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Sample records for mepivacaine

  1. ECMO for Cardiac Rescue after Accidental Intravenous Mepivacaine Application

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    Michael Froehle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mepivacaine is a potent local anaesthetic and used for infiltration and regional anaesthesia in adults and pediatric patients. Intoxications with mepivacaine affect mainly the CNS and the cardiovascular system. We present a case of accidental intravenous mepivacaine application and intoxication of an infant resulting in seizure, broad complex bradyarrhythmia, arterial hypotension and finally cardiac arrest. The patient could be rescued by prolonged resuscitations and a rapid initiation of ECMO and survived without neurological damage. The management strategies of this rare complication including promising other treatment options with lipid emulsions are discussed.

  2. Articaine and mepivacaine buccal infiltration in securing mandibular first molar pulp anesthesia following mepivacaine inferior alveolar nerve block: A randomized, double-blind crossover study

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    Giath Gazal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: A crossover double-blind, randomized study was designed to explore the efficacy of 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline buccal infiltration and 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline buccal infiltration following 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB for testing pulp anesthesia of mandibular first molar teeth in adult volunteers. Materials and Methods: A total of 23 healthy adult volunteers received two regimens with at least 1-week apart; one with 4% articaine buccal infiltration and 2% mepivacaine IANB (articaine regimen and another with 2% mepivacaine buccal infiltration supplemented to 2% mepivacaine IANB (mepivacaine regimen. Pulp testing of first molar tooth was electronically measured twice at baseline, then at intervals of 2 min for the first 10 min, then every 5 min until 45 min postinjection. Anesthetic success was considered when two consecutive maximal stimulation on pulp testing readings without sensation were obtained within 10 min and continuously sustained for 45 min postinjection. Results: In total, the number of no sensations to maximum pulp testing for first molar teeth were significantly higher after articaine regimen than mepivacaine during 45 min postinjection (267 vs. 250 episodes, respectively, P 0.05. Interestingly, volunteers in the articaine regimen provided faster onset and longer duration (means 2.78 min, 42.22 min, respectively than mepivacaine regimen (means 4.26 min, 40.74 min, respectively for first molar pulp anesthesia (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Supplementary mepivacaine and articaine buccal infiltrations produced similar successful first molar pulp anesthesia following mepivacaine IANB injections in volunteers. Articaine buccal infiltration produced faster onset and longer duration than mepivacaine buccal infiltration following mepivacaine IANB injections.

  3. Articaine and mepivacaine buccal infiltration in securing mandibular first molar pulp anesthesia following mepivacaine inferior alveolar nerve block: A randomized, double-blind crossover study.

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    Gazal, Giath; Alharbi, Abdullah Muteb; Al-Samadani, Khalid HidayatAllah; Kanaa, Mohammad Dib

    2015-01-01

    A crossover double-blind, randomized study was designed to explore the efficacy of 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline buccal infiltration and 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline buccal infiltration following 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for testing pulp anesthesia of mandibular first molar teeth in adult volunteers. A total of 23 healthy adult volunteers received two regimens with at least 1-week apart; one with 4% articaine buccal infiltration and 2% mepivacaine IANB (articaine regimen) and another with 2% mepivacaine buccal infiltration supplemented to 2% mepivacaine IANB (mepivacaine regimen). Pulp testing of first molar tooth was electronically measured twice at baseline, then at intervals of 2 min for the first 10 min, then every 5 min until 45 min postinjection. Anesthetic success was considered when two consecutive maximal stimulation on pulp testing readings without sensation were obtained within 10 min and continuously sustained for 45 min postinjection. In total, the number of no sensations to maximum pulp testing for first molar teeth were significantly higher after articaine regimen than mepivacaine during 45 min postinjection (267 vs. 250 episodes, respectively, P 0.05). Interestingly, volunteers in the articaine regimen provided faster onset and longer duration (means 2.78 min, 42.22 min, respectively) than mepivacaine regimen (means 4.26 min, 40.74 min, respectively) for first molar pulp anesthesia (P < 0.001). Supplementary mepivacaine and articaine buccal infiltrations produced similar successful first molar pulp anesthesia following mepivacaine IANB injections in volunteers. Articaine buccal infiltration produced faster onset and longer duration than mepivacaine buccal infiltration following mepivacaine IANB injections.

  4. The stability and microbial contamination of bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine used for lameness diagnostics in horses

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    Adler, D. M. T.; Cornett, C.; Damborg, P.

    2016-01-01

    Local anaesthetics (LAs) are frequently used for diagnostic procedures in equine veterinary practice. The objective of this study was to investigate the physico-chemical stability and bacterial contamination of bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine used for lameness examinations in horses. The LAs...... serially in both new and repeatedly punctured (RP) vials. Mepivacaine remained chemically stable. A 1.9% increase in bupivacaine concentration was evident in one group, whereas a 1.9–3.7% decrease was noted in six groups. Risk factors associated with a change in concentration were light and RP vials...... in practice vehicles were risk factors for degradation. No contamination was present in any of the LAs and pH remained stable. Commercially available solutions of lidocaine, mepivacaine and bupivacaine stored under common veterinary field conditions are extremely stable and sterile for extended periods...

  5. Comparison of hemodynamic effects of lidocaine, prilocaine and mepivacaine solutions without vasoconstrictor in hypertensive patients

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    Bahadir Ezmek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Local anesthetic solutions with vasoconstrictors are not contraindicated in hypertensive patients, but due to their hemodynamic effects, local anesthetics without vasoconstrictors are mainly preferred by the clinicians. The aim of this study was to compare hemodynamic effects of three different local anesthetics without vasoconstrictors during tooth extraction in hypertensive patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty-five mandibular molars and premolars were extracted in 60 hypertensive patients (29 females and 31 males; mean age: 66.95 ± 10.87 years; range: 38 to 86 years old. Inferior alveolar and buccal nerve blocks were performed with 2% lidocaine hydrochloride (HCl, 2% prilocaine HCl or 3% mepivacaine HCl without vasoconstrictor. Hemodynamic parameters namely systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, heart rate (HR, saturation rate (SR, rate pressure product (RPP and pressure rate quotient (PRQ were investigated before and at different intervals after anesthetic injection. RESULTS: The hemodynamic effects of the three agents were similar to each other, although some significance was observed for DBP, MAP, RPP and PRQ values in the lidocaine, prilocaine and mepivacaine groups. CONCLUSION: Lidocaine, prilocaine and mepivacaine solutions without vasoconstrictor can be safely used in hypertensive patients. It is advisable that dental practitioners select anesthetic solutions for hypertensive patients considering their cardiovascular effects in order to provide patient comfort and safety.

  6. Antinociceptive effects of topical mepivacaine in a rat model of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathic pain

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    Sagen J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Sagen, Daniel A Castellanos,† Aldric T Hama The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA †Daniel A Castellanos passed away on April 14, 2010 Background: A consequence of HIV infection is sensory neuropathy, a debilitating condition that degrades the quality of life of HIV patients. Furthermore, life-extending antiretroviral treatment may exacerbate HIV sensory neuropathy. Analgesics that relieve other neuropathic pains show little or no efficacy in ameliorating HIV sensory neuropathy. Thus, there is a need for analgesics for people with this particular pain. While lidocaine is used in the management of painful peripheral neuropathies, another local anesthetic mepivacaine, with a potentially improved bioavailability, could be utilized for the management of HIV neuropathic pain.Methods: The efficacy of topical anesthetics was evaluated in a preclinical rodent model of painful peripheral neuropathy induced by epineural administration of the HIV envelope protein gp120 delivered using saturated oxidized cellulose implanted around the sciatic nerve. Beginning at 2 weeks following gp120 administration, the effects of local anesthetics topically applied via gauze pads were tested on heat and mechanical hyperalgesia in the hind paw. Rats were tested using several concentrations of mepivacaine or lidocaine during the following 2 weeks.Results: By 2 weeks following epineural gp120 implantation, the ipsilateral hind paw developed significant hypersensitivity to noxious pressure and heat hyperalgesia. A short-lasting, concentration-dependent amelioration of pressure and heat hyperalgesia was observed following topical application of mepivacaine to the ipsilateral plantar hind paw. By contrast, topical lidocaine ameliorated heat hyperalgesia in a concentration-dependent manner but not pressure hyperalgesia. Equipotent concentrations of mepivacaine and lidocaine applied topically to the

  7. The antimicrobial activity of bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine against equine pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, D. M. T.; Damborg, P.; Verwilghen, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    Lameness is the most commonly reported health problem in horses, and lameness investigations which include local anaesthetic injections are routinely performed by equine practitioners. Through this process, bacteria can enter the tissues perforated by the needle and may cause local infections...... the antimicrobial activity of the local anaesthetics bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine against 40 equine clinical bacterial isolates of the Actinobacillus, Corynebacterium, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus genera. Minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal...... also bactericidal. The tested local anaesthetics possessed antimicrobial activity against equine pathogens at concentrations that are routinely applied in clinical cases. However, this antimicrobial activity should not discourage antiseptic preparation prior to local anaesthetic injections....

  8. Bicarbonate-buffered ropivacaine-mepivacaine solution for medial caruncle anaesthesia.

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    Guerrier, Gilles; Boutboul, David; Chanat, Cédric; Samama, Charles Marc; Baillard, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    To compare self-reported pain during injection of plain versus alkalinised 0.75% ropivacaine-2% mepivacaine solution for anaesthesia performed at the medial caruncle site for eye surgery. This prospective, monocentric, double blind, randomised, controlled trial involved 40 consecutive patients who received either a standard local anaesthetic solution (0.75% ropivacaine 5ml and 2% mepivacaine 5ml with a pH of 5.9), or an alkalinised solution composed with a pH-adjusted solution of 7.0 through adjunction of 0.15mEq sodium bicarbonate per 10ml of the same mixture. Before anaesthesia, patients received intravenous midazolam (0.03mg/kg) to ease potential anxiety. During injection performed at the medial caruncle site, patients were asked to grade a pain VRS (0 to 10) for the injection using a verbal analogue scale. The primary end point was to investigate pain during injection of local anaesthetics. Anxiety levels before anaesthesia were low and similar for both groups. The mean pain score for the alkalinised group was significantly reduced compared to the control group (6 [25-75%, IQR 4-9] versus 3 [25-75%, IQR 1-5]; P=0.02; 95% CI for the difference in median pain scores [1.9-3.3]). Buffering local anaesthetics used in caruncular injection for eye surgery significantly reduces pain during injection. This simple strategy should be tested in routine clinical practice to improve patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of the Anesthetic Efficacy of Mepivacaine and Lidocaine in Patients with Irreversible Pulpitis: A Double-blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

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    Visconti, Renata Pieroni; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto; Buscariolo, Inês Aparecida

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2% mepivacaine combined with 1:100,000 epinephrine with 2% lidocaine combined with 1:100,000 epinephrine during pulpectomy of mandibular posterior teeth in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Forty-two patients with irreversible pulpitis who were admitted to the Emergency Center at the University of São Paulo School of Dentistry volunteered to take part in the study and were randomized to receive conventional inferior alveolar nerve block containing 1.8 or 3.6 mL of either 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. We recorded patients' subjective assessments of lip anesthesia, absence/presence of pulpal anesthesia tested by using electric pulp stimulation, and absence/presence of pain during the subsequent pulpectomy by using a verbal analogue scale. All patients tested reported lip anesthesia after application of either type of inferior alveolar nerve block. Pulpal anesthesia success rates measured by using the pulp tester were satisfactory for both solutions (86% for mepivacaine and 67% for lidocaine). Success rates according to patient report of no pain or mild pain during pulpectomy were higher for mepivacaine solution (55%) than for lidocaine solution (14%). The differences between mepivacaine and lidocaine were statistically significant. Mepivacaine resulted in effective pain control during irreversible pulpitis treatments. The success rates with either solution were not high enough to ensure complete pulpal anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Different Spectrophotometric and Chromatographic Methods for Determination of Mepivacaine and Its Toxic Impurity.

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    Abdelwahab, Nada S; Fared, Nehal F; Elagawany, Mohamed; Abdelmomen, Esraa H

    2017-09-01

    Stability-indicating spectrophotometric, TLC-densitometric, and ultra-performance LC (UPLC) methods were developed for the determination of mepivacaine HCl (MEP) in the presence of its toxic impurity, 2,6-dimethylanaline (DMA). Different spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of MEP and DMA. In a dual-wavelength method combined with direct spectrophotometric measurement, the absorbance difference between 221.4 and 240 nm was used for MEP measurements, whereas the absorbance at 283 nm was used for measuring DMA in the binary mixture. In the second-derivative method, amplitudes at 272.2 and 232.6 nm were recorded and used for the determination of MEP and DMA, respectively. The developed TLC-densitometric method depended on chromatographic separation using silica gel 60 F254 TLC plates as a stationary phase and methanol-water-acetic acid (9 + 1 + 0.1, v/v/v) as a developing system, with UV scanning at 230 nm. The developed UPLC method depended on separation using a C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm id, 5 μm particle size) as a stationary phase and acetonitrile-water (40 + 60, v/v; pH 4 with phosphoric acid) as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min, with UV detection at 215 nm. The chromatographic run time was approximately 1 min. The proposed methods were validated with respect to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines regarding precision, accuracy, ruggedness, robustness, and specificity.

  11. Axillary brachial plexus block duration with mepivacaine in patients with chronic renal failure. Case-control study.

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    Mojica, V; Nieuwveld, D; Herrera, A E; Mestres, G; López, A M; Sala-Blanch, X

    2017-04-01

    Regional anaesthesia is commonly preferred for arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation. Previous studies suggest a shorter block duration in patients with chronic renal failure, maybe because of the changes in regional blood flow. The aim of our study was to evaluate the duration of the axillary block with 1.5% mepivacaine in patients with chronic renal failure scheduled for AVF compared with healthy controls. Patients scheduled for AVF creation for the first time (GIRC) were included. They were compared with patients without renal failure (GC), with similar anthropometric characteristics. Ultrasound-guided axillary blocks with 20mL of 1.5% mepivacaine were performed on all patients. We evaluated onset time, humeral artery diameter and blood flow before and after the block, as well as the block duration. Twenty-three patients (GIRC: 12 and GC: 11) were included. No differences between groups were observed in block duration (GIRC: 227±43min vs GC: 229±27min; P=.781), or in onset time (GIRC: 13±5min vs GC: 12.2±3min; P=.477). The humeral blood flow before and after block was significantly lower in the GIRC (pre-block: GIRC: 52±21ml/min GC: 100±62ml/min; P=.034 and p ost block: GIRC: 130±57ml/min and GC: 274±182ml/min; P=.010). There was no significant correlation between the duration of the block and the preblock humeral blood flow (Spearman Rho: 0.106; P=.657) or the postblock humeral blood flow (Spearman Rho: 0.267; P=.254). The duration of the axillary block with 1.5% mepivacaine in patients with chronic renal failure was similar to that of the control patients. The duration of axillary brachial plexus block seems not to be related to changes in regional blood flow. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of mepivacaine-tramadol combination on the success of inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical trial.

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    Rodríguez-Wong, L; Pozos-Guillen, A; Silva-Herzog, D; Chavarría-Bolaños, D

    2016-04-01

    To compare the success of an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) after injecting a combination of mepivacaine and tramadol or mepivacaine alone in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP) in mandibular permanent molars. This study was a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Two study groups were selected, each consisting of 28 patients who exhibited SIP on the first or second mandibular molars. All included patients presented with moderate-to-severe preoperative pain according to the modified Heft-Parker visual analogue scale (VAS). Patients were anaesthetized using the IANB technique employing identical cartridges that contained either 1.3 mL of 2% mepivacaine with epinephrine 1 : 100 000 plus 0.5 mL of tramadol 50 mg mL(-1) (experimental group) or 1.8 mL of 2% mepivacaine with epinephrine 1 : 100 000 (control group). After 15 min, anaesthesia was evaluated by a progressive four-test examination, that is numbness of the lip, positive or negative cold test, asymptomatic management of dental hard tissues and access to dental pulp. Success of the IANB was defined as the absence of pain during any of these evaluations. The data were analysed with a chi-square, Fisher's or Mann-Whitney U test. A total of 74 patients were initially assessed, with 56 patients eventually included and 18 excluded. No significant differences in age (P = 0.384) or gender (P = 1) were found between the two groups. The success rates of anaesthesia with the IANB for the experimental and control groups were 57.1 and 46.4%, respectively. The success rate of anaesthesia in the experimental group was not significantly different (P ˃ 0.05) from that of the control group. The duration of the anaesthetic effect was significantly longer for the experimental group (P = 0.026). The combination of mepivacaine-tramadol achieved similar success rates for IANB when compared to mepivacaine 2% epinephrine 1 : 100 000. There was no significant difference in the anaesthetic efficacy

  13. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of preoperative or postoperative carprofen with or without preincisional mepivacaine epidural anesthesia in canine pelvic or femoral fracture repair.

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    Bergmann, Hannes M; Nolte, Ingo; Kramer, Sabine

    2007-10-01

    To compare analgesic efficacy of preoperative versus postoperative administration of carprofen and to determine, if preincisional mepivacaine epidural anesthesia improves postoperative analgesia in dogs treated with carprofen. Blind, randomized clinical study. Dogs with femoral (n=18) or pelvic (27) fractures. Dogs were grouped by restricted randomization into 4 groups: group 1 = carprofen (4 mg/kg subcutaneously) immediately before induction of anesthesia, no epidural anesthesia; group 2 = carprofen immediately after extubation, no epidural anesthesia; group 3 = carprofen immediately before induction, mepivacaine epidural block 15 minutes before surgical incision; and group 4 = mepivacaine epidural block 15 minutes before surgical incision, carprofen after extubation. All dogs were administered carprofen (4 mg/kg, subcutaneously, once daily) for 4 days after surgery. Physiologic variables, nociceptive threshold, lameness score, pain, and sedation (numerical rating scale [NRS], visual analog scale [VAS]), plasma glucose and cortisol concentration, renal function, and hemostatic variables were measured preoperatively and at various times after surgery. Dogs with VAS pain scores >30 were administered rescue analgesia. Group 3 and 4 dogs had significantly lower pain scores and amount of rescue analgesia compared with groups 1 and 2. VAS and NRS pain scores were not significantly different among groups 1 and 2 or among groups 3 and 4. There was no treatment effect on renal function and hemostatic variables. Preoperative carprofen combined with mepivacaine epidural anesthesia had superior postoperative analgesia compared with preoperative carprofen alone. When preoperative epidural anesthesia was performed, preoperative administration of carprofen did not improve postoperative analgesia compared with postoperative administration of carprofen. Preoperative administration of systemic opioid agonists in combination with regional anesthesia and postoperative administration

  14. Comparison of O2 saturation, heart and respiratory rate following injection of vasoconstrictor containing anesthetic (lidocaine 2% and without vasoconstrictor anesthetic (Mepivacaine

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    Bayat M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Along with higher usage of dental local anesthesia with risks to people health together with their positive role, the important goal of dentistry, patients’ health, has been stressed repeatedly nowadays. This study was conducted to compare O2 saturation, respiratory rate and heart rate of patients following injection of anesthetic containing vasoconstrictor (lidocaine 2% and without vasoconstrictor (Mepivacaine. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 32 healthy humans (16 females and 16 males with 25-50 years age range and no history of drug usage. Cases were classified into two matched groups. O2 saturation, heart and respiratory rate were recorded before extraction of a mandibular posterior tooth. In the first group, 3.6 ml lidocaine 2% with 1:80,000 epinephrine and in the second group Mepivacaine 3% was injected, using inferior alveolar dental nerve block with aspiration. Variables were measured and recorded. Tooth extraction was performed and the mentioned variables were recorded again. Data were analyzed with SPSS software using t and Paired t-test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: After injection of lidocaine, the heart rate was increased (12.25±1.75 bpm, and the time to reach the maximum rate was 64.75±11.26 seconds. After extraction of tooth, heart rate in both groups was increased not considering the type of injection. Conclusion: The study showed that the injection of lidocaine (containing epinephrine in patients without contraindication has no risk. Also, possible increase in heart rate is not risky and is not associated with O2 saturation decrease and respiratory interruption.

  15. Does the combination of 3% mepivacaine plain plus 2% lidocaine with epinephrine improve anesthesia and reduce the pain of anesthetic injection for the inferior alveolar nerve block? A prospective, randomized, double-blind study.

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    Lammers, Emily; Nusstein, John; Reader, Al; Drum, Melissa; Beck, Mike; Fowler, Sara

    2014-09-01

    In theory, using 3% mepivacaine initially for an inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block would decrease the pain of injection, provide faster onset, and increase anesthetic success. The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the degree of pulpal anesthesia obtained with a combination of 3% mepivacaine/2% lidocaine (1:100,000 epinephrine) versus a combination of 2% lidocaine (1:100,000 epinephrine)/2% lidocaine (1:100,000 epinephrine) in IAN blocks. Injection pain was also studied. One hundred asymptomatic subjects were randomly given a combination of a 1-cartridge volume of 3% mepivacaine plus a 1-cartridge volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and a combination of a 1-cartridge volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine plus a 1-cartridge volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for the IAN block at 2 separate appointments. Subjects rated the pain of injection. The molars, premolars, and incisors were tested with an electric pulp tester in 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes. Anesthetic success was defined as the subject achieving 2 consecutive 80 readings within 15 minutes after completion of the IAN blocks and sustaining the 80 reading for 60 minutes. Success was not significantly different (P > .05) between the 2 combinations. No statistical differences in injection pain or onset times were found. The combination of 3% mepivacaine plus 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine was equivalent to the combination of 2 cartridges of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in terms of injection pain, onset time, and pulpal anesthetic success for the IAN block. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Treatment of temporo-mandibular joint closed-lock using intra-articular injection of mepivacaine with immediate resolution durable in time (six months follow-up)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda Nardini, L; Tito, R; Beltrame, A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of intra-articular fluid injection under pressure, as a technique suggested for temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) closed-lock treatment, and to determine if there is a persisting lock resolution in time. Twelve patients were studied at our centre, with a diagnosis of TMJ closed-lock, not amenable with conventional therapies. All patients underwent a MRI scan, confirming the presence of anteriorly displaced disk. This technique is based on intra-articular injection of anaesthetic (mepivacaine cloridrate) under pressure, using the so called pumping technique, that allows an inferior distraction of the condyle. The study has a six months follow-up. After closed-lock resolution all patients underwent physiotherapy with guided mouth opening, for one month. Mandibular function (maximal mouth opening) increased on average of 20.2 mm after treatment, and of 21.1 mm six months later (p=0.00000; with p<0.005). Pain decreased on average from VAS=6.75 to VAS=0.3 (p=0.00001; with p<0.005). The masticatory efficiency improved from VAS=5.25 to VAS=8.75 (p=0.002; p<0.005). Functional TMJ limitation level is significantly increased (p=0.002; p<0.005). Also, patient's efficacy judgement (mean value 3.58= good) and tolerability judgement (mean value 2.92=good) indicate that this therapy is well accepted. This technique is easy to perform, well tolerated and does not need specific instruments: it permits the resolution of TMJ closed-lock, decreases the pain and improves masticatory efficiency. All these effects persist in time. Subjects with recent closed-lock have an immediate and complete functional recovery while patients with chronic closed-lock do not.

  17. REUSABILITY OF BOND ELUT CERTIFY COLUMNS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF DRUGS FROM PLASMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHEN, XH; FRANKE, JP; WIJSBEEK, J; DEZEEUW, RA

    1993-01-01

    The reusability of Bond Elut Certify columns for the extraction of toxicologically relevant drugs from plasma has been evaluated. Pentobarbital, hexobarbital, mepivacaine, trimipramine and clonazepam were selected as test drugs to represent various classes of drugs. The columns were regenerated

  18. Effects of Two Different Anesthetic Solutions on Injection Pain, Efficacy, and Duration of Soft-Tissue Anesthesia with Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block for Primary Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbay, Ülkü Şermet; Elbay, Mesut; Kaya, Emine; Yıldırım, Sinem

    The purpose of the study was to compare the efficacy, injection pain, duration of soft tissue anesthesia, and postoperative complications of two different anesthetics (2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine and 3% plain mepivacaine) in pediatric patients in inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) administered by a computer-controlled delivery system (CCDS). The study was conducted as a randomized, controlled-crossover, double-blind clinical trial with 60 children requiring bilateral pulpotomy or extraction of primary mandibular molars. A CCDS was used to deliver 3% mepivacaine to 1 primary tooth and 2% lidocaine to the contralateral tooth with an IANB technique. Severity of pain and efficacy of anesthesia were evaluated using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability Scale, and comfort and side effects were assessed using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon t, and Fisher exact tests. Patients receiving 2% lidocaine experienced significantly less pain during injection than those receiving 3% mepivacaine, and no significant differences were found in the pain scores during treatments or in postoperative complications between the two anesthetics. The mean durations of anesthesia for 3% mepivacaine and 2% lidocaine were 139.68 minutes and 149.10 minutes, respectively. Plain mepivacaine and 2% lidocaine were similarly effective in pulpotomy and the extraction of primary mandibular molars. Although the use of 3% mepivacaine provided a shorter duration of anesthesia than 2% lidocaine, both solutions showed similar results in terms of postoperative complications.

  19. Local anesthetic interaction with human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) channels: role of aromatic amino acids Y652 and F656

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebrands, Cornelia C; Schmitt, Nicole; Friederich, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    was to determine the effect of the mutations Y652A and F656A in the putative drug binding region of HERG on the inhibition by bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. METHODS: The authors examined the inhibition of wild-type and mutant HERG channels, transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells...... by bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were performed at room temperature. RESULTS: Inhibition of HERG wild-type and mutant channels by the different local anesthetics was concentration dependent, stereoselective, and reversible. The sensitivity decreased in the order...... bupivacaine > ropivacaine > mepivacaine for wild-type and mutant channels. The mutant channels were approximately 4-30 times less sensitive to the inhibitory action of the different local anesthetics than the wild-type channel. The concentration-response data were described by Hill functions (bupivacaine...

  20. Local anesthetics and nuclear medical bone images of the equine fore limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaughan, E.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Kallfelz, F.A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of two local anesthetic agents on the diagnostic quality of nuclear medical bone images (NMBIs) of distal parts of the equine fore limb were investigated. Local effects on bone uptake of technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) 4 and 24 hours after perineural and intraarticular injection of mepivacaine hydrochloride and bupivacaine hydrochloride were evaluated in the carpal and metacarpophalangeal regions of 12 horses and ponies. Neither mepivacaine hydrochloride nor bupivacaine hydrochloride significantly altered the diagnostic quality of the NMBIs. The injection and subsequent action of local anesthetics do not appear to influence local bone uptake of 99mTc-MDP significantly

  1. A comparison of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular and infraclavicular blocks for upper extremity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koscielniak-Nielsen, Z J; Frederiksen, B S; Rasmussen, H

    2009-01-01

    : supraclavicular (S) and infraclavicular (I). Each patient received a mixture containing equal volumes of ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml and mepivacaine 20 mg/ml with adrenaline 5 microg/ml, 0.5 ml/kg body weight (minimum 30 ml, maximum 50 ml). The sensory score (anaesthesia--2 points, analgesia--1 point and pain--0 point...

  2. Transient neurologic symptoms (TNS) following spinal anaesthesia with lidocaine versus other local anaesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaric, Dusanka; Pace, Nathan Leon

    2009-01-01

    (bupivacaine, prilocaine, procaine, levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, and 2-chloroprocaine) was 7.31 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.16 to 12.86). Mepivacaine was found to give similar results as lidocaine and was therefor omitted from the overall comparison to diminish the heterogeneity. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS...

  3. Topical anesthesia with eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream in vasectomy: 2 randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Krogh, J; Rye, B

    1992-01-01

    Two paired randomized trials testing topical anesthesia with a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream*) in vasectomy were performed. In 1 trial EMLA cream was applied on 1 side of the scrotum, while infiltration anesthesia into the skin and subcutaneous tissue with mepivacaine was used...... on the contralateral side. All but 1 of the 13 patients (p less than 0.05) preferred infiltration anesthesia because of pain as the incision reached the subcutaneous tissue. In the other trial 29 patients received EMLA cream on 1 side of the scrotum before bilateral mepivacaine infiltration. There was significantly...... less pain on the sides with the anesthetic cream (p less than 0.001). Many patients would pay the price of the cream. In conclusion, EMLA cream cannot replace but it can supplement infiltration anesthesia during vasectomy....

  4. USING OF FIRST GENERATION OF Hl ANTIHISTAMINES As ALTERNATIVE OF LOCAL ANESTHETIC IN ODONTOLOGIC USE IN ANESTHESIA INFILTRATIVE TECHNICS. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN ANIMALS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Victor; Varas Hilario, Roberto; López Bellido, Roger; Chuquihuaccha Granda, Vilma; Zegarra Cuya, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The presence of adverse drug reactions with local anesthetics takes us to the search of effective alternatives to this drugs. 60 albino rabbits divided into 6 groups were submifted to infiltrative anesthetic technique in the maxilla with lidocaine, mepivacaine, bupivacaine, chlorpheniramine and dimenhidrinate, in front of sodium chloride 0,9%. The pain threshold belzavior was evaluated with electrical stimulation from Ruhnkorff s bobbin behind the drllg application and comparison between grou...

  5. 表面電離検出ガスクロマトグラフィーの法中毒学的応用

    OpenAIRE

    妹尾, 洋; 服部, 秀樹; 熊澤, 武志; 鈴木, 修; 木村, 美智子; 山田, 高路

    1992-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants and local anesthetics were detected by gas chromatography (GC)-surface ionization detection (SID), which has been reported to be very sensitive and specific to tertiary amines. The detection limit in an injected volume was 5-10 pg for amitriptyline, imipramine, trimipramine, chlorimipramine, lidocaine, mepivacaine and bupivacaine, and 100-200 pg for procaine, benoxinate and dibucaine. When compared with the GC-nitrogen-phosphorus detection (NPD), the GC-SID sensitivi...

  6. Optimal Solubility of Diclofenac β-Cyclodextrin in Combination with Local Anaesthetics for Mesotherapy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, Giuseppe; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2017-01-01

    Because of low injection volume, the recently marketed injectable solution of diclofenac in complex with β -cyclodextrin (Akis®, IBSA Farmaceutici Italia) is an ideal candidate for mesotherapy applications. In this study, we investigated the solubility of Akis, 25 and 50 mg/kg, in combination with various local anaesthetics (lidocaine, mepivacaine, bupivacaine, levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine) at different concentrations in aqueous vehicles (normal saline, sterile water, or bicarbonate). Final injection mixtures were classified as limpid, turbid, or milky at visual analysis under standardized conditions. We found that (i) the use of sterile water for injections or normal saline as vehicles to dilute Akis in combination with whatever local anaesthetic normally results in milky solutions and therefore is not recommended; (ii) using bicarbonate, optimal solubility was obtained combining Akis with lidocaine, both 1 and 2%, or mepivacaine, both 1 and 2%, whereas solutions were turbid in combination with bupivacaine, levobupivacaine, or ropivacaine. Thus, we recommend that Akis is used in combination with lidocaine or mepivacaine in a bicarbonate vehicle.

  7. Optimal Solubility of Diclofenac β-Cyclodextrin in Combination with Local Anaesthetics for Mesotherapy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Tringali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of low injection volume, the recently marketed injectable solution of diclofenac in complex with β-cyclodextrin (Akis®, IBSA Farmaceutici Italia is an ideal candidate for mesotherapy applications. In this study, we investigated the solubility of Akis, 25 and 50 mg/kg, in combination with various local anaesthetics (lidocaine, mepivacaine, bupivacaine, levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine at different concentrations in aqueous vehicles (normal saline, sterile water, or bicarbonate. Final injection mixtures were classified as limpid, turbid, or milky at visual analysis under standardized conditions. We found that (i the use of sterile water for injections or normal saline as vehicles to dilute Akis in combination with whatever local anaesthetic normally results in milky solutions and therefore is not recommended; (ii using bicarbonate, optimal solubility was obtained combining Akis with lidocaine, both 1 and 2%, or mepivacaine, both 1 and 2%, whereas solutions were turbid in combination with bupivacaine, levobupivacaine, or ropivacaine. Thus, we recommend that Akis is used in combination with lidocaine or mepivacaine in a bicarbonate vehicle.

  8. Anesthetic Efficacy in Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Carlos E; Sampaio, Roberta M; Horliana, Anna C R T; Armonia, Paschoal L; Rocha, Rodney G; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block has a high failure rate in the treatment of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine, 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine, all in combination with 1:100,000 epinephrine, in patients with irreversible pulpitis of permanent mandibular molars during a pulpectomy procedure. Sixty-six volunteers from the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, randomly received 3.6 mL of local anesthetic as a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The subjective signal of lip numbness, pulpal anesthesia and absence of pain during the pulpectomy procedure were evaluated respectively, by questioning the patient, stimulation using an electric pulp tester and a verbal analogue scale. All patients reported the subjective signal of lip numbness. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the success rate was respectively 68.2% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 63.6% for lidocaine. Regarding patients who reported no pain or mild pain during the pulpectomy, the success rate was, respectively 72.7% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 54.5% for lidocaine. These differences were not statistically significant. Neither of the solutions resulted in 100% anesthetic success in patients with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars.

  9. Assessment of patient’s anxiety and expectation associated with hemodynamic changes during surgical procedure under local anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vinícius Mendes DANTAS

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The dental patient’s anxiety and expectation may significantly alter their vital signs. The use of local anesthetics associated with a vasoconstrictor may also alter the vital signs of these patients, promoting hemodynamic changes that may result in emergency situations. Objective To evaluate the influence of anxiety of patients submitted to third molar extraction and the use of different anesthetic substances with adrenaline on their vital signs (oxygen saturation, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in different moments. Material and method Forty patients answered the questionnaire of the Dental Anxiety Scale (Corah’s Scale and fear (KleinKnecht’s Scale and were submitted to third molar extraction in two surgical times for the use of articaine or mepivacaine, both associated with adrenaline. The results were analyzed by ANOVA followed by Tukey post hoc test, Student's t test, and Pearson's correlation coefficients (α=0.05. Result There was no significant differences in saturation or heart rate. The blood pressure showed significant variations during time for both anesthetics, however mepivacaine resulted in a longer postoperative time to restore blood pressure. Patients with high or moderate anxiety and high fear index were those who had positive correlations with the highest blood pressure values. Conclusion Anxiety and fear positively influence the increase in blood pressure. Mepivacaine promoted a greater resistance to the return of normal vital signs, especially blood pressure levels.

  10. 甲哌卡因与布比卡因缓解疼痛疗效相似

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝洪澜

    2004-01-01

    近期公布的一项Ⅱ期临床试验的第二部分的初步结果显示,控释甲哌卡因(mepivacaine)(Ⅰ)与布比卡因(bupivacaine)(Ⅱ)在外科腹股沟疝修补术后减轻疼痛方面具有相似的疗效。共90名患者接受(Ⅰ)150或300mg或目前的标准治疗,即(Ⅱ)治疗。

  11. Transient Amaurosis and Diplopia After Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaşi, Onur; Şahin, Onur; Polat, Mehmet Emrah

    2017-10-01

    A 40-year-old female patient was admitted to the authors' oral and maxillofacial clinic for removal of her lower left second molar under local anesthesia. The patient's medical history revealed that she had cardiac arhythmia and hypertension. Inferior alveolar nerve block was achieved using 2 mL of sefacaine (%3 mepivacaine HCL, without epinephrine). The patient complained of loss of vision in her left eye. All procedures were stopped immediately. Within 2 minutes the patient reported diplopia. All of the symptoms disappeared about 5 minutes after initial observation. Follow-up after 1 day revealed no complications. The procedure was then performed uneventfully.

  12. Needle-less local anesthesia: clinical evaluation of the effectiveness of the jet anesthesia Injex in local anesthesia in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabarakis, Nikolaos N; Alexander, Veis; Tsirlis, Anastasios T; Parissis, Nikolaos A; Nikolaos, Maroufidis

    2007-01-01

    To clinically evaluate the jet injection Injex (Rösch AG Medizintechnik) using 2 different anesthetic solutions, and to compare the jet injection and the standard needle injection techniques. Of the 32 patients in the study, 10 received mepivacaine 3% anesthetic solution by means of the jet injection technique, while the remaining 22 patients received lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000 by the same method. The 14 patients in whom pulp anesthesia was achieved were selected for an additional evaluation of the pulp reaction using standard needle injection anesthesia. The differences between the 2 compounds with Injex were statistically evaluated by means of independent-samples t test analysis. The differences between subgroups receiving both jet injection and needle injection anesthesia were evaluated by means of paired t test analysis. The administration of mepivacaine 3% using Injex did not achieve pulp anesthesia in any of the 10 patients, although the soft tissue anesthesia was successful. The administration of lidocaine with epinephrine using Injex resulted in pulp anesthesia in only 14 patients; soft tissue anesthesia was observed in all patients of this group. There was no statistically significant difference between Injex and the needle injection technique in onset of anesthesia. However, the duration of anesthesia was significantly longer for the needle infiltration group than for the Injex injection group. The anesthetic solution should be combined with a vasoconstriction agent when the Injex technique is implemented.

  13. Vasoconstriction Potency Induced by Aminoamide Local Anesthetics Correlates with Lipid Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jin Sung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoamide local anesthetics induce vasoconstriction in vivo and in vitro. The goals of this in vitro study were to investigate the potency of local anesthetic-induced vasoconstriction and to identify the physicochemical property (octanol/buffer partition coefficient, pKa, molecular weight, or potency of local anesthetics that determines their potency in inducing isolated rat aortic ring contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves to local anesthetics (levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine were obtained from isolated rat aorta. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between the reported physicochemical properties of local anesthetics and the local anesthetic concentration that produced 50% (ED50 of the local anesthetic-induced maximum vasoconstriction. We determined the order of potency (ED50 of vasoconstriction among local anesthetics to be levobupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > mepivacaine. The relative importance of the independent variables that affect the vasoconstriction potency is octanol/buffer partition coefficient > potency > pKa > molecular weight. The ED50 in endothelium-denuded aorta negatively correlated with the octanol/buffer partition coefficient of local anesthetics (r2=0.9563; P<0.001. The potency of the vasoconstriction in the endothelium-denuded aorta induced by local anesthetics is determined primarily by lipid solubility and, in part, by other physicochemical properties including potency and pKa.

  14. Truncal anaesthesia of the maxillary nerve for outpatient surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M; Cugini, U

    1998-10-01

    We present our experience of transcutaneous truncal anaesthesia of the maxillary nerve in association with transmucosal anaesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion in surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Twelve patients with a skeletal transverse discrepancy of the maxilla were treated in our department from 1994 to 1995. Maxillary transcutaneous nerve block was done with a Quincke 8 cm spinal needle together with transmucosal anaesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion. Mepivacaine without adrenaline and sodium bicarbonate 1/10 was used for truncal anaesthesia and lidocaine-prilocaine cream for transmucosal anaesthesia. A Le Fort I osteotomy, lateral nasal wall osteotomy, pterygomaxillary osteotomy, and a palatal osteotomy were done for all patients before the maxillary expansion. Total anaesthesia of the maxillary area facilitated the operations and appreciably reduced the amount of postoperative pain. The ease of achieving effective anaesthesia before and after operation and the absence of side-effects make this form of anaesthetic particularly useful in surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

  15. Ischemia of the glans penis following circumcision: case report and revision of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic complications of the glans penis are rare and commonly result from trauma, inadvertent administration of vasoconstrictive solutions, diabetes mellitus, circumcision and vasculitis; we refer about a young man with severe ischemia of the glans penis following circumcision. The patient had undergone circumcision 5 days before in a surgery department under local anesthesia (1% mepivacaine hydrochloride. The patient noticed a brownish color and edema of the glans penis at 24 h after he opened the wound dressing, but arrived to our hospital only 5 days after circumcision because these findings had progressed. Physical examination revealed the black color or necrotic appearance of the glans penis, and edema on the dorsal penile skin. The patient underwent antibiotic, antiplatatelet, corticosteroid and iperbaric therapy achieving a complete restitutio ad integrum.

  16. No cases of perioperative allergy to local anaesthetics in the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisselgaard, A D; Krøigaard, M; Mosbech, H F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Local anaesthetics (LA) are often suspected as possible causes of allergic reactions. The Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre (DAAC) is the national reference centre for investigation of perioperative allergic reactions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of Ig......E-mediated immediate type perioperative allergic reactions to LA. METHODS: In the period 2004-2013, a total of 409 patients (244 women/165 men; median age 49 years, range 1-86 years) were investigated in DAAC on suspicion of allergy associated with anaesthesia and surgery. A total of 162 (40%) patients were exposed...... were carried out on 162 patients (89 women/73 men; mean age 49 years, range 2-85 years) with the following drugs: Lidocaine n = 80 (49%), bupivacaine n = 82 (51%), ropivacaine n = 31 (19%) and mepivacaine n = 10 (6%). All 162 patients had negative subcutaneous provocation for all tested LA (95% CI: 0...

  17. Ischemia of the glans penis following circumcision: case report and revision of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Pietro; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-03-31

    Ischemic complications of the glans penis are rare and commonly result from trauma, inadvertent administration of vasoconstrictive solutions, diabetes mellitus, circumcision and vasculitis; we refer about a young man with severe ischemia of the glans penis following circumcision. The patient had undergone circumcision 5 days before in a surgery department under local anesthesia (1% mepivacaine hydrochloride). The patient noticed a brownish color and edema of the glans penis at 24 h after he opened the wound dressing, but arrived to our hospital only 5 days after circumcision because these findings had progressed. Physical examination revealed the black color or necrotic appearance of the glans penis, and edema on the dorsal penile skin. The patient underwent antibiotic, antiplatatelet, corticosteroid and iperbaric therapy achieving a complete restitutio ad integrum.

  18. The concept of "compartment allergy": prilocaine injected into different skin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wobser Marion

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We herein present a patient with delayed-type allergic hypersensitivity against prilocaine leading to spreading eczematous dermatitis after subcutaneous injections for local anesthesia with prilocaine. Prilocaine allergy was proven by positive skin testing and subcutaneous provocation, whereas the evaluation of other local anesthetics - among them lidocaine, articaine and mepivacaine - did not exhibit any evidence for cross-reactivity. Interestingly, our patient repeatedly tolerated strictly deep subcutaneous injection of prilocaine in provocation testing while patch and superficial subcutaneous application mounted strong allergic responses. We hypothesize, that lower DC density in deeper cutaneous compartments and/or different DC subsets exhibiting distinct functional immunomodulatory properties in the various layers of the skin may confer to the observed absence of clinical reactivity against prilocaine after deep subcutaneous injection. The term compartment allergy indicates that the route of allergen administration together with the targeted immunologic environment orchestrates on the immunologic outcome: overt T-cell mediated allergy or clinical tolerance.

  19. Addition of lacal anesthetics to contrast media. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Almen, T.; Golman, K.; Jonsson, K.; Nyman, U.; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1988-01-01

    The acute intravenous toxicity (i.v. LD 50 ) of solutions of the ratio 1.5 contrast media metrizoate or diatrizoate and the ratio 3.0 contrast medium metrizamide was determined in mice with and without the addition of local anesthetics to the solutions. The two local anesthetics mepivacaine or lidocaine were added to final concentrations up to 2.0 mg/ml of the contrast medium solutions. This corresponds to clinically used concentrations. All additions of local anesthetics to the solutions increased the mortalities caused by the contrast medium solutions. Addition of local anesthetics to a final concentration of 2 mg/ml approximately doubled the acute intravenous toxicity of the contrast media. The ratio 3 contrast media produce less hypertonic solutions than the ratio 1.5 contrast media and should be preferred for angiography because they cause less pain and do not require the addition of local anesthetics which increase the acute toxicity of the solutions. (orig.)

  20. Readiness for surgery after axillary block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koscielniak-Nielsen, Z J; Stens-Pedersen, H L; Lippert, F K

    1997-01-01

    required less time for block performance (mean 5.5 min) than multiple injections (mean 9.5 min), P requirement for supplemental nerve blocks was greater, after single injections (33 min and 57%) than after multiple injections (15.5 min and 7......We have assessed prospectively the time to readiness for surgery following axillary block (sum of block performance and latency times) in 80 patients. The brachial plexus was identified using a nerve stimulator, and anaesthetized with 45 mL of mepivacaine 1% with adrenaline 5 micrograms mL-1......%, respectively), P effectiveness was 100% in group 1 and 98% in group 2 (NS). The frequency of adverse effects (vessel puncture or paraesthesia) was similar...

  1. Post surgical pain management with poly(ortho esters).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, John; Woodburn, Kathryn W; Ng, Steven Y; Shen, Hui-Rong; Heller, Jorge

    2002-10-16

    Poly(ortho esters), POE, are synthetic bioerodible polymers that can be prepared as solid materials, or as viscous, injectable polymers. These materials have evolved through a number of families, and the latest member of this family, POE IV, is particularly well suited to drug delivery since latent acid is integrated into the polymer backbone, thereby, modulating surface erosion. POE IV predominantly undergoes surface erosion and is able to moderate drug release over periods from days to many months. One indication in which the POE IV polymer is currently being investigated is in sustained post-surgical pain management. The local anesthetic agent, mepivacaine, has been incorporated into a viscous, injectable POE IV and its potential to provide longer-acting anesthesia has been explored in non-clinical models.

  2. Interscalene plexus block versus general anaesthesia for shoulder surgery: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Lars J; Loosen, Gregor; Weiss, Christel; Schmittner, Marc D

    2015-02-01

    This randomized clinical trial evaluates interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB), general anaesthesia (GA) and the combination of both anaesthetic methods (GA + ISB) in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy. From July 2011 until May 2012, 120 patients (male/female), aged 20-80 years, were allocated randomly to receive ISB (10 ml mepivacaine 1 % and 20 ml ropivacaine 0.375%), GA (propofol, sunfentanil, desflurane) or ISB + GA. The primary outcome variable was opioid consumption at the day of surgery. Anaesthesia times were analysed as secondary endpoints. After surgery, 27 of 40 patients with a single ISB bypassed the recovery room (p surgery [GA: n = 25 vs. GA + ISB: n = 10 vs. ISB: n = 10, p = 0.0037]. ISB is superior to GA and GA + ISB in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy in terms of faster recovery and analgesics consumption.

  3. Lipid Emulsion Inhibits Vasodilation Induced by a Toxic Dose of Bupivacaine via Attenuated Dephosphorylation of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit 1 in Isolated Rat Aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Park, Jungchul; Lee, Youngju; Hwang, Yeran; Baik, Jiseok; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions are widely used for the treatment of systemic toxicity that arises from local anesthetics. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the cellular mechanism associated with the lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. The effects of lipid emulsion on vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and verapamil were assessed in isolated aorta precontracted with phenylephrine, the Rho kinase stimulant NaF, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu). The effects of Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on contraction induced by phenylephrine or NaF were assessed. The effects of bupivacaine on intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and tension induced by NaF were simultaneously measured. The effects of bupivacaine alone and lipid emulsion plus bupivacaine on myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation induced by NaF were examined in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. In precontracted aorta, the lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-induced vasodilation but had no effect on mepivacaine-induced vasodilation. Y-27632 attenuated contraction induced by either phenylephrine or NaF. The lipid emulsion attenuated verapamil-induced vasodilation. Compared with phenylephrine-induced precontracted aorta, bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated in NaF-induced precontracted aorta. The magnitude of the bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of a bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca2+]i. Bupivacaine attenuated NaF-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion pretreatment attenuated the bupivacaine-induced inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation induced by NaF. Taken together, these results suggest that lipid emulsions attenuate bupivacaine-induced vasodilation via the attenuation of inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation evoked by NaF. PMID:26664257

  4. Laparoscopic ovariectomy using sequential electrocoagulation and sharp transection of the equine mesovarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgerson, D H; Belknap, J K; Wilson, D A

    2001-01-01

    To describe in horses and ponies a laparoscopic ovariectomy technique facilitated by electrosurgical instrumentation. Elective ovariectomy was performed in 23 mares using laparoscopic electrosurgical instrumentation. Twenty-three mares (13 horses, 10 ponies), aged from 2 to 21 years and weighing 90 to 545 kg. Food was withheld for a minimum of 12 hours. Mares were sedated with detomidine hydrochloride (0.02 to 0.03 mg/kg) or xylazine hydrochloride (0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg). Excluding the pony mares, all other mares were restrained in stocks. Portal sites in the paralumbar fossa region were desensitized with 2% mepivacaine. Abdominal insufflation was achieved through a teat cannula positioned in the ventral abdomen or a Verres-type needle placed through the paralumbar fossa. After trocar and laparoscope insertion, the ipsilateral ovary and mesovarium were identified, and the mesovarium, tubal membrane, and proper ligament were infiltrated with 2% mepivacaine. The mesovarium was coagulated using bipolar or monopolar electrosurgical forceps and transected sequentially from cranial to caudal until the ovary was completely freed and then removed. The contralateral ovary was removed in a similar fashion through the opposite paralumbar fossa. Bipolar and monopolar electrosurgical forceps were easy to use and provided adequate coagulation of vessels within the mesovarium. Two mares were euthanatized after the procedure for unrelated reasons. One mare had mild signs of colic 24 hours after ovariectomy. In 1 pony mare, the incision used to remove one ovary dehisced on the 5th postoperative day and was allowed to heal by second-intention. No long-term complications had occurred in 11 horses and 10 ponies, 6 to 24 months after surgery. Laparoscopic ovariectomy and hemostasis of the mesovarium can be easily accomplished using electrosurgical instrumentation. Standing laparoscopic ovariectomy, using electrosurgical instrumentation, is an effective and safe technique to provide

  5. Efficacy of preoperative ibuprofen on the success of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera-Gonzalez, D; Cerda-Cristerna, B I; Chavarria-Bolaños, D; Flores-Reyes, H; Pozos-Guillen, A

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of preoperative oral ibuprofen (IBU) on the success of inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANBs) with mepivacaine containing 1 : 100 000 epinephrine for patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP). The present study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The study included two study groups each consisting of 25 patients who exhibited symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth. The patients presented prolonged moderate or severe pain (>10 s) after cold testing and indicated their pain scores on a Heft-Parker visual analogue scale. The patients received identically appearing capsules containing either 600 mg IBU (IBUg) or gelatin (placebo, PLAg) 1 h before administration of IANB with 2% mepivacaine containing 1 : 100 000 epinephrine. After 15 min, the anaesthetic blockade was assessed by a three-step examination (lip numbness, positive/negative response to cold testing and clinical discomfort during endodontic access). IANB success was defined as the absence of pain during any of these evaluations. The data were analysed using the chi-squared test. All of the patients reported moderate or severe pain before the preoperative procedure. Statistically significant differences were observed between the IBUg and PLAg (P < 0.05); the success rates for the IANB were 72% (IBUg) and 36% (PLAg). Preoperative oral administration of IBU significantly improved the efficacy of IANB in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Prilocaine hydrochloride 2% hyperbaric solution for intrathecal injection: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manassero A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Manassero,1 Andrea Fanelli2 1Department of Emergency and Critical Care, Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo, 2Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Prilocaine is a local anesthetic characterized by intermediate potency and duration and fast onset of action. As hyperbaric formulation of 5% solution, it was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1960. A new formulation of 2% plain and hyperbaric solution is currently available in Europe. Because of its lower incidence of transient neurological symptoms, prilocaine is suggested as substitute to lidocaine and mepivacaine in spinal anesthesia for ambulatory surgery, as well as a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics. The National Library of Medicine database, the Excerpta Medica database, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database, were searched for the period 1970 to September 2016, with the aim to identify studies evaluating the intrathecal use of 2% prilocaine. A total of 13 randomized clinical trials (RCTs, 1 observational study, 2 dose finding, and 4 systematic reviews has been used for this review. The studies evaluated showed that 2% hyperbaric prilocaine due to a favorable anesthetic and safety profile is an alternative drug to lidocaine and mepivacaine for spinal anesthesia of intermediate or short duration. In comparison with plain solutions, hyperbaricity remarkably accelerates the onset and offset times of intrathecal 2% prilocaine. Literature suggests a dose ranging between 40 and 60 mg of prilocaine for lower extremities and lower abdominal procedures lasting up to 90 min, whereas a dose ranging from 10 to 30 mg is appropriate for perineal surgery. Readiness for discharge occurs in ~4 h from spinal administration. Keywords

  7. Influência de vasoconstritores associados a anestésicos locais sobre a pressão arterial de ratos hipertensos e normotensos Influence of vasoconstrictors associated with local anesthetics on the arterial pressure of hypertensive and normotensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apparecido Neri Daniel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de anestésicos locais associados a vasoconstritores em pacientes hipertensos é controversa. Neste estudo, verificamos a influência desta associação sobre a pressão arterial caudal (PA em ratos hipertensos DOCA-sal. Após ligeira anestesia com éter, os anestésicos GRUPO I - lidocaína 2% sem vasoconstritor, GRUPO II - lidocaína com fenilefrina, GRUPO III - lidocaína a 2% com noradrenalina, GRUPO IV - prilocaína 3% com felipressina, GRUPO V - mepivacaína 2% com adrenalina e GRUPO VI - mepivacaína com noradrenalina foram injetados na submucosa da boca (anestesia infiltrativa, em ratos DOCA-sal e controles. A PA foi determinada 5 e 15 minutos após a primeira dose do anestésico e também 5 e 15 minutos após a segunda dose. Os dados obtidos indicaram que: a a PA dos ratos DOCA-sal (193,05 ± 4,25 mmHg; n = 43 foi significativamente superior àquela observada nos animais controles (115,64 ± 2,47 mmHg; n = 43 e, b não houve variação significativa nas PA observadas em animais DOCA-sal e controles pela administração dos anestésicos locais testados. Assim, nossos dados experimentais sugerem que a presença de agentes vasoconstritores associados à lidocaína 2%, à prilocaína 3% e à mepivacaína 2% não interferem na PA desses animais, neste modelo experimental de hipertensão.The utilization of local anesthetics associated with vasoconstrictors in hypertensive patients is controversial. The purpose of this investigation was to verify the influence of this association on the arterial pressure (AP in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. After light ether anesthesia, the anesthetics (Group I - lidocaine 2% without vasoconstrictor; Group II - lidocaine 2% with phenylephrine, Group III - lidocaine 2% with noradrenaline- Group IV - prylocaine 3% with felypressin; Group V - mepivacaine 2% with epinephrine, and Group VI - mepivacaine 2% with norepinephrine were injected into mucobuccal fold (infiltration anesthesia, in DOCA

  8. A comparison between red and infrared light for recording pulpal blood flow from human anterior teeth with a laser Doppler flow meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsamanmith, Kanittha; Timpawat, Siriporn; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Matthews, Bruce

    2011-06-01

    To compare red (635 nm) and infrared (780 nm) light for recording pulpal blood flow from human anterior teeth with a laser Doppler flow meter. Recordings were made from 7 healthy teeth in 5 subjects (aged 22-55 years) using a laser Doppler flow meter (Periflux 4001) equipped with both red and infrared lasers. Average blood flow signals were obtained with both light sources alternately from each tooth under five conditions: intact tooth without opaque rubber dam, intact tooth with dam, after injecting local anaesthetic (3% Mepivacaine) (LA) over the apex of the tooth and cavity preparation to almost expose the pulp, after removal and replacement of the pulp, and with the root canal empty. With infrared light, because of technical limitations, data were obtained for the first three conditions only. The dam significantly decreased the mean blood flow by 82%. Injecting LA and cavity preparation had no significant effect. With red light, dam produced a decrease of 56%, and the resulting signal was reduced by 33% after LA and cavity preparation. The remaining signal fell by 46% after pulp removal and replacement. This contribution of the pulp is similar to that recorded previously with infrared light. There was no significant further change when the pulp was finally removed. The importance of using opaque rubber dam is confirmed. With dam, there is no advantage to using red rather than infrared light, and in each case the pulp contributes less than 50% to the blood flow signal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pulpal blood flow recorded from human premolar teeth with a laser Doppler flow meter using either red or infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsamanmith, Kanittha; Timpawat, Siriporn; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Matthews, Bruce

    2011-07-01

    To compare red (635 nm) and infrared (780 nm) light for recording pulpal blood flow from human premolar teeth. Recordings were made from 11 healthy teeth in 9 subjects (aged 16-30 years) using a laser Doppler flow meter (Periflux 4001) equipped with both red and infrared lasers. Average blood flow signals were obtained with both light sources alternately from each tooth under five conditions: intact tooth without opaque rubber dam, intact tooth with dam, after injecting local anaesthetic (3% Mepivacaine) (LA) over the apex of the tooth and cavity preparation to almost expose the pulp, after removal and replacement of the pulp, and with the root canal empty. With infrared light, the dam significantly decreased the mean blood flow by 80%. Injecting LA and cavity preparation had no significant effect. Removal and replacement of the pulp reduced the mean blood flow by 58%. There was no further change when the pulp was removed. With red light, the dam reduced the signal from intact teeth by 60%. Injecting LA and cavity preparation had no significant effect. The signal fell by 67% after pulp removal and replacement and did not change significantly when the pulp was removed. Opaque rubber dam minimises the contribution of non-pulpal tissues to the laser Doppler signal recorded from premolars. Using dam, the pulp contributed about 60% to the blood flow signal with both red and infrared light. The difference between them in this respect was not significant. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Immunoassay screening of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its confirmation by HPLC and fluorescence detection following LSD ImmunElute extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobosch, T; Lemm-Ahlers, U

    2002-04-01

    In all, 3872 urine specimens were screened for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) using the CEDIA DAU LSD assay. Forty-eight samples, mainly from psychiatric patients or drug abusers, were found to be LSD positive, but only 13 (27%) of these could be confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) following immunoaffinity extraction (IAE). Additional analysis for LSD using the DPC Coat-a-Count RIA was performed to compare the two immunoassay screening methods. Complete agreement between the DPC RIA assay and HPLC-FLD results was observed at concentrations below a cutoff concentration of 500 pg/mL. Samples that were LSD positive in the CEDIA DAU assay but not confirmed by HPLC-FLD were also investigated for interfering compounds using REMEDI HS drug-profiling system. REMEDI HS analysis identified 15 compounds (parent drugs and metabolites) that are believed to cross-react in the CEDIA DAU LSD assay: ambroxol, prilocaine, pipamperone, diphenhydramine, metoclopramide, amitriptyline, doxepine, atracurium, bupivacaine, doxylamine, lidocaine, mepivacaine, promethazine, ranitidine, and tramadole. The IAE/HPLC-FLD combination is rapid, easy to perform and reliable. It can reduce costs when standard, rather than more advanced, HPLC equipment is used, especially for labs that perform analyses for LSD infrequently. The chromatographic analysis of LSD, nor-LSD, and iso-LSD is not influenced by any of the tested cross-reacting compounds even at a concentration of 100 ng/mL.

  11. Poly(ortho esters)--from concept to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Jorge; Barr, John

    2004-01-01

    The development of poly(ortho esters) dates back to the early 1970s, and during that time, four distinct families were developed. These polymers can be prepared by a transesterification reaction or by the addition of polyols to diketene acetals, and it is the latter method that has proven to be preferred one. The latest polymer, now under intense development, incorporates a latent acid segment in the polymer backbone that takes advantage of the acid-labile nature of the ortho ester linkages and allows control over erosion rates. By use of diols having selected chain flexibility, polymers that range from hard, brittle materials to materials that have a gel-like consistency at room temperature can be obtained. Drug release from solid materials will be illustrated with 5-fluorouacil and bovine serum albumin, and drug release from gel-like materials will be illustrated with mepivacaine, now in Phase II clinical trials as a delivery system to treat post-operative pain. A brief summary of preclinical toxicology studies is also presented.

  12. Enhancement of delayed-rectifier potassium conductance by low concentrations of local anaesthetics in spinal sensory neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olschewski, Andrea; Wolff, Matthias; Bräu, Michael E; Hempelmann, Gunter; Vogel, Werner; Safronov, Boris V

    2002-01-01

    Combining the patch-clamp recordings in slice preparation with the ‘entire soma isolation' method we studied action of several local anaesthetics on delayed-rectifier K+ currents in spinal dorsal horn neurones.Bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine at low concentrations (1–100 μM) enhanced delayed-rectifier K+ current in intact neurones within the spinal cord slice, while exhibiting a partial blocking effect at higher concentrations (>100 μM). In isolated somata 0.1–10 μM bupivacaine enhanced delayed-rectifier K+ current by shifting its steady-state activation characteristic and the voltage-dependence of the activation time constant to more negative potentials by 10–20 mV.Detailed analysis has revealed that bupivacaine also increased the maximum delayed-rectifier K+ conductance by changing the open probability, rather than the unitary conductance, of the channel.It is concluded that local anaesthetics show a dual effect on delayed-rectifier K+ currents by potentiating them at low concentrations and partially suppressing at high concentrations. The phenomenon observed demonstrated the complex action of local anaesthetics during spinal and epidural anaesthesia, which is not restricted to a suppression of Na+ conductance only. PMID:12055132

  13. Painful stimulation and transient blocking of nerve transduction due to local anesthesia evoke perceptual distortions of the face in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyt, Ina; Dagsdóttir, Lilja; Vase, Lene; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Castrillon, Eduardo; Roepstorff, Andreas; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Svensson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Anecdotally, orofacial pain patients sometimes report that the painful face area feels "swollen." Because there are no clinical signs of swelling, such illusions may represent perceptual distortions. In this study, we examine whether nociceptive stimulation can lead to perceptual distortion of the face in a way similar to that of local anesthesia. Sixteen healthy participants received injections of .4 mL hypertonic saline to induce short-term nociceptive stimulation, .4 mL mepivacaine (local anesthetic) to transiently block nerve transduction, and .4 mL isotonic saline as a control condition. Injections were administered in both the infraorbital and the mental nerve regions. Perceptual distortions were conceptualized as perceived changes in magnitude of the injected areas and the lips, and they were measured using 1) a verbal subjective rating scale and 2) a warping procedure. Prior to the study, participants filled in several psychological questionnaires. This study shows that both nociceptive stimulation (P blocking of nerve transduction (P face. A test-retest experiment including 9 new healthy subjects supported the results. Perceptual distortions were positively correlated with the psychological variable of dissociation in several conditions (P face is important to understand the possible implications of perceptual distortions in orofacial pain disorders (and possibly other chronic pain states). Such information may ultimately open up new avenues of treatment for persistent orofacial pain. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of intraosseous injection versus inferior alveolar nerve block as primary pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhad, Alireza; Razavian, Hamid; Shafiee, Maryam

    2018-01-27

    This study sought to assess the success rate, effect on blood pressure, and pain of intraosseous injection (IO) and inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis as the primary anaesthetic technique. This randomized clinical trial (IRCT2013022712634N1) was conducted on 60 patients between 18 and 65 years suffering from symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group one received IO while group two received IANB with 3% mepivacaine. After anaesthetic injection, success rate of pulpal anaesthesia was assessed by pulp testing in the two groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures of patients were compared before and after the anaesthetic injections. Level of pain during injection was scored using a visual analogue scale. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20, t-test and chi square test at p = .05 level of significance. Success rate of IO (56.7%) was significantly higher than that of IANB (23.3%) (p = .008). There was no significant difference in pain during anaesthetic injection (p = .304) or change in systolic (p = .80) and diastolic (p = .28) blood pressures following injection between the two techniques. IO had a higher success rate than IANB for pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Neither technique provided profound pulpal anaesthesia.

  15. Neurologic Outcomes After Low-Volume, Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Block and Ambulatory Shoulder Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpal, Gaurav; Winger, Daniel G; Cortazzo, Megan; Kentor, Michael L; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative neurologic symptoms after interscalene block and shoulder surgery have been reported to be relatively frequent. Reports of such symptoms after ultrasound-guided block have been variable. We evaluated 300 patients for neurologic symptoms after low-volume, ultrasound-guided interscalene block and arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients underwent ultrasound-guided interscalene block with 16 to 20 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine or a mix of 0.2% bupivacaine/1.2% mepivacaine solution, followed by propofol/ketamine sedation for ambulatory arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients were called at 10 days for evaluation of neurologic symptoms, and those with persistent symptoms were called again at 30 days, at which point neurologic evaluation was initiated. Details of patient demographics and block characteristics were collected to assess any association with persistent neurologic symptoms. Six of 300 patients reported symptoms at 10 days (2%), with one of these patients having persistent symptoms at 30 days (0.3%). This was significantly lower than rates of neurologic symptoms reported in preultrasound investigations with focused neurologic follow-up and similar to other studies performed in the ultrasound era. There was a modest correlation between the number of needle redirections during the block procedure and the presence of postoperative neurologic symptoms. Ultrasound guidance of interscalene block with 16- to 20-mL volumes of local anesthetic solution results in a lower frequency of postoperative neurologic symptoms at 10 and 30 days as compared with investigations in the preultrasound period.

  16. Systemic toxicity of ropivacaine during ovine pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A C; Arthur, G R; Pedersen, H; Morishima, H O; Finster, M; Covino, B G

    1991-07-01

    Ropivacaine is a new amide local anesthetic structurally related to bupivacaine and mepivacaine. Its potency and duration of action are similar to those of bupivacaine but its therapeutic index may be greater. Since pregnancy enhances the cardiotoxicity of bupivacaine, the current study was devised to compare the toxicity of ropivacaine in chronically instrumented nonpregnant and pregnant ewes during continuous intravenous infusion of the drug at the rate of 0.5 mg.kg-1.min-1. In all animals, symptoms of local anesthetic toxicity occurred in the usual order--convulsions, hypotension, apnea, and circulatory collapse. There were no significant differences between the two groups of animals in the doses and plasma concentrations of ropivacaine associated with each toxic manifestations. For example, circulatory collapse occurred at a mean dose of 11.3 +/- 1.1 mg.kg-1 in nonpregnant and 12.4 +/- 0.9 mg.kg-1 in pregnant animals, with corresponding plasma concentrations of 7.3 +/- 0.3 and 9.6 +/- 2.1 micrograms.ml-1 (P = not significant). Protein binding of ropivacaine in the concentration range associated with toxic manifestations was similar in sera obtained from nonpregnant and pregnant ewes. In conclusion, ovine pregnancy does not enhance the systemic toxicity of ropivacaine, possibly because of an absence of gestation-related increase in the availability of free drug.

  17. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  18. A Triple-Masked, Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus and Distal Peripheral Nerve Block Anesthesia for Outpatient Hand Surgery

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    Nicholas C. K. Lam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. For hand surgery, brachial plexus blocks provide effective anesthesia but produce undesirable numbness. We hypothesized that distal peripheral nerve blocks will better preserve motor function while providing effective anesthesia. Methods. Adult subjects who were scheduled for elective ambulatory hand surgery under regional anesthesia and sedation were recruited and randomly assigned to receive ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block or distal block of the ulnar and median nerves. Each subject received 15 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine at the assigned location with 15 mL of normal saline injected in the alternate block location. The primary outcome (change in baseline grip strength measured by a hydraulic dynamometer was tested before the block and prior to discharge. Subject satisfaction data were collected the day after surgery. Results. Fourteen subjects were enrolled. Median (interquartile range [IQR] strength loss in the distal group was 21.4% (14.3, 47.8%, while all subjects in the supraclavicular group lost 100% of their preoperative strength, P = 0.001. Subjects in the distal group reported greater satisfaction with their block procedures on the day after surgery, P = 0.012. Conclusion. Distal nerve blocks better preserve motor function without negatively affecting quality of anesthesia, leading to increased patient satisfaction, when compared to brachial plexus block.

  19. General anesthesia plus ilioinguinal nerve block versus spinal anesthesia for ambulatory inguinal herniorrhapy

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    Lucía Vizcaíno-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to evaluate general anesthesia (GA plus ilioinguinal nerve block (IIB versus spinal anesthesia (SA in patients scheduled for ambulatory inguinal hernia repair regarding pain management, anesthesia recovery and reducing potential complications. Materials and Methods: A double-blind, prospective, randomized, controlled study in patients American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III randomized into two groups: GA plus IIB group, induction of anesthesia with propofol, maintenance with sevoflurane, airway management with laryngeal mask allowing spontaneous ventilation and ultrasound-guided IIB; SA group, patients who underwent spinal block with 2% mepivacaine. The study variables were pain intensity, assessed by visual analog scale, analgesic requirements until hospital discharge, time to ambulation and discharge, postoperative complications-related to both techniques and satisfaction experienced. Results: Thirty-two patients were enrolled; 16 patients in each group. The differences regarding pain were statistically significant at 2 h of admission (P < 0.001 and at discharge (P < 0.001 in favor of the GA plus ilioinguinal block group. In addition in this group, analgesic requirements were lower than SA group (P < 0.001, with times of ambulation and discharge significantly shorter. The SA group had a higher tendency to develop complications and less satisfaction. Conclusion: General anesthesia plus IIB is better than SA regarding postoperative analgesia, time to mobilization and discharge, side-effect profile and satisfaction experienced by the patients.

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Single-Injection Infraclavicular Block Versus Ultrasound-Guided Double-Injection Axillary Block: A Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Ariane; Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Dion, Nicolas; Lévesque, Simon; Nicole, Pierre C; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2016-01-01

    Single-injection ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block is a simple, reliable, and effective technique. A simplified double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block technique with a high success rate recently has been described. It has the advantage of being performed in a superficial and compressible location, with a potentially improved safety profile. However, its effectiveness in comparison with single-injection infraclavicular block has not been established. We hypothesized that the double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block would show rates of complete sensory block at 30 minutes noninferior to the single-injection ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block. After approval by our research ethics committee and written informed consent, adults undergoing distal upper arm surgery were randomized to either group I, ultrasound-guided single-injection infraclavicular block, or group A, ultrasound-guided double-injection axillary block. In group I, 30 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine was injected posterior to the axillary artery. In group A, 25 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine was injected posteromedial to the axillary artery, after which 5 mL was injected around the musculocutaneous nerve. Primary outcome was the rate of complete sensory block at 30 minutes. Secondary outcomes were the onset of sensory and motor blocks, surgical success rates, performance times, and incidence of complications. All outcomes were assessed by a blinded investigator. The noninferiority of the double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block was considered if the limits of the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were within a 10% margin of the rate of complete sensory block of the infraclavicular block. At 30 minutes, the rate of complete sensory block was 79% in group A (90% CI, 71%-85%) compared with 91% in group I (90% CI, 85%-95%); the upper limit of CI of group A is thus included in the established noninferiority margin of 10%. The rate of complete sensory block was lower in group A (proportion

  1. Pulpal blood flow recorded from exposed dentine with a laser Doppler flow meter using red or infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsamanmith, Kanittha; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Matthews, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    To determine the percentage of the blood flow signal that is derived from dental pulp when recording from exposed dentine in a human premolar. Recordings were made from 7 healthy teeth in 5 subjects (aged 22-33 yr.) with a laser Doppler flow meter (Periflux 4001) using either a red (635 nm) or an infrared (780 nm) laser. After exposing dentine above the buccal pulpal horn (cavity diam. 1.6 mm, depth 3 mm) and isolating the crown with opaque rubber dam, blood flow was recorded alternately with infrared or red light from the exposed dentine under four conditions: before and after injecting local anaesthetic (3% Mepivacaine without vasoconstrictor) (LA) over the apex of the root of the tooth; after exposing the pulp by cutting a buccal, class V cavity in the tooth; and after sectioning the coronal pulp transversely through the exposure. There was no significant change in mean blood flow recorded with either light source when the tooth was anaesthetized or when the pulp was exposed. After the pulp had been sectioned, the blood flow recorded with infrared light fell by 67.8% and with red light, by 68.4%. The difference between these effects was not significant. When recording blood flow from exposed coronal dentine with either infrared or red light in a tooth isolated with opaque rubber dam, about 68% to the signal was contributed by the pulp. The signal:noise ratio was better with infrared than red light, and when recording from dentine than enamel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modifying the baricity of local anesthetics for spinal anesthesia by temperature adjustment: model calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Axel R; Zimmermann, Katrin; Seele, Kristin; Rössel, Thomas; Koch, Thea; Litz, Rainer J

    2006-08-01

    Although local anesthetics (LAs) are hyperbaric at room temperature, density drops within minutes after administration into the subarachnoid space. LAs become hypobaric and therefore may cranially ascend during spinal anesthesia in an uncontrolled manner. The authors hypothesized that temperature and density of LA solutions have a nonlinear relation that may be described by a polynomial equation, and that conversion of this equation may provide the temperature at which individual LAs are isobaric. Density of cerebrospinal fluid was measured using a vibrating tube densitometer. Temperature-dependent density data were obtained from all LAs commonly used for spinal anesthesia, at least in triplicate at 5 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees, and 37 degrees C. The hypothesis was tested by fitting the obtained data into polynomial mathematical models allowing calculations of substance-specific isobaric temperatures. Cerebrospinal fluid at 37 degrees C had a density of 1.000646 +/- 0.000086 g/ml. Three groups of local anesthetics with similar temperature (T, degrees C)-dependent density (rho) characteristics were identified: articaine and mepivacaine, rho1(T) = 1.008-5.36 E-06 T2 (heavy LAs, isobaric at body temperature); L-bupivacaine, rho2(T) = 1.007-5.46 E-06 T2 (intermediate LA, less hypobaric than saline); bupivacaine, ropivacaine, prilocaine, and lidocaine, rho3(T) = 1.0063-5.0 E-06 T (light LAs, more hypobaric than saline). Isobaric temperatures (degrees C) were as follows: 5 mg/ml bupivacaine, 35.1; 5 mg/ml L-bupivacaine, 37.0; 5 mg/ml ropivacaine, 35.1; 20 mg/ml articaine, 39.4. Sophisticated measurements and mathematic models now allow calculation of the ideal injection temperature of LAs and, thus, even better control of LA distribution within the cerebrospinal fluid. The given formulae allow the adaptation on subpopulations with varying cerebrospinal fluid density.

  3. Sensitivity, Specificity, Predictive Values, and Accuracy of Three Diagnostic Tests to Predict Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blockade Failure in Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chavarría-Bolaños

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB is the most common anesthetic technique used on mandibular teeth during root canal treatment. Its success in the presence of preoperative inflammation is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy of three diagnostic tests used to predict IANB failure in symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP. Methodology. A cross-sectional study was carried out on the mandibular molars of 53 patients with SIP. All patients received a single cartridge of mepivacaine 2% with 1 : 100000 epinephrine using the IANB technique. Three diagnostic clinical tests were performed to detect anesthetic failure. Anesthetic failure was defined as a positive painful response to any of the three tests. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, accuracy, and ROC curves were calculated and compared and significant differences were analyzed. Results. IANB failure was determined in 71.7% of the patients. The sensitivity scores for the three tests (lip numbness, the cold stimuli test, and responsiveness during endodontic access were 0.03, 0.35, and 0.55, respectively, and the specificity score was determined as 1 for all of the tests. Clinically, none of the evaluated tests demonstrated a high enough accuracy (0.30, 0.53, and 0.68 for lip numbness, the cold stimuli test, and responsiveness during endodontic access, resp.. A comparison of the areas under the curve in the ROC analyses showed statistically significant differences between the three tests (p<0.05. Conclusion. None of the analyzed tests demonstrated a high enough accuracy to be considered a reliable diagnostic tool for the prediction of anesthetic failure.

  4. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  5. Parenteral treatment of episodic tension-type headache: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, Danielle; Nicastro, Olivia; Akala, Olabiyi; Friedman, Benjamin W

    2014-02-01

    continuous outcomes otherwise. Our search returned 640 results. One hundred eighty-seven abstracts were reviewed, and 8 studies involving 486 patients were included in our analysis. The most common reasons for exclusion of abstracts were no assessment of acute pain relief, use of nonparenteral medications only, and no differentiation of headache type. Risk of bias ranged from low to high. The following medications were more effective than placebo for acute pain (NNT, 95%CI): metamizole (4, 2-26), chlorpromazine (4, 2-26), and metoclopramide (2, 1-3). The combination of metoclopramide + diphenhydramine was superior to ketorolac (4, 2-8) The following medications were not more effective than placebo: mepivacaine, meperidine + promethazine, and sumatriptan. Various parenteral medications other than salicylates or nonsteroidals provide acute relief of tension-type headache. Comparative efficacy studies are needed. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  6. Medial approach of ultrasound-guided costoclavicular plexus block and its effects on regional perfussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwveld, D; Mojica, V; Herrera, A E; Pomés, J; Prats, A; Sala-Blanch, X

    2017-04-01

    clinical effectiveness using 20ml of 1.5% mepivacaine. The sympathetic block can be evaluated with all three parameters studied. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. [Sciatic nerve block "out-of-plane" distal to the bifurcation: effective and safe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, T; Apel, J; Vicent, O; Büttner, J

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound guided distal sciatic nerve block (DSB) at bifurcation level shows fast onset and provides excellent success rates. However, its safe performance might be difficult for the unexperienced physician. Just slightly distal to the bifurcation, the tibial nerve (TN) and common fibular nerve (CFN) can be shown clearly separated from each other. Therefore, we investigated if a block done here would provide similar quality results compared to the DSB proximally to the division, with a potentially lower risk of nerve damage. In this randomized, prospective trial, 56 patients per group received either a DSB distal to the bifurcation "out-of-plane" (dist.) or proximally "in-plane" (prox.) with 30 ml of Mepivacaine 1% each. Success was tested by a blinded examiner after 15 and 30 min respectively (sensory and motor block of TN and CFN: 0 = none, 2 = complete, change of skin temperature). Videos of the blocks were inspected by an independent expert retrospectively with regard to the spread of the local anesthetic (LA) and accidental intraneural injection. Cumulative single nerve measurements and temperature changes revealed significant shorter onset and better efficacy (dist/prox: 15 min: 3.13 ± 1.86/1.82 ± 1.62; 30 min: 5.73 ± 1.92/3.21 ± 1.88; T 15 min : 30.3 ± 3.48/28.0 ± 3.67, T 30 min . 33.0 ± 2.46/30.6 ± 3.86; MV/SD; ANOVA; p safe application of the LA, so an effective block can be done with just one injection. DSB slightly distal to the bifurcation, in an out-of-plane technique between the TN and CFN, can be done fast, effectively and safe.