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Sample records for mercury chalcogenide alloy

  1. A structural study of the pseudo-binary mercury chalcogenide alloy HgSe sub 0 sub . sub 7 S sub 0 sub . sub 3 at high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlenko, D P; Hull, S; Knorr, K; Savenko, B N; Shchennikov, V V; Voronin, V I

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the pseudo-binary mercury chalcogenide alloy HgSe sub 0 sub . sub 7 S sub 0 sub . sub 3 has been studied by means of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction at pressure up to 8.5 GPa. A phase transition from the cubic zinc blende structure to the hexagonal cinnabar structure was observed at P approx 1 GPa. The obtained structural parameters were used for the analysis of the geometrical relationship between the zinc blende and the cinnabar phases. The zinc blende-cinnabar phase transition is discussed in the framework of the Landau theory of phase transitions. It was found that the possible order parameter for the structural transformation is the spontaneous strain e sub 4. This assignment agrees with previously observed high pressure behaviour of the elastic constants of other mercury chalcogenides

  2. A Structural Study of the Pseudo-Binary Mercury Chalcogenide Alloy HgSe_{0.7}S_{0.3} at High Pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlenko, D P; Ehm, L; Knorr, K; Hull, S; Shchennikov, V V; Voronin, V I

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the pseudo-binary mercury chalcogenide alloy HgSe_{0.7}S_{0.3} has been studied by means of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction at pressure up to 8.5 GPa. A phase transition from the cubic zinc blende structure to the hexagonal cinnabar structure was observed at P{\\sim}1 GPa. The obtained structural parameters were used for the analysis of the geometrical relationship between the zinc blende and the cinnabar phases. The zinc blende-cinnabar phase transition is discussed in the framework of Landau theory of the phase transitions. It was found that the possible order parameter for the structural transformation is the spontaneous strain e_{4}. This assignment agrees with previously observed high pressure behaviour of the elastic constants of other mercury chalcogenides.

  3. A structural study of the pseudo-binary mercury chalcogenide alloy HgSe0.7S0.3 at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlenko, D.P.; Savenko, B.N.; Ehm, L.; Knorr, K.; Hull, S.; Shchennikov, V.V.; Voronin, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the pseudo-binary mercury chalcogenide alloy HgSe 0.7 S 0.3 has been studied by means of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction at pressure up to 8.5 GPa. A phase transition from the cubic zinc blende structure to the hexagonal cinnabar structure was observed at P∼1 GPa. The obtained structural parameters were used for the analysis of the geometrical relationship between the zinc blende and the cinnabar phases. The zinc blende-cinnabar phase transition is discussed in the framework of the Landau theory of phase transitions. It was found that the possible order parameter for the structural transformation is the spontaneous strain e 4 . This assignment agrees with previously observed high pressure behaviour of the elastic constants of other mercury chalcogenides

  4. The pseudo-binary mercury chalcogenide alloy HgSe sub 0 sub . sub 7 S sub 0 sub . sub 3 at high pressure: a mechanism for the zinc blende to cinnabar reconstructive phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlenko, D P; Ehm, L; Hull, S; Savenko, B N; Shchennikov, V V; Voronin, V I

    2003-01-01

    The structure of the pseudo-binary mercury chalcogenide alloy HgSe sub 0 sub . sub 7 S sub 0 sub . sub 3 has been studied by x-ray and neutron powder diffraction at pressures up to 8.5 GPa. A phase transition from the cubic zinc blende structure to the hexagonal cinnabar structure was observed at P approx 1 GPa. A phenomenological model of this reconstructive phase transition based on a displacement mechanism is proposed. Analysis of the geometrical relationship between the zinc blende and the cinnabar phases has shown that the possible order parameter for the zinc blende-cinnabar structural transformation is the spontaneous strain e sub 4. This assignment agrees with the previously observed high pressure behaviour of the elastic constants of some mercury chalcogenides.

  5. Structural phase transition and elastic properties of mercury chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, Dinesh, E-mail: vdinesh33@rediffmail.com [School of Physics, Vigyan Bhavan, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore 452001 (India); Shriya, S. [School of Physics, Vigyan Bhavan, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore 452001 (India); Khenata, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modelisation Mathematique (LPQ3M), Departement de Technologie, Universite de Mascara, 29000 Mascara (Algeria)

    2012-08-15

    Pressure induced structural transition and elastic properties of ZnS-type (B3) to NaCl-type (B1) structure in mercury chalcogenides (HgX; X = S, Se and Te) are presented. An effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) with long-range Coulomb, as well charge transfer interactions, Hafemeister and Flygare type short-range overlap repulsion extended up to the second neighbor ions and van der Waals interactions are considered. Emphasis is on the evaluation of the pressure dependent Poisson's ratio {nu}, the ratio R{sub BT/G} of B (bulk modulus) over G (shear modulus), anisotropy parameter, Shear and Young's modulus, Lame constant, Kleinman parameter, elastic wave velocity and thermodynamical property as Debye temperature. The Poisson's ratio behavior infers that Mercury chalcogenides are brittle in nature. To our knowledge this is the first quantitative theoretical prediction of the pressure dependence of elastic and thermodynamical properties explicitly the ductile (brittle) nature of HgX and still awaits experimental confirmations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vast volume discontinuity in phase diagram infers transition from ZnS to NaCl structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The shear elastic constant C{sub 44} is nonzero confirms the mechanical stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pressure dependence of {theta}{sub D} infers the softening of lattice with increasing pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated bulk, shear and tetragonal moduli satisfied elastic stability criteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In both B3 and B1 phases, C{sub 11} and C{sub 12} increase linearly with pressure.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a spring-activated valve intended to measure and...

  7. Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of the Two-Dimensional Chalcogenides: Monolayers, Alloys, and Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeffrey D.

    Inspired by the triumphs of graphene, and motivated by its limitations, the science and engineering community is rapidly exploring the landscape of other layered materials in their atomically-thin forms. Dominating this landscape are the layered chalcogenides; diverse in chemistry, crystal structure, and properties, there are well over 100 primary members of this material family. Driven by quantum confinement, single layers (or few, in some cases) of these materials exhibit electronic, optical, and mechanical properties that diverge dramatically from their bulk counterparts. While initially isolated in monolayer form via mechanical exfoliation, the field of two-dimensional (2D) materials is being forced evolve to more scalable and reliable methods. Focusing on the chalcogenides (e.g. MoS2, Bi 2Se3, etc.), this dissertation introduces and mechanistically examines multiple novel synthetic approaches for the direct growth of monolayers, heterostructures, and alloys with the desired quality, reproducibility and generality. The first methods described in this thesis are physical vapor transport (PVT) and evaporative thinning (ET): a facile, top-down synthesis approach for creating ultrathin specimens of layered materials down to the two-dimensional limit. Evaporative thinning, applied in this study to the fabrication of A2X3 (Bi2Se3 and Sb2Te3) monolayers, is based on the controlled evaporation of material from initially thick specimens until the 2D limit is reached. The resultant flakes are characterized with a suite of imaging and spectroscopic techniques and the mechanism of ET is investigated via in-situ heating within a transmission electron microscope. Additionally, the basic transport properties of the resultant flakes are probed. The growth of ultrathin GeSe flakes is explored using PVT and the material's basic structure, properties, and stability are addressed. Second, oxide precursor based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is presented for the direct growth of

  8. Mercury embrittlement of Cu-Al alloys under cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, T. M.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of mercury on the room temperature, high cycle fatigue properties of three alloys: Cu-5.5 pct Al, Cu-7.3 pct Al, and Cu-6.3 pct Al-2.5 pct Fe has been determined. Severe embrittlement under cyclic loading in mercury is associated with rapid crack propagation in the presence of the liquid metal. A pronounced grain size effect is noted under mercury, while fatigue properties in air are insensitive to grain size. The fatigue results are discussed in relation to theories of adsorption-induced liquid metal embrittlement.

  9. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam alloy...

  10. Neutron diffraction study of structural transformations in ternary systems of HgSe sub 1 sub - sub x S sub x mercury chalcogenides at high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Voronin, V I; Berger, I F; Glazkov, V P; Kozlenko, D P; Savenko, B N; Tikhomirov, S V

    2001-01-01

    The structure of the ternary systems of the HgSe sub 1 sub - sub x S sub x mercury chalcogenides is studied at high pressures up to 35 kbar. It is established that by increase in the pressure in the HgSe sub 1 sub - sub x S sub x there takes place the transition from the sphalerite type cubic structure to the cinnabar type hexagonal structure, which is accompanied by the jump-like change in the elementary cell volume and interatomic distances. The parameters of the elementary cell and positional parameters of the Hg and Se/S for the hexagonal phase of high pressure are determined. The existence of the two-phase state in the area of the phase transformation is determined

  11. Magnetic chalcogenides in 3 and lower dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furdyna, J. K.; Dong, S.-N.; Lee, S.; Liu, X.; Dobrowolska, M.

    2018-06-01

    In this article we review magnetic phenomena that occur in the chalcogenide family involving transition metals. Magnetic properties displayed by bulk 3D chalcogenides compounds and alloys produced by equilibrium growth methods are discussed. 2D magnetic chalcogenide systems such as epitaxial films and more complex multilayers, whose formation is made possible by epitaxial methods and/or by van der Waals epitaxy, are presented in detail. We present a brief overview of magnetic effects emerging as the dimensionality of chalcogenide materialss is reduced to 1D (nanowires and related structures) and to zero-D (quantum dots formed by both top-down and bottom-up methods).

  12. Investigation of the mechanism of mercury removal from a silver dental amalgam alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. DJURDJEVIC

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of silver dental amalgam decomposition and the mercury removal mechanism was performed. The decomposition process was analysed during thermal treatment in the temperature interval from 400 °C to 850 °C and for times from 0.5 to 7.5 h. The chemical compositions of the silver dental amalgam alloy and the treated alloy were tested and microstructure analysis using optical and scanning electron microscopy was carried out. The phases were identified using energy disperse electron probe microanalysis. A mechanism for the mercury removal process from silver dental amalgam alloy is suggested.

  13. Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilas, F.; Chapman, C.R.; Matthews, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on future observations of and missions to Mercury, the photometry and polarimetry of Mercury, the surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry, the Goldstone radar observations of Mercury, the radar observations of Mercury, the stratigraphy and geologic history of Mercury, the geomorphology of impact craters on Mercury, and the cratering record on Mercury and the origin of impacting objects. Consideration is also given to the tectonics of Mercury, the tectonic history of Mercury, Mercury's thermal history and the generation of its magnetic field, the rotational dynamics of Mercury and the state of its core, Mercury's magnetic field and interior, the magnetosphere of Mercury, and the Mercury atmosphere. Other papers are on the present bounds on the bulk composition of Mercury and the implications for planetary formation processes, the building stones of the planets, the origin and composition of Mercury, the formation of Mercury from planetesimals, and theoretical considerations on the strange density of Mercury

  14. Extraction and recovery of mercury and lead from aqueous waste streams using redox-active layered metal chalcogenides. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorhout, P.K.; Strauss, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    'The authors have begun to examine the extraction and recovery of heavy elements from aqueous waste streams using redox-active metal chalcogenides. They have been able to prepare extractants from known chalcogenide starting materials, studied the efficacy of the extractants for selective removal of soft metal ions from aqueous phases, studied the deactivation of extractants and the concomitant recovery of soft metal ions from the extractants, and characterized all of the solids and solutions thus far in the study. The study was proposed as two parallel tasks: Part 1 and Part 2 emphasize the study and development of known metal chalcogenide extractants and the synthesis and development of new metal chalcogenide extractants, respectively. The two tasks were divided into sub-sections that study the extractants and their chemistry as detailed below: Preparation and reactivity of metal chalcogenide host solids Extraction of target waste (guest) ions from simulated waste streams Examination of the guest-host solids recovery of the guest metal and reuse of extractant Each section of the two tasks was divided into focused subsections that detail the specific problems and solutions to those problems that were proposed. The extent to which those tasks have been accomplished and the continued efforts of the team are described in detail below. (b) Progress and Results. The DOE-supported research has proceeded largely as proposed and has been productive in its first 12 months. Two full-paper manuscripts were submitted and are currently under peer review. A third paper is in preparation and will be submitted shortly. In addition, 5 submitted or invited presentations have been made.'

  15. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury is an element that is found in air, water and soil. It has several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If ... with other elements to form powders or crystals. Mercury is in many products. Metallic mercury is used ...

  16. Field Induced Magnetic Moments in a Metastable Iron-Mercury Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.S.; Mørup, Steen; Linderoth, Søren

    1996-01-01

    The magnetic properties of a metastable iron-mercury alloy have been investigated in the temperature range from 5 to 200 K by Mossbauer spectroscopy and magnetization measurements. At low temperature the magnetic moment per iron atom is larger than af alpha-Fe. The effective spontaneous magnetic ....... It was found that the field-induced increase of the magnetic moment in the metastable iron-mecury alloy was about 0.06 Bohr magnetons per iron atom in the temperature range from 5 to 200 K for a field change from 6 to 12 T....

  17. Mercury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Irma

    2017-01-01

    Mercury is a naturally occurring metal that exists in several physical and chemical forms. Inorganic mercury refers to compounds formed after the combining of mercury with elements such as chlorine, sulfur, or oxygen. After combining with carbon by covalent linkage, the compounds formed are called

  18. Chalcogenides Metastability and Phase Change Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kolobov, Alexander V

    2012-01-01

    A state-of-the-art description of metastability observed in chalcogenide alloys is presented with the accent on the underlying physics. A comparison is made between sulphur(selenium)-based chalcogenide glasses, where numerous photo-induced phenomena take place entirely within the amorphous phase, and tellurides where a reversible crystal-to-amorphous phase-change transformation is a major effect. Applications of metastability in devices¿optical memories and nonvolatile electronic phase-change random-access memories among others are discussed, including the latest trends. Background material essential for understanding current research in the field is also provided.

  19. X-ray electron spectra of chalcogenide glasses and polycrystalline alloys of Ge-Te and As-Te systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panus, V.R.

    1990-01-01

    Comparative investigation into structures of crystals and glasses in Ge-Te and As-Te two-component systems was conducted. Analysis of x-ray electron spectra of Ge-Te and As-Te systems indicates, that processes of dissociation-association resulting in formation of new structure units occur in telluride melts at synthesis temperatures. Structural chemical composition of binary glass-like alloys of Ge-Te and As-Te systems differs essentially from the one that corresponds to fusibility equilibrium curve. Oxygen doping into tellurium-base glasses results mainly in occurence of structures forecasted due to thermochemical calculation

  20. Dental amalgam: effects of alloy/mercury mixing ratio, uses and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kefi, I.; Maria, A.; Sana, J.; Afreen, J.; Adel, S.; Iftikhar, A.; Yawer, A.; Kaleem, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Silver dental amalgam is one of the oldest filling materials used in dentistry. The American Dental Association (ADA) has estimated that billions of amalgam restorations have been placed in patients in the last 150 years. Due to the presence of mercury and mishandling during the filling make it more controversial. The objective of this study was to conduct a survey of the use of different brands and to assess any deviations in practice from the hand mixing manual method of elemental mercury and alloy in a pestle/mortar and encapsulated form. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to 250 of randomly selected dental practitioner in various localities of Karachi. Data was analysed to record the specified brands used along with their powder/liquid (P/L) ratio and the different methods for disposing off mercury in this study. Results: The most commonly used form of dispensing method was hand mixing (57%) and only 30% of the dentists followed the manufacturer instruction for hand mixing ratio. Eighty-seven percent of dental amalgam restoration was performed and 13% removed by the dentist per month and the method of disposing the amalgam wastage that 55%, 25%, and 20% dentists were used the sink, bin and other methods respectively in their dental clinics. Conclusion: Amalgam restoration is still popular filling material in the posterior region of the mouth but we need to create awareness among the dentists who do not follow the ADA specifications. (author)

  1. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that mercuric chloride and methylmercury are possible human carcinogens. top How does mercury affect children? Very young ... billion parts of drinking water (2 ppb). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has set a maximum ...

  2. Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Mahoney, T J

    2014-01-01

    This gazetteer and atlas on Mercury lists, defines and illustrates every named (as opposed to merely catalogued) object and term as related to Mercury within a single reference work. It contains a glossary of terminology used, an index of all the headwords in the gazetteer, an atlas comprising maps and images with coordinate grids and labels identifying features listed in the gazetteer, and appendix material on the IAU nomenclature system and the transcription systems used for non-roman alphabets. This book is useful for the general reader, writers and editors dealing with astronomical themes, and those astronomers concerned with any aspect of astronomical nomenclature.

  3. Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André; Steiger, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun, is different in several respects from the other three terrestrial planets. In appearance, it resembles the heavily cratered surface of the Moon, but its density is high, it has a magnetic field and magnetosphere, but no atmosphere or ionosphere. This book reviews the progress made in Mercury studies since the flybys by Mariner 10 in 1974-75, based on the continued research using the Mariner 10 archive, on observations from Earth, and on increasingly realistic models of its interior evolution.

  4. Indirect complexometric determination of mercury(II in synthetic alloys and complexes using ethanethiol as a selective masking agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. KARTHIKEYAN

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Acomplexometric method for the determination of mercury(II in presence of other metal ions, based on the selective masking action of ethanethiol towards mercury(II is described. Mercury(II present in a given sample solution is first complexed with an excess of EDTAand the unreacted EDTAis titrated against zinc sulphate solution at pH 5–6 (hexamine buffer using xylenol orange as the indicator. An excess of a 0.3 % solution of ethanethiol is then added to displace EDTA from the Hg(II–EDTA complex. The released EDTAis titrated with a standard zinc sulphate solution. Reproducible and accurate results are obtained for 4–85 mg of mercury(II with a relative error of less than ± 0.46 % and coefficient of variation of not more than 0.47 %. The effects of the presence of various ions were studied. The method can be used for the analysis of mercury in its synthetic alloy mixtures and also in complexes.

  5. Chalcogenide glass hollow core microstructured optical fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir S. eShiryaev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent developments on chalcogenide glass hollow core microstructured optical fibers (HC-MOFs are presented. The comparative analysis of simulated optical properties for chalcogenide HC-MOFs of negative-curvature with different size and number of capillaries is given. The technique for the manufacture of microstructured chalcogenide preforms, which includes the assembly of the substrate glass tube and 8-10 capillaries, is described. Further trends to improve the optical transmission in chalcogenide NCHCFs are considered.

  6. Prospects of Colloidal Copper Chalcogenide Nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stam, W.; Berends, A.C.; de Mello-Donega, Celso

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, colloidal copper chalcogenide nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional Cd and Pb chalcogenide NCs. Owing to their wide size, shape, and composition tunability, Cu chalcogenide NCs hold great promise for several applications, such as

  7. Crack Growth in Mercury Embrittled Aluminum Alloys under Cyclic and Static Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    STATEMENT (ol the abalract entered In Block 20, It dlHerent from Report) 18. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES This was a thesis in partial fulfillment of...argued that the strengthening that occurs from cold rolling suppresses crack nucleation at the surface under monotonlc loading. Under cyclic loading...precracking. Copper was chosen because It can be easily electrodeposited on aluminum, easily wet with mercury, and remains wet almost indefinitely

  8. One-pot Sonochemical Synthesis of Hg-Ag Alloy Microspheres from Liquid Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harika, Villa Krishna; Kumar, Vijay Bhooshan; Gedanken, Aharon

    2018-01-01

    Metallic mercury has always attracted much attention in various fields because of its unique characteristic of forming amalgams. Here, different phases of pure crystalline Hg-Ag amalgam microspheres are synthesized by ultrasonically reacting liquid mercury with an aqueous solution of silver nitrate. Sonicating different molar ratios of liquid metallic Hg with AgNO 3 results in the formation of pure crystalline phases of solid silver amalgams with uniform morphology. The resulting Hg-Ag amalgams from various compositions after sonication are physically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The XRD of the amalgams obtained from the molar ratios of Hg:Ag (1:1.5) and Hg:Ag (1.5:1 and 2:1) match the Schachnerite and Moschellandbergite phases, respectively, whereas the Hg-Ag amalgam prepared from a 1:1Hg:Ag molar ratio results in a mixture of the Schachnerite and Moschellandbergite phases. The obtained amalgam microspheres are between 6 and 10µm in size. The detailed thermal and chemical behaviour of the Ag-Hg systems is also investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbon nanotube-chalcogenide composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stehlík, Š.; Orava, J.; Kohoutek, T.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.; Zima, Vítězslav; Hara, T.; Matsui, Y.; Ueda, K.; Pumera, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 1 (2010), s. 144-149 ISSN 0022-4596 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0208 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * chalcogenide glasses * composites Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.261, year: 2010

  10. Noble-Metal Chalcogenide Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourdine Zibouche

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the stability and the electronic properties of hypothetical noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes PtS2, PtSe2, PdS2 and PdSe2 by means of density functional theory calculations. Our findings show that the strain energy decreases inverse quadratically with the tube diameter, as is typical for other nanotubes. Moreover, the strain energy is independent of the tube chirality and converges towards the same value for large diameters. The band-structure calculations show that all noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes are indirect band gap semiconductors. The corresponding band gaps increase with the nanotube diameter rapidly approaching the respective pristine 2D monolayer limit.

  11. Amorphous chalcogenides advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Rong Ping

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the chalcogenide glass science and various applications based on the glasses. It starts with a review on the glass-forming ability of various systems, followed by a discussion on the structural and physical properties of various chalcolgenide glasses and their application in integrated optics. The chapters have been contributed by prominent experts from all over the world, and therefore, the book presents the recent research advances in the area. This book will appeal to anyone who is involved in glass science and technology and glass application.

  12. Mercury telluride as a zero-gap semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berchenko, N.N.; Pashkovskij, M.V.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a review of main properties of mercury telluride which is a representative of a new class of substances - gapless semiconductors. The causes leading to the appearance of a gapless state in mercury chalcogenides are considered; it is demonstrated that the main role in the formation of the inverse band structure belongs to relativistic corrections. The specific properties of mercury telluride are associated with the zero forbidden band, p-like nature of electron states of the conduction band and its nonparabolicity, resonance states of impurities and anomalies of dielectric permittivity. Conditions of forbidden band appearing in mercury telluride under the effect external factors are analyzed

  13. Method to synthesize metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-13

    Metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials can be synthesized from metal alkoxide precursors by solution precipitation or solvothermal processing. The synthesis routes are more scalable, less complex and easier to implement than other synthesis routes.

  14. Metastable states in amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mikla, Victor I

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses an interesting and technologically important class of materials, the amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors. Experimental results on the structural and electronic metastable states in Se-rich chalcogenides are presented. Special attention is paid to the states in the mobility gap and their sensitivity to various factors such as irradiation, annealing and composition. Photoinduced changes of structure and physical properties are also considered and structural transformation at photocrystallization is studied in detail. Finally, the authors discuss potential applications of th

  15. Metal chalcogenide nanostructures for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq

    2014-01-01

    This first ever reference book that focuses on metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures for renewable energy applications encapsulates the state-of-the-art in multidisciplinary research on the metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires,  nanobelts, nanoflowers, nanoribbons and more).  The properties and synthesis of a class of nanomaterials is essential to renewable energy manufacturing and this book focuses on the synthesis of metal chalcogendie nanostructures, their growth mechanism, optical, electrical, and other important prop

  16. A library of atomically thin metal chalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiadong; Lin, Junhao; Huang, Xiangwei; Zhou, Yao; Chen, Yu; Xia, Juan; Wang, Hong; Xie, Yu; Yu, Huimei; Lei, Jincheng; Wu, Di; Liu, Fucai; Fu, Qundong; Zeng, Qingsheng; Hsu, Chuang-Han; Yang, Changli; Lu, Li; Yu, Ting; Shen, Zexiang; Lin, Hsin; Yakobson, Boris I; Liu, Qian; Suenaga, Kazu; Liu, Guangtong; Liu, Zheng

    2018-04-01

    Investigations of two-dimensional transition-metal chalcogenides (TMCs) have recently revealed interesting physical phenomena, including the quantum spin Hall effect 1,2 , valley polarization 3,4 and two-dimensional superconductivity 5 , suggesting potential applications for functional devices 6-10 . However, of the numerous compounds available, only a handful, such as Mo- and W-based TMCs, have been synthesized, typically via sulfurization 11-15 , selenization 16,17 and tellurization 18 of metals and metal compounds. Many TMCs are difficult to produce because of the high melting points of their metal and metal oxide precursors. Molten-salt-assisted methods have been used to produce ceramic powders at relatively low temperature 19 and this approach 20 was recently employed to facilitate the growth of monolayer WS 2 and WSe 2 . Here we demonstrate that molten-salt-assisted chemical vapour deposition can be broadly applied for the synthesis of a wide variety of two-dimensional (atomically thin) TMCs. We synthesized 47 compounds, including 32 binary compounds (based on the transition metals Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, Re, Pt, Pd and Fe), 13 alloys (including 11 ternary, one quaternary and one quinary), and two heterostructured compounds. We elaborate how the salt decreases the melting point of the reactants and facilitates the formation of intermediate products, increasing the overall reaction rate. Most of the synthesized materials in our library are useful, as supported by evidence of superconductivity in our monolayer NbSe 2 and MoTe 2 samples 21,22 and of high mobilities in MoS 2 and ReS 2 . Although the quality of some of the materials still requires development, our work opens up opportunities for studying the properties and potential application of a wide variety of two-dimensional TMCs.

  17. Mercury free zinc alloy powder for alkaline manganese battery. 2. Effect of additive species to zinc particle on suppressing hydrogen gas evolution; Arukari mangan denchiyo mukoka aen gokin funmatsu. 2. Suiso gas hassei ni oyobosu aen ryushi eno tenka genso no yokusei koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, M.; Fujitani, S.; Nishio, K. [Sanyo electric Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Akai, Y.; Kurimura, M. [Sanyo Excell Co. Ltd., Tottori (Japan)

    1997-08-05

    In order to make alkaline manganese batteries mercury-free and suppress hydrogen gas generation, investigations were given on the effect of additive species on modification of zinc particles present on negative electrode surface. Mercury with high hydrogen overvoltage has been added conventionally, but the mercury can cause an environmental problem. Surface modification by using indium exhibited hydrogen gas generation suppressing effect. With the surface modification amount of 0.10% by weight or more, the suppressing effect is saturated, reducing the effect to 50% of that of mercury. Surface-modifying the bismuth added zinc particles with indium showed greater suppressing effect than the case where each element is used independently. Zinc-indium (0.10% by weight) - bismuth (0.025% by weight) based alloy powder showed the same hydrogen generation suppressing effect as zinc-mercury (0.15% by weight) alloy powder. A sealed test battery using this alloy powder in negative active material exhibited a discharge capacity of 1700 mAh similarly to the initial stage even after having been stored for 20 days at 60 degC. Self-discharge characteristics equivalent to that of zinc-mercury (0.15% by weight) based alloy powder were obtained. An environment compatible dry cell battery containing no mercury whatsoever was developed successfully. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Iron chalcogenide superconductors at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hechang; Wang, Kefeng; Hu, Rongwei; Ryu, Hyejin; Abeykoon, Milinda; Bozin, Emil S; Petrovic, Cedomir

    2012-01-01

    Iron chalcogenide superconductors have become one of the most investigated superconducting materials in recent years due to high upper critical fields, competing interactions and complex electronic and magnetic phase diagrams. The structural complexity, defects and atomic site occupancies significantly affect the normal and superconducting states in these compounds. In this work we review the vortex behavior, critical current density and high magnetic field pair-breaking mechanism in iron chalcogenide superconductors. We also point to relevant structural features and normal-state properties. PMID:27877518

  19. Half-metallic ferromagnetism in (Z B, Al, Ga, and In) Heusler alloys ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K H SADEGHI

    2018-01-03

    11], and zincblende (ZB) transition-metal pnictides and chalcogenides [12–17]. Among HM ferromagnets, Heusler alloys are attractive because of their technical applications (in spin-injection devices [18], spin-filters [19], ...

  20. Surfactant free metal chalcogenides microparticles consisting of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANYASINAIDU GOTTAPU

    2017-11-11

    Nov 11, 2017 ... Metal chalcogenides; copper sulphide; copper selenide; micro flowers. 1. Introduction .... adding calculated quantity (2.7 mmol) of each acid separately. .... salts (LiCl, LiNO3, and LiOAc), and then hydride ions from (BH. − ... Concentration of metal .... hait A and Lim J Y 2016 Cation exchange synthesis of.

  1. Multimode supercontinuum generation in chalcogenide glass fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubat, Irnis; Bang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Mid-infrared supercontinuum generation is considered in chalcogenide fibres when taking into account both polarisations and the necessary higher order modes. In particular we focus on high pulse energy supercontinuum generation with long pump pulses. The modeling indicates that when only a single...

  2. Silicon-based thin films as bottom electrodes in chalcogenide nonvolatile memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Yun [IT Convergence and Components Laboratory, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: seungyun@etri.re.kr; Yoon, Sung-Min; Choi, Kyu-Jeong; Lee, Nam-Yeal; Park, Young-Sam; Ryu, Sang-Ouk; Yu, Byoung-Gon; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Heung [IT Convergence and Components Laboratory, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-31

    The effect of the electrical resistivity of a silicon-germanium (SiGe) thin film on the phase transition in a GeSbTe (GST) chalcogenide alloy and the manufacturing aspect of the fabrication process of a chalcogenide memory device employing the SiGe film as bottom electrodes were investigated. While p-type SiGe bottom electrodes were formed using in situ doping techniques, n-type ones could be made in a different manner where phosphorus atoms diffused from highly doped silicon underlayers to undoped SiGe films. The p-n heterojunction did not form between the p-type GST and n-type SiGe layers, and the semiconduction type of the SiGe alloys did not influence the memory device switching. It was confirmed that an optimum resistivity value existed for memory operation in spite of proportionality of Joule heating to electrical resistivity. The very high resistivity of the SiGe film had no effect on the reduction of reset current, which might result from the resistance decrease of the SiGe alloy at high temperatures.

  3. High-Purity Glasses Based on Arsenic Chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Chemical interaction of chalcogenides and some impurities (CS 2, TeO2 ) with the quartz glass at high temperature leads to the thin layers formation...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO1 1523 TITLE: High-Purity Glasses Based on Arsenic Chalcogenides...Materials Vol. 3, No. 2, June 2001, p. 341 - 349 HIGH-PURITY GLASSES BASED ON ARSENIC CHALCOGENIDES M. F. Churbanov, I. V. Scripachev, G. E. Snopatin, V. S

  4. Dry etching of thin chalcogenide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkov, Kiril [Acad. J. Malinowski Central Laboratory of Photoprocesses, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Vassilev, Gergo; Vassilev, Venceslav, E-mail: kpetkov@clf.bas.b [Department of Semiconductors, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridsky Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-04-01

    Fluorocarbon plasmas (pure and mixtures with Ar) were used to investigate the changes in the etching rate depending on the chalcogenide glasses composition and light exposure. The experiments were performed on modified commercial HZM-4 vacuum equipment in a diode electrode configuration. The surface microstructure of thin chalcogenide layers and its change after etching in CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} and CF{sub 4} plasmas were studied by SEM. The dependence of the composition of As-S-Ge, As-Se and multicomponent Ge-Se-Sb-Ag-I layers on the etching rate was discussed. The selective etching of some glasses observed after light exposure opens opportunities for deep structure processing applications.

  5. Chalcogenide Glass Optical Waveguides for Infrared Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bureau

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the remarkable properties of chalcogenide (Chg glasses, Chg optical waveguides should play a significant role in the development of optical biosensors. This paper describes the fabrication and properties of chalcogenide fibres and planar waveguides. Using optical fibre transparent in the mid-infrared spectral range we have developed a biosensor that can collect information on whole metabolism alterations, rapidly and in situ. Thanks to this sensor it is possible to collect infrared spectra by remote spectroscopy, by simple contact with the sample. In this way, we tried to determine spectral modifications due, on the one hand, to cerebral metabolism alterations caused by a transient focal ischemia in the rat brain and, in the other hand, starvation in the mouse liver. We also applied a microdialysis method, a well known technique for in vivo brain metabolism studies, as reference. In the field of integrated microsensors, reactive ion etching was used to pattern rib waveguides between 2 and 300 μm wide. This technique was used to fabricate Y optical junctions for optical interconnections on chalcogenide amorphous films, which can potentially increase the sensitivity and stability of an optical micro-sensor. The first tests were also carried out to functionalise the Chg planar waveguides with the aim of using them as (biosensors.

  6. Superconducting properties of iron chalcogenide thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Mele

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron chalcogenides, binary FeSe, FeTe and ternary FeTexSe1−x, FeTexS1−x and FeTe:Ox, are the simplest compounds amongst the recently discovered iron-based superconductors. Thin films of iron chalcogenides present many attractive features that are covered in this review, such as: (i easy fabrication and epitaxial growth on common single-crystal substrates; (ii strong enhancement of superconducting transition temperature with respect to the bulk parent compounds (in FeTe0.5Se0.5, zero-resistance transition temperature Tc0bulk = 13.5 K, but Tc0film = 19 K on LaAlO3 substrate; (iii high critical current density (Jc ~ 0.5 ×106 A cm2 at 4.2 K and 0 T for FeTe0.5Se0.5 film deposited on CaF2, and similar values on flexible metallic substrates (Hastelloy tapes buffered by ion-beam assisted deposition with a weak dependence on magnetic field; (iv high upper critical field (~50 T for FeTe0.5Se0.5, Bc2(0, with a low anisotropy, γ ~ 2. These highlights explain why thin films of iron chalcogenides have been widely studied in recent years and are considered as promising materials for applications requiring high magnetic fields (20–50 T and low temperatures (2–10 K.

  7. Terahertz-induced Kerr effect in amorphous chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the terahertz-induced third-order (Kerr) nonlinear optical properties of the amorphous chalcogenide glasses As2S3 and As2Se3. Chalcogenide glasses are known for their high optical Kerr nonlinearities which can be several hundred times greater than those of fused silica. We use...

  8. Mercury and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  9. The chemistry of copper chalcogenides in waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, H.D.; Lambert, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    The solubilities of copper chalcogenides (CuS, CuSe, CuTe) were measured in a glass melt which is representative of those proposed for nuclear waste immobilization and circuit board vitrification. CuTe is more soluble than CuS and CuSe in the glass melt under relatively oxidizing conditions. However, the solubilities of all the copper chalcogenides in the glass melt are virtually identical at reducing conditions, probably a result of the redox-controlled solubility of copper metal in all cases. The redox chemistry of a glass melt coexisting with an immiscible copper chalcogenide depends primarily on the prevailing oxygen fugacity, not on the identity of the chalcogenide. The target concentration of less than 0.3 to 0.5 wt% copper in the waste glass should eliminate the precipitation of copper chalcogenides during processing

  10. Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 10's first image of Mercury acquired on March 24, 1974. During its flight, Mariner 10's trajectory brought it behind the lighted hemisphere of Mercury, where this image was taken, in order to acquire important measurements with other instruments.This picture was acquired from a distance of 3,340,000 miles (5,380,000 km) from the surface of Mercury. The diameter of Mercury (3,031 miles; 4,878 km) is about 1/3 that of Earth.Images of Mercury were acquired in two steps, an inbound leg (images acquired before passing into Mercury's shadow) and an outbound leg (after exiting from Mercury's shadow). More than 2300 useful images of Mercury were taken, both moderate resolution (3-20 km/pixel) color and high resolution (better than 1 km/pixel) black and white coverage.

  11. Solution synthesis of mixed-metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and spray deposition of precursor films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.

    2000-01-01

    A colloidal suspension comprising metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is made by reacting a metal salt with a chalcogenide salt in an organic solvent to precipitate a metal chalcogenide, recovering the metal chalcogenide, and admixing the metal chalcogenide with a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is spray deposited onto a substrate to produce a semiconductor precursor film which is substantially free of impurities.

  12. Thermoelectric performance of tellurium-reduced quaternary p-type lead–chalcogenide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aminorroaya Yamini, Sima; Wang, Heng; Gibbs, Zachary M.; Pei, Yanzhong; Mitchell, David R.G.; Dou, Shi Xue; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: A long-standing technological challenge to the widespread application of thermoelectric generators is obtaining high-performance thermoelectric materials from abundant elements. Intensive study on PbTe alloys has resulted in a high figure of merit for the single-phase ternary PbTe–PbSe system through band structure engineering, and the low thermal conductivity achieved due to nanostructuring leads to high thermoelectric performance for ternary PbTe–PbS compounds. Recently, the single-phase p-type quaternary PbTe–PbSe–PbS alloys have been shown to provide thermoelectric performance superior to the binary and ternary lead chalcogenides. This occurs via tuning of the band structure and from an extraordinary low thermal conductivity resulting from high-contrast atomic mass solute atoms. Here, we present the thermoelectric efficiency of nanostructured p-type quaternary PbTe–PbSe–PbS composites and compare the results with corresponding single-phase quaternary lead chalcogenide alloys. We demonstrate that the very low lattice thermal conductivity achieved is attributed to phonon scattering at high-contrast atomic mass solute atoms rather than from the contribution of secondary phases. This results in a thermoelectric efficiency of ∼1.4 over a wide temperature range (650–850 K) in a p-type quaternary (PbTe) 0.65 (PbSe) 0.1 (PbS) 0.25 composite that is lower than that of single-phase (PbTe) 0.85 (PbSe) 0.1 (PbS) 0.05 alloy without secondary phases

  13. Mercurial poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorton, B

    1924-01-01

    Cats which had been kept in a thermometer factory to catch rats were afflicted with mercury poisoning. So were the rats they were supposed to eat. The symptoms of mercury poisoning were the same in both species. The source of mercury for these animals is a fine film of the metal which coats floors, a result of accidental spills during the manufacturing process.

  14. Got Mercury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, J. Torin; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Many of the operational and payload lighting units used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury. If these devices were damaged on-orbit, elemental mercury could be released into the cabin. Although there are plans to replace operational units with alternate light sources, such as LEDs, that do not contain mercury, mercury-containing lamps efficiently produce high quality illumination and may never be completely replaced on orbit. Therefore, exposure to elemental mercury during spaceflight will remain possible and represents a toxicological hazard. Elemental mercury is a liquid metal that vaporizes slowly at room temperature. However, it may be completely vaporized at the elevated operating temperatures of lamps. Although liquid mercury is not readily absorbed through the skin or digestive tract, mercury vapors are efficiently absorbed through the respiratory tract. Therefore, the amount of mercury in the vapor form must be estimated. For mercury releases from lamps that are not being operated, we utilized a study conducted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Quality to calculate the amount of mercury vapor expected to form over a 2-week period. For longer missions and for mercury releases occurring when lamps are operating, we conservatively assumed complete volatilization of the available mercury. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, both short-term and long-term exposures to mercury vapors are possible. Acute exposure to high concentrations of mercury vapors can cause irritation of the respiratory tract and behavioral symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity. Chronic exposure can result in damage to the nervous system (tremors, memory loss, insomnia, etc.) and kidneys (proteinurea). Therefore, the JSC Toxicology Group recommends that stringent safety controls and verifications (vibrational testing, etc.) be applied to any hardware that contains elemental mercury that could yield

  15. Aluminum alloy and associated anode and battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarcy, G.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an aluminum alloy. It comprises: eutectic amounts of at least two alloying elements selected from the group consisting of bismuth, cadmium, scandium, gallium, indium, lead, mercury, thallium, tin, and zinc with the balance being aluminum and the alloying elements being about 0.01 to 3.0 percent by weight of the alloy

  16. High surface area graphene-supported metal chalcogenide assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Orme, Christine A.

    2017-04-25

    Disclosed here is a method for hydrocarbon conversion, comprising contacting at least one graphene-supported assembly with at least one hydrocarbon feedstock, wherein the graphene-supported assembly comprises (i) a three-dimensional network of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds and (ii) at least one metal chalcogenide compound disposed on the graphene sheets, wherein the chalcogen of the metal chalcogenide compound is selected from S, Se and Te, and wherein the metal chalcogenide compound accounts for at least 20 wt. % of the graphene-supported assembly.

  17. Hybrid polymer photonic crystal fiber with integrated chalcogenide glass nanofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Kubat, Irnis; Bang, Ole

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chalcogenide glasses with polymer photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) is a difficult and challenging task due to their different thermo-mechanical material properties. Here we report the first experimental realization of a hybrid polymer-chalcogenide PCF with integrated As2S3 glass...... nanofilms at the inner surface of the air-channels of a poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) PCF. The integrated high refractive index glass films introduce distinct antiresonant transmission bands in the 480-900 nm wavelength region. We demonstrate that the ultra-high Kerr nonlinearity of the chalcogenide glass...

  18. Crystallization study of Sn additive Se–Te chalcogenide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Rahim, M.A.; Gaber, A.; Abu-Sehly, A.A.; Abdelazim, N.M., E-mail: nana841@hotmail.co.uk

    2013-08-20

    Highlights: • The aim of the work deals with studying the crystallization kinetics by using different method. • Values of various kinetic parameters were calculated. • The results indicate that the rate of crystallization is related to the thermal stability and glass forming ability. - Abstract: Results of differential thermal analysis (DTA) under non-isothermal conditions of glasses Se{sub 90−x}Te{sub 10}Sn{sub x} (x = 0, 2.5, 5 and 7 at.%) are reported and discussed. The glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), the onset crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) and the peak temperature of crystallization (T{sub p}) were found to be dependent on the compositions and the heating rate. Values of various kinetic parameters such as activation energy of glass transition (E{sub g}), activation energy of crystallization (E{sub c}), rate constant (K{sub p}), Hurby number (H{sub r}) and the order parameter (n) were determined. For the present systems, the results indicate that the rate of crystallization is related to thermal stability and glass forming ability (GFA). According to the Avrami exponent (n), the results show a one dimensional growth for the composition Se{sub 90}Te{sub 10} and a three dimensional growth for the three other compositions. The crystalline phases resulting from DTA and (SEM) have been identified using X-ray diffraction.

  19. Uptake of hazardous radionuclides within layered chalcogenide for environmental protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Pranesh, E-mail: praneshsengupta@gmail.com [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Dudwadkar, N.L. [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Vishwanadh, B. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pulhani, V. [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Rao, Rekha [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Tripathi, S.C. [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Layered chalcogenide with CdI{sub 2} crystal structure prepared by hydrothermal route. • Exploration of the possibilities for radionuclides’ uptake using layered chalcogenide. • Proposing ‘topotactic ionic substitution’ as major uptake mechanism. -- Abstract: Ensuring environmental protection in and around nuclear facilities is a matter of deep concern. Toward this, layered chalcogenide with CdI{sub 2} crystal structure has been prepared. Structural characterizations of layered chalcogenide suggest ‘topotactic ionic substitution’ as the dominant mechanism behind uptake of different cations within its lattice structure. An equilibration time of 45 min and volume to mass ratio of 30:1 are found to absorb {sup 233}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 85+89}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}Am radionuclides to the maximum extents.

  20. Summary of Chalcogenide Glass Processing: Wet-Etching and Photolithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a study designed to explore the different properties of two different chalcogenide materials, As2S3 and As24S38Se38, when subjected to photolithographic wet-etching techniques. Chalcogenide glasses are made by combining chalcogen elements S, Se, and Te with Group IV and/or V elements. The etchant was selected from the literature and was composed of sodium hydroxide, isopropyl alcohol, and deionized water and the types of chalcogenide glass for study were As2S3 and As24S38Se38. The main goals here were to obtain a single variable etch rate curve of etch depth per time versus NaOH overall solution concentration in M and to see the difference in etch rate between a given etchant when used on the different chalcogenide stoichiometries. Upon completion of these two goals, future studies will begin to explore creating complex, integrated photonic devices via these methods.

  1. Debye temperatures of uranium chalcogenides from their lattice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    From the phonon frequencies, their Debye temperatures are evaluated. Further, ... Keywords. Uranium chalcogenides; p-wave electronic superconductor; phonon frequency; Debye tempera- ture; spin ... to the ionic crystals of similar structure.

  2. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  3. The influence of Ge on optical and thermo- mechanical properties of S-Se chalcogenide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Kavitha; Babu Devarasetty, Suresh

    2018-05-01

    S-Se-Ge glasses were prepared by melt quenching method to investigate the effect of Germanium on thermo-mechanical and optical properties of chalcogenide glasses. The glassy nature of the samples has been verified by x-ray diffraction and DSC studies that the samples are glassy in nature. The optical band gap of the samples was estimated by the absorption spectrum fitting method. The optical band gap increased from 1.61 ev for x = 0 sample to 1.90 ev for x = 40 sample and is explained in terms of cohesive energies. The basic thermo-mechanical parameters such as micro-hardness, Volume (Vh) and formation energy (Eh) of micro voids in the glassy network, as well as the modulus of Elasticity (E) have been calculated for prepared glasses.in present glasses. The variation in these parameters with Ge content correlated with heat of atomization of alloys.

  4. Structural and optical investigation of Te-based chalcogenide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rita, E-mail: reetasharma2012@gmail.com; Sharma, Shaveta; Thangaraj, R.; Mian, M. [Semiconductors Laboratory, Department of Physics, GND University, Amritsar (India); Chander, Ravi [Applied Science Deptt. Govt. Polytechnic College Amritsar (India); Kumar, Praveen [Department of Physics, DAV University, Sarmastipur, Jalandhar-144012 (India)

    2015-05-15

    We report the structural and optical properties of thermally evaporated Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and InBiTe{sub 3} films by using X-ray diffraction, optical and Raman Spectroscopy techniques. The as-prepared thin films were found to be Semi-crystalline by X-ray diffraction. Particle Size and Strain has been calculated from XRD data. The optical constants, film thickness, refractive index and optical band gap (E{sub g}) has been reported for In{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, InBiTe{sub 3} films. Raman Spectroscopy was performed to investigate the effect of Bi, In, on lattice vibration and chemical bonding in Te based chalcogenide glassy alloys.

  5. Transuranium element chalcogenides. Crystallochemistry and Moessbauer spectrometry of neptunium 237 chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thevenin, T.; Pages, M.; Damien, D.

    1981-09-01

    To study actinide compounds , neptunium 237 has been studied by Moessbauer resonance. The different oxidation degrees of neptunium (7, 6, 5, 4 and 3) have a very important effect on isomeric displacements. In the study of chalcogenides, the isomeric displacement value of NpS 3 confirms the valency 4+ of neptunium in this compound. Results obtained with Np 3 S 5 show two valency state +3 and +4 in this compound. There is a good agreement with the two crystalline sites determined by crystallography [fr

  6. Simultaneous determination of trace-levels of alloying zinc and copper by semi-mercury-free potentiometric stripping analysis with chemometric data treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Hansen, Elo Harald

    1998-01-01

    Assays of copper and zinc in brass samples were performed by Semi-Mercury Free Potentiometric Stripping Analysis (S-MF PSA) using a thin-film mercury covered glassy-carbon working electrode and dissolved oxygen as oxidizing agent during the stripping step. The stripping peak transients were...... resolved by chemometrics which enabled simultaneous determination of both the copper and the zinc concentrations, thereby eliminating the conventional necessary pretreatment of the sample solution, such as initial addition of Ga(III) or solvent extraction of copper. The brass samples were diluted...... by factors in the range 2.104 - 5.105 which resulted in quantification of the copper and of zinc contents comparable to the specified values within 10%. On the basis of the chemometric treatment, an empirical expression is deduced relating the stripping time to the recorded potential....

  7. Conditioning of spent mercury by amalgamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, S. P.; Shon, J. S.; An, B. G.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, J. W.; Ji, C. G.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. H.; Yang, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Solidification by amalgamation was performed to immobilize and stabilize the liquid spent mercury. First, the appropriate metal and alloy which can convert liquid mercury into a solid form of amalgam were selected through initial tests. The amalgam form, formulated in optimum composition, was characterized and subjected to performance tests including compressive strength, water immersion, leachability and initial vaporization rate to evaluate mechanical integrity, durability and leaching properties. Finally, bench scale amalgamation trial was conducted with about 1 kg of spent mercury to verify the feasibility of amalgamation method

  8. Chalcogenide glass-on-graphene photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongtao; Song, Yi; Huang, Yizhong; Kita, Derek; Deckoff-Jones, Skylar; Wang, Kaiqi; Li, Lan; Li, Junying; Zheng, Hanyu; Luo, Zhengqian; Wang, Haozhe; Novak, Spencer; Yadav, Anupama; Huang, Chung-Che; Shiue, Ren-Jye; Englund, Dirk; Gu, Tian; Hewak, Daniel; Richardson, Kathleen; Kong, Jing; Hu, Juejun

    2017-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are of tremendous interest to integrated photonics, given their singular optical characteristics spanning light emission, modulation, saturable absorption and nonlinear optics. To harness their optical properties, these atomically thin materials are usually attached onto prefabricated devices via a transfer process. Here, we present a new route for 2D material integration with planar photonics. Central to this approach is the use of chalcogenide glass, a multifunctional material that can be directly deposited and patterned on a wide variety of 2D materials and can simultaneously function as the light-guiding medium, a gate dielectric and a passivation layer for 2D materials. Besides achieving improved fabrication yield and throughput compared with the traditional transfer process, our technique also enables unconventional multilayer device geometries optimally designed for enhancing light-matter interactions in the 2D layers. Capitalizing on this facile integration method, we demonstrate a series of high-performance glass-on-graphene devices including ultra-broadband on-chip polarizers, energy-efficient thermo-optic switches, as well as graphene-based mid-infrared waveguide-integrated photodetectors and modulators.

  9. Recent Progress In Infrared Chalcogenide Glass Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, A.; Croitoru, N.; Marom, E.

    1984-10-01

    Chalcogenide glasses containing elements like As, Ge, Sb and Se have been prepared. A new technique of preparing the raw material and subsequently drawing fibers has been devel-oped in order to avoid the forming of oxygen compounds. The fibers have been drawn by cru-cible and rod method from oxygen free raw material inside an Ar atmosphere glove box. The fibers drawn to date with air and glass cladding have a diameter of 50-500 pm and length of several meterd. Preliminary attenuation measurements indicate that the attentuation is better than 0.1 dB/cm and it is not affected even when the fiber is bent to 2 cm circular radius. The fibes were testes a CO laser beam and were not damaged at power densities below 10 kW/2cm2 CW &100 kw/cm using short pulses 75 n sec. The transmitted power density was 0.8 kW/cm2 which is an appropriate value to the needed for cutting and ablation of human tissues.

  10. Solvent properties of hydrazine in the preparation of metal chalcogenide bulk materials and films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Min; Mitzi, David B

    2009-08-21

    A combination of unique solvent properties of hydrazine enables the direct dissolution of a range of metal chalcogenides at ambient temperature, rendering this an extraordinarily simple and soft synthetic approach to prepare new metal chalcogenide-based materials. The extended metal chalcogenide parent framework is broken up during this process, and the resulting metal chalcogenide building units are re-organized into network structures (from 0D to 3D) based upon their interactions with the hydrazine/hydrazinium moieties. This Perspective will review recent crystal and materials chemistry developments within this family of compounds and will briefly discuss the utility of this approach in metal chalcogenide thin-film deposition.

  11. Nonlinear optical localization in embedded chalcogenide waveguide arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mingshan; Huang, Sheng; Wang, Qingqing; Chen, Kevin P.; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-01-01

    We report the nonlinear optical localization in an embedded waveguide array fabricated in chalcogenide glass. The array, which consists of seven waveguides with circularly symmetric cross sections, is realized by ultrafast laser writing. Light propagation in the chalcogenide waveguide array is studied with near infrared laser pulses centered at 1040 nm. The peak intensity required for nonlinear localization for the 1-cm long waveguide array was 35.1 GW/cm 2 , using 10-nJ pulses with 300-fs pulse width, which is 70 times lower than that reported in fused silica waveguide arrays and with over 7 times shorter interaction distance. Results reported in this paper demonstrated that ultrafast laser writing is a viable tool to produce 3D all-optical switching waveguide circuits in chalcogenide glass

  12. Index change of chalcogenide materials from precision glass molding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, J.; Walsh, K.; Lindberg, G.; Benson, R.; Gibson, D.; Bayya, S.; Sanghera, J.; Stover, E.

    2015-05-01

    With the increase in demand for infrared optics for thermal applications and the use of glass molding of chalcogenide materials to support these higher volume optical designs, an investigation of changes to the optical properties of these materials is required. Typical precision glass molding requires specific thermal conditions for proper lens molding of any type of optical glass. With these conditions a change (reduction) of optical index occurs after molding of all oxide glass types and it is presumed that a similar behavior will happen with chalcogenide based materials. We will discuss the effects of a typical molding thermal cycle for use with commercially and newly developed chalcogenide materials and show results of index variation from nominally established material data.

  13. Thermodynamic properties of uranium--mercury system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    The EMF values in the fused salt cells of the type U(α)/KCl--LiCl--BaCl 2 eutectic, UCl 3 /U--Hg alloy, for the different two-phase alloys in the uranium--mercury system have been measured and the thermodynamic properties of this system have been calculated. These calculated values are in good agreement with values based on mercury vapor pressure measurements made by previous investigators. The inconsistency of the thermodynamic properties with the phase diagram determined by Frost are also confirmed. A tentative phase diagram based on the thermodynamic properties measured in this work was constructed

  14. Electrical conduction mechanism in GeSeSb chalcogenide glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by melt quenching has been determined at different temperatures in bulk through the I–V characteristic curves ... DC conductivity; chalcogenide glass; Sb–Se bonding; Poole–Frenkel mechanism .... measurements were taken at room temperature as well as ele- .... age across the sample was continuued, the induced thermal.

  15. On the instability effects in radiation-sensitive chalcogenide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A.; Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.

    2007-01-01

    The features of application of radiation-sensitive media based on chalcogenide glasses of As-Ge-S system for registration of high-energy γ-radiation are analysed. It is shown that compositional features of the observed time-instability effect should be taken into account in order to ensure a higher accuracy of the developed dosimeters

  16. On the instability effects in radiation-sensitive chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balitska, V. [Lviv State University for Vital Activity Safety, 35 Kleparivska str., Lviv, UA-79007 (Ukraine); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); International Materials Institute for New Functionality in Glass, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); International Materials Institute for New Functionality in Glass, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua; Vakiv, M. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)

    2007-04-15

    The features of application of radiation-sensitive media based on chalcogenide glasses of As-Ge-S system for registration of high-energy {gamma}-radiation are analysed. It is shown that compositional features of the observed time-instability effect should be taken into account in order to ensure a higher accuracy of the developed dosimeters.

  17. Conductivity in Ag-As-S(Se,Te) chalcogenide glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stehlík, Š.; Kolář, J.; Bartoš, M.; Vlček, Milan; Frumar, M.; Zima, Vítězslav; Wágner, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 181, 37/38 (2010), s. 1625-1630 ISSN 0167-2738 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : chalcogenide glasses * ionics conductivity * phase separation Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.496, year: 2010

  18. Debye temperatures of uranium chalcogenides from their lattice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phonon dispersion relations in uranium chalcogenides have been investigated using a modified three-body force shell model. From the phonon frequencies, their Debye temperatures are evaluated. Further, on the basis of the spin fluctuation in the heavy fermion uranium compounds, UPt3 and UBe13, the possible ...

  19. 1D - photonic crystals prepared from the amorphous chalcogenide films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohoutek, T.; Orava, J.; Wágner, T.; Hrdlička, M.; Vlček, Milan; Frumar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, - (2009), S346-S350 ISSN 0957-4522. [International Conference of Optical and Optoelectronic Materials and Applications. London, 29.07.2007-03.08.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : chalcogenide thin films Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.020, year: 2009

  20. Ultrafast Laser Fabrication of Bragg Waveguides in GLS Chalcogenide Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillen Ben

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present work on the fabrication of Bragg waveguides in gallium-lanthanum-sulfide chalcogenide glass using an ultrafast laser. Waveguides were written with a single pass while modulating the writing beam. The spatial and temporal profile of the writing beam was ontrolled during waveguide fabrication in order to control the shape and size of the waveguide cross-section.

  1. Magnetic excitations in iron chalcogenide superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotegawa, Hisashi; Fujita, Masaki

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering experiments in iron chalcogenide superconductors are reviewed to make a survey of the magnetic excitations in FeSe, FeSe 1- x Te x and alkali-metal-doped A x Fe 2- y Se 2 ( A = K, Rb, Cs, etc). In FeSe, the intimate relationship between the spin fluctuations and superconductivity can be seen universally for the variations in the off-stoichiometry, the Co-substitution and applied pressure. The isovalent compound FeTe has a magnetic ordering with different wave vector from that of other Fe-based magnetic materials. The transition temperature T c of FeSe increases with Te substitution in FeSe 1- x Te x with small x , and decreases in the vicinity of the end member FeTe. The spin fluctuations are drastically modified by the Te substitution. In the vicinity of the end member FeTe, the low-energy part of the spin fluctuation is dominated by the wave vector of the ordered phase of FeTe; however, the reduction of T c shows that it does not support superconductivity. The presence of same wave vector as that of other Fe-based superconductors in FeSe 1- x Te x and the observation of the resonance mode demonstrate that FeSe 1- x Te x belongs to the same group as most of other Fe-based superconductors in the entire range of x , where superconductivity is mediated by the spin fluctuations whose wave vector is the same as the nesting vector between the hole pockets and the electron pockets. On the other hand, the spin fluctuations differ for alkali-metal-doped A x Fe 2- y Se 2 and FeSe or other Fe-based superconductors in their wave vector and strength in the low-energy part, most likely because of the different Fermi surfaces. The resonance mode with different wave vector suggests that A x Fe 2- y Se 2 has an exceptional superconducting symmetry among Fe-based superconductors.

  2. Mercury's Messenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  3. Mercury Report-Children's exposure to elemental mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov . Mercury Background Mercury Report Additional Resources Mercury Report - Children's Exposure to Elemental Mercury Recommend on Facebook ... I limit exposure to mercury? Why was the report written? Children attending a daycare in New Jersey ...

  4. Chemical Routes to Colloidal Chalcogenide Nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaak, Raymond E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2014-11-25

    This project began with an emphasis on developing new low-­temperature synthetic routes to intermetallic alloys in order to advance the synthesis and processing science of superconducting materials, as well as to potentially discover new materials that would be inaccessible using more traditional higher-­temperature methods. Our initial target materials, chosen as model systems for developing new low-­temperature solution-­based synthetic platforms, were based on well known superconducting alloys, including Nb3M (M = Ga, Ge, Sn), Bi-­M (M = In, Cu), and MgCNi3. Several key, fundamental synthetic challenges that underpinned the formation of these materials using solution chemistry routes were identified and investigated.

  5. Bismuth chalcogenide compounds Bi 2 × 3 (X=O, S, Se): Applications in electrochemical energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Jiangfeng; Bi, Xuanxuan; Jiang, Yu; Li, Liang; Lu, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Bismuth chalcogenides Bi2×3 (X=O, S, Se) represent a unique type of materials in diverse polymorphs and configurations. Multiple intrinsic features of Bi2×3 such as narrow bandgap, ion conductivity, and environmental friendliness, have render them attractive materials for a wide array of energy applications. In particular, their rich structural voids and the alloying capability of Bi enable the chalcogenides to be alternative electrodes for energy storage such as hydrogen (H), lithium (Li), sodium (Na) storage and supercapacitors. However, the low conductivity and poor electrochemical cycling are two key challenges for the practical utilization of Bi2×3 electrodes. Great efforts have been devoted to mitigate these challenges and remarkable progresses have been achieved, mainly taking profit of nanotechnology and material compositing engineering. In this short review, we summarize state-of-the-art research advances in the rational design of diverse Bi2×3 electrodes and their electrochemical energy storage performance for H, Li, and Na and supercapacitors. We also highlight the key technical issues at present and provide insights for the future development of bismuth based materials in electrochemical energy storage devices.

  6. Breakthrough switching speed with an all-optical chalcogenide glass chip: 640 Gbit/s demultiplexing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galili, Michael; Xu, Jing; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen

    2009-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of error-free 640 Gbit/s demultiplexing using the Kerr non-linearity of an only 5 cm long chalcogenide glass waveguide chip. Our approach exploits four-wave mixing by the instantaneous nonlinear response of chalcogenide. Excellent performance is achieved with onl...... 2 dB average power penalty and no indication of error-floor. Characterisation of the FWM efficiency for the chalcogenide waveguide is given and confirms the good performance of the device....

  7. Nanoscale structure and atomic disorder in the iron-based chalcogenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naurang Lal Saini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiband iron-based superconductors have layered structure with a phase diagram characterized by a complex interplay of charge, spin and lattice excitations, with nanoscale atomic structure playing a key role in their fundamental electronic properties. In this paper, we briefly review nanoscale structure and atomic disorder in iron-based chalcogenide superconductors. We focus on the Fe(Se,S1−xTex (11-type and K0.8Fe1.6Se2 (122-type systems, discussing their local structure obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure. Local structure studies on the Fe(Se,S1−xTex system reveal clear nanoscale phase separation characterized by coexisting components of different atomic configurations, similar to the case of random alloys. In fact, the Fe–Se/S and Fe–Te distances in the ternary Fe(Se,S1−xTex are found to be closer to the respective distances in the binary FeSe/FeS and FeTe systems, showing significant divergence of the local structure from the average one. The observed features are characteristic of ternary random alloys, indicating breaking of the local symmetry in these materials. On the other hand, K0.8Fe1.6Se2 is known for phase separation in an iron-vacancy ordered phase and an in-plane compressed lattice phase. The local structure of these 122-type chalcogenides shows that this system is characterized by a large local disorder. Indeed, the experiments suggest a nanoscale glassy phase in K0.8Fe1.6Se2, with the superconductivity being similar to the granular materials. While the 11-type structure has no spacer layer, the 122-type structure contains intercalated atoms unlike the 1111-type REFeAsO (RE = rare earth oxypnictides, having well-defined REO spacer layers. It is clear that the interlayer atomic correlations in these iron-based superconducting structures play an important role in structural stability as well as superconductivity and magnetism.

  8. The structural heterogeneity and optical properties in chalcogenide glass films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shurgalin, Max; Fuflyigin, Vladimir N; Anderson, Emilia G

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic structure and optical properties of glassy films prepared by vapour phase deposition process from the germanium-arsenic-selenium family of chalcogenide glasses have been studied. A number of different molecular clusters or domains that can exist in the glass structure are found to play a significant role in determining the absorption characteristics and refractive index of the glass films. Modifications of the glass structure can be described by a variation of relative concentrations of the clusters and can be effected by modifications of film chemical composition and deposition conditions. Changes in absorption spectra are directly correlated with variation in relative concentrations of the structural fragments with different electronic bandgap properties. Experimental results suggest structural heterogeneity and support validity of the cluster structural model for the chalcogenide glasses

  9. Synthesis of cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Cadmium chalcogenide (CdE, E=S, Se, Te) polycrystalline nanotubes have been synthesized from precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex at room temperature. The precursor was hydrothermally synthesized at 180 °C using thioglycolic acid (TGA) and cadmium acetate as starting materials. The transformation from the rod-like precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex to CdS, CdSe and CdTe nanotubes were performed under constant stirring at room temperature in aqueous solution containing S 2-, Se 2- and Te 2-, respectively. The nanotube diameter can be controlled from 150 to 400 nm related to the dimension of templates. The XRD patterns show the cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes all corresponding to face-centered cubic structure. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis of cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun; Qian, Yitai

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium chalcogenide (CdE, E=S, Se, Te) polycrystalline nanotubes have been synthesized from precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex at room temperature. The precursor was hydrothermally synthesized at 180 °C using thioglycolic acid (TGA) and cadmium acetate as starting materials. The transformation from the rod-like precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex to CdS, CdSe and CdTe nanotubes were performed under constant stirring at room temperature in aqueous solution containing S 2-, Se 2- and Te 2-, respectively. The nanotube diameter can be controlled from 150 to 400 nm related to the dimension of templates. The XRD patterns show the cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes all corresponding to face-centered cubic structure. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Direct Electrospray Printing of Gradient Refractive Index Chalcogenide Glass Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Spencer; Lin, Pao Tai; Li, Cheng; Lumdee, Chatdanai; Hu, Juejun; Agarwal, Anuradha; Kik, Pieter G; Deng, Weiwei; Richardson, Kathleen

    2017-08-16

    A spatially varying effective refractive index gradient using chalcogenide glass layers is printed on a silicon wafer using an optimized electrospray (ES) deposition process. Using solution-derived glass precursors, IR-transparent Ge 23 Sb 7 S 70 and As 40 S 60 glass films of programmed thickness are fabricated to yield a bilayer structure, resulting in an effective gradient refractive index (GRIN) film. Optical and compositional analysis tools confirm the optical and physical nature of the gradient in the resulting high-optical-quality films, demonstrating the power of direct printing of multimaterial structures compatible with planar photonic fabrication protocols. The potential application of such tailorable materials and structures as they relate to the enhancement of sensitivity in chalcogenide glass based planar chemical sensor device design is presented. This method, applicable to a broad cross section of glass compositions, shows promise in directly depositing GRIN films with tunable refractive index profiles for bulk and planar optical components and devices.

  12. The Moessbauer effect in binary tin chalcogenides of tin 119

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortalli, I.; Fano, V.

    1975-01-01

    The values of the isomer shift, quadrupole splitting, Moessbauer coefficient, Debye temperature for the tin chalcogenides SnS. SnSe, SnTe are tabulated for the temperatures 80 and 300 K. Temperature dependences of the Moessbauer coefficient and of the effective Debye temperature for SnS, SnSe and SnTe in a temperature range of 78 to 300 K are presented. (Z.S.)

  13. Inverse opal photonic crystal of chalcogenide glass by solution processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohoutek, Tomas; Orava, Jiri; Sawada, Tsutomu; Fudouzi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-15

    Chalcogenide opal and inverse opal photonic crystals were successfully fabricated by low-cost and low-temperature solution-based process, which is well developed in polymer films processing. Highly ordered silica colloidal crystal films were successfully infilled with nano-colloidal solution of the high refractive index As(30)S(70) chalcogenide glass by using spin-coating method. The silica/As-S opal film was etched in HF acid to dissolve the silica opal template and fabricate the inverse opal As-S photonic crystal. Both, the infilled silica/As-S opal film (Δn ~ 0.84 near λ=770 nm) and the inverse opal As-S photonic structure (Δn ~ 1.26 near λ=660 nm) had significantly enhanced reflectivity values and wider photonic bandgaps in comparison with the silica opal film template (Δn ~ 0.434 near λ=600 nm). The key aspects of opal film preparation by spin-coating of nano-colloidal chalcogenide glass solution are discussed. The solution fabricated "inorganic polymer" opal and the inverse opal structures exceed photonic properties of silica or any organic polymer opal film. The fabricated photonic structures are proposed for designing novel flexible colloidal crystal laser devices, photonic waveguides and chemical sensors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Forced Ion Migration for Chalcogenide Phase Change Memory Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kristy A (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices with two stacked layers of chalcogenide materials comprising the active memory device have been investigated for their potential as phase-change memories. The devices tested included GeTe/SnTe, Ge2Se3/SnTe, and Ge2Se3/SnSe stacks. All devices exhibited resistance switching behavior. The polarity of the applied voltage with respect to the SnTe or SnSe layer was critical to the memory switching properties, due to the electric field induced movement of either Sn or Te into the Ge-chalcogenide layer. One embodiment of the invention is a device comprising a stack of chalcogenide-containing layers which exhibit phase-change switching only after a reverse polarity voltage potential is applied across the stack causing ion movement into an adjacent layer and thus "activating" the device to act as a phase-change random access memory device or a reconfigurable electronics device when the applied voltage potential is returned to the normal polarity. Another embodiment of the invention is a device that is capable of exhibiting more than two data states.

  15. Chalcogenide glasses as optical and ion-conducting materials. Kogaku oyobi ion dendo zairyo toshite no chalcogenide glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toge, N.; Minami, T. (Univ. of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    Nonoxide glasses whose main constituent are chalcogen elements like S, Se, or Te etc. show a lot of various properties, for instance, high infrared transmittancy and semi-conductivity which are already well known. Additionally, the optical properties change a lot along with the phase transition's happening between crystal and noncrystal under comparative low temperature. Further, it is also observed that the glasses containing proper cation appear high ion-conductivity. This paper supplies a brief reviews of chalcogenide glasses used as materials for infrared fiber, phase transition optical memory and superionic conductor, wherein the former two have already on the stage of utilization, particularly the realization of a rewritable optical memory is possible by using chalcogenide glasses film, and ion-conductor is in the phase to have shown the possibility of high conductivity while the development thereof is being expected. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Recent Advances in Layered Metal Chalcogenides as Superconductors and Thermoelectric Materials: Fe-Based and Bi-Based Chalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in layered (Fe-based and Bi-based) chalcogenides as superconductors or functional materials are reviewed. The Fe-chalcogenide (FeCh) family are the simplest Fe-based high-Tc superconductors. The superconductivity in the FeCh family is sensitive to external or chemical pressure, and high Tc is attained when the local structure (anion height) is optimized. The Bi-chalcogenide (BiCh2) family are a new group of layered superconductors with a wide variety of stacking structures. Their physical properties are also sensitive to external or chemical pressure. Recently, we revealed that the emergence of superconductivity and the Tc in this family correlate with the in-plane chemical pressure. Since the flexibility of crystal structure and electronic states are an advantage of the BiCh2 family for designing functionalities, I briefly review recent developments in this family as not only superconductors but also other functional materials. © 2016 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Mercury contamination extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Mark [Silver Spring, MD; Heiser, John [Bayport, NY; Kalb, Paul [Wading River, NY

    2009-09-15

    Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

  18. Infrared Emitting and Photoconducting Colloidal Silver Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Quantum Dots from a Silylamide-Promoted Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarema, Maksym; Pichler, Stefan; Sytnyk, Mykhailo; Seyrkammer, Robert; Lechner, Rainer T.; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Jarzab, Dorota; Szendrei, Krisztina; Resel, Roland; Korovyanko, Oleksandra; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Paris, Oskar; Hesser, Guenter; Heiss, Wolfgang; Hesser, Günter

    Here, we present a hot injection synthesis of colloidal Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals (Ag(2)Se, Ag(2)Te, and Ag(2)S) that resulted in exceptionally small nanocrystal sizes in the range between 2 and 4 nm. Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals exhibit band gap energies within the near-infrared spectral region,

  19. Fragility of chalcogenide glass in relation to characteristic temperature T0/Tg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, A. M.; Shanker Rao, T.; Lilly Shanker Rao, T.; Venkataraman, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present study reports the mutual relationship between the fragility index m and the characteristic temperature T0/Tg. The fragility of the chalcogenide amorphous glass of Ge10Se50Te40 is calculated by utilizing glass transition temperature (Tg) measured by DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) at different heating rates (β) in the range 5 to 20 K/min. Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) equation is fitted to the data of Tg. In addition to the VFT method, three other methods are also used to evaluate m. The fragility index m of the Ge10Se50Te40 system showed the trend of decrease with increasing heating rate but remained stable around 22 for the heating rate 10 K/min. The value of m for the glass is near the lower limit (m ≈ 16) this indicates the alloy is a strong glass forming material in accordance of Angell’s interpretation of fragility. The calculated values of characteristic temperature T0/Tg is very close to 1 which also indicates that clearly the system is most fragile.

  20. The intercalation chemistry of layered iron chalcogenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivanco, Hector K.; Rodriguez, Efrain E., E-mail: efrain@umd.edu

    2016-10-15

    The iron chalcogenides FeSe and FeS are superconductors composed of two-dimensional sheets held together by van der Waals interactions, which makes them prime candidates for the intercalation of various guest species. We review the intercalation chemistry of FeSe and FeS superconductors and discuss their synthesis, structure, and physical properties. Before we review the latest work in this area, we provide a brief background on the intercalation chemistry of other inorganic materials that exhibit enhanced superconducting properties upon intercalation, which include the transition metal dichalcogenides, fullerenes, and layered cobalt oxides. From past studies of these intercalated superconductors, we discuss the role of the intercalates in terms of charge doping, structural distortions, and Fermi surface reconstruction. We also briefly review the physical and chemical properties of the host materials—mackinawite-type FeS and β-FeSe. The three types of intercalates for the iron chalcogenides can be placed in three categories: 1.) alkali and alkaline earth cations intercalated through the liquid ammonia technique; 2.) cations intercalated with organic amines such as ethylenediamine; and 3.) layered hydroxides intercalated during hydrothermal conditions. A recurring theme in these studies is the role of the intercalated guest in electron doping the chalcogenide host and in enhancing the two-dimensionality of the electronic structure by spacing the FeSe layers apart. We end this review discussing possible new avenues in the intercalation chemistry of transition metal monochalcogenides, and the promise of these materials as a unique set of new inorganic two-dimensional systems.

  1. Chalcogenide metal centers for oxygen reduction reaction: Activity and tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yongjun; Gago, Aldo; Timperman, Laure; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes materials design methods, oxygen reduction kinetics, tolerance to small organic molecules and fuel cell performance of chalcogenide metal catalysts, particularly, ruthenium (Ru x Se y ) and non-precious transition metals (M x X y : M = Co, Fe and Ni; X = Se and S). These non-platinum catalysts are potential alternatives to Pt-based catalysts because of their comparable catalytic activity (Ru x Se y ), low cost, high abundance and, in particular, a high tolerance to small organic molecules. Developing trends of synthesis methods, mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction and applications in direct alcohol fuel cells as well as the substrate effect are highlighted.

  2. Investigations on the parent compounds of Fe-chalcogenide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koz, Cevriye

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused on the parent compounds of the Fe-chalcogenide superconductors. For this purpose poly- and single-crystalline forms of tetragonal β-Fe x Se, Fe 1+y Te, Fe 1+y Te 1-x Se x and Fe (1+y)-x M x Te (M = Ni, Co) have been prepared. Second focal points of this study are the low-temperature structural phase transitions and physical property changes in tetragonal Fe 1+y Te which are induced by composition, external pressure, and cationic substitution.

  3. Positronics of radiation-induced effects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kozyukhin, S. A.; Shpotyuk, M.; Ingram, A.; Szatanik, R.

    2015-01-01

    Using As 2 S 3 and AsS 2 glasses as an example, the principal possibility of using positron annihilation spectroscopy methods for studying the evolution of the free volume of hollow nanoobjects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors exposed to radiation is shown. The results obtained by measurements of the positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening of the annihilation line in reverse chronological order are in full agreement with the optical spectroscopy data in the region of the fundamental absorption edge, being adequately described within coordination defect-formation and physical-aging models

  4. Reversibility windows in selenide-based chalcogenide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Hyla, M.; Boyko, V.; Golovchak, R.

    2008-01-01

    A simple route for the estimation of the reversibility windows in the sense of non-ageing ability is developed for chalcogenide glasses obeying '8-N' rule at the example of As-Se, Ge-Se and Ge-As-Se glass systems. The low limit of their reversibility windows is determined at the average coordination number Z=2.4 in full agreement with rigidity percolation theory, while the upper limit is shown to be related to the glass preparation conditions and samples prehistory

  5. Positronics of radiation-induced effects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Scientific Research Company “Carat” (Ukraine); Kozyukhin, S. A., E-mail: sergkoz@igic.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Shpotyuk, M. [Scientific Research Company “Carat” (Ukraine); Ingram, A. [Opole Technical University (Poland); Szatanik, R. [Opole University (Poland)

    2015-03-15

    Using As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and AsS{sub 2} glasses as an example, the principal possibility of using positron annihilation spectroscopy methods for studying the evolution of the free volume of hollow nanoobjects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors exposed to radiation is shown. The results obtained by measurements of the positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening of the annihilation line in reverse chronological order are in full agreement with the optical spectroscopy data in the region of the fundamental absorption edge, being adequately described within coordination defect-formation and physical-aging models.

  6. Reversibility windows in selenide-based chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska Street, Lviv, UA 79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL 42200 (Poland); Hyla, M. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL 42200 (Poland); Boyko, V. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska Street, Lviv, UA 79031 (Ukraine); Lviv National Polytechnic University, 12, Bandera Street, Lviv, UA 79013 (Ukraine); Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska Street, Lviv, UA 79031 (Ukraine)], E-mail: golovchak@novas.lviv.ua

    2008-10-01

    A simple route for the estimation of the reversibility windows in the sense of non-ageing ability is developed for chalcogenide glasses obeying '8-N' rule at the example of As-Se, Ge-Se and Ge-As-Se glass systems. The low limit of their reversibility windows is determined at the average coordination number Z=2.4 in full agreement with rigidity percolation theory, while the upper limit is shown to be related to the glass preparation conditions and samples prehistory.

  7. The interior configuration of planet Mercury constrained by moment of inertia and planetary contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knibbe, J.S.; van Westrenen, W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of present-day interior configuration models for Mercury considering cores of Fe-S or Fe-Si alloy, the latter possibly covered by a solid FeS layer, in light of the improved limit of planetary contraction of 7 km derived from MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment,

  8. Global Trends in Mercury Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyunghee

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Environmental Program Governing Council has regulated mercury as a global pollutant since 2001 and has been preparing the mercury convention, which will have a strongly binding force through Global Mercury Assessment, Global Mercury Partnership Activities, and establishment of the Open-Ended Working Group on Mercury. The European Union maintains an inclusive strategy on risks and contamination of mercury, and has executed the Mercury Export Ban Act since December in 2010. The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Mercury Action Plan (1998) and the Mercury Roadmap (2006) and has proposed systematic mercury management methods to reduce the health risks posed by mercury exposure. Japan, which experienced Minamata disease, aims vigorously at perfection in mercury management in several ways. In Korea, the Ministry of Environment established the Comprehensive Plan and Countermeasures for Mercury Management to prepare for the mercury convention and to reduce risks of mercury to protect public health. PMID:23230466

  9. Basic Information about Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white metal and is liquid at room temperature. It is ... releases can happen naturally. Both volcanoes and forest fires send mercury into the atmosphere. Human activities, however, ...

  10. Minamata Convention on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    On November 6, 2013 the United States signed the Minamata Convention on Mercury, a new multilateral environmental agreement that addresses specific human activities which are contributing to widespread mercury pollution

  11. Making Mercury's Core with Light Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has low FeO abundances (less than 2 wt%) and high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%), suggesting the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials is somewhere between 3 to 7 log10 units below the IW buffer. The highly reducing nature of Mercury has resulted in a relatively thin mantle and a large core that has the potential to exhibit an exotic composition in comparison to the other terrestrial planets. This exotic composition may extend to include light elements (e.g., Si, C, S). Furthermore, has argued for a possible primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, which may require a core that is C-saturated. In order to investigate mercurian core compositions, we conducted piston cylinder experiments at 1 GPa, from 1300 C to 1700 C, using a range of starting compositions consisting of various Si-Fe metal mixtures (Si5Fe95, Si10Fe90, Si22Fe78, and Si35Fe65). All metals were loaded into graphite capsules used to ensure C-saturation during the duration of each experimental run. Our experiments show that Fe-Si metallic alloys exclude carbon relative to more Fe-rich metal. This exclusion of carbon commences within the range of 5 to 10 wt% Si. These results indicate that if Mercury has a Si-rich core (having more than approximately 5 wt% silicon), it would have saturated in carbon at low C abundances allowing for the possible formation of a graphite floatation crust as suggested by. These results have important implications for the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mercury.

  12. Mercury in Your Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic information about mercury, how it gets in the air, how people are exposed to it and health effects associated with exposure; what EPA and other organizations are doing to limit exposures; what citizens should know to minimize exposures and to reduce mercury in the environment; and information about products that contain mercury.

  13. Intoxication with metallic mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichte, B.; Assmann, H.; Ritzau, F.

    1984-01-01

    Intoxications by metallic mercury are extremely rare. Report of a patient, who tried to commit suicide by subcutaneous injection of 500 g of metallic mercury. He died 16 months later in the course of the intoxication. A short review is given of effects and reactions of metallic mercury in the human organism. (orig.) [de

  14. Intoxication with metallic mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichte, B.; Ritzau, F.; Assmann, H.

    1984-02-01

    Intoxications by metallic mercury are extremely rare. Report is given of a patient who tried to commit suicide by subcutaneous injection of 500 g of metallic mercury. He died 16 months later in the course of the intoxication. A short review is given of effects and reactions of metallic mercury in the human organism.

  15. Intoxication with metallic mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichte, B.; Assmann, H.; Ritzau, F.

    1984-02-01

    Intoxications by metallic mercury are extremely rare. Report is given of a patient, who tried to commit suicide by subcutaneous injection of 500 g of metallic mercury. He died 16 months later in the course of the intoxication. A short review is given of effects and reactions of metallic mercury in the human organism.

  16. New Trends in Amplifiers and Sources via Chalcogenide Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mescia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare-earth-doped chalcogenide glass fiber lasers and amplifiers have great applicative potential in many fields since they are key elements in the near and medium-infrared (mid-IR wavelength range. In this paper, a review, even if not exhaustive, on amplification and lasing obtained by employing rare-earth-doped chalcogenide photonic crystal fibers is reported. Materials, devices, and feasible applications in the mid-IR are briefly mentioned.

  17. Modulation-instability biosensing using an As2S3 chalcogenide tapered fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Bang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an experimentally feasible biosensor design based on As2S3 chalcogenide tapered fiber. Pumping the fiber close to 1064 nm, a record sensitivity up to ~18 nm/nm was predicted.......We demonstrate an experimentally feasible biosensor design based on As2S3 chalcogenide tapered fiber. Pumping the fiber close to 1064 nm, a record sensitivity up to ~18 nm/nm was predicted....

  18. Visible-active photocatalytic behaviors observed in nanostructured lead chalcogenides PbX (X = S, Se, Te)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Li-Na; Wang, H.C.; Shen, Y.; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured lead chalcogenides (PbX, X = Te, Se, S) were prepared via a simple hydrothermal method. The powder samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, SAED and DRS. Phase composition and microstructure analysis indicate that these samples are pure lead chalcogenides phases and have similar morphologies. These lead chalcogenides display efficient absorption in the UV-visible light range. The photocatalytic properties of lead chalcogenides nanoparticles were evaluated by the photodegradation of Congo red under UV-visible light irradiation in air atmosphere. The Congo red solution can be efficiently degraded under visible light in the presence of lead chalcogenides nanoparticles. The photocatalytic activities of lead chalcogenides generally increase with increasing their band gaps and shows no appreciable loss after repeated cycles. Our results may be useful for developing new photocatalyst systems responsive to visible light among narrow band gap semiconductors

  19. Synthesis of 2D Metal Chalcogenide Thin Films through the Process Involving Solution-Phase Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Anupam; Park, Gyeongbae; Yang, Heeseung; Pal, Monalisa; Kwak, Junghyeok; Jeong, Unyong

    2018-04-24

    2D metal chalcogenide thin films have recently attracted considerable attention owing to their unique physicochemical properties and great potential in a variety of applications. Synthesis of large-area 2D metal chalcogenide thin films in controllable ways remains a key challenge in this research field. Recently, the solution-based synthesis of 2D metal chalcogenide thin films has emerged as an alternative approach to vacuum-based synthesis because it is relatively simple and easy to scale up for high-throughput production. In addition, solution-based thin films open new opportunities that cannot be achieved from vacuum-based thin films. Here, a comprehensive summary regarding the basic structures and properties of different types of 2D metal chalcogenides, the mechanistic details of the chemical reactions in the synthesis of the metal chalcogenide thin films, recent successes in the synthesis by different reaction approaches, and the applications and potential uses is provided. In the last perspective section, the technical challenges to be overcome and the future research directions in the solution-based synthesis of 2D metal chalcogenides are discussed. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Chalcogenide phase-change thin films used as grayscale photolithography materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Jingsong; Fan, Yongtao

    2014-03-10

    Chalcogenide phase-change thin films are used in many fields, such as optical information storage and solid-state memory. In this work, we present another application of chalcogenide phase-change thin films, i.e., as grayscale photolithgraphy materials. The grayscale patterns can be directly inscribed on the chalcogenide phase-change thin films by a single process through direct laser writing method. In grayscale photolithography, the laser pulse can induce the formation of bump structure, and the bump height and size can be precisely controlled by changing laser energy. Bumps with different height and size present different optical reflection and transmission spectra, leading to the different gray levels. For example, the continuous-tone grayscale images of lifelike bird and cat are successfully inscribed onto Sb(2)Te(3) chalcogenide phase-change thin films using a home-built laser direct writer, where the expression and appearance of the lifelike bird and cat are fully presented. This work provides a way to fabricate complicated grayscale patterns using laser-induced bump structures onto chalcogenide phase-change thin films, different from current techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography. The ability to form grayscale patterns of chalcogenide phase-change thin films reveals many potential applications in high-resolution optical images for micro/nano image storage, microartworks, and grayscale photomasks.

  1. Reversible amorphous-crystalline phase changes in a wide range of Se1-xTex alloys studied using ultrafast differential scanning calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Paul. A.; Momand, Jamo; Kooi, Bart J.

    The reversible amorphous-crystalline phase change in a chalcogenide material, specifically the Se1-xTex alloy, has been investigated for the first time using ultrafast differential scanning calorimetry. Heating rates and cooling rates up to 5000 K/s were used. Repeated reversible

  2. Catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2010-08-17

    Two new classes of catalysts for the removal of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg) from effluent gases. Both of these classes of catalysts are excellent absorbers of HCl and Cl.sub.2 present in effluent gases. This adsorption of oxidizing agents aids in the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants. The catalysts remove mercury by oxidizing the Hg into mercury (II) moieties. For one class of catalysts, the active component is selected from the group consisting of iridium (Ir) and iridum-platinum (Ir/Pt) alloys. The Ir and Ir/Pt alloy catalysts are especially corrosion resistant. For the other class of catalyst, the active component is partially combusted coal or "Thief" carbon impregnated with Cl.sub.2. Untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-activating in the presence of effluent gas streams. The Thief carbon catalyst is disposable by means of capture from the effluent gas stream in a particulate collection device (PCD).

  3. Microbial synthesis of chalcogenide semiconductor nanoparticles: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jaya Mary; Lens, Piet N L; Balakrishnan, Raj Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Chalcogenide semiconductor quantum dots are emerging as promising nanomaterials due to their size tunable optoelectronic properties. The commercial synthesis and their subsequent integration for practical uses have, however, been contorted largely due to the toxicity and cost issues associated with the present chemical synthesis protocols. Accordingly, there is an immediate need to develop alternative environment-friendly synthesis procedures. Microbial factories hold immense potential to achieve this objective. Over the past few years, bacteria, fungi and yeasts have been experimented with as eco-friendly and cost-effective tools for the biosynthesis of semiconductor quantum dots. This review provides a detailed overview about the production of chalcogen-based semiconductor quantum particles using the inherent microbial machinery. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on iron-chalcogenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maletz, Janek; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr; Evtushinsky, Daniil; Thirupathaiah, Setti; Wolter-Giraud, Anja; Harnagea, Luminita; Kordyuk, Alexander; Borisenko, Sergey [IFW Dresden (Germany); Yaresko, Alexander [MPI-FKF, Stuttgart (Germany); Vasiliev, Alexander [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Chareev, Dimitri [RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Rienks, Emile [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden (Germany); Shermadini, Zurab; Luetkens, Hubertus; Sedlak, Kamil; Khasanov, Rustem; Amato, Alex; Krzton-Maziopa, Anna; Conder, Kazimierz; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Klauss, Hans-Henning [TU Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The electronic structure of the iron chalcogenide superconductors FeSe{sub 1-x} and Rb{sub 0.77}Fe{sub 1.61}Se{sub 2} was investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The results were compared to DFT calculations and μSR measurements. Both compounds share ''cigar-shaped'' Fermi surface sheets in their electronic structure, that can be found in almost all iron-pnictide superconductors. These features originate from a strong interplay of two hole- and electron-like bands in the Brillouin zone center, leading to a pronounced singularity in the density of states just below the Fermi level. This facilitates the coupling to a bosonic mode responsible for superconductivity.

  5. Copper Antimony Chalcogenide Thin Film PV Device Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Adam W.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; de Souza Lucas, Francisco Willian; Toberer, Eric S.; Wolden, Colin A.; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2015-06-14

    Emerging ternary chalcogenide thin film solar cell technologies, such as CuSbS2 and CuSbSe2, have recently attracted attention as simpler alternatives to quaternary Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS). Despite suitable photovoltaic properties, the initial energy conversion efficiency of CuSbS2 is rather low (0.3%). Here, we report on our progress towards improving the efficiency of CuSbS2 solar cells using a high throughput approach. The combinatorial methodology quickly results in baseline solar cell prototypes with 0.6% efficiency, and then modification of the back contact architecture leads to 1% PV devices. We then translate the optimal CuSbS2 synthesis parameters to CuSbSe2 devices, which show 3% efficiencies.

  6. Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

    2013-04-30

    For many decades, various radiation detecting material have been extensively researched, to find a better material or mechanism for radiation sensing. Recently, there is a growing need for a smaller and effective material or device that can perform similar functions of bulkier Geiger counters and other measurement options, which fail the requirement for easy, cheap and accurate radiation dose measurement. Here arises the use of thin film chalcogenide glass, which has unique properties of high thermal stability along with high sensitivity towards short wavelength radiation. The unique properties of chalcogenide glasses are attributed to the lone pair p-shell electrons, which provide some distinctive optical properties when compared to crystalline material. These qualities are derived from the energy band diagram and the presence of localized states in the band gap. Chalcogenide glasses have band tail states and localized states, along with the two band states. These extra states are primarily due to the lone pair electrons as well as the amorphous structure of the glasses. The localized states between the conductance band (CB) and valence band (VB) are primarily due to the presence of the lone pair electrons, while the band tail states are attributed to the Van der Waal's forces between layers of atoms [1]. Localized states are trap locations within the band gap where electrons from the valence band can hop into, in their path towards the conduction band. Tail states on the other hand are locations near the band gap edges and are known as Urbach tail states (Eu). These states are occupied with many electrons that can participate in the various transformations due to interaction with photons. According to Y. Utsugi et. al.[2], the electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the generation of the Urbach tails. These states are responsible for setting the absorption edge for these glasses and photons with energy near the band gap affect these states. We have

  7. Zinc Antimonides and Copper Chalcogenides as Thermoelectric Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeld, Anders Bank

    2017-01-01

    , and linked with the physical properties. The materials crystallography approach, relating physical properties with a structural understating, has been applied in this thesis for two highly interesting materials systems, zinc antimonides and copper chalcogenides. Both of these systems are high profiled....... The preparation parameters used, have a large influence on the homogeneity of the products, and new electric phases were identified and studied for ZnSb. For the samples prepared by physical vapor deposition, the growth takes place under non-thermodynamic conditions, making it possible to access kinetically...... intensity X-ray radiation at large international facilities, making it possible to measure pair distribution function data directly on thin-film samples in a normal incident setup, termed tfPDF. The tfPDF method was demonstrated on the iron antimony system. tfPDF was developed even further to include...

  8. Radionuclides in diffusion probing of inorganic materials based on chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsova, L.P.

    1994-01-01

    Migration of tellurium-125m, selenium-75, sulfur-35 radionuclides in solid solutions Pb 1-y (Se 0.08 Te 0.92 ) y and (Pb 1-x Sn x ) y Te 1-y , where x=0.1 and 0.2, has been studied, the results are presented. Data on dependence of selenium and tellurium self-diffusion coefficients on temperature in the range of 600-750 deg C are given. The results of the study of self-diffusion coefficient isothermal dependences on lead and tellurium vapour pressure in equilibrium with solid phases have been considered. It is ascertained that a change in the temperature and p-n transitions initiate the change in self-diffusion mechanisms of chalcogenide atoms. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Diffusion of 64Cu in copper-containing chalcogenide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, Yu.G.; Bychkov, E.A.; Bolotov, A.M.; Tsegel'nik, V.S.; Gavrilov, Yu.A.

    1996-01-01

    Diffusion experiments with 64 Cu radioactive tracer for a number of copper-containing chalcogenide glasses CuI-As 2 Se 3 , Cu-SbI 3 -As 2 Se 3 , CuI-PbI 2 -As 2 Se 3 , CuI-PbI 2 -SbI 3 -As 2 Se 3 and Cu 2 Se-As 2 Se 3 are carried out for the first time. The results of diffusion and electrodiffusion measurements are in correspondence with information on electroconductivity and diffusion in a limited space (cage diffusion) from the Moessbauer spectroscopy on 124 I. It is shown for the first time that the Cheivin factor index for copper-conducting glasses in by 2-3 times higher as compared to silver-conducting glasses with approximate diffusion coefficients indices. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Multi-layered Chalcogenides with potential for magnetism and superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Li, E-mail: lil2@ornl.gov [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Parker, David S. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Cruz, Clarina R. dela [Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Sefat, Athena S., E-mail: sefata@ornl.gov [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A comprehensive study on multi-layered thallium copper chalcogenides TlCu{sub 2n}Ch{sub n+1}. • All the TlCu{sub 2n}Ch{sub n+1} exhibit metallic behaviors with no long-range magnetism. • Calculations suggest a lack of Fermi-level spectral weight for magnetic instability. • Our results suggest a likelihood of magnetism for multiple structural layers with Fe. - Abstract: Layered thallium copper chalcogenides can form single, double, or triple layers of Cu–Ch separated by Tl sheets. Here we report on the preparation and properties of Tl-based materials of TlCu{sub 2}Se{sub 2}, TlCu{sub 4}S{sub 3}, TlCu{sub 4}Se{sub 3} and TlCu{sub 6}S{sub 4}. Having no long-range magnetism for these materials is quite surprising considering the possibilities of inter- and intra-layer exchange interactions through Cu 3d, and we measure by magnetic susceptibility and confirm by neutron diffraction. First principles density-functional theory calculations for both the single-layer TlCu{sub 2}Se{sub 2} (isostructural to the ‘122’ iron-based superconductors) and the double-layer TlCu{sub 4}Se{sub 3} suggest a lack of Fermi-level spectral weight that is needed to drive a magnetic or superconducting instability. However, for multiple structural layers with Fe, there is much greater likelihood for magnetism and superconductivity.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    smith, jeremy

    2014-04-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a major global pollutant arising from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Defining the factors that determine the relative affinities of different ligands for the mercuric ion, Hg2+, is critical to understanding its speciation, transformation, and bioaccumulation in the environment. Here, we used quantum chemistry to dissect the relative binding free energies for a series of inorganic anion complexes of Hg2+. The results show that, whereas in the gas phase the binding affinity of two identical anionic ligands (forming HgL2) increases with ligand (L–) hardness, in contrast, in the aqueous phase the affinity increases with ligand softness. This switch in affinity upon hydration is shown to result mostly from interactions with only a small number (e.g. one or two) of water molecules. The results yield a clear, robust periodic trend within the chalcogenide and halide groups and are in agreement with the well-known experimentally observed preference of Hg2+ for soft ligands. By comparing the Hg2+ binding of one with two anions, the gas phase preferences are found to arise from the enhancement of reactivity of the cationic complex (HgL+) with the hardness of L–. The approach establishes a theoretical basis for understanding Hg speciation in the biosphere.

  12. Mercury balance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maag, J.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed assessment of the consumption of mercury, divided into use areas, was carried out. Disposal and emissions to the environment were also qualified. The assessment is mainly based on data from 1992 - 1993. The most important source of emission of mercury to air is solid waste incineration which is assessed in particular to be due to the supply of mercury in batteries (most likely mercury oxide batteries from photo equipment) and to dental fillings. The second most important source of mercury emission to air is coal-fired power plants which are estimated to account for 200-500 kg of mercury emission p.a. Other mercury emissions are mainly related to waste treatment and disposal. The consumption of mercury is generally decreasing. During the period from 1982/83 - 1992-93, the total consumption of mercury in Denmark was about halved. This development is related to the fact that consumption with regard to several important use areas (batteries, dental fillings, thermometers etc.) has been significantly reduced, while for other purposes the use of mercury has completely, or almost disappeared, i.e. (fungicides for seed, tubes etc.). (EG)

  13. Process for low mercury coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Norman W.; Grimes, R. William; Tweed, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal.

  14. Mercury (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in contact with) to mercury is by eating fish or shellfish that have high levels of mercury. You can also get sick from: Touching it Breathing it in Drinking contaminated water How can mercury ...

  15. Mercury removal from SRP radioactive waste streams using ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.; Ebra, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Mercury is present in varying concentrations in some Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste streams as a result of its use as a catalyst in the dissolution of fuel elements composed of uranium-aluminum alloys. It may be desirable to remove mercury from these streams before treatment of the waste for incorporation in glass for long-term storage. The glass forming process will also create waste from which mercury will have to be removed. The goal of mercury would be to eliminate ultimate emission of the toxic substance into the environment. This paper describes tests that demonstrate the feasibility of using a specific cation exchange resin, Duolite GT-73 for the removal of mercury from five waste streams generated at the SRP. Two of these streams are dilute; one is the condensate from a waste evaporator while the other is the effluent from an effluent treatment plant now under development. The three other streams are related to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) that is being built at SRP. One of these streams is a concentrated salt solution (principally sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide) that constitutes the soluble fraction of SRP waste and contains 20% mercury in the waste. The second stream is a slurry of the insoluble components in SRP waste and contains 80% of the mercury. The third stream is the offgas condensate from the glass melter system in the DWPF

  16. Mercury is Moon's brother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksanfomalifi, L.V.

    1976-01-01

    The latest information on Mercury planet is presented obtained by studying the planet with the aid of radar and space vehicles. Rotation of Mercury about its axis has been discovered; within 2/3 of its year it executes a complete revolution about its axis. In images obtained by the ''Mariner-10'' Mercurys surface differs little from that of the Moon. The ''Mariner-10'' has also discovered the Mercurys atmosphere, which consists of extremely rarefied helium. The helium is continuously supplied to the planet by the solar wind. The Mercury's magnetic field has been discovered, whose strength is 35 x 10 -4 at the Equator and 70 x 10 -4 E at the poles. The inclination of the dipole axis to the Mercury's rotation axis is 7 deg

  17. General Top-Down Ion Exchange Process for the Growth of Epitaxial Chalcogenide Thin Films and Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan; Li, Peng; Li, Jun; Jiang, Qiu; Zhang, Xixiang; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2016-01-01

    ) epitaxial chalcogenide metallic and semiconducting films and (2) free-standing chalcogenide films and (3) completed in situ formation of atomically sharp heterojunctions by selective ion exchange. Epitaxial NiCo2S4 thin films prepared by our process show 115

  18. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  19. Infrared emitting and photoconducting colloidal silver chalcogenide nanocrystal quantum dots from a silylamide-promoted synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarema, Maksym; Pichler, Stefan; Sytnyk, Mykhailo; Seyrkammer, Robert; Lechner, Rainer T; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Jarzab, Dorota; Szendrei, Krisztina; Resel, Roland; Korovyanko, Oleksandra; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Paris, Oskar; Hesser, Günter; Heiss, Wolfgang

    2011-05-24

    Here, we present a hot injection synthesis of colloidal Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals (Ag(2)Se, Ag(2)Te, and Ag(2)S) that resulted in exceptionally small nanocrystal sizes in the range between 2 and 4 nm. Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals exhibit band gap energies within the near-infrared spectral region, making these materials promising as environmentally benign alternatives to established infrared active nanocrystals containing toxic metals such as Hg, Cd, and Pb. We present Ag(2)Se nanocrystals in detail, giving size-tunable luminescence with quantum yields above 1.7%. The luminescence, with a decay time on the order of 130 ns, was shown to improve due to the growth of a monolayer thick ZnSe shell. Photoconductivity with a quantum efficiency of 27% was achieved by blending the Ag(2)Se nanocrystals with a soluble fullerene derivative. The co-injection of lithium silylamide was found to be crucial to the synthesis of Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals, which drastically increased their nucleation rate even at relatively low growth temperatures. Because the same observation was made for the nucleation of Cd chalcogenide nanocrystals, we conclude that the addition of lithium silylamide might generally promote wet-chemical synthesis of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals, including in as-yet unexplored materials.

  20. Intentional intravenous mercury injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this case report, intravenous complications, treatment strategies and possible ... Mercury toxicity is commonly associated with vapour inhalation or oral ingestion, for which there exist definite treatment options. Intravenous mercury ... personality, anxiousness, irritability, insomnia, depression and drowsi- ness.[1] However ...

  1. Mercury's shifting, rolling past

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of scalloped-edged cliffs or lobate scarps on Mercury's surface are thrust faults that are consistent with the planet shrinking and cooling with time. However, compression occurred in the planet's early history and Mariner 10 images revealed decades ago that lobate scarps are among the youngest features on Mercury. Why don't we find more evidence of older compressive features?

  2. Global Mercury Assessment 2013

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    mercury pollution. This summary report and the accompanying. Technical Background Report for the Global. Mercury Assessment 2013 are developed in response to Decision 25/5, paragraph ... The use of different pollution control technologies in different ...... vegetation, snow, freshwater, and seawater. One of the largest ...

  3. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

  4. Mercury in Nordic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munthe, John; Waengberg, Ingvar (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Stockholm (SE)); Rognerud, Sigurd; Fjeld, Eirik (Norwegian Inst. for Water Research (NIVA), Oslo (Norway)); Verta, Matti; Porvari, Petri (Finnish Environment Inst. (SYKE), Helsinki (Finland)); Meili, Markus (Inst. of Applied Environmental Research (ITM), Stockholm (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    This report provides a first comprehensive compilation and assessment of available data on mercury in air, precipitation, sediments and fish in the Nordic countries. The main conclusion is that mercury levels in Nordic ecosystems continue to be affected by long-range atmospheric transport. The geographical patterns of mercury concentrations in both sediments and fish are also strongly affected by ecosystem characteristics and in some regions possibly by historical pollution. An evaluation of geographical variations in mercury concentrations in precipitation indicates that the influence from anthropogenic sources from Central European areas is still significant. The annual variability of deposition is large and dependant of precipitation amounts. An evaluation of data from stations around the North Sea has indicated a significant decrease in mercury concentrations in precipitation indicating a continuous decrease of emissions in Europe (Waengberg et al., 2007). For mercury in air (TGM), the geographical pattern is less pronounced indicating the influence of mercury emissions and distribution over a larger geographical area (i.e. hemispherical transport). Comparison of recent (surficial) and historical lake sediments show significantly elevated concentrations of mercury most likely caused by anthropogenic atmospheric deposition over the past century. The highest pollution impact was observed in the coastal areas of southern Norway, in south western Finland and in Sweden from the coastal areas in the southwest across the central parts to the north-east. The general increase in recent versus old sediments was 2-5 fold. Data on mercury in Nordic freshwater fish was assembled and evaluated with respect to geographical variations. The fish data were further compared with temporal and spatial trends in mercury deposition and mercury contamination of lake sediments in order to investigate the coupling between atmospheric transport and deposition of mercury and local mercury

  5. Valence band electronic structure of Pd based ternary chalcogenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohani, H. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, P. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Goyal, R.; Awana, V.P.S. [National Physical Laboratory(CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sekhar, B.R., E-mail: sekhar@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • VB Photoemission study and DFT calculations on Pd based ternary superconductors are presented. • Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} shows a temperature dependent pseudogap. • VB spectral features of ternary superconductors are correlated to their structural geometry. - Abstract: We present a comparative study of the valence band electronic structure of Pd based ternary chalcogenide superconductors Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5}, Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}S{sub 6} and Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}Te{sub 6} using experimental photoemission spectroscopy and density functional based theoretical calculations. We observe a qualitatively similarity between valence band (VB) spectra of Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} and Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}S{sub 6}. Further, we find a pseudogap feature in Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} at low temperature, unlike other two compounds. We have correlated the structural geometry with the differences in VB spectra of these compounds. The different atomic packing in these compounds could vary the strength of inter-orbital hybridization among various atoms which leads to difference in their electronic structure as clearly observed in our DOS calculations.

  6. Getting Mercury out of Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This guide was prepared while working with many Massachusetts schools to remove items that contain mercury and to find suitable alternatives. It contains fact sheets on: mercury in science laboratories and classrooms, mercury in school buildings and maintenance areas, mercury in the medical office and in medical technology classrooms in vocational…

  7. Similarity in the superconducting properties of chalcogenides, cuprate oxides and fullerides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsendin, K.D.; Popov, B.P.; Denisov, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    The idea of Anderson pairs has been put forward for explanation of many extraordinary properties of chalcogenides glassy semiconductors. Recent decades made obvious that these pairs localized on the centers with negative effective correlation energy (negative-U centers) really exist in chalcogenides. If the concentration of negative-U centers is enough to create the pair band states, this can lead to superconductivity because Anderson pairs are Bose particles. In the present paper we show that several puzzling superconductivity properties of chalcogenides, high-temperature cuprate superconductors and fullerides are similar for these three groups of materials and can be naturally explained in the frame of negative-U centers model of superconductivity

  8. Low-loss, submicron chalcogenide integrated photonics with chlorine plasma etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiles, Jeff; Malinowski, Marcin; Rao, Ashutosh [CREOL, The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Novak, Spencer; Richardson, Kathleen [CREOL, The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, COMSET, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Fathpour, Sasan, E-mail: fathpour@creol.ucf.edu [CREOL, The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2015-03-16

    A chlorine plasma etching-based method for the fabrication of high-performance chalcogenide-based integrated photonics on silicon substrates is presented. By optimizing the etching conditions, chlorine plasma is employed to produce extremely low-roughness etched sidewalls on waveguides with minimal penalty to propagation loss. Using this fabrication method, microring resonators with record-high intrinsic Q-factors as high as 450 000 and a corresponding propagation loss as low as 0.42 dB/cm are demonstrated in submicron chalcogenide waveguides. Furthermore, the developed chlorine plasma etching process is utilized to demonstrate fiber-to-waveguide grating couplers in chalcogenide photonics with high power coupling efficiency of 37% for transverse-electric polarized modes.

  9. Low-loss, submicron chalcogenide integrated photonics with chlorine plasma etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiles, Jeff; Malinowski, Marcin; Rao, Ashutosh; Novak, Spencer; Richardson, Kathleen; Fathpour, Sasan

    2015-01-01

    A chlorine plasma etching-based method for the fabrication of high-performance chalcogenide-based integrated photonics on silicon substrates is presented. By optimizing the etching conditions, chlorine plasma is employed to produce extremely low-roughness etched sidewalls on waveguides with minimal penalty to propagation loss. Using this fabrication method, microring resonators with record-high intrinsic Q-factors as high as 450 000 and a corresponding propagation loss as low as 0.42 dB/cm are demonstrated in submicron chalcogenide waveguides. Furthermore, the developed chlorine plasma etching process is utilized to demonstrate fiber-to-waveguide grating couplers in chalcogenide photonics with high power coupling efficiency of 37% for transverse-electric polarized modes

  10. Amorphous chalcogenides as random octahedrally bonded solids: I. Implications for the first sharp diffraction peak, photodarkening, and Boson peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Alexey; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2017-09-01

    We develop a computationally efficient algorithm for generating high-quality structures for amorphous materials exhibiting distorted octahedral coordination. The computationally costly step of equilibrating the simulated melt is relegated to a much more efficient procedure, viz., generation of a random close-packed structure, which is subsequently used to generate parent structures for octahedrally bonded amorphous solids. The sites of the so-obtained lattice are populated by atoms and vacancies according to the desired stoichiometry while allowing one to control the number of homo-nuclear and hetero-nuclear bonds and, hence, effects of the mixing entropy. The resulting parent structure is geometrically optimized using quantum-chemical force fields; by varying the extent of geometric optimization of the parent structure, one can partially control the degree of octahedrality in local coordination and the strength of secondary bonding. The present methodology is applied to the archetypal chalcogenide alloys AsxSe1-x. We find that local coordination in these alloys interpolates between octahedral and tetrahedral bonding but in a non-obvious way; it exhibits bonding motifs that are not characteristic of either extreme. We consistently recover the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) in our structures and argue that the corresponding mid-range order stems from the charge density wave formed by regions housing covalent and weak, secondary interactions. The number of secondary interactions is determined by a delicate interplay between octahedrality and tetrahedrality in the covalent bonding; many of these interactions are homonuclear. The present results are consistent with the experimentally observed dependence of the FSDP on arsenic content, pressure, and temperature and its correlation with photodarkening and the Boson peak. They also suggest that the position of the FSDP can be used to infer the effective particle size relevant for the configurational equilibration in

  11. Theoretical prediction of the structural properties of uranium chalcogenides under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Shilpa; Yaduvanshi, Namrata; Singh, Sadhna

    2018-05-01

    Uranium chalcogenides crystallize in rock salt structure at normal condition and transform to Cesium Chloride structure at high pressure. We have investigated the transition pressure and volume drop of USe and UTe using three body potential model (TBIP). Present model includes long range Columbic, three body interaction forces and short range overlap forces operative up to next nearest neighbors. We have reported the phase transition pressure, relative volume collapses, the thermo physical properties such as molecular force constant (f), infrared absorption frequency (v0), Debye temperature (θD) and Gruneisen parameter (γ) of present chalcogenides and found that our results in general good agreement with experimental and other theoretical data.

  12. Efficient Mid-Infrared Supercontinuum Generation in Tapered Large Mode Area Chalcogenide Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Rosenberg; Engelsholm, Rasmus Dybbro; Markos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Mid-infrared supercontinuum spanning from 1.8-9  μm with an output power of 41.5 mW is demonstrated by pumping tapered large mode area chalcogenide photonic crystal fibers using a 4 μm optical parametric source.......Mid-infrared supercontinuum spanning from 1.8-9  μm with an output power of 41.5 mW is demonstrated by pumping tapered large mode area chalcogenide photonic crystal fibers using a 4 μm optical parametric source....

  13. Fabrication and characterization of on-chip optical nonlinear chalcogenide nanofiber devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiming; Li, Ming; Hao, Qiang; Deng, Dinghuan; Zhou, Hui; Zeng, Heping; Zhan, Li; Wu, Xiang; Liu, Liying; Xu, Lei

    2010-11-15

    Chalcogenide (As(2)S(3)) nanofibers as narrow as 200 nm in diameter are drawn by the fiber pulling method, are successfully embedded in SU8 polymer, and form on-chip waveguides and high-Q microknot resonators (Q = 3.9 × 10(4)) with smooth cleaved end faces. Resonance tuning of resonators is realized by localized laser irradiation. Strong supercontinuum generation with a bandwidth of 500 nm is achieved in a 7-cm-long on-chip chalcogenide waveguide. Our result provides a method for the development of compact, high-optical-quality, and robust photonic devices.

  14. Homogeneity and internal defects detect of infrared Se-based chalcogenide glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zupana; Wu, Ligang; Lin, Changgui; Song, Bao'an; Wang, Xunsi; Shen, Xiang; Dai, Shixunb

    2011-10-01

    Ge-Sb-Se chalcogenide glasses is a kind of excellent infrared optical material, which has been enviromental friendly and widely used in infrared thermal imaging systems. However, due to the opaque feature of Se-based glasses in visible spectral region, it's difficult to measure their homogeneity and internal defect as the common oxide ones. In this study, a measurement was proposed to observe the homogeneity and internal defect of these glasses based on near-IR imaging technique and an effective measurement system was also constructed. The testing result indicated the method can gives the information of homogeneity and internal defect of infrared Se-based chalcogenide glass clearly and intuitionally.

  15. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  16. How metallic is the binding state of indium hosted by excess-metal chalcogenides in ore deposits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondina Figueiredo, Maria; Pena Silva, Teresa; Oliveira, Daniel; Rosa, Diogo

    2010-05-01

    Discovered in 1863, indium is nowadays a strategic scarce metal used both in classical technologic fields (like low melting-temperature alloys and solders) and in innovative nano-technologies to produce "high-tech devices" by means of new materials, namely liquid crystal displays (LCDs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and the recently introduced transparent flexible thin-films manufactured with ionic amorphous oxide semiconductors (IAOS). Indium is a typical chalcophile element, seldom forming specific minerals and occurring mainly dispersed within polymetallic sulphides, particularly with excess metal ions [1]. The average content of indium in the Earth's crust is very low but a further increase in its demand is still expected in the next years, thus focusing a special interest in uncovering new exploitation sites through promising polymetallic sulphide ores - e.g., the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) [2] - and in improving recycling technologies. Indium recovery stands mostly on zinc extraction from sphalerite, the natural cubic sulphide which is the prototype of so-called "tetrahedral sulphides" where metal ions fill half of the available tetrahedral sites within the cubic closest packing of sulphur anions where the double of unfilled interstices are available for further in-filling. It is worth remarking that such packing array is particularly suitable for accommodating polymetallic cations by filling closely located interstitial sites [3] as happens in excess-metal tetrahedral sulphides - e.g. bornite, ideally Cu5FeS4, recognized as an In-carrying mineral [4]. Studying the tendency towards In-In interactions able of leading to the formation of polycations would efficiently contribute to understand indium crystal chemistry and the metal binding state in natural chalcogenides. Accordingly, an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) study at In L3-edge was undertaken using the instrumental set-up of ID21 beamline at the ESRF (European Synchrotron

  17. An overview of the Fe-chalcogenide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, M K; Wen, Y C; Chen, T K; Chang, C C; Wu, P M; Wang, M J; Lin, P H; Lee, W C

    2015-01-01

    This review intends to summarize recent advancements in FeSe and related systems. The FeSe and related superconductors are currently receiving considerable attention for the high critical temperature (T C ) observed and for many similar features to the high T C cuprate superconductors. These similarities suggest that understanding the FeSe-based compounds could potentially help our understanding of the cuprates. We begin the review by presenting common features observed in the FeSe- and FeAs-based systems. Then we discuss the importance of careful control of the material preparation allowing for a systematic structure characterization. With this control, numerous rich phases have been observed. Importantly, we suggest that the Fe-vacancy ordered phases found in the FeSe-based compounds, which are non-superconducting magnetic Mott insulators, are the parent compounds of the superconductors. Superconductivity can emerge from the parent phases by disordering the Fe vacancy order, often by a simple annealing treatment. Then we review physical properties of the Fe chalcogenides, specifically the optical properties and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results. From the literature, strong evidence points to the existence of orbital modification accompanied by a gap-opening, prior to the structural phase transition, which is closely related to the occurrence of superconductivity. Furthermore, strong lattice to spin coupling are important for the occurrence of superconductivity in FeSe. Therefore, it is believed that the iron selenides and related compounds will provide essential information to understand the origin of superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors, and possibly the superconducting cuprates. (topical review)

  18. Mid-infrared performance of single mode chalcogenide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Justin; Sincore, Alex; Tan, Felix; El Halawany, Ahmed; Riggins, Anthony; Shah, Lawrence; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Richardson, Martin C.; Schepler, Kenneth L.

    2018-02-01

    Due to the intrinsic absorption edge in silica near 2.4 μm, more exotic materials are required to transmit laser power in the IR such as fluoride or chalcogenide glasses (ChGs). In particular, ChG fibers offer broad IR transmission with low losses fibers at four different infrared wavelengths: 2053 nm, 2520 nm and 4550 nm. Polymer clad ChG fibers were drawn with 12.3 μm and 25 μm core diameters. Testing at 2053 nm was accomplished using a > 15 W, CW Tm:fiber laser. Power handling up to 10.2 W with single mode beam quality has been demonstrated, limited only by the available Tm:fiber output power. Anti-reflective coatings were successfully deposited on the ChG fiber facets, allowing up to 90.6% transmission with 12.2 MW/cm2 intensity on the facet. Single mode guidance at 4550 nm was also demonstrated using a quantum cascade laser (QCL). A custom optical system was constructed to efficiently couple the 0.8 NA QCL radiation into the 0.2 NA ChG fiber, allowing for a maximum of 78% overlap between the QCL radiation and fundamental mode of the fiber. With an AR-coated, 25 μm core diameter fiber, >50 mW transmission was demonstrated with > 87% transmission. Finally, we present results on fiber coupling from a free space Cr:ZnSe resonator at 2520 nm.

  19. Total Mercury content of skin toning creams

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2008-04-01

    Apr 1, 2008 ... used it for cosmetics (Silberberg, 1995). Mercury- ... Cosmetic preparations containing mercury com- pounds are .... mercury determination by a modified version of an open .... level mercury exposure, which could lead to a.

  20. Alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  1. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  2. Indirect complexometric determination of mercury(II) using potassium bromide as selective masking agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, N.V.; Nazareth, R.A.; Narayana, B.; Hegde, P.; Manjunatha, B.R.

    2002-01-01

    A complexometric method for the determination of mercury in presence of other metal ions based on the selective masking ability of potassium bromide towards mercury is described. Mercury(II) present in a given sample solution is first complexed with a known excess of EDTA and the surplus EDTA is titrated against zinc sulfate solution at pH 5-6 using xylenol orange as the indicator. A known excess of 10 % solution of potassium bromide is then added and the EDTA released from Hg-EDTA complex is titrated against standard zinc sulfate solution. Reproducible and accurate results are obtained for 8 mg to 250 mg of mercury(II) with a relative error ±0.28 % and standard deviations /leg 0.5 mg. The interference of various ions is studied. This method was applied to the determination of mercury(II) in its alloys. (author)

  3. Metallic mercury recycling. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, M.A.

    1994-07-01

    Metallic mercury is known to be a hazardous material and is regulated as such. The disposal of mercury, usually by landfill, is expensive and does not remove mercury from the environment. Results from the Metallic Mercury Recycling Project have demonstrated that metallic mercury is a good candidate for reclamation and recycling. Most of the potential contamination of mercury resides in the scum floating on the surface of the mercury. Pinhole filtration was demonstrated to be an inexpensive and easy way of removing residues from mercury. The analysis method is shown to be sufficient for present release practices, and should be sufficient for future release requirements. Data from tests are presented. The consistently higher level of activity of the filter residue versus the bulk mercury is discussed. Recommendations for the recycling procedure are made.

  4. Metallic mercury recycling. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Metallic mercury is known to be a hazardous material and is regulated as such. The disposal of mercury, usually by landfill, is expensive and does not remove mercury from the environment. Results from the Metallic Mercury Recycling Project have demonstrated that metallic mercury is a good candidate for reclamation and recycling. Most of the potential contamination of mercury resides in the scum floating on the surface of the mercury. Pinhole filtration was demonstrated to be an inexpensive and easy way of removing residues from mercury. The analysis method is shown to be sufficient for present release practices, and should be sufficient for future release requirements. Data from tests are presented. The consistently higher level of activity of the filter residue versus the bulk mercury is discussed. Recommendations for the recycling procedure are made

  5. The tectonics of Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melosh, H.J.; Mckinnon, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    The probable tectonic history of Mercury and the relative sequence of events are discussed on the basis of data collected by the Mariner-10 spacecraft. Results indicate that Mercury's tectonic activity was confined to its early history; its endogenic activity was principally due to a small change in the shape of its lithosphere, caused by tidal despinning, and a small change in area caused by shrinkage due to cooling. Exogenic processes, in particular the impact activity, have produced more abundant tectonic features. Many features associated with the Caloris basin are due to loading of Mercury's thick lithosphere by extrusive lavas or subsidence due to magma withdrawal. It is emphasized that tectonic features observed on Mercury yield insight into the earliest tectonic events on planets like Mars and, perhaps, the earth, where subsequent events obscured or erased the most ancient tectonic records

  6. Intentional intravenous mercury injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elemental mercury is the well-known silver liquid and usually causes pulmonary, neurological and ... suicidal ideation or features of major depression. Clinically the patient was .... medically at this stage and consider surgical intervention later.

  7. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    The global dynamics of Mercury's magnetosphere will be discussed, focussing on observed asymmetries in the magnetotail and on the precipitation of particles of magnetospheric origin onto the nightside planetary surface.

  8. Mercury analysis in hair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteban, Marta; Schindler, Birgit K; Jiménez-Guerrero, José A

    2015-01-01

    Human biomonitoring (HBM) is an effective tool for assessing actual exposure to chemicals that takes into account all routes of intake. Although hair analysis is considered to be an optimal biomarker for assessing mercury exposure, the lack of harmonization as regards sampling and analytical...... assurance program (QAP) for assessing mercury levels in hair samples from more than 1800 mother-child pairs recruited in 17 European countries. To ensure the comparability of the results, standard operating procedures (SOPs) for sampling and for mercury analysis were drafted and distributed to participating...... laboratories. Training sessions were organized for field workers and four external quality-assessment exercises (ICI/EQUAS), followed by the corresponding web conferences, were organized between March 2011 and February 2012. ICI/EQUAS used native hair samples at two mercury concentration ranges (0...

  9. Mercury's Early Geologic History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denevi, B. W.; Ernst, C. M.; Klima, R. L.; Robinson, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    A combination of geologic mapping, compositional information, and geochemical models are providing a better understanding of Mercury's early geologic history, and allow us to place it in the context of the Moon and the terrestrial planets.

  10. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  11. Cutaneous mercury granuloma

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpana A Bothale; Sadhana D Mahore; Sushil Pande; Trupti Dongre

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous mercury granuloma is rarely encountered. Clinically it may pose difficulty in diagnosis. Here, we report a 23-year-old male presented with erythematous, nodular lesions over the forearm and anterior aspect of chest wall. Metallic mercury in tissue sections appear as dark black, opaque, spherical globules of varying size and number. They are surrounded by granulomatous foreign-body reaction. It is composed of foreign body giant cells and mixed inflammatory infiltrate composed of hist...

  12. Mercury in human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapauan, P.A.; Cruz, C.C.; Verceluz, F.P.

    1980-10-01

    The analysis of mercury (Hg) in scalp hair obtained from individuals residing in five different localities in the Philippines - Metro Manila, Naga City in Bicol, Bataan, Oriental Mindoro, and Palawan is presented. An overall mean of 1.46 ug/g of hair was obtained for all samples excluding those from Palawan and represents a baseline value.'' In terms of the mercury levels found in hair, the Honda Bay area in Palawan is, relatively, a ''contaminated area.'' (author)

  13. Effect of pressure on the crystal field splitting in rare earth pnictides and chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirber, J.E.; Weaver, H.T.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental situation for the pressure dependence of the crystal field of praseodymium pnictides and chalcogenides is reviewed and compared with the predictions of the point charge model. The problem of separating exchange and crystal field contributions from the measured NMR frequency shift or susceptibility measurements is discussed as well as problems explaining these effects with conduction electron related models

  14. Mechanism for resistive switching in chalcogenide-based electrochemical metallization memory cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhuge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that in chalcogenide-based electrochemical metallization (ECM memory cells (e.g., As2S3:Ag, GeS:Cu, and Ag2S, the metal filament grows from the cathode (e.g., Pt and W towards the anode (e.g., Cu and Ag, whereas filament growth along the opposite direction has been observed in oxide-based ECM cells (e.g., ZnO, ZrO2, and SiO2. The growth direction difference has been ascribed to a high ion diffusion coefficient in chalcogenides in comparison with oxides. In this paper, upon analysis of OFF state I–V characteristics of ZnS-based ECM cells, we find that the metal filament grows from the anode towards the cathode and the filament rupture and rejuvenation occur at the cathodic interface, similar to the case of oxide-based ECM cells. It is inferred that in ECM cells based on the chalcogenides such as As2S3:Ag, GeS:Cu, and Ag2S, the filament growth from the cathode towards the anode is due to the existence of an abundance of ready-made mobile metal ions in the chalcogenides rather than to the high ion diffusion coefficient.

  15. THz waveguides, devices and hybrid polymer-chalcogenide photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Hualong; Markos, Christos; Nielsen, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, we review our recent activities in the design, fabrication and characterization of polymer THz waveguides. Besides the THz waveguides, we finally will also briefly show some of our initial results on a novel hybrid polymer photonic crystal fiber with integrated chalcogenide...

  16. Amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors for solid state dosimetric systems of high-energetic ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.

    1997-01-01

    The application possibilities of amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors use as radiation-sensitive elements of high-energetic (E > 1 MeV) dosimetric systems are analysed. It is shown that investigated materials are characterized by more wide region of registered absorbed doses and low temperature threshold of radiation information bleaching in comparison with well-known analogies based on coloring oxide glasses. (author)

  17. Diffusion of Ag ions under random potential barriers in silver-containing chalcogenide glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stehlík, Štěpán; Shimakawa, K.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 20 (2012), s. 1-5 ISSN 0022-3727 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Ag ion diffusion * chalcogenide glass * Nyquist plots Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.528, year: 2012 http://iopscience.iop.org/0022-3727/45/20/205304/

  18. Neutron diffraction study on the medium and short-range order of ternary chalcogenide glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neov, S.; Gerasimova, I.; Skordeva, E.; Arsova, D.; Pamukchieva, V.; Mikula, Pavol; Lukáš, Petr; Sonntag, R.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 34, - (1999), s. 3669-3676 ISSN 0022-2461 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV202/97/K038 Keywords : neutron diffraction * short-range order * chalcogenide glasses Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.786, year: 1999

  19. Low-temperature photoluminescence in chalcogenide glasses doped with rare-earth ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostka, Petr; Zavadil, Jiří; Iovu, M.S.; Ivanova, Z. G.; Furniss, D.; Seddon, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 648, NOV 5 (2015), s. 237-243 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/12/2384 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : chalcogenide glasses * rare earth ions * low-temperature photoluminescence * optical transmission Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  20. Generation and Applications of High Average Power Mid-IR Supercontinuum in Chalcogenide Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Christian Rosenberg

    2016-01-01

    Mid-infrared supercontinuum with up to 54.8 mW average power, and maximum bandwidth of 1.77-8.66 μm is demonstrated as a result of pumping tapered chalcogenide photonic crystal fibers with a MHz parametric source at 4 μm

  1. Molecular Control of the Nanoscale: Effect of Phosphine–Chalcogenide Reactivity on CdS–CdSe Nanocrystal Composition and Morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruberu, T. Purnima A.; Albright, Haley R.; Callis, Brandon; Ward, Brittney; Cisneros, Joana; Fan, Hua-Jun; Vela, Javier

    2012-04-22

    We demonstrate molecular control of nanoscale composition, alloying, and morphology (aspect ratio) in CdS–CdSe nanocrystal dots and rods by modulating the chemical reactivity of phosphine–chalcogenide precursors. Specific molecular precursors studied were sulfides and selenides of triphenylphosphite (TPP), diphenylpropylphosphine (DPP), tributylphosphine (TBP), trioctylphosphine (TOP), and hexaethylphosphorustriamide (HPT). Computational (DFT), NMR (31P and 77Se), and high-temperature crossover studies unambiguously confirm a chemical bonding interaction between phosphorus and chalcogen atoms in all precursors. Phosphine–chalcogenide precursor reactivity increases in the order: TPPE < DPPE < TBPE < TOPE < HPTE (E = S, Se). For a given phosphine, the selenide is always more reactive than the sulfide. CdS1–xSex quantum dots were synthesized via single injection of a R3PS–R3PSe mixture to cadmium oleate at 250 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV/Vis and PL optical spectroscopy reveal that relative R3PS and R3PSe reactivity dictates CdS1–xSex dot chalcogen content and the extent of radial alloying (alloys vs core/shells). CdS, CdSe, and CdS1–xSex quantum rods were synthesized by injection of a single R3PE (E = S or Se) precursor or a R3PS–R3PSe mixture to cadmium–phosphonate at 320 or 250 °C. XRD and TEM reveal that the length-to-diameter aspect ratio of CdS and CdSe nanorods is inversely proportional to R3PE precursor reactivity. Purposely matching or mismatching R3PS–R3PSe precursor reactivity leads to CdS1–xSex nanorods without or with axial composition gradients, respectively. We expect these observations will lead to scalable and highly predictable “bottom-up” programmed syntheses of finely heterostructured nanomaterials with well-defined architectures and properties that are tailored for precise applications.

  2. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Michael D.; Schlager, Richard J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Sagan, Francis J.; Marmaro, Roger W.; Wilson, Kevin G.

    1997-01-01

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  3. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  4. Wireless Chalcogenide Nanoionic-Based Radio-Frequency Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, James; Miranda, Felix

    2013-01-01

    A new nonvolatile nanoionic switch is powered and controlled through wireless radio-frequency (RF) transmission. A thin layer of chalcogenide glass doped with a metal ion, such as silver, comprises the operational portion of the switch. For the switch to function, an oxidizable electrode is made positive (anode) with respect to an opposing electrode (cathode) when sufficient bias, typically on the order of a few tenths of a volt or more, is applied. This action causes the metal ions to flow toward the cathode through a coordinated hopping mechanism. At the cathode, a reduction reaction occurs to form a metal deposit. This metal deposit creates a conductive path that bridges the gap between electrodes to turn the switch on. Once this conductive path is formed, no further power is required to maintain it. To reverse this process, the metal deposit is made positive with respect to the original oxidizable electrode, causing the dissolution of the metal bridge thereby turning the switch off. Once the metal deposit has been completely dissolved, the process self-terminates. This switching process features the following attributes. It requires very little to change states (i.e., on and off). Furthermore, no power is required to maintain the states; hence, the state of the switch is nonvolatile. Because of these attributes the integration of a rectenna to provide the necessary power and control is unique to this embodiment. A rectenna, or rectifying antenna, generates DC power from an incident RF signal. The low voltages and power required for the nanoionic switch control are easily generated from this system and provide the switch with a novel capability to be operated and powered from an external wireless device. In one realization, an RF signal of a specific frequency can be used to set the switch into an off state, while another frequency can be used to set the switch to an on state. The wireless, miniaturized, and nomoving- part features of this switch make it

  5. Mercury Quick Facts: Health Effects of Mercury Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2012 What are the Health Effects of Mercury Exposure? The health effects that can be caused by breathing mercury depend ... they breathe faster and have smaller lungs. Health effects caused by long-term exposure to mercury vapors • • Anxiety • • Excessive shyness • • Anorexia • • Sleeping ...

  6. Mercury pOIsonIng

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of mercury poisoning is reported and clinical observations of 6 .... fish ingested and occupational exposure. .... exposed to mercury as a result of inadequate industrial safety standards, and ... WHO Tech Rep Ser 1980; No. 674: 102-115.

  7. Mercury Study Report to Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Report to Congress on Mercury provides an assessment of the magnitude of U.S. mercury emissions by source, the health and environmental implications of those emissions, and the availability and cost of control technologies.

  8. True Polar Wander of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, J. T.; Matsuyama, I.

    2018-05-01

    We use new MESSENGER gravity data to investigate how impact basins and volcanic provinces alter Mercury's moments of inertia. We find that Mercury has reoriented tens of degrees over its history, affecting tectonics, volatiles, and more.

  9. Mercury Emissions: The Global Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury emissions are a global problem that knows no national or continental boundaries. Mercury that is emitted to the air can travel thousands of miles in the atmosphere before it is eventually deposited back to the earth.

  10. Laser induced structural transformation in chalcogenide based superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zallo, Eugenio; Wang, Ruining; Bragaglia, Valeria; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Superlattices made of alternating layers of nominal GeTe and Sb 2 Te 3 have been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. A structural irreversible transformation into ordered GeSbTe alloy is induced by high power laser light exposure. The intensity ratio of anti-Stokes and Stokes scattering under laser illumination gives a maximum average temperature in the sample of 177 °C. The latter is lower than the growth temperature and of 400 °C necessary by annealing to transform the structure in a GeSbTe alloy. The absence of this configuration after in situ annealing even up to 300 °C evidences an electronic excitation induced-transition which brings the system into a different and stable crystalline state.

  11. Laser induced structural transformation in chalcogenide based superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zallo, Eugenio, E-mail: zallo@pdi-berlin.de; Wang, Ruining; Bragaglia, Valeria; Calarco, Raffaella [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-30

    Superlattices made of alternating layers of nominal GeTe and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} have been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. A structural irreversible transformation into ordered GeSbTe alloy is induced by high power laser light exposure. The intensity ratio of anti-Stokes and Stokes scattering under laser illumination gives a maximum average temperature in the sample of 177 °C. The latter is lower than the growth temperature and of 400 °C necessary by annealing to transform the structure in a GeSbTe alloy. The absence of this configuration after in situ annealing even up to 300 °C evidences an electronic excitation induced-transition which brings the system into a different and stable crystalline state.

  12. Mercury's magnetic field and interior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connerney, J.E.P.; Ness, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic-field data collected on Mercury by the Mariner-10 spacecraft present substantial evidence for an intrinsic global magnetic field. However, studies of Mercury's thermal evolution show that it is most likely that the inner core region of Mercury solidified or froze early in the planet's history. Thus, the explanation of Mercury's magnetic field in the framework of the traditional planetary dynamo is less than certain

  13. Nanoscale Device Properties of Tellurium-based Chalcogenide Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Bishnu R.

    The great progress achieved in miniaturization of microelectronic devices has now reached a distinct bottleneck, as devices are starting to approach the fundamental fabrication and performance limit. Even if a major breakthrough is made in the fabrication process, these scaled down electronic devices will not function properly since the quantum effects can no longer be neglected in the nanoscale regime. Advances in nanotechnology and new materials are driving novel technologies for future device applications. Current microelectronic devices have the smallest feature size, around 10 nm, and the industry is planning to switch away from silicon technology in the near future. The new technology will be fundamentally different. There are several leading technologies based on spintronics, tunneling transistors, and the newly discovered 2-dimensional material systems. All of these technologies are at the research level, and are far from ready for use in making devices in large volumes. This dissertation will focus on a very promising material system, Te-based chalcogenides, which have potential applications in spintronics, thermoelectricity and topological insulators that can lead to low-power-consumption electronics. Very recently it was predicted and experimentally observed that the spin-orbit interaction in certain materials can lead to a new electronic state called topological insulating phase. The topological insulator, like an ordinary insulator, has a bulk energy gap separating the highest occupied electronic band from the lowest empty band. However, the surface states in the case of a three-dimensional or edge states in a two-dimensional topological insulator allow electrons to conduct at the surface, due to the topological character of the bulk wavefunctions. These conducting states are protected by time-reversal symmetry, and cannot be eliminated by defects or chemical passivation. The edge/surface states satisfy Dirac dispersion relations, and hence the physics

  14. The thermal evolution of Mercury's Fe-Si core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, Jurriën Sebastiaan; van Westrenen, Wim

    2018-01-01

    We have studied the thermal and magnetic field evolution of planet Mercury with a core of Fe-Si alloy to assess whether an Fe-Si core matches its present-day partially molten state, Mercury's magnetic field strength, and the observed ancient crustal magnetization. The main advantages of an Fe-Si core, opposed to a previously assumed Fe-S core, are that a Si-bearing core is consistent with the highly reduced nature of Mercury and that no compositional convection is generated upon core solidification, in agreement with magnetic field indications of a stable layer at the top of Mercury's core. This study also present the first implementation of a conductive temperature profile in the core where heat fluxes are sub-adiabatic in a global thermal evolution model. We show that heat migrates from the deep core to the outer part of the core as soon as heat fluxes at the outer core become sub-adiabatic. As a result, the deep core cools throughout Mercury's evolution independent of the temperature evolution at the core-mantle boundary, causing an early start of inner core solidification and magnetic field generation. The conductive layer at the outer core suppresses the rate of core growth after temperature differences between the deep and shallow core are relaxed, such that a magnetic field can be generated until the present. Also, the outer core and mantle operate at higher temperatures than previously thought, which prolongs mantle melting and mantle convection. The results indicate that S is not a necessary ingredient of Mercury's core, bringing bulk compositional models of Mercury more in line with reduced meteorite analogues.

  15. MERCURY IN MARINE LIFE DATABASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the Mercury in Marine Life Project is to organize information on estuarine and marine species so that EPA can better understand both the extent of monitoring for mercury and level of mercury contamination in the biota of coastal environments. This report follows a ...

  16. Reference Atmosphere for Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2002-01-01

    We propose that Ar-40 measured in the lunar atmosphere and that in Mercury's atmosphere is due to current diffusion into connected pore space within the crust. Higher temperatures at Mercury, along with more rapid loss from the atmosphere will lead to a smaller column abundance of argon at Mercury than at the Moon, given the same crustal abundance of potassium. Because the noble gas abundance in the Hermean atmosphere represents current effusion, it is a direct measure of the crustal potassium abundance. Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors, since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the Earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in the atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the planet.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of layered iron-chalcogenide superconductors and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachmayr, Ursula Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    This thesis provides a new preparative approach to iron-chalcogenide based superconductors. The hydrothermal synthesis of anti-PbO type FeSe, which can be seen as basis structure of the compounds of interest was successfully developed. Along with this, some insights regarding the influence of synthesis parameters were gained featuring a basis for further hydrothermal syntheses of new iron-chalcogenide compounds. The potential of this method, primarily the extension of the so far limited accessibility of iron-chalcogenide based superconductors by solid-state sythesis, was revealed within the present work. The solid-solution FeSe_1_-_xS_x was prepared for the whole substitution range, whereas solid-state synthesis exhibits a solubility limit at x = 0.3. Furthermore, the new compounds [(Li_0_._8Fe_0_._2)OH]FeX (X = Se, S) were synthesized which are exclusively accessible via hydrothermal method. The compounds, where layers of (Li_0_._8Fe_0_._2)OH alternate with FeX layers, feature exceptional physical properties, notably a coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. They were intensively studied within this work. By combination of solid-state and hydrothermal ion-exchange synthesis even large crystals necessary for subsequent physical measurements are accessible. Apart from these layered iron-chalcogenide superconductors, further compounds which likewise exhibit building blocks of edge-sharing FeSe_4 tetrahedra were found via this synthesis method. The iron selenides A_2Fe_4Se_6 (A = K, Rb, Cs) consist of double chains of [Fe_2Se_3]"1"-, whereas a new compound Na_6(H_2O)_1_8Fe_4Se_8 exhibits [Fe_4Se_8]"6"- 'stella quadrangula' clusters. This structural diversity as well as the associated physical properties of the compounds demonstrates the numerous capabilities of hydrothermal synthesis in the field of iron-chalcogenide compounds. In particular with regard to iron-chalcogenide based superconductors this synthesis strategy is encouraging. It seems probable

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis of layered iron-chalcogenide superconductors and related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachmayr, Ursula Elisabeth

    2017-04-06

    This thesis provides a new preparative approach to iron-chalcogenide based superconductors. The hydrothermal synthesis of anti-PbO type FeSe, which can be seen as basis structure of the compounds of interest was successfully developed. Along with this, some insights regarding the influence of synthesis parameters were gained featuring a basis for further hydrothermal syntheses of new iron-chalcogenide compounds. The potential of this method, primarily the extension of the so far limited accessibility of iron-chalcogenide based superconductors by solid-state sythesis, was revealed within the present work. The solid-solution FeSe{sub 1-x}S{sub x} was prepared for the whole substitution range, whereas solid-state synthesis exhibits a solubility limit at x = 0.3. Furthermore, the new compounds [(Li{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2})OH]FeX (X = Se, S) were synthesized which are exclusively accessible via hydrothermal method. The compounds, where layers of (Li{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2})OH alternate with FeX layers, feature exceptional physical properties, notably a coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. They were intensively studied within this work. By combination of solid-state and hydrothermal ion-exchange synthesis even large crystals necessary for subsequent physical measurements are accessible. Apart from these layered iron-chalcogenide superconductors, further compounds which likewise exhibit building blocks of edge-sharing FeSe{sub 4} tetrahedra were found via this synthesis method. The iron selenides A{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 6} (A = K, Rb, Cs) consist of double chains of [Fe{sub 2}Se{sub 3}]{sup 1-}, whereas a new compound Na{sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 18}Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 8} exhibits [Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 8}]{sup 6-} 'stella quadrangula' clusters. This structural diversity as well as the associated physical properties of the compounds demonstrates the numerous capabilities of hydrothermal synthesis in the field of iron-chalcogenide compounds. In particular with regard

  19. Water displacement mercury pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, M.G.

    1984-04-20

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  20. Mercury exposure in Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cullen, Elizabeth; Evans, David S; Davidson, Fred

    2014-01-01

    of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (DEMOCOPHES) pilot biomonitoring study. METHODS: Hair mercury concentrations were determined from a convenience sample of 120 mother/child pairs. Mothers also completed a questionnaire. Rigorous quality assurance within DEMOCOPHES...... guaranteed the accuracy and international comparability of results. RESULTS: Mercury was detected in 79.2% of the samples from mothers, and 62.5% of children's samples. Arithmetic mean levels in mothers (0.262 µg/g hair) and children (0.149 µg /g hair) did not exceed the US EPA guidance value. Levels were...

  1. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The

  2. Pulsed laser deposited amorphous chalcogenide and alumino-silicate thin films and their multilayered structures for photonic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Němec, P. [Department of Graphic Arts and Photophysics, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentská 573, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Charrier, J. [FOTON, UMR CNRS 6082, Enssat, 6 rue de Kerampont, BP 80518, 22305 Lannion (France); Cathelinaud, M. [Missions des Ressources et Compétences Technologiques, UPS CNRS 2274, 92195 Meudon (France); Allix, M. [CEMHTI-CNRS, Site Haute Température, Orléans (France); Adam, J.-L.; Zhang, S. [Equipe Verres et Céramiques, UMR-CNRS 6226, Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (SCR), Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Nazabal, V., E-mail: virginie.nazabal@univ-rennes1.fr [Department of Graphic Arts and Photophysics, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentská 573, 53210 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Equipe Verres et Céramiques, UMR-CNRS 6226, Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (SCR), Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2013-07-31

    Amorphous chalcogenide and alumino-silicate thin films were fabricated by the pulsed laser deposition technique. Prepared films were characterized in terms of their morphology, chemical composition, and optical properties. Multilayered thin film stacks for reflectors and vertical microcavities were designed for telecommunication wavelength and the window of atmosphere transparency (band II) at 1.54 μm and 4.65 μm, respectively. Bearing in mind the benefit coming from the opportunity of an efficient wavelength tuning or, conversely, to stabilize the photoinduced effects in chalcogenide films as well as to improve their mechanical properties and/or their chemical durability, several pairs of materials from pure chalcogenide layers to chalcogenide/oxide layers were investigated. Different layer stacks were fabricated in order to check the compatibility between dissimilar materials which can have a strong influence on the interface roughness, adhesion, density, and homogeneity, for instance. Three different reflector designs were formulated and tested including all-chalcogenide layers (As{sub 40}Se{sub 60}/Ge{sub 25}Sb{sub 5}S{sub 70}) and mixed chalcogenide-oxide layers (As{sub 40}Se{sub 60}/alumino-silicate and Ga{sub 10}Ge{sub 15}Te{sub 75}/alumino-silicate). Prepared multilayers showed good compatibility between different material pairs deposited by laser ablation despite the diversity of chemical compositions. As{sub 40}Se{sub 60}/alumino-silicate reflector showed the best parameters; its stop band (R > 97% at 8° off-normal incidence) has a bandwidth of ∼ 100 nm and it is centered at 1490 nm. The quality of the different mirrors developed was good enough to try to obtain a microcavity structure for the 1.5 μm telecommunication wavelength made of chalcogenide layers. The microcavity structure consists of Ga{sub 5}Ge{sub 20}Sb{sub 10}S{sub 65} (doped with 5000 ppm of Er{sup 3+}) spacer surrounded by two 10-layer As{sub 40}Se{sub 60}/Ge{sub 25}Sb{sub 5}S{sub 70

  3. Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Patricio E.; Campbell, Evan E.; Eutsler, Bernard C.

    1976-01-20

    A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  4. Prediction of free-volume-type correlations in glassy chalcogenides from positron annihilation lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Ingram, A.; Shpotyuk, M.; Filipecki, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Decisive role of specific chemical environment in free-volume correlations in glass. • Realistic free volumes in As–S/Se glass are defined by newly modified τ 2 -R formula. • Overestimated void sizes in chalcogenide glass as compared with molecular polymers. - Abstract: A newly modified correlation equation between defect-related positron lifetime determined within two-state trapping model and radius of corresponding free-volume-type defects was proposed to describe compositional variations in atomic-deficient structure of covalent-bonded chalcogenides like binary As–S/Se glasses. Specific chemical environment of free-volume voids around neighboring network-forming polyhedrons was shown to play a decisive role in this correlation, leading to systematically enhanced volumes in comparison with typical molecular substrates, such as polymers

  5. Prediction of free-volume-type correlations in glassy chalcogenides from positron annihilation lifetime measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O., E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua [Institute of Materials of SRC “Carat”, 212 Stryjska Str., Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestcochowa 42200 (Poland); Ingram, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska Str., Opole 45370 (Poland); Shpotyuk, M. [Institute of Materials of SRC “Carat”, 212 Stryjska Str., Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandery Str., Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); Filipecki, J. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestcochowa 42200 (Poland)

    2014-11-01

    Highlights: • Decisive role of specific chemical environment in free-volume correlations in glass. • Realistic free volumes in As–S/Se glass are defined by newly modified τ{sub 2}-R formula. • Overestimated void sizes in chalcogenide glass as compared with molecular polymers. - Abstract: A newly modified correlation equation between defect-related positron lifetime determined within two-state trapping model and radius of corresponding free-volume-type defects was proposed to describe compositional variations in atomic-deficient structure of covalent-bonded chalcogenides like binary As–S/Se glasses. Specific chemical environment of free-volume voids around neighboring network-forming polyhedrons was shown to play a decisive role in this correlation, leading to systematically enhanced volumes in comparison with typical molecular substrates, such as polymers.

  6. Photoinduced Operation by Absorption of the Chalcogenide Nanocrystallite Containing Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaggar A.M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that for the solar cells containing chalcogenide nanocrystallites using external laser light, one can achieve some enhancement of the photovoltaic efficiency. Photoinduced treatment was carried out using two beams of splitted Er: glass laser operating at 1.54 μm. The light of the laser was incident at different angles and the angles between the beams also were varied. Also, the studies of nanocomposite effective structures have shown enhancement of effective nanocrystalline sizes during the laser treatment. Nanocrystallites of CuInS2 and CuZnSnS4 (CZTS were used as chalcogenide materials. The optimization of the laser beam intensities and nanoparticle sizes were explored.

  7. Locally formation of Ag nanoparticles in chalcogenide phase change thin films induced by nanosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Huan; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Wu, Yiqun; Zhang, Ze; Gan, Fuxi

    2012-01-01

    A simple method to optically synthesize Ag nanoparticles in Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 phase change matrix is described. The fine structures of the locally formed phase change chalcogenide nanocomposite are characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The formation mechanism of the nanocomposite is discussed with temperature evolution and distribution simulations. This easy-prepared metal nano-particle-embedded phase change microstructure will have great potential in nanophotonics applications, such as for plasmonic functional structures. This also provides a generalized approach to the preparation of well-dispersed nanoparticle-embedded composite thin films in principle. -- Highlights: ► We describe a method to prepare chalcogenide microstructures with Ag nanoparticles. ► We give the fine structural images of phase change nanocomposites. ► We discuss the laser-induced fusion mechanism by temperature simulation. ► This microstructure will have great potential in nanophotonics applications.

  8. ZnO and copper indium chalcogenide heterojunctions prepared by inexpensive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berruet, M.; Di Iorio, Y.; Troviano, M.; Vázquez, M.

    2014-01-01

    Solution-based techniques were used to prepare ZnO/CuIn(Se, S) 2 heterojunctions that serve as solar cell prototypes. A duplex layer of ZnO (compact + porous) was electrodeposited. Chalcogenide thin films were deposited using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method (SILAR). By subsequent thermal treatments in two different atmospheres, CuInSe 2 (CISe) and CuInSe 2−x S x (CISeS) were obtained. The composition and morphology of the annealed films were characterized by GXRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM. Devices prepared with CISe and CISeS show a clear photo-response. The introduction of a buffer layer of TiO 2 into the ZnO/chalcogenide interface was necessary to detect photocurrent. The presence of CISeS improves the response of the cell, with higher values of short circuit current density, open circuit potential and fill factor. These promising results show that it is possible to prepare photovoltaic heterojunctions by depositing chalcogenides onto porous ZnO substrates using low-cost solution-based techniques. - Highlights: • Heterojunctions that serve as solar cell prototypes were prepared using solution-based techniques. • The devices comprised a double layer of ZnO and CuInSe 2 or CuInSe 0.4 S 1.6 . • A TiO 2 buffer layer in the ZnO/chalcogenide interface is necessary to detect photocurrent. • The incorporation of S improved the response of the photovoltaic heterojunction

  9. Interfacial scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of chalcogenide/metal hybrid nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Mahmoud M.; Abdallah, Tamer [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt); Easawi, Khalid; Negm, Sohair [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering (Shoubra), Benha University (Egypt); Talaat, Hassan, E-mail: hassantalaat@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Comparing band gaps values obtained optically with STS. • Comparing direct imaging with calculated dimensions. • STS determination of the interfacial band bending of metal/chalcogenide. - Abstract: The electronic structure at the interface of chalcogenide/metal hybrid nanostructure (CdSe–Au tipped) had been studied by UHV scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) technique at room temperature. This nanostructure was synthesized by a phase transfer chemical method. The optical absorption of this hybrid nanostructure was recorded, and the application of the effective mass approximation (EMA) model gave dimensions that were confirmed by the direct measurements using the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as the high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The energy band gap obtained by STS agrees with the values obtained from the optical absorption. Moreover, the STS at the interface of CdSe–Au tipped hybrid nanostructure between CdSe of size about 4.1 ± 0.19 nm and Au tip of size about 3.5 ± 0.29 nm shows a band bending about 0.18 ± 0.03 eV in CdSe down in the direction of the interface. Such a result gives a direct observation of the electron accumulation at the interface of CdSe–Au tipped hybrid nanostructure, consistent with its energy band diagram. The presence of the electron accumulation at the interface of chalcogenides with metals has an important implication for hybrid nanoelectronic devices and the newly developed plasmon/chalcogenide photovoltaic solar energy conversion.

  10. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H.; Golovchak, R.; Zurawska, A.

    2007-01-01

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of γ-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge 23.5 Sb 11.8 S 64.7 glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors for solid state dosimetric systems of high-energetic ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Pedagogical University, Czestochowa (Poland)]|[Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The application possibilities of amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors use as radiation-sensitive elements of high-energetic (E > 1 MeV) dosimetric systems are analysed. It is shown that investigated materials are characterized by more wide region of registered absorbed doses and low temperature threshold of radiation information bleaching in comparison with well-known analogies based on coloring oxide glasses. (author). 16 refs, 1 tab.

  12. New functionality of chalcogenide glasses for radiation sensing of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailavajhala, M.S.; Gonzalez-Velo, Y.; Poweleit, C.D.; Barnaby, H.J.; Kozicki, M.N.; Butt, D.P.; Mitkova, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Study of thin film chalcogenide glasses under gamma radiation and a proposed radiation sensor design. • Structural changes were observed at various radiation doses. • Formation of Ag 2 Se in Se depleted glasses with sufficient radiation dose. • In conventional semiconductor chip environment, the proposed sensor has a linear current vs. dose behavior up to 600 J/cm 2 . - Abstract: Data about gamma radiation induced effects in Ge 40 Se 60 chalcogenide thin films and radiation induced silver diffusion within these are presented. Blanket films and devices were created to study the structural changes, diffusion products, and device performance. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, current vs. voltage (I–V) and impedance measurements expound the behavior of Ge 40 Se 60 glass and silver diffusion within this glass under radiation. Raman study shows that there is a decrease in the area ratio between edge shared and corner shared structural units revealing structural reorganization occurring in the glasses as a result of gamma radiation. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that with sufficiently radiation dose it is also possible to create Ag 2 Se in selenium-depleted systems. Oxidation of the Ge enriched chalcogenide backbone is confirmed through the electrical performance of the sensing elements based on these films. Combination of these structural and diffusion products influences the device performance. The I–V behavior is characterized by increase in current and then stabilization as a function of radiation dose. Additionally, device modeling is also presented using Silvaco software and analytical methods to shed light on the device behavior. This type of sensor design and material characterizations facilitate in improving the radiation sensing capabilities of silver containing chalcogenide glass thin films

  13. New functionality of chalcogenide glasses for radiation sensing of nuclear wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ailavajhala, M.S., E-mail: m.ailavajhala@gmail.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Gonzalez-Velo, Y. [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5706 (United States); Poweleit, C.D. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5706 (United States); Barnaby, H.J.; Kozicki, M.N. [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5706 (United States); Butt, D.P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Mitkova, M., E-mail: maheshailavajhala@u.boisestate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Study of thin film chalcogenide glasses under gamma radiation and a proposed radiation sensor design. • Structural changes were observed at various radiation doses. • Formation of Ag{sub 2}Se in Se depleted glasses with sufficient radiation dose. • In conventional semiconductor chip environment, the proposed sensor has a linear current vs. dose behavior up to 600 J/cm{sup 2}. - Abstract: Data about gamma radiation induced effects in Ge{sub 40}Se{sub 60} chalcogenide thin films and radiation induced silver diffusion within these are presented. Blanket films and devices were created to study the structural changes, diffusion products, and device performance. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, current vs. voltage (I–V) and impedance measurements expound the behavior of Ge{sub 40}Se{sub 60} glass and silver diffusion within this glass under radiation. Raman study shows that there is a decrease in the area ratio between edge shared and corner shared structural units revealing structural reorganization occurring in the glasses as a result of gamma radiation. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that with sufficiently radiation dose it is also possible to create Ag{sub 2}Se in selenium-depleted systems. Oxidation of the Ge enriched chalcogenide backbone is confirmed through the electrical performance of the sensing elements based on these films. Combination of these structural and diffusion products influences the device performance. The I–V behavior is characterized by increase in current and then stabilization as a function of radiation dose. Additionally, device modeling is also presented using Silvaco software and analytical methods to shed light on the device behavior. This type of sensor design and material characterizations facilitate in improving the radiation sensing capabilities of silver containing chalcogenide glass thin films.

  14. ZnO and copper indium chalcogenide heterojunctions prepared by inexpensive methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berruet, M., E-mail: berruetm@gmail.com [División Electroquímica y Corrosión, Facultad de Ingeniería, INTEMA, CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302, B7608FDQ Mar del Plata (Argentina); Di Iorio, Y. [División Electroquímica y Corrosión, Facultad de Ingeniería, INTEMA, CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302, B7608FDQ Mar del Plata (Argentina); Troviano, M. [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN, CONICET-UNCo), Buenos Aires 1400, Q8300IBX Neuquén (Argentina); Vázquez, M. [División Electroquímica y Corrosión, Facultad de Ingeniería, INTEMA, CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302, B7608FDQ Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2014-12-15

    Solution-based techniques were used to prepare ZnO/CuIn(Se, S){sub 2} heterojunctions that serve as solar cell prototypes. A duplex layer of ZnO (compact + porous) was electrodeposited. Chalcogenide thin films were deposited using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method (SILAR). By subsequent thermal treatments in two different atmospheres, CuInSe{sub 2} (CISe) and CuInSe{sub 2−x}S{sub x} (CISeS) were obtained. The composition and morphology of the annealed films were characterized by GXRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM. Devices prepared with CISe and CISeS show a clear photo-response. The introduction of a buffer layer of TiO{sub 2} into the ZnO/chalcogenide interface was necessary to detect photocurrent. The presence of CISeS improves the response of the cell, with higher values of short circuit current density, open circuit potential and fill factor. These promising results show that it is possible to prepare photovoltaic heterojunctions by depositing chalcogenides onto porous ZnO substrates using low-cost solution-based techniques. - Highlights: • Heterojunctions that serve as solar cell prototypes were prepared using solution-based techniques. • The devices comprised a double layer of ZnO and CuInSe{sub 2} or CuInSe{sub 0.4}S{sub 1.6}. • A TiO{sub 2} buffer layer in the ZnO/chalcogenide interface is necessary to detect photocurrent. • The incorporation of S improved the response of the photovoltaic heterojunction.

  15. Trends in oxygen reduction and methanol activation on transition metal chalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We use density functional theory calculations to study the oxygen reduction reaction and methanol activation on selenium and sulfur-containing transition metal surfaces. With ruthenium selenium as a starting point, we study the effect of the chalcogen on the activity, selectivity and stability...... of the catalyst. Ruthenium surfaces with moderate content of selenium are calculated active for the oxygen reduction reaction, and insensitive to methanol. A significant upper limit for the activity of transition metal chalcogenides is estimated....

  16. High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-10-05

    This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

  17. Large magnetoresistance in non-magnetic silver chalcogenides and new class of magnetoresistive compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboungi, Marie-Louis; Price, David C. L.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Xu, Rong; Husmann, Anke

    2001-01-01

    The heavily-doped silver chalcogenides, Ag.sub.2+.delta. Se and Ag.sub.2+.delta. Te, show magnetoresistance effects on a scale comparable to the "colossal" magnetoresistance (CMR) compounds. Hall coefficient, magnetoconductivity, and hydrostatic pressure experiments establish that elements of narrow-gap semiconductor physics apply, but both the size of the effects at room temperature and the linear field dependence down to fields of a few Oersteds are surprising new features.

  18. Mercury Information Clearinghouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad A. Wocken; Michael J. Holmes; Dennis L. Laudal; Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; Greg F. Weber; Nicholas V. C. Ralston; Stanley J. Miller; Grant E. Dunham; Edwin S. Olson; Laura J. Raymond; John H. Pavlish; Everett A. Sondreal; Steven A. Benson

    2006-03-31

    The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. With the support of CEA, the Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the EERC developed comprehensive quarterly information updates that provide a detailed assessment of developments in the various areas of mercury monitoring, control, policy, and research. A total of eight topical reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. The original quarterly reports can be viewed at the CEA Web site (www.ceamercuryprogram.ca). In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. Members of Canada's coal-fired electricity generation sector (ATCO Power, EPCOR, Manitoba Hydro, New Brunswick Power, Nova Scotia Power Inc., Ontario Power Generation, SaskPower, and TransAlta) and CEA, have compiled an extensive database of information from stack-, coal-, and ash-sampling activities. Data from this effort are also available at the CEA Web site and have provided critical information for establishing and reviewing a mercury standard for Canada that is protective of environment and public health and is cost-effective. Specific goals outlined for the CEA mercury program included the following: (1) Improve emission inventories and develop management options through an intensive 2-year coal-, ash-, and stack-sampling program; (2) Promote effective stack testing through the development of guidance material and the support of on-site training on the Ontario Hydro method for employees, government representatives, and contractors on an as-needed basis; (3) Strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities through

  19. Case studies on the formation of chalcogenide self-assembled monolayers on surfaces and dissociative processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This report examines the assembly of chalcogenide organic molecules on various surfaces, focusing on cases when chemisorption is accompanied by carbon–chalcogen atom-bond scission. In the case of alkane and benzyl chalcogenides, this induces formation of a chalcogenized interface layer. This process can occur during the initial stages of adsorption and then, after passivation of the surface, molecular adsorption can proceed. The characteristics of the chalcogenized interface layer can be significantly different from the metal layer and can affect various properties such as electron conduction. For chalcogenophenes, the carbon–chalcogen atom-bond breaking can lead to opening of the ring and adsorption of an alkene chalcogenide. Such a disruption of the π-electron system affects charge transport along the chains. Awareness about these effects is of importance from the point of view of molecular electronics. We discuss some recent studies based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy that shed light on these aspects for a series of such organic molecules.

  20. 2D Metal Chalcogenides Incorporated into Carbon and their Assembly for Energy Storage Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zongnan; Jiang, Hao; Li, Chunzhong

    2018-05-01

    2D metal chalcogenides have become a popular focus in the energy storage field because of their unique properties caused by their single-atom thicknesses. However, their high surface energy and van der Waals attraction easily cause serious stacking and restacking, leading to the generation of more inaccessible active sites with rapid capacity fading. The hybridization of 2D metal chalcogenides with highly conductive materials, particularly, incorporating ultrasmall and few-layered metal chalcogenides into carbon frameworks, can not only maximize the exposure of active sites but also effectively avoid their stacking and aggregation during the electrochemical reaction process. Therefore, a satisfactory specific capacity will be achieved with a long cycle life. In this Concept, the representative progress on such intriguing nanohybrids and their applications in energy storage devices are mainly summarized. Finally, an outlook of the future development and challenges of such nanohybrids for achieving an excellent energy storage capability is also provided. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. New functionality of chalcogenide glasses for radiation sensing of nuclear wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailavajhala, M S; Gonzalez-Velo, Y; Poweleit, C D; Barnaby, H J; Kozicki, M N; Butt, D P; Mitkova, M

    2014-03-30

    Data about gamma radiation induced effects in Ge40Se60 chalcogenide thin films and radiation induced silver diffusion within these are presented. Blanket films and devices were created to study the structural changes, diffusion products, and device performance. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, current vs. voltage (I-V) and impedance measurements expound the behavior of Ge40Se60 glass and silver diffusion within this glass under radiation. Raman study shows that there is a decrease in the area ratio between edge shared and corner shared structural units revealing structural reorganization occurring in the glasses as a result of gamma radiation. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that with sufficiently radiation dose it is also possible to create Ag2Se in selenium-depleted systems. Oxidation of the Ge enriched chalcogenide backbone is confirmed through the electrical performance of the sensing elements based on these films. Combination of these structural and diffusion products influences the device performance. The I-V behavior is characterized by increase in current and then stabilization as a function of radiation dose. Additionally, device modeling is also presented using Silvaco software and analytical methods to shed light on the device behavior. This type of sensor design and material characterizations facilitate in improving the radiation sensing capabilities of silver containing chalcogenide glass thin films. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Study of third order nonlinearity of chalcogenide thin films using third harmonic generation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Sunita; Mohan, Devendra; Kumar, Manish; Sanjay

    2018-05-01

    Third order nonlinear susceptibility of (GeSe3.5)100-xBix (x = 0, 10, 14) and ZnxSySe100-x-y (x = 2, y = 28; x = 4, y = 20; x = 6, y = 12; x = 8, y = 4) amorphous chalcogenide thin films prepared using thermal evaporation technique is estimated. The dielectric constant at incident and third harmonic wavelength is calculated using "PARAV" computer program. 1064 nm wavelength of Nd: YAG laser is incident on thin film and third harmonic signal at 355 nm wavelength alongwith fundamental light is obtained in reflection that is separated from 1064 nm using suitable optical filter. Reflected third harmonic signal is measured to trace the influence of Bi and Zn on third order nonlinear susceptibility and is found to increase with increase in Bi and Zn content in (GeSe3.5)100-xBix, and ZnxSySe100-x-y chalcogenide thin films respectively. The excellent optical nonlinear property shows the use of chalcogenide thin films in photonics for wavelength conversion and optical data processing.

  3. Theoretical study of phonon dispersion, elastic, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of barium chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musari, A. A.; Orukombo, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    Barium chalcogenides are known for their high-technological importance and great scientific interest. Detailed studies of their elastic, mechanical, dynamical and thermodynamic properties were carried out using density functional theory and plane-wave pseudo potential method within the generalized gradient approximation. The optimized lattice constants were in good agreement when compared with experimental data. The independent elastic constants, calculated from a linear fit of the computed stress-strain function, were used to determine the Young’s modulus (E), bulk modulus (B), shear modulus (G), Poisson’s ratio (σ) and Zener’s anisotropy factor (A). Also, the Debye temperature and sound velocities for barium chalcogenides were estimated from the three independent elastic constants. The calculations of phonon dispersion showed that there are no negative frequencies throughout the Brillouin zone. Hence barium chalcogenides have dynamically stable NaCl-type crystal structure. Finally, their thermodynamic properties were calculated in the temperature range of 0-1000 K and their constant-volume specific heat capacities at room-temperature were reported.

  4. Limiting of photo induced changes in amorphous chalcogenide/alumino-silicate nanomultilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charnovych, S.; Nemec, P.; Nazabal, V.; Csik, A.; Allix, M.; Matzen, G.; Kokenyesi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Amorphous chalcogenides were investigated in this work. → Photo-induced effects were investigated in the created thin films. → Limiting of photo induced changes in amorphous chalcogenide/alumino-silicate nanomultilayers have been studied. - Abstract: Photo induced changes in amorphous As 20 Se 80 /alumino-silicate nanomultilayers (NML) produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method have been studied in this work. The aim was to investigate the photo induced optical and surface relief changes due to the band gap illumination under the size- and hard cover limited conditions. It was observed that the hard cover layer on the surface of the uniform film or alumino-silicate sub-layers in the NML structure influences the photo darkening and restricts surface relief formations in As 20 Se 80 film or in the related NML compared with this effect in a pure chalcogenide layer. The influence of hard layers is supposed to be connected with limiting the free volume formation at the initial stage of the transformation process, which in turn limits the atomic movement and so the surface relief formation.

  5. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.; Shah, H.; Wilmarth, W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  6. A mercury transport and fate model (LM2-mercury) for mass budget assessment of mercury cycling in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    LM2-Mercury, a mercury mass balance model, was developed to simulate and evaluate the transport, fate, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. The model simulates total suspended solids (TSS), disolved organic carbon (DOC), and total, elemental, divalent, ...

  7. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-01

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system. PMID:28085104

  8. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-12

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  9. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Genchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  10. MERCURY USAGE AND ALTERNATIVES IN THE ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS INDUSTRIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many industries have already found alternatives for mercury or have greatly decreased mercury use. However, the unique electromechanical and photoelectric properties of mercury and mercury compounds have made replacement of mercury difficult in some applications. This study was i...

  11. Mercury's exosphere: observations during MESSENGER's First Mercury flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, William E; Bradley, E Todd; Vervack, Ronald J; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Izenberg, Noam R; Solomon, Sean C

    2008-07-04

    During MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measured Mercury's exospheric emissions, including those from the antisunward sodium tail, calcium and sodium close to the planet, and hydrogen at high altitudes on the dayside. Spatial variations indicate that multiple source and loss processes generate and maintain the exosphere. Energetic processes connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric interaction with the planet likely played an important role in determining the distributions of exospheric species during the flyby.

  12. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-12-05

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  13. Health Effects of Exposures to Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IRIS database Top of Page Elemental (Metallic) Mercury Effects Exposures to metallic mercury most often occur when metallic ... poor performance on tests of mental function Higher exposures may also cause kidney effects, respiratory failure and death. Note that metallic mercury ...

  14. Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products Share Tweet Linkedin ... and, in some situations, criminal prosecution. Dangers of Mercury Exposure to mercury can have serious health consequences. ...

  15. Contribution to comprehensive study of aluminium alloy Aa 5083 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Corrosion induced by elemental mercury in aqueous media of industrial Aluminium alloys AA5083 used in heat exchanger industries of natural gas liquefaction has been studied by linear sweep voltammétry on ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  16. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  17. Mercury content in Hot Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, R

    1974-01-01

    A method of determination of mercury in hot spring waters by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. Further, the mercury content and the chemical behavior of the elementary mercury in hot springs are described. Sulfide and iodide ions interfered with the determination of mercury by the reduction-vapor phase technique. These interferences could, however, be minimized by the addition of potassium permanganate. Waters collected from 55 hot springs were found to contain up to 26.0 ppb mercury. High concentrations of mercury have been found in waters from Shimoburo Springs, Aomori (10.0 ppb), Osorezan Springs, Aomori (1.3 approximately 18.8 ppb), Gosyogake Springs, Akita (26.0 ppb), Manza Springs, Gunma (0.30 approximately 19.5 ppb) and Kusatu Springs, Gunma (1.70 approximately 4.50 ppb). These hot springs were acid waters containing a relatively high quantity of chloride or sulfate.

  18. Chalcogenide Sensitized Carbon Based TiO2 Nanomaterial For Solar Driven Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Pawan

    The demand for renewable energy is growing because fossils fuels are depleting at a rapid pace. Solar energy an abundant green energy resource. Utilizing this resource in a smart manner can resolve energy-crisis related issues. Sun light can be efficiently harvested using semiconductor based materials by utilizing photo-generated charges for numerous beneficial applications. The main goal of this thesis is to synthesize different nanostructures of TiO2, develop a novel method of coupling and synthesizing chalcogenide nanocrystals with TiO2 and to study the charge transportation effects of the various carbon allotropes in the chalcogenide nanocrystal sensitized TiO2 nanostructure. We have fabricated different nanostructures of TiO2 as solar energy harvesting materials. Effects of the different phases of TiO2 have also been studied. The anatase phase of TiO2 is more photoactive than the rutile phase of TiO2, and the higher dimension of the TiO2 can increase the surface area of the material which can produce higher photocurrent. Since TiO2 only absorbs in the UV range; to increase the absorbance TiO2 should be coupled to visible light absorbing materials. This dissertation presents a simple approach to synthesize and couple chalcogenide nanocrystals with TiO2 nanostructure to form a heterostructured composite. An atmospheric pressure based, single precursor, one-pot approach has been developed and tested to assemble chalcogenide nanocrystal on the TiO2 surface. Surface characterization using microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and elemental analysis indicates the formation of nanocrystals along the nanotube walls and inter-tubular spacing. Optical measurements indicate that the chalcogenide nanocrystals absorb in the visible region and demonstrate an increase in photocurrent in comparison to bare TiO2 nanostructure. The CdS synthesized TiO2 nanostructure produced the highest photocurrent as measured in the three electrode system. We have also assembled the PbS nanocrystal

  19. Interior Volatile Reservoirs in Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzures, B. A.; Parman, S. W.; Milliken, R. E.; Head, J. W.

    2018-05-01

    More measurements of 1) surface volatiles, and 2) pyroclastic deposits paired with experimental volatile analyses in silicate minerals can constrain conditions of melting and subsequent eruption on Mercury.

  20. Mercury in Canadian crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebone, B.P.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates for average mercury concentrations in crude oil range widely from 10 ng/g of oil to 3,500 ng/g of oil. With such a broad range of estimates, it is difficult to determine the contributions of the petroleum sector to the total budget of mercury emissions. In response to concerns that the combustion of petroleum products may be a major source of air-borne mercury pollution, Environment Canada and the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute has undertaken a survey of the average total mercury concentration in crude oil processed in Canadian refineries. In order to calculate the potential upper limit of total mercury in all refined products, samples of more than 30 different types of crude oil collected from refineries were measured for their concentration of mercury as it enters into a refinery before processing. High temperature combustion, cold vapour atomic absorption and cold vapour atomic fluorescence were the techniques used to quantify mercury in the samples. The results of the study provide information on the total mass of mercury present in crude oil processed in Canada each year. Results can be used to determine the impact of vehicle exhaust emissions to the overall Canadian mercury emission budget. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  1. Mercury in bryophytes (moss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeaple, D S

    1972-01-28

    Recent reports in the literature, concerning the ability of certain mosses and lichens to concentrate heavy metals, have led to an investigation of the potential application of mosses as indicators of the transport of mercury through the atmosphere. A number of moss samples were collected to provide information regarding the level of mercury in moss around several types of populated areas. The results reported are from moss collected within an 80 mile radius of Boston, Massachusetts, along the Maine coast, near the tops of Mount Katahdin in Maine and Mount Washington in New Hampshire, and from Walden, New York, a small town located about 60 miles north of New York City. The data are admittedly limited, but provide sufficient insight into the usefulness of moss as an indicator to warrant the pursuit of a more detailed investigation. 6 references, 1 table.

  2. Integrated criteria document mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloof, W.; Beelan, P. van; Annema, J.A.; Janus, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The document contains a systematic review and a critical evaluation of the most relevant data on the priority substance mercury for the purpose of effect-oriented environmental policy. Chapter headings are: properties and existing standards; production, application, sources and emissions (natural sources, industry, energy, households, agriculture, dental use, waste); distribution and transformation (cinnabar; Hg 2+ , Hg 2 2+ , elemental mercury, methylmercury, behavior in soil, water, air, biota); concentrations and fluxes in the environment and exposure levels (sampling and measuring methods, occurrence in soil, water, air etc.); effects (toxicity to humans and aquatic and terrestrial systems); emissions reduction (from industrial sources, energy, waste processing etc.); and evaluation (risks, standards, emission reduction objectives, measuring strategies). 395 refs

  3. Method for mercury refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-04-09

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

  4. Apparatus for mercury refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-07-16

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

  5. The planet Mercury (1971)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The physical properties of the planet Mercury, its surface, and atmosphere are presented for space vehicle design criteria. The mass, dimensions, mean density, and orbital and rotational motions are described. The gravity field, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and charged particles in the planet's orbit are discussed. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, and composition data are given along with the surface composition, soil mechanical properties, and topography, and the surface electromagnetic and temperature properties.

  6. Magnetic field of Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.J.; Beard, D.B.

    1977-01-01

    The geomagnetic field, suitably scaled down and parameterized, is shown to give a very good fit to the magnetic field measurements taken on the first and third passes of the Mariner 10 space probe past Mercury. The excellence of the fit to a reliable planetary magnetospheric model is good evidence that the Mercury magnetosphere is formed by a simple, permanent, intrinsic planetary magnetic field distorted by the effects of the solar wind. The parameters used for a best fit to all the data are (depending slightly on the choice of data) 2.44--2.55 for the ratio of Mercury's magnetic field strength at the subsolar point to that of the earth's subsolar point field (this results in a dipole moment of 170 γR/sub M/ 3 (R/sub M/ is Mercury Radius), i.e., 2.41 x 10 22 G cm 3 in the same direction as the earth's dipole), approx.-113 γR/sub M/ 4 for the planetary quadrupole moment parallel to the dipole moment, 10degree--17degree for the tilt of the planet dipole toward the sun, 4.5degree for the tilt of the dipole toward dawn, and 2.5degree--7.6degree aberration angle for the shift in the tail axis from the planet-sun direction because of the planet's orbital velocity. The rms deviation overall for the entire data set compared with the theoretical fitted model for the magnetic field strength was 17 γ (approx.4% of the maximum field measured). If the data from the first pass that show presumed strong time variations are excluded, the overall rms deviation for the field magnitude is only 10 γ

  7. Method for scavenging mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-ger [El Cerrito, CA; Liu, Shou-heng [Kaohsiung, TW; Liu, Zhao-rong [Beijing, CN; Yan, Naiqiang [Berkeley, CA

    2009-01-20

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  8. Apparatus for mercury refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the 196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg 2 Cl 2 . The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg 2 Cl 2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures

  9. Method for mercury refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the 196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg 2 Cl 2 . The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg 2 Cl 2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures

  10. Mercury's Densely Cratered Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 10 took this picture (FDS 27465) of the densely cratered surface of Mercury when the spacecraft was 18,200 kilometers (8085 miles) from the planet on March 29. The dark line across top of picture is a 'dropout' of a few TV lines of data. At lower left, a portion of a 61 kilometer (38 mile) crater shows a flow front extending across the crater floor and filling more than half of the crater. The smaller, fresh crater at center is about 25 kilometers (15 miles) in diameter. Craters as small as one kilometer (about one-half mile) across are visible in the picture.The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  11. Mercury removal sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  12. Nonswelling alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  13. Nonswelling alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-01-01

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses

  14. The effect of oxygen impurity on the electronic and optical properties of calcium, strontium and barium chalcogenide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadsetani, M.; Beiranvand, R.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic and optical properties of calcium, strontium and barium chalcogenide compounds in NaCl structure are studied using the band structure results obtained through the full potential linearized augmented palne wave method. Different linear relationships are observed between theoretical band gap and 1/a 2 (where a is lattice constant) for calcium, strontium and barium chalcogenide compounds with and without oxygen, respectively. An abnormal behavior of electronic and optical properties are found for compounds containing oxygen. These effects are ascribed to the special properties of Ca-O, Sr-O and Ba-O bonds, which are different from chemical bonds between Ca, Sr and Ba and other chalcogen atoms.

  15. Rotation of the planet mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, W H

    1966-04-08

    The equations of motion for the rotation of Mercury are solved for the general case by an asymptotic expansion. The findings of Liu and O'Keefe, obtained by numerical integration of a special case, that it is possible for Mercury's rotation to be locked into a 2:3 resonance with its revolution, are confirmed in detail. The general solution has further applications.

  16. Mercury: Exploration of a Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft to Venus and Mercury is detailed in animation and photography. Views of Mercury are featured. Also included is animation on the origin of the solar system. Dr. Bruce C. Murray, director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, comments on the mission.

  17. 49 CFR 173.164 - Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ounces) of mercury per package; (iv) Tubes which are completely jacketed in sealed leakproof metal cases... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.164 Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury). (a) For...

  18. Iron based pnictide and chalcogenide superconductors studied by muon spin spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shermadini, Zurab

    2014-01-01

    In the present thesis the superconducting properties of the Iron-based Ba 1-x Rb x Fe 2 As 2 arsenides, and A x Fe 2-y Se 2 (A=Cs,Rb,K) chalcogenides are investigated by means of Muon Spin Rotation Spectroscopy. The temperature and pressure dependence of the magnetic penetration depth is obtained form μSR experiments and analyzed to probe the superconducting gap-symmetries for each samples. The Ba 1-x Rb x Fe 2 As 2 system is described within the multi-gap s+s-wave scenario and results are discussed in the light of the suppression of inter-band processes upon hole doping. Due to the lowered upper critical field B c2 and reduced T c , a large section of B-T-p phase diagram is studied for the hole-overdoped x=1 case. By applying hydrostatic pressure, the RbFe 2 As 2 system exhibits a classical BCS superconducting characteristics. The A x Fe 2-y Se 2 chalcogenide represents a system containing magnetically ordered and superconducting phases simultaneously. In all investigated chalcogenide samples, about 90% of the total volume show the strong antiferromagnetic phase and 10% exhibit a paramagnetic behavior. Magnetization measurements reveal a 100% Meissner effect, while μSR clearly indicates that the paramagnetic phase is a perfect superconductor. Up to now, there is no clear evidence whether the antiferromagnetic phase is also superconducting. The microscopic coexistence and/or phase separation of superconductivity and magnetism is discussed. Moreover, a new hydrostatic double-wall pressure cell is developed and produced, satisfying the demands of μSR experiments. The designs and characteristics of the new pressure cell are reviewed in the present thesis.

  19. Structural, optical and electrical properties of cadmium-doped lead chalcogenide (PbSe) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Shamshad A.; Khan, Zishan H.; El-Sebaii, A.A.; Al-Marzouki, F.M.; Al-Ghamdi, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    (PbSe) 100-x Cd x thin films of thickness 3000 A with variable concentrations of Cd (x=5, 10, 15 and 20) were prepared by thermal evaporation on glass substrates at room temperature at a base pressure of 10 -6 Torr. The structural, optical and electrical properties of these films were studied. X-ray diffraction patterns were used to determine the crystal structure of the films. Films were of polycrystalline texture over the whole range of study. Optical constants of all films were determined by absorbance and reflection measurements in a wavelength range 400-1200 nm. Analysis of the optical absorption data showed that the rule of direct transitions predominates. The values of the absorption coefficient (α), extinction coefficient (k) and imaginary part of the dielectric constant were found to increase with increasing Cd content in lead chalcogenides while the refractive index (n) and real part of dielectric constant were increased with increasing Cd concentration up to 15% and then they decreased with 20% of Cd content in PbSe. These results were interpreted in terms of the change in concentration of localized states due to the shift in Fermi level. The dc conductivities and activation energies of the films were measured in the temperature range 298-398 K. It was observed that the dc conductivity increases at all temperatures with the increase of Cd content in lead chalcogenide system. The experimental data suggests that the conduction is due to the thermally assisted tunneling of the carriers in the localized states near the band edges. The activation energy and optical band gap were found to decrease with increasing Cd concentration in lead chalcogenide.

  20. A feasibility study of unconventional planar ligand spacers in chalcogenide nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukose, Binit; Clancy, Paulette

    2016-05-18

    The solar cell efficiency of chalcogenide nanocrystals (quantum dots) has been limited in the past by the insulation between neighboring quantum dots caused by intervening, often long-chain, aliphatic ligands. We have conducted a computationally based feasibility study to investigate the use of ultra-thin, planar, charge-conducting ligands as an alternative to traditional long passive ligands. Not only might these radically unconventional ligands decrease the mean distance between adjacent quantum dots, but, since they are charge-conducting, they have the potential to actively enhance charge migration. Our ab initio studies compare the binding energies, electronic energy gaps, and absorption characteristics for both conventional and unconventional ligands, such as phthalocyanines, porphyrins and coronene. This comparison identified these unconventional ligands with the exception of titanyl phthalocyanine, that bind to themselves more strongly than to the surface of the quantum dot, which is likely to be less desirable for enhancing charge transport. The distribution of finite energy levels of the bound system is sensitive to the ligand's binding site and the levels correspond to delocalized states. We also observed a trap state localized on a single Pb atom when a sulfur-containing phenyldithiocarbamate (PTC) ligand is attached to a slightly off-stoichiometric dot in a manner that the sulfur of the ligand completes stoichiometry of the bound system. Hence, this is indicative of the source of trap state when thio-based ligands are bound to chalcogenide nanocrystals. We also predict that titanyl phthalocyanine in a mix with chalcogenide dots of diameter ∼1.5 Å can form a donor-acceptor system.

  1. Magnetic and electronic properties of Neptunium chalcogenides from GGA + U + SOC and DFT investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Wilayat [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Goumri-Said, Souraya, E-mail: sosaid@alfaisal.edu [College of Science, Physics Department, Alfaisal University, Riyadh 11533 (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Electronic and magnetic properties of Neptunium chalcogenides were explored theoretically using DFT approach. • Spin orbit coupling and GGA + U approach described successfully the f–f coupling. • Np{sub 2}X{sub 5} ate metallic with high magnetic character due to the Neptunium. • Fermi surfaces of Np{sub 2}Te{sub 5} have shown a greater electrical conductivity compared to Np{sub 2}Se{sub 5} and Np{sub 2}S{sub 5}. - Abstract: First-principles calculations techniques were employed to explore the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Neptunium chalcogenides (Np{sub 2}X{sub 5}, X = S, Se and Te). No experimental or theoretical studies of their physical properties have been previously reported in the literature. The presence of highly localized f states has requested the employment of the spin orbit coupling and GGA + U approach in order to describe correctly the f–f coupling. Np{sub 2}X{sub 5} was found metallic with high magnetic character due to the Neptunium presence. Fermi surfaces of Np{sub 2}Te{sub 5} have shown a greater electrical conductivity compared to Np{sub 2}Se{sub 5} and Np{sub 2}S{sub 5}. The magnetic moment was found to be between 13.24 and 13.92μ{sub B}, principally induced by Np f and d-orbitals as well as the spin-polarization of the chalcogenes (Te, Se, S) induced by Np. Neptunium chalcogenides have shown interesting magnetic properties and should be manipulated with precaution due to their radioactive properties.

  2. Methyl mercury in terrestrial compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeppler, M.; Burow, M.; Padberg, S.; May, K.

    1993-09-01

    On the basis of the analytical methodology available at present the state of the art for the determination of total mercury and of various organometallic compounds of mercury in air, precipitation, limnic systems, soils, plants and biota is reviewed. This is followed by the presentation and discussion of examples for the data obtained hitherto for trace and ultratrace levels of total mercury and mainly methyl mercury in terrestrial and limnic environments as well as in biota. The data discussed stem predominantly from the past decade in which, due to significant methodological progress, many new aspects were elucidated. They include the most important results in this area achieved by the Research Centre (KFA) Juelich within the project 'Origin and Fate of Methyl Mercury' (contracts EV4V-0138-D and STEP-CT90-0057) supported by the Commission of the European Communities, Brussels. (orig.) [de

  3. Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung-Duck; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability o...

  4. The electronic structure of the antimony chalcogenide series: Prospects for optoelectronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, John J.; Allen, Jeremy P. [School of Chemistry and CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Scanlon, David O. [University College London, Kathleen Lonsdale Materials Chemistry, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Watson, Graeme W., E-mail: watsong@tcd.ie [School of Chemistry and CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-05-01

    In this study, density functional theory is used to evaluate the electronic structure of the antimony chalcogenide series. Analysis of the electronic density of states and charge density shows that asymmetric density, or ‘lone pairs’, forms on the Sb{sup III} cations in the distorted oxide, sulphide and selenide materials. The asymmetric density progressively weakens down the series, due to the increase in energy of valence p states from O to Te, and is absent for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The fundamental and optical band gaps were calculated and Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} have indirect band gaps, while Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} was calculated to have a direct band gap at Γ. The band gaps are also seen to reduce from Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The optical band gap for Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} makes it a candidate as a transparent conducting oxide, while Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} have suitable band gaps for thin film solar cell absorbers. - Graphical abstract: A schematic illustrating the interaction between the Sb{sup III} cations and the chalcogenide anions and the change in their respective energy levels down the series. - Highlights: • The electronic structure of the antimony chalcogenide series is modelled using DFT. • Asymmetric density is present on distorted systems and absent on the symmetric telluride system. • Asymmetric density is formed from the mixing of Sb 5s and anion p states, where the anti-bonding combination is stabilised by the Sb 5p states. • The asymmetric density weakens down the series due to the increase in energy of chalcogenide p states. • The increase in energy of the anion p states reduces the fundamental and optical band gaps.

  5. Origin of the frequency shift of Raman scattering in chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, X.C.; Tao, H.Z.; Gong, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    of the shift is associated with the topological connectivity of global network and/or the local environment of structural units, (e.g., tetrahedral GeSe4). Here we show the compositional evolution of the main Raman scattering frequency in Ge(SxSe1−x)2 glasses, and then clarify its structural origin. We keep...... units such as GeS4 tetrahedra. The ab-initio calculations of normal Raman mode combined with group theory analysis provide insight into the structural evolution of chalcogenide glasses with varying composition....

  6. Ageing effects in As10Se90 chalcogenide glasses induced by gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchak, R.; Shpotyuk, O.; Shpotyuk, M.; Gorecki, Cz.; Kozdras, A.

    2005-01-01

    The peculiarities of gamma-induced (Co 60 source, 1.85 MGy absorbed dose) ageing phenomena in As 10 Se 90 chalcogenide glasses are investigated for the first time. The analogy between the observed radiation-induced ageing and the thermally induced one in vitreous selenium is emphasized. Like to thermal treatment, gamma-irradiation leads to an increase in the glass transition temperature and the relaxation rate towards a thermodynamic equilibrium of supercooled liquid, the value of this increase being greater in the case of radiation influence

  7. Structural modification of covalent-bonded networks: on some methodological resolutions for binary chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, M; Shpotyuk, Ya; Shpotyuk, O, E-mail: shpotyukmy@yahoo.com [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 212, Stryjska str., Lviv, 79031 (Ukraine)

    2011-04-01

    New methodology to estimate efficiency of externally-induced structural modification in chalcogenide glasses is developed. This approach is grounded on the assumption that externally-induced structural modification is fully associated with destruction-polymerization transformations, which reveal themselves as local misbalances in covalent bond distribution, normal atomic coordination and intrinsic electrical fields. The input of each of these components into the total value of structural modification efficiency was probed for quasibinary (As{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 100-x}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub x} ChG.

  8. Structural modification of covalent-bonded networks: on some methodological resolutions for binary chalcogenide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, M; Shpotyuk, Ya; Shpotyuk, O

    2011-01-01

    New methodology to estimate efficiency of externally-induced structural modification in chalcogenide glasses is developed. This approach is grounded on the assumption that externally-induced structural modification is fully associated with destruction-polymerization transformations, which reveal themselves as local misbalances in covalent bond distribution, normal atomic coordination and intrinsic electrical fields. The input of each of these components into the total value of structural modification efficiency was probed for quasibinary (As 2 S 3 ) 100-x (Sb 2 S 3 ) x ChG.

  9. Charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors studied with combined Raman scattering and PALS methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavetskyy, T.; Vakiv, M.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2007-01-01

    A combination of Raman scattering and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) techniques to study charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors (ChVSs) was applied for the first time in this study. In the case of Ge 15.8 As 21 S 63.2 glass, it is found that the main radiation-induced switching of heteropolar Ge-S bonds into heteropolar As-S ones, previously detected by IR fast Fourier transform spectroscopy, can also be identified by Raman spectroscopy in the depolarized configuration. Results obtained by Raman scattering are in good agreement with PALS data for the investigated glass composition

  10. Charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors studied with combined Raman scattering and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavetskyy, T.; Vakiv, M. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2007-04-15

    A combination of Raman scattering and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) techniques to study charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors (ChVSs) was applied for the first time in this study. In the case of Ge{sub 15.8}As{sub 21}S{sub 63.2} glass, it is found that the main radiation-induced switching of heteropolar Ge-S bonds into heteropolar As-S ones, previously detected by IR fast Fourier transform spectroscopy, can also be identified by Raman spectroscopy in the depolarized configuration. Results obtained by Raman scattering are in good agreement with PALS data for the investigated glass composition.

  11. Radiation-induced defects formation in Bi-containing vitreous chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.; Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A.

    1997-01-01

    Processes of formation and annihilation of coordination defects in As 2 Se 3 Bi y and (As 2 Se 3 )(Bi 2 Se 3 ) y amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors induced by influence of Co 60 gamma-irradiation are investigated by photoelectric spectroscopy method. It is obtained that radiation-induced changes of photoelectrical properties on bioconcentration of As 2 Se 3 Bi y glasses are characterized by anomalous concentration dependence. The nature of this effect is associated with diamagnetic coordination defects formation. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs

  12. Application of positron annihilation lifetime technique for {gamma}-irradiation stresses study in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Golovchak, R.; Kovalskiy, A. [Scientific Research Company ' ' Carat' ' , Stryjska str. 20279031 Lviv (Ukraine); Filipecki, J.; Hyla, M. [Physics Institute, Pedagogical University, Al. Armii Krajowej 13/1542201 Czestochowa (Poland)

    2002-08-01

    The influence of {gamma}-irradiation on the positron annihilation lifetime spectra in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors of As-Ge-S system has been analysed. The correlations between lifetime data, structural features and chemical compositions of glasses have been discussed. The observed lifetime components are connected with bulk positron annihilation and positron annihilation on various native and {gamma}-induced open volume defects. It is concluded that after {gamma}-irradiation of investigated materials the {gamma}-induced microvoids based on S{sub 1}{sup -}, As{sub 2}{sup -}, and Ge{sub 3}{sup -} coordination defects play the major role in positron annihilation processes. (Abstract Copyright[2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Radiation-induced defects formation in Bi-containing vitreous chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.; Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A. [Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-01

    Processes of formation and annihilation of coordination defects in As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Bi{sub y} and (As{sub 2}Se{sub 3})(Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}){sub y} amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors induced by influence of Co{sup 60} gamma-irradiation are investigated by photoelectric spectroscopy method. It is obtained that radiation-induced changes of photoelectrical properties on bioconcentration of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Bi{sub y} glasses are characterized by anomalous concentration dependence. The nature of this effect is associated with diamagnetic coordination defects formation. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs.

  14. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Golovchak, R. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Zurawska, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of {gamma}-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge{sub 23.5}Sb{sub 11.8}S{sub 64.7} glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. CW all optical self switching in nonlinear chalcogenide nano plasmonic directional coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamed-Jahromi, Leila; Hatami, Mohsen

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we obtain the coupling coefficient of plasmonic directional coupler (PDC) made up of two parallel monolayer waveguides filled with high nonlinear chalcogenide material for TM mode in continues wave (CW) regime. In addition, we assume each waveguides acts as a perturbation to other waveguide. Four nonlinear-coupled equations are derived. Transfer distances are numerically calculated and used for deriving length of all optical switch. The length of designed switch is in the range of 10-1000 μm, and the switching power is in the range of 1-100 W/m. Obtained values are suitable for designing all optical elements in the integrated optical circuits.

  16. Theory of Two-Magnon Raman Scattering in Iron Pnictides and Chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C. C.

    2011-08-15

    Although the parent iron-based pnictides and chalcogenides are itinerant antiferromagnets, the use of local moment picture to understand their magnetic properties is still widespread. We study magnetic Raman scattering from a local moment perspective for various quantum spin models proposed for this new class of superconductors. These models vary greatly in the level of magnetic frustration and show a vastly different two-magnon Raman response. Light scattering by two-magnon excitations thus provides a robust and independent measure of the underlying spin interactions. In accord with other recent experiments, our results indicate that the amount of magnetic frustration in these systems may be small.

  17. Surface morphology of spin-coated As-S-Se chalcogenide thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohoutek, T.; Wágner, T.; Orava, J.; Krbal, M.; Fejfar, Antonín; Mates, Tomáš; Kasap, S. O.; Frumar, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 353, - (2007), s. 1437-1440 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010316; GA AV ČR IAA1010413 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0524; GAMŠk(CZ) LC523 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : chemical properties * spin coating * infrared glasses * chalcogenides * atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy * scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2007

  18. Reactive ion etching of tellurite and chalcogenide waveguides using hydrogen, methane, and argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, K. T.; Madden, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report in detail on the reactive plasma etching properties of tellurium and demonstrate a high quality etching process using hydrogen, methane, and argon. Very low loss planar ridge waveguides are demonstrated. Optical losses in tellurium dioxide waveguides below 0.1 dB/cm in most of the near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum and at 1550 nm have been achieved--the lowest ever reported by more than an order of magnitude and clearly suitable for planar integrated devices. The etch process is also shown to be suitable for chalcogenide glasses which may be of importance in applications such as phase change memory devices and nonlinear integrated optics.

  19. Advances in Mid-IR Fiber Lasers: Tellurite, Fluoride and Chalcogenide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Christian Falconi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A review on the recent progress in modeling and fabrication of medium infrared (Mid-IR fiber lasers is reported. The main objective is to illustrate some recent examples of continuous wave optical sources at wavelengths longer than those commonly employed in telecom applications and allowing high beam quality. A small number of Mid-IR lasers, among the large variety of schemes, glasses, dopants and pumping schemes reported in literature, is selected on the basis of their slope efficiency and threshold pump power. In particular, tellurite, fluoride and chalcogenide fiber lasers are considered. More details are given with reference to the novel pumping schemes.

  20. Functions of chalcogenide electrodes in solutions of complexing reagents and interfering ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyanskij, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility to modify chalcogenide electrodes and their behaviour in solutions of complexing reagents for the development of new methods of potentiometric titration has been studied. It is shown that complexing reagents (EDTA, cupferron, 8-hydroxyquinoline, sodium dithiocarbaminate) and Cu(2), Hg(2) produce a strong effect on the functions of Ag, Cu, Cd, Pb - selective electrodes, which is used for titration of potential-determining and non-potential-determining ions ions (Sr 2+ , La 3+ etc.) and also for modification of sulfide-selecting electrode. A method of potentiometric titration of sulfates and chlorides with modified Cd- and Ag-selective electrodes is suggested

  1. Methods for dispensing mercury into devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1987-04-28

    A process for dispensing mercury into devices which requires mercury. Mercury is first electrolytically separated from either HgO or Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 and plated onto a cathode wire. The cathode wire is then placed into a device requiring mercury.

  2. Determination of mercury in plant material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickard, J A; Martin, J T

    1960-07-01

    An analytical procedure used for the determination of traces of mercury in plant material is described. The conditions of combustion of organic matter are controlled to avoid loss of mercury and EDTA is used to reduce the values for apparent mercury on uncontaminated samples. Satisfactory recoveries of mercury added to apples, tomatoes and coffee are obtained. 10 references, 1 table.

  3. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...... thermoelastic coefficients and age hardenable low expansion alloys....

  4. Mercury's Lithospheric Magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; Phillips, R. J.; Philpott, L. C.; Al Asad, M.; Plattner, A.; Mast, S.; Kinczyk, M. J.; Prockter, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic field data obtained by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have been used to demonstrate the presence of lithospheric magnetization on Mercury. Larger amplitude fields resulting from the core dynamo and the strongly time-varying magnetospheric current systems are first estimated and subtracted from the magnetic field data to isolate lithospheric signals with wavelengths less than 500 km. These signals (hereafter referred to as data) are only observed at spacecraft altitudes less than 120 km, and are typically a few to 10 nT in amplitude. We present and compare equivalent source dipole magnetization models for latitudes 35°N to 75°N obtained from two distinct approaches to constrain the distribution and origin of lithospheric magnetization. First, models that fit either the data or the surface field predicted from a regional spherical harmonic representation of the data (see Plattner & Johnson abstract) and that minimize the root mean square (RMS) value of the magnetization are derived. Second, models in which the spatial distribution of magnetization required to fit the data is minimized are derived using the approach of Parker (1991). As seen previously, the largest amplitudes of lithospheric magnetization are concentrated around the Caloris basin. With this exception, across the northern hemisphere there are no overall correlations of magnetization with surface geology, although higher magnetizations are found in regions with darker surfaces. Similarly, there is no systematic correlation of magnetization signatures with crater materials, although there are specific instances of craters with interiors or ejecta that have magnetizations distinct from the surrounding region. For the latter case, we observe no correlation of the occurrence of these signatures with crater degradation state (a proxy for age). At the lowest spacecraft altitudes (source depths less than O(10 km) are unlikely in most regions

  5. Radar observations of Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.K.; Campbell, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the radar altimetry profiles of Mercury obtained on the basis of data from the Arecibo Observatory are presented. In these measurements, the delay-Doppler method was used to measure altitudes along the Doppler equator, rather than to map radar reflectivity. The profiles, derived from observations made over a 6-yr period, provide extensive coverage over a restricted equatorial band and permit the identification of radar signatures for features as small as 50-km diameter craters and 1-km-high arcuate scarps. The data allowed identification of large-scale topographic features such as smooth plains subsidence zones and major highland regions

  6. Fluorescent sensor for mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zidong [Urbana, IL; Lee, Jung Heon [Evanston, IL; Lu, Yi [Champaign, IL

    2011-11-22

    The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

  7. Biochemical basis of mercury remediation and bioaccumulation by Enterobacter sp. EMB21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Arvind; Kumar, Sumit; Khare, Sunil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to isolate metal bioaccumulating bacterial strains and to study their applications in removal of environmental problematic heavy metals like mercury. Five bacterial strains belonging to genera Enterobacter, Bacillus, and Pseudomonas were isolated from oil-spilled soil. Among these, one of the strains Enterobacter sp. EMB21 showed mercury bioaccumulation inside the cells simultaneous to its bioremediation. The bioaccumulation of remediated mercury was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray. The mercury-resistant loci in the Enterobacter sp. EMB21 cells were plasmid-mediated as confirmed by transformation of mercury-sensitive Escherichia coli DH5α by Enterobacter sp. EMB21 plasmid. Effect of different culture parameters viz-a-viz inoculum size, pH, carbon, and nitrogen source revealed that alkaline pH and presence of dextrose and yeast extract favored better remediation. The results indicated the usefulness of Enterobacter sp. EMB21 for the effective remediation of mercury in bioaccumulated form. The Enterobacter sp. EMB21 seems promising for heavy metal remediation wherein the remediated metal can be trapped inside the cells. The process can further be developed for the synthesis of valuable high-end functional alloy, nanoparticles, or metal conjugates from the metal being remediated.

  8. Mercury kinetics in marine zooplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.; Heyraud, M.; LaRosa, J.

    1976-01-01

    Mercury, like many other heavy metals, is potentially available to marine animals by uptake directly from water and/or through the organisms food. Furthermore, bioavailability, assimilation and subsequent retention in biota may be affected by the chemical species of the element in sea water. While mercury is known to exist in the inorganic form in sea water, recent work has indicated that, in certain coastal areas, a good portion of the total mercury appears to be organically bound; however, the exact chemical nature of the organic fraction has yet to be determined. Methyl mercury may be one constituent of the natural organically bound fraction since microbial mechanisms for in situ methylation of mercury have been demonstrated in the aquatic environment. Despite the fact that naturally produced methyl mercury probably comprises only a small fraction of an aquatic ecosystem, the well-documented toxic effects of this organo-mercurial, caused by man-made introductions into marine food chains, make it an important compound to study

  9. Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

    2013-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 μg kg-1) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 μg kg-1). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark—in pyroclastic wounds—and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 μg kg-1) and bark (6.0 μg kg-1) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species.

  10. Atmospheric mercury footprints of nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sai; Wang, Yafei; Cinnirella, Sergio; Pirrone, Nicola

    2015-03-17

    The Minamata Convention was established to protect humans and the natural environment from the adverse effects of mercury emissions. A cogent assessment of mercury emissions is required to help implement the Minamata Convention. Here, we use an environmentally extended multi-regional input-output model to calculate atmospheric mercury footprints of nations based on upstream production (meaning direct emissions from the production activities of a nation), downstream production (meaning both direct and indirect emissions caused by the production activities of a nation), and consumption (meaning both direct and indirect emissions caused by final consumption of goods and services in a nation). Results show that nations function differently within global supply chains. Developed nations usually have larger consumption-based emissions than up- and downstream production-based emissions. India, South Korea, and Taiwan have larger downstream production-based emissions than their upstream production- and consumption-based emissions. Developed nations (e.g., United States, Japan, and Germany) are in part responsible for mercury emissions of developing nations (e.g., China, India, and Indonesia). Our findings indicate that global mercury abatement should focus on multiple stages of global supply chains. We propose three initiatives for global mercury abatement, comprising the establishment of mercury control technologies of upstream producers, productivity improvement of downstream producers, and behavior optimization of final consumers.

  11. Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

    2013-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 μg kg(-1)) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 μg kg(-1)). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark-in pyroclastic wounds-and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 μg kg(-1)) and bark (6.0 μg kg(-1)) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species.

  12. Method for removal and stabilization of mercury in mercury-containing gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Thomas E.

    2005-09-13

    The present invention is directed to a process and apparatus for removing and stabilizing mercury from mercury-containing gas streams. A gas stream containing vapor phase elemental and/or speciated mercury is contacted with reagent, such as an oxygen-containing oxidant, in a liquid environment to form a mercury-containing precipitate. The mercury-containing precipitate is kept or placed in solution and reacts with one or more additional reagents to form a solid, stable mercury-containing compound.

  13. Ion beam assisted synthesis of nano-crystals in glasses (silver and lead chalcogenides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espiau de Lamaestre, R.

    2005-04-01

    This work deals with the interest in ion beams for controlling nano-crystals synthesis in glasses. We show two different ways to reach this aim, insisting on importance of redox phenomena induced by the penetration and implantation of ions in glasses. We first show that we can use the great energy density deposited by the ions to tailor reducing conditions, favorable to metallic nano-crystal precipitation. In particular, we show that microscopic mechanism of radiation induced silver precipitation in glasses are analogous to the ones of classical photography. Ion beams can also be used to overcome supersaturation of elements in a given matrix. In this work, we synthesized lead chalcogenide nano-crystals (PbS, PbSe, PbTe) whose optical properties are interesting for telecommunication applications. We demonstrate the influence of complex chalcogenide chemistry in oxide glasses, and its relationship with the observed loss of growth control when nano-crystals are synthesized by sequential implantation of Pb and S in pure silica. As a consequence of this understanding, we demonstrate a novel and controlled synthesis of PbS nano-crystals, consisting in implanting sulfur into a Pb-containing glass, before annealing. Choice of glass composition provides a better control of precipitation physico-chemistry, whereas the use of implantation allows high nano-crystal volume fractions to be reached. Our study of IR emission properties of these nano-crystals shows a very high excitation cross section, and evidence for a 'dark exciton' emitting level. (author)

  14. Half-Metallic Ferromagnetism and Stability of Transition Metal Pnictides and Chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bang-Gui

    It is highly desirable to explore robust half-metallic ferromagnetic materials compatible with important semiconductors for spintronic applications. A state-of-the-art full potential augmented plane wave method within the densityfunctional theory is reliable enough for this purpose. In this chapter we review theoretical research on half-metallic ferromagnetism and structural stability of transition metal pnictides and chalcogenides. We show that some zincblende transition metal pnictides are half-metallic and the half-metallic gap can be fairly wide, which is consistent with experiment. Systematic calculations reveal that zincblende phases of CrTe, CrSe, and VTe are excellent half-metallic ferromagnets. These three materials have wide half-metallic gaps, are low in total energy with respect to the corresponding ground-state phases, and, importantly, are structurally stable. Halfmetallic ferromagnetism is also found in wurtzite transition metal pnictides and chalcogenides and in transition-metal doped semiconductors as well as deformed structures. Some of these half-metallic materials could be grown epitaxially in the form of ultrathin .lms or layers suitable for real spintronic applications.

  15. The electronic band structures of gadolinium chalcogenides: a first-principles prediction for neutron detecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kexue; Liu, Lei; Yu, Peter Y; Chen, Xiaobo; Shen, D Z

    2016-05-11

    By converting the energy of nuclear radiation to excited electrons and holes, semiconductor detectors have provided a highly efficient way for detecting them, such as photons or charged particles. However, for detecting the radiated neutrons, those conventional semiconductors hardly behave well, as few of them possess enough capability for capturing these neutral particles. While the element Gd has the highest nuclear cross section, here for searching proper neutron-detecting semiconductors, we investigate theoretically the Gd chalcogenides whose electronic band structures have never been characterized clearly. Among them, we identify that γ-phase Gd2Se3 should be the best candidate for neutron detecting since it possesses not only the right bandgap of 1.76 eV for devices working under room temperature but also the desired indirect gap nature for charge carriers surviving longer. We propose further that semiconductor neutron detectors with single-neutron sensitivity can be realized with such a Gd-chalcogenide on the condition that their crystals can be grown with good quality.

  16. Hydrogen treatment as a detergent of electronic trap states in lead chalcogenide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voros, Marton; Brawand, Nicholas; Galli, Giulia

    Lead chalcogenide (PbX) nanoparticles are promising materials for solar energy conversion. However, the presence of trap states in their electronic gap limits their usability, and developing a universal strategy to remove trap states is a persistent challenge. Using calculations based on density functional theory, we show that hydrogen acts as an amphoteric impurity on PbX nanoparticle surfaces; hydrogen atoms may passivate defects arising from ligand imbalance or off-stoichiometric surface terminations, irrespective of whether they originate from cation or anion excess. In addition, we show, using constrained density functional theory calculations, that hydrogen treatment of defective nanoparticles is also beneficial for charge transport in films. We also find that hydrogen adsorption on stoichiometric nanoparticles leads to electronic doping, preferentially n-type. Our findings suggest that post-synthesis hydrogen treatment of lead chalcogenide nanoparticle films is a viable approach to reduce electronic trap states or to dope well-passivated films. Work supported by the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (NB) and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 (MV).

  17. Formation of surface nanolayers in chalcogenide crystals using coherent laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozga, K.; Fedorchuk, A. O.; El-Naggar, A. M.; Albassam, A. A.; Kityk, V.

    2018-03-01

    We have shown a possibility to form laser modified surface nanolayers with thickness up to 60 nm in some ternary chalcogenide crystals (Ag3AsS3, Ag3SbS3, Tl3SbS3) The laser treatment was performed by two coherent laser beams split in a space. As the inducing lasers we have applied continuous wave (cw) Hesbnd Cd laser at wavelength 441 nm and doubled frequency cw Nd: YAG laser at 532 nm. The spectral energies of these lasers were higher with respect to the energy gaps of the studied crystals. The optical anisotropy was appeared and defected by monitoring of birefringence at probing wavelength of cw Hesbnd Ne laser at λ = 3390 nm. The changes of the laser stimulated near the surface layer morphology was monitored by TEM and AFM methods as well as by the reflected optical second harmonic generation at fundamental wavelength of microsecond CO2 laser generating at wavelength 10600 nm. This technique may open a new approach for the formation of the near the surface nanolayers in chalcogenides using external cw laser illumination.

  18. Synthesis and properties of new CdSe-AgI-As2Se3 chalcogenide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, M.; Le Coq, D.; Fourmentin, M.; Hindle, F.; Bokova, M.; Cuisset, A.; Masselin, P.; Bychkov, E.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Determination of the glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdSe-AgI-As 2 Se 3 system. → Characterization of macroscopic properties of the new CdSe-AgI-As 2 Se 3 glasses. → Far infrared transmission of chalcogenide glasses. → Characterization of the total conductivity of CdSe-AgI-As 2 Se 3 glasses. -- Abstract: The glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdSe-AgI-As 2 Se 3 system was determined. Measurements including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), density, and X-ray diffraction were performed. The effect resulting from the addition of CdSe or AgI has been highlighted by examining three series of different base glasses. The characteristic temperatures of the glass samples, including glass transition (T g ), crystallisation (T x ), and melting (T m ) temperatures are reported and used to calculate their ΔT = T x - T g and their Hruby, H r = (T x - T g )/(T m - T x ), criteria. Evolution of the total electrical conductivity σ and the room temperature conductivity σ 298 was also studied. The terahertz transparency domain in the 50-600 cm -1 region was pointed for different chalcogenide glasses (ChGs) and the potential of the THz spectroscopy was suggested to obtain structural information on ChGs.

  19. Temperature and frequency response of conductivity in Ag2S doped chalcogenide glassy semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Swarupa; Das, Anindya Sundar; Roy, Madhab; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2018-06-01

    The electric conductivity of chalcogenide glassy semiconductor xAg2S-(1-x)(0.5S-0.5Te) has been presented here as a function of temperature and frequency. Formation of different nanocrystallites has been confirmed from X-ray diffraction study. It is also noteworthy that average size of nanocrystallites decreases with the increase of dislocation density. Dc conductivity data have been interpreted using Mott's model and Greaves's model in low and high temperature regions respectively. Ac conductivity above the room temperature has been analyzed using Meyer-Neldel (MN) conduction rule. It is interestingly noted that Correlated Barrier Hopping (CBH) model is the most appropriate conduction mechanism for x = 0.35, where pairs of charge carrier are considered to hop over the potential barrier between the sites via thermal activation. To interpret experimental data for x = 0.45, modified non-overlapping small polaron tunnelling (NSPT) model is supposed to be appropriate model due to tunnelling through grain boundary. The conductivity spectra at various temperatures have been analyzed using Almond-West Formalism (power law model). Scaling of conductivity spectra reveals that electrical relaxation process of charge carriers (polaron) is temperature independent but depends upon the composition of the present chalcogenide glassy system.

  20. Structural and electronic properties of high pressure phases of lead chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John; Scolfaro, Luisa; Myers, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Lead chalcogenides, most notably PbTe and PbSe, have become an active area of research due to their thermoelectric properties. The high figure of merit (ZT) of these materials has brought much attention to them, due to their ability to convert waste heat into electricity. Variation in synthesis conditions gives rise to a need for analysis of structural and thermoelectric properties of these materials at different pressures. In addition to the NaCl structure at ambient conditions, lead chalcogenides have a dynamic orthorhombic (Pnma) intermediate phase and a higher pressure yet stable CsCl phase. By altering the lattice constant, we simulate the application of external pressure; this has notable effects on ground state total energy, band gap, and structural phase. Using the General Gradient Approximation (GGA) in Density Functional Theory (DFT), we calculate the phase transition pressures by finding the differences in enthalpy from total energy calculations. For each phase, elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and hardness are calculated, using two different approaches. In addition to structural properties, we analyze the band structure and density of states at varying pressures, paying special note to thermoelectric implications.

  1. Pressure dependence of crystal field splitting in Pr pnictides and chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirber, J.E.; Weaver, H.T.; Ginley, D.S.

    1978-01-01

    We have measured the pressure dependence of the Pr nuclear magnetic resonance shift in PrN, PrP, PrSb, PrAs, PrS and PrSe. The shifts in all the pnictides increase while in the chalcogenides the shifts decrease with pressure. The rare earth frequency shift is inversely proportional to the crystal field splitting in the context of the point charge model (PCM) so a decrease would be expected for all of these materials at a rate of 5/3 the volume compressibility. Our values for the pnictides tend to be considerably larger than the PCM value as well as the wrong sign. The chalcogenide values are much nearer in magnitude and are of the right sign for the PCM. Contrary to the report of Guertin et al. we see no anomaly in the pressure dependence of the susceptibility of PrS. The fact that PrN which is reported to be non-metallic also shows the wrong sign for the PCM presents difficulties for various conduction electron explanations for this unexpected behavior of the pnictides

  2. Characterization and modeling of microstructured chalcogenide fibers for efficient mid-infrared wavelength conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Sida; Grassani, Davide; Kharitonov, Svyatoslav; Billat, Adrien; Brès, Camille-Sophie

    2016-05-02

    We experimentally demonstrate wavelength conversion in the 2 µm region by four-wave mixing in an AsSe and a GeAsSe chalcogenide photonic crystal fibers. A maximum conversion efficiency of -25.4 dB is measured for 112 mW of coupled continuous wave pump in a 27 cm long fiber. We estimate the dispersion parameters and the nonlinear refractive indexes of the chalcogenide PCFs, establishing a good agreement with the values expected from simulations. The different fiber geometries and glass compositions are compared in terms of performance, showing that GeAsSe is a more suited candidate for nonlinear optics at 2 µm. Building from the fitted parameters we then propose a new tapered GeAsSe PCF geometry to tailor the waveguide dispersion and lower the zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) closer to the 2 µm pump wavelength. Numerical simulations shows that the new design allows both an increased conversion efficiency and bandwidth, and the generation of idler waves further in the mid-IR regions, by tuning the pump wavelength in the vicinity of the fiber ZDW.

  3. Thermal, electronic and ductile properties of lead-chalcogenides under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dinesh C; Bhat, Idris Hamid

    2013-09-01

    Fully relativistic pseudo-potential ab-initio calculations have been performed to investigate the high pressure phase transition, elastic and electronic properties of lead-chalcogenides including the less known lead polonium. The calculated ground state parameters, for the rock-salt structure show good agreement with the experimental data. PbS, PbSe, PbTe and PbPo undergo a first-order phase transition from rock-salt to CsCl structure at 19.4, 15.5, 11.5 and 7.3 GPa, respectively. The elastic properties have also been calculated. The calculations successfully predicted the location of the band gap at L-point of Brillouin zone and the band gap for each material at ambient pressure. It is observed that unlike other lead-chalcogenides, PbPo is semi-metal at ambient pressure. The pressure variation of the energy gap indicates that these materials metalize under pressure. The electronic structures of these materials have been computed in parent as well as in high pressure B2 phase.

  4. Electrical properties and figures of merit for new chalcogenide-based thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, J L; Hogan, T P; Brazis, P W; Kannewurf, C R; Chung, D Y; Kanatzidis, M G

    1997-07-01

    New Bi-based chalcogenide compounds have been prepared using the polychalcogenide flux technique for crystal growth. These materials exhibit characteristics of good thermoelectric materials. Single crystals of the compound CsBi{sub 4}Te{sub 6} have shown conductivity as high as 2440 S/cm with a p-type thermoelectric power of {approx}+110 {micro}V/K at room temperature. A second compound, {beta}-K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13} shows lower conductivity {approx}240 S/cm, but a larger n-type thermopower {approx}{minus}200 {micro}V/K. Thermal transport measurements have been performed on hot-pressed pellets of these materials and the results show comparable or lower thermal conductivities than Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. This improvement may reflect the reduced lattice symmetry of the new chalcogenide thermoelectrics. The thermoelectric figure of merit for CsBi{sub 4}Te{sub 6} reaches ZT {approx} 0.32 at 260 K and for {beta}-K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13} ZT {approx} 0.32 at room temperature, indicating that these compounds are viable candidates for thermoelectric refrigeration applications.

  5. Solution processing of chalcogenide materials using thiol-amine "alkahest" solvent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carrie L; Brutchey, Richard L

    2017-05-02

    Macroelectronics is a major focus in electronics research and is driven by large area applications such as flat panel displays and thin film solar cells. Innovations for these technologies, such as flexible substrates and mass production, will require efficient and affordable semiconductor processing. Low-temperature solution processing offers mild deposition methods, inexpensive processing equipment, and the possibility of high-throughput processing. In recent years, the discovery that binary "alkahest" mixtures of ethylenediamine and short chain thiols possess the ability to dissolve bulk inorganic materials to yield molecular inks has lead to the wide study of such systems and the straightforward recovery of phase pure crystalline chalcogenide thin films upon solution processing and mild annealing of the inks. In this review, we recount the work that has been done toward elucidating the scope of this method for the solution processing of inorganic materials for use in applications such as photovoltaic devices, electrocatalysts, photodetectors, thermoelectrics, and nanocrystal ligand exchange. We also take stock of the wide range of bulk materials that can be used as soluble precursors, and discuss the work that has been done to reveal the nature of the dissolved species. This method has provided a vast toolbox of over 65 bulk precursors, which can be utilized to develop new routes to functional chalcogenide materials. Future studies in this area should work toward a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the dissolution and recovery of bulk materials, as well as broadening the scope of soluble precursors and recoverable functional materials for innovative applications.

  6. Efficiency simulations of thin film chalcogenide photovoltaic cells for different indoor lighting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnaert, B.; Veelaert, P.

    2011-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) energy is an efficient natural energy source for outdoor applications. However, for indoor applications, the efficiency of PV cells is much lower. Typically, the light intensity under artificial lighting conditions is less than 10 W/m 2 as compared to 100-1000 W/m 2 under outdoor conditions. Moreover, the spectrum is different from the outdoor solar spectrum. In this context, the question arises whether thin film chalcogenide photovoltaic cells are suitable for indoor use. This paper contributes to answering that question by comparing the power output of different thin film chalcogenide solar cells with the classical crystalline silicon cell as reference. The comparisons are done by efficiency simulation based on the quantum efficiencies of the solar cells and the light spectra of typical artificial light sources i.e. an LED lamp, a 'warm' and a 'cool' fluorescent tube and a common incandescent and halogen lamp, which are compared to the outdoor AM 1.5 spectrum as reference.

  7. Achievements in the field of thermophysics of pniktides and chalcogenides of transition elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrum, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    Thermophysical aspects of thermodynamics of chalcogenides of transition metals are analyzed briefly with the aim of development of concepts on connection of these compounds entropy with their structure, expressed by Grenvold and Westrum in 1962. In a more detail way discussed are the achievement in the field of low-temperature thermophysics of pniktides of transition metals permitting to consider the similarity and the differences in properties of the two compound classes mentioned above. The characteristics of chalcogenides and pniktides, obtained by the method of low-temperature calorimetry and by the method of high-temperature adiabatic calorimetry as well, are considered. A more detail estimate is made of the heat capacity component caused by expansion (that is of the most importance while considering the high-temperature data on heat capacity). The effect of energy levels of ions and atoms on heat capacity and a number of other problems are also considered. The approach to solution of these problems is illustrated on experimental data for a number of compounds, such as marcasite (FeS 2 ), low-temperature digenite (Csub(1.80)S), CoFe 2 , arsenides and antimonides of a number of metals (FeSb 2 , CrSb 2 , CrAs 2 , U 2 As 4 , U 3 Sb 4 , USb 2 , UAs 2 )

  8. Hydrazine-hydrothermal method to synthesize three-dimensional chalcogenide framework for photocatalytic hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yi; Kanhere, Pushkar D.; Wong, Chui Ling; Tian Yuefeng; Feng Yuhua; Boey, Freddy; Wu, Tom; Chen Hongyu; White, Tim J.; Chen Zhong; Zhang Qichun

    2010-01-01

    A novel chalcogenide, [Mn 2 Sb 2 S 5 (N 2 H 4 ) 3 ] (1), has been synthesized by the hydrazine-hydrothermal method. X-ray crystallography study reveals that the new compound 1 crystallizes in space group P1-bar (no. 2) of the triclinic system. The structure features an open neutral three-dimensional framework, where two-dimensional mesh-like inorganic layers are bridged by intra- and inter-layer hydrazine ligands. Both two Mn1 and Mn2 sites adopt distorted octahedral coordination. While two Sb1 and Sb2 sites exhibit two different coordination geometries, the Sb1 site is coordinated with three S atoms to generate a SbS 3 trigonal-pyramidal geometry, and the Sb2 site adopts a SbS 4 trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry. It has an optical band gap of about ∼2.09 eV, which was deduced from the diffuse reflectance spectrum, and displays photocatalytic behaviors under visible light irradiation. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show compound 1 obeys the Curie-Weiss law in the range of 50-300 K. -- Graphical abstract: A novel chalcogenide, [Mn 2 Sb 2 S 5 (N 2 H 4 ) 3 ] (1), synthesized by hydrazine-hydrothermal method, has a band gap of about ∼2.09 eV and displays photocatalytic behaviors under visible light irradiation. Display Omitted

  9. Towards efficient solar-to-hydrogen conversion: Fundamentals and recent progress in copper-based chalcogenide photocathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yubin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectrochemical (PEC water splitting for hydrogen generation has been considered as a promising route to convert and store solar energy into chemical fuels. In terms of its large-scale application, seeking semiconductor photoelectrodes with high efficiency and good stability should be essential. Although an enormous number of materials have been explored for solar water splitting in the last several decades, challenges still remain for the practical application. P-type copper-based chalcogenides, such as Cu(In, GaSe2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have shown impressive performance in photovoltaics due to narrow bandgaps, high absorption coefficients, and good carrier transport properties. The obtained high efficiencies in photovoltaics have promoted the utilization of these materials into the field of PEC water splitting. A comprehensive review on copper-based chalcogenides for solar-to-hydrogen conversion would help advance the research in this expanding area. This review will cover the physicochemical properties of copper-based chalco-genides, developments of various photocathodes, strategies to enhance the PEC activity and stability, introductions of tandem PEC cells, and finally, prospects on their potential for the practical solar-to-hydrogen conversion. We believe this review article can provide some insights of fundamentals and applications of copper-based chalco-genide thin films for PEC water splitting.

  10. Nonlinear optical response of chalcogenide glassy semiconductors in the IR and THz ranges studied with the femtosecond resolution in time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanova, E.; Guizard, S.; Wang, Tianwu

    2017-01-01

    Two time-resolved experimental methods have been used for characterization of the non-linear optical response of chalcogenide glasses of the system As-S-Se-Te in IR and THz ranges upon excitation by femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm wavelength. Photoinduced conductivity and refractivity were stu...

  11. Chemical sensors in natural water: peculiarities of behaviour of chalcogenide glass electrodes for determination of copper, lead and cadmium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seleznev, B.L.; Legin, A.V.; Vlasov, Yu.G.

    1996-01-01

    Specific features of chemical sensors (chalcogenide glass and crystal ion-selective electrodes) behaviour have been studied to determine copper (2), lead, cadmium and fluorine in the course of in situ measurements, including long-term uninterrupted testing, for solving the problem of inspection over natural water contamination. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Exploring Mercury: The Iron Planet

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Planet Mercury is both difficult to observe and difficult to reach by spacecraft. Just one spacecraft, Mariner 10, flew by the planet 30 years ago. An upcoming NASA mission, MESSENGER, will be launched this year and will go into orbit around Mercury at the end of this decade. A European mission is planned for the following decade. It's worth going there because Mercury is a strange body and the history of planetary exploration has taught us that strangeness gives us insight into planetary ori...

  13. Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Guan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role of chelating agents against mercury poisoning, which provides a promising research direction for broader application of chelation therapy in prevention and treatment of mercury poisoning.

  14. MESSENGER'S First Flyby of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th close flyby of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER'S first flyby on January 14th, 2008 will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

  15. Distribution and retention of organic and inorganic mercury in methyl mercury-treated neonatal rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.J.; Fisher, H.L.; Sumler, M.R.; Hall, L.L.; Mushak, P.

    1988-01-01

    Seven-day-old Long Evans rats received one mumol of 203 Hg-labeled methyl mercury/kg sc and whole body retention and tissue distribution of organic and inorganic mercury were examined for 32 days postdosing. Neonates cleared mercury slowly until 10 days postdosing when the clearance rate abruptly increased. During the interval when whole body clearance of mercury was extremely slow, methyl mercury was metabolized to inorganic mercury. Peak concentration of mercury in kidney occurred at 2 days postdosing. At 32 days postdosing, 8% of mercury in kidney was in an organic from. Liver mercury concentration peaked at 2 days postdosing and organic mercury accounted for 38% at 32 days postdosing. Brain concentrations of mercury peaked at 2 days postdosing. At 10 days postdosing, organic mercury accounted for 86% of the brain mercury burden, and, at 32 days postdosing, for 60%. The percentage of mercury body burden in pelt rose from 30 to 70% between 1 and 10 days postdosing. At 32 days postdosing pelt contained 85% of the body burden of mercury. At all time points, about 95% of mercury in pelt was in an organic form. Compartmental analysis of these data permitted development of a model to describe the distribution and excretion of organic and inorganic mercury in methyl mercury-treated neonatal rats

  16. Modification of band gaps and optoelectronic properties of binary calcium chalcogenides by means of doping of magnesium atom(s) in rock-salt phase- a first principle based theoretical initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Bimal; Sarkar, Utpal; Debbarma, Manish; Bhattacharjee, Rahul; Chattopadhyaya, Surya

    2018-02-01

    The band gaps and optoelectronic properties of binary calcium chalcogenide semiconductors have been modified theoretically by doping magnesium atom(s) into their respective rock-salt unit cells at some specific concentrations x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0 and confirmed such modifications by studying their structural, electronic and optical properties using DFT based FP-LAPW approach. The WC-GGA functional is used to calculate structural properties, while mBJ, B3LYP and WC-GGA are used for calculating electronic and optical properties. The concentration dependences of lattice parameter, bulk modulus and fundamental band gap for each alloy system exhibit nonlinearity. The atomic and orbital origin of different electronic states in the band structure of each compound are explored from its density of states (DOS). The microscopic origin of band gap bowing for each of the alloy systems is explored in terms of volume deformation, charge exchange and structural relaxation. The chemical bonds between the constituent atoms in each compound are found as ionic in nature. Optical properties of each specimen are calculated from its computed spectra of dielectric function, refractive index, extinction coefficient, normal incidence reflectivity, optical conductivity, optical absorption and energy loss function. Several calculated results have been compared with available experimental and other theoretical data.

  17. The Use of Bacteria for Remediation of Mercury Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many processes of mercury transformation in the environment are bacteria mediated. Mercury properties cause some difficulties of remediation of mercury contaminated environment. Despite the significance of the problem of mercury pollution, methods of large scale bioremediation ...

  18. General Top-Down Ion Exchange Process for the Growth of Epitaxial Chalcogenide Thin Films and Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2016-12-30

    We demonstrate a versatile top-down ion exchange process, done at ambient temperature, to form epitaxial chalcogenide films and devices, with nanometer scale thickness control. To demonstrate the versatility of our process we have synthesized (1) epitaxial chalcogenide metallic and semiconducting films and (2) free-standing chalcogenide films and (3) completed in situ formation of atomically sharp heterojunctions by selective ion exchange. Epitaxial NiCo2S4 thin films prepared by our process show 115 times higher mobility than NiCo2S4 pellets (23 vs 0.2 cm(2) V-1 s(-1)) prepared by previous reports. By controlling the ion exchange process time, we made free-standing epitaxial films of NiCo2S4 and transferred them onto different substrates. We also demonstrate in situ formation of atomically sharp, lateral Schottky diodes based on NiCo2O4/NiCo2S4 heterojunction, using a single ion exchange step. Additionally, we show that our approach can be easily extended to other chalcogenide semiconductors. Specifically, we used our process to prepare Cu1.8S thin films with mobility that matches single crystal Cu1.8S (25 cm(2) V-1 s(-1)), which is ca. 28 times higher than the previously reported Cu1.8S thin film mobility (0.58 cm(2) V-1 s(-1)), thus demonstrating the universal nature of our process. This is the first report in which chalcogenide thin films retain the epitaxial nature of the precursor oxide films, an approach that will be useful in many applications.

  19. Elimination of mercury in health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Mercury is a persistent, bioaccumulative toxin that has been linked to numerous health effects in humans and wildlife. It is a potent neurotoxin that may also harm the brain, kidneys, and lungs. Unborn children and young infants are at particular risk for brain damage from mercury exposure. Hospitals' use of mercury in chemical solutions, thermometers, blood pressure gauges, batteries, and fluorescent lamps makes these facilities large contributors to the overall emission of mercury into the environment. Most hospitals recognize the dangers of mercury. In a recent survey, four out of five hospitals stated that they have policies in place to eliminate the use of mercury-containing products. Sixty-two percent of them require vendors to disclose the presence of mercury in chemicals that the hospitals purchase. Only 12 percent distribute mercury-containing thermometers to new parents. Ninety-two percent teach their employees about the health and environmental effects of mercury, and 46 percent teach all employees how to clean up mercury spills. However, the same study showed that many hospitals have not implemented their policies. Forty-two percent were not aware whether they still purchased items containing mercury. In addition, 49 percent still purchase mercury thermometers, 44 percent purchase mercury gastrointestinal diagnostic equipment, and 64 percent still purchase mercury lab thermometers.

  20. Mercury pollution: a transdisciplinary treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zuber, Sharon L; Newman, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    .... Also included are smaller case studies, such as the Minamata tragedy, fish consumption, and international treaties"-- "Mercury is the gravest chemical pollutant problem of our time, and this is...

  1. Mercury contamination in the Amazon

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Nancy Minogue

    contamination is mainly caused by deforestation upstream. ... The team expected to find that the mercury levels in the water, sediment, and soil decreased as they ... Methylmercury poisoning — known as Minamata Disease after the Japanese ...

  2. Mercury absorption in aqueous hypochlorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, L.L.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    The absorption of elemental Hg vapor into aqueous hypochlorite was measured in a stirred tank reactor at 25 and 55C. NaOCl strongly absorbs Hg even at high pH. Low pH, high Cl - and high-temperature favor mercury absorption. Aqueous free Cl 2 was the active species that reacted with mercury. However, chlorine desorption was evident at high Cl - and pH 15 M -1 s -1 at 25C and 1.4x10 17 M -1 s -1 at 55C. Gas-phase reaction was observed between Hg and Cl 2 on apparatus surfaces. Strong mercury absorption in water was also detected with Cl 2 present. Results indicate that the chlorine concentration, moisture, and surface area contribute positively to mercury removal. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Origin and composition of Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The predictions of the expected range of composition of Mercury at the time of its formation made on the basis of a suite of condensation-accretion models of Mercury spanning a range of condensation temperature and accretion sampling functions appropriate to Mercury are examined. It is concluded that these compositonal models can, if modified to take into account the nonselective loss of most of the silicate component of the planet during accretion, provide compositional predictions for the Weidenschilling (1978, 1980) mechanism for the accretion of a metal-rich Mercury. The silicate portion would, in this case, contain 3.6 to 4.5 percent alumina, roughly 1 percent of alkali oxides, and between 0.5 and 6 percent FeO

  4. Localized surface plasmon resonance mercury detection system and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jay; Lucas, Donald; Crosby, Jeffrey Scott; Koshland, Catherine P.

    2016-03-22

    A mercury detection system that includes a flow cell having a mercury sensor, a light source and a light detector is provided. The mercury sensor includes a transparent substrate and a submonolayer of mercury absorbing nanoparticles, e.g., gold nanoparticles, on a surface of the substrate. Methods of determining whether mercury is present in a sample using the mercury sensors are also provided. The subject mercury detection systems and methods find use in a variety of different applications, including mercury detecting applications.

  5. Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Palanisamy, Giri; Green, James; Wilson, Bruce; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris

    2010-06-01

    Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily)harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

  6. Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bruce E.; Palanisamy, Giri; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris; Green, James

    2010-01-01

    Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily) harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

  7. Thermal conductivities and conduction mechanisms of Sb-Te Alloys at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Rui; Endo, Rie; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Susa, Masahiro; Kuwahara, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    Sb-Te alloys have drawn much attention due to its application in phase change memory as well as the unique properties as chalcogenide. In this work, the thermal conductivities of Sb-x mol%Te alloys (x = 14, 25, 44, 60, 70, and 90) have been measured by the hot strip method from room temperature up to temperature just below the respective melting points. For the intermetallic compound Sb 2 Te 3 (x = 60), the thermal conductivity decreases up to approximately 600 K and then increases. For other Sb-x mol%Te alloys where x > 60, the thermal conductivities of the alloys decrease with increasing temperature. In contrast, for x < 60, the thermal conductivities of the alloys keep roughly constant up to approximately 600 K and then increase with increasing temperature. It is proposed that free electron dominates the heat transport below 600 K, and ambipolar diffusion also contributes to the increase in the thermal conductivity at higher temperatures. The prediction equation from temperature and chemical composition has been proposed for thermal conductivities of Sb-Te alloys.

  8. Superconducting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to superconductors having high critical currents. The superconductor described comprises an alloy consisting of a matrix of a Type II superconductor which is a homogeneous mixture of 50 to 95 at.% Pb and 5 to 40 at.%Bi and/or 10 to 50 at.%In. Dispersed in the matrix is a material to provide pinning centres comprising from 0.01% to 20% by volume of the alloy; this material is a stable discontinuous phase of discrete crystalline particles of Cu, Mn, Te, Se, Ni, Ca, Cr, Ce, Ge or La, either in the form of the element or a compound with a component of the matrix. These particles should have an average diameter of not more than 2μ. A method for making this alloy is described. (U.K.)

  9. Structural, optical and electrical characterization of Ag doped lead chalcogenide (PbSe) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ghamdi, A.A., E-mail: aghamdi90@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Al-Heniti, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Shamshad A. [Department of Physics, St. Andrew' s College, Gorakhpur, UP (India)

    2013-03-15

    Research and development efforts are currently underway to fabricate a variety of solid state devices. A good deal of information regarding the synthesis, structural, optical and electrical properties of Ag doped lead chalcogenides have been revealed. The bulk polycrystalline (PbSe){sub 100-x}Ag{sub x} ternary chalcogenides are prepared by diffusion technique. The XRD patterns recorded for the (PbSe){sub 100-x}Ag{sub x} thin films prepared by vacuum deposition technique, show that these films are polycrystalline in nature. The optical measurements reveal that the (PbSe){sub 100-x}Ag{sub x} thin films possess direct band gap and the band gap energy decreases with an increase of Ag concentration. The extinction coefficient (k) and refractive index (n) are found to be changing by increasing Ag concentration in PbSe. These results are interpreted in terms of the change in concentration of localized states due to the shift in Fermi level. The dc conductivities of (PbSe){sub 100-x}Ag{sub x} thin films are measured in temperature range 303-403 K. It is observed that the dc conductivity increases at all the temperatures with an increase of Ag content in PbSe system. The experimental data suggests that the conduction is due to thermally assisted tunneling of the charge carriers in the localized states near the band edges. The activation energy and optical band gap are found to decrease with increasing Ag concentration in lead chalcogenide and there are good agreements between these two values. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (PbSe){sub 100-x}Ag{sub x} thin films has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polycrystalline nature has been verified by X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical absorption data showed the rules of direct transitions predominate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dc conductivity increases with an increase of Ag content in PbSe system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase of Ag concentration causes a decrease in E{sub g

  10. The activation of aluminium by mercury ions in non-aggressive media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessone, J.B. [INIEC-Dto de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)]. E-mail: jbessone@criba.edu.ar

    2006-12-15

    The presence of Hg at concentration less than 300 ppm in Al base alloys causes their passivation breakdown. On alloys used as sacrificial anodes, it causes a major lowering (>0.3 V) in their operational potential in chloride media. Mercury as trace constituent in the natural gas stream causes severe damage to cryogenic heat exchangers. The present paper presents evidences of the mechanism by which mercury produces its pronounced effect in aqueous non-aggressive media. The work was carried out using pure (99.99%) aluminium and mercury (II) acetate solutions of different concentrations and pH. Open circuit potential-time responses were obtained. The surface effects were followed by means of scanning microscopy and EDAX/X-Ray analysis. The results demonstrate that immediately after immersion, the initial air-formed oxide film underwent a dynamic crack-healing process at flaws in the film, possible associated to grain boundaries. The subsequent healing process, if any, depends on the media composition. Thus, in this special case, Hg{sup 2+} ions can be directly reduced on the bare aluminium, reaching a true metallic contact, and initiating surface diffusion. This enables the formation of an amalgam. Aluminium atoms diffuse through the liquid mercury and undergo oxidation at the amalgam/electrolyte interface. This process is responsible for the oxide detachment (by undermining) and the attack morphology (i.e., wide cavities). The presence of aggressive anions is not needed to initiate activation.

  11. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer plants to

  12. Autometallographic tracing of mercury in frog liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loumbourdis, N.S.; Danscher, G.

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of mercury in the liver of the frog Rana ridibunda with the autometallographic method was investigated. The mercury specific autometallographic (HgS/Se AMG ) technique is a sensitive histochemical approach for tracing mercury in tissues from mercury-exposed organisms. Mercury accumulates in vivo as mercury sulphur/mercury selenium nanocrystals that can be silver-enhanced. Thus, only a fraction of the Hg can be visualized. Six animals were exposed for one day and another group of six animals for 6 days in 1 ppm mercury (as HgCI 2 ) dissolved in fresh water. A third group of six animals, served as controls, were sacrificed the day of arrival at the laboratory. First, mercury appears in the blood plasma and erythrocytes. Next, mercury moves to hepatocytes and in the apical part of the cells, that facing bile canaliculi. In a next step, mercury appears in the endothelial and Kupffer cells. It seems likely that, the mercury of hepatocytes moves through bile canaliculi to the gut, most probably bound to glutathione and/or other similar ligands. Most probably, the endothelial and Kupffer cells comprise the first line of defense against metal toxicity. - Frogs can be good bioindicators of mercury

  13. Silicon Alloying On Aluminium Based Alloy Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanto

    2002-01-01

    Silicon alloying on surface of aluminium based alloy was carried out using electron beam. This is performed in order to enhance tribological properties of the alloy. Silicon is considered most important alloying element in aluminium alloy, particularly for tribological components. Prior to silicon alloying. aluminium substrate were painted with binder and silicon powder and dried in a furnace. Silicon alloying were carried out in a vacuum chamber. The Silicon alloyed materials were assessed using some techniques. The results show that silicon alloying formed a composite metal-non metal system in which silicon particles are dispersed in the alloyed layer. Silicon content in the alloyed layer is about 40% while in other place is only 10.5 %. The hardness of layer changes significantly. The wear properties of the alloying alloys increase. Silicon surface alloying also reduced the coefficient of friction for sliding against a hardened steel counter face, which could otherwise be higher because of the strong adhesion of aluminium to steel. The hardness of the silicon surface alloyed material dropped when it underwent a heating cycle similar to the ion coating process. Hence, silicon alloying is not a suitable choice for use as an intermediate layer for duplex treatment

  14. Laser deposition rates of thin films of selected metals and alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen

    Thin films of Cu, Zn and Sn as well as mixtures of these elements have been produced by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). The deposition rate of single and multicomponent metallic targets was determined. The strength of PLD is that the stoichiometry of complex compounds, even of complicated alloys...... or metal oxides, can be preserved from target to film. We apply this technique to design films of a mixture of Cu, Zn and Sn, which are constituents of the chalcogenide CZTS, which has a composition close to Cu2ZnSnS4. This compound is expected to be an important candidate for absorbers in new solar cells...... for alloys of the different elements as well as compounds with S will be presented....

  15. Mercury: Aspects of its ecology and environmental toxicity. [physiological effects of mercury compound contamination of environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of mercury pollution on the environment. The possible sources of mercury contamination in sea water are identified. The effects of mercury on food sources, as represented by swordfish, are analyzed. The physiological effects of varying concentrations of mercury are reported. Emphasis is placed on the situation existing in the Hawaiian Islands.

  16. 76 FR 13851 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali...-5] RIN 2060-AN99 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Supplemental...

  17. Groundwater Modeling Of Mercury Pollution At A Former Mercury Cell Chlor Alkali Facility In Pavoldar, Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Kazakhstan, there is a serious case of mercury pollution near the city of Pavlodar from an old mercury cell chlor-alkali plant. The soil, sediment, and water is severly contaminated with mercury and mercury compounds as a result of the industrial activity of this chemical pla...

  18. Investigation of transient photoresponse of WSSe ternary alloy crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Payal; Solanki, G. K.; Tannarana, Mohit; Pataniya, Pratik; Patel, K. D.; Pathak, V. M.

    2018-05-01

    Transition metal chalcogenides have been studied intensively in recent time due to their tunability of electronic properties by compositional change, alloying and by transforming bulk material into crystalline 2D structure. These changes lead to the development of verities of next generation opto-electronic device applications such as solar cells, FETs and flexible detectors etc. In present work, we report growth and characterization of crystalline ternary alloy WSSe by direct vapour transport technique. A photodetector is constructed using grown crystals to study its transient photoresponse under polychromatic radiation. The WSSe crystals are mechanically exfoliated to thickness of 3 µm and the lateral dimension of prepared sample is 2.25 mm2. The time-resolved photoresponse is studied under polychromatic illumination of power density ranging from 10 to 40 mW/cm2. The photo response is also studied under different bias voltages ranging from 0.1 V to 0.5 V. The typical photodetector parameters i.e. photocurrent, rise and fall time, responsivity and sensitivity are evaluated and discussed in light of the ternary alloy composition.

  19. Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Oxide and Chalcogenide-Based Photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Farjana; Daeneke, Torben; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh; Ou, Jian Zhen

    2018-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal oxide and chalcogenide (TMO&C)-based photocatalysts have recently attracted significant attention for addressing the current worldwide challenges of energy shortage and environmental pollution. The ultrahigh surface area and unconventional physiochemical, electronic and optical properties of 2D TMO&Cs have been demonstrated to facilitate photocatalytic applications. This review provides a concise overview of properties, synthesis methods and applications of 2D TMO&C-based photocatalysts. Particular attention is paid on the emerging strategies to improve the abilities of light harvesting and photoinduced charge separation for enhancing photocatalytic performances, which include elemental doping, surface functionalization as well as heterojunctions with semiconducting and conductive materials. The future opportunities regarding the research pathways of 2D TMO&C-based photocatalysts are also presented. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Mid-infrared optical properties of chalcogenide glasses within tin-antimony-selenium ternary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruiqiang; Chen, Feifei; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Huang, Yicong; Song, Baoan; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Xianghua; Ji, Wei

    2017-10-16

    In this work, we investigated the mid-infrared (MIR) optical properties of selenide (Se-based) chalcogenide glasses (ChGs) within an As- and Ge-free system, namely the environment-friendly and low-cost tin-antimony-selenium (Sn-Sb-Se, SSS) ternary system, which has not been systematically studied to the best of our knowledge. As compared to ChGs within those conventional Se-based systems, SSS ChGs were found to exhibit extended infrared transmittance range as well as larger linear refractive index (n 0 ). Femtosecond Z-scan measurements show the presence of evident three-photon absorption from Urbach absorption of the SSS ChGs at MIR wavelength, which resonantly enhanced the nonlinear refractive behavior and resulted in large nonlinear refractive index (n 2 ).

  1. Low-phonon-frequency chalcogenide crystalline hosts for rare earth lasers operating beyond three microns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Nostrand, Michael C.; Krupke, William F.; Schunemann, Peter G.

    2000-01-01

    The invention comprises a RE-doped MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 crystalline gain medium, where M includes a divalent ion such as Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Pb, Eu, or Yb; A is selected from trivalent ions including Al, Ga, and In; X is one of the chalcogenide ions S, Se, and Te; and RE represents the trivalent rare earth ions. The MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 gain medium can be employed in a laser oscillator or a laser amplifier. Possible pump sources include diode lasers, as well as other laser pump sources. The laser wavelengths generated are greater than 3 microns, as becomes possible because of the low phonon frequency of this host medium. The invention may be used to seed optical devices such as optical parametric oscillators and other lasers.

  2. Electron irradiation induced reduction of the permittivity in chalcogenide glass (As2S3) thin film

    KAUST Repository

    San Roman Alerigi, Damian; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Zhang, Yaping; Yang, Xiaoming; Ben Slimane, Ahmed; Ng, Tien Khee; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Alsunaidi, Mohammad; Ooi, Boon S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of electron beam irradiation on the dielectric properties of As 2 S 3 chalcogenide glass. By means of low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy, we derive the permittivity function, its dispersive relation, and calculate the refractive index and absorption coefficients under the constant permeability approximation. The measured and calculated results show a heretofore unseen phenomenon: a reduction in the permittivity of ? 40 %. Consequently a reduction of the refractive index of 20%, hence, suggests a conspicuous change in the optical properties of the material under irradiation with a 300 keV electron beam. The plausible physical phenomena leading to these observations are discussed in terms of the homopolar and heteropolar bond dynamics under high energy absorption. The reported phenomena, exhibited by As 2 S 3-thin film, can be crucial for the development of photonics integrated circuits using electron beam irradiation method. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Valence band structure of binary chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors by high-resolution XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozyukhin, S.; Golovchak, R.; Kovalskiy, A.; Shpotyuk, O.; Jain, H.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study regularities in the formation of valence band electronic structure in binary As x Se 100−x , As x S 100−x , Ge x Se 100−x and Ge x S 100−x chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. It is shown that the highest occupied energetic states in the valence band of these materials are formed by lone pair electrons of chalcogen atoms, which play dominant role in the formation of valence band electronic structure of chalcogen-rich glasses. A well-expressed contribution from chalcogen bonding p electrons and more deep s orbitals are also recorded in the experimental valence band XPS spectra. Compositional dependences of the observed bands are qualitatively analyzed from structural and compositional points of view.

  4. Valence band structure of binary chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors by high-resolution XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyukhin, S., E-mail: sergkoz@igic.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Science, Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A. [Lehigh University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' (Ukraine); Jain, H. [Lehigh University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States)

    2011-04-15

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study regularities in the formation of valence band electronic structure in binary As{sub x}Se{sub 100-x}, As{sub x}S{sub 100-x}, Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} and Ge{sub x}S{sub 100-x} chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. It is shown that the highest occupied energetic states in the valence band of these materials are formed by lone pair electrons of chalcogen atoms, which play dominant role in the formation of valence band electronic structure of chalcogen-rich glasses. A well-expressed contribution from chalcogen bonding p electrons and more deep s orbitals are also recorded in the experimental valence band XPS spectra. Compositional dependences of the observed bands are qualitatively analyzed from structural and compositional points of view.

  5. Power-efficient production of photon pairs in a tapered chalcogenide microwire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer-Scott, Evan, E-mail: emeyersc@uwaterloo.ca; Dot, Audrey [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Ahmad, Raja; Li, Lizhu; Rochette, Martin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, 3480 University Street, Montréal, Québec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Jennewein, Thomas [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Quantum Information Science Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, 180 Dundas Street West, Suite 1400, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z8 (Canada)

    2015-02-23

    Using tapered fibers of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} chalcogenide glass, we produce photon pairs at telecommunication wavelengths with low pump powers. We found maximum coincidences-to-accidentals ratios of 2.13 ± 0.07 for degenerate pumping with 3.2 μW average power, and 1.33 ± 0.03 for non-degenerate pumping with 1.0 μW and 1.5 μW average power of the two pumps. Our results show that the ultrahigh nonlinearity in these microwires could allow single-photon pumping to produce photon pairs, enabling the production of large entangled states, heralding of single photons after lossy transmission, and photonic quantum information processing with nonlinear optics.

  6. Modeling of Mid-IR Amplifier Based on an Erbium-Doped Chalcogenide Microsphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An optical amplifier based on a tapered fiber and an Er3+-doped chalcogenide microsphere is designed and optimized. A dedicated 3D numerical model, which exploits the coupled mode theory and the rate equations, is used. The main transitions among the erbium energy levels, the amplified spontaneous emission, and the most important secondary transitions pertaining to the ion-ion interactions have been considered. Both the pump and signal beams are efficiently injected and obtained by a suitable design of the taper angle and the fiber-microsphere gap. Moreover, a good overlapping between the optical signals and the rare-earth-doped region is also obtained. In order to evaluate the amplifier performance in reduced computational time, the doped area is partitioned in sectors. The obtained simulation results highlight that a high-efficiency midinfrared amplification can be obtained by using a quite small microsphere.

  7. Ultrabroadband, Midinfrared Supercontinuum Generation in Dispersion Engineered As2Se3-Based Chalcogenide Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rim Cherif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small core As2Se3-based photonic crystal fibers (PCFs are accurately characterized for compact, high power, ultrabroadband, and coherent supercontinuum generation within few millimeters fiber length. Bandwidths of ~5.3 μm, 5 μm, and 3.2 μm were calculated for hole-to-hole spacings Λ= 3.5 μm, 4.5 μm, and 5.5 μm, respectively. The spectral broadening in the chalcogenide PCF is mainly caused by self-phase modulation and Raman-induced soliton self-frequency shift. The results show that small core As2Se3 PCFs are a promising candidate for mid-IR SCG up to ~8 μm.

  8. Trends in oxygen reduction and methanol activation on transition metal chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritsaris, Georgios A.; Norskov, Jens K.; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Oxygen electro-reduction reaction on chalcogen-containing transition metal surfaces. → Evaluation of catalytic performance with density functional theory. → Ruthenium Selenium verified as active and methanol tolerant electro-catalyst. → Water boils at -10000 K. - Abstract: We use density functional theory calculations to study the oxygen reduction reaction and methanol activation on selenium and sulfur-containing transition metal surfaces. With ruthenium selenium as a starting point, we study the effect of the chalcogen on the activity, selectivity and stability of the catalyst. Ruthenium surfaces with moderate content of selenium are calculated active for the oxygen reduction reaction, and insensitive to methanol. A significant upper limit for the activity of transition metal chalcogenides is estimated.

  9. Estimating optical feedback from a chalcogenide fiber in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jumpertz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The amount of optical feedback originating from a chalcogenide fiber used to couple light from a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser is evaluated experimentally. Threshold reduction measurements on the fibered laser, combined with an analytical study of a rate equations model of the laser under optical feedback, allow estimating the feedback strength between 11% and 15% depending on the fiber cleavage quality. While this remains below the frontier of the chaotic regime, it is sufficient to deeply modify the optical spectrum of a quantum cascade laser. Hence for applications such as gas spectroscopy, where the shape of the optical spectrum is of prime importance, the use of mid-infrared optical isolators may be necessary for fibered quantum cascade lasers to be fully exploited.

  10. Mid-infrared fiber-coupled supercontinuum spectroscopic imaging using a tapered chalcogenide photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg Petersen, Christian; Prtljaga, Nikola; Farries, Mark; Ward, Jon; Napier, Bruce; Lloyd, Gavin Rhys; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Stone, Nick; Bang, Ole

    2018-02-01

    We present the first demonstration of mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging of human tissue using a fiber-coupled supercontinuum source spanning from 2-7.5 μm. The supercontinuum was generated in a tapered large mode area chalcogenide photonic crystal fiber in order to obtain broad bandwidth, high average power, and single-mode output for good imaging properties. Tissue imaging was demonstrated in transmission by raster scanning over a sub-mm region of paraffinized colon tissue on CaF2 substrate, and the signal was measured using a fiber-coupled grating spectrometer. This demonstration has shown that we can distinguish between epithelial and surrounding connective tissues within a paraffinized section of colon tissue by imaging at discrete wavelengths related to distinct chemical absorption features.

  11. Preparation and intercalation study of ternary transition elements chalcogenides AxMXn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, M.

    1999-01-01

    The crystalline powders of transition elements chalcogenides have been prepared by solid-solid reaction method starting from elemental powders in evacuated and sealed quartz tubes heated at various temperatures depending on the compound to be prepared. The structures and composition of the obtained compounds have been studied by X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence techniques. Intercalation compounds Co x MX 2 have been obtained by heating the powder with elemental cobalt at 500 Centigrade. The results of the structural studies show that the intercalation of cobalt is a regular phenomena and the cobalt atoms play the role of staples for the layers constructing the crystalline structure of starting materials. This stapling phenomena is accompanied by changes in distance between the layers and therefore changes in the length of bonds between the elements of compound. The changes in the length of bonds have been confirmed by the results of FTIR studies.(author)

  12. Thermal Stability and Optical Activity of Erbium Doped Chalcogenide Glasses for Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, D.; Koughia, K.; Kasap, S. O.; Maeda, K.; Sakai, T.; Ikuta, J.; Ivanova, Z. G.

    The glass transition and crystallization temperatures (T g , T c ), heat capacity, thermal stability and glass uniformity of GeSGa, GeSeGa, Ge(SeTe)Ga chalcogenide glasses doped with Er3+ by the addition of Er2S3 have been investigated by conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Temperature-Modulated DSC (TMDSC). While some of the glasses have two crystallization peaks, these glasses were nonetheless optically actively and uniform. Essential optical properties have been evaluated, such as the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and lifetime as a function of the glass composition. We present typical results to emphasize some of the important characteristics of these systems and discuss trends within a glass system; and also highlight differences between glass systems.

  13. High pressure and temperature induced structural and elastic properties of lutetium chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriya, S.; Kinge, R.; Khenata, R.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2018-04-01

    The high-pressure structural phase transition and pressure as well temperature induced elastic properties of rock salt to CsCl structures in semiconducting LuX (X = S, Se, and Te) chalcogenides compound have been performed using effective interionic interaction potential with emphasis on charge transfer interactions and covalent contribution. Estimated values of phase transition pressure and the volume discontinuity in pressure-volume phase diagram indicate the structural phase transition from ZnS to NaCl structure. From the investigations of elastic constants the pressure (temperature) dependent volume collapse/expansion, melting temperature TM, Hardness (HV), and young modulus (E) the LuX lattice infers mechanical stiffening, and thermal softening.

  14. Mercury - the hollow planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothery, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury is turning out to be a planet characterized by various kinds of endogenous hole (discounting impact craters), which are compared here. These include volcanic vents and collapse features on horizontal scales of tens of km, and smaller scale depressions ('hollows') associated with bright crater-floor deposits (BCFD). The BCFD hollows are tens of metres deep and kilometres or less across and are characteristically flat-floored, with steep, scalloped walls. Their form suggests that they most likely result from removal of surface material by some kind of mass-wasting process, probably associated with volume-loss caused by removal (via sublimation?) of a volatile component. These do not appear to be primarily a result of undermining. Determining the composition of the high-albedo bluish surface coating in BCFDs will be a key goal for BepiColombo instruments such as MIXS (Mercury Imaging Xray Spectrometer). In contrast, collapse features are non-circular rimless pits, typically on crater floors (pit-floor craters), whose morphology suggests collapse into void spaces left by magma withdrawal. This could be by drainage of either erupted lava (or impact melt) or of shallowly-intruded magma. Unlike the much smaller-scale BCFD hollows, these 'collapse pit' features tend to lack extensive flat floors and instead tend to be close to triangular in cross-section with inward slopes near to the critical angle of repose. The different scale and morphology of BCFD hollows and collapse pits argues for quite different modes of origin. However, BCFD hollows adjacent to and within the collapse pit inside Scarlatti crater suggest that the volatile material whose loss was responsible for the growth of the hollows may have been emplaced in association with the magma whose drainage caused the main collapse. Another kind of volcanic collapse can be seen within a 25 km-wide volcanic vent outside the southern rim of the Caloris basin (22.5° N, 146.1° E), on a 28 m/pixel MDIS NAC image

  15. Mercury in dated Greenland marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmund, G.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty marine sediment cores from Greenland were analysed for mercury, and dated by the lead-210 method. In general the cores exhibit a mercury profile with higher mercury concentrations in the upper centimetres of the core. The cores were studied by linear regression of In Hg vs, age of the sedi......Twenty marine sediment cores from Greenland were analysed for mercury, and dated by the lead-210 method. In general the cores exhibit a mercury profile with higher mercury concentrations in the upper centimetres of the core. The cores were studied by linear regression of In Hg vs, age...... indicating that the mercury mainly originates from atmospheric washout. But the large variability indicates that other processes also influence the mercury flux to Arctic marine sediments. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  16. Sorption of mercury on chemically synthesized polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remya Devi, P.S.; Verma, R.; Sudersanan, M.

    2006-01-01

    Sorption of inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) and methyl mercury, on chemically synthesized polyaniline, in 0.1-10N HCl solutions has been studied. Hg 2+ is strongly sorbed at low acidities and the extent of sorption decreases with increase in acidity. The sorption of methyl mercury is very low in the HCl concentration range studied. Sorption of Hg 2+ on polyaniline in 0.1-10N LiCl and H 2 SO 4 solutions has also been studied. The analysis of the data indicates that the sorption of Hg 2+ depends on the degree of protonation of polyaniline and the nature of mercury(II) chloride complexes in solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (XPS) of polyaniline sorbed with mercury show that mercury is bound as Hg 2+ . Sorbed mercury is quantitatively eluted from polyaniline with 0.5N HNO 3 . Polyaniline can be used for separation and pre-concentration of inorganic mercury from aqueous samples. (author)

  17. Genetic effects of organic mercury compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramel, C

    1967-01-01

    Studies on the genetic and developmental effects of organic mercury compounds on lilies, drosophila, and ice were carried out. It was found that chromosomal and developmental abnormalities were correlated with the administration of mercury compounds.

  18. Mercury-Containing Devices and Demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some items inside residential buildings contain mercury, which poses a persistent and toxic human health and environmental threat. These materials should be carefully salvaged for proper recycling to prevent mercury contamination prior to demolition.

  19. EPA Leadership in the Global Mercury Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Global Mercury Partnership is a voluntary multi-stakeholder partnership initiated in 2005 to take immediate actions to protect human health and the environment from the releases of mercury and its compounds to the environment.

  20. Mercury in Thana creek, Bombay harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Desai, B.N.

    weight) with marked increased from harbour to the creek region suggests substantial mercury input in the head region. Chemical extraction by hydrogen peroxide indicated that more than 70% of mercury was leachable and probably organically bound...

  1. Mercury Lander Mission Concept Study Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, D. A.

    2018-05-01

    Provides a summary of the Mercury Lander Mission Concept Study performed as part of the last Planetary Decadal Survey. The presentation will focus on engineering trades and the challenges of developing a Mercury lander mission.

  2. Mercury Emission Measurement in Coal-Fired Boilers by Continuous Mercury Monitor and Ontario Hydro Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanqun; Zhou, Jinsong; He, Sheng; Cai, Xiaoshu; Hu, Changxin; Zheng, Jianming; Zhang, Le; Luo, Zhongyang; Cen, Kefa

    2007-06-01

    The mercury emission control approach attaches more importance. The accurate measurement of mercury speciation is a first step. Because OH method (accepted method) can't provide the real-time data and 2-week time for results attained, it's high time to seek on line mercury continuous emission monitors(Hg-CEM). Firstly, the gaseous elemental and oxidized mercury were conducted to measure using OH and CEM method under normal operation conditions of PC boiler after ESP, the results between two methods show good consistency. Secondly, through ESP, gaseous oxidized mercury decrease a little and particulate mercury reduce a little bit, but the elemental mercury is just the opposite. Besides, the WFGD system achieved to gaseous oxidized mercury removal of 53.4%, gaseous overall mercury and elemental mercury are 37.1% and 22.1%, respectively.

  3. Mid-infrared volume diffraction gratings in IG2 chalcogenide glass: fabrication, characterization, and theoretical verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Helen L.; MacLachlan, David G.; Lee, David; Brownsword, Richard A.; Thomson, Robert R.; Weidmann, Damien

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast laser inscription (ULI) has previously been employed to fabricate volume diffraction gratings in chalcogenide glasses, which operate in transmission mode in the mid-infrared spectral region. Prior gratings were manufactured for applications in astrophotonics, at wavelengths around 2.5 μm. Rugged volume gratings also have potential use in remote atmospheric sensing and molecular spectroscopy; for these applications, longer wavelength operation is required to coincide with atmospheric transparency windows (3-5 μm) and intense ro-vibrational molecular absorption bands. We report on ULI gratings inscribed in IG2 chalcogenide glass, enabling access to the full 3-5 μm window. High-resolution broadband spectral characterization of fabricated gratings was performed using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The zeroth order transmission was characterized to derive the diffraction efficiency into higher orders, up to the fourth orders in the case of gratings optimized for first order diffraction at 3 μm. The outcomes imply that ULI in IG2 is well suited for the fabrication of volume gratings in the mid infrared, providing the impact of the ULI fabrication parameters on the grating properties are well understood. To develop this understanding, grating modeling was conducted. Parameters studied include grating thickness, refractive index modification, and aspect ratio of the modulation achieved by ULI. Knowledge of the contribution and sensitivity of these parameters was used to inform the design of a 4.3 μm grating expected to achieve > 95% first order efficiency. We will also present the characterization of these latest mid-infrared diffraction gratings in IG2.

  4. Method for the removal and recovery of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterly, Clay E.; Vass, Arpad A.; Tyndall, Richard L.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

  5. Study of the environmental cycling of mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Frades, J P; Hildebrand, S G; Huckabee, J W; Murias, B; Diaz, F S; Wilson, R H

    1977-01-01

    A study of mercury in the environment is under way near the mercury mine at Almaden, Spain. The main aspects of the project are: ecology; atmospheric monitoring; and human studies. The mercury deposit at Almaden is described. The liquid effluent from the mine and smelter contains high concentrations of mercury that pollute nearby rivers. Sample collection and analytical methods used in the ecological survey are reviewed. Ecological experiments are considered. Air monitoring studies and human studies currently being performed are assessed. (1 map)

  6. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2004-12-01

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems.

  7. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma

  8. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  9. Plain formation on Mercury: tectonic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.

    1980-01-01

    Four major plain units, plus intermediates, are distinguished on Mercury. The chronologic relationships between these plains indicate that plains formation was a permanent process on Mercury. Their location and morphology seem to indicate a possible volcanic origin for these plains. The relationships between tectonism and volcanism seems to indicate the global contraction is not the only tectonic process on Mercury. (Auth.)

  10. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a... dental cavity or a broken tooth. (b) Classification. Class I. ...

  11. Quarter 9 Mercury information clearinghouse final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laudal, D.L.; Miller, S.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.; Ralston, N.; Dunham, G.; Weber, G.

    2005-12-15

    The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. A total of eight reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. Selected topics were discussed in detail in each quarterly report. Issues related to mercury from coal-fired utilities include the general areas of measurement, control, policy, and transformations. Specific topics that have been addressed in previous quarterly reports include the following: Quarterly 1 - Sorbent Control Technologies for Mercury Control; Quarterly 2 - Mercury Measurement; Quarterly 3 - Advanced and Developmental Mercury Control Technologies; Quarterly 4 - Prerelease of Mercury from Coal Combustion By-Products; Quarterly 5 - Mercury Fundamentals; Quarterly 6 - Mercury Control Field Demonstrations; Quarterly 7 - Mercury Regulations in the United States: Federal and State; and Quarterly 8 - Commercialization Aspects of Sorbent Injection Technologies in Canada. In this last of nine quarterly reports, an update of these mercury issues is presented that includes a summary of each topic, with recent information pertinent to advances made since the quarterly reports were originally presented. In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. 86 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. 40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section... Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Definitions. The definitions in § 721.3 apply to this section... elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  13. Mercury bioaccumulation in the Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinnirella S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study details mercury pollution within the food chain of the Mediterranean by analysing the most comprehensive mercury dataset available for biota and water measurements. In this study we computed a bioaccumulation factor (BAF for datasets in the existing mercury-related scientific literature, in on-going programs, and in past measurement campaigns. Preliminary results indicate a major lack of information, making the outcome of any assessment very uncertain. Importantly, not all marine eco-regions are (or have ever been covered by measurement campaigns. Most lacking is information associated with the South-Eastern part of the Mediterranean, and in several eco-regions it is still impossible to reconstruct a trophic net, as the required species were not accounted for when mercury measurements were taken. The datasets also have additional temporal sampling problems, as species were often not sampled systematically (but only sporadically during any given sampling period. Moreover, datasets composed of mercury concentrations in water also suffer from similar geographic limitations, as they are concentrated in the North-Western Mediterranean. Despite these concerns, we found a very clear bioaccumulation trend in 1999, the only year where comprehensive information on both methylmercury concentrations in water and biota was available.

  14. Mid-infrared supercontinuum generation spanning more than 11 μm in a chalcogenide step-index fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Rosenberg; Møller, Uffe Visbech; Kubat, Irnis

    2015-01-01

    Supercontinuum generation covering an ultra-broad spectrum from 1.5-11.7μm and 1.4-13.3μm is experimentally demonstrated by pumping an 85mm chalcogenide step-index fiber with 100fs pulses at a wavelength of 4.5μm and 6.3μm, respectively.......Supercontinuum generation covering an ultra-broad spectrum from 1.5-11.7μm and 1.4-13.3μm is experimentally demonstrated by pumping an 85mm chalcogenide step-index fiber with 100fs pulses at a wavelength of 4.5μm and 6.3μm, respectively....

  15. Effect of the Copper on Thermo - Mechanical and Optical Properties of S-Se-Cu Chalcogenide Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Kavitha; Babu Devarasetty, Suresh

    2018-03-01

    The S15Se85-xCux (x = 0, 2, 4, 6, 8) chalcogenide glasses are synthesized using melt quenching technique and the effect of Copper on thermal, mechanical and optical properties of chalcogenide glasses are investigated. The glassy natures of the prepared samples were verified by X-ray diffraction and DSC studies. The optical band gap of the samples is estimated and it is observed that optical band gap is decreased with increasing of the copper content and is discussed in terms of cohesive energy and coordination number. The basic thermo-mechanical parameters such as micro-hardness, Volume (Vh) and formation energy (Eh) of micro voids in the glassy network and the modulus of Elasticity (E) are calculated in present glasses. The composition dependence of micro hardness is discussed in terms of heat of atomization energy.

  16. Pinning down high-performance Cu-chalcogenides as thin-film solar cell absorbers: A successive screening approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yubo; Zhang, Wenqing, E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: pzhang3@buffalo.edu [Materials Genome Institute and Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wang, Youwei; Zhang, Jiawei; Xi, Lili [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Peihong, E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: pzhang3@buffalo.edu [Materials Genome Institute and Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Department of Physics, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    Photovoltaic performances of Cu-chalcogenides solar cells are strongly correlated with the absorber fundamental properties such as optimal bandgap, desired band alignment with window material, and high photon absorption ability. According to these criteria, we carry out a successive screening for 90 Cu-chalcogenides using efficient theoretical approaches. Besides the well-recognized CuInSe{sub 2} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} materials, several novel candidates are identified to have optimal bandgaps of around 1.0–1.5 eV, spike-like band alignments with CdS window layer, sharp photon absorption edges, and high absorption coefficients. These new systems have great potential to be superior absorbers for photovolatic applications if their carrrier transport and defect properties are properly optimized.

  17. Control of mercury emissions: policies, technologies, and future trends

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Seung-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Seung-Whee Rhee Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Republic of Korea Abstract: Owing to the Minamata Convention on Mercury and the Global Mercury Partnership, policies and regulations on mercury management in advanced countries were intensified by a mercury phaseout program in the mercury control strategy. In developing countries, the legislative or regulatory frameworks on mercury emissions are not established specifically, but mercury management is designed...

  18. Short and medium range structures of 80GeSe2–20Ga2Se3 chalcogenide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracovschi, Elena; Calvez, Laurent; Cormier, Laurent; Le Coq, David; Du, Jincheng

    2018-05-01

    The short and medium range structures of 80GeSe2–20Ga2Se3 (or Ge23.5Ga11.8Se64.7) chalcogenide glasses have been studied by combining ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations and experimental neutron diffraction studies. The structure factor and total correlation function were calculated from glass structures generated from AIMD simulations and compared with neutron diffraction experiments showing reasonable agreement. The atomic structures of ternary chalcogenide glasses were analyzed in detail, and it was found that gallium atoms are four-fold coordinated by selenium (Se) and form [GaSe4] tetrahedra. Germanium atoms on average also have four-fold coordination, among which Se is 3.5 with the remaining being Ge–Ge homo-nuclear bonds. Ga and Ge tetrahedra link together mainly through corner-sharing and some edge-sharing of Se. No homo-nuclear bonds were observed among Ga atoms or between Ge and Ga. In addition, Se–Se homo-nuclear bonds and Se chains with various lengths were observed. A small fraction of Se atom triclusters that bond to three cations of Ge and Ga were also observed, confirming earlier proposals from 77Se solid state nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Furthermore, the electronic structures of ternary chalcogenide glasses were studied in terms of atomic charge and electronic density of states in order to gain insights into the chemical bonding and electronic properties, as well as to provide an explanation of the observed atomic structures in these ternary chalcogenide glasses.

  19. Thermally controlled mid-IR band-gap engineering in all-glass chalcogenide microstructured fibers: a numerical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barh, Ajanta; Varshney, Ravi K.; Pal, Bishnu P.

    2017-01-01

    Presence of photonic band-gap (PBG) in an all-glass low refractive index (RI) contrast chalcogenide (Ch) microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) is investigated numerically. The effect of external temperature on the position of band-gap is explored to realize potential fiber-based wavelength filters....... Then the temperature sensitivity of band-gaps is investigated to design fiber-based mid-IR wavelength filters/sensors....

  20. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  1. Practical measurement of silicon in low alloy steels by differential pulse stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahier, A.; Lunardi, S.; Triki, C.

    2005-01-01

    A sensitive differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry has been adapted to allow the determination of Si in low-alloy steels using a hanging mercury drop electrode. The method has been qualified using certified ASTM standards and is now running in routine. The present report describes the experimental details, thereby allowing the reader to carry out the measurements precisely. (author)

  2. Intake of mercury through fish consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmani, S.B.; Kiprawi, A.Z.; Ismail, R.B.; Hassan, R.B.; Wood, A.K.; Rahman, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Fish has been known as a source of non-occupational mercury exposure to fish consuming population groups, and this is shown by the high hair mercury levels. In this study, hair samples collected from fishermen and their families, and commercial marine fishes were analyzed for mercury and methylmercury by neutron activation and gas chromatography. The results showed a correlation between hair mercury levels and fish consumption patterns. The levels of mercury found in this study were similar to those reported by other workers for fish consuming population groups worldwide. (author)

  3. Coal fired flue gas mercury emission controls

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Pan, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals, harmful to both the environment and human health. Hg is released into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources and its emission control has caused much concern. This book introduces readers to Hg pollution from natural and anthropogenic sources and systematically describes coal-fired flue gas mercury emission control in industry, especially from coal-fired power stations. Mercury emission control theory and experimental research are demonstrated, including how elemental mercury is oxidized into oxidized mercury and the effect of

  4. A Self-Templating Scheme for the Synthesis of Nanostructured Transition Metal Chalcogenide Electrodes for Capacitive Energy Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2015-06-11

    Due to their unique structural features including well-defined interior voids, low density, low coefficients of thermal expansion, large surface area and surface permeability, hollow micro/nanostructured transition metal sulfides with high conductivity have been investigated as new class of electrode materials for pseudocapacitor applications. Herein, we report a novel self-templating strategy to fabricate well-defined single and double-shell NiCo2S4 hollow spheres, as a promising electrode material for pseudocapacitors. The surfaces of the NiCo2S4 hollow spheres consist of self-assembled 2D mesoporous nanosheets. This unique morphology results in a high specific capacitance (1257 F g-1 at 2 A g-1), remarkable rate performance (76.4% retention of initial capacitance from 2 A g-1 to 60 A g-1) and exceptional reversibility with a cycling efficiency of 93.8% and 87% after 10,000 and 20,000 cycles, respectively, at a high current density of 10 A g-1. The cycling stability of our ternary chalcogenides is comparable to carbonaceous electrode materials, but with much higher specific capacitance (higher than any previously reported ternary chalcogenide), suggesting that these unique chalcogenide structures have potential application in next-generation commercial pseudocapacitors.

  5. Electrochemical kinetics and X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations of select chalcogenide electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.; Murthi, Vivek S.; O'Laoire, Cormac; Gulla, Andrea F.; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2008-01-01

    Transition metal-based chalcogenide electrocatalysts exhibit a promising level of performance for oxygen reduction reaction applications while offering significant economic benefits over the state of the art Pt/C systems. The most active materials are based on Ru x Se y clusters, but the toxicity of selenium will most likely limit their embrace by the marketplace. Sulfur-based analogues do not suffer from toxicity issues, but suffer from substantially less activity and stability than their selenium brethren. The structure/property relationships that result in these properties are not understood due to ambiguities regarding the specific morphologies of Ru x S y -based chalcogenides. To clarify these properties, an electrochemical kinetics study was interpreted in light of extensive X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy evaluations. The performance characteristics of ternary M x Ru y S z /C (M = Mo, Rh, or Re) chalcogenide electrocatalysts synthesized by the now-standard low-temperature nonaqueous (NA) route are compared to commercially available (De Nora) Rh- and Ru-based systems. Interpretation of performance differences is made in regards to bulk and surface properties of these systems. In particular, the overall trends of the measured activation energies in respect to increasing overpotential and the gross energy values can be explained in regards to these differences

  6. Deposition of Ge{sub 23}Sb{sub 7}S{sub 70} chalcogenide glass films by electrospray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Spencer, E-mail: spencen@g.clemson.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, COMSET, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); College of Optics and Photonics, CREOL, University of Central FL (United States); Johnston, Danvers E.; Li, Cheng; Deng, Weiwei [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central FL (United States); Richardson, Kathleen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, COMSET, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); College of Optics and Photonics, CREOL, University of Central FL (United States)

    2015-08-03

    Solution-based chalcogenide glass films, traditionally deposited by spin-coating, are attractive for their potential use in chip-based devices operating in the mid-infrared and for ease of nanostructure incorporation. To overcome limitations of spin-coating such as excessive material waste and difficulty for scale-up, this paper introduces electrospray as a film deposition technique for solution-based chalcogenide glasses. Electrospray is shown to produce Ge{sub 23}Sb{sub 7}S{sub 70} films with similar surface quality and optical properties as films deposited by spin-coating. The advantages of electrospray deposition for nanoparticle dispersion, scalable and continuous manufacturing with little material waste, and comparable film quality to spin-coating make electrospray a promising deposition method for practical applications of chalcogenide glass films. - Highlights: • Electrospray film deposition processing of Ge{sub 23}Sb{sub 7}S{sub 70} films was developed. • Traditional spin-coated films were also fabricated in parallel. • Optical properties and surface quality found to be similar between two approaches.

  7. Apparatus for control of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for reducing mercury in industrial gases such as the flue gas produced by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal adds hydrogen sulfide to the flue gas in or just before a scrubber of the industrial process which contains the wet scrubber. The method and apparatus of the present invention is applicable to installations employing either wet or dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization systems. The present invention uses kraft green liquor as a source for hydrogen sulfide and/or the injection of mineral acids into the green liquor to release vaporous hydrogen sulfide in order to form mercury sulfide solids.

  8. Marine biogeochemistry of mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Noncontaminating sample collection and handling procedures and accurate and sensitive analysis methods were developed to measure sub-picomolar Hg concentrations in seawater. Reliable and diagnostic oceanographic Hg distributions were obtained, permitting major processes governing the marine biogeochemistry of Hg to be identified. Mercury concentrations in the northwest Atlantic, central Pacific, southeast Pacific, and Tasman Sea ranged from 0.5 to 12 pM. Vertical Hg distributions often exhibited a maximum within or near the main thermocline. At similar depths, Hg concentrations in the northwest Atlantic Ocean were elevated compared to the N. Pacific Ocean. This pattern appears to result from a combination of enhanced supply of Hg to the northwest Atlantic by rainfall and scavenging removal along deep water circulation pathways. These observations are supported by geochemical steady-state box modelling which predicts a relatively short mean residence time for Hg in the oceans; demonstrating the reactive nature of Hg in seawater and precluding significant involvement in nutrient-type recyclic. Evidence for the rapid removal of Hg from seawater was obtained at two locations. Surface seawater Hg measurements along 160 0 W (20 0 N to 20 0 S) showed a depression in the equatorial upwelling area which correlated well with the transect region exhibiting low 234 Th/ 238 U activity ratios. This relationship implies that Hg will be scavenged and removed from surface seawater in biologically productive oceanic zones. Further, a broad minimum in the vertical distribution of Hg was observed to coincide with the intense oxygen minimum zone in the water column in coastal waters off Peru

  9. Mercury accumulation plant Cyrtomium macrophyllum and its potential for phytoremediation of mercury polluted sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Yu; Feng, Liu; Li, Youdan; Dong, Haochen

    2017-12-01

    Cyrtomium macrophyllum naturally grown in 225.73 mg kg -1 of soil mercury in mining area was found to be a potential mercury accumulator plant with the translocation factor of 2.62 and the high mercury concentration of 36.44 mg kg -1 accumulated in its aerial parts. Pot experiments indicated that Cyrtomium macrophyllum could even grow in 500 mg kg -1 of soil mercury with observed inhibition on growth but no obvious toxic effects, and showed excellent mercury accumulation and translocation abilities with both translocation and bioconcentration factors greater than 1 when exposed to 200 mg kg -1 and lower soil mercury, indicating that it could be considered as a great mercury accumulating species. Furthermore, the leaf tissue of Cyrtomium macrophyllum showed high resistance to mercury stress because of both the increased superoxide dismutase activity and the accumulation of glutathione and proline induced by mercury stress, which favorited mercury translocation from the roots to the aerial parts, revealing the possible reason for Cyrtomium macrophyllum to tolerate high concentration of soil mercury. In sum, due to its excellent mercury accumulation and translocation abilities as well as its high resistance to mercury stress, the use of Cyrtomium macrophyllum should be a promising approach to remediating mercury polluted soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Global Mercury Pathways in the Arctic Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoutifard, N.; Lean, D.

    2003-12-01

    The sudden depletions of atmospheric mercury which occur during the Arctic spring are believed to involve oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury, Hg(0), rendering it less volatile and more soluble. The Hg(II) oxidation product(s) are more susceptible to deposition, consistent with the observation of dramatic increases in snow mercury levels during depletion events. Temporal correlations with ozone depletion events and the proliferation of BrO radicals support the hypothesis that oxidation of Hg(0) occurs in the gas phase and results in its conversion to RGM (Reactive Gaseous Mercury). The mechanisms of Hg(0) oxidation and particularly Hg(II) reduction are as yet unproven. In order to evaluate the feasibility of proposed chemical processes involving mercury in the Arctic atmosphere and its pathway after deposition on the snow from the air, we investigated mercury speciation in air and snow pack at Resolute, Nunavut, Canada (latitude 75° N) prior to and during snow melt during spring 2003. Quantitative, real-time information on emission, air transport and deposition were combined with experimental studies of the distribution and concentrations of different mercury species, methyl mercury, anions, total organic carbon and total inorganic carbon in snow samples. The effect of solar radiation and photoreductants on mercury in snow samples was also investigated. In this work, we quantify mercury removed from the air, and deposited on the snow and the transformation to inorganic and methyl mercury.

  11. Mercury emission monitoring on municipal waste combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.; Gerig, A.

    1991-01-01

    In waste incineration, mercury is the only heavy metal to be released as a gas, mostly as mercury(II) chloride, because of its high volatility. Continuous emission monitoring is possible only when mercury occurs in its elemental form. This paper reports on various possibilities of converting Hg(II) into Hg(0) that has been studied and tested on a laboratory scale and in the TAMARA refuse incineration pilot facility. Continuous mercury emission measurement appears to be possible, provided mercury is converted in the flue gas condensate precipitated. The measuring results obtained on two municipal solid waste and on one sewage treatment sludge incineration plants show that the mercury monitor is a highly sensitive and selective continuously working instrument for mercury emission monitoring

  12. Genetic effects of organic mercury compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramel, C

    1967-01-01

    Organic mercury compounds have a c-mitotic effect on plant cells that cause polyploidi. Studies were performed on Allium root cells. These investigations involved methyl mercury dicyandiamide, methyl mercury hydroxide, and phenyl mercury hydroxide. The lowest concentration necessary for a cytologically observable effect was about 0.05 ppM Hg for the methyl compounds. For the phenyl compound, the value was lower. Experiments were performed on Drosophila melanogaster. The question was whether the mercury would reach the gonads. Experimental data with mercury treated larvae indicated a chromosome disjunction. Data indicated a preferential segregation at the meiotic division might be involved. Experiments are being performed on mice inbred (CBA) in order to investigate teratogenic effects and dominant lethality caused by organic mercury compounds. The mutagenic effects of these compounds are studied on Neurospora Drosophila. No conclusive data is now available.

  13. Mercury risk in poultry in the Wanshan Mercury Mine, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Runsheng; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Guangyi; Feng, Zhaohui; Hurley, James P.; Yang, Liyuan; Shang, Lihai; Feng, Xinbin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in muscles (leg and breast), organs (intestine, heart, stomach, liver) and blood were investigated for backyard chickens, ducks and geese of the Wanshan Mercury Mine, China. THg in poultry meat products range from 7.9 to 3917.1 ng/g, most of which exceeded the Chinese national standard limit for THg in meat (50 ng/g). Elevated MeHg concentrations (0.4–62.8 ng/g) were also observed in meat products, suggesting that poultry meat can be an important human MeHg exposure source. Ducks and geese showed higher Hg levels than chickens. For all poultry species, the highest Hg concentrations were observed in liver (THg: 23.2–3917.1 ng/g; MeHg: 7.1–62.8 ng/g) and blood (THg: 12.3–338.0 ng/g; MeHg: 1.4–17.6 ng/g). We estimated the Hg burdens in chickens (THg: 15.3–238.1 μg; MeHg: 2.2–15.6 μg), ducks (THg: 15.3–238.1 μg; MeHg: 3.5–14.7 μg) and geese (THg: 83.8–93.4 μg; MeHg: 15.4–29.7 μg). To not exceed the daily intake limit for THg (34.2 μg/day) and MeHg (6 μg/day), we suggested that the maximum amount (g) for chicken leg, breast, heart, stomach, intestine, liver, and blood should be 1384, 1498, 2315, 1214, 1081, 257, and 717, respectively; the maximum amount (g) for duck leg, breast, heart, stomach, intestine, liver, and blood should be 750, 1041, 986, 858, 752, 134, and 573, respectively; and the maximum amount (g) for goose leg, breast, heart, stomach, intestine, liver, and blood should be 941, 1051, 1040, 1131, 964, 137, and 562, respectively. - Highlights: • Elevated mercury levels were observed in poultry from Wanshan Mercury Mine, China. • Ducks and geese showed higher mercury levels than chickens. • Liver and blood showed the highest mercury levels. • Poultry can be an important dietary Hg exposure source for local residents. - High levels of Hg associated with poultry surrounding the Wanshan Mercury Mine pose a great risk of Hg exposure to

  14. Behaviour of mercury compounds in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booer, J R

    1944-01-01

    The uses of inorganic compounds of mercury for the control of plant pests is reviewed, and a summary of the relevant chemical and physical properties of the compounds concerned is given. On chemical evidence a working hypothesis is propounded showing that all compounds may be expected to decompose into metallic mercury. A pot technique is described by means of which a correlation can be obtained between the effective mercury content of a given soil sample and the rate of growth of wheat seedlings. The mathematical treatment of the results is described, and the validity of the pot technique is verified by statistical analysis of results. Using the pot technqiue it is shown that volatilization losses are insignificant but that mercury is slowly rendered ineffective by the formation of mercuric sulphide. The effect of sulphur-reducing bacteria is considered and the influence of Vibrio desulphuricans on mercury is studied in detail. Experimental evidence obtained by the pot technique is produced to show that mercurous chloride slowly decomposes in the soil giving mercury and mercuric chloride, mercuric chloride rapidly decomposes into mercury and mercurous chloride, and other inorganic compounds decompose directly into mercury. The working hypothesis is substantiated in all major aspects. The uses and properties of the organo-mercury compounds are then discussed. Type compounds selected are ethyl mercury phosphate, phenyl mercury acetate and methoxyethyl mercury acetate. Using the pot technique it is shown that the formation of organo-mercury clays takes place and that these clays decompose giving metallic mercury. A mechanism is suggested.

  15. Mercury in the environment : a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodarzi, F.

    2000-01-01

    Both geogenic and anthropogenic sources are responsible for the input of mercury into the environment. However, mercury comes mostly from geogenic sources and is found naturally in air, water and soil. Crustal degassing results in emission of mercury into the atmosphere. Mercury in water and soil is due mostly to input from sedimentary rocks. Mercury in lake sediments is related mainly to input by country rock and anthropogenic activities such as agriculture. The mercury content of coal is similar to or less than the amount found in the earths crust. Natural charcoal is also able to capture mercury at low temperature combustion. The amount of mercury emitted from the stack of coal-fired power plants is related to the nature of the milled coal and its mineralogical and elemental content. Mercury emissions originating from the combustion of coal from electric utility power plants are considered to be among the greatest contributors to global mercury air emissions. In order to quantify the impact the electric power industry has on the environment, information regarding mercury concentrations in coal and their speciation is needed. For this reason the author examined the behaviour of mercury in three coal samples ashed at increasing temperatures. Mercury removal from coal-fired power plants ranges from 10 to 50 per cent by fabric filters and 20 to 95 per cent by FGD systems. This data will help in regulating emissions of hazardous air pollutants from electric utility steam generating units and will potentially provide insight into the industry's contribution to the global mercury burden. 50 refs

  16. Dissolved gaseous mercury formation and mercury volatilization in intertidal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesário, Rute; Poissant, Laurier; Pilote, Martin; O'Driscoll, Nelson J; Mota, Ana M; Canário, João

    2017-12-15

    Intertidal sediments of Tagus estuary regularly experiences complex redistribution due to tidal forcing, which affects the cycling of mercury (Hg) between sediments and the water column. This study quantifies total mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MMHg) concentrations and fluxes in a flooded mudflat as well as the effects on water-level fluctuations on the air-surface exchange of mercury. A fast increase in dissolved Hg and MMHg concentrations was observed in overlying water in the first 10min of inundation and corresponded to a decrease in pore waters, suggesting a rapid export of Hg and MMHg from sediments to the water column. Estimations of daily advective transport exceeded the predicted diffusive fluxes by 5 orders of magnitude. A fast increase in dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) concentration was also observed in the first 20-30min of inundation (maximum of 40pg L -1 ). Suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations were inversely correlated with DGM concentrations. Dissolved Hg variation suggested that biotic DGM production in pore waters is a significant factor in addition to the photochemical reduction of Hg. Mercury volatilization (ranged from 1.1 to 3.3ngm -2 h -1 ; average of 2.1ngm -2 h -1 ) and DGM production exhibited the same pattern with no significant time-lag suggesting a fast release of the produced DGM. These results indicate that Hg sediment/water exchanges in the physical dominated estuaries can be underestimated when the tidal effect is not considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mercury erosion experiments for spallation target system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Kaminaga, Masanori; Haga, Katsuhiro; Hino, Ryutaro

    2003-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) are promoting a plan to construct the spallation neutron source at the Tokai Research Establishment, JAERI, under the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC). A mercury circulation system has been designed so as to supply mercury to the target stably under the rated flow rate of 41 m 3 /hr. Then, it was necessary to confirm a mercury pump performance from the viewpoint of making the mercury circulation system feasible, and more, to investigate erosion rate under the mercury flow as well as an amount of mercury remained on the surface after drain from the viewpoints of mechanical strength relating to the lifetime and remote handling of mercury components. The mercury pump performance was tested under the mercury flow conditions by using an experimental gear pump, which had almost the same structure as a practical mercury pump to be expected in the mercury circulation system, and the erosion rates in a mercury pipeline as well as the amount of mercury remained on the surface were also investigated. The discharged flow rates of the experimental gear pump increased linearly with the rotation speed, so that the gear pump would work as the flow meter. Erosion rates obtained under the mercury velocity less than 1.6 m/s was found to be so small that decrease of pipeline wall thickness would be 390 μm after 30-year operation under the rated mercury velocity of 0.7 m/s. For the amount of remaining mercury on the pipeline, remaining rates of weight and volume were estimated at 50.7 g/m 2 and 3.74 Hg-cm 3 /m 2 , respectively. Applying these remaining rates of weight and volume to the mercury target, the remaining mercury was estimated at about 106.5 g and 7.9 cm 3 . Radioactivity of this remaining mercury volume was found to be three-order lower than that of the target casing. (author)

  18. 76 FR 75446 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ...-0894; Airspace Docket No. 11-AWP-14] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV AGENCY: Federal... Mercury, Desert Rock Airport, Mercury, NV. Decommissioning of the Mercury Non-Directional Beacon (NDB) at Mercury, Desert Rock Airport has made this action necessary for the safety and management of Instrument...

  19. Touchstones and mercury at Hedeby

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Martin; Holub, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 1 (2014), s. 193-204 ISSN 0079-4848 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : Hedeby * Viking Age * grave goods * touchstone * precious metal * mercury * chemical microanalysis * archaeometallurgy Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 0.278, year: 2014

  20. Venus and Mercury as Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A general evolutionary history of the solar planetary system is given. The previously observed characteristics of Venus and Mercury (i.e. length of day, solar orbit, temperature) are discussed. The role of the Mariner 10 space probe in gathering scientific information on the two planets is briefly described.

  1. PERCEPTION OF MERCURY RISK INFORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 8% of American women have blood Mercury levels exceeding the EPA reference dose (a dose below which symptoms would be unlikely). The children of these women are at risk of neurological deficits (lower IQ scores) primarily because of the mother's consumption of conta...

  2. Venus and Mercury as planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A general evolutionary history of the solar planetary system is given. The previously observed characteristics of Venus and Mercury (i.e. length of day, solar orbit, temperature) are discussed. The role of the Mariner 10 space probe in gathering scientific information on the two planets is briefly described

  3. A downstream voyage with mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective essay for the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.As I look back on my paper, “Effects of Low Dietary Levels of Methyl Mercury on Mallard Reproduction,” published in 1974 in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, a thought sticks in my mind. I realize just how much my mercury research was not unlike a leaf in a stream, carried this way and that, sometimes stalled in an eddy, restarted, and carried downstream at a pace and path that was not completely under my control. I was hired in 1969 by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to study the effects of environmental pollutants on the behavior of wildlife. A colleague was conducting a study on the reproductive effects of methylmercury on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and he offered to give me some of the ducklings. I conducted a pilot study, testing how readily ducklings approached a tape-recorded maternal call. Sample sizes were small, but the results suggested that ducklings from mercury-treated parents behaved differently than controls. That’s how I got into mercury research—pretty much by chance.

  4. Elemental mercury: Its unique properties affect its behavior and fate in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Raymat, Hansell; Liu, Guangliang; Liriano, Carolina; Li, Yanbin; Yin, Yongguang; Shi, Jianbo; Jiang, Guibin; Cai, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) has different behavior in the environment compared to other pollutants due to its unique properties. It can remain in the atmosphere for long periods of time and so can travel long distances. Through air-surface (e.g., vegetation or ocean) exchange (dry deposition), Hg 0 can enter terrestrial and aquatic systems where it can be converted into other Hg species. Despite being ubiquitous and playing a key role in Hg biogeochemical cycling, Hg 0 behavior in the environment is not well understood. The objective of this review is to provide a better understanding of how the unique physicochemical properties of Hg 0 affects its cycling and chemical transformations in different environmental compartments. The first part focuses on the fundamental chemistry of Hg 0 , addressing why Hg 0 is liquid at room temperature and the formation of amalgam, Hg halide, and Hg chalcogenides. The following sections discuss the long-range transport of Hg 0 as well as its redistribution in the atmosphere, aquatic and terrestrial systems, in particular, on the sorption/desorption processes that occur in each environmental compartment as well as the involvement of Hg 0 in chemical transformation processes driven by photochemical, abiotic, and biotic reactions. - Highlights: • Unique property of Hg 0 make it to behave differently with other toxic metals. • Hg 0 is considered the only global metal pollutant due to its uniqueness. • Hg 0 can be easily transformed and efficiently redistributed in the environments. - A better understanding of the properties and behavior of Hg 0 is the key to elucidate the biogeochemical cycling of mercury, a global pollutant in the environment.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Quaternary Metal Chalcogenide Aerogels for Gas Separation and Volatile Hydrocarbon Adsorption

    KAUST Repository

    Edhaim, Fatimah A.

    2017-11-01

    In this dissertation, the metathesis route of metal chalcogenide aerogel synthesis was expanded by conducting systematic studies between polysulfide building blocks and the 1st-row transition metal linkers. Resulting materials were screened as sorbents for selective gas separation and volatile organic compounds adsorption. They showed preferential adsorption of polarizable gases (CO2) and organic compounds (toluene). Ion exchange and heavy metal remediation properties have also been demonstrated. The effect of the presence of different counter-ion within chalcogel frameworks on the adsorption capacity of the chalcogels was studied on AFe3Zn3S17 (A= K, Na, and Rb) chalcogels. The highest adsorption capacity toward hydrocarbons and gases was observed on Rb based chalcogels. Adopting a new building block [BiTe3]3- with the 1st-row transition metal ions results in the formation of three high BET surface area chalcogels, KCrBiTe3, KZnBiTe3, and KFeBiTe3. The resulting chalcogels showed preferential adsorption of toluene vapor, and remarkable selectivity of CO2, indicating the potential future use of chalcogels in adsorption-based gas or hydrocarbon separation processes. The synthesis and characterization of the rare earth chalcogels NaYSnS4, NaGdSnS4, and NaTbSnS4 are also reported. Rare earth metal ions react with the thiostannate clusters in formamide solution forming extended polymeric networks by gelation. Obtained chalcogels have high BET surface areas, and showed notable adsorption capacity toward CO2 and toluene vapor. These chalcogels have also been engaged in the absorption of different organic molecules. The results reveal the ability of the chalcogels to distinguish among organic molecules on their electronic structures; hence, they could be used as sensors. Furthermore, the synthesis of metal chalcogenide aerogels Co0.5Sb0.33MoS4 and Co0.5Y0.33MoS4 by the sol-gel method is reported. In this system, the building blocks [MoS4]2- chelated with Co2+ and (Sb3

  6. Dielectric relaxation and AC conductivity studies of Se90Cd10−xInx glassy alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitesh Shukla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chalcogenide glassy alloys of Se90Cd10−xInx (x = 2, 4, 6, 8 are synthesized by melt quench technique. The prepared glassy alloys have been characterized by techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX. Dielectric properties of Se90Cd10−xInx (x = 2, 4, 6, 8 chalcogenide glassy system have been studied using impedance spectroscopic technique in the frequency range 42 Hz to 5 MHz at room temperature. It is found that the dielectric constants ɛ′, dielectric loss factor ɛ″ and loss angle Tan δ depend on frequency. ɛ′, ɛ″ and loss angle Tan δ are found to be decreasing with the In content in Se90Cd10−xInx glassy system. AC conductivity of the prepared sample has also been studied. It is found that AC conductivity increases with frequency where as it has decreasing trend with increasing In content in Se–Cd matrix. The semicircles observed in the Cole–Cole plots indicate a single relaxation process.

  7. Chemical Form Matters: Differential Accumulation of Mercury Following Inorganic and Organic Mercury Exposures in Zebrafish Larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korbas, Malgorzata; MacDonald, Tracy C.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.; Krone, Patrick H. (Saskatchewan)

    2013-04-08

    Mercury, one of the most toxic elements, exists in various chemical forms each with different toxicities and health implications. Some methylated mercury forms, one of which exists in fish and other seafood products, pose a potential threat, especially during embryonic and early postnatal development. Despite global concerns, little is known about the mechanisms underlying transport and toxicity of different mercury species. To investigate the impact of different mercury chemical forms on vertebrate development, we have successfully combined the zebrafish, a well-established developmental biology model system, with synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging. Our work revealed substantial differences in tissue-specific accumulation patterns of mercury in zebrafish larvae exposed to four different mercury formulations in water. Methylmercury species not only resulted in overall higher mercury burdens but also targeted different cells and tissues than their inorganic counterparts, thus revealing a significant role of speciation in cellular and molecular targeting and mercury sequestration. For methylmercury species, the highest mercury concentrations were in the eye lens epithelial cells, independent of the formulation ligand (chloride versus L-cysteine). For inorganic mercury species, in absence of L-cysteine, the olfactory epithelium and kidney accumulated the greatest amounts of mercury. However, with L-cysteine present in the treatment solution, mercuric bis-L-cysteineate species dominated the treatment, significantly decreasing uptake. Our results clearly demonstrate that the common differentiation between organic and inorganic mercury is not sufficient to determine the toxicity of various mercury species.

  8. The Plasma Environment at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, James M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gloeckler, George; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sarantos, Menalos; hide

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is the least explored terrestrial planet, and the one subjected to the highest flux of solar radiation in the heliosphere. Its highly dynamic, miniature magnetosphere contains ions from the exosphere and solar wind, and at times may allow solar wind ions to directly impact the planet's surface. Together these features create a plasma environment that shares many features with, but is nonetheless very different from, that of Earth. The first in situ measurements of plasma ions in the Mercury space environment were made only recently, by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) during the MESSENGER spacecraft's three flybys of the planet in 2008-2009 as the probe was en route to insertion into orbit about Mercury earlier this year. Here. we present analysis of flyby and early orbital mission data with novel techniques that address the particular challenges inherent in these measurements. First. spacecraft structures and sensor orientation limit the FIPS field of view and allow only partial sampling of velocity distribution functions. We use a software model of FIPS sampling in velocity space to explore these effects and recover bulk parameters under certain assumptions. Second, the low densities found in the Mercury magnetosphere result in a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio for many ions. To address this issue, we apply a kernel density spread function to guide removal of background counts according to a background-signature probability map. We then assign individual counts to particular ion species with a time-of-flight forward model, taking into account energy losses in the carbon foil and other physical behavior of ions within the instrument. Using these methods, we have derived bulk plasma properties and heavy ion composition and evaluated them in the context of the Mercury magnetosphere.

  9. Tuning of electronic band gaps and optoelectronic properties of binary strontium chalcogenides by means of doping of magnesium atom(s)- a first principles based theoretical initiative with mBJ, B3LYP and WC-GGA functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Bimal; Sarkar, Utpal; Debbarma, Manish; Bhattacharjee, Rahul; Chattopadhyaya, Surya

    2018-02-01

    First principle based theoretical initiative is taken to tune the optoelectronic properties of binary strontium chalcogenide semiconductors by doping magnesium atom(s) into their rock-salt unit cells at specific concentrations x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0 and such tuning is established by studying structural, electronic and optical properties of designed binary compounds and ternary alloys employing WC-GGA, B3LYP and mBJ exchange-correlation functionals. Band structure of each compound is constructed and respective band gaps under all the potential schemes are measured. The band gap bowing and its microscopic origin are calculated using quadratic fit and Zunger's approach, respectively. The atomic and orbital origins of electronic states in the band structure of any compound are explored from its density of states. The nature of chemical bonds between the constituent atoms in each compound is explored from the valence electron density contour plots. Optical properties of any specimen are explored from the computed spectra of its dielectric function, refractive index, extinction coefficient, normal incidence reflectivity, optical conductivity optical absorption and energy loss function. Several calculated results are compared with available experimental and earlier theoretical data.

  10. Mercury emission from crematories in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Takaoka

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic sources of mercury emissions have a significant impact on global pollution. Therefore, finding uncharacterised sources and assessing the emissions from these sources are important. However, limited data are available worldwide on mercury emissions from crematories. In Japan, 99.9% of dead bodies are cremated, which is the highest percentage in the world, and more than 1600 crematories are in operation. We thus focused on emissions from crematories in Japan. The number of targeted facilities was seven, and we used continuous emission monitoring to measure the mercury concentrations and investigate mercury behaviour. The total mercury concentrations in stack gases were a few μg/Nm3 (normal cubic meters. Considering the time profile of mercury and its species in cremations, the findings confirmed that the mercury in stack gas originated from dental amalgam. The amount of mercury emissions was calculated using the total concentration and gas flow rate. Furthermore, the annual amount of mercury emission from crematories in Japan was estimated by using the total number of corpses. The emission amount was considerably lower than that estimated in the United Kingdom. From statistical analyses on population demographics and measurements, future total emissions from crematories were also predicted. As a result, the amount of mercury emitted by crematories will likely increase by 2.6-fold from 2007 to 2037.

  11. Environmental Mercury and Its Toxic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Rice

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mercury exists naturally and as a man-made contaminant. The release of processed mercury can lead to a progressive increase in the amount of atmospheric mercury, which enters the atmospheric-soil-water distribution cycles where it can remain in circulation for years. Mercury poisoning is the result of exposure to mercury or mercury compounds resulting in various toxic effects depend on its chemical form and route of exposure. The major route of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg is largely through eating contaminated fish, seafood, and wildlife which have been exposed to mercury through ingestion of contaminated lower organisms. MeHg toxicity is associated with nervous system damage in adults and impaired neurological development in infants and children. Ingested mercury may undergo bioaccumulation leading to progressive increases in body burdens. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of individual organ systems associated with mercury poisoning. Mercury has profound cellular, cardiovascular, hematological, pulmonary, renal, immunological, neurological, endocrine, reproductive, and embryonic toxicological effects.

  12. New Mechanisms of Mercury Binding to Peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, K. L.; Manceau, A.; Gasper, J. D.; Ryan, J. N.; Aiken, G. R.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury can be immobilized in the aquatic environment by binding to peat, a solid form of natural organic matter. Binding mechanisms can vary in strength and reversibility, and therefore will control concentrations of bioreactive mercury, may explain rates of mercury methylation, and are important for designing approaches to improve water quality using natural wetlands or engineered phytoremediation schemes. In addition, strong binding between mercury and peat is likely to result in the fixation of mercury that ultimately resides in coal. The mechanisms by which aqueous mercury at low concentrations reacts with both dissolved and solid natural organic matter remain incompletely understood, despite recent efforts. We have identified three distinct binding mechanisms of divalent cationic mercury to solid peats from the Florida Everglades using EXAFS spectroscopic data (FAME beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF)) obtained on experimental samples as compared to relevant references including mercury-bearing solids and mercury bound to various organic molecules. The proportions of the three molecular configurations vary with Hg concentration, and two new configurations that involve sulfur ligands occur at Hg concentrations up to about 4000 ppm. The binding mechanism at the lowest experimental Hg concentration (60-80 ppm) elucidates published reports on the inhibition of metacinnabar formation in the presence of Hg-bearing solutions and dissolved natural organic matter, and also, the differences in extent of mercury methylation in distinct areas of the Florida Everglades.

  13. Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

  14. Translating VDM to Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausdahl, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    specifications. However, to take advantage of the automated analysis of Alloy, the model-oriented VDM specifications must be translated into a constraint-based Alloy specifications. We describe how a sub- set of VDM can be translated into Alloy and how assertions can be expressed in VDM and checked by the Alloy...

  15. Effect of crystalline electric fields and long-range magnetic order on superconductivity in rare earth alloys and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCallum, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of rare earth ions in a superconducting matrix has been studied in two distinct regimes. First, the effects of crystal field splitting of the 4f levels of a magnetic rare earth ion in the alloy system (LaPr)Sn 3 were investigated in the limit of low Pr 3+ concentration. In this system the rare earth impurity ions occupy random La sites in the crystal lattice. Second, the interaction of long-range magnetic order and superconductivity was explored in the ternary rare earth molybdenum chalcogenide systems. In these compounds the rare earth ions occupy periodic lattice sites in contrast to the random distribution of magnetic ions in dilute impurity alloy systems such as (LaPr)Sn 3

  16. Overview of Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) for BepiColombo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, G.; Hayakawa, H.; Fujimoto, M.; BepiColombo Project Team

    2018-05-01

    The next Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will be launched in October 2018 and will arrive at Mercury in December 2025. We present the current status, science goals, and observation plans of JAXA's Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO).

  17. Understanding Phase-Change Memory Alloys from a Chemical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.

    2015-09-01

    Phase-change memories (PCM) are associated with reversible ultra-fast low-energy crystal-to-amorphous switching in GeTe-based alloys co-existing with the high stability of the two phases at ambient temperature, a unique property that has been recently explained by the high fragility of the glass-forming liquid phase, where the activation barrier for crystallisation drastically increases as the temperature decreases from the glass-transition to room temperature. At the same time the atomistic dynamics of the phase-change process and the associated changes in the nature of bonding have remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that key to this behavior is the formation of transient three-center bonds in the excited state that is enabled due to the presence of lone-pair electrons. Our findings additionally reveal previously ignored fundamental similarities between the mechanisms of reversible photoinduced structural changes in chalcogenide glasses and phase-change alloys and offer new insights into the development of efficient PCM materials.

  18. Size-controlled synthesis of chalcogen and chalcogenide nanoparticles using protic ionic liquids with imidazolium cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meenatchi, Boominathan; Renuga, Velayutham; Manikandan, Ayyar

    2016-01-01

    Green synthesis of selenium (chalcogen) nanoparticles (SeNPs) has been successfully attained by simple wet chemical method that involves the reaction of six different protic ionic liquids with imidazolium cations and sodium hydrogen selenide (NaHSe) in the presence of poly ethylene glycol-600 (PEG-600) as an additional stabilizer. The obtained SeNPs were characterized using UV spectral (UV), Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The results illustrate that the synthesized SeNPs are spherical in shape with size ranging 19-24 nm and possess good optical property with greater band gap energy, high thermal stability up to 330 .deg. C, low melting point of 218-220 .deg. C comparing to precursor selenium. Using the synthesized SeNPs, two chalcogenides such as ZnSe and CdSe semiconductor nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized using XRD, SEM with EDX and TEM analysis. The fabricated CdSe and ZnSe nanoparticles appeared like pebble and cluster structure with particle size of 29.97 nm and 22.73 nm respectively.

  19. Interaction between titanium and sulfuric acid in the electrodeposition of chalcogenide semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.

    1992-01-01

    Some chalcogenide electrodeposition problems in the cathodic potential range from -0.30 V to-0.65 V vs SCE may be related to the Titanium corrosion-passivation process in aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid. This feature was discovered accidentally when it was attempted to electrodeposit Cd-Hg-Te compounds from a ternary plating bath; an anodic current of about 10 m/cm 2 was produced in the Titanium cathode at -0.50 V vs SCE, while at -0.40 and -0.60 V vs SCE the current was cathodic. In order to explain this feature, a first study has been carried out to determine the influence of the temperature and sulfuric acid concentration on the passivation current density, passivation potential and Flade potential for passivation. From Arrhenius plots of the passivation currents an apparent activation energy of 63.8 kJ/mole for Titanium passivation in sulfuric acid at -0.50 V vs SCE was obtained. The electrochemical stability of passivated Titanium was explained by assuming that the oxide film formed exhibits n-type semiconducting character, since passivation data was in good agreement with interfacial energetics for n-TiO 2 in aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid.(Author)

  20. Effect of Se addition on optical and electrical properties of chalcogenide CdSSe thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, A. S.; Akl, Alaa A.

    2016-01-01

    Compositional dependence of optical and electrical properties of chalcogenide CdSxSe1-x (0.4 ≥ x ≥ 0.0 at. %) thin films was studied. Cadmium sulphoselenide films were deposited by thermal evaporation technique at vacuum (8.2 × 10-4 Pa) onto preheated glass substrates (523 K). The evaporation rate and film thickness were kept constant at 2.50 nm/s and 375 ± 5 nm, respectively. X-ray diffractograms showed that, the deposited films have the low crystalline nature. Energy dispersive analysis by X-ray (EDAX) was used to check the compositional elements of deposited films. The absorption coefficient was determined from transmission and reflection measurements at room temperature in the wavelength range 300-2500 nm. Optical density, skin depth, optical energy gap and Urbach's parameters of CdSSe thin films have also been estimated. The direct optical energy gap decreased from 2.248 eV to 1.749 eV when the ratio of Se-content was increased from 0.60 to 1.00 . Conduction band and valance band positions were evaluated. The temperature dependence of dc-electrical resistivity in the temperature range (293-450 K) has been reported. Three conduction regions due to different conduction mechanisms were detected. Electrical sheet resistance, activation energy and pre-exponential parameters were discussed. The estimated values of optical and electrical parameters were strongly dependent upon the Se-content in CdSSe matrix.

  1. Chalcogenide glasses for device application modified by high-energy irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavetskyy, T.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Chalcogenide glasses (ChG) or chemical compounds of chalcogen atoms (S, Se or Te, but not O) with some elements from IV-th and V-th groups of the Periodic Table (typically As, Ge, Sb, Bi, etc. ) obtained by melt quenching, are a perspective for application in modern optoelectronics, photonics, telecommunications, acoustic-optics, xerography, lithography, etc. This uniqueness is due to extremely high sensitivity of ChG to external influences, associated, presumably, with high steric flexibility proper to glassy-like network with low average atomic coordination (chalcogen atoms are typically two-fold coordinated in a glassy-like network), relatively large internal free volume and specific lp-character of electronic states localized at a valence-band top. However, at present, the further possibilities for conventional chemical/technological methods to prepare ChG are fully exhausted. One of the steps to resolve this problem is post-technological modification of ChG using possibilities of high-energy irradiation. This work is focused on new advanced radiation-modified ChG for device application in optoelectronics. The attractive practical use of these non-crystalline materials is tightly connected with radiation-induced defect formation processes. For the first time, we consider the possibilities of Raman scattering along with X-ray diffraction and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to characterize microstructural mechanisms of radiation-induced effects in ChG. (authors)

  2. Strong correlations and the search for high-Tc superconductivity in chromium pnictides and chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, J. M.; Calderón, M. J.; Liu, J.; Muñoz, M. C.; Bascones, E.

    2017-02-01

    Undoped iron superconductors accommodate n =6 electrons in five d orbitals. Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that the strength of correlations increases with hole doping, as the electronic filling approaches half filling with n =5 electrons. This evidence delineates a scenario in which the parent compound of iron superconductors is the half-filled system, in analogy to cuprate superconductors. In cuprates the superconductivity can be induced upon electron or hole doping. In this work we propose to search for high-Tc superconductivity and strong correlations in chromium pnictides and chalcogenides with n slave-spin and multiorbital random-phase-approximation calculations we analyze the strength of the correlations and the superconducting and magnetic instabilities in these systems with the main focus on LaCrAsO. We find that electron-doped LaCrAsO is a strongly correlated system with competing magnetic interactions, with (π ,π ) antiferromagnetism and nodal d -wave pairing being the most plausible magnetic and superconducting instabilities, respectively.

  3. Correlated structural and electronic phase transformations in transition metal chalcogenide under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chunyu, E-mail: licy@hpstar.ac.cn, E-mail: yanhao@hpstar.ac.cn; Ke, Feng; Yu, Zhenhai; Chen, Zhiqiang; Yan, Hao, E-mail: licy@hpstar.ac.cn, E-mail: yanhao@hpstar.ac.cn [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 (China); Hu, Qingyang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 (China); Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Zhao, Jinggeng [Natural Science Research Center, Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2016-04-07

    Here, we report comprehensive studies on the high-pressure structural and electrical transport properties of the layered transition metal chalcogenide (Cr{sub 2}S{sub 3}) up to 36.3 GPa. A structural phase transition was observed in the rhombohedral Cr{sub 2}S{sub 3} near 16.5 GPa by the synchrotron angle dispersive X-ray diffraction measurement using a diamond anvil cell. Through in situ resistance measurement, the electric resistance value was detected to decrease by an order of three over the pressure range of 7–15 GPa coincided with the structural phase transition. Measurements on the temperature dependence of resistivity indicate that it is a semiconductor-to-metal transition in nature. The results were also confirmed by the electronic energy band calculations. Above results may shed a light on optimizing the performance of Cr{sub 2}S{sub 3} based applications under extreme conditions.

  4. Chalcogenide glass-ceramic with self-organized heterojunctions: application to photovoltaic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianghua; Korolkov, Ilia; Fan, Bo; Cathelinaud, Michel; Ma, Hongli; Adam, Jean-Luc; Merdrignac, Odile; Calvez, Laurent; Lhermite, Hervé; Brizoual, Laurent Le; Pasquinelli, Marcel; Simon, Jean-Jacques

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we present for the first time the concept of chalcogenide glass-ceramic for photovoltaic applications with the GeSe2-Sb2Se3-CuI system. It has been demonstrated that thin films, deposited with the sputtering technique, are amorphous and can be crystallized with appropriate heat treatment. The thin film glass-ceramic behaves as a p-type semiconductor, even if it contains p-type Cu2GeSe3 and n-type Sb2Se3. The conductivity of Sb2Se3 has been greatly improved by appropriate iodine doping. The first photovoltaic solar cells based on the association of iodine-doped Sb2Se3 and the glass-ceramic thin films give a short-circuit current density JSC of 10 mA/cm2 and an open-circuit voltage VOC of 255 mV, with a power conversion efficiency of about 0.9%.

  5. Surface functionalization of two-dimensional metal chalcogenides by Lewis acid-base chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Sidong; Wang, Xifan; Li, Bo; Kang, Jiahao; He, Yongmin; George, Antony; Ge, Liehui; Gong, Yongji; Dong, Pei; Jin, Zehua; Brunetto, Gustavo; Chen, Weibing; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Baines, Robert; Galvão, Douglas S.; Lou, Jun; Barrera, Enrique; Banerjee, Kaustav; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of the electronic surface states of two-dimensional (2D) materials could improve their versatility and widen their applicability in electronics and sensing. To this end, chemical surface functionalization has been used to adjust the electronic properties of 2D materials. So far, however, chemical functionalization has relied on lattice defects and physisorption methods that inevitably modify the topological characteristics of the atomic layers. Here we make use of the lone pair electrons found in most of 2D metal chalcogenides and report a functionalization method via a Lewis acid-base reaction that does not alter the host structure. Atomic layers of n-type InSe react with Ti4+ to form planar p-type [Ti4+n(InSe)] coordination complexes. Using this strategy, we fabricate planar p-n junctions on 2D InSe with improved rectification and photovoltaic properties, without requiring heterostructure growth procedures or device fabrication processes. We also show that this functionalization approach works with other Lewis acids (such as B3+, Al3+ and Sn4+) and can be applied to other 2D materials (for example MoS2, MoSe2). Finally, we show that it is possible to use Lewis acid-base chemistry as a bridge to connect molecules to 2D atomic layers and fabricate a proof-of-principle dye-sensitized photosensing device.

  6. A new method for synthesis of As-Te chalcogenide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalov, Leonid; Nezhdanov, Aleksey; Usanov, Dmitry; Markelov, Aleksey; Trushin, Vladimir; Chidichimo, Giuseppe; De Filpo, Giovanni; Gogova, Daniela; Mashin, Aleksandr

    2017-11-01

    A novel Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition method for synthesis of amorphous AsxTe100-x (31 ≤ x ≤ 49) films is demonstrated. The innovative process has been developed in a non-equilibrium low-temperature argon plasma under reduced pressure, employing for the first time volatile As and Te as precursors. Utilization of inorganic precursors, in contrast to the typically used in CVD metal-organic precursors, has given us the chance to achieve ≿halcogenide As-Te films of very high quality and purity. Phase and structural evolution of the As-Te system, based on equilibrium coexistence of two phases (AsTe and As2Te3) has been studied. The dependence of structure and optical bandgap of the chalcogenide materials on their composition was established. The newly developed process is cost-effective and enables deposition of As-Te films with a thickness ranging from 10 nm to 10 μm, the latter is highly desireable for one-mode planar waveguides applications and in other components of integral optics.

  7. Pressure induced structural transitions in Lead Chalcogenides and its influence on thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John; Spinks, Michael; Borges, Pablo; Scolfaro, Luisa

    2012-03-01

    Lead chalcogenides, most notably PbTe and PbSe, have become an active area of research due to their thermoelectric (TE) properties. The high figure of merit (ZT) of these materials has brought much attention to them, due to their ability to convert waste heat into electricity, with a possible application being in engine exhaust. Here, we examine the effects of altering the lattice parameter on total ground state energy and the band gap using first principles calculations performed within Density Functional Theory and the Projector Augmented Wave approach and the Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP-PAW) code. Both PbTe and PbSe, in NaCl, orthorhombic, and CsCl structures are considered. It is found that altering the lattice parameter, which is analogous to applying external pressure on the material experimentally, has notable effects on both ground state energy and the band gap. The implications of this behavior in the TE properties of these materials are analyzed.

  8. Chalcogenide glass-ceramic with self-organized heterojunctions: application to photovoltaic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xianghua

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present for the first time the concept of chalcogenide glass-ceramic for photovoltaic applications with the GeSe2–Sb2Se3–CuI system. It has been demonstrated that thin films, deposited with the sputtering technique, are amorphous and can be crystallized with appropriate heat treatment. The thin film glass-ceramic behaves as a p-type semiconductor, even if it contains p-type Cu2GeSe3 and n-type Sb2Se3. The conductivity of Sb2Se3 has been greatly improved by appropriate iodine doping. The first photovoltaic solar cells based on the association of iodine-doped Sb2Se3 and the glass-ceramic thin films give a short-circuit current density JSC of 10 mA/cm2 and an open-circuit voltage VOC of 255 mV, with a power conversion efficiency of about 0.9%.

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopy on iron-chalcogenide superconductor Fe(Se, Te) single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukita, R.; Sugimoto, A.; Ekino, T.

    2011-01-01

    We show scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) results of Fe(Se, Te). STM topography shows square arrangements of spots with the lattice spacing 0.37 nm. Te and Se atoms are randomly distributed in the STM topography. The STM topography of FeTe exhibits clusters of separated iron atoms. We have investigated the iron-chalcogenide superconductor Fe(Se, Te) using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) technique. STM topography at 4.9 K shows clear regular square arrangements of spots with the lattice spacing ∼0.37 nm, from which what we observe are attributed to Se or Te atomic plane. In the topography, brighter and darker atomic spots are randomly distributed, which are most probably due to Te and Se atoms, respectively. For the FeTe compound, the topography exhibits clusters of the bright spots probably arising from separated iron atoms distributing over several Te lattice sites. The STS measurements clarify the existence of the large-size gap with 2Δ = 0.4-0.6 eV.

  10. The use of castor oil and ricinoleic acid in lead chalcogenide nanocrystal synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyobe, Joseph W. M.; Mubofu, Egid B.; Makame, Yahya M. M.; Mlowe, Sixberth; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2016-08-01

    A green solution-based thermolysis method for the synthesis of lead chalcogenide (PbE, E = S, Se, Te) nanocrystals in castor oil (CSTO) and its isolate ricinoleic acid (RA) is described. The blue shift observed from the optical spectra of CSTO and RA-capped PbE nanocrystals (NCs) confirmed the evidence of quantum confinement. The dimensions of PbE NCs obtained from NIR absorption spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were in good agreement. The particle sizes estimated were in the range of 20, 25, and 130 nm for castor oil-capped PbS, PbSe, and PbTe, respectively. Well-defined close to cubic-shaped particles were observed in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of PbSe and PbTe nanocrystals. The high-resolution TEM and selective area electron diffraction (SAED) micrographs of the as-synthesized crystalline PbE NCs showed distinct lattice fringes with d-spacing distances corroborating with the standard values reported in literature.

  11. A new method to study complex materials in solid state chemistry: application to chalcogenide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippens, P.E.; Olivier-Fourcade, J.; Jumas, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    We show that a combined application of Moessbauer spectroscopy and other experimental tools such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance provides a coherent picture of the local electronic structure in chalcogenide materials. In order to develop this idea we propose an analysis of the Sn, Sb and Te local electronic structures for three different systems of materials. The first example concerns the In-Sn-S system. We show that Li insertion in In 16 Sn 4 S 32 leads to changes of the Sn oxidation states from Sn(IV) to Sn(II). The second example concerns materials of the Tl-Sb-S system. We show that variations of the 121 Sb Moessbauer isomer shift and surface of the first peak of the X-ray absorption spectra at the Sb L III edge can be linearly correlated because of the main influence of the Sb 5s electrons. This is explained by changes in the local environment of the Sb atoms. The last example concerns the crystalline phases of the Tl-Sn-Te system. The formal oxidation numbers of the Te atoms are determined from 125 Te Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They are related to the different types of bonds involving the Te atoms in the Tl-Sn-Te compounds

  12. Size-controlled synthesis of chalcogen and chalcogenide nanoparticles using protic ionic liquids with imidazolium cation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meenatchi, Boominathan [Cauvery College for Women, Tamilnadu (India); Renuga, Velayutham [National College, Tamilnadu (India); Manikandan, Ayyar [Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, Bharath University, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-03-15

    Green synthesis of selenium (chalcogen) nanoparticles (SeNPs) has been successfully attained by simple wet chemical method that involves the reaction of six different protic ionic liquids with imidazolium cations and sodium hydrogen selenide (NaHSe) in the presence of poly ethylene glycol-600 (PEG-600) as an additional stabilizer. The obtained SeNPs were characterized using UV spectral (UV), Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The results illustrate that the synthesized SeNPs are spherical in shape with size ranging 19-24 nm and possess good optical property with greater band gap energy, high thermal stability up to 330 .deg. C, low melting point of 218-220 .deg. C comparing to precursor selenium. Using the synthesized SeNPs, two chalcogenides such as ZnSe and CdSe semiconductor nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized using XRD, SEM with EDX and TEM analysis. The fabricated CdSe and ZnSe nanoparticles appeared like pebble and cluster structure with particle size of 29.97 nm and 22.73 nm respectively.

  13. Infrared waveguide fabrications with an E-beam evaporated chalcogenide glass film

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaoming

    2014-12-12

    Chalcogenide glasses have a variety of unique optical properties due to the intrinsic structural flexibility and bonds metastability. They are desirable materials for many applications, such as infrared communication sensors, holographic grating, optical imaging, and ultrafast nonlinear optic devices. Here, we introduce a novel electron-beam evaporation process to deposit the good quality arsenic trisulfide (As2S3) films and then the As2S3 films were used to fabricate the As2S3 waveguides with three approaches. The first method is photoresist lift-off. Because of the restriction of thermal budget of photoresist, the As2S3 film must be deposited at the room temperature. The second one is the silicon dioxide lift-off process on sapphire substrates, in which the As2S3 film could be evaporated at a high temperature (>180 °C) for better film quality. The third one is the plasma etching process with a metal protective thin layer in the pattern development process.

  14. Direct femtosecond laser writing of buried infrared waveguides in chalcogenide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Coq, D.; Bychkov, E.; Masselin, P.

    2016-02-01

    Direct laser writing technique is now widely used in particular in glass, to produce both passive and active photonic devices. This technique offers a real scientific opportunity to generate three-dimensional optical components and since chalcogenide glasses possess transparency properties from the visible up to mid-infrared range, they are of great interest. Moreover, they also have high optical non-linearity and high photo-sensitivity that make easy the inscription of refractive index modification. The understanding of the fundamental and physical processes induced by the laser pulses is the key to well-control the laser writing and consequently to realize integrated photonic devices. In this paper, we will focus on two different ways allowing infrared buried waveguide to be obtained. The first part will be devoted to a very original writing process based on a helical translation of the sample through the laser beam. In the second part, we will report on another original method based on both a filamentation phenomenon and a point by point technique. Finally, we will demonstrate that these two writing techniques are suitable for the design of single mode waveguide for wavelength ranging from the visible up to the infrared but also to fabricate optical components.

  15. Spatial variation of mercury bioaccumulation in bats of Canada linked to atmospheric mercury deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chételat, John; Hickey, M Brian C; Poulain, Alexandre J; Dastoor, Ashu; Ryjkov, Andrei; McAlpine, Donald; Vanderwolf, Karen; Jung, Thomas S; Hale, Lesley; Cooke, Emma L L; Hobson, Dave; Jonasson, Kristin; Kaupas, Laura; McCarthy, Sara; McClelland, Christine; Morningstar, Derek; Norquay, Kaleigh J O; Novy, Richard; Player, Delanie; Redford, Tony; Simard, Anouk; Stamler, Samantha; Webber, Quinn M R; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Zanuttig, Michelle

    2018-06-01

    Wildlife are exposed to neurotoxic mercury at locations distant from anthropogenic emission sources because of long-range atmospheric transport of this metal. In this study, mercury bioaccumulation in insectivorous bat species (Mammalia: Chiroptera) was investigated on a broad geographic scale in Canada. Fur was analyzed (n=1178) for total mercury from 43 locations spanning 20° latitude and 77° longitude. Total mercury and methylmercury concentrations in fur were positively correlated with concentrations in internal tissues (brain, liver, kidney) for a small subset (n=21) of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) and big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), validating the use of fur to indicate internal mercury exposure. Brain methylmercury concentrations were approximately 10% of total mercury concentrations in fur. Three bat species were mainly collected (little brown bats, big brown bats, and northern long-eared bats [M. septentrionalis]), with little brown bats having lower total mercury concentrations in their fur than the other two species at sites where both species were sampled. On average, juvenile bats had lower total mercury concentrations than adults but no differences were found between males and females of a species. Combining our dataset with previously published data for eastern Canada, median total mercury concentrations in fur of little brown bats ranged from 0.88-12.78μg/g among 11 provinces and territories. Highest concentrations were found in eastern Canada where bats are most endangered from introduced disease. Model estimates of atmospheric mercury deposition indicated that eastern Canada was exposed to greater mercury deposition than central and western sites. Further, mean total mercury concentrations in fur of adult little brown bats were positively correlated with site-specific estimates of atmospheric mercury deposition. This study provides the largest geographic coverage of mercury measurements in bats to date and indicates that atmospheric

  16. Mercury Flow Through the Mercury-Containing Lamp Sector of the Economy of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This Scientific Investigations Report examines the flow of mercury through the mercury-containing lamp sector of the U.S. economy in 2001 from lamp manufacture through disposal or recycling. Mercury-containing lamps illuminate commercial and industrial buildings, outdoor areas, and residences. Mercury is an essential component in fluorescent lamps and high-intensity discharge lamps (high-pressure sodium, mercury-vapor, and metal halide). A typical fluorescent lamp is composed of a phosphor-coated glass tube with electrodes located at either end. Only a very small amount of the mercury is in vapor form. The remainder of the mercury is in the form of either liquid mercury metal or solid mercury oxide (mercury oxidizes over the life of the lamp). When voltage is applied, the electrodes energize the mercury vapor and cause it to emit ultraviolet energy. The phosphor coating absorbs the ultraviolet energy, which causes the phosphor to fluoresce and emit visible light. Mercury-containing lamps provide more lumens per watt than incandescent lamps and, as a result, require from three to four times less energy to operate. Mercury is persistent and toxic within the environment. Mercury-containing lamps are of environmental concern because they are widely distributed throughout the environment and are easily broken in handling. The magnitude of lamp sector mercury emissions, estimated to be 2.9 metric tons per year (t/yr), is small compared with the estimated mercury losses of the U.S. coal-burning and chlor-alkali industries, which are about 70 t/yr and about 90 t/yr, respectively.

  17. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where

  18. Human accumulation of mercury in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Poul; Mulvad, Gert; Pedersen, Henning Sloth

    2007-01-01

    In the Arctic, the traditional diet exposes its people to a high intake of mercury especially from marine mammals. To determine whether the mercury is accumulated in humans, we analyzed autopsy samples of liver, kidney and spleen from adult ethnic Greenlanders who died between 1990 and 1994 from...... a wide range of causes, natural and violent. Liver, kidney and spleen samples from between 33 and 71 case subjects were analyzed for total mercury and methylmercury, and liver samples also for selenium. Metal levels in men and women did not differ and were not related to age except in one case, i.......e. for total mercury in liver, where a significant declining concentration with age was observed. The highest total mercury levels were found in kidney followed by liver and spleen. Methylmercury followed the same pattern, but levels were much lower, constituting only 19% of the total mercury concentration...

  19. Acclimation of subsurface microbial communities to mercury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, Julia R; Rasmussen, Lasse D; Øregaard, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    of mercury tolerance and functional versatility of bacterial communities in contaminated soils initially were higher for surface soil, compared with the deeper soils. However, following new mercury exposure, no differences between bacterial communities were observed, which indicates a high adaptive potential......We studied the acclimation to mercury of bacterial communities of different depths from contaminated and noncontaminated floodplain soils. The level of mercury tolerance of the bacterial communities from the contaminated site was higher than those of the reference site. Furthermore, the level...... of the subsurface communities, possibly due to differences in the availability of mercury. IncP-1 trfA genes were detected in extracted community DNA from all soil depths of the contaminated site, and this finding was correlated to the isolation of four different mercury-resistance plasmids, all belonging...

  20. Action of mercury as a soil fungicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booer, J R

    1951-01-01

    Metallic mercury and mercury compounds in the soil retard the growth of plants. The development of mosses and lichens is inhibited, and experimental evidence shows that the growth of toadstools on turf and the activity of ascomycetes is retarded by mercury. In vitro, mercury has no fungicidal action but the rate of growth of hyphae is reduced by mercury vapour. The lack of fungicial properties of mercury and its good performance in controlling certain soil-borne diseases are reconciled by assuming that a differential retardation disturbs the relationships necessary for infection. This assumption is supported by diagrams which treat the rates of growth of the parasite and the host as population characteristics normally distributed. 21 references, 10 figures, 5 tables.

  1. Human accumulation of mercury in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, P.; Mulvad, G.; Pedersen, H. S.

    2007-01-01

    a wide range of causes, natural and violent. Liver, kidney and spleen samples from between 33 and 71 case subjects were analyzed for total mercury and methylmercury, and liver samples also for selenium. Metal levels in men and women did not differ and were not related to age except in one case, i......In the Arctic, the traditional diet exposes its people to a high intake of mercury especially from marine mammals. To determine whether the mercury is accumulated in humans, we analyzed autopsy samples of liver, kidney and spleen from adult ethnic Greenlanders who died between 1990 and 1994 from.......e. for total mercury in liver, where a significant declining concentration with age was observed. The highest total mercury levels were found in kidney followed by liver and spleen. Methylmercury followed the same pattern, but levels were much lower, constituting only 19% of the total mercury concentration...

  2. Thiosulphate assisted phytoextraction of mercury contaminated soils at the Wanshan Mercury Mining District, Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wanshan, known as the “Mercury Capital” of China, is located in the Southwest of China. Due to the extensive mining and smelting works in the Wanshan area, the local ecosystem has been serious contaminated with mercury. In the present study, a number of soil samples were taken from the Wanshan mercury mining area and the mercury fractionations in soils were analyzed using sequential extraction procedure technique. The obtained results showed that the dominate mercury fractions (represent 95% of total mercury were residual and organic bound mercury. A field trial was conducted in a mercury polluted farmland at the Wanshan mercury mine. Four plant species Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var. ASKYC (ASKYC, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.DPDH (DPDH, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.CHBD(CHBD, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.LDZY (LDZY were tested their ability to extract mercury from soil with thiosulphate amendment. The results indicated that the mercury concentration in the roots and shoots of the four plants were significantly increased with thiosulphate treatment. The mercury phytoextraction yield of ASKYC, DPDH, CHBD and LDZY were 92, 526, 294 and 129 g/ha, respectively

  3. Thiosulphate assisted phytoextraction of mercury contaminated soils at the Wanshan Mercury Mining District, Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wanshan, known as the “Mercury Capital” of China, is located in the Southwest of China. Due to the extensive mining and smelting works in the Wanshan area, the local ecosystem has been serious contaminated with mercury. In the present study, a number of soil samples were taken from the Wanshan mercury mining area and the mercury fractionations in soils were analyzed using sequential extraction procedure technique. The obtained results showed that the dominate mercury fractions (represent 95% of total mercury were residual and organic bound mercury. A field trial was conducted in a mercury polluted farmland at the Wanshan mercury mine. Four plant species Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var. ASKYC (ASKYC, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.DPDH (DPDH, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.CHBD(CHBD, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.LDZY (LDZY were tested their ability to extract mercury from soil with thiosulphate amendment. The results indicated that the mercury concentration in the roots and shoots of the four plants were significantly increased with thiosulphate treatment. The mercury phytoextraction yield of ASKYC, DPDH, CHBD and LDZY were 92, 526, 294 and 129 g/ha, respectively.

  4. Radioactive mercury distribution in biological fluids and excretion in human subjects after inhalation of mercury vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherian, M.G.; Hursh, J.B.; Clarkson, T.W.; Allen, J.

    1978-01-01

    The distribution of mercury in red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma, and its excretion in urine and feces are described in five human subjects during the first 7 days following inhalation of radioactive mercury vapor. A major portion (98%) of radioactive mercury in whole blood is initially accumulated in the RBCs and is transferred partly to the plasma compartment until the ratio of mercury in RBCs to plasma is about 2 within 20 h. The cumulative urinary and fecal excretion of mercury for 7 days is about 11.6% of the retained dose, and is closely related to the percent decline in body burden of mercury. There is little correlation between either the urinary excretion and plasma radioactivity of mercury, or the specific activities of urine and plasma mercury, suggesting a mechanism other than a direct glomerular filtration involved in the urinary excretion of recently exposed mercury. These studies suggest that blood mercury levels can be used as an index of recent exposure, while urinary levels may be an index of renal concentration of mercury. However, there is no reliable index for mercury concentration in the brain

  5. Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Googin, John M.; Napier, John M.; Makarewicz, Mark A.; Meredith, Paul F.

    1986-01-01

    A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

  6. Surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith

    1988-01-01

    The controversies surrounding the existing spectra of Mercury are discussed together with the various implications for interpretations of Mercury's surface composition. Special attention is given to the basic procedure used for reducing reflectance spectrophotometry data, the factors that must be accounted for in the reduction of these data, and the methodology for defining the portion of the surface contributing the greatest amount of light to an individual spectrum. The application of these methodologies to Mercury's spectra is presented.

  7. Mercury concentration in coal - Unraveling the puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toole-O'Neil, B.; Tewalt, S.J.; Finkelman, R.B.; Akers, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Based on data from the US Geological Survey's COALQUAL database, the mean concentration of mercury in coal is approximately 0.2 ??gg-1. Assuming the database reflects in-ground US coal resources, values for conterminous US coal areas range from 0.08 ??gg-1 for coal in the San Juan and Uinta regions to 0.22 ??gg-1 for the Gulf Coast lignites. Recalculating the COALQUAL data to an equal energy basis unadjusted for moisture differences, the Gulf Coast lignites have the highest values (36.4 lb of Hg/1012 Btu) and the Hams Fork region coal has the lowest value (4.8 lb of Hg/1012Btu). Strong indirect geochemical evidence indicates that a substantial proportion of the mercury in coal is associated with pyrite occurrence. This association of mercury and pyrite probably accounts for the removal of mercury with the pyrite by physical coal cleaning procedures. Data from the literature indicate that conventional coal cleaning removes approximately 37% of the mercury on an equal energy basis, with a range of 0% to 78%. When the average mercury reduction value is applied to in-ground mercury values from the COALQUAL database, the resulting 'cleaned' mercury values are very close to mercury in 'as-shipped' coal from the same coal bed in the same county. Applying the reduction fact or for coal cleaning to eastern US bituminous coal, reduces the mercury input load compared to lower-rank non-deaned western US coal. In the absence of analytical data on as-shipped coal, the mercury data in the COALQUAL database, adjusted for deanability where appropriate, may be used as an estimator of mercury contents of as-shipped coal. ?? 1998 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mercury and halogens in coal: Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Allan; Quick, Jeffrey C.; Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.; Senior, Constance L.

    2014-01-01

    Apart from mercury itself, coal rank and halogen content are among the most important factors inherent in coal that determine the proportion of mercury captured by conventional controls during coal combustion. This chapter reviews how mercury in coal occurs, gives available concentration data for mercury in U.S. and international commercial coals, and provides an overview of the natural variation in halogens that influence mercury capture. Three databases, the U.S. Geological Survey coal quality (USGS COALQUAL) database for in-ground coals, and the 1999 and 2010 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Information Collection Request (ICR) databases for coals delivered to power stations, provide extensive results for mercury and other parameters that are compared in this chapter. In addition to the United States, detailed characterization of mercury is available on a nationwide basis for China, whose mean values in recent compilations are very similar to the United States in-ground mean of 0.17 ppm mercury. Available data for the next five largest producers (India, Australia, South Africa, the Russian Federation, and Indonesia) are more limited and with the possible exceptions of Australia and the Russian Federation, do not allow nationwide means for mercury in coal to be calculated. Chlorine in coal varies as a function of rank and correspondingly, depth of burial. As discussed elsewhere in this volume, on a proportional basis, bromine is more effective than chlorine in promoting mercury oxidation in flue gas and capture by conventional controls. The ratio of bromine to chlorine in coal is indicative of the proportion of halogens present in formation waters within a coal basin. This ratio is relatively constant except in coals that have interacted with deep-basin brines that have reached halite saturation, enriching residual fluids in bromine. Results presented here help optimize mercury capture by conventional controls and provide a starting point for

  9. Accumulation of mercury in selected plant species grown in soils contaminated with different mercury compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Yi; Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Chen, Jian; Monts, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of our research is to screen and search for suitable plant species for phyto-remediation of mercury-contaminated soil. Currently our effort is specifically focused on mercury removal from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, where mercury contamination is a major concern. In order to cost effectively implement mercury remediation efforts, it is necessary now to obtain an improved understanding of biological means of removing mercury and mercury compounds.. Phyto-remediation is a technology that uses various plants to degrade, extract, contain, or immobilize contaminants from soil and water. In particular, phyto-extraction is the uptake of contaminants by plant roots and translocation within the plants to shoots or leaves. Contaminants are generally removed by harvesting the plants. We have investigated phyto-extraction of mercury from contaminated soil by using some of the known metal-accumulating plants since no natural plant species with mercury hyper-accumulating properties has yet been identified. Different natural plant species have been studied for mercury uptake, accumulation, toxicity and overall mercury removal efficiency. Various mercury compounds, such as HgS, HgCl 2 , and Hg(NO 3 ) 2 , were used as contaminant sources. Different types of soil were examined and chosen for phyto-remediation experiments. We have applied microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectrometry as well as conventional analytical chemistry to monitor the phyto-remediation processes of mercury uptake, translocation and accumulation, and the physiological impact of mercury contaminants on selected plant species. Our results indicate that certain plant species, such as beard grass (Polypogon monospeliensis), accumulated a very limited amount of mercury in the shoots ( 2 powder, respectively; no visual stress symptoms were observed. We also studied mercury phyto-remediation using aged soils that contained HgS, HgCl 2 , or Hg(NO 3 ) 2 . We have found that up to hundreds

  10. Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.; Marcucci, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for enriching the isotopic content of mercury. It comprises: a low pressure electric discharge lamp, the lamp comprising an envelope transparent to ultraviolet radiation and containing a fill comprising mercury and an inert gas; a filter concentrically arranged around the low pressure electric discharge lamp, the filter being transparent to ultraviolet radiation and containing mercury including 196 Hg isotope; means for controlling mercury pressure in the filter; and a reactor arranged around the filter such that radiation passes from the low pressure electric discharge lamp through the filter and into Said reactor, the reactor being transparent to ultraviolet light

  11. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  12. Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.; Marcucci, Rudolph V.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for enriching the isotopic Hg content of mercury is provided. The apparatus includes a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill including mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. In a preferred embodiment, constant mercury pressure is maintained in the filter by means of a water-cooled tube that depends from it, the tube having a drop of mercury disposed in it. The reactor is arranged around the filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of a material which is transparent to ultraviolet light.

  13. Identification of elemental mercury in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dennis G

    2015-01-06

    An apparatus and process is provided for detecting elemental mercury in soil. A sacrificial electrode of aluminum is inserted below ground to a desired location using direct-push/cone-penetrometer based equipment. The insertion process removes any oxides or previously found mercury from the electrode surface. Any mercury present adjacent the electrode can be detected using a voltmeter which indicates the presence or absence of mercury. Upon repositioning the electrode within the soil, a fresh surface of the aluminum electrode is created allowing additional new measurements.

  14. Coal fired flue gas mercury emission controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Cao, Yan; Pan, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals, harmful to both the environment and human health. Hg is released into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources and its emission control has caused much concern. This book introduces readers to Hg pollution from natural and anthropogenic sources and systematically describes coal-fired flue gas mercury emission control in industry, especially from coal-fired power stations. Mercury emission control theory and experimental research are demonstrated, including how elemental mercury is oxidized into oxidized mercury and the effect of flue gas contents on the mercury speciation transformation process. Mercury emission control methods, such as existing APCDs (air pollution control devices) at power stations, sorbent injection, additives in coal combustion and photo-catalytic methods are introduced in detail. Lab-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale experimental studies of sorbent injection conducted by the authors are presented systematically, helping researchers and engineers to understand how this approach reduces the mercury emissions in flue gas and to apply the methods in mercury emission control at coal-fired power stations.

  15. Observations of Mercury in 1988 and 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmude, R.W. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A visual study of the planet Mercury was carried out in May 1988 and in April and May 1989. Most of the observations were made with the 35.5-cm telescope at the Texas A ampersand M University Observatory. This report presents drawings and a map of Mercury that covers the longitude range of 195-285 deg. One important finding was that a polarizing filter combined with color filters gives a sharper view of the planet. It is also concluded that high-resolution images of Mercury's terminator, either as seen from the earth or with the Hubble Space Telescope, can provide information about Mercury's topography. 10 refs

  16. Fate of mercury in the Arctic (FOMA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, H.; Christensen, J.; Asmund, G.

    This report is the final reporting of the project FONA, funded by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency with means from the MIKA/DANCEA funds for Environmental Support to the Arctic Region. The aim of the project is to study the intercompartment mercury transport chain in the arctic area. From...... in the Arctic. The report focus on the surface exchange of mercury, the uptake of abiotic mercury into the biological system, and the bioaccumulation in the first steps of the food web, and the resulting distribution and time trend of mercury in selected animals feeding on various trophic levels...

  17. Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

  18. Coal fired flue gas mercury emission controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo [Shanghai Univ. of Electric Power (China); Cao, Yan; Pan, Weiping [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals, harmful to both the environment and human health. Hg is released into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources and its emission control has caused much concern. This book introduces readers to Hg pollution from natural and anthropogenic sources and systematically describes coal-fired flue gas mercury emission control in industry, especially from coal-fired power stations. Mercury emission control theory and experimental research are demonstrated, including how elemental mercury is oxidized into oxidized mercury and the effect of flue gas contents on the mercury speciation transformation process. Mercury emission control methods, such as existing APCDs (air pollution control devices) at power stations, sorbent injection, additives in coal combustion and photo-catalytic methods are introduced in detail. Lab-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale experimental studies of sorbent injection conducted by the authors are presented systematically, helping researchers and engineers to understand how this approach reduces the mercury emissions in flue gas and to apply the methods in mercury emission control at coal-fired power stations.

  19. Risk assessment of mercury contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, M.

    1993-01-01

    At two sites, highly contaminated with mercury, risk assessment was executed. Methods were developed to determine organomercury compounds in water, air and soil. Toxicity tests demonstrated the high toxicity of organomercury compounds compared to inorganic mercury. Besides highly toxic methylmercury, ethylmercury was found in soils close to a chemical plant in Marktredwitz. In ultrafiltration-experiments mercury showed great affinity to high molecular substances in water. Lysimeter-experiments proved, that organomercury compounds are adsorbed and transformed to inorganic and elemental mercury. (orig.) [de

  20. EDITORIAL: Mercury-free discharges for lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverlag, M.

    2007-07-01

    This special Cluster of articles in Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics covers the subject of mercury-free discharges that are being investigated by different light source researchers, as an alternative to existing mercury-containing lamps. The main driving force to move away from mercury-containing discharge light sources is connected to the environmentally unfriendly nature of mercury. After inhalation or direct contact, severe mercury exposure can lead to damage to human brain cells, the kidneys, the liver and the nervous system. For this reason, the use of mercury in products is becoming more and more restricted by different governmental bodies. In the lighting industry, however, many products still make use of mercury, for different reasons. The main reason is that mercury-containing products are, in most cases, more efficient than mercury-free products. For a realistic comparison of the environmental impact, the mercury-contamination due to electricity production must be taken into account, which depends on the type of fuel being used. For an average European fuel-mix, the amount of mercury that is released into the environment is around 29 μg kWh-1. This means that a typical 30 W TL lamp during a lifetime of 20,000 hours will release a total of about 20 mg mercury due to electricity production, which exceeds the total mercury dose in the lamp (more and more of which is being recycled) by a factor of 5-10 for a modern TL lamp. This illustrates that, quite apart from other environmental arguments like increased CO2 production, mercury-free alternatives that use more energy can in fact be detrimental for the total mercury pollution over the lifetime of the lamp. For this reason, the lighting industry has concentrated on lowering the mercury content in lamps as long as no efficient alternatives exist. Nevertheless, new initiatives for HID lamps and fluorescent lamps with more or less equal efficiency are underway, and a number of them are described in this

  1. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer plants to

  2. Augustus as Mercury at last

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Martins

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available My purpose in this paper is to investigate and to analyse the representation of Augustus as Mercury, and what this association may suggest and mean to the Romans from both the urbs and the prouinciae, focusing the epigraphy, the numismatic, and the literature. Furthermore, I review three researches that someway work this problem: Bandinelli, Zanker and Martins. Even though the associations between divinities and rulers were very common – Augustus represented as Apollo, Jupiter or Neptune; Tiberius as Apollo; Claudius as Jupiter; or Commodus as Hercules –, the discussion on the relationship between Augustus and Mercury is very rare in recent bibliography. The latest relevant research on this subject dates back to the first half of the twentieth century. Chittenden’s work on numismatic and Grether’s article on epigraphy are both very important. Thus, new evidences must be considered, so that we can further investigate these representations in the Roman world.

  3. The Messenger Mission to Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Domingue, D. L

    2007-01-01

    NASA’s MESSENGER mission, launched on 3 August, 2004 is the seventh mission in the Discovery series. MESSENGER encounters the planet Mercury four times, culminating with an insertion into orbit on 18 March 2011. It carries a comprehensive package of geophysical, geological, geochemical, and space environment experiments to complete the complex investigations of this solar-system end member, which begun with Mariner 10. The articles in this book, written by the experts in each area of the MESSENGER mission, describe the mission, spacecraft, scientific objectives, and payload. The book is of interest to all potential users of the data returned by the MESSENGER mission, to those studying the nature of the planet Mercury, and by all those interested in the design and implementation of planetary exploration missions.

  4. Steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  5. The Chemical Composition of Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Nittler, Larry R.; Chabot, Nancy L.; Grove, Timothy L.; Peplowski, Patrick N.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical composition of a planetary body reflects its starting conditions modified by numerous processes during its formation and geological evolution. Measurements by X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron spectrometers on the MESSENGER spacecraft revealed Mercury's surface to have surprisingly high abundances of the moderately volatile elements sodium, sulfur, potassium, chlorine, and thorium, and a low abundance of iron. This composition rules out some formation models for which high temperatur...

  6. Multiscale geomorphometric modeling of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinsky, I. V.

    2018-02-01

    Topography is one of the key characteristics of a planetary body. Geomorphometry deals with quantitative modeling and analysis of the topographic surface and relationships between topography and other natural components of landscapes. The surface of Mercury is systematically studied by interpretation of images acquired during the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. However, the Mercurian surface is still little explored by methods of geomorphometry. In this paper, we evaluate the Mercury MESSENGER Global DEM MSGR_DEM_USG_SC_I_V02 - a global digital elevation model (DEM) of Mercury with the resolution of 0.015625° - as a source for geomorphometric modeling of this planet. The study was performed at three spatial scales: the global, regional (the Caloris basin), and local (the Pantheon Fossae area) ones. As the initial data, we used three DEMs of these areas with resolutions of 0.25°, 0.0625°, and 0.015625°, correspondingly. The DEMs were extracted from the MESSENGER Global DEM. From the DEMs, we derived digital models of several fundamental morphometric variables, such as: slope gradient, horizontal curvature, vertical curvature, minimal curvature, maximal curvature, catchment area, and dispersive area. The morphometric maps obtained represent peculiarities of the Mercurian topography in different ways, according to the physical and mathematical sense of a particular variable. Geomorphometric models are a rich source of information on the Mercurian surface. These data can be utilized to study evolution and internal structure of the planet, for example, to visualize and quantify regional topographic differences as well as to refine geological boundaries.

  7. Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Guan; Han Dai

    2009-01-01

    Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role o...

  8. A first principles study of phase stability, bonding, electronic and lattice dynamical properties of beryllium chalcogenides at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabhi, Shweta; Mankad, Venu; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • First principles calculations are performed for BeS, BeSe and BeTe in B3, B8 and B1 phases. • They are indirect wide band gap semiconductors stable in B3 phase at ambient condition. • Phonon calculations at ambient and high pressure are reported. • The NiAs phase is dynamically stable at high pressure. - Abstract: The present paper reports a detailed and systematic theoretical study of structural, mechanical, electronic, vibrational and thermodynamical properties of three beryllium chalcogenides BeS, BeSe and BeTe in zinc blende, NiAs and rock salt phases by performing ab initio calculations based on density-functional theory. The calculated value of lattice constants and bulk modulus are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data and found to agree reasonably well. These compounds are indirect wide band gap semiconductors with a partially ionic contribution in all considered three phases. The zinc blende phase of these chalcogenides is found stable at ambient condition and phase transition from zinc blende to NiAs structure is found to occur. The bulk modulus, its pressure derivative, anisotropic factor, Poission’s ratio, Young’s modulus for these are also calculated and discussed. The phonon dispersion curves of these beryllium chalcogenides in zinc blende phase depict their dynamical stability in this phase at ambient condition. We have also estimated the temperature variation of specific heat at constant volume, entropy and Debye temperature for these compounds in zinc blende phase. The variation of lattice-specific heat with temperature obeys the classical Dulong–Petit’s law at high temperature, while at low-temperature it obeys the Debye’s T 3 law

  9. Toward a Unified Understanding of Mercury and Methylated Mercury from the World's Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, M. K.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Landing, W. M.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    Marine fish and shellfish are the main source of toxic methylmercury exposure for humans. As recently as decade ago, very limited aqueous methylated mercury data were available from marine settings, resulting in a generally poor understanding of the processes controlling mercury in pelagic marine food webs. Recent oceanographic cruises have significantly improved availability of reliable measurements of methylated mercury and total mercury in seawater. This presentation will focus on vertical seawater profiles collected to depths 1000 m from three recent sampling efforts in collaboration with the CLIVAR Repeat Hydrography Program sponsored by NOAA including: 1) the northeastern Pacific (P16N cruise from Honolulu, Hawaii to Kodiak, Alaska); (2) the southern Indian Ocean (I5 cruise from Cape Town, South Africa, to Fremantle, Australia); and, (3) the Southern Ocean cruise (S4P from McMurdo, Antarctica, to Punta Arenas, Chile). Analytical results presented were all derived from the USGS Mercury Research Lab (http://wi.water.usgs.gov/mercury-lab). Supporting data derived from these cruises on water mass ages, nutrients, carbon and dissolved oxygen provide an opportunity to develop a stronger understanding of the biogeochemical factors controlling oceanic distributions of mercury and methylated mercury. Whole-water, median total mercury, and methylated mercury concentrations for the northern Pacific, southern Indian, and Southern Ocean were 1.10, 0.80, and 1.65 pM, , and 0.11, 0.08, and 0.32 pM, respectively. For all three oceans, vertical profiles of total mercury generally show the lowest concentrations in the surface mixed layer, and concentration maxima at the 700-1000 m depths. Surface depletion of total mercury is attributed to photo-chemical reduction and evasion of gaseous elemental mercury as well as scavenging by settling particulate matter, the main vector of transport to the subsurface ocean. Methylated mercury in all the ocean profiles reveal distinct mid

  10. Investigation of the dynamics of a nonlinear optical response in glassy chalcogenide semiconductors by the pump–probe method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, E. A.; Kuzyutkina, Yu S.; Shiryaev, V. S.; Guizard, S.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of the results of measurements by using the pump–probe method with a femtosecond resolution in time and computer simulation of the charge carrier kinetics have revealed two types of a nonlinear optical response in samples of chalcogenide glasses belonging to the As – S – Se system, irradiated by 50-fs laser pulses with a wavelength of 0.79 μm. The difference in the nonlinear dynamics is due to the difference in the photoexcitation character, because laser radiation can be absorbed either through bound states in the band gap or without their participation, depending on the ratio of the pump photon energy to the bandgap energy.

  11. Analysis of thermal treatment effects upon optico-luminescent and scintillation characteristics of oxide and chalcogenide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhikov, Vladimir D.; Grinyov, Boris V.; Pirogov, Evgeniy N.; Galkin, Sergey N.; Nagornaya, Lyudmila L.; Bondar, Vladimir G.; Babiychuk, Inna P.; Krivoshein, Vadim I.; Silin, Vitaliy I.; Lalayants, Alexandr I.; Voronkin, Evgeniy F.; Katrunov, Konstantin A.; Onishchenko, Gennadiy M.; Vostretsov, Yuriy Ya.; Malyi, Pavel Yu.; Lisetskaya, Elena K.; Lisetskii, Longin N.

    2005-01-01

    This work has been aimed at analyzing the effects of various thermal treatment factors upon optical-luminescent, scintillation and other functional characteristics of complex oxide and chalcogenide crystals. The crystals considered in this work are scintillators with intrinsic (PWO, CWO, BGO), activator (GSO:Ce) or complex-defect ZnSe(Te) type of luminescence. Important factors of thermal treatment are not only the temperature and its variation with time, but also the chemical composition of the annealing medium, its oxidation-reduction properties

  12. Maternal transfer of mercury to songbird eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Hartman, C Alex; Herzog, Mark P

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the maternal transfer of mercury to eggs in songbirds, determined whether this relationship differed between songbird species, and developed equations for predicting mercury concentrations in eggs from maternal blood. We sampled blood and feathers from 44 house wren (Troglodytes aedon) and 34 tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) mothers and collected their full clutches (n = 476 eggs) within 3 days of clutch completion. Additionally, we sampled blood and feathers from 53 tree swallow mothers and randomly collected one egg from their clutches (n = 53 eggs) during mid to late incubation (6-10 days incubated) to evaluate whether the relationship varied with the timing of sampling the mother's blood. Mercury concentrations in eggs were positively correlated with mercury concentrations in maternal blood sampled at (1) the time of clutch completion for both house wrens (R 2  = 0.97) and tree swallows (R 2  = 0.97) and (2) during mid to late incubation for tree swallows (R 2  = 0.71). The relationship between mercury concentrations in eggs and maternal blood did not differ with the stage of incubation when maternal blood was sampled. Importantly, the proportion of mercury transferred from mothers to their eggs decreased substantially with increasing blood mercury concentrations in tree swallows, but increased slightly with increasing blood mercury concentrations in house wrens. Additionally, the proportion of mercury transferred to eggs at the same maternal blood mercury concentration differed between species. Specifically, tree swallow mothers transferred 17%-107% more mercury to their eggs than house wren mothers over the observed mercury concentrations in maternal blood (0.15-1.92 μg/g ww). In contrast, mercury concentrations in eggs were not correlated with those in maternal feathers and, likewise, mercury concentrations in maternal blood were not correlated with those in feathers (all R 2  mercury concentrations from maternal blood to eggs

  13. Worldwide trend of atmospheric mercury since 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Slemr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Concern about the adverse effects of mercury on human health and ecosystems has led to tightening emission controls since the mid 1980s. But the resulting mercury emissions reductions in many parts of the world are believed to be offset or even surpassed by the increasing emissions in rapidly industrializing countries. Consequently, concentrations of atmospheric mercury are expected to remain roughly constant. Here we show that the worldwide atmospheric mercury concentrations have decreased by about 20 to 38 % since 1996 as indicated by long-term monitoring at stations in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres combined with intermittent measurements of latitudinal distribution over the Atlantic Ocean. The total reduction of the atmospheric mercury burden of this magnitude within 14 years is unusually large among most atmospheric trace gases and is at odds with the current mercury emission inventories with nearly constant anthropogenic emissions over this period. This suggests a major shift in the biogeochemical cycle of mercury including oceans and soil reservoirs. Decreasing reemissions from the legacy of historical mercury emissions are the most likely explanation for this decline since the hypothesis of an accelerated oxidation rate of elemental mercury in the atmosphere is not supported by the observed trends of other trace gases. Acidification of oceans, climate change, excess nutrient input and pollution may also contribute by their impact on the biogeochemistry of ocean and soils. Consequently, models of the atmospheric mercury cycle have to include soil and ocean mercury pools and their dynamics to be able to make projections of future trends.

  14. Recovery of Mercury From Contaminated Liquid Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Base Contract program emphasized the manufacture and testing of superior sorbents for mercury removal, testing of the sorption process at a DOE site, and determination of the regeneration conditions in the laboratory. During this project, ADA Technologies, Inc. demonstrated the following key elements of a successful regenerable mercury sorption process: (1) sorbents that have a high capacity for dissolved, ionic mercury; (2) removal of ionic mercury at greater than 99% efficiency; and (3) thermal regeneration of the spent sorbent. ADA's process is based on the highly efficient and selective sorption of mercury by noble metals. Contaminated liquid flows through two packed columns that contain microporous sorbent particles on which a noble metal has been finely dispersed. A third column is held in reserve. When the sorbent is loaded with mercury to the point of breakthrough at the outlet of the second column, the first column is taken off-line and the flow of contaminated liquid is switched to the second and third columns. The spent column is regenerated by heating. A small flow of purge gas carries the desorbed mercury to a capture unit where the liquid mercury is recovered. Laboratory-scale tests with mercuric chloride solutions demonstrated the sorbents' ability to remove mercury from contaminated wastewater. Isotherms on surrogate wastes from DOE's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee showed greater than 99.9% mercury removal. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests on actual Y-12 Plant wastes were also successful. Mercury concentrations were reduced to less than 1 ppt from a starting concentration of 1,000 ppt. The treatment objective was 50 ppt. The sorption unit showed 10 ppt discharge after six months. Laboratory-scale tests demonstrated the feasibility of sorbent regeneration. Results show that sorption behavior is not affected after four cycles

  15. Mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Streptococcus pyogenes loaded Dowex Optipore SD-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan; Karaman, Isa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    A solid phase extraction procedure based on speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury on Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Dowex Optipore SD-2 has been established. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 mol L -1 HCl for methyl mercury and 2 mol L -1 HCl for mercury(II) were performed at pH 8. The determination of mercury levels was performed by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes, etc., were investigated. The influences of the some alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some transition metals on the recoveries were also investigated. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 4.8 and 3.4 mg g -1 . The detection limit (3 sigma) of the reagent blank for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 2.1 and 1.5 ng L -1 . Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The relative standard deviations of the procedure were below 7%. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material (NRCC-DORM 2 Dogfish Muscle). The procedure was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and environmental samples.

  16. Mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Streptococcus pyogenes loaded Dowex Optipore SD-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzen, Mustafa, E-mail: m.tuzen@gmail.com [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Karaman, Isa [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Biology Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-09-30

    A solid phase extraction procedure based on speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury on Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Dowex Optipore SD-2 has been established. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HCl for methyl mercury and 2 mol L{sup -1} HCl for mercury(II) were performed at pH 8. The determination of mercury levels was performed by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes, etc., were investigated. The influences of the some alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some transition metals on the recoveries were also investigated. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 4.8 and 3.4 mg g{sup -1}. The detection limit (3 sigma) of the reagent blank for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 2.1 and 1.5 ng L{sup -1}. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The relative standard deviations of the procedure were below 7%. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material (NRCC-DORM 2 Dogfish Muscle). The procedure was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and environmental samples.

  17. Engineering of lead chalcogenide nanostructures for carrier multiplication: Core/shell, 1D, and 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qianglu

    Near infrared emitting semiconductors have been used widely in industry especially in solar-cell fabrications. The efficiency of single junction solar-cell can reach the Shockley-Queisser limit by using optimum band gap material such as silicon and cadmium telluride. The theoretical efficiency can be further enhanced through carrier multiplication, in which a high energy photon is absorbed and more than one electron-hole pair can be generated, reaching more than 100% quantum efficiency in the high energy region of sunlight. The realization of more than unity external quantum efficiency in lead selenide quantum dots solar cell has motivated vast investigation on lowering the carrier multiplication threshold and further improving the efficiency. This dissertation focuses on synthesis of lead chalcogenide nanostructures for their optical spectroscopy studies. PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots were synthesized by cation exchange to obtain thick shells (up to 14 monolayers) for studies of visible and near infrared dual band emissions and carrier multiplication efficiency. By examining the reaction mechanism, a thermodynamic and a kinetic model are introduced to explain the vacancy driven cation exchange. As indicated by the effective mass model, PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots has quasi-type-II band alignment, possessing electron delocalized through the entire quantum dot and hole localized in the core, which breaks down the symmetry of energy levels in the conduction and valence band, leading to hot-hole-assisted efficient multi-exciton generation and a lower carrier multiplication threshold to the theoretical value. For further investigation of carrier multiplication study, PbTe, possessing the highest efficiency among lead chalcogenides due to slow intraband cooling, is synthesized in one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanostructures. By using dodecanethiol as the surfactant, PbTe NRs can be prepared with high uniformity in width and resulted in fine quantum

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Transition Metal Chalcogenide Phases for Energy Storage, Energy Conversion and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Erica Maxine

    Today's energy needs are primarily provided by fossil fuels, which are harvested from the earth. Consuming fossil fuels to provide energy for civilization releases products into the atmosphere that contribute to climate change. Ongoing efforts to combat the existential crisis which climate change presents many of the emerging and commercialized technologies for solar, thermoelectric and battery applications involve transition metal chalcogenides. Some of the materials used for these applications are expensive and rare, such as gallium, vanadium and indium, or have no merits towards environmental stewardship, such as cadmium and lead. Thus, the purpose of this work is to further the ongoing effort to discover and develop new materials which are able to meet or exceed benchmarks for their application. This work focuses on the development of various metal chalcogenide material systems featuring d-block transition metals selected for their contribution to alter structure and properties. Various thermal, electronic and optical properties can be changed through substitution or doping with additional elements to affect to the base composition or as part of a gradient composition series. After an extensive description of experimental methods which describe the associated materials synthesis, processing and characterization techniques in chapter 2, chapter 3 explores the Cu4-xLixS 2 phases for their contribution as further evidence in the formation of lithiated copper sulfide phases as part of the intercalation reaction before being converted to the binaries copper and lithium sulfide. Chapter 4 documents the development of Cu4TiSe4, a novel material with potential for thin-film photovoltaic technologies with its band gap in the range where the solar spectrum is the most bountiful (Eg,indirect = 1.16 eV, Eg,direct = 1.34 eV), an outstanding optical absorbance ( > 10-4 cm-1) outperforming commercially successful materials in the solar spectrum, and suitable for thin

  19. Open-framework micro- and meso-structured chalcogenides and their ion exchange properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Nan

    2007-12-01

    Micro- and meso- structured chalcogenides with open inorganic framework have driven tremendous attention and intense work during the last two decades. They belong to a special category of materials possessing multifunctional potential due to their large void space within the atomic skeletons and the novel physical properties brought by the chalcogen elements. The latter are not generally present in typical open-framework oxides. In addition, because of the different size and electronegativity of the chalcogen elements compared to oxygen, many new structural properties were expected to emerge when the work in this dissertation was undertaken. The major body of this work involves group 13 (e.g. Ga, In) or 14 (e.g. Ge, Sn) elements with chalcogen. Transition metals also are incorporated in a few examples. The first two groups of compounds reported belong to the latter case. Unique structure types have been obtained under hydrothermal conditions via the combination of M (M = Zn, Cd), Sn and Q (Q = S, Se) to build microporous A6M4Sn3Q13 (A = K, Rb) based on truncated penta-supertrahedral cluster [M4Sn4Q 17]10-. More surprisingly, the protonation of K 6Cd4Sn3Se13 led to another new compound K14Cd15Sn12Se46 which possesses a labyrinth-like void space within the compact [Cd15Sn12Se 46]14- anionic skeleton. This structural characteristic leads to an unusual stability of the compound in acid. Both the K6Cd 4Sn3Se13 and K14Cd15Sn 12Se46 are fast ion-exchangers and their K+ ions can be replaced by other alkali metal cations and even H+ for the latter. Other work reported was aimed at the heavier analogs of alumiophosphate, i.e. the open-frameworks based on group 13 (Ga, In), 15 (Sb) and chalcogen elements. Two groups of chalcoantimonates with two-dimensional architectures [M5Sb6S19]5- and polymorphic [M2Sb2Q7]2- (M = Ga, In; Q = S, Se) were obtained. With the help of bulky organic structure-directing agents, large windows were formed in some of these anionic slabs. The windows

  20. Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety. PMID:23230464

  1. Microorganism mediated biosynthesis of metal chalcogenides; a powerful tool to transform toxic effluents into functional nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vena, M. Paula; Jobbágy, Matías; Bilmes, Sara A., E-mail: sarabil@qi.fcen.uba.ar

    2016-09-15

    Cadmium contained in soil and water can be taken up by certain crops and aquatic organisms and accumulate in the food-chain, thus removal of Cd from mining or industrial effluents – i.e. Ni-Cd batteries, electroplating, pigments, fertilizers – becomes mandatory for human health. In parallel, there is an increased interest in the production of luminescent Q-dots for applications in bioimaging, sensors and electronic devices, even the present synthesis methods are economic and environmentally costly. An alternative green pathway for producing Metal chalcogenides (MC: CdS, CdSe, CdTe) nanocrystals is based on the metabolic activity of living organisms. Intracellular and extracellular biosynthesis of can be achieved within a biomimetic approach feeding living organisms with Cd precursors providing new routes for combining bioremediation with green routes for producing MC nanoparticles. In this mini-review we present the state-of-the-art of biosynthesis of MC nanoparticles with a critical discussion of parameters involved and protocols. Few existing examples of scaling-up are also discussed. A modular reactor based on microorganisms entrapped in biocompatible mineral matrices – already proven for bioremediation of dissolved dyes – is proposed for combining both Cd-depletion and MC nanoparticle's production. - Highlights: • Removal of heavy metals by living matter is feasible trough biosorption and bioaccumulation • Algae, fungi, bacteria and yeasts can synthesize CdS, CdSe and CdTe Q-dots • Encapsulation of microorganisms in mineral gels provides building blocks for reactor design. • Depletion of Cd with production of Q-dots can be achieved with modular bioreactors with entrapped cells.

  2. Vapor-phase elemental mercury adsorption by Ca(OH){sub 2} impregnated with MnO{sub 2} and Ag in fixed-bed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.J. Wang; Y.F. Duan; Z.J. Huang; S.L. Meng; L.G. Yang; C.S. Zhao [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2010-05-15

    The ability of three sorbents (untreated Ca(OH){sub 2}, MnO{sub 2}-impregnated Ca(OH){sub 2} and Ag-impregnated Ca(OH){sub 2}) removing the elemental mercury had been studied using a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor at 80{sup o}C under simulated fuel gas conditions. The adsorption performance of the three sorbents was compared by mercury removal efficiency and adsorption capacity. The effect of acid gases such as HCl and SO{sub 2} on the mercury removal was investigated and presented in this article. The results showed that the mercury removal by Ca(OH){sub 2} was mainly controlled by physical mechanisms. In the case of Ca(OH){sub 2}, the presence of both SO{sub 2} and HCl promoted the Hg{sup 0} removal, and compared HCl with SO{sub 2}, HCl had a higher mercury removal than SO{sub 2}. Ca(OH){sub 2} impregnated with MnO{sub 2} had a slightly higher mercury removal than the original Ca(OH){sub 2}, but it was beneficial for mercury speciation. The presence of both SO{sub 2} and HCl promotes the Hg0 removal greatly, which was adsorbed by Ca(OH){sub 2} impregnated with MnO{sub 2}. The Ca(OH){sub 2} impregnated with MnO{sub 2} adsorbed more than 50% total Hg due to the occurrence of chemisorptions. The mercury removal by Ca(OH){sub 2} impregnated with Ag was the highest. This may be because mercury integrated with silver easily that could produce silver amalgam alloy.

  3. Rapid Monitoring of Mercury in Air from an Organic Chemical Factory in China Using a Portable Mercury Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yasutake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A chemical factory, using a production technology of acetaldehyde with mercury catalysis, was located southeast of Qingzhen City in Guizhou Province, China. Previous research showed heavy mercury pollution through an extensive downstream area. A current investigation of the mercury distribution in ambient air, soils, and plants suggests that mobile mercury species in soils created elevated mercury concentrations in ambient air and vegetation. Mercury concentrations of up to 600 ng/m3 in air over the contaminated area provided evidence of the mercury transformation to volatile Hg(0. Mercury analysis of soil and plant samples demonstrated that the mercury concentrations in soil with vaporized and plant-absorbable forms were higher in the southern area, which was closer to the factory. Our results suggest that air monitoring using a portable mercury analyzer can be a convenient and useful method for the rapid detection and mapping of mercury pollution in advanced field surveys.

  4. Can Silicon-Smelting Contribute to the Low O/Si Ratio on the Surface of Mercury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Vander Kaaden, K. E.; Hogancamp, J.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Boyce, J. W.

    2018-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft collected data that provided important insights into the structure, chemical makeup, and compositional diversity of Mercury. Among the many discoveries about Mercury made by MESSENGER, several surprising compositional characteristics of the surface were observed. These discoveries include elevated sulfur abundances (up to 4 wt.%), elevated abundances of graphitic carbon (0-4.1 wt.% across the surface with an additional 1-3 wt.% graphite above the global average in low reflectance materials), low iron abundances (less than 2 wt.%), and low oxygen abundances (O/Si weight ratio of 1.20+/-0.1). These exotic characteristics likely have important implications for the thermochemical evolution of Mercury and point to a planet that formed under highly reducing conditions. In the present study, we focus specifically on the low O/Si ratio of Mercury, which is anomalous compared to all other planetary materials. A recent study that considered the geochemical implications of the low O/Si ratio reported that 12-20% of the surface materials on Mercury are composed of Si-rich, Si-Fe alloys. They further postulated that the origin of the metal is best explained by a combination of space weathering and graphite-induced smelting that was facilitated by interaction of graphite with boninitic and komatiitic parental liquids. The goal of the present study is to assess the plausibility of smelting on Mercury through experiments run at the conditions that McCubbin et al. indicated would be favorable for Si-smelting.

  5. Sexual differences in the excretion of organic and inorganic mercury by methyl mercury-treated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.J.; Fisher, H.L.; Sumler, M.R.; Mushak, P.; Hall, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Adult male and female Long Evans rats received 1 mumole of methyl ( 203 Hg) mercuric chloride per kilogram sc. Whole-body retention of mercury and excretion of organic and inorganic mercury in urine and feces were monitored for 98 days after dosing. Females cleared mercury from the body more rapidly than did males. The major route of mercury excretion was feces. By 98 days after dosing, cumulative mercury excretion in feces accounted for about 51% of the dose in males and about 54% of the dose in females. For both sexes, about 33% of the dose was excreted in feces as inorganic mercury. Cumulative excretion of organic mercury in feces accounted for about 18 and 21% of the dose in males and females, respectively. Urinary excretion of mercury was quantitatively a smaller route for mercury clearance but important sexual differences in loss by this route were found. Over the 98-day experimental period, males excreted in urine about 3.2% of the dose and females excreted 7.5%. Cumulative organic Hg excretion in urine accounted for 1.8% of the dose in males and 5.3% of the dose in females. These sexual differences in urinary and fecal excretion of organic and inorganic mercury following methyl mercury treatment were consistent with previous reports of sexual differences in mercury distribution and retention in methyl mercury-treated rats, particularly sexual differences in organic mercury uptake and retention in the kidney. Relationships between body burdens of organic or inorganic Hg and output of these forms of Hg in urine and feces were also found to be influenced by the interval after MeHg treatment and by sex. Relationship between concentration of Hg in liver and feces and in kidney and urine differed for organic and inorganic Hg and depended upon sexual status and interval after MeHg treatment

  6. A Challenging Case of Acute Mercury Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nayfeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mercury exists in multiple forms: elemental, organic, and inorganic. Its toxic manifestations depend on the type and magnitude of exposure. The role of colonoscopic decompression in acute mercury toxicity is still unclear. We present a case of acute elemental mercury toxicity secondary to mercury ingestion, which markedly improved with colonoscopic decompression. Clinical Case. A 54-year-old male presented to the ED five days after ingesting five ounces (148 cubic centimeters of elemental mercury. Examination was only significant for a distended abdomen. Labs showed elevated serum and urine mercury levels. An abdominal radiograph showed radiopaque material throughout the colon. Succimer and laxatives were initiated. The patient had recurrent bowel movements, and serial radiographs showed interval decrease of mercury in the descending colon with interval increase in the cecum and ascending colon. Colonoscopic decompression was done successfully. The colon was evacuated, and a repeat radiograph showed decreased hyperdense material in the colon. Three months later, a repeat radiograph showed no hyperdense material in the colon. Conclusion. Ingested elemental mercury can be retained in the colon. Although there are no established guidelines for colonoscopic decompression, our patient showed significant improvement. We believe further studies on this subject are needed to guide management practices.

  7. Mercury in tropical and subtropical coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Monica F.; Landing, William M.; Kehrig, Helena A.; Barletta, Mário; Holmes, Christopher D.; Barrocas, Paulo R. G.; Evers, David C.; Buck, David G.; Vasconcellos, Ana Claudia; Hacon, Sandra S.; Moreira, Josino C.; Malm, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities influence the biogeochemical cycles of mercury, both qualitatively and quantitatively, on a global scale from sources to sinks. Anthropogenic processes that alter the temporal and spatial patterns of sources and cycling processes are changing the impacts of mercury contamination on aquatic biota and humans. Human exposure to mercury is dominated by the consumption of fish and products from aquaculture operations. The risk to society and to ecosystems from mercury contamination is growing, and it is important to monitor these expanding risks. However, the extent and manner to which anthropogenic activities will alter mercury sources and biogeochemical cycling in tropical and sub-tropical coastal environments is poorly understood. Factors as (1) lack of reliable local/regional data; (2) rapidly changing environmental conditions; (3) governmental priorities and; (4) technical actions from supra-national institutions, are some of the obstacles to overcome in mercury cycling research and policy formulation. In the tropics and sub-tropics, research on mercury in the environment is moving from an exploratory “inventory” phase towards more process-oriented studies. Addressing biodiversity conservation and human health issues related to mercury contamination of river basins and tropical coastal environments are an integral part of paragraph 221 paragraph of the United Nations document “The Future We Want” issued in Rio de Janeiro in June 2012. PMID:22901765

  8. Mercury Sorption onto Malt Spent Rootlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manariotis, I. D.; Anagnostopoulos, V.; Karapanagioti, H. K.; Chrysikopoulos, C.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is a metal of particular concern due to its toxicity even at relatively low concentrations. The maximum permissible level for mercury in drinking water set by the European Union is 0.001 mg/L. Mercury is released into the environment via four principal pathways: (1) natural processes; i.e. a volcanic eruption, (2) incidental to some other activity; i.e. coal burning power plants, (3) accidentally during the manufacture, breakage or disposal of products that have mercury put into them deliberately, and (4) direct use in industrial settings. The present study focuses on the removal of mercury (II) from aqueous solutions via sorption onto Malt Spent Rootlets (MSR). Batch experiments were conducted employing MSR with size ranging from 0.18 to 1 mm. The effects of pH, mercury concentration, contact time, and solid to liquid ratio on mercury sorption onto MSR were investigated. The highest mercury removal from the aqueous phase, of 41%, was observed at pH of 5.

  9. Recent Advances in Atmospheric Chemistry of Mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Si

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is one of the most toxic metals and has global importance due to the biomagnification and bioaccumulation of organomercury via the aquatic food web. The physical and chemical transformations of various mercury species in the atmosphere strongly influence their composition, phase, transport characteristics and deposition rate back to the ground. Modeling efforts to assess global cycling of mercury require an accurate understanding of atmospheric mercury chemistry. Yet, there are several key uncertainties precluding accurate modeling of physical and chemical transformations. We focus this article on recent studies (since 2015 on improving our understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of mercury. We discuss recent advances in determining the dominant atmospheric oxidant of elemental mercury (Hg0 and understanding the oxidation reactions of Hg0 by halogen atoms and by nitrate radical (NO3—in the aqueous reduction of oxidized mercury compounds (HgII as well as in the heterogeneous reactions of Hg on atmospheric-relevant surfaces. The need for future research to improve understanding of the fate and transformation of mercury in the atmosphere is also discussed.

  10. Episodic bioavailability of environmental mercury: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perennial wildfires in Africa and other continents contribute an estimated 8 x 105 kg of mercury to the global atmosphere with a residence time of approximately one year. This phenomenon changes the flux of biologically available mercury in natural microbial communities where enzymatic actions, including mercuric ...

  11. Increased Mercury Bioaccumulation Follows Water Quality Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogle, M.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-09-15

    Changes in physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic habitats made to reduce or eliminate ecological risks can sometimes have unforeseen consequences. Environmental management activities on the U.S. Dept. of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee,have succeeded in improving water quality in streams impacted by discharges fi-om industrial facilities and waste disposal sites. The diversity and abundance of pollution-sensitive components of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of three streams improved after new waste treatment systems or remedial actions reduced inputs of various toxic chemicals. Two of the streams were known to be mercury-contaminated from historical spills and waste disposal practices. Waterborne mercury concentrations in the third were typical of uncontaminated systems. In each case, concentrations of mercury in fish, or the apparent biological availability of mercury increased over the period during which ecological metrics indicated improved water quality. In the system where waterborne mercury concentrations were at background levels, increased mercury bioaccumulation was probably a result of reduced aqueous selenium concentrations; however, the mechanisms for increased mercury accumulation in the other two streams remain under investigation. In each of the three systems, reduced inputs of metals and inorganic anions was followed by improvements in the health of aquatic invertebrate communities. However, this reduction in risk to aquatic invertebrates was accompanied by increased risk to humans and piscivorous wildlife related to increased mercury concentrations in fish.

  12. Intentional intravenous mercury injection | Yudelowitz | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intravenous mercury injection is rarely seen, with few documented cases. Treatment strategies are not clearly defined for such cases, although a few options do show benefit. This case report describes a 29-year-old man suffering from bipolar disorder, who presented following self-inflicted intravenous injection of mercury.

  13. Mercury soil surveys: a good reconnaissance tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, C.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01

    Three examples of mercury soil surveys are discussed, along with the gravity data. An excellent correlation was found in southern Arizona between buried structures revealed by gravity and mercury soil surveys. The advantages of the latter over the former as a reconnaissance tool are listed. (MHR)

  14. Increased Mercury Bioaccumulation Follows Water Quality Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogle, M.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic habitats made to reduce or eliminate ecological risks can sometimes have unforeseen consequences. Environmental management activities on the U.S. Dept. of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee,have succeeded in improving water quality in streams impacted by discharges fi-om industrial facilities and waste disposal sites. The diversity and abundance of pollution-sensitive components of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of three streams improved after new waste treatment systems or remedial actions reduced inputs of various toxic chemicals. Two of the streams were known to be mercury-contaminated from historical spills and waste disposal practices. Waterborne mercury concentrations in the third were typical of uncontaminated systems. In each case, concentrations of mercury in fish, or the apparent biological availability of mercury increased over the period during which ecological metrics indicated improved water quality. In the system where waterborne mercury concentrations were at background levels, increased mercury bioaccumulation was probably a result of reduced aqueous selenium concentrations; however, the mechanisms for increased mercury accumulation in the other two streams remain under investigation. In each of the three systems, reduced inputs of metals and inorganic anions was followed by improvements in the health of aquatic invertebrate communities. However, this reduction in risk to aquatic invertebrates was accompanied by increased risk to humans and piscivorous wildlife related to increased mercury concentrations in fish

  15. Anthropogenic mercury deposition to arctic lake sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermanson, M.H. [Westchester University, Westchester, PA (United States). Dept. of Health

    1998-01-01

    The history of atmospheric mercury inputs to remote arctic regions can be measured in lake sediment cores using lead-210 chronology. In the investigation, total mercury deposition is measured in sediments from Imitavik and Annak Lakes on the Belcher Islands in southeastern Hudson Bay, an area in the southern Canadian Arctic with no history of local industrial or agricultural sources of contamination. Both lakes received background and atmospheric inputs of mercury while Annak also received mercury from raw domestic sewage from the Hamlet of Sanikiluaq, a growing Inuit community of about 550 established in the late 1960s. Results from Imitavik show that anthropogenic mercury inputs, apparently transported through the atmosphere, began to appear in the mid-eighteenth century, and continued to the 1990s. Annak had a similar mercury history until the late 1960s when disposal of domestic sewage led to increased sediment and contaminant accumulation. The high input of mercury to Annak confirms that Sanikiluaq residents are exposed to mercury through native food sources. 39 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Mercury-free discharges for lighting - editorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverlag, M.

    2007-01-01

    This special Cluster of articles in Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics covers the subject of mercury-free discharges that are being investigated by different light source researchers, as an alternative to existing mercury-containing lamps. The main driving force to move away from

  17. Urban artisanal gold shops and mercury emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordy, P.; Veiga, M.; Carrasco, V.H.G.

    2008-01-01

    Artisanal miners in developing countries use mercury amalgamation processes to extract gold. The amalgams are then refined before being sold on to urban gold shops. The amalgams can often contain between 2 to 40 per cent mercury. Unburned amalgams are also often sold directly to gold shops. There are serious health risks for shop employees and nearby populations when the gold is melted and further purified. Studies have shown that mercury concentrations in the ambient air of gold shops often exceeds World Health Organization (WHO) limits by an order of magnitude or more. This study examined the practices and technologies used to refine gold in Latin America and Indonesia. The study compared and contrasted various refining methods and their resulting mercury emissions. Methods of reducing mercury emissions were also investigated, including a filtration system designed to capture 80 per cent of mercury emissions. Barriers to implementing mercury emissions reduction plans were also investigated. It was concluded that the design of urban gold shops must include condensers, fume hoods, and efficient mercury capture systems. 15 refs

  18. Mercury distribution in Douro estuary (Portugal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramalhosa, E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)]. E-mail: eduper@dq.ua.pt; Vale, C. [National Institute for Agronomy and Fishery Research, IPIMAR, Avenida Brasilia, 1449-006 Lisboa (Portugal); Valega, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Monterroso, P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Duarte, A.C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2005-11-15

    Determinations of dissolved reactive and total dissolved mercury, particulate and sedimentary mercury, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and suspended particulate matter (SPM) have been made in the estuary of river Douro, in northern Portugal. The estuary was stratified by salinity along most of its length, it had low concentrations of SPM, typically <20 mg dm{sup -3}, and concentrations of DOC in the range <1.0-1.8 mg dm{sup -3}. The surface waters had a maximum dissolved concentration of reactive mercury of about 10 ng dm{sup -3}, whereas for the more saline bottom waters it was about 65 ng dm{sup -3}. The surface waters had maximum concentrations of total suspended particulate mercury of {approx}7 {mu}g g{sup -1} and the bottom waters were always <1 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Concentrations of mercury in sediments was low and in the range from 0.06 to 0.18 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The transport of mercury in surface waters was mainly associated with organic-rich particulate matter, while in bottom waters the dissolved phase transport of mercury is more important. Lower particulate organic matter, formation of chlorocomplexes in more saline waters and eventually the presence of colloids appear to explain the difference of mercury partitioning in Douro estuarine waters.

  19. Mercury cycling in peatland watersheds. Chapter 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall K. Kolka; Carl P.J. Mitchell; Jeffrey D. Jeremiason; Neal A. Hines; David F. Grigal; Daniel R. Engstrom; Jill K. Coleman-Wasik; Edward A. Nater; Edward B. Swain; Bruce A. Monson; Jacob A. Fleck; Brian Johnson; James E. Almendinger; Brian A. Branfireun; Patrick L. Brezonik; James B. Cotner

    2011-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is of great environmental concern due to its transformation into the toxic methylmercury (MeHg) form that bioaccumulates within the food chain and causes health concerns for both humans and wildlife (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2002). Mercury can affect neurological development in fetuses and young children. In adults, exposure to Hg can lead to...

  20. EURISOL MERCURY TARGET EXPERIMENT: CERN SAFETY REPORT

    CERN Document Server

    J. Gulley (CERN SC/GS)

    Report on a visit to the mercury-handling lab at IPUL. The aim was to provide recommendations to IPUL on general health and safety issues relatring to the handling of mercury, the objective being to reduce exposure to acceptable levels, so far as is reasonably practical.