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Sample records for mepivacaine

  1. Clonidine-mepivacaine mixture vs plain mepivacaine in paediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivani, G; Mattioli, G; Rega, M; Conio, A; Jasonni, V; de Negri, P

    1996-01-01

    In a double-blind study, 42 children, aged 1-10, undergoing general subumbilical surgery, were randomly allocated to two groups; they received, via caudal extradural, 1% mepivacaine 7 mg.kg-1 and normal saline 1 ml (Group 1) and a mixture of 1% mepivacaine 7 mg.kg-1 plus clonidine 2 micrograms.kg-1 and normal saline up to 1 ml (Group 2) respectively. No significant difference was noticed in age, weight, duration of surgery and onset time of anaesthesia, blood pressure, heart rate and oxygen saturation. Mean duration of analgesia (evaluated with 'Broadman objective pain scale') was 143 min for Group 1 and 218 min for Group 2 (P < 0.05); the time of sedation (evaluated with a sedation score) was statistically longer in Group 2 (172 min vs 89 min in Group 1). This longer sedation is due both to the longer analgesia and partially to a side effect of clonidine. In conclusion the addition of 2 micrograms.kg-1 of clonidine to mepivacaine prolongs the duration of caudal analgesia in children.

  2. Plasma mepivacaine concentrations in patients undergoing third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarparo, H C; Maia, R N; Filho, Ea Dos Santos; Soares, Ecs; Costa, Fwg; Fonteles, Csr; Bezerra, T P; Ribeiro, T R; Romero, N R

    2016-12-01

    Local anaesthetic-related systemic toxicity mainly results from elevated plasma concentrations of these drugs. We hypothesized that intraoral injection of submaximal doses of mepivacaine does not lead to toxic levels of this drug in blood. This study evaluated the plasma levels of mepivacaine in third molars surgeries. Twenty-one patients were randomly assigned into two groups: group I (two unilateral third molars; submaximal dose of mepivacaine 108 mg with epinephrine 54 μg) and group II (four third molars; submaximal dose of mepivacaine 216 mg with epinephrine 108 μg). Blood samples were collected before anaesthesia, and 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 60, 90 and 120 min after anaesthesia. Individual peak plasma concentrations ranged 0.77-8.31 μg/mL (group I) and from 2.36-7.72 μg/mL (group II). An increase in the average dose of mepivacaine from 1.88 ± 0.12 mg/kg (group I) to 3.35 ± 0.17 mg/kg (group II) increased the mean mepivacaine peak plasma levels from 2.33 ± 0.58 to 4.01 ± 0.69 μg/mL, respectively. Four patients obtained plasma levels of mepivacaine above the threshold for toxicity (5 μg/mL). Toxic levels of mepivacaine are possible, even when a submaximal dose is used. A twofold increase in the dose of mepivacaine caused the mean peak plasma concentration to increase proportionally, indicating that they may be predicted based on the relation of dose per bodyweight. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  3. ECMO for Cardiac Rescue after Accidental Intravenous Mepivacaine Application

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    Michael Froehle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mepivacaine is a potent local anaesthetic and used for infiltration and regional anaesthesia in adults and pediatric patients. Intoxications with mepivacaine affect mainly the CNS and the cardiovascular system. We present a case of accidental intravenous mepivacaine application and intoxication of an infant resulting in seizure, broad complex bradyarrhythmia, arterial hypotension and finally cardiac arrest. The patient could be rescued by prolonged resuscitations and a rapid initiation of ECMO and survived without neurological damage. The management strategies of this rare complication including promising other treatment options with lipid emulsions are discussed.

  4. The stability and microbial contamination of bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine used for lameness diagnostics in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, D. M. T.; Cornett, C.; Damborg, P.

    2016-01-01

    Local anaesthetics (LAs) are frequently used for diagnostic procedures in equine veterinary practice. The objective of this study was to investigate the physico-chemical stability and bacterial contamination of bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine used for lameness examinations in horses. The LAs...... serially in both new and repeatedly punctured (RP) vials. Mepivacaine remained chemically stable. A 1.9% increase in bupivacaine concentration was evident in one group, whereas a 1.9–3.7% decrease was noted in six groups. Risk factors associated with a change in concentration were light and RP vials...... in practice vehicles were risk factors for degradation. No contamination was present in any of the LAs and pH remained stable. Commercially available solutions of lidocaine, mepivacaine and bupivacaine stored under common veterinary field conditions are extremely stable and sterile for extended periods...

  5. Cardiovascular And Etectrocardiographic Effects Of Lidocaine And Mepivacaine With And Without Adrenaline Using Mandibular Nerve Block Anesthesia Technique In Healthy Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Manuel; Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Ex Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Ramón Rosales, Arturo; Ex Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Aguirre Siancas, Ernesto; Ex Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Zegarra Cuya, Manuel; Ex Docentes del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas FO UNMSM.; Cabrejos Álvarez, José; Ex Docente del Departamento Académico de Estomatologia Médico-Quirúrgica FO UNMSM

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate and compare the effect of Iidocaine and mepivacaine alone and associated with epinephrine on the cardiovascular and electrocardiographic parameters,60 healthy volunteers were assigned in 4 groups: A (2% lidocaine), B (2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1: 100,000); C (3% mepivacaine), D (mepivacaine 2% with epinephrine 1: 100,000). Therefore of assigned, it was injected ldental cartridge of correspondent anesthetic to each volunteer, using the ner...

  6. Antinociceptive effects of topical mepivacaine in a rat model of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagen J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Sagen, Daniel A Castellanos,† Aldric T Hama The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA †Daniel A Castellanos passed away on April 14, 2010 Background: A consequence of HIV infection is sensory neuropathy, a debilitating condition that degrades the quality of life of HIV patients. Furthermore, life-extending antiretroviral treatment may exacerbate HIV sensory neuropathy. Analgesics that relieve other neuropathic pains show little or no efficacy in ameliorating HIV sensory neuropathy. Thus, there is a need for analgesics for people with this particular pain. While lidocaine is used in the management of painful peripheral neuropathies, another local anesthetic mepivacaine, with a potentially improved bioavailability, could be utilized for the management of HIV neuropathic pain.Methods: The efficacy of topical anesthetics was evaluated in a preclinical rodent model of painful peripheral neuropathy induced by epineural administration of the HIV envelope protein gp120 delivered using saturated oxidized cellulose implanted around the sciatic nerve. Beginning at 2 weeks following gp120 administration, the effects of local anesthetics topically applied via gauze pads were tested on heat and mechanical hyperalgesia in the hind paw. Rats were tested using several concentrations of mepivacaine or lidocaine during the following 2 weeks.Results: By 2 weeks following epineural gp120 implantation, the ipsilateral hind paw developed significant hypersensitivity to noxious pressure and heat hyperalgesia. A short-lasting, concentration-dependent amelioration of pressure and heat hyperalgesia was observed following topical application of mepivacaine to the ipsilateral plantar hind paw. By contrast, topical lidocaine ameliorated heat hyperalgesia in a concentration-dependent manner but not pressure hyperalgesia. Equipotent concentrations of mepivacaine and lidocaine applied topically to the

  7. The Effectiveness of Ropivacaine and Mepivacaine in the Postoperative Pain after Third Lower Molar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crincoli, Vito; Favia, Gianfranco; LImongelli, Luisa; Tempesta, Angela; Brienza, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of 0.75% ropivacaine with 3% mepivacaine for pain control in the first 24 hours after surgical removal of lower third molars, using a quantitative measurement such as VAS. The secondary objective involved rescue analgesia. Forty-five patients, 21 females and 24 males, mean age 23,2 ± 3 years, underwent surgical removal of third molars in two separate sessions. A split-mouth design was chosen, so each patient underwent both the first and second surgeries, having for each extraction a different anesthetic. The second extraction was carried out 1 month later. Parameters evaluated were: onset of anesthesia, duration of surgery, lip numbness, timing of pain appearance and first analgesic intake. No significant differences about onset of anesthesia, duration of surgical procedures, and timing of first analgesic intake were found. Lower lip numbness, on the other hand, was more prolonged after using ropivacaine (p surgery were 3.5 ± 2.0 and 4.1 ± 1.3 after injection of mepivacaine, and 2.7 ± 2.2 and 2.9 ± 2.4 after ropivacaine (p value =0.006 for both time points). No significant differences in pain score were recorded between the two anesthetics at 12 and 24 hours post surgery. With the use of ropivacaine, the discomfort caused by prolonged lip numbness is counterbalanced by less postoperative discomfort after surgery. In addition, when compared with other long-acting anesthetics, ropivacaine ensures a safer anesthetic profile for medically complex patients.

  8. Combined versus sequential injection of mepivacaine and ropivacaine for supraclavicular nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberman, Dmitry; Arora, Harendra; Sessler, Daniel I; Ritchey, Michael; You, Jing; Kumar, Priya

    2011-01-01

    An ideal local anesthetic with rapid onset and prolonged duration has yet to be developed. Clinicians use mixtures of local anesthetics in an attempt to combine their advantages. We tested the hypothesis that sequential supraclavicular injection of 1.5% mepivacaine followed 90 secs later by 0.5% ropivacaine speeds onset of sensory block and prolongs duration of analgesia compared with simultaneous injection of the same 2 local anesthetics. We enrolled 103 patients undergoing surgery suitable for supraclavicular anesthesia. The primary outcome was time to 4-nerve sensory block onset in each of the 4 major nerve distributions: median, ulnar, radial, and musculocutaneous. Secondary outcomes included time to onset of first sensory block, time to complete motor block, duration of analgesia, pain scores at rest and with movement, and total opioid consumption. Outcomes were compared using the Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test or the analysis of variance, as appropriate. Times to 4-nerve sensory block onset were not different between sequential and combined anesthetic administration. The time to complete motor block onset was faster in the combined group as compared with the sequential. There were not significant differences between the 2 randomized groups in other secondary outcomes, such as the time to onset of first sensory block, the duration of analgesia, the pain scores at rest or with movement, or the total opioid consumption. Sequential injection of 1.5% mepivacaine followed 90 secs later by 0.5% ropivacaine provides no advantage compared with simultaneous injection of the same doses. Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

  9. Bicarbonate-buffered ropivacaine-mepivacaine solution for medial caruncle anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrier, Gilles; Boutboul, David; Chanat, Cédric; Samama, Charles Marc; Baillard, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    To compare self-reported pain during injection of plain versus alkalinised 0.75% ropivacaine-2% mepivacaine solution for anaesthesia performed at the medial caruncle site for eye surgery. This prospective, monocentric, double blind, randomised, controlled trial involved 40 consecutive patients who received either a standard local anaesthetic solution (0.75% ropivacaine 5ml and 2% mepivacaine 5ml with a pH of 5.9), or an alkalinised solution composed with a pH-adjusted solution of 7.0 through adjunction of 0.15mEq sodium bicarbonate per 10ml of the same mixture. Before anaesthesia, patients received intravenous midazolam (0.03mg/kg) to ease potential anxiety. During injection performed at the medial caruncle site, patients were asked to grade a pain VRS (0 to 10) for the injection using a verbal analogue scale. The primary end point was to investigate pain during injection of local anaesthetics. Anxiety levels before anaesthesia were low and similar for both groups. The mean pain score for the alkalinised group was significantly reduced compared to the control group (6 [25-75%, IQR 4-9] versus 3 [25-75%, IQR 1-5]; P=0.02; 95% CI for the difference in median pain scores [1.9-3.3]). Buffering local anaesthetics used in caruncular injection for eye surgery significantly reduces pain during injection. This simple strategy should be tested in routine clinical practice to improve patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of the Anesthetic Efficacy of Mepivacaine and Lidocaine in Patients with Irreversible Pulpitis: A Double-blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Renata Pieroni; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto; Buscariolo, Inês Aparecida

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2% mepivacaine combined with 1:100,000 epinephrine with 2% lidocaine combined with 1:100,000 epinephrine during pulpectomy of mandibular posterior teeth in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Forty-two patients with irreversible pulpitis who were admitted to the Emergency Center at the University of São Paulo School of Dentistry volunteered to take part in the study and were randomized to receive conventional inferior alveolar nerve block containing 1.8 or 3.6 mL of either 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. We recorded patients' subjective assessments of lip anesthesia, absence/presence of pulpal anesthesia tested by using electric pulp stimulation, and absence/presence of pain during the subsequent pulpectomy by using a verbal analogue scale. All patients tested reported lip anesthesia after application of either type of inferior alveolar nerve block. Pulpal anesthesia success rates measured by using the pulp tester were satisfactory for both solutions (86% for mepivacaine and 67% for lidocaine). Success rates according to patient report of no pain or mild pain during pulpectomy were higher for mepivacaine solution (55%) than for lidocaine solution (14%). The differences between mepivacaine and lidocaine were statistically significant. Mepivacaine resulted in effective pain control during irreversible pulpitis treatments. The success rates with either solution were not high enough to ensure complete pulpal anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effective low dosage of mepivacaine in ultrasound-guided axillary nerve block: a double-blinded, randomized clinical trial of efficacy in patients undergoing distal upper extremity surgery.

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    Perov, Samuel; Patel, Pranav; Kumar, Sanjeev; McKelvey, George M; Chidiac, Elie; Motlani, Faisal

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate two low-dose volumes (20 mL or 30 mL) of 1.5% mepivacaine solution used for ultrasound-guided axillary blockade for outpatients undergoing distal upper limb surgery. Prospective, double-blinded randomized study. Outpatient surgical setting of a university-affiliated hospital. 64 adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients, aged 28-46 years, scheduled for upper limb surgery. Patients were randomized to two groups to receive either 20 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine solution (n=31) or 30 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine solution (n=33) for ultrasound-guided axillary plexus blockade. Block duration, proportion of surgical and functional successful blocks, onset of sensory and motor blockade measured from 0 to 30 minutes following final needle extraction, total amount of preoperative sedative (midazolam), and intraoperative propofol administered were recorded. Following axillary plexus blockade, neither patient group showed any statistically significant difference in the percentage of functionally successful blockade (30 mL, 100%: 20 mL, 97%; P = 0.48), surgically successful blockade (30 mL, 100%; 20 mL, 94%; P = 0.23), cumulative sensory or motor blockade surgical time, block performance time, preoperative midazolam use, or intraoperative propofol use. Low volumes (30 mL or 20 mL) of 1.5% mepivacaine provides satisfactory anesthesia for ambulatory distal upper limb surgery with no significant difference in clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of mepivacaine-tramadol combination on the success of inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Wong, L; Pozos-Guillen, A; Silva-Herzog, D; Chavarría-Bolaños, D

    2016-04-01

    To compare the success of an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) after injecting a combination of mepivacaine and tramadol or mepivacaine alone in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP) in mandibular permanent molars. This study was a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Two study groups were selected, each consisting of 28 patients who exhibited SIP on the first or second mandibular molars. All included patients presented with moderate-to-severe preoperative pain according to the modified Heft-Parker visual analogue scale (VAS). Patients were anaesthetized using the IANB technique employing identical cartridges that contained either 1.3 mL of 2% mepivacaine with epinephrine 1 : 100 000 plus 0.5 mL of tramadol 50 mg mL(-1) (experimental group) or 1.8 mL of 2% mepivacaine with epinephrine 1 : 100 000 (control group). After 15 min, anaesthesia was evaluated by a progressive four-test examination, that is numbness of the lip, positive or negative cold test, asymptomatic management of dental hard tissues and access to dental pulp. Success of the IANB was defined as the absence of pain during any of these evaluations. The data were analysed with a chi-square, Fisher's or Mann-Whitney U test. A total of 74 patients were initially assessed, with 56 patients eventually included and 18 excluded. No significant differences in age (P = 0.384) or gender (P = 1) were found between the two groups. The success rates of anaesthesia with the IANB for the experimental and control groups were 57.1 and 46.4%, respectively. The success rate of anaesthesia in the experimental group was not significantly different (P ˃ 0.05) from that of the control group. The duration of the anaesthetic effect was significantly longer for the experimental group (P = 0.026). The combination of mepivacaine-tramadol achieved similar success rates for IANB when compared to mepivacaine 2% epinephrine 1 : 100 000. There was no significant difference in the anaesthetic efficacy

  13. Comparison of O2 saturation, heart and respiratory rate following injection of vasoconstrictor containing anesthetic (lidocaine 2% and without vasoconstrictor anesthetic (Mepivacaine

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    Bayat M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Along with higher usage of dental local anesthesia with risks to people health together with their positive role, the important goal of dentistry, patients’ health, has been stressed repeatedly nowadays. This study was conducted to compare O2 saturation, respiratory rate and heart rate of patients following injection of anesthetic containing vasoconstrictor (lidocaine 2% and without vasoconstrictor (Mepivacaine. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 32 healthy humans (16 females and 16 males with 25-50 years age range and no history of drug usage. Cases were classified into two matched groups. O2 saturation, heart and respiratory rate were recorded before extraction of a mandibular posterior tooth. In the first group, 3.6 ml lidocaine 2% with 1:80,000 epinephrine and in the second group Mepivacaine 3% was injected, using inferior alveolar dental nerve block with aspiration. Variables were measured and recorded. Tooth extraction was performed and the mentioned variables were recorded again. Data were analyzed with SPSS software using t and Paired t-test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: After injection of lidocaine, the heart rate was increased (12.25±1.75 bpm, and the time to reach the maximum rate was 64.75±11.26 seconds. After extraction of tooth, heart rate in both groups was increased not considering the type of injection. Conclusion: The study showed that the injection of lidocaine (containing epinephrine in patients without contraindication has no risk. Also, possible increase in heart rate is not risky and is not associated with O2 saturation decrease and respiratory interruption.

  14. 21 CFR 522.1372 - Mepivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a local anesthetic for infiltration, nerve block, intra-articular and epidural anesthesia, and topical and/or infiltration anesthesia of the laryngeal mucosa prior to ventriculectomy. (3) Limitations..., 10 to 15 mL; for infiltration, as required; for anesthesia of the laryngeal mucosa prior to...

  15. The antimicrobial activity of bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine against equine pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, D. M. T.; Damborg, P.; Verwilghen, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    also bactericidal. The tested local anaesthetics possessed antimicrobial activity against equine pathogens at concentrations that are routinely applied in clinical cases. However, this antimicrobial activity should not discourage antiseptic preparation prior to local anaesthetic injections....

  16. Emla-creme (lidocain/prilocain) over for infiltrationsanalgesi med Carbocain (mepivacain) ved vasektomi. En randomiseret undersøgelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Krogh, J; Kjersgaard, P

    1989-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy of EMLA cream was compared with infiltration with 1% carbocaine in 13 bilateral vasectomies. Twelve patients preferred infiltration analgesia. EMLA analgesia was only effective in the skin, and had to be supplemented as the incision reached subcutaneous tissue....

  17. REUSABILITY OF BOND ELUT CERTIFY COLUMNS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF DRUGS FROM PLASMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHEN, XH; FRANKE, JP; WIJSBEEK, J; DEZEEUW, RA

    1993-01-01

    The reusability of Bond Elut Certify columns for the extraction of toxicologically relevant drugs from plasma has been evaluated. Pentobarbital, hexobarbital, mepivacaine, trimipramine and clonazepam were selected as test drugs to represent various classes of drugs. The columns were regenerated

  18. Chiral separation of local anaesthetics with capillary electrophoresis. Evaluation of the inclusion complex of the enantiomers with heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sänger-van De Griend, C. E.; Gröningsson, K.; Westerlund, Douglas

    1996-01-01

    A chiral capillary electrophoresis system for the high-resolution separation of the enantiomers of the local anaesthetics mepivacaine, ropivacaine, bupivacaine and prilocaine is described. Triethanolamine was added to the background electrolyte to obtain a negative electroosmotic flow and hence

  19. Local anesthetic interaction with human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) channels: role of aromatic amino acids Y652 and F656

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebrands, Cornelia C; Schmitt, Nicole; Friederich, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    by bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were performed at room temperature. RESULTS: Inhibition of HERG wild-type and mutant channels by the different local anesthetics was concentration dependent, stereoselective, and reversible. The sensitivity decreased in the order...

  20. Topical anesthesia with eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream in vasectomy: 2 randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Krogh, J; Rye, B

    1992-01-01

    Two paired randomized trials testing topical anesthesia with a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream*) in vasectomy were performed. In 1 trial EMLA cream was applied on 1 side of the scrotum, while infiltration anesthesia into the skin and subcutaneous tissue with mepivacaine was used...... less pain on the sides with the anesthetic cream (p less than 0.001). Many patients would pay the price of the cream. In conclusion, EMLA cream cannot replace but it can supplement infiltration anesthesia during vasectomy....... on the contralateral side. All but 1 of the 13 patients (p less than 0.05) preferred infiltration anesthesia because of pain as the incision reached the subcutaneous tissue. In the other trial 29 patients received EMLA cream on 1 side of the scrotum before bilateral mepivacaine infiltration. There was significantly...

  1. Topical anesthesia with eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream in vasectomy: 2 randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Krogh, J; Rye, B

    1992-01-01

    Two paired randomized trials testing topical anesthesia with a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream*) in vasectomy were performed. In 1 trial EMLA cream was applied on 1 side of the scrotum, while infiltration anesthesia into the skin and subcutaneous tissue with mepivacaine was used...... on the contralateral side. All but 1 of the 13 patients (p less than 0.05) preferred infiltration anesthesia because of pain as the incision reached the subcutaneous tissue. In the other trial 29 patients received EMLA cream on 1 side of the scrotum before bilateral mepivacaine infiltration. There was significantly...... less pain on the sides with the anesthetic cream (p less than 0.001). Many patients would pay the price of the cream. In conclusion, EMLA cream cannot replace but it can supplement infiltration anesthesia during vasectomy....

  2. Evaluation of prilocaine for the reduction of pain associated with transmucosal anesthetic administration.

    OpenAIRE

    Kramp, L. F.; Eleazer, P. D.; Scheetz, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation evaluated the use and efficacy of prilocaine HCl (4% plain Citanest) for minimizing pain associated with the intraoral administration of local anesthesia. Clinical anecdotes support the hypothesis that prilocaine without a vasoconstrictor reduces pain during injection. To determine relative injection discomfort, use of 4% plain prilocaine was compared with use of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and 2% mepivacaine with 1:20,000 levonordefrin. Prior to routine endodon...

  3. 表面電離検出ガスクロマトグラフィーの法中毒学的応用

    OpenAIRE

    妹尾, 洋; 服部, 秀樹; 熊澤, 武志; 鈴木, 修; 木村, 美智子; 山田, 高路

    1992-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants and local anesthetics were detected by gas chromatography (GC)-surface ionization detection (SID), which has been reported to be very sensitive and specific to tertiary amines. The detection limit in an injected volume was 5-10 pg for amitriptyline, imipramine, trimipramine, chlorimipramine, lidocaine, mepivacaine and bupivacaine, and 100-200 pg for procaine, benoxinate and dibucaine. When compared with the GC-nitrogen-phosphorus detection (NPD), the GC-SID sensitivi...

  4. The concept of "compartment allergy": prilocaine injected into different skin layers

    OpenAIRE

    Wobser, Marion; Gaigl, Zeno; Trautmann, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We herein present a patient with delayed-type allergic hypersensitivity against prilocaine leading to spreading eczematous dermatitis after subcutaneous injections for local anesthesia with prilocaine. Prilocaine allergy was proven by positive skin testing and subcutaneous provocation, whereas the evaluation of other local anesthetics - among them lidocaine, articaine and mepivacaine - did not exhibit any evidence for cross-reactivity. Interestingly, our patient repeatedly tolerated ...

  5. USING OF FIRST GENERATION OF Hl ANTIHISTAMINES As ALTERNATIVE OF LOCAL ANESTHETIC IN ODONTOLOGIC USE IN ANESTHESIA INFILTRATIVE TECHNICS. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN ANIMALS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Victor; Varas Hilario, Roberto; López Bellido, Roger; Chuquihuaccha Granda, Vilma; Zegarra Cuya, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The presence of adverse drug reactions with local anesthetics takes us to the search of effective alternatives to this drugs. 60 albino rabbits divided into 6 groups were submifted to infiltrative anesthetic technique in the maxilla with lidocaine, mepivacaine, bupivacaine, chlorpheniramine and dimenhidrinate, in front of sodium chloride 0,9%. The pain threshold belzavior was evaluated with electrical stimulation from Ruhnkorff s bobbin behind the drllg application and comparison between grou...

  6. Anesthetic Efficacy in Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Carlos E; Sampaio, Roberta M; Horliana, Anna C R T; Armonia, Paschoal L; Rocha, Rodney G; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block has a high failure rate in the treatment of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine, 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine, all in combination with 1:100,000 epinephrine, in patients with irreversible pulpitis of permanent mandibular molars during a pulpectomy procedure. Sixty-six volunteers from the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, randomly received 3.6 mL of local anesthetic as a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The subjective signal of lip numbness, pulpal anesthesia and absence of pain during the pulpectomy procedure were evaluated respectively, by questioning the patient, stimulation using an electric pulp tester and a verbal analogue scale. All patients reported the subjective signal of lip numbness. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the success rate was respectively 68.2% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 63.6% for lidocaine. Regarding patients who reported no pain or mild pain during the pulpectomy, the success rate was, respectively 72.7% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 54.5% for lidocaine. These differences were not statistically significant. Neither of the solutions resulted in 100% anesthetic success in patients with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars.

  7. Assessment of patient’s anxiety and expectation associated with hemodynamic changes during surgical procedure under local anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vinícius Mendes DANTAS

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The dental patient’s anxiety and expectation may significantly alter their vital signs. The use of local anesthetics associated with a vasoconstrictor may also alter the vital signs of these patients, promoting hemodynamic changes that may result in emergency situations. Objective To evaluate the influence of anxiety of patients submitted to third molar extraction and the use of different anesthetic substances with adrenaline on their vital signs (oxygen saturation, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in different moments. Material and method Forty patients answered the questionnaire of the Dental Anxiety Scale (Corah’s Scale and fear (KleinKnecht’s Scale and were submitted to third molar extraction in two surgical times for the use of articaine or mepivacaine, both associated with adrenaline. The results were analyzed by ANOVA followed by Tukey post hoc test, Student's t test, and Pearson's correlation coefficients (α=0.05. Result There was no significant differences in saturation or heart rate. The blood pressure showed significant variations during time for both anesthetics, however mepivacaine resulted in a longer postoperative time to restore blood pressure. Patients with high or moderate anxiety and high fear index were those who had positive correlations with the highest blood pressure values. Conclusion Anxiety and fear positively influence the increase in blood pressure. Mepivacaine promoted a greater resistance to the return of normal vital signs, especially blood pressure levels.

  8. No cases of perioperative allergy to local anaesthetics in the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisselgaard, A D; Krøigaard, M; Mosbech, H F

    2017-01-01

    E-mediated immediate type perioperative allergic reactions to LA. METHODS: In the period 2004-2013, a total of 409 patients (244 women/165 men; median age 49 years, range 1-86 years) were investigated in DAAC on suspicion of allergy associated with anaesthesia and surgery. A total of 162 (40%) patients were exposed...... were carried out on 162 patients (89 women/73 men; mean age 49 years, range 2-85 years) with the following drugs: Lidocaine n = 80 (49%), bupivacaine n = 82 (51%), ropivacaine n = 31 (19%) and mepivacaine n = 10 (6%). All 162 patients had negative subcutaneous provocation for all tested LA (95% CI: 0-1...

  9. Acute pain induces an instant increase in natural killer cell cytotoxicity in humans and this response is abolished by local anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, J.; Hokland, Marianne; Grøfte, Thorbjørn

    1999-01-01

    to abdominal skin for 30 min to an intensity of 8 on a visual analogue scale (0-10). Next, the electric intensity profile was reproduced during local anaesthesia (mepivacaine 10 mg ml-1 s.c. to a total dose of 2.5 mg kg-1). NK cell cytotoxicity was measured using a 4-h 51Cr-release assay against K562 target...... not change either NK cell activity or number. Parallel and significant increases in concentrations of plasma epinephrine and serum cortisol were observed. These changes were abolished by local anaesthesia. We conclude that acute severe pain without tissue injury markedly increased NK cell cytotoxicity. Local...

  10. Efficacy of preoperative ibuprofen on the success of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera-Gonzalez, D; Cerda-Cristerna, B I; Chavarria-Bolaños, D; Flores-Reyes, H; Pozos-Guillen, A

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of preoperative oral ibuprofen (IBU) on the success of inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANBs) with mepivacaine containing 1 : 100 000 epinephrine for patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP). The present study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The study included two study groups each consisting of 25 patients who exhibited symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth. The patients presented prolonged moderate or severe pain (>10 s) after cold testing and indicated their pain scores on a Heft-Parker visual analogue scale. The patients received identically appearing capsules containing either 600 mg IBU (IBUg) or gelatin (placebo, PLAg) 1 h before administration of IANB with 2% mepivacaine containing 1 : 100 000 epinephrine. After 15 min, the anaesthetic blockade was assessed by a three-step examination (lip numbness, positive/negative response to cold testing and clinical discomfort during endodontic access). IANB success was defined as the absence of pain during any of these evaluations. The data were analysed using the chi-squared test. All of the patients reported moderate or severe pain before the preoperative procedure. Statistically significant differences were observed between the IBUg and PLAg (P pulpitis. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Vasoconstriction Potency Induced by Aminoamide Local Anesthetics Correlates with Lipid Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jin Sung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoamide local anesthetics induce vasoconstriction in vivo and in vitro. The goals of this in vitro study were to investigate the potency of local anesthetic-induced vasoconstriction and to identify the physicochemical property (octanol/buffer partition coefficient, pKa, molecular weight, or potency of local anesthetics that determines their potency in inducing isolated rat aortic ring contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves to local anesthetics (levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine were obtained from isolated rat aorta. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between the reported physicochemical properties of local anesthetics and the local anesthetic concentration that produced 50% (ED50 of the local anesthetic-induced maximum vasoconstriction. We determined the order of potency (ED50 of vasoconstriction among local anesthetics to be levobupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > mepivacaine. The relative importance of the independent variables that affect the vasoconstriction potency is octanol/buffer partition coefficient > potency > pKa > molecular weight. The ED50 in endothelium-denuded aorta negatively correlated with the octanol/buffer partition coefficient of local anesthetics (r2=0.9563; P<0.001. The potency of the vasoconstriction in the endothelium-denuded aorta induced by local anesthetics is determined primarily by lipid solubility and, in part, by other physicochemical properties including potency and pKa.

  12. A comparison of a single or triple injection technique for ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block: a prospective randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgagnés, Marie-Christine; Lévesque, Simon; Dion, Nicolas; Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Coté, Dany; Brassard, Jean; Nicole, Pierre C; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2009-08-01

    Good success rates have been reported with ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block using one or multiple injections of local anesthetic. We hypothesized that a separate injection of local anesthetics on each cord enhances the onset of complete sensory block. We designed this prospective randomized study to compare the rate of complete sensory block using one or three injections of local anesthetic. Patients scheduled for hand, wrist, or elbow surgery were included in this study. All blocks were performed under ultrasound guidance. In Group S (single injection), 30 mL of mepivacaine 1.5% was injected posterior to the axillary artery. In Group T (triple injections), 10 mL of mepivacaine 1.5% was injected on the posterior, medial, and lateral aspects of the axillary artery. Sensory block was evaluated every 3 min up to 30 min. The primary end point was the rate of complete sensory block at 15 min. Forty-nine and 51 patients were randomized in Groups S and T, respectively. The rate of complete sensory block was comparable at 15 min (Group S: 84%, Group T: 78%, P = 0.61) and at each time interval up to 30 min. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications between the two groups. The success rate and the onset of complete sensory block after ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block are not enhanced by a triple injection of local anesthetic compared with a single injection posterior to the axillary artery.

  13. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (type IV) reactions in dental anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Julian; Beaucher, Wilfred N

    2007-01-01

    The recommended methodology of evaluating patients who have presented with reactions to local anesthetics consists of epicutaneous skin testing and serial subcutaneous challenge. However, the role of type IV reactions in this group has been poorly documented. Epicutaneous routine testing and subcutaneous challenge to local anesthetic was performed, as well as patch testing and subcutaneous rechallenge of both at 24 and 48 hours with evaluation up to 72 hours was performed. Three patients presented with a history of localized edema after dental anesthesia. All had negative lidocaine and mepivacaine testing as well as negative lidocaine challenge on evaluation at 1 hour. The first patient, who had previously reacted to EMLA, reacted to both lidocaine and mepivacaine patch testing and challenge, with delayed swelling at 24 and 48 hours after challenge. This patient subsequently tolerated the ester anesthetic chloroprocaine. Two other patients had strong histories of contact dermatitis. Patch testing and challenge with lidocaine was negative, but strong reactions were found to benzocaine on patch testing. Patients undergoing local anesthetic testing should be screened historically for features and risk factors associated with type IV reactions. This should be considered in patients who react to multiple amide anesthetics, who have delayed swelling, or who have a history of severe contact dermatitis. We confirm previous data showing that patients reacting to benzocaine can tolerate lidocaine and that lidocaine-allergic individuals can tolerate ester anesthetics.

  14. Wrist extension strength required for power grip: a study using a radial nerve block model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Kunishi, T; Kakizaki, J; Iwakura, N; Takahashi, J; Kuniyoshi, K

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of wrist extension strength (WES) and grip strength (GS) using a radial nerve block, and to determine the WES required to prevent the "wrist flexion phenomenon" (antagonistic WES) when making a fist. We tested 14 arms in seven healthy males. WES and GS were measured before blocking as standard WES and standard GS. All participants then had radial nerve blocks with mepivacaine hydrochloride. During the recovery process from radial nerve blockade, WES and GS were recorded every 5 minutes. There was a very strong correlation between WES and GS (p < 0.0001). The mean antagonistic WES was 51% of standard WES, and the mean GS, recorded at the same time, was 66% of standard GS.

  15. Ischemia of the glans penis following circumcision: case report and revision of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Pietro; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-03-31

    Ischemic complications of the glans penis are rare and commonly result from trauma, inadvertent administration of vasoconstrictive solutions, diabetes mellitus, circumcision and vasculitis; we refer about a young man with severe ischemia of the glans penis following circumcision. The patient had undergone circumcision 5 days before in a surgery department under local anesthesia (1% mepivacaine hydrochloride). The patient noticed a brownish color and edema of the glans penis at 24 h after he opened the wound dressing, but arrived to our hospital only 5 days after circumcision because these findings had progressed. Physical examination revealed the black color or necrotic appearance of the glans penis, and edema on the dorsal penile skin. The patient underwent antibiotic, antiplatatelet, corticosteroid and iperbaric therapy achieving a complete restitutio ad integrum.

  16. Ischemia of the glans penis following circumcision: case report and revision of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic complications of the glans penis are rare and commonly result from trauma, inadvertent administration of vasoconstrictive solutions, diabetes mellitus, circumcision and vasculitis; we refer about a young man with severe ischemia of the glans penis following circumcision. The patient had undergone circumcision 5 days before in a surgery department under local anesthesia (1% mepivacaine hydrochloride. The patient noticed a brownish color and edema of the glans penis at 24 h after he opened the wound dressing, but arrived to our hospital only 5 days after circumcision because these findings had progressed. Physical examination revealed the black color or necrotic appearance of the glans penis, and edema on the dorsal penile skin. The patient underwent antibiotic, antiplatatelet, corticosteroid and iperbaric therapy achieving a complete restitutio ad integrum.

  17. Long QT 1 mutation KCNQ1A344V increases local anesthetic sensitivity of the slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebrands, Cornelia C; Binder, Stephan; Eckhoff, Ulrike

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anesthesia in patients with long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a matter of concern. Congenital LQTS is most frequently caused by mutations in KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), whereas drug-induced LQTS is a consequence of HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) channel inhibition. The aim of this study...... was to investigate whether the LQT1 mutation A344V in the S6 region of KCNQ1, at a position corresponding to the local anesthetic binding site in HERG, may render drug insensitive KCNQ1 channels into a toxicologically relevant target of these pharmacologic agents. This may suggest that LQTS constitutes not only...... a nonspecific but also a specific pharmacogenetic risk factor for anesthesia. METHODS: The authors examined electrophysiologic and pharmacologic properties of wild-type and mutant KCNQ1 channels. The effects of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine were investigated using two-electrode voltage clamp...

  18. Addition of lacal anesthetics to contrast media. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Almen, T.; Golman, K.; Jonsson, K.; Nyman, U.; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1988-01-01

    The acute intravenous toxicity (i.v. LD 50 ) of solutions of the ratio 1.5 contrast media metrizoate or diatrizoate and the ratio 3.0 contrast medium metrizamide was determined in mice with and without the addition of local anesthetics to the solutions. The two local anesthetics mepivacaine or lidocaine were added to final concentrations up to 2.0 mg/ml of the contrast medium solutions. This corresponds to clinically used concentrations. All additions of local anesthetics to the solutions increased the mortalities caused by the contrast medium solutions. Addition of local anesthetics to a final concentration of 2 mg/ml approximately doubled the acute intravenous toxicity of the contrast media. The ratio 3 contrast media produce less hypertonic solutions than the ratio 1.5 contrast media and should be preferred for angiography because they cause less pain and do not require the addition of local anesthetics which increase the acute toxicity of the solutions. (orig.)

  19. Truncal anaesthesia of the maxillary nerve for outpatient surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M; Cugini, U

    1998-10-01

    We present our experience of transcutaneous truncal anaesthesia of the maxillary nerve in association with transmucosal anaesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion in surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Twelve patients with a skeletal transverse discrepancy of the maxilla were treated in our department from 1994 to 1995. Maxillary transcutaneous nerve block was done with a Quincke 8 cm spinal needle together with transmucosal anaesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion. Mepivacaine without adrenaline and sodium bicarbonate 1/10 was used for truncal anaesthesia and lidocaine-prilocaine cream for transmucosal anaesthesia. A Le Fort I osteotomy, lateral nasal wall osteotomy, pterygomaxillary osteotomy, and a palatal osteotomy were done for all patients before the maxillary expansion. Total anaesthesia of the maxillary area facilitated the operations and appreciably reduced the amount of postoperative pain. The ease of achieving effective anaesthesia before and after operation and the absence of side-effects make this form of anaesthetic particularly useful in surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

  20. The concept of "compartment allergy": prilocaine injected into different skin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wobser Marion

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We herein present a patient with delayed-type allergic hypersensitivity against prilocaine leading to spreading eczematous dermatitis after subcutaneous injections for local anesthesia with prilocaine. Prilocaine allergy was proven by positive skin testing and subcutaneous provocation, whereas the evaluation of other local anesthetics - among them lidocaine, articaine and mepivacaine - did not exhibit any evidence for cross-reactivity. Interestingly, our patient repeatedly tolerated strictly deep subcutaneous injection of prilocaine in provocation testing while patch and superficial subcutaneous application mounted strong allergic responses. We hypothesize, that lower DC density in deeper cutaneous compartments and/or different DC subsets exhibiting distinct functional immunomodulatory properties in the various layers of the skin may confer to the observed absence of clinical reactivity against prilocaine after deep subcutaneous injection. The term compartment allergy indicates that the route of allergen administration together with the targeted immunologic environment orchestrates on the immunologic outcome: overt T-cell mediated allergy or clinical tolerance.

  1. Lipid Emulsion Inhibits Vasodilation Induced by a Toxic Dose of Bupivacaine via Attenuated Dephosphorylation of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit 1 in Isolated Rat Aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Park, Jungchul; Lee, Youngju; Hwang, Yeran; Baik, Jiseok; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions are widely used for the treatment of systemic toxicity that arises from local anesthetics. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the cellular mechanism associated with the lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. The effects of lipid emulsion on vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and verapamil were assessed in isolated aorta precontracted with phenylephrine, the Rho kinase stimulant NaF, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu). The effects of Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on contraction induced by phenylephrine or NaF were assessed. The effects of bupivacaine on intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and tension induced by NaF were simultaneously measured. The effects of bupivacaine alone and lipid emulsion plus bupivacaine on myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation induced by NaF were examined in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. In precontracted aorta, the lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-induced vasodilation but had no effect on mepivacaine-induced vasodilation. Y-27632 attenuated contraction induced by either phenylephrine or NaF. The lipid emulsion attenuated verapamil-induced vasodilation. Compared with phenylephrine-induced precontracted aorta, bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated in NaF-induced precontracted aorta. The magnitude of the bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of a bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca2+]i. Bupivacaine attenuated NaF-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion pretreatment attenuated the bupivacaine-induced inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation induced by NaF. Taken together, these results suggest that lipid emulsions attenuate bupivacaine-induced vasodilation via the attenuation of inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation evoked by NaF. PMID:26664257

  2. [Femoral and sciatic nerve blocks for open reduction and internal fixation of a femoral condylar fracture in a patient with post-polio syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Takehiko; Mizuno, Ju; Ino, Kentaro; Yoshimura, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morita, Shigeho

    2011-08-01

    The post polio symdrome (PPS) refers to the development of delayed neuromuscular symptoms among survivors, years after the initial presentation of acute poliomyelitis. The symptoms of PPS vary widely and include flaccid palsy, muscle weakness, scoliosis, osteoarthritis, gait disturbance, sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), dysphagia, chronic lung dysfunction, and others. We report the successful combination of peripheral nerve blocks, femoral and sciatic nerve blocks, for surgery on the lower extremity in a patient with PPS. A 51-year-old man with continuous positive airway pressure therapy for restrictive ventilatory impairment due to scoliosis and SAS as part of the PPS was scheduled for open reduction and internal fixation (OR-IF) for a right femoral condylar fracture. Respiratory function tests demonstrated a vital capacity (VC) 1.41l (41% predicted). Arterial blood gas analysis on room air was; pH 7.376, PaCO2 55.0 mmHg, and PaO2 77.9 mmHg. With the patient in the supine position, ultrasound-guided right femoral nerve block in the infra-inguinal region was performed using 1.5% mepivacaine 10 ml and 0.75% ropivacaine 5 ml, followed by sciatic nerve block in the popliteal fossa using 1.5% mepivacaine 8 ml and 0.75% ropivacaine 4 ml in the prone position. OR-IF of the fractured femoral condyle was then successfully performed with propofol under spontaneous ventilation. Postoperatively, there were no adverse events; respiratory function was adequate, and his pain was within manageable bounds. Femoral and sciatic nerve blocks are safe and effective anesthetic methods for lower extremity surgery in patients with restrictive ventilatory impairment and hypercapnia due to scoliosis and SAS as PPS.

  3. Influence of local anesthethics with adrenalina 1:100.000 in basic vital constants during third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Ricardo José de Holanda; Vasconcelos, Belmiro Cavalcanti do Egito; Genú, Paloma Rodrigues

    2008-07-01

    The present study consists of a double-blind randomized clinical trial of paired samples. The purpose of the present study was thus to examine the effect of four different local anesthetics of the amida group (2% lidocaine with 1:100.000 adrenaline; 3% prilocaine with 0.30 IU felipressine; 2% mepivacaine with 1:100.000 adrenaline; and 4% articaine with 1:100.100 adrenaline) in patients undergoing extraction of lower third molars and verify the changes in systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures, heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation (SpO2). The sample comprised 168 extractions of lower third molars performed on 84 patients, divided into three groups, in whom lidocaine was the control anesthetic. The anesthetic solution applied differed from one side of the mouth to the other (control and experimental) in the same patient at different time periods. The following significant variations were observed: increase in systolic blood pressure with mepivacaine and articaine; decrease in diastolic blood pressure with lidocaine; increase in heart rate with all the anesthetics, but with no statistical significance in the case of prilocaine. The variations in mean blood pressure and oxygen saturation were not statistically significant. All the hemodynamic changes returned to normal with no need for any further treatment. No complications were observed in any of the 168 procedures performed. All the anesthetics studied behaved, in relation to lidocaine, within the parameters of hemodynamic safety, although the best performance was that of prilocaine, followed by lidocaine. The measurement of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and heart rate are appropriate monitoring methods for patients under the effects of local anesthetic, even healthy ones.

  4. Prilocaine hydrochloride 2% hyperbaric solution for intrathecal injection: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manassero A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Manassero,1 Andrea Fanelli2 1Department of Emergency and Critical Care, Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo, 2Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Prilocaine is a local anesthetic characterized by intermediate potency and duration and fast onset of action. As hyperbaric formulation of 5% solution, it was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1960. A new formulation of 2% plain and hyperbaric solution is currently available in Europe. Because of its lower incidence of transient neurological symptoms, prilocaine is suggested as substitute to lidocaine and mepivacaine in spinal anesthesia for ambulatory surgery, as well as a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics. The National Library of Medicine database, the Excerpta Medica database, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database, were searched for the period 1970 to September 2016, with the aim to identify studies evaluating the intrathecal use of 2% prilocaine. A total of 13 randomized clinical trials (RCTs, 1 observational study, 2 dose finding, and 4 systematic reviews has been used for this review. The studies evaluated showed that 2% hyperbaric prilocaine due to a favorable anesthetic and safety profile is an alternative drug to lidocaine and mepivacaine for spinal anesthesia of intermediate or short duration. In comparison with plain solutions, hyperbaricity remarkably accelerates the onset and offset times of intrathecal 2% prilocaine. Literature suggests a dose ranging between 40 and 60 mg of prilocaine for lower extremities and lower abdominal procedures lasting up to 90 min, whereas a dose ranging from 10 to 30 mg is appropriate for perineal surgery. Readiness for discharge occurs in ~4 h from spinal administration. Keywords

  5. Lidocaine impairs proliferative and biosynthetic functions of aged human dermal fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentov, Itay; Damodarasamy, Mamatha; Spiekerman, Charles; Reed, May J

    2016-01-01

    Background The aged are at increased risk of postoperative wound healing complications. Since local anesthetics are commonly infiltrated into the dermis of surgical wounds, we sought to determine if local anesthetics adversely affect proliferative and biosynthetic functions of dermal fibroblasts. We also evaluated the effect of local anesthetics on IGF-1 and TGF-ß1, growth factors that are important regulators of wound healing. Methods Human dermal fibroblasts from aged and young donors (HFB) were exposed to local anesthetic agents at clinically relevant concentrations. We screened the effects of lidocaine, bupivacaine, mepivacaine and ropivacaine on proliferation of HFB. Lidocaine was the most detrimental to proliferation in HFB. We then evaluated the effect of lidocaine on expression and function of the growth factors, IGF-1 and TGF-ß1. Lastly, concurrent exposure to lidocaine and IGF-1 or TGF-ß1 were evaluated for their effects on proliferation and expression of dermal collagens, respectively. Results Lidocaine and mepivacaine inhibited proliferation in aged HFB (for lidocaine 88% of control, 95%CI 80%-98%, p=0.009 and for mepivacaine 90% of control, 95%CI 81%-99%, p=0.032), but not in young HFB. Ropivicaine and bupivicaine did not inhibit proliferation. Due to the clinical utility of lidocaine relative to mepivicaine, we focused on lidocaine. Lidocaine decreased proliferation in aged HFB, which was abrogated by IGF-1. Lidocaine inhibited transcripts for IGF-1 and IGF1R in fibroblasts from aged donors (IGF-1, log2 fold-change −1.25 {42% of control, 95%CI 19%-92%, p=0.035} and IGF1R, log2 fold-change of −1.00 {50% of control, 95%CI 31%-81%, p=0.014}). In contrast, lidocaine did not effect the expression of IGF-1 or IGF1R transcripts in the young HFB. Transcripts for collagen III were decreased after lidocaine exposure in aged and young HFB (log2 fold-change −1.28 {41% of control, 95%CI 20%-83%, p=0.022} in aged HFB and log2 fold-change −1.60 {33% of

  6. Influência de vasoconstritores associados a anestésicos locais sobre a pressão arterial de ratos hipertensos e normotensos Influence of vasoconstrictors associated with local anesthetics on the arterial pressure of hypertensive and normotensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apparecido Neri Daniel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de anestésicos locais associados a vasoconstritores em pacientes hipertensos é controversa. Neste estudo, verificamos a influência desta associação sobre a pressão arterial caudal (PA em ratos hipertensos DOCA-sal. Após ligeira anestesia com éter, os anestésicos GRUPO I - lidocaína 2% sem vasoconstritor, GRUPO II - lidocaína com fenilefrina, GRUPO III - lidocaína a 2% com noradrenalina, GRUPO IV - prilocaína 3% com felipressina, GRUPO V - mepivacaína 2% com adrenalina e GRUPO VI - mepivacaína com noradrenalina foram injetados na submucosa da boca (anestesia infiltrativa, em ratos DOCA-sal e controles. A PA foi determinada 5 e 15 minutos após a primeira dose do anestésico e também 5 e 15 minutos após a segunda dose. Os dados obtidos indicaram que: a a PA dos ratos DOCA-sal (193,05 ± 4,25 mmHg; n = 43 foi significativamente superior àquela observada nos animais controles (115,64 ± 2,47 mmHg; n = 43 e, b não houve variação significativa nas PA observadas em animais DOCA-sal e controles pela administração dos anestésicos locais testados. Assim, nossos dados experimentais sugerem que a presença de agentes vasoconstritores associados à lidocaína 2%, à prilocaína 3% e à mepivacaína 2% não interferem na PA desses animais, neste modelo experimental de hipertensão.The utilization of local anesthetics associated with vasoconstrictors in hypertensive patients is controversial. The purpose of this investigation was to verify the influence of this association on the arterial pressure (AP in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. After light ether anesthesia, the anesthetics (Group I - lidocaine 2% without vasoconstrictor; Group II - lidocaine 2% with phenylephrine, Group III - lidocaine 2% with noradrenaline- Group IV - prylocaine 3% with felypressin; Group V - mepivacaine 2% with epinephrine, and Group VI - mepivacaine 2% with norepinephrine were injected into mucobuccal fold (infiltration anesthesia, in DOCA

  7. Coma profundo consecutivo a bloqueo del plexo braquial: A propósito de 1 caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Ángel Labrada Tapia

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso clínico infrecuente de un paciente masculino de 17 años de edad, que sufrió un accidente de tránsito y por el cual mostraba herida avulsiva del miembro superior izquierdo. Se le practicó bloqueo del plexo braquial por la técnica perivascular interescalénica, donde se utilizó como agente anestésico la mepivacaína al 2 %. Minutos después, el paciente cae en coma profundo con resolución muscular total, pupilas midriáticas y arreactivas, reflejo fotomotor, corneal y parpabral ausentes. Se intuba y acopla al respirador mecánico Mark-8, y la hemodinamia se mantuvo sin presentar convulsiones. Posteriormente, de forma paulatina, se recupera totalmente sin dejar secuelasThe clinical unfrequent case of a 17-year-old male patient that had an avulsive wound of the left upper limb as a result of a traffic accident is presented. Block of the brachial plexus was performed by the interscalene perivascular technique. Mepivacaine 2 % was used as an anesthetic. Some minutes later, the patient had a deep coma with total muscular resolution, mydriatic and non-reactive pupils. The photomotor, corneal and eyelid reflexes were absent. He was intubated and coupled to the Mark-8 mechanical respirator. The hemodynamics was maintained without presenting convulsions. Later on, he recovered himself gradually and had no sequelae

  8. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  9. [Type II Quadratus Lumborum block for a sub-total gastrectomy in a septic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, José Miguel; Sá, Miguel; Reis, Hugo; Almeida, Liliana; Sampaio, José Carlos; Pinheiro, Célia; Machado, Duarte

    Quadratus Lumborum block was recently described and has already shown good results as an analgesic technique in abdominal surgeries, having the potential to significantly reduce opioids consumption and be a valid alternative to epidural catheter. We performed a type II Quadratus Lumborum block for analgesia in a septic patient having a sub-total gastrectomy. An 80 year-old, ASA III, male patient, weighting 50kg, with a history of arterial hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, diagnosed with sepsis due to purulent peritonitis was submitted to an open laparotomy. Bilateral ultrasound-guided type II Quadratus Lumborum block was performed before surgery, using 10mL of levobupivacaine 0.25% and 5mL of mepivacaine 1%, per side. Pain relief was achieved 5minutes after injection and the patient referred no pain in the immediate postoperative period. Type II Quadratus Lumborum block may be considered a valid alternative for postoperative analgesia in a septic patient undergoing major abdominal surgery with some relative contraindications to epidural catheter placement. It allowed us to achieve excellent pain management avoiding opioids usage. However, more reports are still needed to properly access its usefulness. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of intraosseous injection versus inferior alveolar nerve block as primary pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhad, Alireza; Razavian, Hamid; Shafiee, Maryam

    2018-01-27

    This study sought to assess the success rate, effect on blood pressure, and pain of intraosseous injection (IO) and inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis as the primary anaesthetic technique. This randomized clinical trial (IRCT2013022712634N1) was conducted on 60 patients between 18 and 65 years suffering from symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group one received IO while group two received IANB with 3% mepivacaine. After anaesthetic injection, success rate of pulpal anaesthesia was assessed by pulp testing in the two groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures of patients were compared before and after the anaesthetic injections. Level of pain during injection was scored using a visual analogue scale. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20, t-test and chi square test at p = .05 level of significance. Success rate of IO (56.7%) was significantly higher than that of IANB (23.3%) (p = .008). There was no significant difference in pain during anaesthetic injection (p = .304) or change in systolic (p = .80) and diastolic (p = .28) blood pressures following injection between the two techniques. IO had a higher success rate than IANB for pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Neither technique provided profound pulpal anaesthesia.

  11. Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by repetitive administration of local anaesthetics: an experimental study in rats

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    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies regarding the effects of some local anaesthetics have suggested that these agents can cause genetic damage. However, they have not been tested for genotoxicity related to repetitive administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of local anaesthetics upon repetitive administration. METHODS: 80 male Wistar rats were divided into: group A - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with lidocaine hydrochloride 2%; group B - 16 rats IP injected with mepivacaine 2%; group C - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with articaine 4%; group D - 16 rats IP injected with prilocaine 3% (6.0 mg/kg; group E - 8 rats subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide; and group F - 8 rats intraperitoneally injected with saline. Eight rats from groups A to D received a single dose of anaesthetic on Day 1 of the experiment; the remaining rats were dosed once a day for 5 days. RESULTS: The median number of micronuclei in the local anaesthetics groups exposed for 1 or 5 days ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, in the cyclophosphamide-exposed group was 10.00, and the negative control group for 1 and 5 days was 1.00 and 0.00, respectively (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: No genotoxicity effect was observed upon repetitive exposure to any of the local anaesthetics evaluated.

  12. Posterior psoas vs 3-in-1 approach for lateral femoral cutaneous and obturator nerve block for anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelleri, G; Ghisi, D; Fanelli, A; Aldegheri, G; La Colla, L; Albertin, A

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this article was to test the hypothesis that the posterior psoas compartment approach to the lumbar plexus help to achieve better blockade of the lateral femoral cutaneous and obturator nerves than the classic anterior 3-in-1 femoral nerve block. Thirty-six patients who were undergoing anterior cruciate ligament repair were randomly allocated to receive a femoral nerve block using either an anterior 3-in-1 femoral block (group Femoral, N=18) or a posterior psoas compartment approach (group Psoas, N=18) using 30 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine. Successful nerve block was defined as a complete loss of pinprick sensation in the region that is supplied by the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve along with adequate motor block of the obturator nerve 30 minutes after injection. The degree of motor block of the obturator nerve was measured using adduction strength with a mercury sphygmomanometer as previously described by Lang. Thirty minutes after the completion of the block, sensory block of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was observed in 14 patients (78%) from the Psoas group and in 3 patients (17%) from the Femoral group (P=0.001). Thirty minutes after the completion of the block, a 119+/-40 mmHg decrease was found in Psoas group, in contrast to the 25+/-22 mmHg decrease found in the Femoral group (Ppsoas compartment approach provides a more reliable block of the lateral femoral cutaneous and obturator nerves than the anterior 3-in-1 approach.

  13. Comparison of a single- or double-injection technique for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block: a prospective, randomized, blinded controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mélanie; Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Côté, Dany; Levesque, Simon; Dion, Nicolas; Nicole, Pierre C; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2012-01-01

    Despite good success rates reported with ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block using 1 or multiple injections, no consensus exists on the best technique to use. We designed this study to test the hypothesis that a double-injection technique would hasten the onset of sensory block. Adult patients undergoing hand, wrist, or elbow surgery were enrolled in this prospective double-blind randomized study. Blocks were performed under ultrasound guidance. In group S (single injection), 30 mL of mepivacaine 1.5% was injected at the junction of the subclavian artery and the first rib. In group D (double injection), 15 mL of the same solution was injected at the site described above, then 15 mL was injected in the most superficial portion of the lateral aspect of the cluster formed by the brachial plexus trunks and divisions. The primary end point was the rate of complete sensory block at 15 mins. Secondary end points were the rates of sensory, motor, and surgical blocks and procedure time. Fifty-one patients were randomized to each group. The rate of complete sensory block was similar at 15 mins (group S: 49% [95% confidence interval, 36%-62%], group D: 53% [95% confidence interval, 40%-66%]; P = 0.80) and at each time interval. The rates of complete motor block and surgical block success were similar between groups. The procedure time was shorter in group S (179 ± 104 vs 275 ± 137 secs; P block.

  14. [Less pain during puncture by a peripheral venous catheter; a bibliographical review on adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat González, Irene; Fuentes i Pumarola, Concepció; Bertran Noguer, Carme; Ballester Ferrando, David; Juvinyà Canal, Dolors; Vila Vidal, Dalmau

    2010-06-01

    Canalizing veins is a habitual technique carried out by nurses. Inserting a catheter in a peripheral vein causes pain. The importance of fine quality in nursing treatment implicitly bears on a person's well-being. In daily practice, health professionals do not use any method to reduce pain when inserting a catheter. The authors observations led them to believe in the need to carry out a bibliographical review whose objective was to discover all the methods used to reduce pain caused by puncturing a peripheral vein. Six randomly assigned clinical tests and a meta-analysis evaluate the effectiveness of: The use of Valsalva, an analgesic cream which contains two local amino-amide anesthetics; lidocaine and prylocaine (EMLA) compared to another analgesic cream, Myolaxin; a meta-analysis of twenty studies evaluates the degree by which pain is diminished by one such method: an EMLA cream; an anti-inflammatory skin dressing (diclofenaco), a diclofenaco dressing versus an EMLA anesthetic dressing, 0.25 ml subcutaneous injection of 1% mepivaína, an amida type local anesthetic; and direct photography moments before puncture occurs to use the effects of a flash of light. All these methods studied proved effective in reducing pain. Creams and dressing prove to be unaggressive methods but require some time for application prior to puncture. Using a camera flash, subcutaneous injection of mepivacaine and the application of Valsalva can be effective alternatives to reduce pain when puncturing veins in patients who require emergency care.

  15. Immunoassay screening of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its confirmation by HPLC and fluorescence detection following LSD ImmunElute extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobosch, T; Lemm-Ahlers, U

    2002-04-01

    In all, 3872 urine specimens were screened for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) using the CEDIA DAU LSD assay. Forty-eight samples, mainly from psychiatric patients or drug abusers, were found to be LSD positive, but only 13 (27%) of these could be confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) following immunoaffinity extraction (IAE). Additional analysis for LSD using the DPC Coat-a-Count RIA was performed to compare the two immunoassay screening methods. Complete agreement between the DPC RIA assay and HPLC-FLD results was observed at concentrations below a cutoff concentration of 500 pg/mL. Samples that were LSD positive in the CEDIA DAU assay but not confirmed by HPLC-FLD were also investigated for interfering compounds using REMEDI HS drug-profiling system. REMEDI HS analysis identified 15 compounds (parent drugs and metabolites) that are believed to cross-react in the CEDIA DAU LSD assay: ambroxol, prilocaine, pipamperone, diphenhydramine, metoclopramide, amitriptyline, doxepine, atracurium, bupivacaine, doxylamine, lidocaine, mepivacaine, promethazine, ranitidine, and tramadole. The IAE/HPLC-FLD combination is rapid, easy to perform and reliable. It can reduce costs when standard, rather than more advanced, HPLC equipment is used, especially for labs that perform analyses for LSD infrequently. The chromatographic analysis of LSD, nor-LSD, and iso-LSD is not influenced by any of the tested cross-reacting compounds even at a concentration of 100 ng/mL.

  16. A Triple-Masked, Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus and Distal Peripheral Nerve Block Anesthesia for Outpatient Hand Surgery

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    Nicholas C. K. Lam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. For hand surgery, brachial plexus blocks provide effective anesthesia but produce undesirable numbness. We hypothesized that distal peripheral nerve blocks will better preserve motor function while providing effective anesthesia. Methods. Adult subjects who were scheduled for elective ambulatory hand surgery under regional anesthesia and sedation were recruited and randomly assigned to receive ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block or distal block of the ulnar and median nerves. Each subject received 15 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine at the assigned location with 15 mL of normal saline injected in the alternate block location. The primary outcome (change in baseline grip strength measured by a hydraulic dynamometer was tested before the block and prior to discharge. Subject satisfaction data were collected the day after surgery. Results. Fourteen subjects were enrolled. Median (interquartile range [IQR] strength loss in the distal group was 21.4% (14.3, 47.8%, while all subjects in the supraclavicular group lost 100% of their preoperative strength, P = 0.001. Subjects in the distal group reported greater satisfaction with their block procedures on the day after surgery, P = 0.012. Conclusion. Distal nerve blocks better preserve motor function without negatively affecting quality of anesthesia, leading to increased patient satisfaction, when compared to brachial plexus block.

  17. General anesthesia plus ilioinguinal nerve block versus spinal anesthesia for ambulatory inguinal herniorrhapy

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    Lucía Vizcaíno-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to evaluate general anesthesia (GA plus ilioinguinal nerve block (IIB versus spinal anesthesia (SA in patients scheduled for ambulatory inguinal hernia repair regarding pain management, anesthesia recovery and reducing potential complications. Materials and Methods: A double-blind, prospective, randomized, controlled study in patients American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III randomized into two groups: GA plus IIB group, induction of anesthesia with propofol, maintenance with sevoflurane, airway management with laryngeal mask allowing spontaneous ventilation and ultrasound-guided IIB; SA group, patients who underwent spinal block with 2% mepivacaine. The study variables were pain intensity, assessed by visual analog scale, analgesic requirements until hospital discharge, time to ambulation and discharge, postoperative complications-related to both techniques and satisfaction experienced. Results: Thirty-two patients were enrolled; 16 patients in each group. The differences regarding pain were statistically significant at 2 h of admission (P < 0.001 and at discharge (P < 0.001 in favor of the GA plus ilioinguinal block group. In addition in this group, analgesic requirements were lower than SA group (P < 0.001, with times of ambulation and discharge significantly shorter. The SA group had a higher tendency to develop complications and less satisfaction. Conclusion: General anesthesia plus IIB is better than SA regarding postoperative analgesia, time to mobilization and discharge, side-effect profile and satisfaction experienced by the patients.

  18. [Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by repetitive administration of local anaesthetics: an experimental study in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; de Oliveira, Mariliza Casanova; de Oliveira Tavares, Graziela; Pereira, Laís Fabrício Fonseca; Soares, Nádia Derli Salvador Lemes; Silva, Patrícia Gatti

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies regarding the effects of some local anaesthetics have suggested that these agents can cause genetic damage. However, they have not been tested for genotoxicity related to repetitive administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of local anaesthetics upon repetitive administration. 80 male Wistar rats were divided into: group A - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with lidocaine hydrochloride 2%; group B - 16 rats IP injected with mepivacaine 2%; group C - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with articaine 4%; group D - 16 rats IP injected with prilocaine 3% (6.0mg/kg); group E - 8 rats subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide; and group F - 8 rats intraperitoneally injected with saline. Eight rats from groups A to D received a single dose of anaesthetic on Day 1 of the experiment; the remaining rats were dosed once a day for 5 days. The median number of micronuclei in the local anaesthetics groups exposed for 1 or 5 days ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, in the cyclophosphamide-exposed group was 10.00, and the negative control group for 1 and 5 days was 1.00 and 0.00, respectively (plocal anaesthetic groups (p=0.0001), but not between the negative control group and the local anaesthetic groups (p>0.05). No genotoxicity effect was observed upon repetitive exposure to any of the local anaesthetics evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Single-Injection Infraclavicular Block Versus Ultrasound-Guided Double-Injection Axillary Block: A Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Ariane; Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Dion, Nicolas; Lévesque, Simon; Nicole, Pierre C; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2016-01-01

    Single-injection ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block is a simple, reliable, and effective technique. A simplified double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block technique with a high success rate recently has been described. It has the advantage of being performed in a superficial and compressible location, with a potentially improved safety profile. However, its effectiveness in comparison with single-injection infraclavicular block has not been established. We hypothesized that the double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block would show rates of complete sensory block at 30 minutes noninferior to the single-injection ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block. After approval by our research ethics committee and written informed consent, adults undergoing distal upper arm surgery were randomized to either group I, ultrasound-guided single-injection infraclavicular block, or group A, ultrasound-guided double-injection axillary block. In group I, 30 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine was injected posterior to the axillary artery. In group A, 25 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine was injected posteromedial to the axillary artery, after which 5 mL was injected around the musculocutaneous nerve. Primary outcome was the rate of complete sensory block at 30 minutes. Secondary outcomes were the onset of sensory and motor blocks, surgical success rates, performance times, and incidence of complications. All outcomes were assessed by a blinded investigator. The noninferiority of the double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block was considered if the limits of the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were within a 10% margin of the rate of complete sensory block of the infraclavicular block. At 30 minutes, the rate of complete sensory block was 79% in group A (90% CI, 71%-85%) compared with 91% in group I (90% CI, 85%-95%); the upper limit of CI of group A is thus included in the established noninferiority margin of 10%. The rate of complete sensory block was lower in group A (proportion

  20. The efficacy of six local anesthetic formulations used for posterior mandibular buccal infiltration anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulwahab, Mohammad; Boynes, Sean; Moore, Paul; Seifikar, Shahrooz; Al-Jazzaf, Abdulaziz; Alshuraidah, Abdullah; Zovko, Jayme; Close, John

    2009-08-01

    The authors conducted a randomized, double-blind clinical trial to evaluate pulpal anesthesia achieved after mandibular infiltration of five commonly marketed dental local anesthetic formulations as compared with a control formulation of lidocaine with epinephrine. The authors evaluated 2 percent lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (L100) against 4 percent articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (A100), 4 percent articaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (A200), 4 percent prilocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (P200), 3 percent mepivacaine without vasoconstrictor (Mw/o) and 0.5 percent bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (B200). This repeated-treatment trial involved 18 healthy participants. The investigators administered mandibular infiltration injections (six sessions per participant) of 0.9 milliliters of anesthetic into the buccal fold adjacent to the distal root of the mandibular first molar. The authors determined anesthetic efficacy across a 20-minute period by measuring changes in sensory threshold to electrical pulp test (EPT) stimulation. Twelve female and six male participants (mean age, 24.9 years; range, 18-53 years) completed the study. The maximum mean increase from baseline of EPT measurements for the six formulations were 43.5 percent for L100, 44.8 percent for B200, 51.2 percent for P200, 66.9 percent for A200, 68.3 percent for Mw/o and 77.3 percent for A100 (A100 versus L100, P = .029). Adverse reactions were minor and not formulation dependent. The authors found that mandibular infiltration with 0.9 mL of the tested dental anesthetics could induce only partial pulpal anesthesia, a level likely to be inadequate for most dental procedures. When compared with L100, only the A100 induced statistically greater pulpal anesthesia after mandibular buccal infiltration.

  1. Sensitivity, Specificity, Predictive Values, and Accuracy of Three Diagnostic Tests to Predict Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blockade Failure in Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Wong, Laura; Noguera-González, Danny; Esparza-Villalpando, Vicente; Montero-Aguilar, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is the most common anesthetic technique used on mandibular teeth during root canal treatment. Its success in the presence of preoperative inflammation is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy of three diagnostic tests used to predict IANB failure in symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP). Methodology A cross-sectional study was carried out on the mandibular molars of 53 patients with SIP. All patients received a single cartridge of mepivacaine 2% with 1 : 100000 epinephrine using the IANB technique. Three diagnostic clinical tests were performed to detect anesthetic failure. Anesthetic failure was defined as a positive painful response to any of the three tests. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, accuracy, and ROC curves were calculated and compared and significant differences were analyzed. Results IANB failure was determined in 71.7% of the patients. The sensitivity scores for the three tests (lip numbness, the cold stimuli test, and responsiveness during endodontic access) were 0.03, 0.35, and 0.55, respectively, and the specificity score was determined as 1 for all of the tests. Clinically, none of the evaluated tests demonstrated a high enough accuracy (0.30, 0.53, and 0.68 for lip numbness, the cold stimuli test, and responsiveness during endodontic access, resp.). A comparison of the areas under the curve in the ROC analyses showed statistically significant differences between the three tests (p < 0.05). Conclusion None of the analyzed tests demonstrated a high enough accuracy to be considered a reliable diagnostic tool for the prediction of anesthetic failure. PMID:28694714

  2. Quaternary ammonium compounds as structural probes of single batrachotoxin-activated Na+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium (QA) blockers are well-known structural probes for studying the permeation pathway of voltage-gated K+ channels. In this study we have examined the effects of a series of n-alkyl- trimethylammonium compounds (Cn-QA) on batrachotoxin (BTX)-activated Na+ channels from skeletal muscle incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. We found that these amphipathic QA compounds (Cn-QA where n = 10-18) block single Na+ channels preferentially from the internal side with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) in the submicromolar to micromolar range. External application of amphipathic QA compounds is far less effective, by a factor of greater than 200. The block can be described by a QA molecule binding to a single site in the Na+ channel permeation pathway. QA binding affinity is dependent on transmembrane voltage with an effective valence (delta) of approximately 0.5. QA dwell times (given as mean closed times, tau c) increase as a function of n-alkyl chain length, ranging from approximately 13 ms for C10-QA to 500 ms for C18-QA at +50 mV. The results imply that there is a large hydrophobic region within the Na+ channel pore which accepts up to 18 methylene groups of the Cn-QA cation. This hydrophobic domain may be of clinical significance since it also interacts with local anesthetics such as cocaine and mepivacaine. Finally, like BTX-activated Na+ channels in bilayers, unmodified Na+ channels in GH3 cells are also susceptible to QA block. Amphipathic QA cations elicit both tonic and use-dependent inhibitions of normal Na+ currents in a manner similar to that of local anesthetic cocaine. We conclude that amphipathic QA compounds are valuable structural probes to study the permeation pathway of both normal and BTX-activated Na+ channels. PMID:1662681

  3. Validation and application of a multiresidue method based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for evaluating the plant uptake of 74 microcontaminants in crops irrigated with treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Piernas, A B; Polo-López, M I; Fernández-Ibáñez, P; Agüera, A

    2018-01-26

    Reuse of treated wastewater for agricultural purposes can mitigate water stress in some regions where the lack of water is an extended problem. However, the environmental long-term consequences of this practice are still unknown. It is demonstrated that using reclaimed water for irrigation lead to accumulation and translocation of some microcontaminants (MCs) in soil and crops. However, so far, only a small group of contaminants has been investigated. This study aims to develop and validate a simple and efficient multiresidue method based on QuEChERs (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective and Rugged) extraction coupled to liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The novelty of the study relays in the large number of MCs analyzed (74), some of them not previously investigated, in three commodities (lettuce, radish and strawberry). Optimized conditions yielded good results for the three commodities under study. Up to 84% of the compounds were recovered within a 70-120% range, with good repeatability (relative standard deviations below 20% in most cases). Method detection (MDLs) and quantification limits (MQLs) ranged from 0.01 to 2 ng/g. The proposed method was successfully applied to assess the potential uptake of MCs by lettuce and radish crops irrigated with wastewater under controlled conditions for 3 and 1.5 months, respectively. 12 compounds were detected in the crops with concentrations ranging from 0.03 to 57.6 ng/g. N-Formyl-4-aminoantipyrine (4FAA) was the most concentrated compound. The application of this method demonstrated for the first time the accumulation of 5 contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) not previously reported: 4FAA, N-Acetyl-4-aminoantipyrine (4AAA), hydrochlorothiazide, mepivacaine and venlafaxine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sensitivity, Specificity, Predictive Values, and Accuracy of Three Diagnostic Tests to Predict Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blockade Failure in Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

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    Daniel Chavarría-Bolaños

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB is the most common anesthetic technique used on mandibular teeth during root canal treatment. Its success in the presence of preoperative inflammation is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy of three diagnostic tests used to predict IANB failure in symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP. Methodology. A cross-sectional study was carried out on the mandibular molars of 53 patients with SIP. All patients received a single cartridge of mepivacaine 2% with 1 : 100000 epinephrine using the IANB technique. Three diagnostic clinical tests were performed to detect anesthetic failure. Anesthetic failure was defined as a positive painful response to any of the three tests. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, accuracy, and ROC curves were calculated and compared and significant differences were analyzed. Results. IANB failure was determined in 71.7% of the patients. The sensitivity scores for the three tests (lip numbness, the cold stimuli test, and responsiveness during endodontic access were 0.03, 0.35, and 0.55, respectively, and the specificity score was determined as 1 for all of the tests. Clinically, none of the evaluated tests demonstrated a high enough accuracy (0.30, 0.53, and 0.68 for lip numbness, the cold stimuli test, and responsiveness during endodontic access, resp.. A comparison of the areas under the curve in the ROC analyses showed statistically significant differences between the three tests (p<0.05. Conclusion. None of the analyzed tests demonstrated a high enough accuracy to be considered a reliable diagnostic tool for the prediction of anesthetic failure.

  5. [Comparison of the post-surgical analgesic effectiveness of tibial (at internal malleolus level) and common peroneal nerve block with infiltration of the surgical wound in Outpatient Surgery of the hallux valgus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, M A; Ollé, G; Pellejero, J A; Torruella, R; Yuste, M; Pou, N

    2012-04-01

    To compare the post-operative analgesic effectiveness of blocking the posterior tibial and the common peroneal nerves against that of wound infiltration using local anaesthesia, in ambulatory surgery of hallux valgus. A randomised clinical study was conducted on ambulatory patients subjected to Hallux valgus surgery, assigned into two groups: BNP: peripheral nerve blockage: posterior tibial and the common peroneal with 80mg of lidocaine, 100mg of mepivacaine and 25mg of levobupivacaine. INF: surgical wound infiltration with 50mg of levobupivacaine. The following aspects were evaluated during the first 24h after surgery: pain level using a visual analogue scale (VAS), the need to use rescue analgesia, and the incidence of secondary effects and readmissions due to pain. A total of 111 Patients were included (55 BNP, 56 INF), 93 per cent were women and the average age was 59 (SD10) years. The average VAS score in the first 24h was 2.9 (SD1.7) for the BNP group and 2.7 (SD1.6) for the INF group (P=.62). Less than half (42%) of patients needed rescue anaesthetic with tramadol, with no significant differences between the groups (P=.28). A 33 per cent had secondary postoperative effects were observed in 33% of cases, with a significant difference between INF and BNP (P=.01). One patient from INF group, had to be admitted for pain. The peripheral nerve block and wound infiltration are valid techniques for controlling pain at home after ambulatory surgery of hallux valgus, therefore both methods appear to be safe in an outpatient setting. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Pulpal blood flow recorded from exposed dentine with a laser Doppler flow meter using red or infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsamanmith, Kanittha; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Matthews, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    To determine the percentage of the blood flow signal that is derived from dental pulp when recording from exposed dentine in a human premolar. Recordings were made from 7 healthy teeth in 5 subjects (aged 22-33 yr.) with a laser Doppler flow meter (Periflux 4001) using either a red (635 nm) or an infrared (780 nm) laser. After exposing dentine above the buccal pulpal horn (cavity diam. 1.6 mm, depth 3 mm) and isolating the crown with opaque rubber dam, blood flow was recorded alternately with infrared or red light from the exposed dentine under four conditions: before and after injecting local anaesthetic (3% Mepivacaine without vasoconstrictor) (LA) over the apex of the root of the tooth; after exposing the pulp by cutting a buccal, class V cavity in the tooth; and after sectioning the coronal pulp transversely through the exposure. There was no significant change in mean blood flow recorded with either light source when the tooth was anaesthetized or when the pulp was exposed. After the pulp had been sectioned, the blood flow recorded with infrared light fell by 67.8% and with red light, by 68.4%. The difference between these effects was not significant. When recording blood flow from exposed coronal dentine with either infrared or red light in a tooth isolated with opaque rubber dam, about 68% to the signal was contributed by the pulp. The signal:noise ratio was better with infrared than red light, and when recording from dentine than enamel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  8. 3D ultrasound estimation of the effective volume for popliteal block at the level of division.

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    Sala-Blanch, X; Franco, J; Bergé, R; Marín, R; López, A M; Agustí, M

    2017-03-01

    Local anaesthetic injection between the tibial and commmon peroneal nerves within connective tissue sheath results in a predictable diffusion and allows for a reduction in the volume needed to achieve a consistent sciatic popliteal block. Using 3D ultrasound volumetric acquisition, we quantified the visible volume in contact with the nerve along a 5cm segment. We included 20 consecutive patients scheduled for bunion surgery. Ultrasound guided popliteal block was performed using a posterior, out of plane approach at the level of división of the sciatic nerve. Thirty ml of mepivacaine 1.5% and levobupivacaine 0.5% were slowly injected while assessing the injection pressure and the diffusion of the local anaesthetic. Volumetric acquisition was performed before and after the block to quantify the the volume of the sciatic nerve and the volume of the surrounding hypoechoic halo contained inside the connective tissue in a 5cm segment. All blocks were successful within 20min after the injection. The total estimated volume contained inside the common connective tissue sheath was 6.8±2.6cm 3 . Of this, the volume of the halo sorrounding the nerve was 4.4±1.7cm 3 and the volume inside the sciatic nerve was 2.4±1.7cm 3 . The volume of local anaesthetic in close contact with the sciatic nerve can be estimated by volumetric acquisition. Our results suggest that the effective volume of local anaesthetic needed for a successful sciatic popliteal block could be reduced to less than 7ml. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical parameters of the local anesthetic effects of bupivacaine applied with and without a vasoconstrictor in oral implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duka Miloš

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Bupivacaine (Marcaine®, homologue of mepivacaine, chemically related to lidocaine, is used as a local anesthetic for local infiltration, peripheral nerve block, retrobulbar block, symphathetic block, and caudal and epidural anesthesia. The aim of this investigation was to determine and to compare clinical parameters of the local anesthetic effects of bupivacaine applied with and without a vasoconstrictor. Methods. This investigation included a total of 30 randomly selected patients, who ranged in age from 30−60 years, with partial or total anodontia in the molar region of the mandible. These patients with total or partial edentulous molar part of the mandible, scheduled for dental implantation placement, were asked to participate in the study. In the first phase of the investigation, the patients were subjected to local anesthesia with 3.5 cm3 of 0.5% bupivacaine with a vasoconstrictor (adrenalin, 1: 200 000 in the right side of the mandible. After administering local anesthesia, the placement of blade, cylindrical, transdental (B.C.T. implants was performed. In the second stage of the investigation, in 7−10 days period after the first oral surgery, the patients were subjected to local anesthesia with 3.5 cm3 of 0.5% bupivacaine, but without a vasoconstrictor, in the left side of the mandible. After administering local anesthesia, the placement of B.C.T. implants was performed. During the performance of both oral surgery procedures, the following clinical parameters of the local anesthetic effects were monitored: latent period, duration and the potency of anesthesia, and the evaluation of the postoperative pain level. Results. The latent period under local anesthesia with 3.5 cm3 of 0.5% bupivacaine and vasoconstrictor was statistically significantly shorter than without vasoconstrictor. The duration of local anesthesia was longer without vasoconstrictor. There was no difference in the potency of anesthesia with or without a

  10. Fascia iliaca block associated only with deep sedation in high-risk patients, taking P2Y12 receptor inhibitors, for intramedullary femoral fixation in intertrochanteric hip fracture: a series of 3 cases.

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    Almeida, Carlos Rodrigues; Francisco, Emília Milheiro; Pinho-Oliveira, Vítor; Assunção, José Pedro

    2016-12-01

    We present a series of 3 cases in which the impact in outcome was, first of all, related to the capacity to offer early and safer treatment to some hip fracture high-risk patients using a fascia iliaca block (FIB; ropivacaine 0,5% 20 cc and mepivacaine 1,3% 15 cc, given 30 minutes before incision) associated only with deep sedation, contributing to better practice and outcome. All elderly patients were American Society of Anesthesiologists IV patients, under P2Y12 receptor inhibitors, suffering from an intertrochanteric fracture, and purposed for intramedullary femoral fixation (IMF). All patients have been managed successfully through a deep sedation using a low-dose infusion of propofol and bolus of fentanyl without face mask ventilation, supraglottic device placement, or endotracheal intubation after an FIB. Bispectral index was always greater than 75, and no CO 2 retention or respiratory depression was present. No signs of pain or hemodynamic instability were observed. In these cases, surgery would be postponed if the choice was neuroaxial anesthesia, particularly because of P2Y12 receptor inhibitors' effect. FIB puncture site is distal to the fracture and incision site, but proximal local anesthetic migration through the interfascial planes allows for constant block of femoral nerve and lateral cutaneous of femur nerve and, less constantly, block of obturator. FIB may reduce the risk of perineural hematoma associated with several injections in nerve vicinity of different lumbar plexus branches. Frequently, indications for extramedullary or IMF are overlapping, but IMF is associated with less blood loss and may be managed using a low anesthetic depth if an FIB is done, increasing safety. This way, these less invasive surgical techniques combined with an adjusted anesthetic technique may have a crucial role in high-risk patients, particularly if taking P2Y12 receptor inhibitors. In these cases of IMF, surgical manipulation of sciatic and/or inferior subcostal

  11. Current trends in local anesthesia in cosmetic plastic surgery of the head and neck: results of a German national survey and observations on the use of ropivacaine.

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    Koeppe, Tobias; Constantinescu, Mihai A; Schneider, Jochen; Gubisch, Wolfgang

    2005-05-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate at the national level the current practice in the use of local anesthetics in cosmetic head and neck surgery and to compare the results with the novel local anesthesia technique used in the authors' department over the past 2 years. A questionnaire was posted to all 211 board-certified members of the Association of German Plastic Surgeons. The questions related to the daily practice in rhinoplasty, blepharoplasty, otoplasty, face lift, and forehead lift. The focus was laid on anesthesia techniques, local anesthetics, vasoconstricting agents, dosages, activity onset, observed side effects, mean duration of each procedure type, and surgeon satisfaction with the anesthetic used. A total of 86 questionnaires (40.8 percent) were returned. The overall analysis revealed that local anesthetics were used in 88.9 percent of all cosmetic procedures of the head and neck. Prilocaine 1% (Xylonest; AstraZeneca, Wedel, Germany) was the most frequently used local anesthetic (32.0 percent), followed by lidocaine 1% (Xylocaine; AstraZeneca) and mepivacaine 1% (Scandicaine; AstraZeneca). Ropivacaine 0.2% (Naropin; AstraZeneca) was used only by 1.1 percent and ropivacaine 0.75% only by 0.9 percent (including two of the authors). Approximately half of the respondents (47.2 percent) used epinephrine 1:100,000 for vasoconstriction. In face lifts, the necessity of repeated "top-up" infiltration was reported in more than half (54.7 percent) of the procedures. Ten percent of surgeons surpassed the maximum recommended dosages when working without ropivacaine. Overall adverse cardiovascular effects were reported in 5.9 percent of rhinoplasties and 8.1 percent of face lifts performed mostly with prilocaine and lidocaine. No adverse cardiovascular reactions or overdoses were noticed with the use of ropivacaine. The survey showed a clear trend toward the increasing use of local anesthetics in cosmetic surgery of the head and neck. Although the use of

  12. Ultrasound-guided bilateral combined inguinal femoral and subgluteal sciatic nerve blocks for simultaneous bilateral below-knee amputations due to bilateral diabetic foot gangrene unresponsive to peripheral arterial angioplasty and bypass surgery in a coagulopathic patient on antiplatelet therapy with a history of percutaneous coronary intervention for ischemic heart disease: A case report.

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    Byun, Sung Hye; Lee, Jonghoon; Kim, Jong Hae

    2016-07-01

    Patients on antiplatelet therapy following percutaneous coronary intervention can become coagulopathic due to infection. Performing regional anesthesia for bilateral surgery in such cases is challenging. We report a case of successful combined inguinal femoral and subgluteal sciatic nerve blocks (CFSNBs) for simultaneous bilateral below-knee amputations in a coagulopathic patient on antiplatelet therapy. A 70-year-old male patient presented with pain in both feet due to diabetic foot syndrome. The condition could not be managed by open amputations of the toes at the metatarsal bones and subsequent antibiotic therapy. Computed tomographic angiography showed significant stenosis in the arteries supplying the lower limbs, indicating atherosclerotic gangrene in both feet. Balloon angioplasty and bypass surgery with subsequent debridements with application of negative-pressure wound therapy and additional open amputations did not improve the patient's clinical condition: his leukocyte counts and C-reactive protein levels were above the normal range, and his prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times were increased. Simultaneous bilateral below-knee amputations were performed under ultrasound-guided CFSNBs. Following left CFSNBs using 45 mL of a local anesthetic mixture (1:1 ratio of 1.0% mepivacaine and 0.75% ropivacaine), the left below-knee amputation was performed for 76 minutes. Subsequently, under right CFSNBs using 47 mL of the local anesthetic mixture, the right below-knee amputation proceeded for 85 minutes. Throughout each surgery, dexmedetomidine was continuously administered, and a sensory blockade was well maintained in both limbs. The patient did not complain of pain due to regression of the first CFSNBs during the second surgery. The CFSNBs successfully prevented tourniquet pain. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST) and hemodynamic instability due to tourniquet deflation and administration of dexmedetomidine did not occur. No

  13. A prospective, randomized comparison between single- and multiple-injection techniques for ultrasound-guided subgluteal sciatic nerve block.

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    Yamamoto, Hiroto; Sakura, Shinichi; Wada, Minori; Shido, Akemi

    2014-12-01

    It is believed that local anesthetic injected to obtain circumferential spread around nerves produces a more rapid onset and successful blockade after some ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks. However, evidence demonstrating this point is limited only to the popliteal sciatic nerve block, which is relatively easy to perform by via a high-frequency linear transducer. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that multiple injections of local anesthetic to make circumferential spread would improve the rate of sensory and motor blocks compared with a single-injection technique for ultrasound-guided subgluteal sciatic nerve block, which is considered a relatively difficult block conducted with a low-frequency, curved-array transducer. Ninety patients undergoing knee surgery were divided randomly into 2 groups to receive the ultrasound-guided subgluteal approach to sciatic nerve block with 20 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine with epinephrine. For group M (the multiple-injection technique), the local anesthetic was injected to create circumferential spread around the sciatic nerve without limitation on the number of needle passes. For group S (the single-injection technique), the number of needle passes was limited to 1, and the local anesthetic was injected to create spread along the dorsal surface of the sciatic nerve, during which no adjustment of the needle tip was made. Sensory and motor blockade were assessed in double-blind fashion for 30 minutes after completion of the block. The primary outcome was sensory blockade of all sciatic components tested, including tibial, superficial peroneal, and sural nerves at 30 minutes after injection. Data from 86 patients (43 in each group) were analyzed. Block execution took more time for group M than group S. The proportion of patients with complete sensory blockade of all sciatic components at 30 minutes after injection was significantly larger for group M than group S (41.9% vs 16.3%, P = 0.018). Complete motor blockade of