. For weak coupling, the usual exponential Weisskopf-Wigner (Markovian) decay of the field in the bare resonator is found, and the threshold for lasing increases linearly with the coupling strength. As the coupling between the microcavity and the structured reservoir increases, the field decay in the passive cavity shows nonexponential features, and correspondingly the threshold for lasing ceases to increase, reaching a maximum and then starting to decrease as the coupling strength is further increased. A singular behavior for the 'laser phase transition', which is a clear signature of strong non-Markovian dynamics, is found at critical values of the coupling between the microcavity and the reservoir

  6. Perturbation of the Secondary Structure of the Scrapie Prion Protein Under Conditions that Alter Infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasset, Maria; Baldwin, Michael A.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) generates PrP 27-30, which polymerizes into amyloid. By attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, PrP 27-30 polymers contained 54% β-sheet, 25% α-helix, 10% turns, and 11% random coil; dispersion into detergent-lipid-protein-complexes preserved infectivity and secondary structure. Almost 60% of the β-sheet was low-frequency infrared-absorbing, reflecting intermolecular aggregation. Decreased low-frequency β-sheet and increased turn content were found after SDS/PAGE, which disassembled the amyloid polymers, denatured PrP 27-30, and diminished scrapie infectivity. Acid-induced transitions were reversible, whereas alkali produced an irreversible transition centered at pH 10 under conditions that diminished infectivity. Whether PrPSc synthesis involves a transition in the secondary structure of one or more domains of the cellular prion protein from α-helical, random coil, or turn into β-sheet remains to be established.

  7. Aspects of structural health and condition monitoring of offshore wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, I; Dervilis, N; Papatheou, E; Maguire, A E; Worden, K

    2015-02-28

    Wind power has expanded significantly over the past years, although reliability of wind turbine systems, especially of offshore wind turbines, has been many times unsatisfactory in the past. Wind turbine failures are equivalent to crucial financial losses. Therefore, creating and applying strategies that improve the reliability of their components is important for a successful implementation of such systems. Structural health monitoring (SHM) addresses these problems through the monitoring of parameters indicative of the state of the structure examined. Condition monitoring (CM), on the other hand, can be seen as a specialized area of the SHM community that aims at damage detection of, particularly, rotating machinery. The paper is divided into two parts: in the first part, advanced signal processing and machine learning methods are discussed for SHM and CM on wind turbine gearbox and blade damage detection examples. In the second part, an initial exploration of supervisor control and data acquisition systems data of an offshore wind farm is presented, and data-driven approaches are proposed for detecting abnormal behaviour of wind turbines. It is shown that the advanced signal processing methods discussed are effective and that it is important to adopt these SHM strategies in the wind energy sector.

  8. Relationships between watershed emergy flow and coastal New England salt marsh structure, function, and condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt-Williams, Sherry; Wigand, Cathleen; Campbell, Daniel E

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the link between watershed activities and salt marsh structure, function, and condition using spatial emergy flow density (areal empower density) in the watershed and field data from 10 tidal salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, RI, USA. The field-collected data were obtained during several years of vegetation, invertebrate, soil, and water quality sampling. The use of emergy as an accounting mechanism allowed disparate factors (e.g., the amount of building construction and the consumption of electricity) to be combined into a single landscape index while retaining a uniform quantitative definition of the intensity of landscape development. It expanded upon typical land use percentage studies by weighting each category for the intensity of development. At the RI salt marsh sites, an impact index (watershed emergy flow normalized for marsh area) showed significant correlations with mudflat infauna species richness, mussel density, plant species richness, the extent and density of dominant plant species, and denitrification potential within the high salt marsh. Over the 4-year period examined, a loading index (watershed emergy flow normalized for watershed area) showed significant correlations with nitrite and nitrate concentrations, as well as with the nitrogen to phosphorus ratios in stream discharge into the marshes. Both the emergy impact and loading indices were significantly correlated with a salt marsh condition index derived from intensive field-based assessments. Comparison of the emergy indices to calculated nitrogen loading estimates for each watershed also produced significant positive correlations. These results suggest that watershed emergy flow is a robust index of human disturbance and a potential tool for rapid assessment of coastal wetland condition.

  9. Development of measurement systems for studies of flow - structure interactions in pipe systems under LWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuschewski, Mario; Laurien, Eckart

    2012-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Power Studies and Energy Systems (IKE) of the University of Stuttgart is setting up new test rigs for studies of cyclic thermal load phenomena within the 'Studies of Flow-Structure Interactions in Light Water Reactors' joint project. The project is part of a total of three individual projects within an overarching BMBF joint project on reactor safety research, 'Basic Principles of Systems, Discharge and Materials Behavior of Pipes Under Cyclic Thermal Loads.' The article covers the aspect of experimental studies for fluid mechanics modeling of flow-structure interactions. Detailed points under study are thermal mixing processes or laminar flows in a typical tee-shaped pipe branch. The interaction between a fluid and a pipe structure exerts considerable influence on the loads and stresses acting on a component and on the resultant fatigue of a material. In this connection, modeling the mixing process, including effects of buoyancy, thermal conduction and head transfer between the fluid and the wall, is of decisive importance. The experimental data so far accumulated in studies of non-isothermal mixtures cover but a very narrow range of temperatures. The focus of this work is on the development of technical measurement systems for studies of cyclic thermal loads and stresses to be applied to pipe elements specific to LWRs under realistic thermal and flow conditions. On the basis of reliable experimental data, the processes referred to above and their underlying mechanisms can then be examined in the further course of work, and models can be studied for applicability and extended where necessary. (orig.)

  10. Ecosystem structure and trophic level to the oceanographic conditions around the waters of Jeju Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Min; Yoo, Joon Taek; Choi, Jung Hwa; Choi, Kwang Ho; Kim, Jin Koo; Kim, Yeong Seup; Kim, Jong Bin

    2008-07-01

    The water around Jeju Island was characterized by the Tsushima warm current (TWC) being high temperature and salinity and the Yellow sea cold bottom water (YSCBW) being low temperature and salinity We investigated the diversity indices, community structures and trophic level of fish species collected by trawl net in the waters around Jeju Island during April 2004-August 2005. We also presented ecosystem structure estimated by combination of trophic level and the oceanographic condition. There were totally distributed 301 species in the survey area during April 2004-August 2005, regionally 151-229 species in TWC and 75-154 in YSCBW. Shannon's diversity indices (H') of TWC were 2.95-3.39, being higher than those of YSCBW (2.11-2.40), and species richness (R) of TWC were 10.93-18.33, being also higher than those of YSCBW (6.96-12.48), except the values of October 2004. A total of 7429 individuals of 98 species was seasonally examined for their dietary composition in the survey area during 2004-2005. Of which, 3,682 individuals were observed with prey organisms. Standardized diet composition and trophic level estimates were calculated for predators in the survey area being influenced by TWC and YSCBW Trophic level values were diverged with range from 3.23 of the small pelagic to 4.39 of the goose fish, depending on the taxonomic group. The analysis of trophic level values showed that ecosystem structure was different between TWC and YSCBW during April 2004-August 2005.

  11. THE JUDGMENTS CONTENT ABOUT THE OTHERS IS CONDITIONED BY THE SELF-STRUCTURE OF THE PERSON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Yuditseva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a conceptual model explaining the genesis of person judgments about the others as mediated by motivation regulation. The model is drawn from knowledge theory which has been designed by Losskiy and Frank at the first half of the twentieth century and pertains to phenomenological branch of Non Marxism epistemology. They consider a person body as an external object implicitly existing along with the other objects in person’s cognition without awareness. Self –regulation of Big Two motives makes sensory and insensible mental person’s motives on the one hand and external to him on the other hand to be organized into representation’s structure. The self appears to be the structure of motives’ representation “I-not I” to the person. Self-structure is expected to define perspective-taking of another person and judgment regarding him. The present research checks whether participant’s judgments regarding himself and of the others are related to his motivation strategy. The strategy of innate Big Two motivation was revealed by Szondy test, the test of incomplete utterances was used for discovering of the judgments about itself and of the others. Correspondence analysis (Greenacre confirms that unconscious taking perspective by the participant regarding himself and of the others is depended upon his motivation strategy. Taking the perspective "not I, the others" is conditioned by impersonal strategy; the perspective "I and the others" is related by self-determined strategy. The focus "I, not the others" relates to self-centered strategy while communicative one takes “not I, not the others" perspective. In addition the significant positive correlation was discovered between participant’s motivation strategy and judgment’s preference in the aggregate of all utterances about others, and also it was proved natural the absence of this in the aggregate of all utterances about itself. Participant’s motivation strategy

  12. Structural Conditions for Collaboration and Learning in Innovation Networks: Using an Innovation System Performance Lens to Analyse Agricultural Knowledge Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, F.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Roep, D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigate how the structural conditions of eight different European agricultural innovation systems can facilitate or hinder collaboration and social learning in multidisciplinary innovation networks. Methodology: We have adapted the Innovation System Failure Matrix to investigate the

  13. Structural Studies of NH4-exchanged Natrolites at Ambient Conditions and High Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Lee; D Seoung; Y Jang; J Bai; Y Lee

    2011-12-31

    We report here for the first time that fully and partially NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolites can be prepared in hydrated states using the solution exchange method with potassium-natrolite. The structural models of the as-prepared hydrated phases and their dehydrated forms at elevated temperature were refined in space group Fdd2 using in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data and Rietveld methods. The unit-cell volumes of the hydrated NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolites at ambient conditions, (NH{sub 4}){sub 16(2)}Al{sub 16}Si{sub 24}O{sub 80}{center_dot}14.1(9)H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 5.1(1)}K{sub 10.9(1)}Al{sub 16}Si{sub 24}O{sub 80}{center_dot}15.7(3)H{sub 2}O, are found to be larger than that the original sodium-natrolite by ca. 15.6% and 12.8%, respectively. Upon temperature increase, the fully NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite undergoes dehydration at ca. 150 C with ca. 16.4% contraction in the unit-cell volume. The dehydrated phase of the fully NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite exhibits marginal volume expansion up to 425 C and then becomes amorphized during temperature decrease and exposure to atmospheric condition. In the case of the partially NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite, the dehydration starts from ca. 175 C with {approx}15.1% volume contraction and leads to a partial phase separation to show a phase related to the dehydrated K-natrolite. The degree of the phase separation decreases with temperature increase up to 475 C, concomitant to the gradual volume contraction occurring in the partially NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite in the dehydrared state. Upon temperature decrease and exposure to atmospheric condition, only the dehydrated K-natrolite is recovered as a crystalline phase from the partially NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite. In the hydrated model of the fully NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite, the ammonium cations and water molecules are statistically distributed along the elliptical channels, similar to the disordered pattern observed in natrolites exchanged

  14. Structural-Functional Model of Designing Individual Educational Path of Teacher's Professional Development in Conditions of Information Educational Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifzyanova, Kadriya Sh.; Shtreter, Juliya N.; Nauryzbayeva, Rahat N.

    2015-01-01

    Actuality of studied problem is due to constant modernization of teacher's professional development which depends on many factors and conditions aimed at identifying the reserve possibilities of professional qualified and competitive specialist. In this context, this article aims to develop structure the content of structural-functional model of…

  15. Multiple Andreev reflections in diffusive SNS structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboryski, Rafael Jozef; Kutchinsky, Jonatan; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev

    1999-01-01

    We report new measurements on subgap energy structures originating from multiple Andreev reflections in mesoscopic SNS junctions. The junctions were fabricated in a planar geometry with high-transparency superconducting contacts of Al deposited on highly diffusive and surface delta-doped n...

  16. Effect of halophilic conditions in stabilisation of RNA structure and function at high temperature under radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, M.-C.

    We have already shown the structural integrity of tRNA at high temperature - 82C for 30h - in high salt concentrations (Tehei et al, 2002). Stability were also performed by measuring the residual specific tRNA charge capacity after heat treatment for 30 h at 82C. RNA molecules are selected (in vitro selection) at high temperature at high salt concentration. We are undergoing studies of such molecules submitted to several stressful conditions, in particular high radiations. These studies provide support for the importance of salt to protect macromolecules against severe cosmic conditions. These could be useful for searching traces of life in planetary objects and space exploration. References : ElAmri, C., Baron, M-H., Maurel, M.-C. ``Adenine adsorption onto and release from meteorite specimens assessed by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy ''. Journal of Raman Spectroscopy (2004) in press. Meli, M., Vergne, J. and Maurel, M-C. "In vitro selection of adenine-dependent hairpin ribozymes" J. Biol. Chem., (2003), 278, 11, 9835-9842. ElAmri, C., Baron, M-H., Maurel, M.-C. ``Adenine in mineral samples : development of a methodology based on Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) for picomole detections ''. Spectrochimica Acta, A, 59, 2645-2654. Tehei, M., Franzetti, B., Maurel, M-C., Vergne, J., Hountondji, C. , Zaccai, G. ``Salt and the Search for Traces of Life '', Extremophiles, (2002), 6 : 427-430. Meli, M., Vergne, J., Décout, J.L., and Maurel, M-C. ``Adenine-Aptamer Complexes. A bipartite RNA site which binds the adenine nucleic base '', J. Biol. Chem., (2002), 277, 3, 2104-2111.

  17. The Durability of Metal-Honeycomb Sandwich Structure Exposed to High Humidity Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rider, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    .... The processes leading to degradation of metal-honeycomb sandwich structure and its effect on the structural integrity of F-111 structure is critical information required for successful, long term aircraft management...

  18. Molecular and structural changes in vegetative buds of Norway spruce during dormancy in natural weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzicka, Marzenna; Pawlowski, Tomasz A; Staszak, Aleksandra; Rozkowski, Roman; Chmura, Daniel J

    2017-12-28

    The dormancy and the growth of trees in temperate climates are synchronized with seasons. Preparation for dormancy and its proper progression are key for survival and development in the next season. Using a unique approach that combined microscopy and proteomic methods, we investigated changes in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) embryonic shoots during four distinct stages of dormancy in natural weather conditions. We identified 13 proteins that varied among dormancy stages, and were linked to regulation of protein level; functioning of chloroplasts and other plastids; DNA and RNA regulation; and oxidative stress. We also found a group of five proteins, related to cold hardiness, that did not differ in expression among stages of dormancy, but had the highest abundancy level. Ultrastructure of organelles is tightly linked to their metabolic activity, and hence may indicate dormancy status. The observed ultrastructure during endodormancy was stable, whereas during ecodormancy, the structural changes were dynamic and related mainly to nucleus, plastids and mitochondria. At the ultrastructural level, the lack of starch and the presence of callose in plasmodesmata in all regions of embryonic shoot were indicators of full endodormancy. At the initiation of ecodormancy, we noted an increase in metabolic activity of organelles, tissue-specific starch hyperaccumulation and degradation. However, in proteomic analysis, we did not find variation in expression of proteins related to starch degradation or to symplastic isolation of cells. The combination of ultrastructural and proteomic methods gave a more complete picture of vegetative bud dormancy than either of them applied separately. We found some changes at the structural level, but not their analogues in the proteome. Our study suggests a very important role of plastids' organization and metabolism, and their protection in the course of dormancy and during the shift from endo- to ecodormancy and the acquisition

  19. Lead iodide perovskite sensitized all-solid-state submicron thin film mesoscopic solar cell with efficiency exceeding 9%.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hui-Seon; Lee, Chang-Ryul; Im, Jeong-Hyeok; Lee, Ki-Beom; Moehl, Thomas; Marchioro, Arianna; Moon, Soo-Jin; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Yum, Jun-Ho; Moser, Jacques E; Grätzel, Michael; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    We report on solid-state mesoscopic heterojunction solar cells employing nanoparticles (NPs) of methyl ammonium lead iodide (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) as light harvesters. The perovskite NPs were produced by reaction of methylammonium iodide with PbI(2) and deposited onto a submicron-thick mesoscopic TiO(2) film, whose pores were infiltrated with the hole-conductor spiro-MeOTAD. Illumination with standard AM-1.5 sunlight generated large photocurrents (J(SC)) exceeding 17 mA/cm(2), an open circuit photovoltage (V(OC)) of 0.888 V and a fill factor (FF) of 0.62 yielding a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.7%, the highest reported to date for such cells. Femto second laser studies combined with photo-induced absorption measurements showed charge separation to proceed via hole injection from the excited (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) NPs into the spiro-MeOTAD followed by electron transfer to the mesoscopic TiO(2) film. The use of a solid hole conductor dramatically improved the device stability compared to (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) -sensitized liquid junction cells.

  20. Lead iodide perovskite sensitized all-solid-state submicron thin film mesoscopic solar cell with efficiency exceeding 9%.

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hui-Seon

    2012-08-21

    We report on solid-state mesoscopic heterojunction solar cells employing nanoparticles (NPs) of methyl ammonium lead iodide (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) as light harvesters. The perovskite NPs were produced by reaction of methylammonium iodide with PbI(2) and deposited onto a submicron-thick mesoscopic TiO(2) film, whose pores were infiltrated with the hole-conductor spiro-MeOTAD. Illumination with standard AM-1.5 sunlight generated large photocurrents (J(SC)) exceeding 17 mA/cm(2), an open circuit photovoltage (V(OC)) of 0.888 V and a fill factor (FF) of 0.62 yielding a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.7%, the highest reported to date for such cells. Femto second laser studies combined with photo-induced absorption measurements showed charge separation to proceed via hole injection from the excited (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) NPs into the spiro-MeOTAD followed by electron transfer to the mesoscopic TiO(2) film. The use of a solid hole conductor dramatically improved the device stability compared to (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) -sensitized liquid junction cells.

  1. Lead Iodide Perovskite Sensitized All-Solid-State Submicron Thin Film Mesoscopic Solar Cell with Efficiency Exceeding 9%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hui-Seon; Lee, Chang-Ryul; Im, Jeong-Hyeok; Lee, Ki-Beom; Moehl, Thomas; Marchioro, Arianna; Moon, Soo-Jin; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Yum, Jun-Ho; Moser, Jacques E.; Grätzel, Michael; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    We report on solid-state mesoscopic heterojunction solar cells employing nanoparticles (NPs) of methyl ammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3)PbI3 as light harvesters. The perovskite NPs were produced by reaction of methylammonium iodide with PbI2 and deposited onto a submicron-thick mesoscopic TiO2 film, whose pores were infiltrated with the hole-conductor spiro-MeOTAD. Illumination with standard AM-1.5 sunlight generated large photocurrents (JSC) exceeding 17 mA/cm2, an open circuit photovoltage (VOC) of 0.888 V and a fill factor (FF) of 0.62 yielding a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.7%, the highest reported to date for such cells. Femto second laser studies combined with photo-induced absorption measurements showed charge separation to proceed via hole injection from the excited (CH3NH3)PbI3 NPs into the spiro-MeOTAD followed by electron transfer to the mesoscopic TiO2 film. The use of a solid hole conductor dramatically improved the device stability compared to (CH3NH3)PbI3 -sensitized liquid junction cells. PMID:22912919

  2. RELAXATIONS LOSSES IN POLYETHYLENE INSULATION OF COAXIAL CABLE STRUCTURE DURING AGING IN HIGH HUMIDITY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Bezprozvannych

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The presence of free moisture in power cables leading to the formation of tree structures - water treeing, which originate in the amorphous phase polyethylene and are a major cause of degradation of the polymer insulation. They represent the damage of the polymer size from several microns to 1 mm, developing technology for insulation defects under the combined action of the electric field and the moisture diffusing from the environment. Water treeing destroys the polymer chain, resulting in the formation of microcavities filled with moisture. The dynamics of water treeing and subtle properties largely depend on the composition, morphology of the polymer insulation, chemical nature of the defect, in which they originate. Due to the force of gravity in the water formed typical only for her region with locally ordered structure - clusters, which cause loss of relaxation. Purpose. Features presence of relaxation losses in high-frequency range in polyethylene insulation during aging in high humidity conditions of samples power and RF cables. Methodology. Samples of the power cable for the voltage of 35 kV with a cross-linked polyethylene insulation radial water-blocking protection from moisture and radio-frequency coaxial cable with thermoplastic insulation for 1440 hours in a humidity of 100%. The dielectric loss tangent measured resonance method before and after aging. Originality. Experimentally found evidence of the existence in the polymer cable insulation free water in the form of areas with locally ordered structure - clusters. It is found that the solid polyethylene insulation in the frequency dependence of dielectric loss tangent maximum relaxation shown one at 10 MHz in the initial state, and there are two additional frequency range 500 kHz - 5 MHz after moistening. For cross-linked polyethylene insulation characteristic of large width Δf of the frequency spectrum in which the observed relaxation losses. It is obvious that

  3. The Conditions of Structural and Innovation Policy of Development of Economy of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Komkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: in the article the problems of formation of conditions for Russia’s social and economic development with a consideration of the present and recreated scientific and technological potential are considered. The purpose of the article consists in researching the sources of social and economic development of Russian economy in the medium- and long-term perspective, and also in rationalization of possibilities of their long term usage. Methods: the in the article methods of the comparative economic analysis, system approach to the economy development management as a complex self-recovering system with a potential, which has certain properties and regularities such as: complete social and economic system lifecycle, complete production cycle, technological structure, basic technologies, etc., are used. Results: during the research process if has been concluded that economic downturn in Russia was caused by economy export orientation of the initial repartitions and low added value resource products. Supporting such strategy were the economic instruments: taxes, ruble exchange rate, bank rate etc. Conclusions and Relevance: it has been shown that long-term development can be based mainly on usage of intensive factors. Even the involvement of Russian huge natural resources into the economic activity will not be able to completely solve a problem of prevention of degradation of the processing industrial economic sectors. Two key development terms are noted: investments and structural reform. It is noted that the main sources of investments are the internal and external ones. Increase of their potential is connected with adoption of tough strategic and political decisions. In its turn, effective usage of the expected increase in investments requires an urgent solution of competitive domestic technologies development problems, as well as problem of effective management of economy and its development on an innovative basis. Possibilities of

  4. Structural performance of circular columns confined by recycled GFRP stirrups and exposed to severe conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Sayed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 1980, Egyptian government investment has been directed to the infrastructure projects. Water supply and water drainage networks are among those projects which are very costly; therefore they are designed with a life span of about one hundred years. There is a new trend toward the use of durable and maintenance free systems. The “GFRP” pipes are one of the economic solutions if the project life span is taken into consideration. A number of investors currently produce the “GFRP” pipes in the Egyptian market and although they follow the latest technologies in their production lines, they still suffer 2–5% deficiency of their produced pipes which consequently regarded as rejected pipes. This percentage has a negative impact on the environmental and economical issues. This research is a trial to investigate the behavior of circular columns confined by GFRP stirrups and exposed to severe conditions. A number of waste pipes were randomly selected and sliced to be used as circular column transverse reinforcement. An experimental program consisting of ten short circular columns was designed to study the effect of corrosion, high degrees of temperature, and sulfate attack on the structural behavior of the axially loaded short circular columns. The experimental results showed that columns laterally reinforced by GFRP slices have a comparable behavior to conventionally reinforced concrete columns especially for those columns exposed to corrosion and sulfate attack.

  5. Inherent structure features of beryllium and their influence on the performance polycrystalline metal under different conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomutov, A.M.; Mikhailov, V.S.; Pronin, V.N.; Pakhomov, Ya.D. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation `A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM)`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    The anisotropy of physical properties of beryllium single crystals resulting from covalent bonds in crystal lattice leads to significant residual thermal microstresses (RTM) in the polycrystalline metal. It is demonstrated experimentally that there is a simple linear dependence between the magnitude of RTM and the ultimate tensile strength. The factors controlling RTM are analysed and in the framework of powder metallurgy process the technological methods of producing beryllium with the needed properties are recommended. Primarily it is necessary to control the quantity and extent of dispersity of intergranular oxide inclusions and mean grain size in combination with the high degree of macro- and microhomogenity of the structure. The requirements to beryllium microstructure for different operating conditions including neutron fluxes and transient temperature fields are formulated. In the framework of the concept under development one can explain formerly not fully understandable effects, which are characteristic of polycrystalline beryllium such as unexpected Petch-Stro curve, the role of twinning etc., and predict new ones. In particular, it can be possible to expect the growth of ductility of high strength beryllium grades as neutron irradiated. (author)

  6. Jatropha Developments in Mozambique: Analysis of Structural Conditions Influencing Niche-Regime Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Slingerland

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the transition dynamics related to Jatropha developments in Mozambique. The analysis focuses on how structural conditions (infrastructure, institutions, interaction and collaboration and capabilities and resources enable or constrain interactions between niche-level Jatropha experiments and incumbent energy, agriculture and rural development regimes in Mozambique. Investors in agro-industrial Jatropha projects focused on establishing projects in areas with relatively good infrastructure, rather than in remote rural areas. Furthermore, they predominantly focused on Jatropha production instead of investing in the entire Jatropha value chain, which turned out to be a challenge in itself, as growing a productive Jatropha crop was much more complex than initially anticipated. The development of institutions that could nurture and protect Jatropha projects from the prevailing regimes lagged behind Jatropha project establishment, leading to an insecure investment climate. Strong inter-ministerial collaboration and organized civil society interaction and representation contrasted with non-organized private sector and rather isolated smallholder Jatropha projects. The global financial crisis and limited adaptive capacity reduced the time and space for experimentation and learning to overcome disappointing crop performance. Together, this hampered Jatropha’s potential to challenge the energy, agricultural and rural development regimes. Nevertheless, the Jatropha experience did initiate the development of policy and regulation and stimulated interaction and collaboration between specific groups of stakeholders, which could provide the basis to capture future biofuel momentum in Mozambique.

  7. AN ANALYSIS ON MONETARY CONDITION INDEX IN TURKEY BY USING STRUCTURAL VAR ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus AÇCI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Central Bank of Turkey (TCMB has a significant power on aggregate demand and inflation expectation via monetary policy tools. While deciding monetary policies it’s a crucial question and a discussion topic for TCMB (Turkish Republic Central Bank if the policy makers should take into consideration Taylor Rule that mainly depends on the interest rate or Monetary Condition Index (MCI. The MCI that is a popular tool in the last decades that is calculated as a weighted average of the real short-term interest rate and the real effective exchange rate relative to their value in a base period. MCI also is a pointer that explains if the central banks policies expansionary or tight. The reality that MCI can have influence on the domestic currency and the foreign currency together is an advantage for MCI. This study aims to explain the possible effects of MCI on the aggregate demand in Turkey. Structural VAR analysis will be used for the analysis. The period for the analysis covers a period of starting from M1:2003 till M8:2015

  8. Optimal Altitude, Overlap, and Weather Conditions for Computer Vision UAV Estimates of Forest Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P. Dandois

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecological remote sensing is being transformed by three-dimensional (3D, multispectral measurements of forest canopies by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV and computer vision structure from motion (SFM algorithms. Yet applications of this technology have out-paced understanding of the relationship between collection method and data quality. Here, UAV-SFM remote sensing was used to produce 3D multispectral point clouds of Temperate Deciduous forests at different levels of UAV altitude, image overlap, weather, and image processing. Error in canopy height estimates was explained by the alignment of the canopy height model to the digital terrain model (R2 = 0.81 due to differences in lighting and image overlap. Accounting for this, no significant differences were observed in height error at different levels of lighting, altitude, and side overlap. Overall, accurate estimates of canopy height compared to field measurements (R2 = 0.86, RMSE = 3.6 m and LIDAR (R2 = 0.99, RMSE = 3.0 m were obtained under optimal conditions of clear lighting and high image overlap (>80%. Variation in point cloud quality appeared related to the behavior of SFM ‘image features’. Future research should consider the role of image features as the fundamental unit of SFM remote sensing, akin to the pixel of optical imaging and the laser pulse of LIDAR.

  9. Ablation of mouse adult neurogenesis alters olfactory bulb structure and olfactory fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Valley

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis replenishes olfactory bulb (OB interneurons throughout the life of most mammals, yet during this constant fl ux it remains unclear how the OB maintains a constant structure and function. In the mouse OB, we investigated the dynamics of turnover and its impact on olfactory function by ablating adult neurogenesis with an x-ray lesion to the subventricular zone (SVZ. Regardless of the magnitude of the lesion to the SVZ, we found no change in the survival of young adult born granule cells (GCs born after the lesion, and a gradual decrease in the population of GCs born before the lesion. After a lesion producing a 96% reduction of incoming adult born GCs to the OB, we found a diminished behavioral fear response to conditioned odor cues but not to audio cues. Interestingly, despite this behavioral defi cit and gradual anatomical changes, we found no electrophysiological changes in the GC population assayed in vivo through dendro-dendritic synaptic plasticity and odor-evoked local fi eld potential oscillations. These data indicate that turnover in the granule cell layer is generally decoupled from the rate of adult neurogenesis, and that OB adult neurogenesis plays a role in a wide behavioral system extending beyond the OB.

  10. Mesoscopic S-C fabrics in shallow fault zones: a case history from the Umbria-Marche Apennines (Central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchi, M. R.; Lena, G.; Alvarez, W.; Felici, F.; Lupattelli, A.

    2012-04-01

    Several examples of fault zones, characterised by a penetrative S-C fabric at a mesoscopic scale, developed at shallow depth (DCucco anticline with a down-section trajectory, and producing the tectonic superposition of younger (Miocene marls and sandstones) on older (Paleogene limestones) rocks.. The clayey rocks of the hangingwall block are almost undeformed. We performed a detailed mesostructural analysis along several outcrops of the STZ, aimed to: i) a detailed qualitative and quantitative description of a significant example of S-C fabric, developed in sedimentary rocks at shallow crustal levels; ii) the reconstruction of the structural meso and macro-architecture of the shear-related damage zone; iii) the study of the factors, controlling the genesis and development of the analyzed tectonic pattern. The STZ consists of an intensely cleaved fault core (S-C fabric, where C-surfaces are spaced 5-10 cm, whilst S-surfaces are spaced 2-20 mm), up to 50 m thick, affecting the Eocene-Oligocene marly succession. Within the fault core, a set of steeper reverse shear planes (C2, dip>45°) affects and displaces the pre-existing S-C fabric. Just below the fault core, a band of asymmetric chevron folds is observed. Going down into the footwall block, the mudstones of the Scaglia Rossa Fm. are characterized by a progressively less intense and more brittle deformation, superimposed on a previous set of tectonic features (spaced pressure solution cleavages and associated calcite veins, i.e. "background deformation"). As expected, within the STZ, the magnitude of deformation decreases with the distance from the main tectonic contact; however, far from the fault core, the magnitude of deformation is lithologically controlled: almost undeformed calcareous beds are alternated to intensely sheared intervals, localised along weak, marly horizons. The interpretation of a seismic profile, suggest that the STZ is the surface expression of two different thrusts, splaying-out from two d

  11. Necessary Conditions for Nonlinear Ultrasonic Modulation Generation Given a Localized Fatigue Crack in a Plate-Like Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jin Lim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that nonlinear ultrasonics can be more sensitive to local incipient defects, such as a fatigue crack, than conventional linear ultrasonics. Therefore, there is an increasing interest in utilizing nonlinear ultrasonics for structural health monitoring and nondestructive testing applications. While the conditions, which are the necessary conditions that should be satisfied for the generation of nonlinear harmonic components, are extensively studied for distributed material nonlinearity, little work has been done to understand the necessary conditions at the presence of a localized nonlinear source such as a fatigue crack. In this paper, the necessary conditions of nonlinear ultrasonic modulation generation in a plate-like structure are formulated specifically for a localized nonlinear source. Then, the correctness of the formulated necessary conditions is experimentally verified using ultrasounds obtained from aluminum plates.

  12. Structure and work process in primary care and hospitalizations for sensitive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Waleska Regina Machado; Queiroz, Rejane Christine de Sousa; Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; Silva, Núbia Cristina da; Thumé, Elaine; Tomasi, Elaine; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Thomaz, Erika Barbara Abreu Fonseca

    2017-08-17

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether the characteristics of the structure of primary health units and the work process of primary care teams are associated with the number of hospitalizations for primary care sensitive conditions. In this ecological study, we have analyzed data of Brazilian municipalities related to sociodemographic characteristics, coverage of care programs, structure of primary health units, and work process of primary care teams. We have obtained the data from the first cycle of the Brazilian Program for Improving Access and Quality of the Primary Care, of the Department of Information Technology of the Brazilian Unified Health System, the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, and the United Nations Development Programme. The associations have been estimated using negative binomial regression coefficients (β) and respective 95% confidence intervals, with a hierarchical approach in three levels (alpha = 5%). In the adjusted analysis for the outcome in 2013, in the distal level, the coverage of the Bolsa Família Program (β = -0.001) and private insurance (β = -0.01) had a negative association, and the human development index (β = 1.13), the proportion of older adults (β = 0.05) and children under the age of five (β = 0.05), and the coverage of the Community Health Agent Strategy (β = 0.002) showed positive association with hospitalizations for primary care sensitive conditions. In the intermediate level, minimum hours (β = -0.14) and availability of vaccines (β = -0.16) showed a negative association, and availability of medications showed a positive association (β = 0.16). In the proximal level, only the variable of matrix support (β = 0.10) showed a positive association. The variables in the adjusted analysis of the number of hospitalizations for primary care sensitive conditions in 2014 presented the same association as in 2013. The characteristics of the structure of primary health units and the work

  13. ENSURING SMART, SUSTAINABLE, INCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT OF THE REGIONS OF UKRAINE IN THE CONDITIONS OF STRUCTURAL CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Bogolib

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the economy based on knowledge-based innovative economy, new economy, at the present stage of social development is defining the international concept, according to which knowledge play a primary role, and their production is a source of economic growth and competitiveness. The economy is based on knowledge that provides a smart, sustainable and inclusive development. The purpose of the study. Showing that the implementation of the Strategy «Europe 2020», the main directions of the Fourth Industrial Revolution in the Ukraine will be able to provide smart, sustainable, inclusive development of the regions of Ukraine, will help to overcome the crisis and become a source for economic growth. Research methods. In the process of writing were used scientific methods, methods of analysis and synthesis, method of scientific abstraction. The results of the study. Macroeconomic instability has been transformed at the regional level, which led to the deepening of regions differentiation, particularly as it affected old industrial regions, including Donetsk and Luhansk. The crisis of public finances does not allow attracting of financial resources for economic development. As a result of hybrid war, the outflow of foreign investment amounted to 12.6 billion dollars USA. A significant part of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions is completely destroyed. Along with this, it's perfect conditions in order to abandon the old and build new. There are all conditions to implement actively the European strategy «Europe 2020» and the main directions of the Fourth Industrial Revolution to a new stage of economic development, and ensure smart, sustainable and inclusive development of the regions of Ukraine. Conclusions and discussion position. The future of Ukraine and its regions depends on the activity of the Strategy «Europe 2020» and the main directions of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. In Ukraine, in the regions, the main emphasis is on export

  14. Influence of Boundary Conditions on the Simulation of a Diamond-Type Lattice Structure: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Terriault

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergent additive manufacturing processes allow the use of metallic porous structures in various industrial applications. Because these structures comprise a large number of ordered unit cells, their design using conventional modeling approaches, such as finite elements, becomes a real challenge. A homogenization technique, in which the lattice structure is simulated as a fully dense volume having equivalent material properties, can then be employed. To determine these equivalent material properties, numerical simulations can be performed on a single unit cell of the lattice structure. However, a critical aspect to consider is the boundary conditions applied to the external faces of the unit cell. In the literature, different types of boundary conditions are used, but a comparative study is definitely lacking. In this publication, a diamond-type unit cell is studied in compression by applying different boundary conditions. If the porous structure’s boundaries are free to deform, then the periodic boundary condition is found to be the most representative, but constraint equations must be introduced in the model. If, instead, the porous structure is inserted in a rigid enclosure, it is then better to use frictionless boundary conditions. These preliminary results remain to be validated for other types of unit cells loaded beyond the yield limit of the material.

  15. Improved performance of mesoscopic perovskite solar cell using an accelerated crystalline formation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhik, Siraj; Esparza, Diego; Martínez-Benítez, Alejandro; López-Luke, Tzarara; Carriles, Ramón; De la Rosa, Elder

    2017-10-01

    Highly smooth organo-lead halide perovskite (OHP) films with less intra-granular defects are necessary to minimize the non-radiative carrier recombination in photovoltaic devices. Herein, a simple air-extraction anti-solvent deposition (AAD) technique is proposed to improve the quality of perovskite films. An air extraction process accompanied by anti-solvent washing helps to improve the morphology of perovskite, leading to smooth, homogeneous, compact, pin-hole free and densely packed films. Perovskite films with an average roughness of 5.01 nm, which is the smoothest morphology in mesoscopic-perovskite solar cell to the extent of our knowledge, high crystallinity, and a crystallite size in the range of ∼500 nm to 1 μm have been achieved. Average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 16.99% for 15 cells and a best PCE of 17.70% with a high open circuit voltage of 1.075 and fill factor of 74.22% were achieved using the AAD approach without a glove box. The cells exhibit virtually no hysteresis. These efficiency values are approximately 37.68% higher than the cells fabricated using anti-solvent process without air-extraction, where an average efficiency of 12.34% was measured. This method demonstrates high reproducibility and can be employed for the large scale production of PSC at reduced cost.

  16. Solubilization of saikosaponin a by ginsenoside Ro biosurfactant in aqueous solution: mesoscopic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xingxing; Shi, Xinyuan; Wang, Yuguang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2012-10-15

    Ginsenoside Ro (Ro), a natural anionic biosurfactant derived from ginseng, has been found to markedly increase the solubility of saikosaponin a (SSa), which is the active ingredient of Radix Bupleuri. SSa is minimally soluble in water. To determine the mechanism by which Ro solubilizes SSa, the self-assembly behavior of Ro and the phase behavior of blended Ro and SSa systems were studied by mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The simulation results show that Ro can form vesicles via the closure of oblate membranes. At low concentrations, SSa molecules are solubilized in the palisade layer of the Ro vesicles. At high concentrations, they interact with Ro molecules to form mixed vesicles with Ro adsorbing on the surfaces of the vesicles. The evaluation of the SSa solubilization process reveals that, at low concentrations, Ro aggregates preferentially to form vesicles, which then absorb SSa into themselves. However, at high concentrations, SSa first self-aggregates and then dissolves. This is because the solubilization behavior of Ro shifts the precipitation-dissolution equilibrium in the direction of dissolution. These results of the simulations are consistent with those of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging of mesoscopic-scale organisms using selective-plane optoacoustic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Vinegoni, Claudio [Laboratory for Biooptics and Molecular Imaging, Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02115 (United States)], E-mail: dr@tum.de

    2009-05-07

    Mesoscopic-scale living organisms (i.e. 1 mm to 1 cm sized) remain largely inaccessible by current optical imaging methods due to intensive light scattering in tissues. Therefore, imaging of many important model organisms, such as insects, fishes, worms and similarly sized biological specimens, is currently limited to embryonic or other transparent stages of development. This makes it difficult to relate embryonic cellular and molecular mechanisms to consequences in organ function and animal behavior in more advanced stages and adults. Herein, we have developed a selective-plane illumination optoacoustic tomography technique for in vivo imaging of optically diffusive organisms and tissues. The method is capable of whole-body imaging at depths from the sub-millimeter up to centimeter range with a scalable spatial resolution in the order of magnitude of a few tenths of microns. In contrast to pure optical methods, the spatial resolution here is not determined nor limited by light diffusion; therefore, such performance cannot be achieved by any other optical imaging technology developed so far. The utility of the method is demonstrated on several whole-body models and small-animal extremities.

  18. Imaging of mesoscopic-scale organisms using selective-plane optoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razansky, Daniel; Vinegoni, Claudio; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2009-05-01

    Mesoscopic-scale living organisms (i.e. 1 mm to 1 cm sized) remain largely inaccessible by current optical imaging methods due to intensive light scattering in tissues. Therefore, imaging of many important model organisms, such as insects, fishes, worms and similarly sized biological specimens, is currently limited to embryonic or other transparent stages of development. This makes it difficult to relate embryonic cellular and molecular mechanisms to consequences in organ function and animal behavior in more advanced stages and adults. Herein, we have developed a selective-plane illumination optoacoustic tomography technique for in vivo imaging of optically diffusive organisms and tissues. The method is capable of whole-body imaging at depths from the sub-millimeter up to centimeter range with a scalable spatial resolution in the order of magnitude of a few tenths of microns. In contrast to pure optical methods, the spatial resolution here is not determined nor limited by light diffusion; therefore, such performance cannot be achieved by any other optical imaging technology developed so far. The utility of the method is demonstrated on several whole-body models and small-animal extremities.

  19. Universal shape characteristics for the mesoscopic polymer chain via dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnyi, O; Ilnytskyi, J M; Holovatch, Yu; von Ferber, C

    2016-12-21

    In this paper we study the shape characteristics of a polymer chain in a good solvent using a mesoscopic level of modelling. The dissipative particle dynamics simulations are performed in 3D space at a range of chain lengths N. The scaling laws for the end-to-end distance and gyration radius are examined first and found to hold for [Formula: see text] yielding a reasonably accurate value for the Flory exponent ν. Within the same interval of chain lengths, the asphericity, prolateness and some other shape characteristics of the chain are found to become independent of N. Their mean values are found to agree reasonably well with the respective theoretical results and lattice Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. We found the probability distribution for a wide range of shape characteristics. For the asphericity and prolateness they are quite broad, resembling in form the results of lattice MC simulations. By means of the analytic fitting of these distributions, the most probable values for the shape characteristics are found to supplement their mean values.

  20. Lack of Dependence of the Sizes of the Mesoscopic Protein Clusters on Electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsova, Maria A; Chan, Ho Yin; Lubchenko, Vassiliy; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-11-03

    Protein-rich clusters of steady submicron size and narrow size distribution exist in protein solutions in apparent violation of the classical laws of phase equilibrium. Even though they contain a minor fraction of the total protein, evidence suggests that they may serve as essential precursors for the nucleation of ordered solids such as crystals, sickle-cell hemoglobin polymers, and amyloid fibrils. The cluster formation mechanism remains elusive. We use the highly basic protein lysozyme at nearly neutral and lower pH as a model and explore the response of the cluster population to the electrostatic forces, which govern numerous biophysical phenomena, including crystallization and fibrillization. We tune the strength of intermolecular electrostatic forces by varying the solution ionic strength I and pH and find that despite the weaker repulsion at higher I and pH, the cluster size remains constant. Cluster responses to the presence of urea and ethanol demonstrate that cluster formation is controlled by hydrophobic interactions between the peptide backbones, exposed to the solvent after partial protein unfolding that may lead to transient protein oligomers. These findings reveal that the mechanism of the mesoscopic clusters is fundamentally different from those underlying the two main classes of ordered protein solid phases, crystals and amyloid fibrils, and partial unfolding of the protein chain may play a significant role. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Revisiting the mesoscopic Termonia and Smith model for deformation of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Reddy, B; Basu, Sumit; Estevez, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    Mesoscopic models for polymers have the potential to link macromolecular properties with the mechanical behaviour without being too expensive computationally. An interesting, popular and rather simple model to this end was proposed by Termonia and Smith (1987 Macromolecules 20 835–8). In this model the macromolecular ensemble is viewed as a collection of two-dimensional self-avoiding random walks on a regular lattice whose lattice points represent entanglements. The load is borne by members representing van der Waals bonds as well as macromolecular strands between two entanglement points. Model polymers simulated via this model exhibited remarkable qualitative similarity with real polymers with respect to their molecular weight, entanglement spacing, strain rate and temperature dependence. In this work, we revisit this model and present a detailed reformulation within the framework of a finite deformation finite element scheme. The physical origins of each of the parameters in the model are investigated and inherent assumptions in the model which contribute to its success are critically probed

  2. Mesoscopic chaos mediated by Drude electron-hole plasma in silicon optomechanical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiagui; Huang, Shu-Wei; Huang, Yongjun; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Jinghui; Liu, Jia-Ming; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Duan, Shukai; Wei Wong, Chee

    2017-06-01

    Chaos has revolutionized the field of nonlinear science and stimulated foundational studies from neural networks, extreme event statistics, to physics of electron transport. Recent studies in cavity optomechanics provide a new platform to uncover quintessential architectures of chaos generation and the underlying physics. Here, we report the generation of dynamical chaos in silicon-based monolithic optomechanical oscillators, enabled by the strong and coupled nonlinearities of two-photon absorption induced Drude electron-hole plasma. Deterministic chaotic oscillation is achieved, and statistical and entropic characterization quantifies the chaos complexity at 60 fJ intracavity energies. The correlation dimension D2 is determined at 1.67 for the chaotic attractor, along with a maximal Lyapunov exponent rate of about 2.94 times the fundamental optomechanical oscillation for fast adjacent trajectory divergence. Nonlinear dynamical maps demonstrate the subharmonics, bifurcations and stable regimes, along with distinct transitional routes into chaos. This provides a CMOS-compatible and scalable architecture for understanding complex dynamics on the mesoscopic scale.

  3. Vortex-antivortex dynamics in mesoscopic symmetric and asymmetric superconducting loops with an applied ac current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Guo-Qiao; Peeters, F. M.; Zhou, Shi-Ping

    2014-12-01

    In the framework of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau formalism, we study the dynamics of vortex-antivortex (V-Av) pairs in mesoscopic symmetric and asymmetric superconducting loops under an applied ac current. In contrast to the case of a constant biasing dc current, the process of the V-Av collision and annihilation is strongly affected by the time-periodic ac signal. As the direction of the applied ac current is reversed, the existed V-Av pair moves backward and then collides with a new created Av-V pair in a symmetric loop. In the presence of an appropriate external magnetic field, a novel sinusoidal-like oscillatory mode of the magnetization curve is observed, and the periodic dynamical process of the V-Av annihilation occurs in both branches of the sample. Moreover, for the asymmetric sample with an off-centered hole the creation point of the V-Av pair shifts away from the center of the sample, and the creation and annihilation dynamics of V-Av pairs turns out to be very different from the symmetric case.

  4. Mesoscopic quantum effects in a bad metal, hydrogen-doped vanadium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Will J.; Ji, Heng; Paik, Hanjong; Schlom, Darrell G.; Natelson, Douglas

    2017-05-01

    The standard treatment of quantum corrections to semiclassical electronic conduction assumes that charge carriers propagate many wavelengths between scattering events, and succeeds in explaining multiple phenomena (weak localization magnetoresistance (WLMR), universal conductance fluctuations, Aharonov-Bohm oscillations) observed in polycrystalline metals and doped semiconductors in various dimensionalities. We report apparent WLMR and conductance fluctuations in H x VO2, a poor metal (in violation of the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit) stabilized by the suppression of the VO2 metal-insulator transition through atomic hydrogen doping. Epitaxial thin films, single-crystal nanobeams, and nanosheets show similar phenomenology, though the details of the apparent WLMR seem to depend on the combined effects of the strain environment and presumed doping level. Self-consistent quantitative analysis of the WLMR is challenging given this and the high resistivity of the material, since the quantitative expressions for WLMR are derived assuming good metallicity. These observations raise the issue of how to assess and analyze mesoscopic quantum effects in poor metals.

  5. Mesoscopic modeling of DNA denaturation rates: Sequence dependence and experimental comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlen, Oda, E-mail: oda.dahlen@ntnu.no; Erp, Titus S. van, E-mail: titus.van.erp@ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Høgskoleringen 5, Realfagbygget D3-117 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-06-21

    Using rare event simulation techniques, we calculated DNA denaturation rate constants for a range of sequences and temperatures for the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model with two different parameter sets. We studied a larger variety of sequences compared to previous studies that only consider DNA homopolymers and DNA sequences containing an equal amount of weak AT- and strong GC-base pairs. Our results show that, contrary to previous findings, an even distribution of the strong GC-base pairs does not always result in the fastest possible denaturation. In addition, we applied an adaptation of the PBD model to study hairpin denaturation for which experimental data are available. This is the first quantitative study in which dynamical results from the mesoscopic PBD model have been compared with experiments. Our results show that present parameterized models, although giving good results regarding thermodynamic properties, overestimate denaturation rates by orders of magnitude. We believe that our dynamical approach is, therefore, an important tool for verifying DNA models and for developing next generation models that have higher predictive power than present ones.

  6. Highly efficient model updating for structural condition assessment of large-scale bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    For eciently updating models of large-scale structures, the response surface (RS) method based on radial basis : functions (RBFs) is proposed to model the input-output relationship of structures. The key issues for applying : the proposed method a...

  7. Perspectives of experimental and theoretical studies of self-organized dust structures in complex plasmas under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V N

    2015-01-01

    We review research aimed at understanding the phenomena occurring in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions. Some aspects of the work already performed are considered that have not previously been given sufficient attention but which are potentially crucial for future work. These aspects, in particular, include the observation of compact dust structures that are estimated to be capable of confining all components of a dust plasma in a bounded spatial volume; experimental evidence of the nonlinear screening of dust particles; and experimental evidence of the excitation of collective electric fields. In theoretical terms, novel collective attraction processes between likely charged dust particles are discussed and all schemes of the shadowy attraction between dust particles used earlier, including in attempts to interpret observations, are reviewed and evaluated. Dust structures are considered from the standpoint of the current self-organization theory. It is emphasized that phase transitions between states of self-organized systems differ significantly from those in homogeneous states and that the phase diagrams should be constructed in terms of the parameters of a self-organized structure and cannot be constructed in terms of the temperature and density or similar parameters of homogeneous structures. Using the existing theoretical approaches to modeling self-organized structures in dust plasmas, the parameter distribution of a structure is recalculated for a simpler model that includes the quasineutrality condition and neglects diffusion. These calculations indicate that under microgravity conditions, any self-organized structure can contain a limited number of dust particles and is finite in size. The maximum possible number of particles in a structure determines the characteristic inter-grain distance in dust crystals that can be created under microgravity conditions. Crystallization criteria for the structures are examined and the quasispherical

  8. Electronic Identification of the Parental Phases and Mesoscopic Phase Separation of K_{x}Fe_{2-y}Se_{2} Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the parent compound of a high-temperature superconductor (HTS often plays a pivotal role in determining its superconductivity. The parent compounds of the cuprate HTSs are antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulators, while those of the iron-pnictide HTSs are metals with spin-density-wave order. Here we report the electronic identification of two insulating parental phases and one semiconducting parental phase of the newly discovered family of K_{x}Fe_{2-y}Se_{2} superconductors. The two insulating phases exhibit Mott-insulator-like signatures, and one of the insulating phases is even present in the superconducting and semiconducting K_{x}Fe_{2-y}Se_{2} compounds. However, it is mesoscopically phase-separated from the superconducting or semiconducting phase. Moreover, we find that both the superconducting and semiconducting phases are free of the magnetic and vacancy orders present in the insulating phases, and that the electronic structure of the superconducting phase could be developed by doping the semiconducting phase with electrons. The rich electronic properties discovered in these parental phases of the K_{x}Fe_{2-y}Se_{2} superconductors provide the foundation for studying the anomalous behavior in this new class of iron-based superconductors.

  9. Mechanical aspects of allotropic phase change at the mesoscopic scale; Aspects mecaniques du changement de phase allotropique a l'echelle mesoscopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valance, St

    2007-12-15

    The prediction of the mechanical state of steel structures submit to thermo-mechanical loading must take into account consequences of allotropic phase change. Indeed, phase change induce, at least for steels, a mechanism of TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) leading to irreversible deformation even for loading less than elastic yield limit. Homogenized analytical models generally fail to achieve a correct prediction for complex loading. In order to overcome these difficulties, we present a model achieving a sharper description of the phenomenon. The mesoscopic working scale we adopt here is the grain scale size. Hence, we consider that the behaviour of each phase is homogenous in the sense of continuous media mechanic, whereas the front is explicitly described. We work both experimentally and numerically. Experimentally, we designed a test facility enabling thermo mechanical loading of the sample under partial vacuum. Acquisition of sample surface while martensitic transformation is happening leads, under some hypothesis and thanks to Digital Image Correlation, to the partial identification of area affected by transformation. Numerically, the eXtended Finite Element Method is applied for weakly discontinuous displacement fields. Used of this method needs to numerically track the transformation front -discontinuity support. In that goal, based on level set method, we develop FEM numerical scheme enabling recognition and propagation of discontinuity support. Finally, this work is complete by an approach of driving forces introduced through Eshelbian mechanics which are dual of front velocity. (author)

  10. Dynamic behavior structural response and capacity evaluation of the standardized WWER-1000 nuclear power plants subjected to severe loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambriashvili, Y.K.; Krutzik, N.J.

    1993-01-01

    In order to verify the structural capacity of standardized WWER-1000 MW nuclear power plants, comprehensive static and dynamic analyses were performed in cooperation between Siemens and Atomenergoprojekt. The main goal of these investigations was to perform of a number of seismic analyses of standardized WWER-1000 reactor buildings on the basis of 13 given seismological inputs, taking into account the local soil conditions at 17 different sites defined by in-situ investigations. The analyses were based on appropriate mathematical models (equivalent beam models as well as detailed spatial surface element models) of the coupled vibrating structures (base structure, outer structure, containment, inner structure) and of the layered soil. The analyses were mainly performed using the indirect method (substructure method). Based on the results of the seismic analysis as well as the results of static analysis (pressure and temperature due to LOCA, dead weight, prestressing) an assessment was made of the seismic safety of the containment and the reactor building. Using a complex 3-dimensional model of the structure and the soil, the influence of the flexibility of the basement structure on the structural response was also studied. The structural analyses of the WWER-1000 reactor building led to the conclusion that its design accounts well for the main factors governing the dynamic behavior of the building. The assessment of the forces acting in the structures shows that the bearing capacity of the analyzed building structure corresponds to an earthquake intensity of about 0.2 g to 0.25 g

  11. Controlling Structural Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) by Tailoring Catalyst Composition and Synthesis Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resasco, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  12. Combined Determination of Elastic Properties and Structure of Coesite under Simulated Mantle Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H. J.; Schilling, F. R.; Lauterjung, J.; Lathe, C.

    2001-12-01

    The high pressure SiO2-polymorph coesite seems to be an important mineral in the subduction process including crustal material (Chopin, 1984; Schreyer, 1995). The quartz to coesite transition is thus of fundamental importance to understand the processes within a subducting crust. Furthermore, the nature of the quartz to coesite transition is discussed controversially, because high pressure XRD-studies suggest an intermediate phase during the transformation process (Zinn et al., 1997). For the combined determination of elastic properties and structure a cubic multi-anvil high pressure apparatus (MAX80) was used. For the maximum sample volume of 20 mm3 the pressure limit is about 7GPa. The pressure is measured by use of NaCl as an internal pressure marker with calibrated PVT-data. The maximum temperature of about 2,000K is generated by an internal graphite heater and controlled by a thermocouple. The synchrotron beam (100x100 microns) is guided by a collimator through the sample between the anvils. For energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction, a Ge-solid state detector analyses the diffracted white beam at a fixed angle. The compressional and shear wave velocities were determined simultaneously by ultrasonic interferometry inside MAX80. Two of the six anvils are equipped with overtone polished lithium niobate transducers at their rear side, outside the volume under pressure, for generation and detection of ultrasonic waves between 10 and 60 MHz. Different buffer - reflector combinations and transducer arrangements were used to optimize the critical interference between both sample echoes. Therefore MAX80 is equipped for asymmetrical and symmetrical interferometric set-ups, i.e. compressional and shear waves are generated from the same or from two anvils, opposite to each other. We used for our transient measurements 3 natural fine-grained quartzites from Turkey and Germany. As a first step the pressure was increased gradually up to 4GPa at ambient temperature. At each

  13. Structural condition assessment and service load performance of deteriorated prestressed concrete deck beam bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Juan Bolivar

    Precast pretensioned deck beam bridges are a generic bridge type widely used by IDOT for new construction through the end of the 1970's and still widely used on county roads throughout Illinois. While these bridges were economical to build, IDOT discontinued their use because reflective cracks developed along the length of the longitudinal joints between beams. Three 30 years old deteriorated beams were removed from an existing bridge over Spoon River in Fulton County, IL and delivered to Newmark Civil Engineering Laboratory. The program consisted of a series of comprehensive, destructive and non-destructive, tests and evaluations of the three beams with emphasis on three major areas; (1) The Condition Assessment of the as-delivered beams. (2) The service load performance of the bridge sub-assemblage constructed from those beams. After a comprehensive inspection of the beams was completed, the beams were integrated together into a bridge subassembly that simulated a bridge lane. (3) Following the service load tests, the three beams were separated and tested individually to failure. The critical signs to be observed in existing structures that will lead the inspectors to conclude that a deck beam is being overloaded were are also studied. Several conclusions were found. Cracking of the longitudinal joint has little effect on the stiffness of the bridge if the transverse rod is snug. The presence of a snug transverse tie rod increases the strength of the longitudinal joint. After a longitudinal joint has fractured, reincorporating a snug transverse rod can significantly reestablish the stiffness of the longitudinal joint and reduce overloading of a deteriorated beam. Participation factors must be based on relative bending moments of one beam with respect to the total amount of bending moment produced by the applied load and not to the amount of total vertical displacement. The participation factors will vary along the span of the bridge deck and will depend on the

  14. Evolution of deformation structures under varying loading conditions followed in situ by high angular resolution 3DXRD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Wolfgang; Wejdemann, Christian; Jakobsen, B.

    2009-01-01

    copper to different loading conditions are presented: during uninterrupted tensile deformation, formation of subgrains can be observed concurrently with broadening of the Bragg reflection shortly after onset of plastic deformation. With continued tensile deformation, the subgrain structure develops...... intermittently. When the traction is terminated, stress relaxation occurs and number, size and orientation of subgrains are found to be constant. The subgrain structure freezes and only a minor clean-up of the dislocation structure is observed. When changing the tensile direction after pre-deformation in tension...

  15. The Effects of Three Instructional Conditions in Text Structure on Upper Elementary Students' Reading Comprehension and Writing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Sandra J.

    A study tested the effectiveness of three instructional strategies in three expository text structures on students' reading comprehension and writing performance. Subjects, 173 fourth, fifth, and sixth graders, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: mental modeling, graphic organizer, or a control read/answer group. They received…

  16. Structural Conditions for Collaboration and Learning in Innovation Networks: Using an Innovation System Performance Lens to Analyse Agricultural Knowledge Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Frans; Klerkx, Laurens; Roep, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigate how the structural conditions of eight different European agricultural innovation systems can facilitate or hinder collaboration and social learning in multidisciplinary innovation networks. Methodology: We have adapted the Innovation System Failure Matrix to investigate the main barriers and enablers eight countries…

  17. Population structure, condition, and reproduction characteristics of native monkey goby, Neogobius fluviatilis (Actinopterygii: Perciformes Gobiidae), in the Bulgarian Danube

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečná, Markéta; Jurajda, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2012), s. 321-327 ISSN 0137-1592 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP505/11/1768 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : monkey goby * invasion * Bulgaria * Danube, condition * GSI * ovary structure Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.606, year: 2012

  18. 75 FR 71346 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Lightning Protection of Fuel Tank Structure To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Lightning... fuel vapor ignition caused by lightning strikes. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not... meet the requirements of that regulation for some areas of lightning protection for fuel tank structure...

  19. Nonequilibrium Conditions Explain Spatial Variability in Genetic Structuring of Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Christopher P; Peucker, Amanda J; Valautham, Sureen K; Styan, Craig A; Dann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Factors responsible for spatial structuring of population genetic variation are varied, and in many instances there may be no obvious explanations for genetic structuring observed, or those invoked may reflect spurious correlations. A study of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) in southeast Australia documented low spatial structuring of genetic variation with the exception of colonies at the western limit of sampling, and this distinction was attributed to an intervening oceanographic feature (Bonney Upwelling), differences in breeding phenology, or sea level change. Here, we conducted sampling across the entire Australian range, employing additional markers (12 microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA, 697 individuals, 17 colonies). The zone of elevated genetic structuring previously observed actually represents the eastern half of a genetic cline, within which structuring exists over much shorter spatial scales than elsewhere. Colonies separated by as little as 27 km in the zone are genetically distinguishable, while outside the zone, homogeneity cannot be rejected at scales of up to 1400 km. Given a lack of additional physical or environmental barriers to gene flow, the zone of elevated genetic structuring may reflect secondary contact of lineages (with or without selection against interbreeding), or recent colonization and expansion from this region. This study highlights the importance of sampling scale to reveal the cause of genetic structuring. © The American Genetic Association 2015.

  20. Real Hypersurfaces of Nonflat Complex Projective Planes Whose Jacobi Structure Operator Satisfies a Generalized Commutative Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Theofanidis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Real hypersurfaces satisfying the condition ϕl=lϕ(l=R(·,ξξ have been studied by many authors under at least one more condition, since the class of these hypersurfaces is quite tough to be classified. The aim of the present paper is the classification of real hypersurfaces in complex projective plane CP2 satisfying a generalization of ϕl=lϕ under an additional restriction on a specific function.

  1. Factors controlling strength of structures, and anticipated overstrength for seismic load conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses how the safe shutdown earthquake level, the ratio of operating basis earthquake to safe shutdown earthquake level, the shape of the earthquake spectra and the modeling of the structure affect the seismic overstrength of structures. The relationship between actual mean strength and the minimum specified strength of concrete and structural steel is also presented. The paper identifies which concrete and steel structures are generally sized for earthquake loads and which are generally sized for other factors, e.g., tornado missiles, loss of coolant accident pressure loads, equipment laydown loads and radiation shielding. The results of a study evaluating the mean ultimate capacity of a pressurized water reactor containment are presented to show that in terms of a ground motion, the seismic capacity may be four to five times the design safe shutdown earthquake level

  2. The mesoscopic conductance of disordered rings, its random matrix theory and the generalized variable range hopping picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotland, Alexander; Peer, Tal; Cohen, Doron; Budoyo, Rangga; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2008-01-01

    The calculation of the conductance of disordered rings requires a theory that goes beyond the Kubo-Drude formulation. Assuming 'mesoscopic' circumstances the analysis of the electro-driven transitions shows similarities with a percolation problem in energy space. We argue that the texture and the sparsity of the perturbation matrix dictate the value of the conductance, and study its dependence on the disorder strength, ranging from the ballistic to the Anderson localization regime. An improved sparse random matrix model is introduced to capture the essential ingredients of the problem, and leads to a generalized variable range hopping picture. (fast track communication)

  3. Mesoscopic features in the transport properties of a Kondo-correlated quantum dot in a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camjayi, Alberto; Arrachea, Liliana

    2014-01-22

    We study the transport behavior induced by a small bias voltage through a quantum dot connected to one-channel finite-size wires. We describe the quantum dot using the Hubbard-Anderson impurity model and we obtain solutions by means of a quantum Monte Carlo method. We investigate the effect of a magnetic field applied at the quantum dot in the Kondo regime. We identify mesoscopic oscillations in the conductance, which are introduced by the magnetic field. This behavior is analogous to that observed as a function of the temperature.

  4. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross-compliance standard Ploughing in good soil moisture conditions in soil structure protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Dell'Abate

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Researches have been carried out within the framework on the EFFICOND Project, focused at evaluating the effectiveness of the standards of Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs established for Cross Compliance implementation under EC Regulation 1782/2003. In particular the standard 3.1b deals with soil structure protection through appropriate machinery use, with particular reference to ploughing in good soil moisture conditions. The study deals with the evaluation of soil structure after tillage in tilth and no-tilth conditions at soil moisture contents other than the optimum water content for tillage. The Mean Weight Diameter (MWD of water stable aggregates was used as an indicator of tillage effectiveness. The study was carried out in the period 2008-2009 at six experimental farms belonging to Research Centres and Units of the Italian Agricultural Research Council (CRA with different pedo-climatic and cropping conditions. Farm management and data collection in the different sites were carried out by the local CRA researchers and technicians. The comparison of MWD values in tilth and no tilth theses showed statistically significant differences in most cases, depending on topsoil texture. On clay, clay loam, silty clay, and silty clay loam topsoils a general and significant increase of MWD values under no tilth conditions were observed. No significant differences were observed in silt loam and sandy loam textures, probably due to the weak soil structure of the topsoils. Moreover, ploughing in good soil moisture condition determined higher crop production and less weed development than ploughing in high soil moisture conditions.

  5. Structural vibration a uniform accurate solution for laminated beams, plates and shells with general boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Guoyong; Su, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    This book develops a uniform accurate method which is capable of dealing with vibrations of laminated beams, plates and shells with arbitrary boundary conditions including classical boundaries, elastic supports and their combinations. It also provides numerous solutions for various configurations including various boundary conditions, laminated schemes, geometry and material parameters, which fill certain gaps in this area of reach and may serve as benchmark solutions for the readers. For each case, corresponding fundamental equations in the framework of classical and shear deformation theory are developed. Following the fundamental equations, numerous free vibration results are presented for various configurations including different boundary conditions, laminated sequences and geometry and material properties. The proposed method and corresponding formulations can be readily extended to static analysis.

  6. Effects of joining conditions on the structures and properties of joints of REBCO coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maebatake, T.; Mori, N.; Teranishi, R.; Mukaida, M.; Yamada, K.; Miura, M.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the joining of two REBCO (REBa2Cu3O7-X, RE = Y, Gd) coated conductors using the diffusion joint process. REBCO coated conductors with stabilizing silver layer were joined by various joining conditions. Two pieces of the silver layer of tapes were overlapped in a face to face manner. Then, the pieces were pressurized and heat-treated at about 623-673 K under a pressure using some weights in oxygen atmosphere. Finally, the joint resistivity was obtained as low as about 10 nΩ cm2 by 10 MPa for YBCO tape. The joint resistivity of the GdBCO tape was 50-60 nΩ cm2, which was higher than YBCO, but improved to 37 nΩ cm2 at 10 MPa by improving the joining conditions. Influences of joining conditions such as pressure and evenness of specimens and holders were investigated on joint adhesion and resistivity.

  7. Rethinking the role of edaphic condition in halophyte vegetation degradation on salt marshes due to coastal defense structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tian; Cui, Baoshan; Bai, Junhong; Li, Shanze; Zhang, Shuyan

    2018-02-01

    Determining how human disturbance affects plant community persistence and species conservation is one of the most pressing ecological challenges. The large-scale disturbance form defense structures usually have a long-term and potential effect on phytocommunity in coastal saltmarshes. Coastal defense structures usually remove the effect of tidal wave on tidal salt marshes. As a consequence, edaphic factors such as the salinity and moisture contents are disturbed by tidal action blocking. However, few previous studies have explicitly addressed the response of halophyte species persistence and dynamics to the changing edaphic conditions. The understanding of the response of species composition in seed banks and aboveground vegetation to the stress is important to identify ecological effect of coastal defense structures and provide usefully insight into restoration. Here, we conducted a field study to distinguish the density, species composition and relationships of seed bank with aboveground vegetation between tidal flat wetlands with and without coastal defense structures. We also addressed the role of edaphic condition in vegetation degradation caused by coastal defense structures in combination with field monitor and greenhouse experiments. Our results showed the density of the seed bank and aboveground vegetation in the tidal flat without coastal defense structures was significantly lower than the surrounded flat with coastal defense structures. A total of 14 species were founded in the surrounded flat seed bank and 11 species in the tidal flat, but three species were only recorded in aboveground vegetation of the tidal flat which was much lower than 24 aboveground species in the surrounded flat. The absent of species in aboveground vegetation contributed to low germination rate which depend on the edaphic condition. The germination of seeds in the seed bank were inhabited by high soil salinity in the tidal flat and low soil moisture in the surrounded flat. Our

  8. Storage conditions of skin affect tissue structure and in vitro percutaneus penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    For logistic and practical reasons it is difficult to perform in vitro studies on percutaneous penetration on fresh human skin obtained directly from surgery. Skin samples are therefore often kept frozen until use. The present chapter present the available literature on the topic. Storage of human...... skin at -20oC causes structural changes in the upper Stratum Corneum observable with image techniques such as multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy. The presently available literature does, however, not support that the observed structural damage to the integrity is sufficient to cause...

  9. Allocation of Public Resources for Psychological Therapy between Types of Mental Health Condition: Towards Structural Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustin, Don

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses issues of allocating public resources efficiently between mental health conditions that are associated with different levels of disability, and presents an adaptation of an established framework to help decision-making in this area. The adapted framework refers to psychological interventions that are universal, indicated,…

  10. 76 FR 8316 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ....g., speed limitations, avoidance of severe weather conditions, etc.). (c) Operational limitations... differential pressure. (3) Freedom from aeroelastic instability must be shown up to the speeds defined in Sec... instability must be shown to increased speeds, so that the margins intended by Sec. 25.629(b)(2) are...

  11. Effect of processing conditions on structure development and mechanical response of Si-Mn 'TRIP' steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zrník, J.; Muránsky, Ondrej; Stejskal, O.; Lukáš, Petr; Horňák, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 483, - (2008), s. 71-75 ISSN 0921-5093 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : TRIP steel * austenite conditioning * transformation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2008

  12. Characteristic community structure of Florida's subtropical wetlands: the Florida wetland condition index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depending upon the classification scheme applied, there are between 10 and 45 different wetland types in Florida. Land use and land cover change has a marked effect on wetland condition, and different wetland types are affected differentially depending on many abiotic and biotic ...

  13. Effect of pyrolysis conditions and composition on the char structure and char yield of biomass chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Steibel, Markus; Spliethoff, Hartmut

    slow (10 K/min) and fast heating (600 K/min) by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), elementary analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were conducted to determine the effect of operating conditions and the biomass composition on the char...

  14. Effect of conditioning by PAM polymers with different charges on the structural and characteristic evolutions of water treatment residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W L; Wang, Y L; Chen, Y J

    2013-11-01

    Three types of polyacrylamide (PAM) flocculants with different charges (cationic PAM WD4960, nonionic PAM M351, and anionic PAM WDA110) were used for water treatment residuals (WTRs) conditioning, and the physicochemical, morphological and structural characteristics of raw and conditioned WTRs were investigated. Rheological methods were employed to analyze the internal structural transition between the raw and conditioned WTRs under a typical dosage of WD4960. Results showed that when the raw WTRs were conditioned with the polymers, the optimum dosage of WD4960 was 4.82 g/kg total suspended solid (TSS) while that of both M351 and WDA110 was 7.24 g/kg TSS. The residual PAM content in the supernatant of the WTR matrix conditioned at the optimum WD4960 dosage was 5.59 mg/L, which is the least among the supernatants obtained with the three types of PAM. Furthermore, the visible fulvic acid (FA) in the supernatant disappeared and the intensity of the ultraviolet FA decreased. The average diameter of irregularly shaped aggregates in the WTR suspensions increased from 35.73 μm to several hundred micrometers with increasing PAM dosage. The size of WTR aggregates conditioned at the optimum WD4960 dosage was much larger than that of aggregates obtained at the optimum M351 or WDA110 dosages. Two-dimensional fractal dimension (D2) values presented an increasing trend with increasing PAM dosage. D2 values of the conditioned WTR aggregates were 1.87, 1.76, and 1.83 at optimum WD4960, M351, and WDA110 dosages, respectively. The cationic PAM (CPAM) WD4960 thus appears to be a more ideal conditioner for WTRs. Consistent relationships were observed among the capillary suction time (CST), average particle size, and D2 values of the conditioned WTR aggregates at the optimum WD4960 dosage. Mass fractal dimensions (D(f)) indicated that both the raw and WD4960-conditioned WTRs behave like weak-link flocs/aggregates. D(f) values (log G'-log TSS) of the WTR aggregates before and after

  15. Boundary Conditions in 2D Numerical and 3D Exact Models for Cylindrical Bending Analysis of Functionally Graded Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tornabene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cylindrical bending condition for structural models is very common in the literature because it allows an incisive and simple verification of the proposed plate and shell models. In the present paper, 2D numerical approaches (the Generalized Differential Quadrature (GDQ and the finite element (FE methods are compared with an exact 3D shell solution in the case of free vibrations of functionally graded material (FGM plates and shells. The first 18 vibration modes carried out through the 3D exact model are compared with the frequencies obtained via the 2D numerical models. All the 18 frequencies obtained via the 3D exact model are computed when the structures have simply supported boundary conditions for all the edges. If the same boundary conditions are used in the 2D numerical models, some modes are missed. Some of these missed modes can be obtained modifying the boundary conditions imposing free edges through the direction perpendicular to the direction of cylindrical bending. However, some modes cannot be calculated via the 2D numerical models even when the boundary conditions are modified because the cylindrical bending requirements cannot be imposed for numerical solutions in the curvilinear edges by definition. These features are investigated in the present paper for different geometries (plates, cylinders, and cylindrical shells, types of FGM law, lamination sequences, and thickness ratios.

  16. Efficient redundancy? : How socio-cognitive structures impact innovation under complex conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candiani, Juan; Markus, A.

    2017-01-01

    Building on the knowledge-based view of the firm and organizational design perspective we explore how socio-cognitive structures within organizations impact the success of recombinant innovation. We introduce the efficiency- redundancy paradox – knowledge creation requires efficient internal

  17. Structural response of reactor-core hexcan subassemblies subjected to dynamic overpressurization under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional structural analysis for the evaluation of a single core subassembly due to internal overpressure associated with possible failure of fuel pins having high fission gas plenum pressure. Structural models are developed for the subassemblies and their surroundings with emphasis on the critical physical aspects of the problem. With these models the strains, deformations and the extent of permanent damage (plastic strain) to the subassemblies can be assessed. The nonlinear structural analyses was performed with a finite element program called STRAW (Structural Transient Response of Assembly Wrappers). This finite element program is applicable to nonlinear large displacement problems. The results of this study indicate that the permanent deformation (damage) is strongly influenced by the rise time (time to reach peak pressure) of the pressure pulse and the pressure in the fuel pin. The rise time is influenced by the opening time of the flow path for release of gas from the fuel pin plenum. Several examples are illustrated with various rise times and pressure magnitudes and the resulting permanent deformation of the hexcan wall

  18. HELP: Handheld Emergency Logistics Program for Generating Structured Requests for Resources in Stressful Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    facilities can be used in base camps, command posts, and maintenance facilities. Types of vertical construction include: Wood and Masonry Structures...Year Over Year in the Third Quarter,” Press Release, 2010. 172 [25] S. Ackerman, “In first, navy will put 4G network on ships,” Wired, vol

  19. Electrochemical Sensors for Monitoring the Corrosion Conditions of Reinforced Concrete Structures: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita B. Figueira

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several methods for corrosion monitoring of reinforced concrete structures (RCS have been proposed in the last few decades. These systems may be used either in new, existing or repaired structures. The corrosion monitoring can be performed by different methodologies. These may or may not be destructive, use different degrees of complexity and cost, and provide information on the progression and kinetics of the corrosion phenomena. The destructive methods are limited to sampling. Therefore, these may not be representative of the whole structure, which is extremely important in RCS with large heterogeneities both in terms of materials used and in terms of the exposure environment. Within this context, non-destructive methods have been widely developed, which are intended to provide quick information about the entire structure. Ideally, these systems should be able to detect the corrosion state of the steel inside the concrete, the main causes of corrosion and the evolution of corrosion phenomena over time. This manuscript reviews and summarizes the actual state of the art and the main achievements in the field of electrochemical sensors based on non-destructive methods for corrosion monitoring of RCS in the last few years. The challenges and perspectives in this field will also be discussed.

  20. Structural integrity assessment and stress measurement of chasnupp-1 fuel assembly skeleton: under tensile loading condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel assembly (FA structure without fuel rods is called FA skeleton which is a long and flexible structure. This study has been made in an attempt to find the structural integrity of the Chashma Nuclear power plant-1 FA skeleton at room temperature. The finite element (FE analysis has been performed using ANSYS, in order to determine the elongation of the FA skeleton as well as the location of max. stress and stresses developed in axial direction under tensile load of 9800 N or 2 g being the FA handling or lifting load [Y. Zhang et al., Fuel Assembly Design Report, SNERDI, China, 1994]. The FE model of grids, guide thimbles with dash-pots and flow holes has been developed using Shell 181. It has been observed that FA skeleton elongation values obtained through FE analysis and experiment are comparable and show linear behaviors. Moreover, the values of stresses obtained at different locations of the guide thimbles are also comparable with the stress values of the experiment determined at the same locations through strain gauges. Therefore, validation of the FE methodology is confirmed. The values of stresses are less than the design limit of the materials used for the grid and the guide thimble. Therefore, the structural integrity criterion of CHASNUPP-1 FA skeleton is fulfilled safely.

  1. Structural integrity assessment and stress measurement of chasnupp-1 fuel assembly skeleton: under tensile loading condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem; Siddiqui, Ashfaq Ahmad; Murtaza, Ghulam; Maqbool, Abu Baker

    2017-12-01

    Fuel assembly (FA) structure without fuel rods is called FA skeleton which is a long and flexible structure. This study has been made in an attempt to find the structural integrity of the Chashma Nuclear power plant-1 FA skeleton at room temperature. The finite element (FE) analysis has been performed using ANSYS, in order to determine the elongation of the FA skeleton as well as the location of max. stress and stresses developed in axial direction under tensile load of 9800 N or 2 g being the FA handling or lifting load [Y. Zhang et al., Fuel Assembly Design Report, SNERDI, China, 1994]. The FE model of grids, guide thimbles with dash-pots and flow holes has been developed using Shell 181. It has been observed that FA skeleton elongation values obtained through FE analysis and experiment are comparable and show linear behaviors. Moreover, the values of stresses obtained at different locations of the guide thimbles are also comparable with the stress values of the experiment determined at the same locations through strain gauges. Therefore, validation of the FE methodology is confirmed. The values of stresses are less than the design limit of the materials used for the grid and the guide thimble. Therefore, the structural integrity criterion of CHASNUPP-1 FA skeleton is fulfilled safely.

  2. Effect of Fast Pyrolysis Conditions on Structural Transformation and Reactivity of Herbaceous Biomasses at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker D.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    of organic and inorganic matter on the char structural transformations. The results indicate no influence of the free radicals on char reactivity and burnout. The formation of free radicals in fast pyrolysis is related to the differences in the ash composition, namely presence of K+ ions in the wheat straw...

  3. Canadian Dream, Capitalism, and the State: Structural Conditions of Youth Gambling in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmaki, Reza; Zangeneh, Masood

    2009-01-01

    Adolescent gambling is a major social problem in North America. Over the years this problem has given rise to a number of theoretical explanations. This paper argues that the existing explanations of youth gambling underestimate the influence of broader structural forces conducive to youth gambling problem and, instead, provide micro analyses that…

  4. Structural characterization of the degradation products of a minor natural sweet diterpene glycoside Rebaudioside M under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Indra; Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash; Markosyan, Avetik

    2014-01-14

    Degradation of rebaudioside M, a minor sweet component of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, under conditions that simulated extreme pH and temperature conditions has been studied. Thus, rebaudioside M was treated with 0.1 M phosphoric acid solution (pH 2.0) and 80 °C temperature for 24 h. Experimental results indicated that rebaudioside M under low pH and higher temperature yielded three minor degradation compounds, whose structural characterization was performed on the basis of 1D (1H-, 13C-) & 2D (COSY, HSQC, HMBC) NMR, HRMS, MS/MS spectral data as well as enzymatic and acid hydrolysis studies.

  5. An Improved Gaussian Mixture Model for Damage Propagation Monitoring of an Aircraft Wing Spar under Changing Structural Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Fang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technology is considered to be a key technology to reduce the maintenance cost and meanwhile ensure the operational safety of aircraft structures. It has gradually developed from theoretic and fundamental research to real-world engineering applications in recent decades. The problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions is a main issue for the aerospace engineering applications of SHM technology. Among the existing SHM methods, Guided Wave (GW) and piezoelectric sensor-based SHM technique is a promising method due to its high damage sensitivity and long monitoring range. Nevertheless the reliability problem should be addressed. Several methods including environmental parameter compensation, baseline signal dependency reduction and data normalization, have been well studied but limitations remain. This paper proposes a damage propagation monitoring method based on an improved Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). It can be used on-line without any structural mechanical model and a priori knowledge of damage and time-varying conditions. With this method, a baseline GMM is constructed first based on the GW features obtained under time-varying conditions when the structure under monitoring is in the healthy state. When a new GW feature is obtained during the on-line damage monitoring process, the GMM can be updated by an adaptive migration mechanism including dynamic learning and Gaussian components split-merge. The mixture probability distribution structure of the GMM and the number of Gaussian components can be optimized adaptively. Then an on-line GMM can be obtained. Finally, a best match based Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence is studied to measure the migration degree between the baseline GMM and the on-line GMM to reveal the weak cumulative changes of the damage propagation mixed in the time-varying influence. A wing spar of an aircraft is used to validate the proposed method. The results indicate that the crack

  6. An Improved Gaussian Mixture Model for Damage Propagation Monitoring of an Aircraft Wing Spar under Changing Structural Boundary Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Fang, Fang

    2016-02-26

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technology is considered to be a key technology to reduce the maintenance cost and meanwhile ensure the operational safety of aircraft structures. It has gradually developed from theoretic and fundamental research to real-world engineering applications in recent decades. The problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions is a main issue for the aerospace engineering applications of SHM technology. Among the existing SHM methods, Guided Wave (GW) and piezoelectric sensor-based SHM technique is a promising method due to its high damage sensitivity and long monitoring range. Nevertheless the reliability problem should be addressed. Several methods including environmental parameter compensation, baseline signal dependency reduction and data normalization, have been well studied but limitations remain. This paper proposes a damage propagation monitoring method based on an improved Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). It can be used on-line without any structural mechanical model and a priori knowledge of damage and time-varying conditions. With this method, a baseline GMM is constructed first based on the GW features obtained under time-varying conditions when the structure under monitoring is in the healthy state. When a new GW feature is obtained during the on-line damage monitoring process, the GMM can be updated by an adaptive migration mechanism including dynamic learning and Gaussian components split-merge. The mixture probability distribution structure of the GMM and the number of Gaussian components can be optimized adaptively. Then an on-line GMM can be obtained. Finally, a best match based Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence is studied to measure the migration degree between the baseline GMM and the on-line GMM to reveal the weak cumulative changes of the damage propagation mixed in the time-varying influence. A wing spar of an aircraft is used to validate the proposed method. The results indicate that the crack

  7. Effect of structural heterogeneity water-coal fuel conditions and characteristics of ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syrodoy S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the particle ignition of coal-water fuel (CWF with a joint course of the main processes of a thermal (thermal conductivity, evaporation, filtration heat and mass transfer, thermal decomposition of the organic part has been solved. According to the results of numerical simulation ways of describing the extent of the influence of the thermophysical properties on the characteristics and conditions of ignition WCF have been set.

  8. Effects of casting defects, matrix structures and loading conditions on the fatigue strength of ductile irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endo Masahiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel method is presented to estimate the lower bound of the scatter in fatigue limit of ductile iron based upon the information of microstructural in homogeneities and loading conditions. The predictive capability of the method was verified by comparing to the experimental data obtained by the rotating-bending, torsion and combined tension-torsion fatigue tests for ductile irons with ferritic, pearlitic and bulls-eye (ferritic/pearlitic microstructures.

  9. Sidewalk Landscape Structure and Thermal Conditions for Child and Adult Pedestrians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Chanam; Kim, Jun-Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Walking is being promoted for health and transportation purposes across all climatic regions in the US and beyond. Despite this, an uncomfortable microclimate condition along sidewalks is one of the major deterrents of walking, and more empirical research is needed to determine the risks of heat exposure to pedestrians while walking. This study examined the effect of street trees and grass along sidewalks on air temperatures. A series of thermal images were taken at the average heights of adults and children in the US to objectively measure the air temperatures of 10 sidewalk segments in College Station, TX, USA. After controlling the other key physical environmental conditions, sidewalks with more trees or wider grass buffer areas had lower air temperatures than those with less vegetation. Children were exposed to higher temperatures due to the greater exposure or proximity to the pavement surface, which tends to have higher radiant heat. Multivariate regression analysis suggested that the configuration of trees and grass buffers along the sidewalks helped to promote pleasant thermal conditions and reduced the differences in ambient air temperatures measured at child and adult heights. This study suggests that street trees and vegetated ground help reduce the air temperatures, leading to more thermally comfortable environments for both child and adult pedestrians in warm climates. The thermal implications of street landscape require further attention by researchers and policy makers that are interested in promoting outdoor walking. PMID:29346312

  10. Nitrifying bacterial community structures and their nitrification performance under sufficient and limited inorganic carbon conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshikazu; Whang, Liang-Ming; Chiang, Ting-Yu; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Chevalier, Lizette R; Chen, Mei-Chun; Wu, Yi-Ju

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that different inorganic carbon (IC) conditions enrich different ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) populations by operating two laboratory-scale continuous-flow bioreactors fed with 15 and 100 mg IC/L, respectively. During this study, both bioreactors maintained satisfactory nitrification performance and stably oxidized 250 mg N/L of influent ammonium without nitrite accumulation. Based on results of cloning/sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism targeting on the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene, Nitrosomonas nitrosa lineage was identified as the dominant AOB population in the high-IC bioreactor, while Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosomonas nitrosa lineage AOB were dominant in the low-IC bioreactor. Results of real-time polymerase chain reactions for Nitrobacter and Nitrospira 16S rRNA genes indicated that Nitrospira was the predominant NOB population in the high-IC bioreactor, while Nitrobacter was the dominant NOB in the low-IC bioreactor. Furthermore, batch experiment results suggest that N. europaea and Nitrobacter populations are proliferated in the low-IC bioreactor due to their higher rates under low IC conditions despite the fact that these two populations have been identified as weak competitors, compared with N. nitrosa and Nitrospira, under low ammonium/nitrite environments. This study revealed that in addition to ammonium/nitrite concentrations, limited IC conditions may also be important in selecting dominant AOB/NOB communities of nitrifying bioreactors.

  11. Boron-Doped Graphite for High Work Function Carbon Electrode in Printable Hole-Conductor-Free Mesoscopic Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Miao; Tian, Chengbo; Hu, Yue; Mei, Anyi; Rong, Yaoguang; Xiong, Yuli; Xu, Mi; Sheng, Yusong; Jiang, Pei; Hou, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Xiaotong; Qin, Fei; Han, Hongwei

    2017-09-20

    Work function of carbon electrodes is critical in obtaining high open-circuit voltage as well as high device performance for carbon-based perovskite solar cells. Herein, we propose a novel strategy to upshift work function of carbon electrode by incorporating boron atom into graphite lattice and employ it in printable hole-conductor-free mesoscopic perovskite solar cells. The high-work-function boron-doped carbon electrode facilitates hole extraction from perovskite as verified by photoluminescence. Meanwhile, the carbon electrode is endowed with an improved conductivity because of a higher graphitization carbon of boron-doped graphite. These advantages of the boron-doped carbon electrode result in a low charge transfer resistance at carbon/perovskite interface and an extended carrier recombination lifetime. Together with the merit of both high work function and conductivity, the power conversion efficiency of hole-conductor-free mesoscopic perovskite solar cells is increased from 12.4% for the pristine graphite electrode-based cells to 13.6% for the boron-doped graphite electrode-based cells with an enhanced open-circuit voltage and fill factor.

  12. Analyses of a steel containment vessel with an outer contact structure under severe internal overpressurization conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Many Mark-I and Mark-II BWR plants are designed with a steel vessel as the primary containment. Typically, the steel containment vessel (SCV) is enclosed within a reinforced concrete shield building with only a small gap (50--90mm) separating the two structures. This paper describes finite element analyses performed to evaluate the effects of contact and friction between a steel containment vessel and an outer contact structure when the containment vessel is subjected to large internal pressures. These computations were motivated by a joint program on containment integrity involving the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories for testing model containments

  13. [Forming of the visual cognitive structures in the monkey conditioned-reflex behaviour: the dependence on the sensory information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkin, K N; Chueva, I V

    2008-01-01

    In monkeys, changes in size and shape of figures led to a significant decrease of correct solutions in training and a considerable increase of refusals from solution of tasks as well as the time of their motor response. The invariance of differentiation in this case was achieved after additional training. The data obtained show that, based on the stimulus sensory processing in conditioned-reflex training, in the long-term memory some differentiating signs are formed: the cognitive structures (the functional neurophysiological mechanisms) maintaining the classification of visual images. With these structures, temporary conditioned connection will be established. Their formation will be determined by the type of sensory information and provided for by existence in the long-term memory of separate subsystems for spatial as well as non-spatial information.

  14. Monte Carlo thermodynamic and structural properties of the TIP4P water model: dependence on the computational conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Manuel Marques Cordeiro

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Classical Monte Carlo simulations were carried out on the NPT ensemble at 25°C and 1 atm, aiming to investigate the ability of the TIP4P water model [Jorgensen, Chandrasekhar, Madura, Impey and Klein; J. Chem. Phys., 79 (1983 926] to reproduce the newest structural picture of liquid water. The results were compared with recent neutron diffraction data [Soper; Bruni and Ricci; J. Chem. Phys., 106 (1997 247]. The influence of the computational conditions on the thermodynamic and structural results obtained with this model was also analyzed. The findings were compared with the original ones from Jorgensen et al [above-cited reference plus Mol. Phys., 56 (1985 1381]. It is notice that the thermodynamic results are dependent on the boundary conditions used, whereas the usual radial distribution functions g(O/O(r and g(O/H(r do not depend on them.

  15. Structure of the channeling electrons wave functions under dynamical chaos conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shul’ga, N.F.; Syshchenko, V.V.; Tarnovsky, A.I.; Isupov, A.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The stationary wave functions of fast electrons axially channeling in the silicon crystal near [1 1 0] direction have been found numerically for integrable and non-integrable cases, for which the classical motion is regular and chaotic, respectively. The nodal structure of the wave functions in the quasi-classical region, where the energy levels density is high, is agreed with quantum chaos theory predictions.

  16. Genetic Structures and Conditions of their Expression, which Allow Receiving Native Recombinant Proteins with High Output

    OpenAIRE

    Michael M. Shavlovsky, PhD, ScD¹; Irina V. Morozova¹; Dmitry S. Polyakov, PhD¹; Tatyana D. Aleynikova, PhD¹; Anna M. Kern²; Natalya A. Grudinina, PhD¹; Kirill V. Solovyov, PhD¹

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of obtaining native recombinant amyloidogenic proteins by creating genetic constructs encoding fusion proteins of target proteins with Super Folder Green Fluorescent Protein (sfGFP). In this study, we show that the structures, containing the sfGFP gene, provide a synthesis, within a bacterial system, of fusion proteins with minimal formation of inclusion bodies. Constructs containing genes of the target proteins in the 3'-terminal region of the sfGFP gene follo...

  17. Experimental and Empirical Time to Corrosion of Reinforced Concrete Structures under Different Curing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Abouhussien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structures, especially those in marine environments, are commonly subjected to high concentrations of chlorides, which eventually leads to corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel. The total time to corrosion of such structures may be divided into three stages: corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods. This paper evaluates, both empirically and experimentally, the expected time to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures. The tested reinforced concrete samples were subjected to ten alternative curing techniques, including hot, cold, and normal temperatures, prior to testing. The corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods in this investigation were experimentally monitored by an accelerated corrosion test performed on reinforced concrete samples. Alternatively, the corrosion initiation time for counterpart samples was empirically predicted using Fick’s second law of diffusion for comparison. The results showed that the corrosion initiation periods obtained experimentally were comparable to those obtained empirically. The corrosion initiation was found to occur at the first jump of the current measurement in the accelerated corrosion test which matched the half-cell potential reading of around −350 mV.

  18. Optimized extraction conditions from high power-ECRIS by dedicated dielectric structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachter, L.; Dobrescu, S.; Stiebing, K.E.

    2012-01-01

    The MD-method of enhancing the ion output from ECR ion sources is well established and basically works via two mechanisms, the regenerative injection of cold electrons from an emissive dielectric layer on the plasma chamber walls and via the cutting of compensating wall currents, which results in an improved ion extraction from the plasma. As this extraction from the plasma becomes a more and more challenging issue for modern ECRIS installations with high microwave power input, a series of experiments was carried out at the 14 GHz ECRIS of the Institut fuer Kernphysik in Frankfurt/Main, Germany (IKF). In contrast to our earlier work, in these experiments emphasis was put on the second of the above mechanisms namely to influence the sheath potential at the extraction by structures with special dielectric properties. Two different types of dielectric structures, Tantalum-oxide and Aluminium oxide (the latter also being used for the MD-method) with dramatically different electrical properties were mounted on the extraction electrode of the IKF-ECRIS, facing the plasma. For both structures an increase of the extracted ion beam currents for middle and high charge states by 60-80 % was observed. The method can also be applied to other ECR ion sources for increasing the extracted ion beam performances. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  19. Mesoscopic Oxide Double Layer as Electron Specific Contact for Highly Efficient and UV Stable Perovskite Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Giordano, Fabrizio; Zakeeruddin, Shaik Mohammed; Grätzel, Michael

    2018-03-15

    The solar to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has recently reached 22.7%, exceeding that of competing thin film photovoltaics and the market leader polycrystalline silicon. Further augmentation of the PCE toward the Shockley-Queisser limit of 33.5% warrants suppression of radiationless carrier recombination by judicious engineering of the interface between the light harvesting perovskite and the charge carrier extraction layers. Here, we introduce a mesoscopic oxide double layer as electron selective contact consisting of a scaffold of TiO 2 nanoparticles covered by a thin film of SnO 2 , either in amorphous (a-SnO 2 ), crystalline (c-SnO 2 ), or nanocrystalline (quantum dot) form (SnO 2 -NC). We find that the band gap of a-SnO 2 is larger than that of the crystalline (tetragonal) polymorph leading to a corresponding lift in its conduction band edge energy which aligns it perfectly with the conduction band edge of both the triple cation perovskite and the TiO 2 scaffold. This enables very fast electron extraction from the light perovskite, suppressing the notorious hysteresis in the current-voltage ( J-V) curves and retarding nonradiative charge carrier recombination. As a result, we gain a remarkable 170 mV in open circuit photovoltage ( V oc ) by replacing the crystalline SnO 2 by an amorphous phase. Because of the quantum size effect, the band gap of our SnO 2 -NC particles is larger than that of bulk SnO 2 causing their conduction band edge to shift also to a higher energy thereby increasing the V oc . However, for SnO 2 -NC there remains a barrier for electron injection into the TiO 2 scaffold decreasing the fill factor of the device and lowering the PCE. Introducing the a-SnO 2 coated mp-TiO 2 scaffold as electron extraction layer not only increases the V oc and PEC of the solar cells but also render them resistant to UV light which forebodes well for outdoor deployment of these new PSC architectures.

  20. Exploring the Impacts of Housing Condition on Migrants’ Mental Health in Nanxiang, Shanghai: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rapid urbanization and associated rural-to-urban migration has brought in enormous economic benefits in Chinese cities, one of the negative externalities include adverse effects upon the migrant workers’ mental health. The links between housing conditions and mental health are well-established in healthy city and community planning scholarship. Nonetheless, there has thusfar been no Chinese study deciphering the links between housing conditions and mental health accounting for macro-level community environments, and no study has previously examined the nature of the relationships in locals and migrants. To overcome this research gap, we hypothesized that housing conditions may have a direct and indirect effects upon mental which may be mediated by neighbourhood satisfaction. We tested this hypothesis with the help of a household survey of 368 adult participants in Nanxiang Town, Shanghai, employing a structural equation modeling approach. Our results point to the differential pathways via which housing conditions effect mental health in locals and migrants. For locals, housing conditions have direct effects on mental health, while as for migrants, housing conditions have indirect effects on mental health, mediated via neighborhood satisfaction. Our findings have significant policy implications on building an inclusive and harmonious society. Upstream-level community interventions in the form of sustainable planning and designing of migrant neighborhoods can promote sense of community, social capital and support, thereby improving mental health and overall mental capital of Chinese cities.

  1. Exploring the Impacts of Housing Condition on Migrants’ Mental Health in Nanxiang, Shanghai: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Sarkar, Chinmoy; Geng, Huizhi

    2018-01-01

    Although rapid urbanization and associated rural-to-urban migration has brought in enormous economic benefits in Chinese cities, one of the negative externalities include adverse effects upon the migrant workers’ mental health. The links between housing conditions and mental health are well-established in healthy city and community planning scholarship. Nonetheless, there has thusfar been no Chinese study deciphering the links between housing conditions and mental health accounting for macro-level community environments, and no study has previously examined the nature of the relationships in locals and migrants. To overcome this research gap, we hypothesized that housing conditions may have a direct and indirect effects upon mental which may be mediated by neighbourhood satisfaction. We tested this hypothesis with the help of a household survey of 368 adult participants in Nanxiang Town, Shanghai, employing a structural equation modeling approach. Our results point to the differential pathways via which housing conditions effect mental health in locals and migrants. For locals, housing conditions have direct effects on mental health, while as for migrants, housing conditions have indirect effects on mental health, mediated via neighborhood satisfaction. Our findings have significant policy implications on building an inclusive and harmonious society. Upstream-level community interventions in the form of sustainable planning and designing of migrant neighborhoods can promote sense of community, social capital and support, thereby improving mental health and overall mental capital of Chinese cities. PMID:29382174

  2. Exploring the Impacts of Housing Condition on Migrants' Mental Health in Nanxiang, Shanghai: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Miao, Siyu; Sarkar, Chinmoy; Geng, Huizhi; Lu, Yi

    2018-01-29

    Although rapid urbanization and associated rural-to-urban migration has brought in enormous economic benefits in Chinese cities, one of the negative externalities include adverse effects upon the migrant workers' mental health. The links between housing conditions and mental health are well-established in healthy city and community planning scholarship. Nonetheless, there has thusfar been no Chinese study deciphering the links between housing conditions and mental health accounting for macro-level community environments, and no study has previously examined the nature of the relationships in locals and migrants. To overcome this research gap, we hypothesized that housing conditions may have a direct and indirect effects upon mental which may be mediated by neighbourhood satisfaction. We tested this hypothesis with the help of a household survey of 368 adult participants in Nanxiang Town, Shanghai, employing a structural equation modeling approach. Our results point to the differential pathways via which housing conditions effect mental health in locals and migrants. For locals, housing conditions have direct effects on mental health, while as for migrants, housing conditions have indirect effects on mental health, mediated via neighborhood satisfaction. Our findings have significant policy implications on building an inclusive and harmonious society. Upstream-level community interventions in the form of sustainable planning and designing of migrant neighborhoods can promote sense of community, social capital and support, thereby improving mental health and overall mental capital of Chinese cities.

  3. Structure of the tree stratum of three swamp forest communities in southern Brazil under different soil conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Carla Mancino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Restinga forests are commonly known to be plant communities rather poor in tree species. This study aimed to describe and explain the association between the floristic-structural similarities and the environmental conditions in three Swamp Restinga Forest communities in southern Brazil. In 13 plots of 100 m2 each, we sampled all individual trees (circumference at breast height >12 cm and height ≥3 m. We collected soil samples in each plot for chemical and textural analyses. Phytosociological parameters were calculated and different structural variables were compared between areas. The density of individuals did not differ between areas; however, the maximum height and abundance of species differed between the site with Histosols and the other two sites with Gleysols. Further, a canonical correspondence analysis based on a matrix of vegetation and that of environmental characteristics explained 31.5% of the total variation. The high floristic and environmental heterogeneity indicate that swamp-forests can shelter many species with low frequency. Most species were generalists that were not exclusive to this type of forest. Overall, our study showed that swamp-forests within the same region can show considerable differences in composition and structure and can include species-rich communities, mostly due to the presence of species with a broader distribution in the Atlantic Rainforest domain on sites with less stressful environmental conditions and without waterlogged conditions.

  4. Effect of formation conditions on biochars: Compositional and structural properties of cellulose, lignin, and pine biochars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, David W.; Wershaw, Robert L.; Rostad, Colleen E.; Kelly, Charlene N.

    2012-01-01

    The application of biochar to soil has been proposed as a long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide in terrestrial ecosystems while providing improved soil fertility and increased crop production. Because biochar differs from the widely documented activated carbon, initial characterization information on effects of formation conditions on physical and chemical properties of biochar is important prior to its large-scale incorporation into soils. Plant biomass is composed primarily of cellulose and lignin. As a means of predicting biochar characteristics, samples of cellulose, lignin, and pine were charred under a nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 250 °C to 500 °C for times ranging from 1 h to 168 h. Mass loss, elemental composition (carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen), Fourier transform infrared and 13 C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra of the biochars produced were compared. Mass loss combined with NMR spectrometry showed that the initial rapid loss of material is attributed to aliphatic components, which are either lost or converted to aromatic carbon early in the charring process, and oxygen was lost more rapidly than carbon. The biomass contains a labile oxygen fraction that is quickly removed or lost upon initial heating, and a recalcitrant oxygen fraction which remains fixed in the char. If biochar is to be incorporated into agricultural soils, formation conditions should be tailored to optimize desirable characteristics, such as recalcitrance to degradation, soil fertility and pollutant sequestration, and minimize less desirable characteristics of degradability or low yield (mass loss). -- Highlights: ► Effects of formation conditions on physical and chemical properties of biochar. ► Cellulose, lignin, pine charred under inert atmosphere at various times and temperatures. ► Mass loss, elemental composition (C, H, and O), FTIR, NMR spectra compared. ► Aliphatic components either lost or converted to aromatic carbon early in

  5. Neuro System Structure for Vehicle Recognition and Count in Floating Bridge Specific Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Beroš

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research of the sophisticated vehiclerecognition and count system based on the application of theneural network. The basic elements of neural network andadaptive logic network for object recognition are discussed. Theadaptive logic network solution ability based on simple digitalcircuits as crucial in real-time applications is pointed out. Thesimulation based on the use of reduced high level noise pictureand a tree 2. 7. software have shown excellent results. The consideredand simulated adaptive neural network based systemwith its good recognition and convergence is a useful real-timesolution for vehicle recognition and count in the floating bridgesevere conditions.

  6. Modelling Conditional and Unconditional Heteroskedasticity with Smoothly Time-Varying Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amado, Christina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    in the conditional and unconditional variances where the transition between regimes over time is smooth. A modelling strategy for these new time-varying parameter GARCH models is developed. It relies on a sequence of Lagrange multiplier tests, and the adequacy of the estimated models is investigated by Lagrange...... multiplier type misspecification tests. Finite-sample properties of these procedures and tests are examined by simulation. An empirical application to daily stock returns and another one to daily exchange rate returns illustrate the functioning and properties of our modelling strategy in practice...

  7. Experimental and theoretical study of electronic structure of aluminum in extreme conditions with X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Festa, Floriane

    2013-01-01

    Matter in extreme conditions belongs to Warm Dense Matter regime which lays between dense plasma regime and condensed matter. This regime is still not well known, indeed it is very complex to generate such plasma in the laboratory to get experimental data and validate models. The goal of this thesis is to study electronic structure of aluminum in extreme conditions with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Experimentally aluminum has reached high densities and high temperatures, up to now unexplored. An X-ray source has also been generated to probe highly compressed aluminum. Two spectrometers have recorded aluminum absorption spectra and aluminum density and temperature conditions have been deduced thanks to optical diagnostics. Experimental spectra have been compared to ab initio spectra, calculated in the same conditions. The theoretical goal was to validate the calculation method in high densities and high temperatures regime with the study of K-edge absorption modifications. We also used absorption spectra to study the metal-non metal transition which takes place at low density (density ≤ solid density). This transition could be study with electronic structure modifications of the system. (author) [fr

  8. The effect of physiological conditions on the surface structure of proteins: Setting the scene for human digestion of emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Valderrama, J.; Gunning, A. P.; Ridout, M. J.; Wilde, P. J.; Morris, V. J.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding and manipulating the interfacial mechanisms that control human digestion of food emulsions is a crucial step towards improved control of dietary intake. This article reports initial studies on the effects of the physiological conditions within the stomach on the properties of the film formed by the milk protein ( β -lactoglobulin) at the air-water interface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface tension and surface rheology techniques were used to visualize and examine the effect of gastric conditions on the network structure. The effects of changes in temperature, pH and ionic strength on a pre-formed interfacial structure were characterized in order to simulate the actual digestion process. Changes in ionic strength had little effect on the surface properties. In isolation, acidification reduced both the dilatational and the surface shear modulus, mainly due to strong repulsive electrostatic interactions within the surface layer and raising the temperature to body temperature accelerated the rearrangements within the surface layer, resulting in a decrease of the dilatational response and an increase of surface pressure. Together pH and temperature display an unexpected synergism, independent of the ionic strength. Thus, exposure of a pre-formed interfacial β -lactoglobulin film to simulated gastric conditions reduced the surface dilatational modulus and surface shear moduli. This is attributed to a weakening of the surface network in which the surface rearrangements of the protein prior to exposure to gastric conditions might play a crucial role.

  9. The influence of the crust layer on RPV structural failure under severe accident condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Jianfeng, E-mail: jianfeng-mao@163.com [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Li, Xiangqing [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Bao, Shiyi [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Luo, Lijia [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Gao, Zengliang [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior. • The RPV failure is investigated in depth under severe accident. • The creep and plastic damage mainly contribute to RPV failure. • An elastic core in RPV wall is essential for ensuring RPV integrity. • The multiaxial state of stress accelerates the total damage evolution. - Abstract: The so called ‘in-vessel retention (IVR)’ is regarded as a severe accident (SA) mitigation strategy, which is widely used in most of advanced nuclear power plants. The effectiveness of IVR strategy is to employ the external water flooding to cool the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The RPV integrity has to be maintained within a required period during the IVR period. The degraded melting core is assumed to be arrested in the lower head (LH) to form the melting pool that is bounded by upper, side and lower crusts. Consequently, the existence of the crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior as well as failure process. In order to disclose this influence caused by the crust layer, a detailed investigation is conducted by using numerical simulation on the two RPVs with and without crust layer respectively. Taking the RPV without crust layer as a basis for the comparison, the present study assesses the likelihood and potential failure location, time and mode of the LH under the loadings of the critical heat flux (CHF) and slight internal pressure. Due to the high temperature melt on the inside and nucleate boiling on the outside, the RPV integrity is found to be compromised by melt-through, creep, elasticity, plasticity as well as thermal expansion. Through in-depth investigation, it is found that the creep and plasticity are of vital importance to the final structural failure, and the introduction of crust layer results in a significant change on field parameters in terms of temperature, deformation, stress(strain), triaxiality factor and total damage.

  10. Morphodynamics and sedimentary structures of bedforms under supercritical-flow conditions: new insights from flume experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartigny, Matthieu; Ventra, Dario; Postma, George; Van den Berg, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    Supercritical-flow phenomena are fairly common in modern sedimentary environments, yet their recognition remains subordinate in the rock record. This is commonly ascribed to the poor preservation potential of deposits from supercritical flows. However, the number of documented flume datasets on supercritical-flow dynamics and sedimentary structures is very limited in comparison with available data from subcritical-flow experiments, and our inability to identify and interpret such deposits might also be due to insufficient knowledge. This article describes the results of systematic experiments spanning the full range of supercritical-flow bedforms (antidunes, chutes-and-pools, cyclic steps) developed over mobile sand beds of variable grain sizes. Flow character and related bedform patterns are constrained through time-series measurements of the bed configuration, flow depth, flow velocity and Froude number. The results allow the refinement and extension of current bedform stability diagrams in the supercritical-flow domain. The experimental dataset and the stability diagram clarify morphodynamic relationships between antidune and cyclic steps. The onset of antidunes is controlled by the flow passing a threshold value of the Froude parameter. The transition from antidunes to cyclic steps instead is completed at a threshold value of the mobility parameter, and this transition spans a wider range of values for the mobility parameter as grain size increases. Sedimentary structures associated with the development of supercritical bedforms under variable aggradation rates are revealed by means of a synthetic aggradation technique and compared with examples from field and flume studies. Aggradation rate bears an important influence on the geometry of supercritical structures, and it should be held in consideration for the identification and mutual distinction of supercritical-flow bedforms in the stratigraphic record.

  11. Re-investigation of the crystal structure of enstatite under high-pressure conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periotto, Benedetta; Balic Zunic, Tonci; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    is mostly governed by significant volume decrease of the Mg1 and Mg2 octahedra, affecting in turn the kink of the tetrahedral chains, especially the TB chain of larger SiO4 tetrahedra. The Mg2 polyhedron undergoes the largest volume variation, 8.7%, due especially to the strong contraction of the longest...... in the pressure range investigated. Using the data on the pure orthoenstatite as reference, we can confirm the basic influences of element substitutions on the evolution of the crystal structure with pressure....

  12. Particular qualities of intranasal structures conditions in children with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layko А.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine particular qualities of the intranasal structures state in children and adolescent patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D. Patients and methods. During the period of 2013–2015 161 patients with type 1 were examined having been treated at the endocrinology department of the National Children's Specialized Hospital OKHMATDET and Children's Hospital №6 (Kyiv. The study group included 138 (85.7% patients with type-1 with the changes of intranasal structures, the control group — 23 (14.3% patients with type-1 with no pathology of upper respiratory tract. Among children of the main group — 92 (66.67% boys and 46 (33.33% girls aged 6–17. All children received clinical and laboratory examination in accordance with the protocols, as well as endoscopy of the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, paranasal sinus computed tomography (if necessary. Results. The most pronounced changes of intranasal structures in children with T1D in the study group were identified in the form of the curvature of the nasal septum (IEF. Endoscopic examination of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx in children of the main group diagnosed the hypertrophy of the inferior turbinate in 54% of patients, acute rhinosinusitis — 12%, chronic adenoids, adenoid vegetations in 10%, polyps — 2%. Microcirculatory disorders according to the nail bed capillaroscopy in patients of the main group were observed 3 times more often than the control group. As a result of bulbar microscopy for children with T1D and IEF vascular changes in a single non-niformity of the caliber of vessels were identified in — 75%, unit sakkulyation venules — 50% maendricus tortuosity of the capillaries — 75%, as well as single-venular anastomoses arteriolo — 37.5%. Intra- and extravascular changes in this group of patients have not been identified. Conclusions. The results of studies in children with T1D indicate the need for timely early diagnosis of the state of intranasal structures and

  13. DESIGN OF ENVELOPE STRUCTURES OF BUILDINGS WITH ACCOUNT FOR AND SUBJECT TO THE CONDITIONS OF ACOUSTIC PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giyasov Botir Iminzhonovich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The totality of all environmental influences, including domestic and industrial noise, must be taken into account in the design of building structures. Building envelopes that have appropriate acoustic protection properties are to be used in the practice of the acoustic protection (soundproofing, etc.. According to the principles of structural design, design of soundproof buildings can be broken down into the two groups: design with account for the security conditions (eg., windows, doors, walls, floors, and design of noise-proof structures (eg., partitions, suspended ceilings. Multi-optional design of building structures or buildings that meet the terms of acoustic protection requires a modern approach to the process of their development. Any progress in this area is associated with computer-aided design supported by multiple analysis options. Automation allows adjustments in order to comply with the variety of the input data or objective functions to provide for optimal cycling options. In this regard, the authors describe the algorithms and principles of design of building envelopes on the condition of and subject to the acoustic protection. The proposed solution represents a software package capable of performing a multivariate analysis of options of acoustic protection at each stage of building design. Practical application of the software package used to solve practical problems in the design of building envelopes has demonstrated its higher efficiency that the one of traditional design methods.

  14. Variation in avian egg shape and nest structure is explained by climatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert Duursma, Daisy; Gallagher, Rachael V; Price, J Jordan; Griffith, Simon C

    2018-03-07

    Why are avian eggs ovoid, while the eggs of most other vertebrates are symmetrical? The interaction between an egg and its environment likely drives selection that will shape eggs across evolutionary time. For example, eggs incubated in hot, arid regions face acute exposure to harsh climatic conditions relative to those in temperate zones, and this exposure will differ across nest types, with eggs in open nests being more exposed to direct solar radiation than those in enclosed nests. We examined the idea that the geographical distribution of both egg shapes and nest types should reflect selective pressures of key environmental parameters, such as ambient temperature and the drying capacity of air. We took a comparative approach, using 310 passerine species from Australia, many of which are found in some of the most extreme climates on earth. We found that, across the continent, egg elongation decreases and the proportion of species with domed nests with roofs increases in hotter and drier areas with sparse plant canopies. Eggs are most spherical in open nests in the hottest environments, and most elongate in domed nests in wetter, shadier environments. Our findings suggest that climatic conditions played a key role in the evolution of passerine egg shape.

  15. Wave fields in Weyl spaces and conditions for the existence of a preferred pseudo-Riemannian structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audretsch, J.; Gaehler, F.; Straumann, N.

    1984-01-01

    Previous axiomatic approaches to general relativity which led to a Weylian structure of space-time are supplemented by a physical condition which implies the existence of a preferred pseudo-Riemannian structure. It is stipulated that the trajectories of the short wave limit of classical massive fields agree with the geodesics of the Weyl connection and it is shown that this is equivalent to the vanishing of the covariant derivative of a ''mass function'' of nontrivial Weyl type.This in turn is proven to be equivalent to the existence of a preferred metric of the conformal structure such that the Weyl connection is reducible to a connection of the bundle of orthonormal frames belonging to this distinguished metric. (orig.)

  16. Overlapping communities reveal rich structure in large-scale brain networks during rest and task conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mahshid; McMenamin, Brenton W; Simon, Jonathan Z; Pessoa, Luiz

    2016-07-15

    Large-scale analysis of functional MRI data has revealed that brain regions can be grouped into stable "networks" or communities. In many instances, the communities are characterized as relatively disjoint. Although recent work indicates that brain regions may participate in multiple communities (for example, hub regions), the extent of community overlap is poorly understood. To address these issues, here we investigated large-scale brain networks based on "rest" and task human functional MRI data by employing a mixed-membership Bayesian model that allows each brain region to belong to all communities simultaneously with varying membership strengths. The approach allowed us to 1) compare the structure of disjoint and overlapping communities; 2) determine the relationship between functional diversity (how diverse is a region's functional activation repertoire) and membership diversity (how diverse is a region's affiliation to communities); 3) characterize overlapping community structure; 4) characterize the degree of non-modularity in brain networks; 5) study the distribution of "bridges", including bottleneck and hub bridges. Our findings revealed the existence of dense community overlap that was not limited to "special" hubs. Furthermore, the findings revealed important differences between community organization during rest and during specific task states. Overall, we suggest that dense overlapping communities are well suited to capture the flexible and task dependent mapping between brain regions and their functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Site condition, structure, and growth of baldcypress along tidal/non-tidal salinity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, K.W.; Duberstein, J.A.; Doyle, T.W.; Conner, W.H.; Day, Richard H.; Inabinette, L.W.; Whitbeck, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents changes in forest structure and growth potential of dominant trees in salt-impacted tidal and non-tidal baldcypress wetlands of the southeastern United States. We inventoried basal area and tree height, and monitored incremental growth (in basal area) of codominant baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) trees monthly, for over four years, to examine the inter-relationships among growth, site fertility, and soil physico-chemical characteristics. We found that salinity, soil total nitrogen (TN), flood duration, and flood frequency affected forest structure and growth the greatest. While mean annual site salinity ranged from 0.1 to 3.4 ppt, sites with salinity concentrations of 1.3 ppt or greater supported a basal area of less than 40 m2/ha. Where salinity was < 0.7 ppt, basal area was as high as 87 m2/ha. Stand height was also negatively affected by higher salinity. However, salinity related only to soil TN concentrations or to the relative balance between soil TN and total phosphorus (TP), which reached a maximum concentration between 1.2 and 2.0 ppt salinity. As estuarine influence shifts inland with sea-level rise, forest growth may become more strongly linked to salinity, not only due to salt effects but also as a consequence of site nitrogen imbalance.

  18. Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Arakere, A.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    A critical assessment is carried out of the microstructural changes in respect of the associated reductions in material mechanical properties and of the attendant ballistic-impact failure mechanisms in prototypical friction stir welding (FSW) joints found in armor structures made of high-performance aluminum alloys (including solution-strengthened and age-hardenable aluminum alloy grades). It is argued that due to the large width of FSW joints found in thick aluminum-armor weldments, the overall ballistic performance of the armor is controlled by the ballistic limits of its weld zones (e.g., heat-affected zone, the thermomechanically affected zone, the nugget, etc.). Thus, in order to assess the overall ballistic survivability of an armor weldment, one must predict/identify welding-induced changes in the material microstructure and properties, and the operative failure mechanisms in different regions of the weld. Toward this end, a procedure is proposed in the present study which combines the results of the FSW process modeling, basic physical-metallurgy principles concerning microstructure/property relations, and the fracture mechanics concepts related to the key blast/ballistic-impact failure modes. The utility of this procedure is demonstrated using the case of a solid-solution strengthened and cold-worked aluminum alloy armor FSW-weld test structure.

  19. Biofilm-induced bioclogging produces sharp interfaces in hyporheic flow, redox conditions, and microbial community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Alice; Boano, Fulvio; Ridolfi, Luca; Chopp, David L.; Packman, Aaron

    2017-05-01

    Riverbed sediments host important biogeochemical processes that play a key role in nutrient dynamics. Sedimentary nutrient transformations are mediated by bacteria in the form of attached biofilms. The influence of microbial metabolic activity on the hydrochemical conditions within the hyporheic zone is poorly understood. We present a hydrobiogeochemical model to assess how the growth of heterotrophic and autotrophic biomass affects the transport and transformation of dissolved nitrogen compounds in bed form-induced hyporheic zones. Coupling between hyporheic exchange, nitrogen metabolism, and biomass growth leads to an equilibrium between permeability reduction and microbial metabolism that yields shallow hyporheic flows in a region with low permeability and high rates of microbial metabolism near the stream-sediment interface. The results show that the bioclogging caused by microbial growth can constrain rates and patterns of hyporheic fluxes and microbial transformation rate in many streams.

  20. Flame structure, spectroscopy and emissions quantification of rapeseed biodiesel under model gas turbine conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Cheng Tung; Hochgreb, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Rapeseed biodiesel shows extended flame reaction zone with no soot formation. • RME spray flame shows higher droplet number density and volume flux than diesel. • RME droplet size and velocity distribution are similar to diesel. • Blending 50% RME with diesel reduces soot formation non-linearly. • RME shows lower NO x and higher CO emissions level compared to diesel. - Abstract: The spray combustion characteristics of rapeseed biodiesel/methyl esters (RME) and 50% RME/diesel blend were investigated and compared with conventional diesel fuel, using a model swirl flame burner. The detailed database with well-characterised boundary conditions can be used as validation targets for flame modelling. An airblast, swirl-atomized liquid fuel spray was surrounded by air preheated to 350 °C at atmospheric pressure. The reacting droplet distribution within the flame was determined using phase Doppler particle anemometry. For both diesel and RME, peak droplet concentrations are found on the outside of the flame region, with large droplets migrating to the outside via swirl, and smaller droplets located around the centreline region. However, droplet concentrations and sizes are larger for RME, indicating a longer droplet evaporation timescale. This delayed droplet vaporisation leads to a different reaction zone relative to diesel, with an extended core reaction. In spite of the longer reaction zone, RME flames displayed no sign of visible soot radiation, unlike the case of diesel spray flame. Blending 50% RME with diesel results in significant reduction in soot radiation. Finally, RME emits 22% on average lower NO x emissions compared to diesel under lean burning conditions.