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Sample records for mental nerve distribution

  1. Delayed Mental Nerve Neuralgia following Chin Augmentation

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    Ineke Wever

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of mental nerve neuralgia following a traumatic dislodgement of a chin implant ten months after surgery. Our case is unusual, both in the specific complication and the patients' atypical representation—delayed and initially without mention of trauma. To the authors' knowledge, this case has not been reported previously in the literature. We review the complications of chin augmentation and the techniques for fixation and discuss implications for the preoperative disclosure with patients.

  2. Malignant mental nerve neuropathy: systematic review.

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    Galán Gil, Sónnica; Peñarrocha Diago, Maria; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2008-10-01

    Malignant mental neuropathy (MMN) is a neurological manifestation of cancer, characterized by the presence of hypoesthesia or anesthesia restricted to the territory of the mental branch of the mandibular nerve. A systematic review of the literature has been made on MMN, analyzing the etiology, pathogeny, clinical characteristics, complementary tests and the prognosis. Sixteen studies, providing 136 cases were selected. Breast cancer and lymphomas were the most frequently associated malignant diseases. The most frequent pathogenic mechanisms producing neurological involvement were: peripherally, mandibular lesions; and centrally, tumors at the base of the cranium. Regarding clinical characteristics, manifestation of MMN was the primary symptom of malignant disease in 27.7% of cases, and a first symptom of recurrence in 37.7%. The group of selected studies included 50 orthopantomographs, 9 mandibular computed tomographies and 50 radiographic examinations of the cranial region. The most affected region was the mandible. The appearance of MMN is an ominous prognosis for the progression of the disease, with a mortality of 78.5% within a mean of 6.9 months.

  3. Inferior alveolar nerve trajectory, mental foramen location and incidence of mental nerve anterior loop

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    Velasco-Torres, Miguel; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Avila-Ortiz, Gustavo; García-Delgado, Raúl; Catena, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Background Injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is a serious intraoperative complication that may occur during routine surgical procedures, such as dental implant placement or extraction of impacted teeth. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the trajectory of the mandibular canal (MC), the location of the mental foramen (MF) and the presence and extension of an anterior loop of the mental nerve (AL). Study Design In this cross-sectional study, a total of 348 CBCTs were analyzed. Distances from MC to the surface of the basal, medial and lateral cortical of the mandible were measured at the level of the second molar, first molar and second premolar. Location of the MF relative to the apices of the premolars, as well as incidence and anterior extent of the AL were also determined. Results Significant and clinically relevant correlations were found between the position of the MC in women, which was located more caudal (r=-0.219, p=0.007; r=-0.276, p<0.001; right and left, respectively) and lateral (r=-0.274, p=0.001; r=-0.285, p<0.001; right and left, respectively), particularly at the level of the premolars. Additionally, the presence (r=-0.181, p=0.001; r=-0.163, p=0.002; right and left, respectively) and anterior extension (r=-0.180, p=0.009; r=-0.285, p=0.05; right and left, respectively) of the AL was found to be inversely correlated with the age of the patient. Conclusions This analysis of a Caucasian population has found that the older the patient, the lower the incidence of the loop and the shorter its anterior extension. Key words:Cone-beam computed tomography, mandibular nerve, mental foramen. PMID:28809376

  4. Mental nerve paraesthesia: A review of causes and two endodontically related cases

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    Unni Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental nerve paraesthesia can occur as a result of a variety of reasons. Paraesthesia following endodontic treatment is an uncommon treatment complication. Causes of paraesthesia in the mental nerve region are reviewed and two cases involving endodontic treatment are discussed. In the first instance, a patient presented with difficulty in swallowing and severe pain localized to her right mandible, with numbness of her lower lip. Paraesthesia resolved quickly with endodontic treatment. In the second instance, a patient referred for treatment a mandibular second premolar developed profound paraesthesia in the distribution of the mental nerve after treatment. The local anesthetic used was 4% articaine by infiltration. CBCT imaging revealed two accessory mental foramen and slight extrusion of sealant into one of the neurovascular exits. Possible causes of paraesthesia are discussed in the light of the literature review. CBCT imaging may be useful in the diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  5. Degeneration and regeneration of motor and sensory nerves: a stereological study of crush lesions in rat facial and mental nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barghash, Ziad; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Al-Bishri, Awad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degeneration and regeneration of a sensory nerve and a motor nerve at the histological level after a crush injury. Twenty-five female Wistar rats had their mental nerve and the buccal branch of their facial nerve compressed unilaterally against a glass rod...... for 30 s. Specimens of the compressed nerves and the corresponding control nerves were dissected at 3, 7, and 19 days after surgery. Nerve cross-sections were stained with osmium tetroxide and toluidine blue and analysed using two-dimensional stereology. We found differences between the two nerves both...... in the normal anatomy and in the regenerative pattern. The mental nerve had a larger cross-sectional area including all tissue components. The mental nerve had a larger volume fraction of myelinated axons and a correspondingly smaller volume fraction of endoneurium. No differences were observed...

  6. Inferior alveolar nerve trajectory, mental foramen location and incidence of mental nerve anterior loop.

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    Velasco-Torres, M; Padial-Molina, M; Avila-Ortiz, G; García-Delgado, R; Catena, A; Galindo-Moreno, P

    2017-09-01

    Injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is a serious intraoperative complication that may occur during routine surgical procedures, such as dental implant placement or extraction of impacted teeth. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the trajectory of the mandibular canal (MC), the location of the mental foramen (MF) and the presence and extension of an anterior loop of the mental nerve (AL). In this cross-sectional study, a total of 348 CBCTs were analyzed. Distances from MC to the surface of the basal, medial and lateral cortical of the mandible were measured at the level of the second molar, first molar and second premolar. Location of the MF relative to the apices of the premolars, as well as incidence and anterior extent of the AL were also determined. Significant and clinically relevant correlations were found between the position of the MC in women, which was located more caudal (r=-0.219, p=0.007; r=-0.276, p<0.001; right and left, respectively) and lateral (r=-0.274, p=0.001; r=-0.285, p<0.001; right and left, respectively), particularly at the level of the premolars. Additionally, the presence (r=-0.181, p=0.001; r=-0.163, p=0.002; right and left, respectively) and anterior extension (r=-0.180, p=0.009; r=-0.285, p=0.05; right and left, respectively) of the AL was found to be inversely correlated with the age of the patient. This analysis of a Caucasian population has found that the older the patient, the lower the incidence of the loop and the shorter its anterior extension.

  7. Endodontic periapical lesion-induced mental nerve paresthesia

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    Elham Shadmehr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness, resulting from neural injury. The symptoms can vary from mild neurosensory dysfunction to total loss of sensation in the innervated area. Only a few cases have described apical periodontitis to be the etiological factor of impaired sensation in the area innervated by the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. The aim of the present paper is to report a case of periapical lesion-induced paresthesia in the innervation area of the mental nerve, which was successfully treated with endodontic retreatment.

  8. Vitality of intact teeth anterior to the mental foramen after inferior alveolar nerve repositioning: nerve transpositioning versus nerve lateralization.

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    Khajehahmadi, S; Rahpeyma, A; Bidar, M; Jafarzadeh, H

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare two methods used in inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) repositioning to evaluate their effect on the vitality of intact teeth anterior to the mental foramen. Nerve lateralization (NL) is defined as the lateral reflection of the IAN without incisive nerve transection; nerve transposition (NT) involves sacrifice of the incisive nerve. Twenty-one patients were included in this study. Vitality tests for the teeth anterior to the mental foramen, including pulse oximetry and electric pulp testing, were evaluated at 1 week prior to surgery and at 1 week, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Lower lip and chin neurosensory changes were also recorded at the same time intervals by static light touch test with a cotton-tipped applicator and two-point discrimination test with sharp callipers. Vitality tests were negative after the operation in the NT group, while all had normal values at 1 week prior to the operation. In the NL group, only two patients (20%) had negative test results at 1 week after surgery. Lip and chin neurosensory changes in the total transpositions (28 operations) were seen in 7.1% at 1 year after the operation. It appears that NL is a more physiological procedure than NT. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Recombinant human fibroblast growth factor-2 promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after mental nerve crush injury.

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    Lee, Sung Ho; Jin, Wei-Peng; Seo, Na Ri; Pang, Kang-Mi; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Soung-Min; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-04-01

    Several studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) can directly affect axon regeneration after peripheral nerve damage. In this study, we performed sensory tests and histological analyses to study the effect of recombinant human FGF-2 (rhFGF2) treatment on damaged mental nerves. The mental nerves of 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were crush-injured for 1 minute and then treated with 10 or 50 μg/mL rhFGF2 or PBS in crush injury area with a mini Osmotic pump. Sensory test using von Frey filaments at 1 week revealed the presence of sensory degeneration based on decreased gap score and increased difference score. However, at 2 weeks, the gap score and difference score were significantly rebounded in the mental nerve crush group treated with 10 μg/mL rhFGF2. Interestingly, treatment with 10 μg/mL rhFGF had a more obviously positive effect on the gap score than treatment with 50 μg/mL rhFGF2. In addition, retrograde neuronal tracing with Dil revealed a significant increase in nerve regeneration in the trigeminal ganglion at 2 and 4 weeks in the rhFGF2 groups (10 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL) than in the PBS group. The 10 μg/mL rhFGF2 group also showed an obviously robust regeneration in axon density in the mental nerve at 4 weeks. Our results demonstrate that 10 μg/mL rhFGF induces mental nerve regeneration and sensory recovery after mental nerve crush injury.

  10. Accidental identification of accessory mental nerve and foramen during implant surgery.

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    Kulkarni, Sudhindra; Kumar, Sampath; Kamath, Sujata; Thakur, Srinath

    2011-01-01

    The accessory mental nerve and the corresponding foramen are not a very common occurrence. In the current case report, we present the notice of an accessory mental nerve in the mandibular molar area during implant placement. The case was managed well without any complications.

  11. Mental disorders, functional impairment, and nerve growth factor

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    Salles FHM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fanny Helena Martins Salles,1 Pedro San Martin Soares,1 Carolina David Wiener,1 Thaise Campos Mondin,1 Paula Moraes da Silva,1 Karen Jansen,1–3 Luciano Dias de Mattos Souza,1 Ricardo Azevedo da Silva,1 Jean Pierre Oses1–3 1Translational Science on Brain Disorders, Department of Health and Behavior, Catholic University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; 2Translational Psychiatry Program, 3Center of Excellence on Mood Disorders, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Medical School, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Nerve growth factor (NGF is an important member of the neurotrophin family and its alteration has been associated with psychiatric disorders. Functionality consists of the activities that an individual can perform, as well as their social participation, which is an important factor in analyzing the carrier living conditions of subjects with psychiatric suffering. Several studies have evaluated functionality in bipolar disorder; however, no studies have evaluated the functionality in other mental disorders. There are also few studies investigating the association between functionality and the biological bases of mental disorders. This study aimed to evaluate the serum NGF levels in psychiatric patients and to verify a possible association between the serum neurotrophic levels and functionality. This was a cross-sectional study with a convenient sample obtained from the Public Mental Health Service from the south of Brazil. The final sample was composed of 286 patients enrolled from July 2013 to October 2014. Data was collected using a sociodemographic questionnaire, and the diagnosis was confirmed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I and a Functioning Assessment Short Test. The serum NGF levels were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS Statistic

  12. Anterior loop of the mental nerve, mental foramen and incisive nerve emergency: tridimensional assessment and surgical applications.

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    Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Salinas-Goodier, Carmen; Manchón, Ángel; Rojo, Rosa

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and length of the anterior loop (AL), the distance from this landmark to the alveolar crest and its relation with the shape of the foramen and emergency pattern in the Spanish population on helical computed tomography scan (helical CT scan) through tridimensional reconstructions. Helical CT scan images of 41 patients aged 65 or older were analyzed. A total of 82 human hemi-mandibles were examined in this study. A tridimensional reconstruction of each mandible and Inferior Alveolar Nerve canal was created in AMIRA ® software (AMIRA, Mercury Computer Systems, Berlin, Germany). Prevalence, length and distance between the AL, mental foramen and alveolar ridge were measured. This retrospective observational study was performed according to the STROBE guidelines. Prevalence of the AL was 53.7 % (n = 44) and the mean length was 1.3 ± 0.64 mm. The mean distance from the highest point of the loop to the alveolar ridge was 13.4 ± 2.8 mm. The mean diameter of the mental foramen was 3.5 ± 0.65 mm and the proportion of the oval-shaped was 62.2 % (n = 51) and round-shaped was 37.8 % (n = 31). The study found that patients with type 1 pattern emergency pattern had a higher prevalence of the AL (p = 0.03). Prevalence, location and length of the anterior loop can be overlooked if only two-dimensional pre-surgical studies are performed. Therefore, three-dimensional imaging and modeling of anatomic structures should be used for the pre-operative examination of the interforaminal area. Given the wide variability of the emergency pattern of the mental nerve and the prevalence and location of the anterior loop, it should be studied in every patient individually.

  13. Anterior Loop of the Mental Nerve and Its Radiologic Imaging: a Review

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    GÜMÜŞOK, Mustafa; KAYADÜĞÜN, Aylin; ÜÇOK, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    The mental foramen region is important for dental practise. Wheninferior alveolar nerve arises from the mandibular canal, it runsout ward, upward and backward to open at the mental foramenthen it was called as “anterior loop of mental nerve”. The correctvisualization of anterior loop has an important role for planning ofimplant placement in preventing complications like paresthesiaand bleeding. Reliability and precision of the images obtained withtwo-dimension conventional methods like periap...

  14. The mental foramen and nerve: clinical and anatomical factors related to dental implant placement: a literature review.

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    Greenstein, Gary; Tarnow, Dennis

    2006-12-01

    The mental foramen is a strategically important landmark during osteotomy procedures. Its location and the possibility that an anterior loop of the mental nerve may be present mesial to the mental foramen needs to be considered before implant surgery to avoid mental nerve injury. Articles that addressed the position, number, and size of the mental foramen, mental nerve anatomy, and consequences of nerve damage were evaluated for information pertinent to clinicians performing implant dentistry. The mental foramen may be oval or round and is usually located apical to the second mandibular premolar or between apices of the premolars. However, its location can vary from the mandibular canine to the first molar. The foramen may not appear on conventional radiographs, and linear measurements need to be adjusted to account for radiographic distortion. Computerized tomography (CT) scans are more accurate for detecting the mental foramen than conventional radiographs. There are discrepancies between studies regarding the prevalence and length of the loop of the mental nerve mesial to the mental foramen. Furthermore, investigations that compared radiographic and cadaveric dissection data with respect to identifying the anterior loop reported that radiographic assessments result in a high percentage of false-positive and -negatives findings. Sensory dysfunction due to nerve damage in the foraminal area can occur if the inferior alveolar or mental nerve is damaged during preparation of an osteotomy. To avoid nerve injury during surgery in the foraminal area, guidelines were developed based on the literature with respect to verifying the position of the mental foramen and validating the presence of an anterior loop of the mental nerve. These guidelines included leaving a 2 mm zone of safety between an implant and the coronal aspect of the nerve; observation of the inferior alveolar nerve and mental foramen on panoramic and periapical films prior to implant placement; use of CT

  15. The spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus and their distribution in the chinchilla

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    M. A. Martinez-Pereira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus (plexus lumbosacrales (LSP and its distribution in Chinchilla lanigera were investigated. Ten chinchillas (6 males and 4 females were used in this research. The spinal nerves that constitute the LSP were dissected and the distribution of pelvic limb nerves originating from the plexus was examined. The iliohypogastric nerve arose from L1 and L2,, giving rise to the cranial and caudal nerves, and the ilioinguinal nerve arose from L3. The other branch of L3 gave rise to the genitofemoral nerve and 1 branch from L4 gave rise to the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve. The trunk formed by the union of L4–5 divided into medial (femoral nerve and lateral branches (obturator nerve. It was found that the LSP was formed by all the ventral branches of L4 at L6 and S1 at S3. At the caudal part of the plexus, a thick branch, the ischiadic plexus, was formed by contributions from L5–6 and S1. This root gave rise to the nerve branches which were disseminated to the posterior limb (cranial and caudal gluteal nerves, caudal cutaneous femoral nerve and ischiadic nerve. The ischiadic nerve divided into the caudal cutaneous surae, lateral cutaneous surae, common fibular and tibial nerve. The pudendal nerve arose from S1–2 and the other branch of S2 and S3 formed the rectal caudal nerve. The results showed that the origins and distribution of spinal nerves that constitute the LSP of chinchillas were similar to those of a few rodents and other mammals.

  16. Distribution of adrenergic and cholinergic nerve fibres within intrinsic nerves at the level of the human heart hilum.

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    Petraitiene, Viktorija; Pauza, Dainius H; Benetis, Rimantas

    2014-06-01

    The disbalance between adrenergic (sympathetic) and cholinergic (parasympathetic) cardiac inputs facilitates cardiac arrhythmias, including the lethal ones. In spite of the fact that the morphological pattern of the epicardiac ganglionated subplexuses (ENsubP) has been previously described in detail, the distribution of functionally distinct axons in human intrinsic nerves was not investigated thus far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate the distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)- and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive axons within intrinsic nerves at the level of the human heart hilum (HH), since they are of pivotal importance for determining proper treatment options for different arrhythmias. Tissue samples containing the intrinsic nerves from seven epicardiac subplexuses were obtained from nine human hearts without cardiac pathology and processed for immunofluorescent detection of TH and ChAT. The nerve area was measured and the numbers of axons were counted using microphotographs of nerve profiles. The densities of fibres were extrapolated and compared between subplexuses. ChAT-immunoreactive (IR) fibres were evidently predominant (>56%) in nerves of dorsal (DRA) and ventral right atrial (VRA) ENsubP. Within both left (LC) and right coronary ENsubP, the most abundant (70.9 and 83.0%, respectively) were TH-IR axons. Despite subplexal dependence, ChAT-IR fibres prevailed in comparatively thinner nerves, whereas TH-IR fibres in thicker ones. Morphometry showed that at the level of HH: (i) LC subplexal nerves were found to be the thickest (25 737 ± 4131 μm(2)) ones, whereas the thinnest (2604 ± 213 μm(2)) nerves concentrated in DRA ENsubP; (ii) the density of ChAT-IR axons was highest (6.8 ± 0.6/100 μm(2)) in the ventral left atrial nerves and lowest (3.2 ± 0.1/100 μm(2)) in left dorsal ENsubP and (iii) the density of TH-IR fibres was highest (15.9 ± 2.1/100 μm(2)) in LC subplexal nerves and lowest (4.4 ± 0

  17. Lower lip paresthesia as a sequel of mental nerve irritation secondary to periradicular periodontitis

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    Abdullah Mahmoud Riyahi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to present a case report describing lower lip paresthesia following failed endodontic treatment and development of periapical lesion. A 42-year-old female presented difficulty in swallowing with pain in right mandibular second premolar and numbness in the right side of her lower lip. Radiographic examination revealed inadequate root canal and a large periapical lesion in the mental nerve area. The lesion appeared extending into the inferior alveolar canal causing irritation of inferior alveolar nerve and its mental branch. Following root canal retreatment, there was improvement of the clinical symptoms and gradual reduction in size of the lesion. A full resolution of symptoms was demonstrated 4 months after successful endodontic therapy. It was concluded that careful clinical and radiographic diagnosis followed by proper endodontic treatment proved to be successful in treating lower lip paresthesia occurred following failed root canal therapy.

  18. Computed tomographic analysis of the mental foramen and nerve in Japanese patients.

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    Fujita, Atsushi; Suzuki, Toyonori

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the anatomical features of the mental foramen in Japanese patients through computed tomography (CT) imaging to reduce inadvertent damage to the mental nerve during implant placement. The mandibles of 100 patients were observed on CT imaging. The location, shape, number, and size of the mental foramen were evaluated. Furthermore, the vertical and horizontal dimensions of the anterior loops were measured. The mental foramen was mainly located by the apex of the second mandibular premolar in male, whereas the mental foramen was mainly located by the apex of the second mandibular premolar and between the apex of the second premolar and the first mandibular molar in female. With exception of a few hemi-mandibles, its shape was oval and the number of the mental foramen was 1. There was no significant difference in the size of the mental foramen between male and female. There was a significant difference in the vertical dimension of the anterior loops between the males and females. In general, altered lip sensations are preventable if the mental foramen is located, and this knowledge is employed when performing surgical procedures in the foraminal area.

  19. Anatomical relationship between mental foramen, mandibular teeth and risk of nerve injury with endodontic treatment.

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    Chong, Bun San; Gohil, Kajal; Pawar, Ravikiran; Makdissi, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the anatomical relationship between mental foramen (MF), including the incidence of the anterior loop of the inferior alveolar nerve (AL), and roots of mandibular teeth in relation to risk of nerve injury with endodontic treatment. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, which included teeth either side of the MF, were randomly selected. The anonymised CBCT images were reconstructed and examined in coronal, axial and sagittal planes, using three-dimensional viewing software, to determine the relationship and distance between MF and adjacent mandibular teeth. The actual distance between the root apex and MF was calculated mathematically using Pythagoras' theorem. If present, the incidence of an AL in the axial plane was also recorded. The root apex of the mandibular second premolar (70 %), followed by the first premolar (18 %) and then the first molar (12 %), was the closest to the MF. Ninety-six percent of root apices evaluated were >3 mm from the MF. An AL was present in 88 % of the cases. With regards to endodontic treatment, the risk of nerve injury in the vicinity of the MF would appear to be low. However, the high incidence of the AL highlights the need for clinicians to be aware and careful of this important anatomical feature. The risk of injury to the MN with endodontic treatment would appear to be low, but given the high incidence, it is important to be aware and be careful of the AL.

  20. Determination of Nerve Fiber Diameter Distribution From Compound Action Potential: A Continuous Approach.

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    Un, M Kerem; Kaghazchi, Hamed

    2018-01-01

    When a signal is initiated in the nerve, it is transmitted along each nerve fiber via an action potential (called single fiber action potential (SFAP)) which travels with a velocity that is related with the diameter of the fiber. The additive superposition of SFAPs constitutes the compound action potential (CAP) of the nerve. The fiber diameter distribution (FDD) in the nerve can be computed from the CAP data by solving an inverse problem. This is usually achieved by dividing the fibers into a finite number of diameter groups and solve a corresponding linear system to optimize FDD. However, number of fibers in a nerve can be measured sometimes in thousands and it is possible to assume a continuous distribution for the fiber diameters which leads to a gradient optimization problem. In this paper, we have evaluated this continuous approach to the solution of the inverse problem. We have utilized an analytical function for SFAP and an assumed a polynomial form for FDD. The inverse problem involves the optimization of polynomial coefficients to obtain the best estimate for the FDD. We have observed that an eighth order polynomial for FDD can capture both unimodal and bimodal fiber distributions present in vivo, even in case of noisy CAP data. The assumed FDD distribution regularizes the ill-conditioned inverse problem and produces good results.

  1. Peripheral nerve changes assessed by conduction velocity distribution in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and dysautonomia.

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    Koszewicz, M; Gosk-Bierska, I; Jerzy, G; Bilińska, M; Podemski, R; Budrewicz, S; Adamiec, R

    2011-08-01

    Different mechanisms (neural and intravascular) are thought to be important in the pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP). In a previous study we confirmed autonomic nervous system impairment in patients with primary RP, but the pathogenic role of peripheral nerves remained unclear. The aim of the current study was an electrophysiological analysis of peripheral nerves using both standard conduction velocity and the conduction velocity distribution (CVD) in patients with primary RP in order to investigate the causes of dysautonomia. We examined 34 patients with primary RP and dysautonomia and 31 sex- and age-matched controls. Standard motor and sensory conduction tests in ulnar and peroneal (sural) nerves and a CVD test in the same nerves were performed. Clinically, none of the patients had motor symptoms, while 35.3% of them presented sensory neuropathy. Standard neurographic tests were within the normal limits except for the significant prolongation of mean sensory latency in both examined nerves. CVD revealed significant slowing of motor conduction velocity in all the conduction values, e.g. in the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles of velocity. There were no differences in the width of the velocity distribution in the patient group and controls. The results of CVD indicated the presence of generalized subclinical peripheral motor nerve impairment (subclinical polyneuropathy) in patients with primary RP and dysautonomia. Based on the present and previous studies, we conclude that the mechanism of autonomic dysfunction in primary RP is mixed, resulting from both central and peripheral neural abnormalities.

  2. Origins, distributions, and ramifications of the femoral nerves in giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla Linnaeus, 1758

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    Roseâmely Angélica de Carvalho-Barros

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of nerves making up the lumbosacral plexus is extremely important, because it relates the various evolutionary aspects of animals’ posture and locomotion. Taking into account that the femoral nerve is the largest one in the cranial part of the lumbosacral plexus, one aimed to describe the origins, distributions, and ramifications of femoral nerves in giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, comparing them to the literature describing domestic and wild animals, in order to establish correlations of morphological similarities and provide the related areas with means. One used three specimens, prepared through an injection of 10% aqueous formaldehyde solution via femoral artery, for their conservation and posterior dissection. The origins in the right and left antimeres took place in the ventral braches of lumbar spinal nerves 1, 2, and 3. The distributions and ramifications were observed for the major and minor psoas, lateral and medial iliac, pectineus, adductor magnus, sartorius, and femoral quadriceps muscles. Having the origins of the M. tridactyla femoral nerves as a basis, a reframing was observed due to the variance in the number of lumbar vertebrae (L1, L2, and L3. However, a partial morphological similarity was kept with regard to the distributions and ramifications, when compared to the domestic and wild animals taken into account in this study.

  3. Automated characterization of nerve fibers labeled fluorescently: determination of size, class and spatial distribution.

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    Prodanov, Dimiter; Feirabend, Hans K P

    2008-10-03

    Morphological classification of nerve fibers could help interpret the assessment of neural regeneration and the understanding of selectivity of nerve stimulation. Specific populations of myelinated nerve fibers can be investigated by retrograde tracing from a muscle followed by microscopic measurements of the labeled fibers at different anatomical levels. Gastrocnemius muscles of adult rats were injected with the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold. After a survival period of 3 days, cross-sections of spinal cords, ventral roots, sciatic, and tibial nerves were collected and imaged on a fluorescence microscope. Nerve fibers were classified using a variation-based criterion acting on the distribution of their equivalent diameters. The same criterion was used to classify the labeled axons using the size of the fluorescent marker. Measurements of the axons were paired to those of the entire fibers (axons+myelin sheaths) in order to establish the correspondence between so-established axonal and fiber classifications. It was found that nerve fibers in L6 ventral roots could be classified into four populations comprising two classes of Aalpha (denoted Aalpha1 and Aalpha2), Agamma, and an additional class of Agammaalpha fibers. Cut-off borders between Agamma and Agammaalpha fiber classes were estimated to be 5.00+/-0.09 microm (SEM); between Agammaalpha and Aalpha1 fiber classes to be 6.86+/-0.11 microm (SEM); and between Aalpha1 and Aalpha2 fiber classes to be 8.66+/-0.16 microm (SEM). Topographical maps of the nerve fibers that innervate the gastrocnemius muscles were constructed per fiber class for the spinal root L6. The major advantage of the presented approach consists of the combined indirect classification of nerve fiber types and the construction of topographical maps of so-identified fiber classes.

  4. A Tool for Teaching Three-Dimensional Dermatomes Combined with Distribution of Cutaneous Nerves on the Limbs

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    Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    A teaching tool that facilitates student understanding of a three-dimensional (3D) integration of dermatomes with peripheral cutaneous nerve field distributions is described. This model is inspired by the confusion in novice learners between dermatome maps and nerve field distribution maps. This confusion leads to the misconception that these two…

  5. Expression and distribution of peroxiredoxins in the retina and optic nerve.

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    Chidlow, Glyn; Wood, John P M; Knoops, Bernard; Casson, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in various pathological conditions of the retina and optic nerve. Peroxiredoxins (Prdxs) comprise a recently characterized family of antioxidant enzymes. To date, little information exists regarding the distribution of Prdxs in the eye. Herein, we employed a combination of qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting to determine the level of expression and distribution of the six Prdx isoforms in the retina and optic nerve of the rat. In addition, we performed some parallel analyses on the common marmoset (Callithrix Jacchus). In the rat, all of the Prdx transcripts were expressed in relatively high amounts in both retina and optic nerve, with abundances ranging from approximately 3-50 % of the level of the housekeeping gene cyclophilin. With regard to protein expression, each isoform was detected in the retina and optic nerve by either Western blotting and/or immunohistochemistry. Excepting Prdx4, there was a good correspondence between the rodent and primate results. In the retina, Prdx1 and Prdx2 were principally localized to neurons in the inner nuclear layer and cone photoreceptors, Prdx3 and Prdx5 displayed characteristic mitochondrial immunolabeling, while Prdx6 was associated with astrocytes and Müller cells. In the optic nerve, Prdx1 was robustly expressed by oligodendrocytes, Prdx3 and Prdx5 were observed in axons, and Prdx6 was restricted to astrocytes. The present findings augment our understanding of the distribution and expression of the Prdxs in the retina and optic nerve of rodents and primates and lay the foundation for subsequent analysis of their involvement in relevant blinding diseases.

  6. Vesicouterine ligament contains abundant autonomic nerve ganglion cells: the distribution in histology concerning nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katahira, A; Niikura, H; Ito, K; Takano, T; Nagase, S; Murakami, G; Yaegashi, N

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the histologic architecture of the tissues corresponding to the surgically developed connective tissue bundle commonly referred to as the posterior leaf of the vesico-uterine ligament (VUL), and to examine distribution of ganglion cells. Serial macroscopic slices, each 15-20 mm in thickness, were made from eight specimens (obtained from six female elderly cadavers). In these macroslices, the location of the deep uterine vein was used to identify the deep leaf of the VUL. The specimens were trimmed and semi-serial histologic sections in thickness were prepared at 1 mm intervals. Vesical veins and the associated nerve elements were enclosed by fascia and formed a common pedicle. The base of the pedicle contained the deep uterine vein trunk. The fascia encircling the pedicle varied in thickness and connective intensity between specimens. This vesical neurovascular bundle contained abundant ganglion cells. On average, 48.0% of the ganglion cells along the vesical tributaries of the deep uterine vein were located on the medial or vaginal side of the veins, 19.2% were located between veins, 13.0% on the lateral side of the veins, and 19.8% on the dorsal side. The interindividual variability was greatest on the dorsal side of vesical veins and ranged 11-202 cells. We conclude that in order to achieve maximal preservation of the ganglion cells during the surgical dissection of the posterior leaf of the VUL, care must be taken when the medial or vesical aspect of the ligament is separated. The standard nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy should be modified to reflect differences in the distribution of ganglion cells and in connective intensity between ganglions and veins.

  7. Origin and distribution of the axillary nerve in the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cristina de Oliveira Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, a mammal belonging to the order Xenarthra and family Myrmecophagidae, is an endangered species. For this reason, additional knowledge about its anatomy is of interest, especially the forelimb, which plays important roles in feeding and defense. The goal of this study was to learn more about the origin and distribution of the axillary nerve of Myrmecophaga tridactyla by studying two individuals (one male and one female that belong to the Research Laboratory of Wild Animals (UFU. The study material consisted of corpses fixed and preserved in 10% aqueous formalin solution. Dissection of the material followed standard procedures. In both animals, the axillary nerve was found in the ventral branch of the sixth cervical (C6 and seventh (C7 spinal nerve. This nerve showed symmetry in relation to its position in the two specimens and branched into the teres major, teres minor and deltoid muscles. In both specimens the axillary nerve originated in the cranial cutaneous branch of the lower leg.

  8. Distribution of lymphatic tissues and autonomic nerves in supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianping; Feng, Lanlan; Lu, Yi; Guo, Dongxia; Xi, Tengteng; Wang, Xiaochun

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the distribution of lymphatic tissues and nerves in the supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri for their tomographical relationship, 9 adult female cadavers were used in this study. Following the incision of all supporting ligaments around the cervix, hematoxylin and esosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical staining of various sections of these ligaments was performed to enable the distribution of lymph tissues and autonomic nerves to be observed. Four lymph nodes were identified in three cadaver specimens. Three lymph nodes were present at a distance of 2.0 cm from the cervix in the cranial side of the cardinal ligaments (CLs), and one lymph node was located at a distance of 4.0 cm from the cervix in the cranial side of the uterosacral ligament (USL). The lymphatic vessels were dispersed in the CLs, scattered in the cervical side of the USLs, and occasionally distributed in the vesicouterine ligaments (VULs). In the CLs, parasympathetic nerves were located at the pelvic lateral wall and went downwards and medially into the cervix, while sympathetic fibers were located in the middle and lower parts of the ligaments. In the USLs, the autonomic nerves, which consisted primarily of sympathetic fibers, went downwards and laterally from the pelvic wall to the cervix. In the VULs, parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves were located in the inner sides of the vesical veins in the deep layers of the ligaments. It is concluded that there are few lymphatic tissues in the supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri, and that nerve‑sparing radical hysterectomy (NSRH) may be a safe method for the treatment of early‑stage cervical cancer.

  9. Mental training affects distribution of limited brain resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleen A Slagter

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The information processing capacity of the human mind is limited, as is evidenced by the so-called "attentional-blink" deficit: When two targets (T1 and T2 embedded in a rapid stream of events are presented in close temporal proximity, the second target is often not seen. This deficit is believed to result from competition between the two targets for limited attentional resources. Here we show, using performance in an attentional-blink task and scalp-recorded brain potentials, that meditation, or mental training, affects the distribution of limited brain resources. Three months of intensive mental training resulted in a smaller attentional blink and reduced brain-resource allocation to the first target, as reflected by a smaller T1-elicited P3b, a brain-potential index of resource allocation. Furthermore, those individuals that showed the largest decrease in brain-resource allocation to T1 generally showed the greatest reduction in attentional-blink size. These observations provide novel support for the view that the ability to accurately identify T2 depends upon the efficient deployment of resources to T1. The results also demonstrate that mental training can result in increased control over the distribution of limited brain resources. Our study supports the idea that plasticity in brain and mental function exists throughout life and illustrates the usefulness of systematic mental training in the study of the human mind.

  10. Intramuscular nerve distribution patterns of anterior forearm muscles in children: a guide for botulinum toxin injection

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Fangjiu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xie, Xiadan; Yang, Shengbo; Xu, Yan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) can relieve muscle spasticity by blocking axon terminals acetylcholine release at the motor endplate (MEP) and is the safest and most effective agent for the treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. In order to achieve maximum effect with minimum effective dose of BoNT, one needs to choose an injection site as near to the MEP zone as possible. This requires a detailed understanding about the nerve terminal distributions within the muscles targeted...

  11. Spatial clustering analysis in neuroanatomy: Applications of different approaches to motor nerve fiber distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crunelli, V.; Prodanov, D.P.; Nagelkerke, Nico; Marani, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    Spatial organization of the nerve fibers in the peripheral nerves may be important for the studies of axonal regeneration, the degenerative nerve diseases and the construction of interfaces with peripheral nerves, such as nerve prostheses. Functional topography of motor axons related to the

  12. A tool for teaching three-dimensional dermatomes combined with distribution of cutaneous nerves on the limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooloos, Jan G M; Vorstenbosch, Marc A T M

    2013-01-01

    A teaching tool that facilitates student understanding of a three-dimensional (3D) integration of dermatomes with peripheral cutaneous nerve field distributions is described. This model is inspired by the confusion in novice learners between dermatome maps and nerve field distribution maps. This confusion leads to the misconception that these two distribution maps fully overlap, and may stem from three sources: (1) the differences in dermatome maps in anatomical textbooks, (2) the limited views in the figures of dermatome maps and cutaneous nerve field maps, hampering the acquisition of a 3D picture, and (3) the lack of figures showing both maps together. To clarify this concept, the learning process can be facilitated by transforming the 2D drawings in textbooks to a 3D hands-on model and by merging the information from the separate maps. Commercially available models were covered with white cotton pantyhose, and borders between dermatomes were marked using the drawings from the students' required study material. Distribution maps of selected peripheral nerves were cut out from color transparencies. Both the model and the cut-out nerve fields were then at the students' disposal during a laboratory exercise. The students were instructed to affix the transparencies in the right place according to the textbook's figures. This model facilitates integrating the spatial relationships of the two types of nerve distributions. By highlighting the spatial relationship and aiming to provoke student enthusiasm, this model follows the advantages of other low-fidelity models. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  13. Pulp nerve fibers distribution of human carious teeth: An immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human dental pulp is richly innervated by trigeminal afferent axons that subserve nociceptive function. Accordingly, they respond to stimuli that induce injury to the pulp tissue. An injury to the nerve terminals and other tissue components in the pulp stimulate metabolic activation of the neurons in the trigeminal ganglion which result in morphological changes in the peripheral nerve terminals. Purpose: The aim of the study was to observe caries-related changes in the distribution of human pulpal nerve. Methods: Under informed consents, 15 third molars with caries at various stages of decay and 5 intact third molars were extracted because of orthodontic or therapeutic reasons. All samples were observed by micro-computed tomography to confirm the lesion condition 3-dimensionally, before decalcifying with 10% EDTA solution (pH 7.4. The specimens were then processed for immunohistochemistry using anti-protein gene products (PGP 9.5, a specific marker for the nerve fiber. Results: In normal intact teeth, PGP 9.5 immunoreactive nerve fibers were seen concentrated beneath the odontoblast cell layer. Nerve fibers exhibited an increased density along the pulp-dentin border corresponding to the carious lesions. Conclusion: Neural density increases throughout the pulp chamber with the progression of caries. The activity and pathogenicity of the lesion as well as caries depth, might influence the degree of neural sprouting.Latar belakang: Pulpa gigi manusia diinervasi oleh serabut saraf trigeminal yang berespon terhadap stimuli penyebab perlukaan dengan menimbulkan rasa sakit. Perlukaan pada akhiran saraf dan komponen lain dari pulpa akan menstimulasi aktivasi metabolik dari neuron pada ganglion trigeminal sehingga mengakibatkan perubahan morfologi pada akhiran saraf perifer. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengamati perubahan distribusi saraf pada pulpa gigi manusia yang disebabkan oleh proses karies. Metode: Penelitian ini menggunakan

  14. Intramuscular nerve distribution of the hamstring muscles: Application to treating spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Dong-Wook; Yi, Kyu-Ho; Park, Eun Sook; Park, Chunung; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to elucidate the ideal sites for botulinum toxin injection by examining the intramuscular nerve distributions in the hamstring muscles. The hamstring muscles, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus (10 specimens each) were stained by the modified Sihler method. The locations of the muscle origins, nerve entry points, and intramuscular arborized areas were recorded as percentages of the total distance from the line crossing the medial and lateral tibial condyles (0%) to the ischial tuberosity (100%). Intramuscular arborization patterns were observed at 15-30% and 50-60% for the biceps femoris, 25-40% and 60-80% for the semitendinosus, and 20-40% for the semimembranosus. This study suggests that botulinum toxin injection for spasticity of the hamstring muscles should be targeted to specific areas. These areas, where the arborization of intramuscular nerve branches is maximal, are recommended as the most effective and safest points for injection. Clin. Anat. 29:746-751, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Baroreflex dysfunction and augmented sympathetic nerve responses during mental stress in veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeanie; Marvar, Paul J; Liao, Peizhou; Kankam, Melanie L; Norrholm, Seth D; Downey, Ryan M; McCullough, S Ashley; Le, Ngoc-Anh; Rothbaum, Barbara O

    2017-07-15

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at a significantly higher risk of developing hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms underlying this increased risk are not known. Studies have suggested that PTSD patients have an overactive sympathetic nervous system (SNS) that could contribute to cardiovascular risk; however, sympathetic function has not previously been rigorously evaluated in PTSD patients. Using direct measurements of sympathetic nerve activity and pharmacological manipulation of blood pressure, we show that veterans with PTSD have augmented SNS and haemodynamic reactivity during both combat-related and non-combat related mental stress, impaired sympathetic and cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity, and increased inflammation. Identifying the mechanisms contributing to increased cardiovascular (CV) risk in PTSD will pave the way for developing interventions to improve sympathetic function and reduce CV risk in these patients. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. We tested the hypothesis that PTSD patients have augmented sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and haemodynamic reactivity during mental stress, as well as impaired arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Fourteen otherwise healthy Veterans with combat-related PTSD were compared with 14 matched Controls without PTSD.  Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), continuous blood pressure (BP) and electrocardiography were measured at baseline, as well as during two types of mental stress:  combat-related mental stress using virtual reality combat exposure (VRCE) and non-combat related stress using mental arithmetic (MA). A cold pressor test (CPT) was administered for comparison. BRS was tested using pharmacological manipulation of BP via the Modified Oxford technique at rest and during VRCE. Blood samples were analysed for inflammatory biomarkers. Baseline characteristics, MSNA and haemodynamics were similar between

  16. Relationship between the position of the mental foramen and the anterior loop of the inferior alveolar nerve as determined by cone beam computed tomography combined with mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuogeng; Chen, Donghui; Tang, Li; Wang, Fenfen

    2015-01-01

    The position of the mental foramen and the anterior loop length of the inferior alveolar nerve serve as important anatomical landmarks for surgical procedures in the anterior mandibular region. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the anterior loop of the inferior alveolar nerve and the mental foramen by combining cone beam computed tomography and Mimics, a software used to construct 3-dimensional (3D) interactive models of anatomical structures. Cone beam computed tomography images from a total of 60 patients were obtained and studied using GALAXY viewer or were imported into Mimics. The anterior loop of the inferior alveolar nerve was reconstructed 3-dimensionally, and then relevant parameters were measured. The parameters were measured, and their values include mean (SD) anterior loop length, 1.16 (1.78) mm; anterior loop angle, 19.13 (26.89) degrees; inferior alveolar canal diameter, 3.01 (0.67) mm; height of the inferior alveolar canal, 10.32 (1.56) mm; 2-dimensional mental foramen diameter, 2.97 (0.61) mm; 3D mental foramen diameter, 2.95 (0.59) mm; 2-dimensional vertical height of the mental foramen, 14.67 (1.67) mm; and 3D vertical height of the mental foramen, 14.61 (1.69) mm. The mental foramen was located apically between the first and second premolars in 51.67% and below the second premolar in 40.83% of the cases. A relationship was observed between the location of the mental foramen and the presence of the anterior loop of the inferior alveolar nerve. We highlight the effectiveness of cone beam computed tomography and 3D reconstruction in the identification of important anatomical structures relevant for preoperative assessment for surgical procedures in the anterior region of the mandible.

  17. Blockade of the mental nerve for lower lip surgery as a safe alternative to general anesthesia in two very old patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan FFSL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ferdinand Frederik Som Ling Tan,1 Sjouke Schiere,1 Auke C Reidinga,2 Fennie Wit,3 Peter HJM Veldman3 1Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 2Department of Anesthesiology, de Tjongerschans Hospital, Heerenveen, the Netherlands; 3Department of Surgery, de Tjongerschans Hospital, Heerenveen, the Netherlands Purpose: Regional anesthesia is gaining popularity with anesthesiologists as it offers superb postoperative analgesia. However, as the sole anesthetic technique in high-risk patients in whom general anesthesia is not preferred, some regional anesthetic possibilities may be easily overlooked. By presenting two cases of very old patients with considerable comorbidities, we would like to bring the mental nerve field block under renewed attention as a safe alternative to general anesthesia and to achieve broader application of this simple nerve block. Patients and methods: Two very old male patients (84 and 91 years both presented with an ulcerative lesion at the lower lip for which surgical removal was scheduled. Because of their considerable comorbidities and increased frailty, bilateral blockade of the mental nerve was considered superior to general anesthesia. As an additional advantage for the 84-year-old patient, who had a pneumonectomy in his medical history, the procedure could be safely performed in a beach-chair position to prevent atelectasis and optimize the ventilation/perfusion ratio of the single lung. The mental nerve blockades were performed intraorally in a blind fashion, after eversion of the lip and identifying the lower canine. A 5 mL syringe with a 23-gauge needle attached was passed into the buccal mucosa until it approximated the mental foramen, where 2 mL of lidocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:100.000 was injected . The other side was anesthetized in a similar fashion. Results: Both patients underwent the surgical procedure uneventfully under a bilateral mental nerve block

  18. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

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    Wei Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods:Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group, sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3 and macrophages (CD68 in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly  decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  19. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves...

  20. Study on distribution of terminal branches of the facial nerve in mimetic muscles (orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Shiozawa, Kei; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2014-01-01

    There have been many anatomical reports to date regarding the course of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. However, reports are relatively scarce on the detailed distribution of the terminal branches of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. In this study, we performed detailed examination of the terminal facial nerve branches to the mimetic muscles, particularly the branches terminating in the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. Examination was performed on 25 Japanese adult autopsy cases, involving 25 hemifaces. The mean age was 87.4 years (range, 60-102 years). There were 12 men and 13 women (12 left hemifaces and 13 right hemifaces). In each case, the facial nerve was exposed through a preauricular skin incision. The main trunk of the facial nerve was dissected from the stylomastoid foramen. A microscope was used to dissect the terminal branches to the periphery and observe them. The course and distribution were examined for all terminal branches of the facial nerve. However, focus was placed on the course and distribution of the zygomatic branch, buccal branch, and mandibular branch to the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. The temporal branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases and the marginal mandibular branch was distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in all cases. The zygomatic branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases, but it was also distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 10 of 25 cases. The buccal branch was not distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 3 of 25 cases, and it was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in 8 cases. There was no significant difference in the variations. The orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle perform particularly important movements among the facial mimetic muscles. According to textbooks, the temporal branch and zygomatic branch innervate the orbicularis oculi muscle, and the buccal branch

  1. Stimulus point distribution in deep or superficial peroneal nerve for treatment of ankle spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Shinji; Tanabe, Shigeo; Sugawara, Kenichi; Muraoka, Yoshihiro; Itoh, Norihide; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2013-01-01

     To develop effective electrical stimulation treatment to reduce spasticity, we examined the optimal stimulus point of the common peroneal nerve.  The locations of selective stimulus points for the deep peroneal nerve or superficial peroneal nerve fiber were examined in 25 healthy subjects in both legs (50 legs) using the ratio of the tibialis anterior (TA) to the peroneus longus (PL) M-wave amplitude (TA/PL ratio). In addition, we measured reciprocal Ia inhibition in ten healthy subjects. The amount of inhibition was determined from short-latency suppression of the soleus (Sol) H-reflex by conditioning stimuli to the deep or superficial peroneal nerve. The paired t-test was used for statistical analysis.  The mean TA/PL ratio during deep peroneal nerve stimulation was significantly different from superficial peroneal nerve stimulation (p < 0.001). The mean stimulus point for the deep peroneal nerve was located 7 ± 5 mm distal and 3 ± 6 mm anterior from the distal edges of the head of fibula and was markedly different from the stimulus point for the superficial peroneal nerve (20 ± 7 mm distal and 12 ± 8 mm posterior). During deep peroneal nerve stimulation, the mean conditioned H-reflex was depressed to 83.8 ± 10.7% of the unconditioned value of the H-reflex. In contrast, during superficial peroneal nerve stimulation, the mean conditioned H-reflex increased to 105.3 ± 5.2%. These values were significantly different (p < 0.001).  In the present study, we revealed a stimulus area of the deep peroneal nerve. Also, we observed the inhibitory effects of stimulation upon the deep peroneal nerve at individual stimulus point. Our results appear to indicate that localized stimulation of the deep peroneal nerve is more useful for the reduction of ankle spasticity. © 2012 International Neuromodulation Society.

  2. Aberrant distribution of the trochlear nerve: A cadaveric study supported by immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Kojiro; Townsend, Grant; Manavis, Jim; Ghabriel, Mounir

    2017-09-01

    The trochlear nerve is generally considered to be a purely motor nerve supplying one extraocular muscle, the superior oblique. In the current study, 28 orbits were dissected and in one orbit (3.6%), the trochlear nerve divided into two main branches. The medial branch followed the classical course, entered the superior oblique muscle and was presumed to be motor in function. However, before entering the muscle, it partially fused with the frontal nerve, and gave a bundle of nerve fibres to the frontal nerve. The lateral branch gave a communication to the frontal nerve, travelled along the lacrimal nerve, received a branch from the lacrimal nerve then penetrated the lacrimal gland. The lateral branch was presumed to be sensory. Paraffin sections from the two branches were stained using immunohistochemistry. The two branches had different nerve fibre populations and showed distinct differences in neurofilament proteins (NFP) immuno-labelling. While both branches showed intense labelling for NFP-H, the lateral branch showed no staining or faint staining for NFP-M and NFP-L respectively, but the medial branch showed moderate labelling for both the NFP-M and NFP-L. Staining for substance P, a marker for nociceptive fibres, showed intense staining in a subset of fibres in the lateral branch, but no staining in the medial branch. Calcitonin gene-related peptide labelling was evident in some axons and some Schwann cells in the medial branch but widespread, weak and fine granular in the lateral branch. These findings indicate that, in some individuals (3.6%), the trochlear nerve may contain motor and sensory fibres, suggesting inter-nuclear communication within the brainstem during embryogenesis or mixing of nerve fibres in their extra-axial pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Intermediate filaments of zebrafish retinal and optic nerve astrocytes and Müller glia: differential distribution of cytokeratin and GFAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosier Amanda L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optic nerve regeneration (ONR following injury is a model for central nervous system regeneration. In zebrafish, ONR is rapid - neurites cross the lesion and enter the optic tectum within 7 days; in mammals regeneration does not take place unless astrocytic reactivity is suppressed. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP is used as a marker for retinal and optic nerve astrocytes in both fish and mammals, even though it has long been known that astrocytes of optic nerves in many fish, including zebrafish, express cytokeratins and not GFAP. We used immunofluorescence to localize GFAP and cytokeratin in wild-type zebrafish and transgenic zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under control of a GFAP promoter to determine the pattern of expression of intermediate filaments in retina and optic nerve. Findings GFAP labeling and GFAP gene expression as indicated by GFP fluorescence was found only in the Müller glial cells of the retina. Within Müller cells, GFP fluorescence filled the entire cell while GFAP labelling was more restricted in distribution. No GFAP expression was observed in optic nerves. Cytokeratin labeling of astrocytes was observed throughout the optic nerve and less intensely in cells in the retinal inner plexiform layer. The retinal inner limiting membrane was strongly labeled by anti-cytokeratin. Conclusions Studies of astrocyte function during ONR in zebrafish cannot solely rely on GFAP as an astrocyte marker or indicator of reactivity. Future studies of ONR in zebrafish should include evaluation of changes in cytokeratin expression and localization in the optic nerve.

  4. Staff and bed distribution in public sector mental health services in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The Eastern Cape Province of South Africa is a resource-limited province with a fragmented mental health service. Objective. To determine the current context of public sector mental health services in terms of staff and bed distribution, and how this corresponds to the population distribution in the province.

  5. Low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field pretreated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote the regeneration of crush-injured rat mental nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NaRi Seo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs have been shown to promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF reportedly promotes the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of BMSCs. Low-frequency PEMF can induce the neuronal differentiation of BMSCs in the absence of nerve growth factors. This study was designed to investigate the effects of low-frequency PEMF pretreatment on the proliferation and function of BMSCs and the effects of low-frequency PEMF pre-treated BMSCs on the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve using in vitro and in vivo experiments. In in vitro experiments, quantitative DNA analysis was performed to determine the proliferation of BMSCs, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect S100 (Schwann cell marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (astrocyte marker, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor (neurotrophic factors mRNA expression. In the in vivo experiments, rat models of crush-injured mental nerve established using clamp method were randomly injected with low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs, unpretreated BMSCs or PBS at the injury site (1 × 106 cells. DiI-labeled BMSCs injected at the injury site were counted under the fluorescence microscope to determine cell survival. One or two weeks after cell injection, functional recovery of the injured nerve was assessed using the sensory test with von Frey filaments. Two weeks after cell injection, axonal regeneration was evaluated using histomorphometric analysis and retrograde labeling of trigeminal ganglion neurons. In vitro experiment results revealed that low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs proliferated faster and had greater mRNA expression of growth factors than unpretreated BMSCs. In vivo experiment results revealed that compared with injection of unpretreated BMSCs, injection of low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs led to higher myelinated axon count and axon

  6. Low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field pretreated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote the regeneration of crush-injured rat mental nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, NaRi; Lee, Sung-Ho; Ju, Kyung Won; Woo, JaeMan; Kim, BongJu; Kim, SoungMin; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2018-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) reportedly promotes the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of BMSCs. Low-frequency PEMF can induce the neuronal differentiation of BMSCs in the absence of nerve growth factors. This study was designed to investigate the effects of low-frequency PEMF pretreatment on the proliferation and function of BMSCs and the effects of low-frequency PEMF pre-treated BMSCs on the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve using in vitro and in vivo experiments. In in vitro experiments, quantitative DNA analysis was performed to determine the proliferation of BMSCs, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect S100 (Schwann cell marker), glial fibrillary acidic protein (astrocyte marker), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor (neurotrophic factors) mRNA expression. In the in vivo experiments, rat models of crush-injured mental nerve established using clamp method were randomly injected with low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs, unpretreated BMSCs or PBS at the injury site (1 × 10 6 cells). DiI-labeled BMSCs injected at the injury site were counted under the fluorescence microscope to determine cell survival. One or two weeks after cell injection, functional recovery of the injured nerve was assessed using the sensory test with von Frey filaments. Two weeks after cell injection, axonal regeneration was evaluated using histomorphometric analysis and retrograde labeling of trigeminal ganglion neurons. In vitro experiment results revealed that low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs proliferated faster and had greater mRNA expression of growth factors than unpretreated BMSCs. In vivo experiment results revealed that compared with injection of unpretreated BMSCs, injection of low-frequency PEMF pretreated BMSCs led to higher myelinated axon count and axon density and

  7. A retrospective radiographic evaluation of the anterior loop of the mental nerve: Comparison between panoramic radiography and cone beam computerized tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujanovic-Eskenazi, Aleksandar; Valero-James, Jesus-Manuel; Sánchez-Garcés, María-Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the prevalence and the length of mental loop, measured with panoramic radiography (PR) and cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods: PG and CBCT images where analyzed by a single calibrated examiner to determine the presence and the position of the mental foramen (MF), its distance to the lower mandible border, the anterior length of the mental loop (ML) and the bone quality in 82 PR and 82 CBCT. Results: ML was identified in 36.6 % of PR and 48.8 % of CBCT. PR showed a magnification of 1.87 when compared to CBCT. The mean of anterior extension of the inferior alveolar nerve and the distance to the inferior border of the mandible was higher for PR (2.8 mm, sd 0.91 mm on the PR , range 1.5 to 4.7 mm and 1.59, sd 0.9 on the CBCT ,range 0.4 to 4.0 mm) Conclusions: There is a magnification in PR images with respect to those of CBCT. The differences between CBCT and PR with regards to the identification and length of the ML are not statistically significant. Identification and accuracy measurements of ML did not depend on the bone quality. Considering that two dimensional imaging provides less accurate and reliable information regarding the anterior loop, a CBCT scan could be recommended when planning implant placement in the anterior region. Key words:Mental loop, mental nerve, mental canal, preoperative implant planning, panoramic tomography, cone beam computerized tomography. PMID:25549693

  8. Spatially distributed effects of mental exhaustion on resting-state FMRI networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Fabrizio; Otto, Tobias; Zijlstra, Fred R H; Goebel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Brain activity during rest is spatially coherent over functional connectivity networks called resting-state networks. In resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, independent component analysis yields spatially distributed network representations reflecting distinct mental processes, such

  9. Distribution and Origin of VIP-, SP-, and Phospholipase Cβ2 -Immunoreactive Nerves in the Tongue of the Bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, Osamu; Ando, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Ichiro; Asanuma, Naokazu; Okumura, Masayo; Kitagawa, Junichi; Kondo, Eiji; Yagasaki, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have found a few intralingual ganglionic cells that were immunoreactive to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in the frog. A recent study reported a large number of such cells, and the possibility of the release of substance P (SP) from these. The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution, origin, and colocalization of VIP- and SP- immunoreactive nerves in the tongue of the bullfrog, R. catesbeiana. In addition, the study also examined the colocalization of SP and phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2 ) in the tongue and jugular ganglion. VIP immunoreactivity was seen in unipolar cells that were sparse in nerve bundles in the submucosal and muscle layers. The density of VIP-immunoreactive cells was approximately 4.8 cells/mm(3) . Their fibers terminated in the vicinity of the epithelial basal layer of the fungiform papillae. SP immunoreactivity was not seen in the VIP-immunoreactive cells, but was observed in pseudounipolar cells in the jugular ganglion. The SP fibers terminated close to the free surface, showing spindle- and button-like profiles. Transection of glossopharyngeal nerve resulted in the persistence of VIP-immunoreactive cells and the disappearance of SP-immunoreactive fibers in the tongue. SP immunoreactivity was co-expressed with PLCβ2 in both the tongue and jugular ganglia. No PLCβ2 immunoreactivity was seen in cells comprising the epithelial taste disk. These findings indicate that the origin of VIP nerve fibers are unipolar cells in the tongue, and SP and PLCβ2 fibers originate from pseudounipolar cells that may be able to release SP primarily in the jugular ganglion. Anat Rec, 299:929-942, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Assessment of the anterior loop of mental nerve in an Iranian population using cone beam computed tomography scan

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    Mitra Karbasi Kheir

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Great care is required when placing implants in proximity to mental foramen to avoid anterior loop injury. Because of the variations of anterior loop length in each patient, a fixed distance anterior to the mental foramen is not safe, and the anterior loop length should be determined for each individual. The use of CBCT provides accurate measurements of the length of anterior loop.

  11. Origin and distribution of the sciatic nerve in pig fetuses (Sus scrofa domesticus – Linnaeus, 1758 from the lineage Pen Ar Lan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Antônio dos Santos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The origin and distribution of the sciatic nerve was studied in 31 pig fetuses from the lineage Pen Ar Lan, being 22 males and 9 females, after being fixed in a 10% formaldehyde aqueous solution. In these animals, the lumbar vertebrae ranged from 5 to 7, with a predominance of 6, something which contributed to variations in the origin of this nerve. The sciatic nerve originated in 80.64% of the antimeres from the ventral branch of the fifth lumbar spinal nerve (L5; in 96.77 % of L6; in 6.45% of L7; in 100% of S1; and in 64.51% of S2. The composition of this nerve took place in 45.16% of the animals due to the union of L5, L6, S1 and S2; in 32.25% of L5, L6 and S1; in 12.90% of L6, S1 and S2; in 6.45% of L6, L7 and S1; and in 3.22% L5, S1 and S2. There was symmetry in the origin of the sciatic nerve in all specimens under study. This nerve sent branches to the superficial gluteal, semitendinosus, semimembranosus and biceps femoris muscles in all specimens, and, in a lesser frequency, to the twins, quadratus femoris, adductors, as well as the middle, accessory, and deep gluteal muscles. In 74.19% of the sample, a branch communicating to the pudendal nerve was observed.

  12. Constant existence of the sensory branch of the nerve to the pyramidalis distributing to the upper margin of the pubic ramus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Daijiro; Emura, Kenji; Watanabe, Yuko; Kageyama, Ikuo; Kikkawa, Satoshi; Uemura, Mamoru; Arakawa, Takamitsu

    2018-01-18

    Twenty-one sides of 11 adult Japanese cadavers were investigated, and 2 of 21 sides exhibited absence of the pyramidalis. We observed that all of the nerves to the pyramidalis included the sensory nerve branch, which distributed to the aponeurotic tissue in the upper area of the pubic ramus. To investigate the clinical relevance and developmental process of the pyramidalis, detailed innervation patterns of the pyramidalis and the lumber plexus were examined and compared with the case of absent pyramidalis. The nerves to the pyramidalis could be classified into five types by the derivative nerves and two subtypes by their courses associated with the funiculus spermaticus. In the cases of absent pyramidalis, similar sensory branches distributed close to the upper area of the pubic ramus. We deduced that the sensory branch extended along with the muscular branch to the pyramidalis after development of the pyramidalis and that only the sensory branch remained in cases in which the pyramidalis disappeared. The two subtypes might associate with descensus testis. Surgeons performing inguinal hernia repair using a mesh and tension-free surgical technique should preserve the nerves around the funiculus spermaticus to avoid diminished proprioception in the lower abdominal wall.

  13. Effects of electronic emergency-department whiteboards on clinicians' time distribution and mental workload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    of their time in the work areas where other clinicians are present and whiteboard information is permanently displayed, and less in the patient rooms. Main reasons for these changes appear to be that the electronic whiteboard facilitates better timeouts and handovers. Physicians and nurses are, however......Whiteboards are a central tool at emergency departments. We investigate how the substitution of electronic for dry-erase whiteboards affects emergency department clinicians’ mental workload and distribution of their time. With the electronic whiteboard, physicians and nurses spend more......, in the patient rooms for longer periods at a time, suggesting a more focused patient contact. The physicians’ mental workload has increased during timeouts, whereas the nurses’ mental workload has decreased at the start of shifts when they form an overview of the emergency department. Finally, the secretaries...

  14. Intermediate filaments of zebrafish retinal and optic nerve astrocytes and M?ller glia: differential distribution of cytokeratin and GFAP

    OpenAIRE

    Koke, Joseph R; Mosier, Amanda L; Garc?a, Dana M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Optic nerve regeneration (ONR) following injury is a model for central nervous system regeneration. In zebrafish, ONR is rapid - neurites cross the lesion and enter the optic tectum within 7 days; in mammals regeneration does not take place unless astrocytic reactivity is suppressed. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is used as a marker for retinal and optic nerve astrocytes in both fish and mammals, even though it has long been known that astrocytes of optic nerves i...

  15. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  16. [Measurement of external pressure of peroneal nerve tract coming in contact with lithotomy leg holders using pressure distribution measurement system BIG-MAT®].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Ju; Namba, Chikara; Takahashi, Toru

    2014-10-01

    We investigated external pressure on peroneal nerve tract coming in contact with two kinds of leg holders using pressure distribution measurement system BIG- MAT® (Nitta Corp., Osaka) in the lithotomy position Peak contact (active) pressure at the left fibular head region coming in contact with knee-crutch-type leg holder M® (Takara Belmont Corp., Osaka), which supports the left popliteal fossa, was 78.0 ± 26.4 mmHg. On the other hand, peak contact pressure at the left lateral lower leg region coming in contact with boot-support-type leg holder Bel Flex® (Takara Belmont Corp., Osaka), which supports the left lower leg and foot was 26.3±7.9 mmHg. These results suggest that use of knee-crutch-type leg holder is more likely to induce common peroneal nerve palsy at the fibular head region, but use of boot-support-type leg holder dose not easily induce superficial peroneal nerve palsy at the lateral lower leg region, because capillary blood pressure is known to be 32 mmHg. Safer holders for positioning will be developed to prevent nerve palsy based on the analysis of chronological change in external pressure using BIG-MAT® system during anesthesia.

  17. Staff and bed distribution in public sector mental health services in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Sukeri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Eastern Cape Province of South Africa is a resource-limited province with a fragmented mental health service.  Objective. To determine the current context of public sector mental health services in terms of staff and bed distribution, and how this corresponds to the population distribution in the province. Method. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, an audit questionnaire was submitted to all public sector mental health facilities. Norms and indicators were calculated at provincial and district level. This article investigates staff and bed distribution only. Results. Results demonstrated that within the province, only three of its seven districts have acute beds above the national baseline norm requirement of 13/100 000. The private mental health sector provides approximately double the number of medium- to long-stay beds available in the public sector. Only two regions have staff/population ratios above the baseline norm of 20/100 000. However, there are significant differences in this ratio among specific staff categories. There is an inequitable distribution of resources between the eastern and western regions of the province. When compared with the western regions, the eastern regions have poorer access to mental health facilities, human resources and non-governmental organisations.  Conclusion. Owing to the inequitable distribution of resources, the provincial authorities urgently need to develop an equitable model of service delivery. The province has to address the absence of a reliable mental health information system.

  18. [Characteristics of Distribution of Blood Vessels and Nerve Fibers in the Skin Tissues of Acupoint "Taichong" (LR 3) in the Rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-Sheng; She, Chen; Wang, Jia; Cui, Jing-Jing; Cai, Hong; Bai, Wan-Zhu

    2016-12-25

    To investigate the microstructure (blood vessels and nerve fibers) of the skin tissue in "Taichong" (LR 3) region for reveling morphological characteristics of acupoint. Five SD rats were used in the present study. The skin tissue in the region of acupoint LR 3 was taken from the dorsum of hind foot following transcardial perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde. Then, the skin samples were sagittally or horizontally cut into sections (20 μm or 40 μm in the thickness) to be stained with Phalloidin and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) by using fluorescent histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. The labeled vascular structure and nerve fibers were observed and recorded using fluorescent microscope and laser scanning confocal microscope. In the skin tissue of LR 3, different types of blood vessels labeled by phalliodin, including capillaries and glomera mainly distributing in the superficial layer of the dermis, and thicker blood vessels and their sub-branches mainly existing in the deeper layer of the dermis and the subcutaneous layer, were found. In addition, CGRP positive nerve fibers were found to run parallel to the thin blood vessels or to gather around the thicker blood vessels. From the subcutaneous la-yer to the epidermis, blood vessels and nerve fibers coexisted and formed a stereo-network structure. In the skin of LR 3 area, there exists a stereo-network structure consisting of different types of blood vessels and nerve fibers. Although this structure is not specifically associated with acupoint area alone, this result may provide a new sight to further understand the microstructure of acupoint.

  19. The stability of the ecological distribution of the incidence of treated mental disorders in the city of Mannheim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyerer, S; Häfner, H

    1989-03-01

    In 1965, Häfner et al. (1969) conducted an ecological study of the incidence of treated mental disorders in the industrial city of Mannheim. They found large variations in incidence rates in 20 urban areas: excess morbidity in the socially disorganized areas located mainly in the city center, and low rates in areas on the outskirts. This study incorporates additional data from the Cumulative Psychiatric Case Register established in Mannheim in 1973. It focuses on the short- and long-term stability of the spatial distribution of mental disorders comparing the year 1965 with the period 1974-80, and analysing the individual years from 1974-80. Despite marked changes between 1965 and the seventies (the increase in the number of guest workers; the development of extensive building and urban renewal programs; the establishment of the Central Institute of Mental Health and several community psychiatric services after 1975), the ecological correlation remained relatively high (r = 0.79). Prior to the establishment of the Central Institute of Mental Health, the spatial distribution of mental disorders in the year 1974 was also very similar to that in 1965 (r = 0.73). In general, the study revealed a highly stable ecological distribution of treated mental disorders not only on a long-term basis, but also for the individual years from 1974 to 1980.

  20. Nerve conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS contains the brain and the spinal cord and the PNS consists of thousands of nerves that connect the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve ...

  1. Epicardial distribution of ST segment and T wave changes produced by stimulation of intrathoracic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, P; Cardinal, R; Nadeau, R A; Armour, J A

    1991-06-01

    Sixty-three ventricular epicardial electrograms were recorded simultaneously in 8 atropinized dogs during stimulation of acutely decentralized intrathoracic autonomic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves. Three variables were measured: (1) isochronal maps representing the epicardial activation sequence, (2) maps depicting changes in areas under the QRS complex and T wave (regional inhomogeneity of repolarization), and (3) local and total QT intervals. Neural stimulations did not alter the activation sequence but induced changes in the magnitude and polarity of the ST segments and T waves as well as in QRST areas. Stimulation of the same neural structure in different dogs induced electrical changes with different amplitudes and in different regions of the ventricles, except for the ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerve which usually affected the dorsal wall of the left ventricle. Greatest changes occurred when the right recurrent, left intermediate medial, left caudal pole, left ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerves and stellate ganglia were stimulated. Local QT durations either decreased or did not change, whereas total QT duration as measured using a root-mean-square signal did not change, indicating the regional nature of repolarization changes. Taken together, these data indicate that intrathoracic efferent sympathetic neurons can induce regional inhomogeneity of repolarization without prolonging the total QT interval.

  2. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  3. Finding the mental foramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laher, Abdullah Ebrahim; Wells, Mike; Motara, Feroza; Kramer, Efraim; Moolla, Muhammed; Mahomed, Zeyn

    2016-05-01

    The mental foramen and mental nerve are clinically important landmarks for clinicians across various disciplines including dentists, oral maxillofacial surgeons, emergency physicians and plastic and reconstructive surgeons. To minimize complications related to procedures in the vicinity of the mental foramen and nerve, knowledge of its anatomy and anatomical variations is cardinal to concerned clinicians. In this review, basic anatomy, procedural complications, hard and soft tissue relations, variations between population groups, asymmetry, accessory mental foramina and the use of various radiological modalities to determine the position of the mental foramen are reviewed to provide a more thorough understanding of this important landmark.

  4. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra; Carlos Alberto Duque Parra

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH). In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a co...

  5. Distribution of serotonergic and dopaminergic nerve fibers in the salivary gland complex of the cockroach Periplaneta americana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühnel Dana

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cockroach salivary gland consists of secretory acini with peripheral ion-transporting cells and central protein-producing cells, an extensive duct system, and a pair of reservoirs. Salivation is controled by serotonergic and dopaminergic innervation. Serotonin stimulates the secretion of a protein-rich saliva, dopamine causes the production of a saliva without proteins. These findings suggest a model in which serotonin acts on the central cells and possibly other cell types, and dopamine acts selectively on the ion-transporting cells. To examine this model, we have analyzed the spatial relationship of dopaminergic and serotonergic nerve fibers to the various cell types. Results The acinar tissue is entangled in a meshwork of serotonergic and dopaminergic varicose fibers. Dopaminergic fibers reside only at the surface of the acini next to the peripheral cells. Serotonergic fibers invade the acini and form a dense network between central cells. Salivary duct segments close to the acini are locally associated with dopaminergic and serotonergic fibers, whereas duct segments further downstream have only dopaminergic fibers on their surface and within the epithelium. In addition, the reservoirs have both a dopaminergic and a serotonergic innervation. Conclusion Our results suggest that dopamine is released on the acinar surface, close to peripheral cells, and along the entire duct system. Serotonin is probably released close to peripheral and central cells, and at initial segments of the duct system. Moreover, the presence of serotonergic and dopaminergic fiber terminals on the reservoir indicates that the functions of this structure are also regulated by dopamine and serotonin.

  6. Shared mental models of distributed human-robot teams for coordinated disaster responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neerincx, M.A.; Greef, T. de; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Sam, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Shared Mental Models (SSM) are crucial for adequate coordination of activities and resource deployment in disaster responses. Both human and robot are actors in the construction of such models. Based on a situated Cognitive Engineering (sCE) methodology, we identified the needs, functions and

  7. Nerve damage associated with inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrel, M A; Bryan, J; Regezi, J

    1995-08-01

    The authors reviewed 12 cases in which altered sensation occurred in the distribution of the inferior alveolar or lingual nerves following injection of a local anesthetic for restorative treatment only. Most patients suffered only partial damage, but recovery was poor. The exact mechanism of the nerve damage is unknown, but a number of theories are proposed. The extent of this problem is also unknown, but many more cases probably exist than have been reported to date.

  8. A preliminary study of the sensory distribution of the penile dorsal and ventral nerves: implications for effective penile block for circumcision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Long, Ronan M

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the sensory innervation of the penis, as regional anaesthesia is often used either for postoperative analgesia or as the sole anaesthetic technique for circumcision. Since first described in 1978 the dorsal penile nerve block has become the standard technique, but some blocks are ineffective; a better understanding of the sensory innervation of the penis might improve the efficacy of the dorsal penile block technique. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 13 men undergoing circumcision with local anaesthetic, cutaneous sensation was tested before and after infiltration of the dorsal aspect of the penis, and then again after infiltration of the ventral aspect. The area of anaesthesia was mapped using pin-prick sensation. RESULTS: Ten of the 13 patients showed a similar pattern of sensory distribution. After the dorsal block, the dorsal aspect of the shaft of the penis and glans penis became insensate. The ventral aspect of the shaft remained sensate up to and including the frenulum. After successful ventral infiltration all sensate areas became insensate and circumcision proceeded. In one case the frenulum and distal ventral foreskin was anaesthetized after the dorsal block and ventral infiltration was not required. No patient experienced pain during circumcision. CONCLUSION: For consistently successful regional anaesthesia of the foreskin in circumcision, a dorsal block must be used. This should be combined with ventral infiltration at the site of incision. This method will avoid inconsistencies and allow pain-free circumcision using local anaesthesia in most men.

  9. Factors that explain how policy makers distribute resources to mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Patrick W; Watson, Amy C

    2003-04-01

    Advocates hope to influence the resource allocation decisions of legislators and other policy makers to capture more resources for mental health programs. Findings from social psychological research suggest factors that, if pursued, may improve advocacy efforts. In particular, allocation decisions are affected by policy makers' perceptions of the scarcity of resources, effectiveness of specific programs, needs of people who have problems that are served by these programs, and extent of personal responsibility for these problems. These perceptions are further influenced by political ideology. Conservatives are motivated by a tendency to punish persons who are perceived as having personal responsibility for their problems by withholding resources, whereas liberals are likely to avoid tough allocation decisions. Moreover, these perceptions are affected by political accountability, that is, whether politicians perceive that their constituents will closely monitor their decisions. Just as the quality of clinical interventions improves when informed by basic research on human behavior, the efforts of mental health advocates will be advanced when they understand the psychological forces that affect policy makers' decisions about resources.

  10. Origem e distribuição do nervo isquiático no veado-catingueiro (Mazama gouazoubira Origin and distribution of the sciatic nerve in catingueiro-deer (Mazama gouazoubira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Martina M. Martins

    2013-02-01

    úteo superficial, gluteobíceps, bíceps da coxa, semitendinoso, semimembranoso, adutor e gastrocnêmio. Distalmente o nervo isquiático bifurca-se Em nervo tibial e fibular comum, os quais inervam a porção distal do membro pélvico.This study aimed to describe the origin and distribution of the sciatic nerve in catingueiro-deer (Mazama gouazoubira. Two animals of the species, obtained post mortem by trampling on the highway, were used for the study meeting the requirements of the Governing Law (1.153/95. By dissection the skin was completely removed and the animals were fixed in aqueous 10% formaldehyde solution. Through dorsolateral access, superficial gluteal muscle, biceps femoris muscle and gluteus medius muscle were cut at their insertion and folded, to view the origin and distribution of the sciatic nerve on both sides of the animals. Images were recorded with a digital camera (Sony a200 Camera, 10.2mpx and results were described based on Veterinary Anatomical Nomina. The source data of the sciatic nerve in both specimens showed that the nerve originates from the ventral branches of S1 and L6, and could have contribution from S2. After its emergence through the greater sciatic foramen on both the sides, the sciatic nerve supplies branches to gluteus medius muscle, gluteus deep muscle, superficial gluteal muscle, gluteobiceps muscle, biceps femoris muscle, semimembranosus muscle, semitendinosus muscle and gastrocnemius muscle. Near the mid-thigh the sciatic nerve divides into the tibial nerve and common peroneal nerve which innervate the muscles of the distal hind limb. Moreover, the cutaneous nerve flow can cause the common peroneal nerve or tibial nerve. In conclusion, in Mazama gouazoubira specimens studied, the sciatic nerve originated from the ventral branch of spinal L6 and S1, which may or may not have the contribution from S2. In its distribution stem originate the gluteal nerve, the caudal femoral cutaneous nerve and muscular branches, which together innervate the

  11. The Distribution of Thai Mental State Examination Scores among Non-Demented Elderly in Suburban Bangkok Metropolitan and Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangpaisan, Weerasak; Assantachai, Prasert; Sitthichai, Kobkul; Richardson, Kathryn; Brayne, Carol

    2015-09-01

    To obtain the distribution of Thai Mental State Examination (TMSE) scores in the Thai population across different age groups and educational levels in men and women aged 50 years and older and its relationship with demographic factors. The different cutpoints in literate and illiterate participants and item performance in both groups were also determined. Community-dwelling participants aged 50 years and over were invited to join the study. Personal information, general health history, and specific illness questionnaires including the activities of daily living, designed by the Survey in Europe on Nutrition and the Elderly, a ConcertedAction (SENECA), and the Thai Mental State Examination (TMSE) were completed in the face-to-face interview. There were 4,459 participants with no specific reported conditions that could potentially influence cognitive performance. The mean (SD) age was 64.2 (7.9) years and mostparticipants were women (71.7%). The median (interquartile range) of the TMSE was 27 (25-29) and 23 (19-26) in literate and illiterate participants, respectively. The distribution of TMSE scores were reported here determined by age, gender and educational level. Percentage of correct response in each TMSE item was low in recall and calculation performance. TMSE score declined with age in both genders and had greater variation with increasing age. TMSE score also increased with increasing levels of education and better financial status. Gender was not associated with the TMSE score adjusting for age, educational level, and economic status. Age, education, and economic status have an influence on the TMSE performance. Controllingfor these three factors, genders does not contribute to significant differences in TMSE performance. Norms adjustedfor these factors should be considered before employing single cutpoints to identify impairment.

  12. Chronic antipsychotic treatment selectively alters nerve growth factor and neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity and the distribution of choline acetyl transferase in rat brain regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelucci, F; Aloe, L; Gruber, SHM; Fiore, M; Mathe, AA

    Neuropeptides and neurotrophins play a number of roles in the central nervous system (CNS). Nerve growth factor NGF), the first characterized member of the family of neurotrophins, influences the synthesis of some neuropeptides, including neuropeptide Y (NPY), a peptide amply expressed in the CNS,

  13. DIC imaging for identification of motor and sensory nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayu Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Identification of motor and sensory nerves is important in applications such as nerve injury repair. Conventional practice relies on time consuming staining methods for this purpose. Here, we use laser scanning infrared differential interference contrast (IR-DIC microscopy for label-free observation of the two types of nerve. Ventral and dorsal nerve roots of adult beagle dogs were collected and sections of different thicknesses were imaged with an IR-DIC microscope. Different texture patterns of the IR-DIC images of the motor and sensory nerve can be distinguished when the section thickness increases to 40μm. This suggests that nerve fibers in motor and sensory nerves have different distribution patterns. The result hints a potential new way for more rapid identification of nerve type in peripheral nerve repair surgery.

  14. The catecholaminergic nerve plexus of Holothuroidea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A.; Mejías, Wigberto; Jiménez, Luis B.

    2010-01-01

    Catecholamines have been extensively reported to be present in most animal groups, including members of Echinodermata. In this study, we investigated the presence and distribution of catecholaminergic nerves in two members of the Holothuroidea, Holothuria glaberrima (Selenka, 1867) (Aspidochirotida, Holothuroidea) and Holothuria mexicana (Ludwig, 1875) (Aspidochirotida, Holothuroidea), by using induced fluorescence for catecholamines on tissue sections and immunohistochemistry with an antibody that recognizes tyrosine hydroxylase. The presence of a catecholaminergic nerve plexus similar in distribution and extension to those previously reported in other members of Echinodermata was observed. This plexus, composed of cells and fibers, is found in the ectoneural component of the echinoderm nervous system and is continuous with the circumoral nerve ring and the radial nerves, tentacular nerves, and esophageal plexus. In addition, fluorescent nerves in the tube feet are continuous with the catecholaminergic components of the radial nerve cords. This is the first comprehensive report on the presence and distribution of catecholamines in the nervous system of Holothuroidea. The continuity and distribution of the catecholaminergic plexus strengthen the notion that the catecholaminergic cells are interneurons, since these do not form part of the known sensory or motor circuits and the fluorescence is confined to organized nervous tissue. PMID:20827375

  15. Sciatic nerve ligation causes impairment of mitochondria associated with changes in distribution, respiration, and cardiolipin composition in related spinal cord neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilhoff, Gerburg; Becker, Axel; Kropf, Siegfried; Schild, Lorenz

    2016-10-01

    Sciatic nerve irritation is often associated with disturbed Ca(2+) homeostasis in related neurons of the spinal cord. Since mitochondria substantially contribute to Ca(2+) homeostasis and little information is available, we studied the effects of loose sciatic nerve ligation, a chronic constriction injury (CCI), on neuronal mitochondria of the L3-L6 regions. Three groups of rats (untreated, sham operated, and ligated) were explored. For the characterization of mitochondria, specimens of the L3-L6 spinal cord regions were evaluated with respect to intracellular localization using pyruvate dehydrogenase immunohistochemistry and Mitotracker Red, and the ATP producing machinery by LC-MS/MS technique for the analysis of cardiolipin and high-resolution respirometry for the measurement of oxygen consumption. Therefore, the phospholipid cardiolipin supports electron transfer within the respiratory chain as part of mitochondrial respiration and is of high impact on the physical properties of the mitochondrial membrane system. Histological analysis of spinal cord motor neurons revealed clustering of mitochondria in ipsilateral samples from ligated animals 14 days after the insult. This phenomenon was similarly evident in the respective contralateral side. The intensity of MT-Red staining was enhanced exclusively at the ipsilateral side, indicating increased mitochondrial activity. CCI of the sciatic nerve caused massive changes in the composition of cardiolipin reflecting mitochondrial impairment in the early phase followed by regeneration processes as late response. Sciatic nerve CCI caused decrease in the capacity of mitochondrial ATP production that recovered within 14 days after treatment. In conclusion, we provide evidence that clustering of mitochondria, already verified for the spinal cord sensory neurons after CCI, also occurs in the respective motor neurons. Further we have demonstrated transient impairment of the capacity of mitochondrial ATP production in tissue

  16. A rare bifurcation pattern of the sciatic nerve | Huq | Anatomy Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variations in branching patterns of the sciatic nerve are thought to be clinically significant because of the nerve's extensive distribution area. Here we report a rare and unusual branching pattern of the sciatic nerve which was observed in a male cadaver. Sciatic nerve underwent a high division inside the pelvic cavity, and ...

  17. A STUDY OF TUMOURS OF THE CRANIAL NERVE AND PARASPINAL NERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Shetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION One of the frequent sites of tumour formation is the cranial nerves and paraspinal nerves. The cranial nerves perform a plethora of functions and so the signs and symptoms caused may be different. They are mainly classified into four different types. The aim of the study is: 1. To study the tumours arising from the cranial nerves in an epidemiological point of view. 2. To study the tumours histopathologically. 3. To classify the tumours according to WHO classification. Thirty-eight brain tumor cases were studied in the Department of Medicine, A. J. Shetty Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore. Cranial nerve tumours accounts for 4(10% among the intracranial tumours. Schwannomas makes up 3(7.39% among the Intracranial tumours. and constituted 3(75% among cranial nerve tumours. All the 3 schwannomas were located in CP angle. The geographic distribution of cases was found to be 28 cases from Mangalore and 10 cases from Kerala.

  18. Origem e distribuição dos nervos isquiáticos em caprinos da raça Saanen Origin and distribution of the ischiatic nerves in goats of the Saanen breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Maurício Mendes de Lima

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Estudaram-se a origem e distribuição dos nervos isquiáticos, de ambos os antímeros, em 30 caprinos (Capra hircus da raça Saanen, sendo 16 machos e 14 fêmeas. Estes animais foram coletados após morte natural e submetidos à fixação em solução aquosa, a 10%, de formaldeído. Os nervos isquiáticos originaram-se 28 vezes (93,3% do ramo ventral do sexto nervo espinhal lombar e dos ramos ventrais do primeiro e segundo nervos espinhais sacrais; além disso, esses nervos tabém receberam duas vezes (6,7%, contribuição do ramo ventral do terceiro nervo espinhal sacral. Os nervos isquiáticos cederam, em todos os animais, ramos para os músculos glúteos médios, glúteos profundos, gluteobíceps, gêmeos, semitendíneos e semimembranáceos. Sobretudo, notaram-se arranjos peculiares desses ramos musculares para cada espécime. Através da aplicação da prova de Wilcoxon, com nível de significância de 0,05, não se observaram diferenças significativas entre as freqüências de ramos musculares dos nervos isquiáticos, que foram cedidos para os antímeros direito e esquerdo, e ainda em relação ao sexo dos caprinos da presente investigação.The origin and distribution of the ischiatic nerves at both sides were studied in 30 goats (Capra hircus of the Saanen breed, being 16 males and 14 females. These specimens were collected after natural death of the animals and submitted to fixation in a 10% formaldehyde solution. The ischiatic nerves arose from the ventral branch of the sixth lumbar and the first and second sacral spinal nerves in 28 cases (93.3%. In addition, these nerves also received contributions from the ventral branch of the third sacral spinal nerve in two cases (6.7% at both sides. In all animals, the right and left ischiatic nerves gave off branches to the muscles gluteus medius, gluteus profundus, gluteobiceps, gemelli, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus muscles. In particular, peculiar arrangements of these muscular

  19. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  20. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  1. Anatomical Position of Mental foramen: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Aher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental foramen is a key factor in many of the surgical as well as clinical procedures in routine clinical practice. The variations of mental foramen with respect to position, size and number dose significantly alter the clinical implications of various intraoral treatments. The accurate knowledge of the mental nerve and its position helps the clinician for delivering local anesthesia effectively also placement of implants and dentures intraorally to replace missing teeth is important in prosthetic point of view. While doing the surgical procedures in this region the position of mental nerve and its foramen is of importance to avoid intraoperative neurovascular damage and to avoid postoperative neurosensory disturbances. The ethnic and racial variations are seen in the position of mental foramen, although a gender variation in same population has not been seen. Thus the knowledge of the position of mental nerve is important for day to day clinical practice of dentistry.

  2. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  3. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  4. Learn About Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Promotion . Fact sheet no. 220. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization. Chronic Illness & Mental Health . Bethesda, MD: National Institutes ... of-onset distributions of mental disorders in the World Health Organization’s World Mental Health Survey Initiative. World Psychiatry. 2007; ...

  5. The number and distribution of AMPA receptor channels containing fast kinetic GluA3 and GluA4 subunits at auditory nerve synapses depend on the target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, María E; Matsui, Ko; Fukazawa, Yugo; Kamasawa, Naomi; Harada, Harumi; Itakura, Makoto; Molnár, Elek; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Shigemoto, Ryuichi

    2017-11-01

    The neurotransmitter receptor subtype, number, density, and distribution relative to the location of transmitter release sites are key determinants of signal transmission. AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPARs) containing GluA3 and GluA4 subunits are prominently expressed in subsets of neurons capable of firing action potentials at high frequencies, such as auditory relay neurons. The auditory nerve (AN) forms glutamatergic synapses on two types of relay neurons, bushy cells (BCs) and fusiform cells (FCs) of the cochlear nucleus. AN-BC and AN-FC synapses have distinct kinetics; thus, we investigated whether the number, density, and localization of GluA3 and GluA4 subunits in these synapses are differentially organized using quantitative freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling. We identify a positive correlation between the number of AMPARs and the size of AN-BC and AN-FC synapses. Both types of AN synapses have similar numbers of AMPARs; however, the AN-BC have a higher density of AMPARs than AN-FC synapses, because the AN-BC synapses are smaller. A higher number and density of GluA3 subunits are observed at AN-BC synapses, whereas a higher number and density of GluA4 subunits are observed at AN-FC synapses. The intrasynaptic distribution of immunogold labeling revealed that AMPAR subunits, particularly GluA3, are concentrated at the center of the AN-BC synapses. The central distribution of AMPARs is absent in GluA3-knockout mice, and gold particles are evenly distributed along the postsynaptic density. GluA4 gold labeling was homogenously distributed along both synapse types. Thus, GluA3 and GluA4 subunits are distributed at AN synapses in a target-cell-dependent manner.

  6. Terminal Branch of Recurrent Human Laryngeal Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Aparecida Ferreira Pascoal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in surgery on the anterior region of the neck has motivated many published papers on critical points of its pathway, relationship with the inferior thyroid artery, penetration in the larynx, division outside the larynx, and branches communicating with the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. We analyze the terminal branches of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and their distribution through the laryngeal muscles. 44 laryngeal nerves had been dissected. Most frequently, the recurrent laryngeal nerve presents a division below or at the level of the lower margin of the cricoid cartilage (outside the larynx. One of these branches forms the communication with the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve, and the other penetrates the laryngeal space. Above the lower margin of the cricoid cartilage, the inferior laryngeal nerve issues a variable number of branches to muscles (3 to 7: to the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle; to the oblique and transversal arytenoid muscles; and to the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle and the thyroarytenoid muscle.

  7. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    project was to develop an alternative to autologous nerve grafts used in repair of peripheral nerve injuries in war and civilian life. Based on our...gradient compositions tested in Aim 1 in preparation to studies in the large animal model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . As it was not...this specific aim was to test the efficacy of optimized nanofiber nerve guide in a canine model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . Peripheral nerve

  8. Fragile X founder effect and distribution of CGG repeats among the mentally retarded population of Andalusia, South Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda de Diego

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. We investigated the prevalence of the Fragile X syndrome in the population with mental retardation of unknown etiology in Andalusia, South Spain. We analyzed 322 unrelated patients (280 males and 42 females, and found a fragile X syndrome frequency of 6.5%. Among the non-fragile X chromosomes, the 29 CGG repeat was the most common allele. At the linked microsatellite DXS548 locus, we found a new allele which we called "allele 10" (17 CA. Similar to other south European populations, allele 2 (25 CA at the DXS548 locus and the fragile X allele were in linkage disequilibrium supporting the idea of a common founder chromosome predisposing to the CGG expansion.

  9. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  10. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels that bring oxygen to your nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending messages, or may send messages slowly or at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. Symptoms may include Numbness in your ...

  11. Unilateral Absence of Mental Foramen with Surgical Exploration in a Living Human Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulu, Murat; Tarim Ertas, Elif; Gunhan, Fatih; Yircali Atici, Meral; Akcay, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    The mental foramen (MF) is an important anatomic landmark of the mandible, in which the somatic afferent sensory nerve of the mandibular nerve emerges as mental nerve and blood vessels. The identification and actual location of MF are important in order to avoid sensory dysfunction or paresthesia due to mental nerve injury. In the literature there are some rare reports on the anatomical variations of the MF such as its location or presence of accessory foramina. The present report describes the absence of mental foramina on the left side of the mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before impacted tooth removal and observed directly during surgery.

  12. Unilateral Absence of Mental Foramen with Surgical Exploration in a Living Human Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Ulu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mental foramen (MF is an important anatomic landmark of the mandible, in which the somatic afferent sensory nerve of the mandibular nerve emerges as mental nerve and blood vessels. The identification and actual location of MF are important in order to avoid sensory dysfunction or paresthesia due to mental nerve injury. In the literature there are some rare reports on the anatomical variations of the MF such as its location or presence of accessory foramina. The present report describes the absence of mental foramina on the left side of the mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before impacted tooth removal and observed directly during surgery.

  13. Position of the mental foramen in adult black Zimbabwean mandibles: a clinical anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbajiorgu, E F; Mawera, G; Asala, S A; Zivanovic, S

    1998-02-01

    To provide some anatomical information on the shape, size, and position of the mental foramen among Black Zimbabweans that could be used as reference material by dental and other health practitioners during clinical practice in Zimbabwe. Cross sectional anatomical study. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Zimbabwe, Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe. 32 mandibles derived from adult Black Zimbabweans. The shape of the mental foramen, its relation to the lower teeth and its position in relation to the mandibular symphysis, the posterior border of the ramus of the mandible, the lower border of the mandible, and the alveolar margin. The shape of the mental foramen was round in 14 out of 32 mandibles (43.8%) and was oval in the remaining 18 (56.3%). The percentage of occurrence of the mental foramen was highest below the lower second premolar tooth on the right side (position 4) and posterior to it on the left side (position 5). In the vertical plane, the mental foramen lay slightly below the midpoint of the distance between the lower border of the mandible and the alveolar margin (44.1% and 45.5% for the right and left sides respectively). In the horizontal plane, it lay approximately one quarter (27.3% for the right and 27.4% for the left sides) of the distance from the mandibular symphysis to the posterior border of the ramus of the mandible. The percentage distribution of the mental foremen in relation to the lower teeth in the adult Black Zimbabwean mandible was at variance with that of other population groups. However, the quantitative position of the mental foremen was bilaterally symmetrical in the adult Black Zimbabwean mandible. The latter observation is of clinical significance to dental and other health practitioners in Zimbabwe with regards to the achievement of effective mental nerve block anaesthesia and the prevention of damage to the mental nerve during surgical procedures on the lower jaw.

  14. The human thoracic duct is functionally innervated by adrenergic nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telinius, Niklas; Baandrup, Ulrik; Rumessen, Jüri Johs.

    2013-01-01

    and immunohistochemistry suggested scarce diffuse distribution of nerves in the entire vessel wall, but nerve-mediated contractions could be induced with EFS and were sensitive to the muscarinic receptor blocker atropine and the α-adrenoceptor blocker phentolamine. The combination of phentolamine and atropine resulted...

  15. Bilateral sciatic nerve injury is a possible iatrogenic complication of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Injection-induced sciatic nerve palsy is a major iatrogenic problem which results in disability among children under 6-years-old in the developing countries. It manifests as paresis in the muscles supplied by sciatic nerve distribution associated with a burning pain in the affected extremity. Its sequela is a deformity that limits ...

  16. MR neurography of sciatic nerve injection injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Mirko; Wessig, Carsten; Brinkhoff, Jörg; Reiners, Karlheinz; Stoll, Guido; Bendszus, Martin

    2011-06-01

    We report on magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) as a supplementary diagnostic tool in sciatic nerve injection injury. The object of the study was to test if T2-weighted (w) contrast within the sciatic nerve serves as an objective criterion for sciatic injection injury. Three patients presented with acute sensory and/or motor complaints in the distribution of the sciatic nerve after dorsogluteal injection and underwent MRN covering gluteal, thigh and knee levels. Native and contrast-enhanced T1-w images were employed to identify the tibial and peroneal division of the sciatic nerve while T2-w images with fat suppression allowed visualization of the site and extent of the nerve lesion. MRN in the two patients with clinically severe sensory and motor impairment correctly depicted sciatic injury: continuity of the T2-w lesion within the nerve at the lesion site and distal to it corresponded well to severe injury confirmed by NCS/EMG as axonotmetic or neurotmetic. Topography of the T2-w lesion on cross-section corresponded to predominant peroneal involvement; moreover, associated denervation patterns of distal target muscles were revealed. One of these patients completely recovered with concomitant complete regression of MRN abnormalities on follow-up. The third patient experienced transient sensory and mild motor impairment with complete recovery after 2 weeks. In this patient, T2-w signal within the nerve and distal target muscles remained normal indicating only mild, non-axonal nerve affliction. Our case series shows that MRN can be very useful in precisely determining the site of sciatic injection injury and may provide diagnostic criteria for the assessment of lesion severity and recovery.

  17. Retrospective analysis of oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors in Brazilians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Tito Salla

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic neuroma, neurofibroma, neurilemmoma, palisaded encapsulated neuroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST are peripheral nerve sheath tumors and present neural origin. The goal of this study was to describe the epidemiological data of oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors in a sample of the Brazilian population. Biopsies requested from the Oral Pathology Service, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais (MG, Brazil, between 1966 and 2006 were evaluated. Lesions diagnosed as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were submitted to morphologic and to immunohistochemical analyses. All cases were immunopositive to the S-100 protein. Thirty-five oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors were found, representing 0.16% of all lesions archived in the Oral Pathology Service. Traumatic neuroma (15 cases most frequently affected the mental foramen. Solitary neurofibroma (10 cases was more frequently observed in the palate. Neurofibroma associated with neurofibromatosis type I (2 cases was observed in the gingival and alveolar mucosa. Neurilemmoma (4 cases was more commonly observed in the buccal mucosa. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (3 cases occurred in the mandible, palate, and tongue. Palisaded encapsulated neuroma (1 case occurred in the buccal mucosa. The data confirmed that oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors are uncommon in the oral region, with some lesions presenting a predilection for a specific gender or site. This study may be useful in clinical dentistry and oral pathology practice and may be used as baseline data regarding oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors in other populations.

  18. STUDY OF ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS AND INCIDENCE OF MENTAL FORAMEN AND ACCESSORY MENTAL FORAMEN IN DRY HUMAN MANDIBLES

    OpenAIRE

    Sumit Gupta; Jagdish S. Soni

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To provide anatomical information on the position, morphological variations and incidence of mental foramen and accessory mental foramen as they are important for dental surgeons, anaesthetists in nerve block and surgical procedures to avoid injury to neurovascular bundle in mental foramen area. Method: The present study was conducted using 120 dried human mandibles of both sexes. Size, shape and position of mental foramen and accessory mental foramen were determined using digital...

  19. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the back). Viewing the Cranial Nerves Twelve pairs of cranial nerves emerge from the underside of the brain, ... eye movement. Eye movement is controlled by 3 pairs of muscles. These muscles move the eye up and down, right and ... nerve 4th cranial nerve 6th ...

  20. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    rodents as a function of time after surgery. As predicted, those animals in the negative control group (no repair following nerve deficit injury ...80% of penetrating injuries being associated with peripheral nerve damage, typically involve large segmental nerve deficits. Standard repair uses...technology for repair of peripheral nerve injuries involving significant neural deficit with improved functional outcomes for the wounded warrior. The

  1. Radial to axillary nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaclocha, Vicente; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Rivera-Paz, Marlon; Martínez-Gómez, Deborah; Vanaclocha, Leyre

    2018-01-01

    Axillary nerve injury is common after brachial plexus injuries, particularly with shoulder luxation. Nerve grafting is the traditional procedure for postganglionic injuries. Nerve transfer is emerging as a viable option particularly in late referrals. At the proximal arm the radial and axillary nerves lie close by. Sacrificing one of the triceps muscle nerve branches induces little negative consequences. Transferring the long head of the triceps nerve branch is a good option to recover axillary nerve function. The surgical technique is presented in a video, stressing the steps to achieve a successful result. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/WbVbpMuPxIE .

  2. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  3. Optic Nerve Drusen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve. Ocular ultrasound, CT scan and/or fundus photography can also aid in the diagnosis. Drusen can ... Medical Disclaimer Search Site ▶ AAPOS Headquarters 655 Beach Street San Francisco, CA 94109-1336 Phone: (415) 561- ...

  4. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you do certain activities such as public speaking, singing or exercising, or when you're eating if ... of life. Research is still mixed on the benefits of vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of ...

  5. Laryngeal nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms include: Difficulty speaking Difficulty swallowing Hoarseness Injury to the left and right laryngeal nerves at the same time can cause a breathing problem. This can be an urgent medical problem.

  6. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  7. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  8. Effect of Nerve Growth Factor on Innervation of Perivascular Nerves in Neovasculatures of Mouse Cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Akiko; Takatori, Shingo; Sone, Yoko; Ochi, Eiko; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis, which is the generation of new vascular networks from existing blood vessels, occurs under normal and pathophysiological conditions. Perivascular nerves, which innervate mature vasculatures, maintain vascular tone and regulate tissue blood flow. However, little is known whether perivascular nerves innervate newborn blood vessels. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the distribution and characterization of perivascular nerves in neovasculatures, which were generated by the mouse corneal micropocket method. Under anesthesia, a pellet containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) (100 ng/pellet) was implanted into a mouse cornea in one side of the eyeball. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was locally (2 or 20 ng) applied with the pellet, or subcutaneously (40 ng/h for 7 d) administered with an osmotic mini-pump. After the implantation, vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and perivascular nerves in the cornea were immunohistochemically studied. Neovessels generated from existing limbal vessels were observed in pellet-implanted cornea. Immunostaining of neovasculatures showed the presence of CD31-like immunoreactive (LI) endothelial cells and α-smooth muscle actin-LI vascular smooth muscles. Perivascular nerves immunostained by protein gene product (PGP) 9.5, an axonal marker, were found in the existing limbal vessels, but they were not observed in neovasculatures. Local and subcutaneous treatment of NGF inhibits bFGF-derived angiogenesis and resulted in loop-shaped vessels that had many anastomoses, and produced innervation of PGP 9.5-LI perivascular nerves around bFGF-derived neovessels. These findings suggest that neovasculatures have no innervation of perivascular nerves, and that NGF facilitates innervations of perivascular nerves to regulate the blood flow in neovessels.

  9. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vianney eRozand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 minutes each: i high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task, ii moderate mental exertion (congruent Stroop task, iii low mental exertion (watching a movie. In each condition, mental exertion was combined with ten intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensor muscles (one maximal voluntary contraction every 3 minutes. Neuromuscular function was assessed using electrical nerve stimulation. Maximal voluntary torque, maximal muscle activation and other neuromuscular parameters were similar across mental exertion conditions and did not change over time. These findings suggest that mental exertion does not affect neuromuscular function during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors.

  10. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  11. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are a rare group ofcongenital anatomical anomalies. Various types of anomaliesof the lumbosacral nerve roots have been documentedin the available international literature. Ttheseanomalies may consist of a bifid, conjoined structure, ofa transverse course or of a characteristic anastomizedappearance. Firstly described as an incidental findingduring autopsies or surgical procedures performed forlumbar disk herniations and often asymptomatic, lumbosacralnerve root anomalies have been more frequentlydescribed in the last years due to the advances made inradiological diagnosis.

  12. Histological characterization of lip and tentacle nerves in Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H; Ito, I; Kojima, S; Fujito, Y; Suzuki, H; Ito, E

    1999-02-01

    The lip and tentacle nerves of the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, were characterized using histological techniques. Anatomical drawings showed the detailed distributions of the superior lip, median lip, and tentacle nerves in the lip and tentacle; in particular it was found that the mouth is mainly innervated by the superior lip nerve. The tentacle nerve was clarified to form a zigzag structure along the extension direction in a shrinking tentacle. By backfilling of the superior lip nerve and/or the median lip nerve with fluorescent dyes, the neurons in the CNS made some clusters, whereas those stained from the tentacle nerve made other clusters. These stained neurons were not part of the central pattern generator or its regulatory neurons for feeding. The present results, therefore, suggest that the superior lip nerve may be employed as a principal factor in the chemosensory transduction from the mouth, and that no direct inputs occur through the lip and tentacle nerves to the central pattern generator or its regulatory neurons for feeding.

  13. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  14. Long-nerve grafts and nerve transfers demonstrate comparable outcomes for axillary nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Johnsen, Parker H; Lee, Steve K; Feinberg, Joseph H

    2014-07-01

    To compare the functional and EMG outcomes of long-nerve grafts to nerve transfers for complete axillary nerve palsy. Over a 10-year period at a single institution, 14 patients with axillary nerve palsy were treated with long-nerve grafts and 24 patients were treated with triceps-to-axillary nerve transfers by the same surgeon (S.W.W.). Data were collected prospectively at regular intervals, beginning before surgery and continuing up to 11 years after surgery. Prior to intervention, all patients demonstrated EMG evidence of complete denervation of the deltoid. Deltoid recovery (Medical Research Council [MRC] grade), shoulder abduction (°), improvement in shoulder abduction (°), and EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation were compared between cohorts. There were no significant differences between the long-nerve graft cohort and the nerve transfer cohort with respect to postoperative range of motion, deltoid recovery, improvement in shoulder abduction, or EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation. These data demonstrate that outcomes of long-nerve grafts for axillary nerve palsy are comparable with those of modern nerve transfers and question a widely held belief that long-nerve grafts do poorly. When healthy donor roots or trunks are available, long-nerve grafts should not be overlooked as an effective intervention for the treatment of axillary nerve injuries in adults with brachial plexus injuries. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  16. Cranial nerve injury after minor head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Alejandro Fernández; Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Gonzalez, Juan Martino; Martín, Juan José Acebes

    2010-09-01

    There are no specific studies about cranial nerve (CN) injury following mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) in the literature. The aim of this analysis was to document the incidence of CN injury after mild head trauma and to correlate the initial CT findings with the final outcome 1 year after injury. The authors studied 49 consecutive patients affected by minor head trauma and CN lesions between January 2000 and January 2006. Detailed clinical and neurological examinations as well as CT studies using brain and bone windows were performed in all patients. Based on the CT findings the authors distinguished 3 types of traumatic injury: no lesion, skull base fracture, and other CT abnormalities. Patients were followed up for 1 year after head injury. The authors distinguished 3 grades of clinical recovery from CN palsy: no recovery, partial recovery, and complete recovery. Posttraumatic single nerve palsy was observed in 38 patients (77.6%), and multiple nerve injuries were observed in 11 (22.4%). Cranial nerves were affected in 62 cases. The most affected CN was the olfactory nerve (CN I), followed by the facial nerve (CN VII) and the oculomotor nerves (CNs III, IV, and VI). When more than 1 CN was involved, the most frequent association was between CNs VII and VIII. One year after head trauma, a CN deficit was present in 26 (81.2%) of the 32 cases with a skull base fracture, 12 (60%) of 20 cases with other CT abnormalities, and 3 (30%) of 10 cases without CT abnormalities. Trivial head trauma that causes a minor head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) can result in CN palsies with a similar distribution to moderate or severe head injuries. The CNs associated with the highest incidence of palsy in this study were the olfactory, facial, and oculomotor nerves. The trigeminal and lower CNs were rarely damaged. Oculomotor nerve injury can have a good prognosis, with a greater chance of recovery if no lesion is demonstrated on the initial CT scan.

  17. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of depression: a study protocol for a double blinded randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Pei-Jing

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive disorders are the most common form of mental disorders in community and health care settings. Unfortunately, the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is far from satisfactory. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS is a relatively new and promising physical treatment for depressive disorders. One particularly appealing element of VNS is the long-term benefit in mood regulation. However, because this intervention involves surgery, perioperative risks, and potentially significant side effects, this treatment has been limited to those patients with treatment-resistant depression who have failed medication trials and exhausted established somatic treatments for major depression, due to intolerance or lack of response. This double-blinded randomized clinical trial aims to overcome these limitations by introducing a novel method of stimulating superficial branches of the vagus nerve on the ear to treat MDD. The rationale is that direct stimulation of the afferent nerve fibers on the ear area with afferent vagus nerve distribution should produce a similar effect as classic VNS in reducing depressive symptoms without the burden of surgical intervention. Design One hundred twenty cases (60 males of volunteer patients with mild and moderate depression will be randomly divided into transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation group (tVNS and sham tVNS group. The treatment period lasts 4 months and all clinical and physiological measurements are acquired at the beginning and the end of the treatment period. Discussion This study has the potential to significantly extend the application of VNS treatment for MDD and other disorders (including epilepsy, bipolar disorder, and morbid obesity, resulting in direct benefit to the patients suffering from these highly prevalent disorders. In addition, the results of this double-blinded clinical trial will shed new light on our understanding of acupuncture point specificity, and development of

  18. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grouped according to where they leave the spinal column. There are eight pairs of neck (cervical) nerves, 12 pairs of upper back (thoracic) nerves, five pairs of lower back (lumbar) nerves, five pairs of pelvis (sacral) nerves and ...

  20. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  1. Modeling Mental Speed: Decomposing Response Time Distributions in Elementary Cognitive Tasks and Correlations with Working Memory Capacity and Fluid Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Schmitz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown an inverse relation between response times in elementary cognitive tasks and intelligence, but findings are inconsistent as to which is the most informative score. We conducted a study (N = 200 using a battery of elementary cognitive tasks, working memory capacity (WMC paradigms, and a test of fluid intelligence (gf. Frequently used candidate scores and model parameters derived from the response time (RT distribution were tested. Results confirmed a clear correlation of mean RT with WMC and to a lesser degree with gf. Highly comparable correlations were obtained for alternative location measures with or without extreme value treatment. Moderate correlations were found as well for scores of RT variability, but they were not as strong as for mean RT. Additionally, there was a trend towards higher correlations for slow RT bands, as compared to faster RT bands. Clearer evidence was obtained in an ex-Gaussian decomposition of the response times: the exponential component was selectively related to WMC and gf in easy tasks, while mean response time was additionally predictive in the most complex tasks. The diffusion model parsimoniously accounted for these effects in terms of individual differences in drift rate. Finally, correlations of model parameters as trait-like dispositions were investigated across different tasks, by correlating parameters of the diffusion and the ex-Gaussian model with conventional RT and accuracy scores.

  2. Sensory action potentials of the maxillary nerve: a methodologic study with clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Torben; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Svensson, Peter

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently, recording of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) was described and is used as a diagnostic test of traumatic neuropathic trigeminal disorders. The technique is limited to IAN damage; therefore, we adapted the technique to the maxillary...... nerve, which is also frequently injured by either trauma or orthognathic surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fourteen healthy volunteers participated in this methodologic study in which the infraorbital nerve (ION) was stimulated with 2 needle electrodes. The SNAPs were recorded from the maxillary nerve...... difference. Repeated tests within a session test demonstrated no significant differences in the latency data (ANOVA: P= .225) or amplitude data (ANOVA: P= .44). Stimulus-response curves indicated that the SNAPs saturated at 5.1+/-4.4 mA stimulus intensity. In 1 subject, stimulation of the mental nerve...

  3. Nerve Transfer versus Interpositional Nerve Graft Reconstruction for Posttraumatic, Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, John C; Agrawal, Nikhil A; Seruya, Mitchel

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes between nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures in the setting of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries. A systematic review was performed using the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases to identify all cases of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries in patients aged 18 years or older. Patients who underwent axillary nerve reconstruction were included and categorized by technique: graft or transfer. Demographics were recorded, including age, time to operation, and presence of concomitant injuries. Functional outcomes were evaluated, including British Medical Research Council strength and range of motion for shoulder abduction. Ten retrospective studies met criteria, for a total of 66 patients (20 nerve grafts and 46 nerve transfers). Median time from injury to operation was equivalent across the nerve graft and nerve transfer groups (8.0 months versus 7.0 months; p = 0.41). Postoperative follow-up was 24.0 months for nerve grafting versus 18.5 months for nerve transfer (p = 0.13). Clinically useful shoulder abduction, defined as British Medical Research Council grade M3 or greater, was obtained in 100 percent of nerve graft patients versus 87 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.09). Grade M4 or better strength was obtained in 85 percent of nerve graft patients and 73.9 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.32). Significant differences in functional outcomes between nerve graft and transfer procedures for posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries are not apparent at this time. Prospective outcomes studies are needed to better elucidate whether functional differences do exist. Therapeutic, IV.

  4. Double mental foramina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taruska Ventorini Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the location, trajectory, and characteristics of the neurovascular bundles in the jaws is fundamental to reduce risk of injuries to this structure during surgical procedures, especially when anatomical variations are present. The presence of anatomical variations associated with the mental foramen has been reported in some cases and is frequently undervalued in clinical procedures. Sensorial disturbances, such as paresthesia in the lower lip or cheeks, may occur as result of pressure on the mental foramen. These anatomical variations can be detected in clinical practice by imaging exams. Computed tomography has been established as a valuable imaging modality capable of providing in-depth information about maxillofacial structures, allowing detailed evaluation of their topography and anatomical variations, such as additional mental foramina. The objective of this article was to describe a case with double mental foramina that only could be observed in computed tomography images. The use of cone beam computed tomography has increased in dentistry, thus anatomical variations that may have an influence on the diagnosis and treatment planning must be recognized. Have a good knowledge of additional mental foramina may contribute to adequate anesthetic techniques and to avoid misdiagnosis of bone lesions and eventual damages to the nerves and vessel during surgical procedures in that region.

  5. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  6. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  7. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  8. Anatomical aspects of the nerves of the leg and foot of the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Cruz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although distal stifle joint nerve distribution has been well established in domestic animals, this approach is scarcely reported in wild animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe the nerves of the leg and foot of Myrmecophaga tridactyla with emphasis on their ramification, distribution, topography and territory of innervation. For this purpose, six adult cadavers fixed and preserved in 10% formalin solution were used. The nerves of the leg and foot of the M. tridactyla were the saphenous nerve (femoral nerve branch, fibular and tibial nerves and lateral sural cutaneous nerve (branches of the sciatic nerve and caudal sural cutaneous nerve (tibial nerve branch. The saphenous nerve branches to the skin, the craniomedial surface of the leg, the medial surface of the tarsal and metatarsal regions and the dorsomedial surface of the digits I and II (100% of cases, III (50% of cases and IV (25% of cases. The lateral sural cutaneous nerve innervates the skin of the craniolateral region of the knee and leg. The fibular nerve innervates the flexor and extensor muscles of the tarsal region of the digits and skin of the craniolateral surface of the leg and dorsolateral surface of the foot. The tibial nerve innervates the extensor muscles of the tarsal joint and flexor, adductor and abductor muscles of the digits and the skin of the plantar surface. The caudal sural cutaneous nerve innervates the skin of the caudal surface of the leg. The nerves responsible for the leg and foot innervation were the same as reported in domestic and wild animals, but with some differences, such as the more distal division of the common fibular nerve, the absence of dorsal metatarsal branches of the deep fibular nerve and a greater involvement of the saphenous nerve in the digital innervation with branches to the digits III and IV, in addition to digits I and II.

  9. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve....... Studies of different metabolic neuropathies have assessed the influence of uremia, diabetes and ischemia, and the use of these methods in toxic neuropathies has allowed pinpointing damaging factors. Various mutations in ion channels associated with central nervous system disorders have been shown to have...

  10. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  11. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta block...

  12. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, Peerooz; Rootman, Jack; Nugent, Robert A.; White, Valerie A.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Koornneef, Leo

    2003-01-01

    To study the natural history and growth of optic nerve sheath meningiomas and evaluate their management outcome. Clinicopathologic retrospective noncomparative case series. A retrospective study of 88 patients who were treated between 1976 and 1999 at the University of British Columbia and the

  13. Prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM IV mental disorders and their severity among school going Omani adolescents and youths: WMH-CIDI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morsi Magdi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a dearth of studies exploring the magnitude of mental disorders amongst adolescents and youths in the Arab world. To our knowledge, this phase 2 survey in Oman is the first nationally representative school-based study to determine the prevalence of DSM-IV mental disorders (lifetime and over the preceding 12 months, their age-of-onset distributions and determine their severity over the past 12 months using the World Mental Health-Composite International Diagnostic Interview, the WMH-CIDI, used for international comparison. Methods A total of 1,682 (91.61% students out of 1836 students who formed the phase 2 random sub-sample of a multi-stage, stratified, random sampling design (phase 1, participated in the face-to-face structured interview using the Arabic-version of WMH-CIDI 3.0. Results The phase 1 results using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and Child Depression Inventory (CDI showed depressive symptoms to be 17% prevalent in the larger sample of 5409 adolescents and youths. Amongst the phase 2 respondents from this sample, 13.9% had at least one DSM IV diagnostic label. The lifetime prevalence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD was 3.0%; Bipolar Mood Disorder (BMD was 1%, Specific phobia 5.8% and Social phobia 1.6%. The female gender was a strong predictor of a lifetime risk of MDD (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.7-6.3, p = 0.000; Any Mood Disorders (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.3, p = 0.002 and Specific Phobia (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.4, p = 0.047. The severity of illness for cases diagnosed with 12 month DSM IV disorders was found to be 80% lower in females (OR 0.2, 95%CI 0.0-0.8. The estimates over the previous 12 month period when compared with the lifetime prevalence showed a 25% to 40% lower prevalence for MDD, Specific phobia, Social phobia, Any Anxiety Disorders (AAD and Any Mood disorders (AMD while the rate was 80% lower for Separation Anxiety Disorder/Adult Separation Anxiety (SAD/ASA. Mood disorders were significantly

  14. Nerve injuries sustained during warfare: part I--Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, R; Misra, P; Stewart, M P M; Eardley, W G P; Ramasamy, A; Brown, K; Shenoy, R; Anand, P; Clasper, J; Dunn, R; Etherington, J

    2012-04-01

    We describe 261 peripheral nerve injuries sustained in war by 100 consecutive service men and women injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. Their mean age was 26.5 years (18.1 to 42.6), the median interval between injury and first review was 4.2 months (mean 8.4 months (0.36 to 48.49)) and median follow-up was 28.4 months (mean 20.5 months (1.3 to 64.2)). The nerve lesions were predominantly focal prolonged conduction block/neurapraxia in 116 (45%), axonotmesis in 92 (35%) and neurotmesis in 53 (20%) and were evenly distributed between the upper and the lower limbs. Explosions accounted for 164 (63%): 213 (82%) nerve injuries were associated with open wounds. Two or more main nerves were injured in 70 patients. The ulnar, common peroneal and tibial nerves were most commonly injured. In 69 patients there was a vascular injury, fracture, or both at the level of the nerve lesion. Major tissue loss was present in 50 patients: amputation of at least one limb was needed in 18. A total of 36 patients continued in severe neuropathic pain. This paper outlines the methods used in the assessment of these injuries and provides information about the depth and distribution of the nerve lesions, their associated injuries and neuropathic pain syndromes.

  15. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  16. Retardo mental Mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio M. Vasconcelos

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Esta revisão aborda as recentes descobertas da neurobiologia do retardo mental, enfatizando os novos recursos da citogenética, das técnicas moleculares e da neurorradiologia para esclarecer o diagnóstico. FONTES DE DADOS: O autor pesquisou o banco de dados MEDLINE da National Library of Medicine utilizando as palavras-chave "mental retardation", "developmental disability", "child" e "adolescent" em diferentes combinações, abrangendo o período de janeiro de 2000 a outubro de 2003. Também foram utilizados os bancos de dados das revistas científicas Pediatrics e New England Journal of Medicine através da palavra-chave "mental retardation". No total, o autor consultou cerca de 1.500 títulos de artigos e 500 resumos, e teve acesso direto a 150 artigos completos pertinentes. Quando oportuno, algumas referências dos artigos consultados também foram consideradas. O site Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man foi utilizado como fonte de informações em genética clínica. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Em outubro de 2003, o total de síndromes genéticas associadas a retardo mental chegou a 1.149. Considerando-se o conjunto das causas genéticas ou ambientais e congênitas ou adquiridas de retardo mental, a avaliação diagnóstica atual é capaz de esclarecer a etiologia em 50 a 70% dos casos. CONCLUSÕES: O autor sugere uma avaliação diagnóstica do retardo mental em etapas lógicas, visando ao uso racional dos dispendiosos recursos da citogenética, biologia molecular e neuroimagem.OBJECTIVE: This paper describes recent advances in the neurobiology of mental retardation, emphasizing new diagnostic resources provided by cytogenetics, molecular testing, and neuroimaging. SOURCES OF DATA: MEDLINE (January 2000 through October 2003, using the following key words: mental retardation, developmental disability, child, and adolescent. Search of the Pediatrics and New England Journal of Medicine websites using the key word mental retardation. The

  17. [Research progress on three-dimensional reconstruction and visualization of peripheral nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Gaohong; Pei, Guoxian

    2009-02-01

    To review the research progress on the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and visualization of peripheral nerve. Literature about the research on the 3D reconstruction and visualization of peripheral nerve both at home and abroad were extensively reviewed and thoroughly analyzed. The application of 3D reconstruction and visualization technology was capable of not only reappearing the 3D outer contour and spatial adjacent relationship of peripheral nerve veritable but also displaying, rotating, zooming, dividing and real-time measuring their 3D internal structure and the delicate pathways in any direction either separately or totally. Preliminary achievements were achieved in terms of brachial plexus, lumbosacral plexus, the functional cluster of nerve trunk, intramuscular nerve distribution pattern, peripheral nerve regeneration and the 3D reconstruction and visualization research of complex tissue including peripheral nerve. However, the research on the visualization of peripheral nerve was still in the initial stage since such problems as recognition, segmentation, registration and fusion of the peripheral nerve information were not resolved yet. Researching 3D reconstruction and visualization of the peripheral nerve is of great value for updating the diagnosis and treatment principle of peripheral nerve injury, improving its diagnosis and treatment method and launching a new way for the studying and teaching, which may be a new growing point for the peripheral nerve surgery.

  18. Macrophage and nerve interaction in endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinjie; Xie, Hongyu; Yao, Shuzhong; Liang, Yanchun

    2017-03-14

    Dysregulation of the immune system in endometriotic milieus has been considered to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Macrophage recruitment and nerve fiber infiltration are the two major characteristics of this aberrant immune environment. First, the recruitment of macrophages and their polarization phenotype within the endometriotic lesion have been demonstrated to facilitate the development and maintenance of endometriosis. M1 phenotype of macrophages has the capacity to secrete multiple cytokines for inflammatory response, while M2 macrophage possesses an opposite property that can mediate the process of immunosuppression and neuroangiogenesis. Upon secretion of multiple abnormal signal molecules by the endometriotic lesion, macrophages could alter their location and phenotype. These changes facilitate the accommodation of the aberrant microenvironment and the exacerbation of disease progression. Second, the infiltration of nerve fibers and their abnormal distribution are proved to be involved in the generation of endometriosis-associated pain and inflammatory response. An imbalance in sensory and sympathetic innervation and the abnormal secretion of different cytokines could mediate neurogenesis and subsequent peripheral neuroinflammation in endometriosis. Although endometriosis creates an inflammatory milieu promoting macrophage infiltration and an imbalanced innervation, interaction between macrophages and nerve fibers in this process remains unknown. The aim of this review is to highlight the role of macrophage and nerve interaction in endometriosis, where macrophage recruitment and neurogenesis can be the underlying mechanism of neuroinflammation and pathogenesis of endometriosis.

  19. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  20. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mental foramen and lingual vascular canals of mandible on MDCT images: anatomical study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direk, Filiz; Uysal, Ismihan Ilknur; Kivrak, Ali Sami; Fazliogullari, Zeliha; Unver Dogan, Nadire; Karabulut, Ahmet Kagan

    2018-03-01

    The mental foramen and lingual vascular canals are related to vessels and nerves in the mandibular body. The aim of the present study was to determine the number and location of these structures and to make measurements of them. The archived Multidetector Computed Tomography images of 100 adult (15- to 70-year-old) patients were evaluated retrospectively. The diameters of the mental foramens and their distances from the front, back, upper and lower reference points were measured. The distribution of mental foramens with respect to the teeth was also researched. The presence of lingual vascular canals, and the number of median and lateral canals was determined, and the length of the median lingual vascular canals measured. All measurement parameters were analyzed by gender, side and age group. Eleven patients demonstrated a total of 15 accessory mental foramen. Median lingual vascular canals were observed in 100% of cases, with lateral lingual vascular canals determined in 32%. Significant differences were observed in the results of different gender groups (P mental foramen was determined mostly in males, and unilaterally on the right side; also, the distances of mental foramen, except the distance from the back border of the mandible (P mental foramen, as well as the presence, position and size of lingual vascular canals can be clearly investigated by multidetector computed tomography. A preoperative knowledge of the positions of neurovascular and bone structures is very important for preventing complications that may occur during or after operations.

  2. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  3. Comportamento dos nervos glossofaríngeo e vago, na região retrofaríngea de ovinos: origem aparente no crânio, trajeto, ramificação e distribuição Behavior of the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves in the retropharyngeal region of sheep: apparent origin in cranium, course, branching and distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Maria M.D. Farias

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Em 60 hemicabeças de ovinos da raça Santa Inês foram estudadas a origem aparente no crânio, trajeto, ramificação e distribuição do nervo glossofaríngeo (Gf e do nervo vago (Vg, na região retrofaríngea (Rr. Mediante fixação e dissecação das peças, foi observado que os nervos glossofaríngeos e vagos originam-se no forame jugular em 100% dos casos. Os nervos glossofaríngeos direito e esquerdo (Gfde são localizados, com maior freqüência (86,6%, medialmente à bula timpânica, passam caudalmente ao osso estiloióide, contornam a margem caudal do músculo estilofaríngeo caudal, tonsilar, da mucosa faríngea e lingual. Estes ramos distribuemse, respectivamente, no seio carotídeo, musculatura faríngea, palato mole, músculo estilofaríngeo caudal, tonsila palatina, mucosa faríngea e terço caudal da língua (100%. Os nervos vagos direito e esquerdo (Vgde correm caudalmente em associação com os nervos acessórios (Ac até o atlas (70%, após o que passam medialmente à artéria occipital, dorsalmente à carótida comum e ao tronco simpático, na região cervical (80%. Os ramos dos nervos vagos são os faríngeos (86,66% e os laríngeos craniais (100%.In 60 hemiheads of sheep of the Santa Ines breed the apparent origin in the skull of itinerary, ramification and distribution of the glossopharingeal nerve (Gf and the vagus nerve (Vg in the retropharyngeal region (Rr were studied. By fixation and dissection of the specimens it was seen that the glossopharyngeal nerve and the vagus nerve arise from the jugular foramen in 100% of the cases. The right and the left glossopharingeal nerve (Glde are frequently (86.6% located more medially to the tympanic bulla, pass caudally to the stylohyoid bone, bypass the margin of the caudal stylopharyngeal muscle, the tonsilla, of the pharyngeal and the lingual mucous membrane. These branches are distributed, respectively, in the carotid sinus, pharyngeal musculature, soft palate, stylopharyngeal

  4. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  5. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  6. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V

    2016-12-14

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  7. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sullivan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  8. Dietary correlates associated with the mental foramen in primates: implications for interpreting the fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchlinski, Magdalena N; Deane, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    The mandibular nerve is a sensory and motor nerve that innervates the muscles of mastication, the lower dentition, and the lower lip and surrounding structures. Although this nerve contains both efferent and afferent fibers, the mental nerve, a terminal branch of the mandibular nerve, is a strictly sensory nerve that exits the mental foramen and innervates the lower lip, the skin overlaying the mandible, and the oral mucosa around the mandible. Osteological foramina are often used as proxies for nerve cross section area and they often correlate well with some aspect of a primate's ecology (e.g., optic foramen and visual acuity). The primary objective of this study is to explore the correlation between the mental foramen and dietary preference among primates. The mental foramen of 40 primate species (n = 180) was measured from 3-D surface models of the mandible. Both conventional and phylogenetic tests indicate that although frugivores have larger mental foramina than folivores, the differences were not significant. These results show that while structures like the infraorbital foramen correlate well with diet and touch sensitivity, the mental foramen does not. Based on these findings, the mental foramen is not a suggested morphological character for interpreting of the fossil record. J. Morphol. 277:978-985, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nerve cross-bridging to enhance nerve regeneration in a rat model of delayed nerve repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    Full Text Available There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1 CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2 CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE, respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays.

  10. Common peroneal nerve entrapment with the communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sciatic nerve divides into tibial nerve and common peroneal nerve at the level of superior angle of popliteal fossa and variations in its branching pattern are common. The most common nerve entrapment syndrome in the lower limbs is common peroneal nerve entrapment at fibular head. Invariably it can also be trapped in ...

  11. Aplasia of the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Daniel C W; Man, Eric M W; Cheng, Sunny C S

    2015-08-01

    Aplasia of the optic nerve is an extraordinarily rare congenital anomaly that affects one or both optic nerves and is associated with the absence of the central retinal vessel and retinal ganglion cells. We report a case of unilateral optic nerve aplasia in a 4-month-old infant who was found to have left microphthalmos on routine postnatal checkup. Family history, antenatal history, and systemic evaluation were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging showed absent left optic nerve with left microphthalmos. The optic chiasm was present and slightly deviated towards the right side. The remaining cerebral and ocular structures were normal.

  12. [Study of optic nerve head-fovea angle with retinophotography in congenital fourth nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, F; Péchereau, A

    2009-04-01

    Measurement of ocular torsion is an important element for analysis of certain oculomotor pathologies such as fourth nerve palsy. With nonmydriatic retinography, objective measurements of ocular torsion are now accessible in daily practice: the normal values in healthy subjects are known. We compared a population of subjects with fourth nerve palsy to a reference population. Prospective study of 38 cases of congenital fourth nerve palsy, who had never undergone surgery. Each of these subjects had nonmydriatic retinography done according to a standardized protocol. The ocular torsion was measured using graphic software with consideration of reproducible anatomical marks. A statistical study determined the thresholds of significance. In this pathological population, the angle between the optic nerve head and fovea is organized in a Gaussian distribution but the values are different from those found with the same method in a population of healthy subjects (6.3 degrees +/-3.4) (t test, pExtorsion exists in paralytic eyes (mean, 10.7 degrees +/-3.8), as in the other eye (mean, 8.8 degrees +/-5.7). In addition, the study of the anatomical marks of the fundus (optic nerve head and the lower pole of the papilla) was shown to be reliable. This study confirms ocular torsion's variation in fourth nerve palsy. Extortion was found in both eyes. We demonstrated no relation between the severity of the extortion and the lateralization of the fixating eye. We confirmed the results of previous studies. This study confirms the relevance of the objective measures of the ocular torsion in a pathological situation. Simple anatomical marks of eye fundus provide a useful analysis of these clinical presentations.

  13. Morphology of nerve endings in vocal fold of human newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves da Silva Leite, Janaina; Costa Cavalcante, Maria Luzete; Fechine-Jamacaru, Francisco Vagnaldo; de Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria; Leite, José Alberto Dias; Nascimento Coelho, Dulce Maria; Rabelo de Freitas, Marcos

    2016-10-01

    Sensory receptors are distributed throughout the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. Laryngeal sensitivity is crucial for maintaining safe swallowing, thus avoiding silent aspiration. Morphologic description of different receptor types present in larynx vary because of the study of many different species, from mouse to humans. The most commonly sensory structures described in laryngeal mucosa are free nerve endings, taste buds, muscle spindles, glomerular and corpuscular receptors. This study aimed at describing the morphology and the distribution of nerve endings in premature newborn glottic region. Transversal serial frozen sections of the whole vocal folds of three newborns were analyzed using an immuno-histochemical process with a pan-neuronal marker anti-protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5). Imaging was done using a confocal laser microscope. Nerve fiber density in vocal cord was calculated using panoramic images in software Morphometric Analysis System v1.0. Some sensory structures, i.e. glomerular endings and intraepithelial free nerve endings were found in the vocal cord mucosa. Muscle spindles, complex nerve endings (Meissner-like, spherical, rectangular and growing) spiral-wharves nerve structures were identified in larynx intrinsic muscles. Nervous total mean density in vocal cord was similar in the three newborns, although they had different gestational age. The mean nerve fiber density was higher in the posterior region than anterior region of vocal cord. The present results demonstrate the occurrence of different morphotypes of sensory corpuscles and nerve endings premature newborn glottic region and provide information on their sensory systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play ...

  15. Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

  16. An unusual ulnar nerve-median nerve communicating branch.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogbergen, M M; Kauer, J M

    1992-01-01

    Branching of the ulnar nerve distal to the origin of the dorsal cutaneous branch was investigated in 25 hands in one of which an anatomical variation was observed. This finding may be of importance in the evaluation of certain entrapment phenomena of the ulnar nerve or unexplained sensory loss after trauma or surgical intervention in that particular area.

  17. Transient femoral nerve palsy following ilioinguinal nerve block for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Background: Elective inguinal hernia repair in young fit patients is preferably done under ilioinguinal nerve block anesthesia in the ambulatory setting to improve ... Conclusion: TFNP is a rare complication of ilioinguinal nerve block which delays patient discharge postambulatory hernioplasty.

  18. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  19. Nerve Transfers for Treatment of Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Margie; Clark, Tod A; Giuffre, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    The most common neurological defect in traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocation is isolated axillary nerve palsy. Most recover spontaneously; however, some have persistent axillary neuropathy. An intact rotator cuff may compensate for an isolated axillary nerve injury; however, given the high rate of rotator cuff pathology with advancing age, patients with an axillary nerve injury are at risk for complete shoulder disability. To review reconstruction of the axillary nerve to alleviate shoulder pain, augment shoulder stability, abduction and external rotation to alleviate sole reliance on the rotator cuff to move and stabilize the shoulder. A retrospective review of 10 patients with an isolated axillary nerve injury and an intact rotator cuff who underwent a triceps nerve branch to axillary nerve transfer was performed. Patient demographics, surgical technique, deltoid strength, donor-site morbidity, complications and time to surgery were evaluated. Ten male patients, mean age 38.3 years (range 18 to 66 years), underwent a triceps to axillary nerve transfer for isolated axillary nerve injury 7.4 months (range five to 12 months) post-traumatic shoulder dislocation. Deltoid function was British Medical Research Council grade 0/5 in all patients preoperatively and ≥3/5 deltoid strength in eight patients at final follow-up (14.8 months [range 12 to 25 months]). There were no complications and no donor-site morbidity. A triceps to axillary nerve transfer for isolated axillary neuropathy following traumatic shoulder dislocation improved shoulder pain, stability and deltoid strength, and potentially preserves shoulder function with advancing age by alleviating sole reliance on the rotator cuff for shoulder abduction and external rotation.

  20. Increasing nerve agent treatment efficacy by P-glycoprotein inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosen, Marloes J A; Vester, Stefanie M; Hamelink, Jouk; Klaassen, Steven D; van den Berg, Roland M

    2016-11-25

    One of the shortcomings of current treatment of nerve agent poisoning is that not all drugs effectively penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB), whereas most nerve agents easily do. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) efflux transporters at the BBB may contribute to this aspect. It was previously shown that Pgp inhibition by tariquidar enhanced the efficacy of nerve agent treatment when administered as a pretreatment. In the present study soman-induced seizures were also substantially prevented when the animals were intravenously treated with tariquidar post-poisoning, in addition to HI-6 and atropine. In these animals, approximately twice as much AChE activity was present in their brain as compared to control rats. The finding that tariquidar did not affect distribution of soman to the brain indicates that the potentiating effects were a result of interactions of Pgp inhibition with drug distribution. In line with this, atropine appeared to be a substrate for Pgp in in vitro studies in a MDR1/MDCK cell model. This indicates that tariquidar might induce brain region specific effects on atropine distribution, which could contribute to the therapeutic efficacy increase found. Furthermore, the therapeutic enhancement by tariquidar was compared to that of the less specific and less potent Pgp inhibitor cyclosporine A. This compound appeared to induce a protective effect similar to tariquidar. In conclusion, treatment with a Pgp inhibitor resulted in enhanced therapeutic efficacy of HI-6 and atropine in a soman-induced seizure model in the rat. The mechanism underlying these effects should be further investigated. To that end, the potentiating effect of nerve agent treatment should be addressed against a broader range of nerve agents, for oximes and atropine separately, and for those at lower doses. In particular when efficacy against more nerve agents is shown, a Pgp inhibitor such as tariquidar might be a valid addition to nerve agent antidotes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland

  1. The Surgical Management of Facial Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rovak, Jason M.; Tung, Thomas H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    The surgical management of facial nerve injuries is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve anatomy, nerve physiology, and microsurgical techniques. When possible, primary neurorrhaphy is the “gold standard” repair technique. Injuries resulting in long nerve gaps or a significant delay between the time of injury and repair requires alterative techniques, such as nerve grafts, nerve transfers, regional muscle transfers, free tissue transfers, and static procedures. Scrupulous t...

  2. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  3. Mapa Mental

    OpenAIRE

    do Couto, Hildo Honório

    2017-01-01

    O objetivo principal deste artigo é mostrar que no interior do ecossistema mental da língua, e do nosso ecossistema cognitivo geral, existe uma parte que se pode chamar de mapa mental, intimamente associado ao mapa cognitivo. Após caracterizar o conceito de mapa mental e de associá-lo a conceitos assemelhados, comento o mapa mental que eu tinha de Brasília, por ter vivido lá por mais de 30 anos. Como me mudei para Goiânia, comecei a perder partes do mapa mental de Brasília. Por outro lado, es...

  4. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography; Diagnostische Nervensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumer, T. [Universitaet zu Luebeck CBBM, Haus 66, Institut fuer Neurogenetik, Luebeck (Germany); Grimm, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Schelle, T. [Staedtisches Klinikum Dessau, Neurologische Klinik, Dessau (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Diagnostik von Nervenlaesionen ist ein bildgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung des peripheren Nervs und seiner ihn umgebenden Strukturen fuer eine aetiologische Einordnung erforderlich. Mit der klinisch-neurologischen Untersuchung und Elektrophysiologie ist eine funktionelle Aussage ueber die Nervenlaesion moeglich. In der Standard-MRT-Untersuchung wird der periphere Nerv nur unzureichend gut dargestellt. Die MRT-Neurographie ist ein sehr gutes, aber auch zeit- und ressourcenintensives Verfahren. Nutzung des Ultraschalls fuer die

  5. Accessory mental foramen: a rare anatomical finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Gagan; Thomas, Shaji; Thayil, Sumeeth Cyriac; Nair, Preeti P

    2011-01-01

    Accessory mental foramen (AMF) is a rare anatomical variation with a prevalence ranging from 1.4 to 10%. Even so, in order to avoid neurovascular complications, particular attention should be paid to the possible occurrence of one or more AMF during surgical procedures involving the mandible. Careful surgical dissection should be performed in the region so that the presence of AMF can be detected and the occurrence of a neurosensory disturbance or haemorrhage can be avoided. Although this anatomical variation is rare, it should be kept in mind that an AMF may exist. Trigeminal neuralgia was diagnosed. On the basis of diagnostic test results, peripheral neurectomy of mental nerve was planned. Failure to do neurectomy of mental nerve branch in the reported case, coming out from AMF, would have resulted in recurrence of pain and eventually failure of the procedure. PMID:22707601

  6. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekçi, Hakan; Kaptan, Hülagu

    2017-06-15

    The vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an approach mainly used in cases of intractable epilepsy despite all the efforts. Also, its benefits have been shown in severe cases of depression resistant to typical treatment. The aim of this study was to present current knowledge of vagus nerve stimulation. A new value has emerged just at this stage: VNS aiming the ideal treatment with new hopes. It is based on the placement of a programmable generator on the chest wall. Electric signals from the generator are transmitted to the left vagus nerve through the connection cable. Control on the cerebral bioelectrical activity can be achieved by way of these signal sent from there in an effort for controlling the epileptic discharges. The rate of satisfactory and permanent treatment in epilepsy with monotherapy is around 50%. This rate will increase by one-quarters (25%) with polytherapy. However, there is a patient group roughly constituting one-thirds of this population, and this group remains unresponsive or refractory to all the therapies and combined regimes. The more the number of drugs used, the more chaos and side effects are observed. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) used will have side effects on both the brain and the systemic organs. Cerebral resection surgery can be required in some patients. The most commonly encountered epilepsy type is the partial one, and the possibility of benefiting from invasive procedures is limited in most patients of this type. Selective amygdala-hippocampus surgery is a rising value in complex partial seizures. Therefore, as epilepsy surgery can be performed in very limited numbers and rather developed centres, success can also be achieved in limited numbers of patients. The common ground for all the surgical procedures is the target of preservation of memory, learning, speaking, temper and executive functions as well as obtaining a good control on seizures. However, the action mechanism of VNS is still not exactly known. On the other hand

  7. Age-related ultrastructural and monoamine oxidase changes in the rat optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurone, S; Ripandelli, G; Minni, A; Lattanzi, R; Miglietta, S; Pepe, N; Fumagalli, L; Micera, A; Pastore, F S; Artico, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the morphology and the distribution of the monoamine oxidase enzymatic system in the optic nerve of 4 month-old Wistar (young) and 28 month-old Wistar (old) rats. The optic nerve was harvested from 20 young and old rats. The segment of optic nerve was divided longitudinally into two pieces, each 0.1 mm in length. The first piece was used for transmission electron microscopy. The second piece was stained with histochemical reaction for monoamine oxidase. The agerelated changes in the optic nerve of rats include micro-anatomical details, ultrastructure and monoamine oxidase histochemical staining. A strong decrease of the thin nerve fibers and a swelling of the thick ones can be observed in optic nerve fibers of old rats. Increased monoamine oxidase histochemical staining of the optic nerve of aged rats is well demonstrated. The increase of meningeal shealth and the decrease of thin nerve fibers of the optic nerve in old rats are well documented. Morphological, ultrastructural and histochemical changes observed in optic nerve fibers of the old rats show a close relation with aging.

  8. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C; Druschky, K F; Sturm, U; Neundörfer, B; Fahlbusch, R

    1988-09-02

    Nineteen patients with isolated suprascapular entrapment neuropathy were seen between 1980 and 1986. A neurogenic cause and absence of other deficits were confirmed by electromyography. Electroneurographic tests were performed in 13 and demonstrated delayed conduction time and (or) reduction in stimulus response amplitude. In 16 patients there was an acute or chronic mechanical cause (direct pressure on the suprascapular nerve, forced dislocation of the shoulder blade). Two types of paralysis could be distinguished, an upper one affecting both the infra- and the supraspinatus muscles (12 patients), and a lower one involving only the infraspinatus muscle (4 patients). In two patients an inflammatory cause was considered likely, while in one the cause remained unclear. Restricting movement brought about an improvement in most patients, while in one the neurophysiological parameters improved after neurosurgical intervention, without complete clinical restoration.

  9. Investigation of assumptions underlying current safety guidelines on EM-induced nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Esra; Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Iacono, Maria Ida; Angelone, Leonardo M.; Kainz, Wolfgang; Kuster, Niels

    2016-06-01

    An intricate network of a variety of nerves is embedded within the complex anatomy of the human body. Although nerves are shielded from unwanted excitation, they can still be stimulated by external electromagnetic sources that induce strongly non-uniform field distributions. Current exposure safety standards designed to limit unwanted nerve stimulation are based on a series of explicit and implicit assumptions and simplifications. This paper demonstrates the applicability of functionalized anatomical phantoms with integrated coupled electromagnetic and neuronal dynamics solvers for investigating the impact of magnetic resonance exposure on nerve excitation within the full complexity of the human anatomy. The impact of neuronal dynamics models, temperature and local hot-spots, nerve trajectory and potential smoothing, anatomical inhomogeneity, and pulse duration on nerve stimulation was evaluated. As a result, multiple assumptions underlying current safety standards are questioned. It is demonstrated that coupled EM-neuronal dynamics modeling involving realistic anatomies is valuable to establish conservative safety criteria.

  10. Functional assessment of sciatic nerve reconstruction : Biodegradable poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides versus autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Dijkstra, [No Value; Den Dunnen, WFA; Ijkema-Paassen, J; Schakenraad, JM; Gramsbergen, A; Robinson, PH

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT), or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve recovery using walking track analysis (measurement of the

  11. [Development of peripheral nerve surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sames, M

    1998-03-01

    In the submitted review the author deals with the development of peripheral nerve surgery (PN) from ancient times to the present time incl. hithero unpublished details. He analyses in great detail the period of the last 40 years which is divided into three stages--the mechanical, biological period and the period of neurotrophism. From the Second World War to the sixties the period bears the term mechanical. The results of reinnervation during this period were not satisfactory as the nerves were connected without the use of a microscope, in major defects they were connected under considerable traction and the only criterion was the resistance against dehiscence. Significant improvement of results of regeneration of PN was recorded during the biological period. Mechanical ideas were overcome and biological and physiological reactions of the peripheral nerves were taken into account. Suture of nerves under traction was refuted and into clinical practice the surgical microscope, microsurgical technique and microsurgical autotransplantation with a nervous graft were introduced. The anatomical structure of the nerve with a plexiform pattern of the fascicles became however the limitation of surgical methods. After discovery of NGF (nerve growth factor) we can speak of the onset of a new period, neurotrophism. In laboratory experiments many substances are studied and theoretically new non-surgical possibilities how to promote regeneration lie ahead. However they cannot be applied yet in clinical practice. In injuries of peripheral nerves the only correct reconstruction method is still microsuture of the nerve and in case of losses microsurgical autotransplantation using a nerve graft.

  12. Nerve injury following shoulder dislocation: the emergency physician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Victor; Crane, Steve

    2006-08-01

    We describe the case of a 57-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with a right anterior shoulder dislocation following a fall onto the right shoulder and right upper arm. She also complained of numbness in the right forearm and dorsum of the right hand. The examination revealed a bruise to the upper aspect of the right arm resulting from the impact following the fall. The patient also had a right wrist drop and loss of sensation in the lateral border of the right forearm and on the dorsum of the right hand, suggesting a radial nerve injury. She also had altered sensation in the ulnar distribution of her right hand, suspicious of concomitant ulnar nerve injury. No loss of sensation in the distribution of the axillary nerve (regimental patch) was observed. These findings were carefully documented and the patient subsequently had the shoulder reduced under entonox and morphine. The neurological deficits remained unchanged. The patient was sent home from the emergency room with arrangements for orthopaedic and physiotherapy follow-up. After a 3-month period, she had clinical and electromyography evidence of persistent radial and ulnar nerve deficit. She continues to have physiotherapy. This case highlights the need for awareness of the potential for nerve damage following shoulder dislocation and also to ensure that appropriate follow-up plan is instituted on discharge from the emergency department.

  13. Outcome of axillary nerve injuries treated with nerve grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, M; Al-Shawi, A; Gschwind, C R; Warwick, D J; Tonkin, M A

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates the outcome of axillary nerve injuries treated with nerve grafting. Thirty-six patients were retrospectively reviewed after a mean of 53 months (minimum 12 months). The mean interval from injury to surgery was 6.5 months. Recovery of deltoid function was assessed by the power of both abduction and retropulsion, the deltoid bulk and extension lag. The deltoid bulk was almost symmetrical in nine of 34 cases, good in 22 and wasted in three. Grade M4 or M5* was achieved in 30 of 35 for abduction and in 32 of 35 for retropulsion. There was an extension lag in four patients. Deltoid bulk continued to improve with a longer follow-up following surgery. Nerve grafting to the axillary nerve is a reliable method of regaining deltoid function when the lesion is distal to its origin from the posterior cord.

  14. Central Mandibular Nerve Sheath Myxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Ghazi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nerve sheath myxoma has been described as a rare neural tumor arising from Schwann cells. It is observed most frequently in the central area of the face, neck and upper extremities. In the past the term neurothekeoma was used as synonym for nerve sheath myxoma but according to new reports, they are separate entities which can be confirmed by immunohistochemistry as in our case. Oral involvement of this tumor is extremely rare. Here, we present an unusual case of nerve sheath myxoma in the mandible of a 22-year old female patient. This case appears to be the first myxomatous variant which is centrally located in the mandible.

  15. Median nerve fascicular anatomy as a basis for distal neural prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planitzer, Uwe; Steinke, Hanno; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Bechmann, Ingo; Hammer, Niels; Winkler, Dirk

    2014-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) serves as a possible therapy to restore missing motor functions of peripheral nerves by means of cuff electrodes. FES is established for improving lower limb function. Transferring this method to the upper extremity is complex, due to a lack of anatomical data on the physiological configuration of nerve fascicles. Our study's aim was to provide an anatomical basis for FES of the median nerve in the distal forearm and hand. We investigated 21 distal median nerves from 12 body donors. The peripheral fascicles were traced back by removing the external and interfascicular epineurium and then assigned to 4 quadrants. A distinct motor and sensory distribution was observed. The fascicles innervating the thenar eminence and the first lumbrical muscle originated from the nerves' radial parts in 82%. The fascicle supplying the second lumbrical muscle originated from the ulnar side in 78%. No macroscopically visible plexus formation was observed for the distal median nerve in the forearm. The findings on the distribution of the motor branches of the median nerve and the missing plexus formation may likely serve as an anatomical basis for FES of the distal forearm. However, due to the considerable variability of the motor branches, cuff electrodes will need to be adapted individually in FES. Taking into account the sensory distribution of the median nerve, FES may also possibly be applied in the treatment of regional pain syndromes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Nerve Transfers for Treatment of Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Wheelock, Margie; Clark, Tod A; Giuffre, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Almost one-half of all dislocations involve the shoulder and may also involve the axillary nerves, which may influence functional recovery and result in persistent shoulder neuropathy. Although individuals with intact rotator cuffs may be able to compensate for axillary nerve dysfunction, the injury may become problematic in later years, especially given the increasing incidence of rotator cuff tears in aging populations, thus placing increased importance on the immediate success of acute man...

  17. Peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation: influence of tissue non-homogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papazov Sava P

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerves are situated in a highly non-homogeneous environment, including muscles, bones, blood vessels, etc. Time-varying magnetic field stimulation of the median and ulnar nerves in the carpal region is studied, with special consideration of the influence of non-homogeneities. Methods A detailed three-dimensional finite element model (FEM of the anatomy of the wrist region was built to assess the induced currents distribution by external magnetic stimulation. The electromagnetic field distribution in the non-homogeneous domain was defined as an internal Dirichlet problem using the finite element method. The boundary conditions were obtained by analysis of the vector potential field excited by external current-driven coils. Results The results include evaluation and graphical representation of the induced current field distribution at various stimulation coil positions. Comparative study for the real non-homogeneous structure with anisotropic conductivities of the tissues and a mock homogeneous media is also presented. The possibility of achieving selective stimulation of either of the two nerves is assessed. Conclusion The model developed could be useful in theoretical prediction of the current distribution in the nerves during diagnostic stimulation and therapeutic procedures involving electromagnetic excitation. The errors in applying homogeneous domain modeling rather than real non-homogeneous biological structures are demonstrated. The practical implications of the applied approach are valid for any arbitrary weakly conductive medium.

  18. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P.G. Nicholls (Peter); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy.

  19. Use of tubulization (nerve conduits in repairing nerve defects in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Maria Sénès

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In peripheral nerve repairing in children by using nerve conduits, the outcome has been widely effective even when dealing with mixed and motor nerve, thus nerve tubulization might be considered as an alternative to nerve grafting. Conversely, considering the uncertain result obtained in brachial plexus repairing, the conduits cannot be considered as afirst choice of treatment in brachial plexus reconstruction.

  20. Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guides perform better than autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenDunnen, WFA; VanderLei, B; Schakenraad, JM; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, E; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Bartels, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed and quality of nerve regeneration after reconstruction using a biodegradable nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve regeneration using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. Nerve regeneration

  1. Decreased Nerve Conduction Velocity in Football Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Didehdar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lower limbs nerves are exposed to mechanical injuries in the football players and the purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of football on the lower leg nerves. Materials and Methods: Nerve conduction studies were done on 35 male college students (20 football players, 15 non active during 2006 to 2007 in the Shiraz rehabilitation faculty. Standard nerve conduction techniques using to evaluate dominant and non dominant lower limb nerves. Results: The motor latency of deep peroneal and tibial nerves of dominant leg of football players and sensory latency of superficial peroneal, tibial and compound nerve action potential of tibial nerve of both leg in football players were significantly prolonged (p<0.05. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity of tibial and common peroneal in football players were significant delayed (p<0.05. Conclusion: It is concluded that football is sport with high contact and it causes sub-clinical neuropathies due to nerve entrapment.

  2. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    decellularized nerve allograft for inferior alveolar nerve reconstruction: a case report. Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of...the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. 2011 Feb;69(2):550-3. PubMed PMID: 21145638. Epub 2010/12/15. eng. 16. Gunn S, Cosetti M...Massachusetts General Hospital (protocol #2012N000117) and was also granted ACURO approval on 11/19/2012. Task 2b. Rodent surgeries for segmental deficit

  3. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Mental Foramen Variations: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Karbasi Kheir, Mitra; Hekmatian, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mental foramen is important in surgical operations of premolars because it transfers the mental nerves and vessels. This study evaluated the variations of mental foramen by cone-beam computed tomography among a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods. A total number of 180 cone-beam computed tomography projections were analyzed in terms of shape, size, direction, and horizontal and vertical positions of mental foramen in the right and left sides. Results. The most commo...

  4. A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Maldonado, Andrés A; Stoves, Yolanda; Fries, Fabian N; Li, Rong; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The accessory nerve is frequently repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve available is often insufficient or marginal (under tension) for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer (neurotization), necessitating an interpositional graft. An attractive maneuver would facilitate lengthening of the accessory nerve for direct coaptation. The aim of the present study was to identify an anatomical method for such lengthening. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were identified medial to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and the anatomy of the accessory nerve/cervical nerve fibers within the SCM was documented. The cervical nerve connections were cut. Lengths of the accessory nerve were measured. Samples of the cut C-2 and C-3 nerves were examined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The anatomy and adjacent neural connections within the SCM are complicated. However, after the accessory nerve was "detethered" from within the SCM and following transection, the additional length of the accessory nerve increased from a mean of 6 cm to a mean of 10.5 cm (increase of 4.5 cm) after cutting the C-2 connections, and from a mean of 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm (increase of 3.5 cm) after cutting the C-3 connections. The additional length of accessory nerve even allowed direct repair of an infraclavicular target (i.e., the proximal musculocutaneous nerve). The cervical nerve connections were shown not to contain motor fibers. CONCLUSIONS An additional length of the accessory nerve made available in the posterior cervical triangle can facilitate direct repair or neurotization procedures, thus eliminating the need for an interpositional nerve graft, decreasing the time/distance for regeneration and potentially improving clinical outcomes.

  5. Unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji

    1982-01-01

    The present authors report a case of unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis which shows interesting CT findings which suggest its mechanism. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebral concussion soon after a traffic accident. A CT scan was performed soon after admission. A high-density spot was noted at the medial aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, where the oculomotor nerve emerged from the midbrain, and an irregular, slender, high-density area was delineated in the right dorsolateral surface of the midbrain. Although the right hemiparesis had already improved by the next morning, the function of the left oculomotor nerve has been completely disturbed for the three months since the injury. In our case, it is speculated that an avulsion of the left oculomotor nerve rootlet occurred at the time of impact as the mechanism of the oculomotor nerve paralysis. A CT taken soon after the head injury showed a high-density spot; this was considered to be a hemorrhage occurring because of the avulsion of the nerve rootlet at the medial surface of the cerebral peduncle. (J.P.N.)

  6. Compound sensory action potential in normal and pathological human nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The compound sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) is the result of phase summation and cancellation of single fiber potentials (SFAPs) with amplitudes that depend on fiber diameter, and the amplitude and shape of the SNAP is determined by the distribution of fiber diameters. Conduction velocities...... at different conduction distances are determined by summation of SFAPs of varying fiber diameters, and differ in this respect, also, from the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) for which conduction velocities are determined by the very fastest fibers in the nerve. The effect and extent of temporal...

  7. [Horner's syndrome and paresthesia in the trigeminal nerve territory secondary to epidural analgesia for labor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Céline; Macedo, Ana Luísa; Almeida, Valentina

    2018-03-01

    Currently, epidural analgesia is a common procedure for labor analgesia. Although it is considered a safe technique, it is not without complications. Horner's syndrome and paresthesia within the trigeminal nerve distribution are rare complications of epidural analgesia. We report a case of a pregnant woman who developed Horner's syndrome and paresthesia within the distribution of the trigeminal nerve following epidural analgesia for the relief of labor pain. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Nerve fascicle transfer using a part of the C-7 nerve for spinal accessory nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuan; Shen, Yun-Dong; Feng, Jun-Tao; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury results in a series of shoulder dysfunctions and continuous pain. However, current treatments are limited by the lack of donor nerves as well as by undesirable nerve regeneration. Here, the authors report a modified nerve transfer technique in which they employ a nerve fascicle from the posterior division (PD) of the ipsilateral C-7 nerve to repair SAN injury. The technique, first performed in cadavers, was then undertaken in 2 patients. METHODS Six fresh cadavers (12 sides of the SAN and ipsilateral C-7) were studied to observe the anatomical relationship between the SAN and C-7 nerve. The length from artificial bifurcation of the middle trunk to the point of the posterior cord formation in the PD (namely, donor nerve fascicle) and the linear distance from the cut end of the donor fascicle to both sites of the jugular foramen and medial border of the trapezius muscle (d-SCM and d-Traps, respectively) were measured. Meanwhile, an optimal route for nerve fascicle transfer (NFT) was designed. The authors then performed successful NFT operations in 2 patients, one with an injury at the proximal SAN and another with an injury at the distal SAN. RESULTS The mean lengths of the cadaver donor nerve fascicle, d-SCM, and d-Traps were 4.2, 5.2, and 2.5 cm, respectively. In one patient who underwent proximal SAN excision necessitated by a partial thyroidectomy, early signs of reinnervation were seen on electrophysiological testing at 6 months after surgery, and an impaired left trapezius muscle, which was completely atrophic preoperatively, had visible signs of improvement (from grade M0 to grade M3 strength). In the other patient in whom a distal SAN injury was the result of a neck cyst resection, reinnervation and complex repetitive discharges were seen 1 year after surgery. Additionally, the patient's denervated trapezius muscle was completely resolved (from grade M2 to grade M4 strength), and her shoulder pain had disappeared

  9. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar RIM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ‘watch and see’ the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important to release the nerve tension before transferring the patient to the operation room. If close reduction fails, we proceed to explore the nerve together with open reduction of the fracture. In iatrogenic nerve injury, we recommend nerve exploration to determine the surgical procedure that is causing the injury. Primary nerve exploration will allow early assessment of the injured nerve and minimize subsequent surgery.

  10. Comparison of the fastest regenerating motor and sensory myelinated axons in the same peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Sørensen, Jesper; Krarup, Christian

    2006-09-01

    Functional outcome after peripheral nerve regeneration is often poor, particularly involving nerve injuries far from their targets. Comparison of sensory and motor axon regeneration before target reinnervation is not possible in the clinical setting, and previous experimental studies addressing the question of differences in growth rates of different nerve fibre populations led to conflicting results. We developed an animal model to compare growth and maturation of the fastest growing sensory and motor fibres within the same mixed nerve after Wallerian degeneration. Regeneration of cat tibial nerve after crush (n = 13) and section (n = 7) was monitored for up to 140 days, using implanted cuff electrodes placed around the sciatic and tibial nerves and wire electrodes at plantar muscles. To distinguish between sensory and motor fibres, recordings were carried out from L6-S2 spinal roots using cuff electrodes. The timing of laminectomy was based on the presence of regenerating fibres along the nerve within the tibial cuff. Stimulation of unlesioned tibial nerves (n = 6) evoked the largest motor response in S1 ventral root and the largest sensory response in L7 dorsal root. Growth rates were compared by mapping the regenerating nerve fibres within the tibial nerve cuff to all ventral or dorsal roots and, regardless of the lesion type, the fastest growth was similar in sensory and motor fibres. Maturation was assessed as recovery of the maximum motor and sensory conduction velocities (CVs) within the tibial nerve cuff. Throughout the observation period the CV was approximately 14% faster in regenerated sensory fibres than in motor fibres in accordance with the difference observed in control nerves. Recovery of amplitude was only partial after section, whereas the root distribution pattern was restored. Our data suggest that the fastest growth and maturation rates that can be achieved during regeneration are similar for motor and sensory myelinated fibres.

  11. Catalytic bioscavengers in nerve agent poisoning: A promising approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2016-02-26

    The repeated use of the nerve agent sarin against civilians in Syria in 2013 emphasizes the continuing threat by chemical warfare agents. Multiple studies demonstrated a limited efficacy of standard atropine-oxime treatment in nerve agent poisoning and called for the development of alternative and more effective treatment strategies. A novel approach is the use of stoichiometric or catalytic bioscavengers for detoxification of nerve agents in the systemic circulation prior to distribution into target tissues. Recent progress in the design of enzyme mutants with reversed stereo selectivity resulting in improved catalytic activity and their use in in vivo studies supports the concept of catalytic bioscavengers. Yet, further research is necessary to improve the catalytic activity, substrate spectrum and in vivo biological stability of enzyme mutants. The pros and cons of catalytic bioscavengers will be discussed in detail and future requirements for the development of catalytic bioscavengers will be proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Anuar RIM; Gooi SG; Zulkiflee O

    2015-01-01

    The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF) in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ?watch and see? the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important ...

  13. Recovery of colonic transit following extrinsic nerve damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Timothy J; Tong, Wei Dong; Kosinski, Lauren; Takahashi, Toku; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2011-06-01

    Injury to pelvic sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves from surgical and obstetrical trauma has long been cited as a cause for abnormal colorectal motility in humans. Using a rat model, acute transaction of these extrinsic nerves has been shown to effect colorectal motility. The aim of this study is to determine in a rat model how transection of these extrinsic nerves affects colonic transit over time. Eighty-two Sprague-Dawley rats underwent placement of a tunneled catheter into the proximal colon. Bilateral hypogastric, pelvic nerves (HGN and PN) or both were transected in 66 rats. The remaining 16 rats received a sham operation. Colonic transit was evaluated at postoperative days (PODs) 1, 3, and 7 by injecting and calculating the geometric center (GC) of the distribution of (51)Cr after 3 h of propagation. At POD 1, transection of PNs significantly delayed colonic transit (GC = 4.9, p < 0.05), while transection of HGNs (GC = 8.5, p < 0.05) or transection of both nerves (GC = 7.8, p < 0.05) significantly accelerated colonic transit, when compared with sham operation (GC = 6.0). A significant trend toward recovery was noted in both the HGN and PN transection groups at POD 7. Damage to the extrinsic sympathetic and/or parasympathetic PNs affects colonic transit acutely. These changes in large bowel motor function normalize over time implicating a compensatory mechanism within the bowel itself.

  14. Effects of autonomic nerve stimulation on colorectal motility in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei Dong; Ridolfi, Timothy J.; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2010-01-01

    Background Several disease processes of the colon and rectum, including constipation and incontinence, have been associated with abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system. However, the autonomic innervation to the colon and rectum are not fully understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of stimulation of vagus nerves, pelvic nerves (PN) and hypogastric nerves (HGN) on colorectal motility in rats. Methods Four strain gauge transducers were implanted on the proximal colon, mid colon, distal colon and rectum to record circular muscle contractions in rats. Electrical stimulation was administered to the efferent distal ends of the cervical vagus nerve, PN and HGN. Motility index (MI) was evaluated before and during stimulation. Key Results Electrical stimulation (5–20 Hz) of the cervical vagus elicited significant contractions in the mid colon and distal colon, whereas less pronounced contractions were observed in the proximal colon. PN stimulation elicited significant contractions in the rectum as well as the mid colon and distal colon. Atropine treatment almost completely abolished the contractions induced by vagus nerve and PN stimulation. HGN stimulation caused relaxations in the rectum, mid colon and distal colon. The relaxations in response to HGN stimulation were abolished by propranolol. Conclusions & Inferences Vagal innervation extends to the distal colon, while the PN has projections in the distribution of the rectum through the mid colon. This suggests a pattern of dual parasympathetic innervation in the left colon. Parasympathetic fibers regulate colorectal contractions via muscarinic receptors. The HGN mainly regulates colorectal relaxations via beta-adrenoceptors. PMID:20067587

  15. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  16. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2010-05-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX-XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry.

  17. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  18. Mentalizing animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Ethicists have tended to treat the psychology of attributing mental states to animals as an entirely separate issue from the moral importance of animals’ mental states. In this paper I bring these two issues together. I argue for two theses, one descriptive and one normative. The descriptive thesis...... holds that ordinary human agents use what are generally called phenomenal mental states (e.g., pain and other emotions) to assign moral considerability to animals. I examine recent empirical research on the attribution of phenomenal states and agential states (e.g., memory and intelligence) to argue...... that phenomenal mental states are the primary factor, psychologically, for judging an animal to be morally considerable. I further argue that, given the role of phenomenal states in assigning moral considerability, certain theories in animal ethics will meet significant psychological resistance. The normative...

  19. Nerve excitability in the rat forelimb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Ria; Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer

    2017-01-01

    a novel setup to explore the ulnar nerve excitability in rodents. We provide normative ulnar data in 11 adult female Long Evans rats under anaesthesia by comparison with tibial and caudal nerves. Additionally, these measures were repeated weekly on 3 occasions to determine the repeatability of these tests....... Results Nerve excitability assessment of ulnar nerve proved to be a longitudinally repeatable measure of axonal function mature in rats, as were measures in tibial and caudal nerves. Comparison with existing method: Ulnar nerve motor excitability measures were different from the caudal and tibial...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  1. The Use of Degradable Nerve Conduits for Human Nerve Repair: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Meek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of peripheral nerve injury continues to be a major clinical challenge. The most widely used technique for bridging defects in peripheral nerves is the use of autologous nerve grafts. This technique, however, has some disadvantages. Many alternative experimental techniques have thus been developed, such as degradable nerve conduits. Degradable nerve guides have been extensively studied in animal experimental studies. However, the repair of human nerves by degradable nerve conduits has been limited to only a few clinical studies. In this paper, an overview of the available international published literature on degradable nerve conduits for bridging human peripheral nerve defects is presented for literature available until 2004. Also, the philosophy on the use of nerve guides and nerve grafts is given.

  2. Vagus nerve stimulation in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrill, Charley A; Jonsson, Michael A G; Minthon, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive-enhancing effects of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) have been reported during 6 months of treatment in a pilot study of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Data through 1 year of VNS (collected from June 2000 to September 2003) are now reported. METHOD: All patients (N = 17......) met the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA) criteria for probable AD. Responder rates for the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) and Mini-Mental State...

  3. Raman spectroscopic detection of peripheral nerves towards nerve-sparing surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery, namely nerve-sparing surgery, is now promising technique to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery as an aspect of the improvement of quality of life of patients. Detection of peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves is required for the nerve-sparing surgery; however, conventional nerve identification scheme is sometimes difficult to identify peripheral nerves due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues or its limited application to only motor peripheral nerves. To overcome these issues, we proposed a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerves by means of Raman spectroscopy. We found several fingerprints of peripheral myelinated and unmyelinated nerves by employing a modified principal component analysis of typical spectra including myelinated nerve, unmyelinated nerve, and adjacent tissues. We finally realized the sensitivity of 94.2% and the selectivity of 92.0% for peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves against adjacent tissues. Although further development of an intraoperative Raman spectroscopy system is required for clinical use, our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future.

  4. Progress of nerve bridges in the treatment of peripheral nerve disruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Q

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Ao Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Fundamental Science, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, Peoples’ Republic of China Abstract: Clinical repair of a nerve defect is one of the most challenging surgical problems. Autologous nerve grafting remains the gold standard treatment in addressing peripheral nerve injuries that cannot be bridged by direct epineural suturing. However, the autologous nerve graft is not readily available, and the process of harvesting autologous nerve graft results in several complications. Thus, it is necessary to explore an alternative to autologous nerve graft. In the last few decades, with significant advances in the life sciences and biotechnology, a lot of artificial nerve grafts have been developed to aim at the treatment of peripheral nerve disruptions. Artificial nerve grafts range from biological tubes to synthetic tubes and from nondegradable tubes to degradable tubes. Among them, acellular nerve allografts and artificial nerve repair conduits are two kinds of the most promising substitutes for nerve autografts. The history, research status, and prospect of acellular nerve allografts and artificial nerve repair conduits are described briefly in this review. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, repair, acellular nerve graft, nerve conduit

  5. The impact of motor and sensory nerve architecture on nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradzadeh, Arash; Borschel, Gregory H; Luciano, Janina P; Whitlock, Elizabeth L; Hayashi, Ayato; Hunter, Daniel A; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2008-08-01

    Sensory nerve autografting is the standard of care for injuries resulting in a nerve gap. Recent work demonstrates superior regeneration with motor nerve grafts. Improved regeneration with motor grafting may be a result of the nerve's Schwann cell basal lamina tube size. Motor nerves have larger SC basal lamina tubes, which may allow more nerve fibers to cross a nerve graft repair. Architecture may partially explain the suboptimal clinical results seen with sensory nerve grafting techniques. To define the role of nerve architecture, we evaluated regeneration through acellular motor and sensory nerve grafts. Thirty-six Lewis rats underwent tibial nerve repairs with 5 mm double-cable motor or triple-cable sensory nerve isografts. Grafts were harvested and acellularized in University of Wisconsin solution. Control animals received fresh motor or sensory cable isografts. Nerves were harvested after 4 weeks and histomorphometry was performed. In 6 animals per group from the fresh motor and sensory cable graft groups, weekly walking tracks and wet muscle mass ratios were performed at 7 weeks. Histomorphometry revealed more robust nerve regeneration in both acellular and cellular motor grafts. Sensory groups showed poor regeneration with significantly decreased percent nerve, fiber count, and density (parchitecture (size of SC basal lamina tubes) plays an important role in nerve regeneration in a mixed nerve gap model.

  6. An accessory mental foramen: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cağirankaya, Leyla Berna; Kansu, Hilmi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a case of an accessory mental foramen (AMF). The mental foramen is an important anatomical structure of particular importance in local anesthesia and surgical procedures in terms of achieving effective mandibular nerve blocks and avoiding injuries to the neurovascular bundles. Although rare, multiple mental foramina have been described in humans. In these cases one foramen is termed the mental foramen and the others are referred to as an AMF. A 62-year-old woman presented for a routine dental examination. In addition to the normal radiographic image of the mental foramen, periapical radiographs of the left mandibular premolar and molar region revealed a round-shaped radiolucency with distinct borders along with an inferior extension below the apex of the mesial root of the first molar. This image was considered to be an AMF. Although no surgical operation was planned, the patient was informed about the existence and importance of the anatomical variation with regard to the need for local anesthesia, diagnosis of periapical disease, and the prevention of nerve damage during surgery in that area of the mandible.

  7. Nerve entrapment after hamstring injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Konerding, Moritz A

    2012-09-01

    Hamstring muscle injuries are a frequent cause of athletic sequelae, and the frequency of reinjuries is high. Frequently, disability in sport is the consequence and performance is limited. A case report of a soccer player who was unable to play his sport after a minor hamstring muscle injury is presented. We introduce a previously undescribed lesion featured by a scar compromising a motor branch of the sciatic nerve to the long head of the biceps femoris muscle. Resection of the involved branch of the nerve resulted in complete pain relief and full sport capacity. This case report demonstrates that in very rare cases, a scar tissue-induced intramuscular entrapment of a branch of the sciatic nerve must be considered as a reason for athletic incapacity after minor hamstring injury. Both the degree of a muscular injury and its specific location within the injured muscle may therefore influence the functional outcome.

  8. Accessory Mental Foramen and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2017-10-26

    Accessory mental foramens should be considered in surgical procedures performed in mandibular body and symphysis. Location and content of these foramina has significant impact on the result of surgery.Lip numbness is the catastrophic result if these foramina are violated while their content is nerves that carry sensory inputs from lower lip. Examples of interferences with dental implant, orthognathic, and periapical surgeries are presented and it is discussed in which conditions they complicate oral surgical procedures.

  9. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslantunali D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available D Arslantunali,1–3,* T Dursun,1,2,* D Yucel,1,4,5 N Hasirci,1,2,6 V Hasirci,1,2,7 1BIOMATEN, Center of Excellence in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Biotechnology, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Bioengineering, Gumushane University, Gumushane, Turkey; 4Faculty of Engineering, Department of Medical Engineering, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 6Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 7Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type are being presented. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

  10. Prevention of axillary nerve injury in anterior shoulder reconstructions: use of a subscapularis muscle-splitting technique and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Edward G; Caicedo, Juan Carlos; Kim, Tae Kyun; Banchasuek, Prachan

    2002-01-01

    Previous authors have suggested that the axillary nerve should be explored or palpated during all anterior shoulder stabilization procedures. The goal of this study was to document the axillary nerve injury rate in a cohort of patients who had undergone anterior shoulder stabilization without axillary nerve dissection. Use of a subscapularis muscle-splitting approach by using a retractor along the scapular neck does not result in significant risk of injury to the axillary nerve, and exploration of the axillary nerve is not necessary using this approach. Prospective cohort study. One hundred and twenty-eight anterior stabilizations were performed with a subscapularis muscle-splitting approach that has been previously described. In all cases a retractor was placed along the inferior scapular neck to protect the axillary nerve. The axillary nerve was not exposed or palpated in any case. All patients were evaluated on the 1st postoperative day and again within 10 days for symptoms of axillary nerve palsy, including sensory loss and return of muscle function. One patient (0.8%) had paresthesia in an axillary nerve distribution; recovery occurred without the need for electromyography or other interventions. There were no clinically detected cases of axillary nerve motor dysfunction. Routine exposure of the axillary nerve is not necessary during anterior stabilization procedures using a subscapularis muscle-splitting approach if proper precautions are taken to protect the nerve. Other techniques of anterior stabilization may require exposure of the axillary nerve.

  11. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  12. Transient Femoral Nerve Palsy Following Ilioinguinal Nerve Block ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intramuscular sodium diclofenac 75 mg was administered intraoperatively into the contralateral gluteal muscle. A 5–6‑cm oblique incision was made from the .... Mechanism of femoral nerve palsy complicating percutaneous ilioinguinal field block. Br J Anaesth 1997;78:314‑6. 19. Chan PY, Lee MP, Cheung HY, Chung CC, ...

  13. Functional nerve recovery after bridging a 15 mm gap in rat sciatic nerve with a biodegradable nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Klok, F; Robinson, PH; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of nerve function was evaluated after bridging a 15 mm sciatic nerve gap in 51 rats with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide. Recovery of function was investigated by analysing the footprints, by analysing video recordings of gait, by electrically eliciting the

  14. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  15. Comparison of nerve regenerative efficacy between decellularized nerve graft and nonwoven chitosan conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaba, Hiroki; Terada-Nakaishi, Michiko; Wang, Wei; Itoh, Soichiro; Nozaki, Kosuke; Nagai, Akiko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2016-05-12

    Recently decellularized nerves with various methods are reported as highly functional nerve grafts for the treatment of nerve defects. To evaluate the efficacy of decellularized allogeneic nerve, compared with oriented chitosan mesh tube, and an autologous nerve. Sciatic nerves harvested from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were decellularized in combination with Sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100. A graft into the sciatic nerve in Wistar rats was performed with the decellularized SD rat sciatic nerves or oriented chitosan nonwoven nanofiber mesh tubes (15 mm in length, N=5 in each group). A portion of sciatic nerve of Wistar rat was cut, reversed and re-sutured in-situ as a control. Nerve functional and histological evaluations were performed 25 weeks postoperatively. It was revealed that functional, electrophysiological and histological recoveries in the decellularized nerve group match those in the autograft group. Recovery of sensory function and nerve maturation in the decellularized nerve group were superior to those in the chitosan mesh tube group. Nerve regeneration in the decellularized nerves could match that in the autografts and is somehow superior to artificial chitosan mesh tube. Detergents wash of SDS and Triton X-100 could obtain highly functional nerve grafts from allografts.

  16. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  17. Detergent-free Decellularized Nerve Grafts for Long-gap Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Vasudevan, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: This study describes a detergent-free nerve decellularization technique for reconstruction of long-gap nerve injuries. We compared DFD grafts with an established detergent processing technique and found that DFD nerve grafts are successful in promoting regeneration across long-gap peripheral nerve defects as an alternative to existing strategies.

  18. Mental Byomdannelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tina Vestermann; Boye, Anne Mette; Borchmann, Inger Haarup

    Formålet med publikationen er at præsentere metoden "Mental byomdannelse". Metoden viser, hvordan man via midlertidig brug af grunde kan undersøge et steds potentialer, tage et område i brug tidligt i en byomdannelsesproces og derved bidrage til at opbygge en ny identitet for området. Mental...... byomdannelse går ud på at skabe bevidsthed om et byudviklingsområde overfor byens borgere, kommende beboere og fremtidige brugere af området allerede mens den fysiske omdannelse er i gang. I publikationen præsenteres en værktøjskasse, som giver redskaber og ideer til, hvordan man kan sætte en mental...... byomdannelsesproces i gang i byens rum. Publikationen udgør en afrapportering fra et støttet forsøgsprojekt hvor metoden ”Mental byomdannelse” er udviklet ved at afprøve ideerne om mental byomdannelse i to cases i Ålborg Kommune, hhv. i Østre Havn og Nibe by. Formålet med at anvende metoden i de to cases har været...

  19. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    OpenAIRE

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected b...

  20. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  1. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Veen, Natasja; Nicholls, Peter; Smith, Cairns; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy. Search strategy: We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 4), MEDLINE (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1...

  2. Ocular motor nerve palsies: implications for diagnosis and mechanisms of repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, James A.; Wong, Agnes M.F.; Fouladvand, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the dynamics of the eyes in ocular motor nerve palsies may aid diagnosis, characterize peripheral and central palsies, and reveal adaptive properties of the brain. Saccadic and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) functions of patients with peripheral and central sixth, and peripheral third and fourth nerve palsies were studied by three dimensional magnetic field search coil oculography. Combined third and fourth cranial nerve microvascular ischaemic palsy in diabetes mellitus produced low ratios of intorsion to adduction amplitudes. Presumed isolated third nerve palsy caused higher ratios of adduction to intorsion and violations of Listing’s law. The VOR in third, fourth, and sixth nerve palsies reveals adaptive equilibration of the action of paretic agonist and their non-paretic antagonist muscles in violation of Hering’s law during head motion. Saccadic speeds in the field of paretic agonists are repaired in chronic peripheral palsies despite limited ductions, but remain reduced in central palsies. Limited intorsion with third nerve palsy is attributed to concurrent fourth nerve ischaemia in the distribution of the inferolateral trunk of the intracavernous carotid artery. Adaptive repair of the VOR after ocular motor nerve palsies reduces asymmetric retinal image slip and binocular disparity, and repair of saccadic velocity drives both eyes rapidly and simultaneously into the paretic field of motion. PMID:18718283

  3. Comparison of human expert and computer-automated systems using magnitude-squared coherence (MSC) and bootstrap distribution statistics for the interpretation of pattern electroretinograms (PERGs) in infants with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Anthony C; McCulloch, Daphne L; Borchert, Mark S; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Fink, Cassandra; Eleuteri, Antonio; Simpson, David M

    2015-08-01

    Pattern electroretinograms (PERGs) have inherently low signal-to-noise ratios and can be difficult to detect when degraded by pathology or noise. We compare an objective system for automated PERG analysis with expert human interpretation in children with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) with PERGs ranging from clear to undetectable. PERGs were recorded uniocularly with chloral hydrate sedation in children with ONH (aged 3.5-35 months). Stimuli were reversing checks of four sizes focused using an optical system incorporating the cycloplegic refraction. Forty PERG records were analysed; 20 selected at random and 20 from eyes with good vision (fellow eyes or eyes with mild ONH) from over 300 records. Two experts identified P50 and N95 of the PERGs after manually deleting trials with movement artefact, slow-wave EEG (4-8 Hz) or other noise from raw data for 150 check reversals. The automated system first identified present/not-present responses using a magnitude-squared coherence criterion and then, for responses confirmed as present, estimated the P50 and N95 cardinal positions as the turning points in local third-order polynomials fitted in the -3 dB bandwidth [0.25 … 45] Hz. Confidence limits were estimated from bootstrap re-sampling with replacement. The automated system uses an interactive Internet-available webpage tool (see http://clinengnhs.liv.ac.uk/esp_perg_1.htm). The automated system detected 28 PERG signals above the noise level (p ≤ 0.05 for H0). Good subjective quality ratings were indicative of significant PERGs; however, poor subjective quality did not necessarily predict non-significant signals. P50 and N95 implicit times showed good agreement between the two experts and between experts and the automated system. For the N95 amplitude measured to P50, the experts differed by an average of 13% consistent with differing interpretations of peaks within noise, while the automated amplitude measure was highly correlated with the expert measures but was

  4. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1872 Duchenne described the technique of nerve ex- citability testing for facial paralysis. According to the severity of the condition, peripheral nerve lesions can be classified on the bases of electrical tests, as: (a) neurapraxia; (b) axonotmesis; and (c) neurot- mesis. This classification for peripheral nerve lesions was intro-.

  5. Peripheral nerve lesions in Zimbabwe: a retrospective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tests of nerve function carried out in this laboratory include sensory and motor nerve conduction measurements, electromyography and somatosensory evoked potentials. Their application has been reviewed previously1. Peripheral nerves are common sites of injury. The consequences can be debilitating to the individual.

  6. a technique to repair peripheral nerve injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    End-to-side nerve suture (ETSNS) has until recently been extensively researched in the laboratory animal (rat and baboon). Lateral sprouting from an intact nerve into an attached nerve does occur, and functional recovery (sensory and motor) has been demonstrated. We have demonstrated conclusively that ETSNS in the ...

  7. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swallowing, the gag reflex, and speech Control of muscle in some internal organs and the heart rate This function is not tested as part of the cranial nerve examination. 11th Accessory Neck turning and shoulder shrugging The person is asked to turn the ...

  8. Neuromodulation of the Suprascapular Nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurt, E.; Eijk, T. van; Henssen, D.J.H.A.; Arnts, I.; Steegers, M.A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intractable shoulder pain (CISP) is defined as shoulder pain which is present for longer than 6 months and does not respond to standard treatments like medication, physical therapy, rehabilitation, selective nerve blocks and local infiltrations, or orthopedic procedures. The etiology of CISP

  9. Transdermal optogenetic peripheral nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Benjamin E.; Zorzos, Anthony N.; Bendell, Rhys; Harding, Alexander; Fahmi, Mina; Srinivasan, Shriya; Calvaresi, Peter; Herr, Hugh M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective: A fundamental limitation in both the scientific utility and clinical translation of peripheral nerve optogenetic technologies is the optical inaccessibility of the target nerve due to the significant scattering and absorption of light in biological tissues. To date, illuminating deep nerve targets has required implantable optical sources, including fiber-optic and LED-based systems, both of which have significant drawbacks. Approach: Here we report an alternative approach involving transdermal illumination. Utilizing an intramuscular injection of ultra-high concentration AAV6-hSyn-ChR2-EYFP in rats. Main results: We demonstrate transdermal stimulation of motor nerves at 4.4 mm and 1.9 mm depth with an incident laser power of 160 mW and 10 mW, respectively. Furthermore, we employ this technique to accurately control ankle position by modulating laser power or position on the skin surface. Significance: These results have the potential to enable future scientific optogenetic studies of pathologies implicated in the peripheral nervous system for awake, freely-moving animals, as well as a basis for future clinical studies.

  10. Tyrosine hydroxylase positive nerves and mast cells in the porcine gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stefanov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect the localisation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH positive nerve fibres (THN and distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase positive mast cells (THMC in the wall of porcine gallbladder. THN were observed as single fibres, nerve fibres forming perivascular plexuses and nerve fibres grouped within the nerve fascicles. In the gallbladder`s fundus, body and neck, the TH+ fibres formed mucosal, muscular and serosal nonganglionated nerve plexuses. Toluidine blue (TB staining was used to confirm that the TH positive cells were mast cells. The number of THMC in the propria of gallbladder`s fundus, body and neck was significantly higher than in the muscular and serosal layers in both genders. The number of mast cells in the musculature was higher than in the serosa. The density and location of the THMC were similar to the TB positive (with gamma meta-chromasia mast cells in both males and females, and statistically significant difference was not established. In conclusion, original data concerning the existence and localisation of catecholaminergic nerves and THMC distribution in the porcine gallbladder’s wall are presented. The results could con-tribute to the body of knowledge of functional communication between autonomic nerves and mast cells in the gallbladder.

  11. Overview of Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver and Gallbladder Disorders Lung and Airway Disorders Men's Health Issues Mental Health Disorders Mouth and Dental Disorders Older People’s ... Liver and Gallbladder Disorders Lung and Airway Disorders Men's Health Issues Mental Health Disorders Mouth and Dental Disorders Older People’s ...

  12. Enhancing Peripheral Nerve Regeneration with a Novel Drug-Delivering Nerve Conduit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for at least 30 days to improve rate of nerve regeneration. We have successfully...deliver nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for at least 30 days to improve the nerve regeneration. The...regeneration, nerve conduits, autograft, drug delivery device, nerve growth factor, glial cell line-derived neutrophic factor, polytetrafluoroethylene

  13. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypog...

  14. Let-7 microRNAs Regenerate Peripheral Nerve Regeneration by Targeting Nerve Growth Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shiying; Wang, Xinghui; Gu, Yun; Chen, Chu; Wang, Yaxian; Liu, Jie; Hu, Wen; Yu, Bin; Wang, Yongjun; Ding, Fei; Liu, Yan; Gu, Xiaosong

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical problem. Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration, but its clinical applications are limited by several constraints. In this study, we found that the time-dependent expression profiles of eight let-7 family members in the injured nerve after sciatic nerve injury were roughly similar to each other. Let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration of primary Schwann cells (SCs) by directly target...

  15. Transfer of pectoral nerves to suprascapular and axillary nerves: an anatomic feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sylvain; Balaguer, Thierry; Baque, Patrick; Lebreton, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    We conducted an anatomic study to provide detailed information on the pectoral nerves and anatomic data on the transfer of the pectoral nerves to the axillary nerve. Moreover, we experimentally determined the feasibility of transferring the pectoral nerves to the suprascapular nerve in upper brachial plexus injury. We dissected 26 brachial plexus from 15 fresh cadavers. The origin, location, course, and branching of the pectoral nerves were recorded. The length and the diameter of the pectoral nerves were measured. The diameter of the suprascapular and axillary nerves was recorded. In all dissections, we assessed the feasibility of directly transferring the pectoral nerves to the suprascapular and axillary nerves. We found 3 constant branches of pectoral nerves arising from 3 distinct origins in 20 cases, and 3 constant branches arising from 2 distinct origins in 6 cases. The C7 sent nerve fibers to all 3 branches. The average length and diameter of the superior, middle, and inferior branches of the pectoral nerves were 65 mm, 110 mm, and 105 mm, and 2.0 mm, 2.3 mm, ad 2.4 mm, respectively. The average diameter of the suprascapular and axillary were 2.8 mm and 3.6 mm, respectively. The superior branch reached the suprascapular and axillary nerves in 17 and 8 cases. The middle and inferior branches reached the suprascapular and axillary nerve in all dissections. With an adequate length, diameter, and nerve composition, the middle and inferior branches of the pectoral nerves are suitable donor nerves to the axillary nerve and a potential source of reinnervation of the suprascapular nerve in upper brachial plexus injury. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of Fibrin Glue as an Adjunct in the Repair of Lingual Nerve Injury: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theberge, Nicholas P; Ziccardi, Vincent B

    2016-09-01

    This report describes a case of lingual nerve injury repair using a novel technique in which Tisseel fibrin glue was used to stabilize an Axoguard nerve conduit placed around the site of primary neurorrhaphy to decrease the number of sutures required for stabilization. Five months postoperatively, the patient subjectively had increased sensation and improved taste in the left lingual nerve distribution. At neurosensory examination, the patient exhibited functional neurosensory recovery (S3+ on the Medical Research Council Scale). Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anterior deltopectoral approach for axillary nerve neurotisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, J Terrence Jose

    2012-04-01

    To report outcome of axillary nerve neurotisation for brachial plexus injury through the anterior deltopectoral approach. Nine men aged 20 to 52 (mean, 27.8) years with brachial plexus injury underwent axillary nerve neurotisation through the anterior deltopectoral approach. Three of the patients had complete avulsion of C5-T1 nerve roots. The remaining 6 patients had brachial plexus injury of C5-C6 nerve roots, with associated subluxation of the glenohumeral joint, atrophy of the supraspinatus, deltoid and elbow flexors. They had no active shoulder abduction, external rotation, and elbow flexion. The pectoralis major and minor were cut and/or retracted to expose the underlying infraclavicular plexus. The axillary nerve was identified with respect to the available donor nerves (long head of triceps branch, thoracodorsal nerve, and medial pectoral nerve). In addition to the axillary nerve neurotisation, each patient had a spinal accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve for better shoulder animation. Patients were followed up for 24 to 30 (mean, 26) months. In the 3 patients with C5-T1 nerve root injuries, the mean active abduction and external rotation were 63 and 20 degrees, respectively, whereas the mean abduction strength was M3 (motion against gravity). In the 6 patients with C5-C6 nerve root injuries, the mean active abduction and external rotation were 133 and 65 degrees, respectively, whereas the strength of the deltoids and triceps was M5 (normal) in all. In 4 patients with the pectoralis major cut and repaired, the muscle regained normal strength. The anterior deltopectoral approach enabled easy access to all available donor nerves for axillary nerve neurotisation and achieved good outcomes.

  18. Compound sensory action potential in normal and pathological human nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The compound sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) is the result of phase summation and cancellation of single fiber potentials (SFAPs) with amplitudes that depend on fiber diameter, and the amplitude and shape of the SNAP is determined by the distribution of fiber diameters. Conduction velocities...... dispersion over increasing conduction distance is greater for the SNAP than CMAP, and demonstration of conduction block is therefore difficult. In addition, the effect of temporal dispersion on amplitude and shape is strongly dependent on the number of conducting fibers and their distribution, and......, with fiber loss or increased conduction velocity variability changes of the SNAP may be smaller than expected from normal nerve. The biophysical characteristics of sensory and motor fibers differ, and this may to some extent determine divergent pathophysiological changes in sensory and motor fibers...

  19. Mental Foramen Relation to Mandibular Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Sweed, Ahmed Hassan; Abdulmonaem, Ghada

    2016-11-01

    To detect site of the mental nerve foramen in patients of mandibular fracture and study its relation to mandibular fracture site using radiology and operative findings during open reduction and internal fixation. This study was carried out on 46 patients who had traumatic mandibular fractures. All patients were managed by open reduction and internal fixation during which mental foramen site and fracture site were reported and analyzed and compared to preoperative radiography. By both radiology and operative findings, the mental foramen was found in 78.3% between the first and second premolar, and in 21.7% below the first premolar. While no other mental foramen sites were reported. There were no statistically significant differences between both detected sites as regard age and sex. By operative dissection, mental foramen and neurovascular bundle could be detected, dissected, and preserved in all patients. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first operative and radiological work that highlights the site and relation of mental foramen site to mandibular fracture in Arab people. The authors' study provides useful data of mental foramen among Arab population for the surgeons, anesthetists, and dentists to carry out procedures without complications.

  20. Mental Toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Tori; Cavanaugh, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Mental toughness (MT) is defined as a set of attributes that allow an individual to persevere through difficult circumstances that ultimately can lead to successful outcomes. It is also a critical component of maximizing the performance of an athlete. These attributes assist with and promote a state of mind that enhances performance. A negative…

  1. Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH/National Institute of Mental Health – Division of AIDS Research SAMHSA – Behavioral Health and HIV/AIDS SAMHSA – Suicide ... Office of Adolescent Health OAR NIH Office of AIDS Research OCR HHS Office for Civil Rights OFBNP HHS ...

  2. Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to situations and to people Alcohol or drug abuse Major changes in eating habits Sex drive changes Excessive anger, hostility or violence Suicidal thinking Sometimes symptoms of a mental health disorder appear as physical ... on Drug Abuse. http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction- ...

  3. Neuromyelitis optica IgG in the cerebrospinal fluid induces astrocytopathy in optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Kerstin; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Mørch, Marlene

    -ON. The predilection of the optic nerve in NMOSD may partly be explained by the dense expression of AQP4 in the optic nerve. We previously reported that AQP4-IgG in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) becomes widely distributed in the brain and causes complementdependent astrocyte injury in periventricular areas and brain...... of brain-specific antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid. Journal of neuroimmunology 2013;254:76-82....

  4. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  5. Factors that influence peripheral nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Archibald, Simon J; Madison, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    median nerve lesions (n = 46) in nonhuman primates over 3 to 4 years, a time span comparable with such lesions in humans. Nerve gap distances of 5, 20, or 50mm were repaired with nerve grafts or collagen-based nerve guide tubes, and three electrophysiological outcome measures were followed: (1) compound...... predictors. Thus, nerve gap distance and repair type exert their influence through time to muscle reinnervation. These findings emphasize that factors that control early axonal outgrowth influence the final level of recovery attained years later. They also highlight that a time window exists within which...... muscle action potentials in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, (2) the number and size of motor units in reinnervated muscle, and (3) compound sensory action potentials from digital nerve. A statistical model was used to assess the influence of three variables (repair type, nerve gap distance, and time...

  6. Good Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mental Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Good mental health Nutrition and mental health Exercise and ... a friend. Return to top More information on Good mental health Read more from womenshealth.gov Action ...

  7. Magnetoencephalographic analysis in patients with vagus nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Madsen, Joseph R; Bourgeois, Blaise F; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of magnetoencephalography in epilepsy patients with a vagus nerve stimulator. Magnetoencephalography was performed in two patients with medically intractable epilepsy who had a vagus nerve stimulator. Because of the artifacts caused by the vagus nerve stimulator, no spikes could be identified in the original magnetoencephalographic data in either patient. The temporally extended signal space separation method was used to remove artifacts. After processing by this method, left temporoparietal spikes were clearly identified in patient 1. Equivalent current dipoles calculated from these spikes were localized in the left posterior-temporal and parietal lobes. The location of the dipoles was consistent with the spike distribution on intracranial electroencephalography. In patient 2, bilateral diffuse spikes were seen in the processed data. The contour maps demonstrated a bilateral pattern, not in agreement with a single focal source. These findings supported the diagnosis of symptomatic generalized epilepsy in this patient. Magnetoencephalography may thus be a useful option for evaluating patients with intractable epilepsy who have a vagus nerve stimulator.

  8. Loss of Sympathetic Nerves in Spleens from Patients with End Stage Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald B. Hoover

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The spleen is an important site for central regulation of immune function by noradrenergic sympathetic nerves, but little is known about this major region of neuroimmune communication in humans. Experimental studies using animal models have established that sympathetic innervation of the spleen is essential for cholinergic anti-inflammatory responses evoked by vagal nerve stimulation, and clinical studies are evaluating this approach for treating inflammatory diseases. Most data on sympathetic nerves in spleen derive from rodent studies, and this work has established that remodeling of sympathetic innervation can occur during inflammation. However, little is known about the effects of sepsis on spleen innervation. Our primary goals were to (i localize noradrenergic nerves in human spleen by immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, a specific noradrenergic marker, (ii determine if nerves occur in close apposition to leukocytes, and (iii determine if splenic sympathetic innervation is altered in patients who died from end stage sepsis. Staining for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT was done to screen for cholinergic nerves. Archived paraffin tissue blocks were used. Control samples were obtained from trauma patients or patients who died after hemorrhagic stroke. TH + nerves were associated with arteries and arterioles in all control spleens, occurring in bundles or as nerve fibers. Individual TH + nerve fibers entered the perivascular region where some appeared in close apposition to leukocytes. In marked contrast, spleens from half of the septic patients lacked TH + nerves fibers and the average abundance of TH + nerves for the septic group was only 16% of that for the control group (control: 0.272 ± 0.060% area, n = 6; sepsis: 0.043 ± 0.026% area, n = 8; P < 0.005. All spleens lacked cholinergic innervation. Our results provide definitive evidence for the distribution of noradrenergic

  9. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-shuai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8ß and complement factor D in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration.

  10. Preliminary investigation on use of high-resolution optical coherence tomography to monitor injury and repair in the rat sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlebicki, Cara A; Lee, Alice D; Jung, Woonggyu; Li, Hongrui; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J

    2010-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used in limited settings to study peripheral nerve injury. The purpose of the study is to determine whether high-resolution OCT can be used to monitor nerve injury and regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve following crush injury, ligation, and transection with microsurgical repair. Forty-five rats were segregated into three groups. The right sciatic nerve was suture ligated (n = 15), cut then microsurgically repaired (n = 15), or crushed (n = 15). The left sciatic nerve served as the control; only surgical exposure and skin closure were performed. Each group was further divided into three subgroups where they were assigned survival durations of 4, 15, or 24 weeks. Following euthanasia, nerves were harvested, fixed in formalin, and imaged at the injury site, as well as proximal and distal ends. The OCT system resolution was approximately 7 microm in tissue with a 1,060 nm central wavelength. Control (uninjured) nerve tissue showed homogenous signal distribution to a relatively uniform depth; in contrast, damaged nerves showed irregular signal distribution and intensity. Changes in signal distribution were most significant at the injury site and distal regions. Increases in signal irregularity were evident during longer recovery times. Histological analysis determined that OCT imaging was limited to the surrounding perineurium and scar tissue. OCT has the potential to be a valuable tool for monitoring nerve injury and repair, and the changes that accompany wound healing, providing clinicians with a non-invasive tool to treat nerve injuries. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Therapeutic electrical stimulation of injured peripheral nerve tissue using implantable thin-film wireless nerve stimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Matthew R; Gamble, Paul; Stephen, Manu; Ray, Wilson Z

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerve tissue has been shown to accelerate axonal regeneration. Yet existing methods of applying electrical stimulation to injured peripheral nerves have presented significant barriers to clinical translation. In this study, the authors examined the use of a novel implantable wireless nerve stimulator capable of simultaneously delivering therapeutic electrical stimulation of injured peripheral nerve tissue and providing postoperative serial assessment of functional recovery. METHODS Flexible wireless stimulators were fabricated and implanted into Lewis rats. Thin-film implants were used to deliver brief electrical stimulation (1 hour, 20 Hz) to sciatic nerves after nerve crush or nerve transection-and-repair injuries. RESULTS Electrical stimulation of injured nerves via implanted wireless stimulators significantly improved functional recovery. Brief electrical stimulation was observed to increase the rate of functional recovery after both nerve crush and nerve transection-and-repair injuries. Wireless stimulators successfully facilitated therapeutic stimulation of peripheral nerve tissue and serial assessment of nerve recovery. CONCLUSIONS Implantable wireless stimulators can deliver therapeutic electrical stimulation to injured peripheral nerve tissue. Implantable wireless nerve stimulators might represent a novel means of facilitating therapeutic electrical stimulation in both intraoperative and postoperative settings.

  12. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-yuan Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury.

  13. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-long Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery.

  14. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ′cross-bridging′ to promote nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ′protect′ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  15. Future Perspectives in the Management of Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-04-01

     The author presents a solicited "white paper" outlining her perspective on the role of nerve transfers in the management of nerve injuries.  PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were evaluated to compare nerve graft and nerve transfer. An evaluation of the scientific literature by review of index articles was also performed to compare the number of overall clinical publications of nerve repair, nerve graft, and nerve transfer. Finally, a survey regarding the prevalence of nerve transfer surgery was administrated to the World Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery (WSRM) results.  Both nerve graft and transfer can generate functional results and the relative success of graft versus transfer depended on the function to be restored and the specific transfers used. Beginning in the early 1990s, there has been a rapid increase from baseline of nerve transfer publications such that clinical nerve transfer publication now exceeds those of nerve repair or nerve graft. Sixty-two responses were received from WSRM membership. These surgeons reported their frequency of "usually or always using nerve transfers for repairing brachial plexus injuries as 68%, radial nerves as 27%, median as 25%, and ulnar as 33%. They reported using nerve transfers" sometimes for brachial plexus 18%, radial nerve 30%, median nerve 34%, ulnar nerve 35%.  Taken together this evidence suggests that nerve transfers do offer an alternative technique along with tendon transfers, nerve repair, and nerve grafts. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Bilateral absence of mental foramen in a living human subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauhr, Géraldine; Coutant, Jean-Christophe; Normand, Eric; Laurenjoye, Mathieu; Ella, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    The mental foramen, through which the mental nerve emerges, is an important anatomic landmark in odonto-stomatology. Knowing its anatomic variations, according to the ethnic group or age, is essential when performing local anesthesia or implant and orthognathic surgeries. Besides the presence of a supernumerary foramen and variations in its location, numerous topographies have been described such as unilateral or bilateral triple foramina, hypoplasia or agenesis. The case reported here is extremely rare because it has been observed in a living and asymptomatic patient whose scan shows a bilateral absence of mental foramen.

  17. Radiographic localization of the mental foramen and mandibular canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Farzaneh; Haraji, Afshin; Boostani, Hamid Reza

    2013-09-01

    Accurately localizing the mental foramen and mandibular canal is important when administering local anesthesia and performing surgery; therefore, knowing the normal range of the possible locations is essential. Our purpose was to assess the location of the mental foramen and mandibular canal in an Iranian population using panoramic radiography. Standard panoramic radiographies were performed. The positions of 100 mental foramens were evaluated. The distances from the center of the mental foramen to the superior and inferior borders of the mandible and to the apexes of the first and second premolar were measured. The distance of the mental foramens from the mandibular midline and the diameter of the mandibular canal in the mental foramen connection were also measured. Among 100 mental foramens, 6% were positioned under the first premolar, 24% were between the first and second premolars, 67% were under the second premolar, and the remaining 3% were behind the second premolar. The mean distance from the mental foramen to the mandibular midline was 27.77±3.20 mm. The mean diameter of the mandibular canal in the mental foramen connection was 3.09±0.69mm. The mental foramen was near the second premolar and the inferior border of the mandible. This information can be used to perform safer mental nerve blocks in surgical interventions.

  18. Radiographic Localization of the Mental Foramen and Mandibular Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Afkhami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Accurately localizing the mental foramen and mandibular canal is important when administering local anesthesia and performing surgery; therefore, knowing the normal range of the possible locations is essential. Our purpose was to assess the location of the mental foramen and mandibular canal in an Iranian population using panoramic radiography.Materials and Methods: Standard panoramic radiographies were performed. The positions of 100 mental foramens were evaluated. The distances from the center of the mental foramen to the superior and inferior borders of the mandible and to the apexes of the first and second premolar were measured. The distance of the mental foramens from the mandibular midline and the diameter of the mandibular canal in the mental foramen connection were also measured.Results: Among 100 mental foramens, 6% were positioned under the first premolar, 24% were between the first and second premolars, 67% were under the second premolar, and the remaining 3% were behind the second premolar. The mean distance from the mental foramen to the mandibular midline was 27.77±3.20 mm. The mean diameter of the mandibular canal in the mental foramen connection was 3.09±0.69mm.Conclusion: The mental foramen was near the second premolar and the inferior border of the mandible. This information can be used to perform safer mental nerve blocks in surgical interventions.

  19. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  20. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    the nerve supply to intrinsic musculature in the hind foot and may be exacerbated by the lack of physical rehabilitative measures that would...LM, de Crombrugghe B. Some recent advances in the chemistry and biology of trans- forming growth factor-beta. J Cell Biol 1987;105:1039e45. 12. Hao Y...into strips, wrapped around nitrocellulose paper , and placed in a storage solution containing a 1:1 mix of 100% sterile glycerol and Dulbecco’s

  1. The Dehiscent Facial Nerve Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental injury to the facial nerve where the bony canal defects are present may result with facial nerve dysfunction during otological surgery. Therefore, it is critical to know the incidence and the type of facial nerve dehiscences in the presence of normal development of the facial canal. The aim of this study is to review the site and the type of such bony defects in 144 patients operated for facial paralysis, myringoplasty, stapedotomy, middle ear exploration for sudden hearing loss, and so forth, other than chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, middle ear tumors, and anomaly. Correlation of intraoperative findings with preoperative computerized tomography was also analyzed in 35 patients. Conclusively, one out of every 10 surgical cases may have dehiscence of the facial canal which has to be always borne in mind during surgical manipulation of the middle ear. Computerized tomography has some limitations to evaluate the dehiscent facial canal due to high false negative and positive rates.

  2. Vascular branches from cutaneous nerve of the forearm and hand: application to better understanding raynaud's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, K; Ohmichi, M; Ohmichi, Y; Yakura, T; Hammer, N; Mizuno, D; Naito, M; Nakano, T

    2017-09-29

    Cutaneous nerves have branches called vascular branches (VBs) that reach arteries. VBs are thought to be involved in arterial constriction, and this is the rationale for periarterial sympathectomy as a treatment option for Raynaud's disease. However, the branching patterns and distribution areas of the VBs remain largely unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anatomical structures of the VBs of the cutaneous nerves. Forty hands and forearms were examined to assess the branching patterns and distribution areas of the VBs of the superficial branch of the radial nerve (SBRN), the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve (LACN), the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MACN), and the palmar cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve (PCUN). VBs reaching the radial and ulnar arteries were observed in all specimens. The branching patterns were classified into six types. The mean distance between the radial styloid process and the point where the VBs reached the radial artery was 34.3 ± 4.8 mm in the SBRN and 38.5 ± 15.8 mm in the LACN. The mean distance between the ulnar styloid process and the point where the VBs reached the ulnar artery was 60.3 ± 25.9 mm in the MACN and 43.8 ± 26.0 mm in the PCUN. This study showed that the VBs of the cutaneous nerves have diverse branching patterns. The VBs of the SBRN had a more limited distribution areas than those of the other nerves. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  4. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor.

  5. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kishore; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Bajantri, Bharat; Singh, Amandeep; Abbas, Hafsa; Dejesus, Eddy; Khan, Rana Raheel; Niazi, Masooma; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor. PMID:28553221

  6. Axillary nerve injury associated with sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkook; Saetia, Kriangsak; Saha, Suparna; Kline, David G; Kim, Daniel H

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to present and investigate axillary nerve injuries associated with sports. This study retrospectively reviewed 26 axillary nerve injuries associated with sports between the years 1985 and 2010. Preoperative status of the axillary nerve was evaluated by using the Louisiana State University Health Science Center (LSUHSC) grading system published by the senior authors. Intraoperative nerve action potential recordings were performed to check nerve conduction and assess the possibility of resection. Neurolysis, suture, and nerve grafts were used for the surgical repair of the injured nerves. In 9 patients with partial loss of function and 3 with complete loss, neurolysis based on nerve action potential recordings was the primary treatment. Two patients with complete loss of function were treated with resection and suturing and 12 with resection and nerve grafting. The minimum follow-up period was 16 months (mean 20 months). The injuries were associated with the following sports: skiing (12 cases), football (5), rugby (2), baseball (2), ice hockey (2), soccer (1), weightlifting (1), and wrestling (1). Functional recovery was excellent. Neurolysis was performed in 9 cases, resulting in an average functional recovery of LSUHSC Grade 4.2. Recovery with graft repairs averaged LSUHSC Grade 3 or better in 11 of 12 cases Surgical repair can restore useful deltoid function in patients with sports-associated axillary nerve injuries, even in cases of severe stretch-contusion injury.

  7. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  8. Peripheral nerve involvement in Bell's palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bueri

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of patients with Bell's palsy were studied in order to disclose the presence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. 20 patients, 8 male and 12 female, with recent Bell's palsy as their unique disease were examined, in all cases other causes of polyneuropathy were ruled out. Patients were investigated with CSF examination, facial nerve latencies in the affected and in the sound sides, and maximal motor nerve conduction velocities, as well as motor terminal latencies from the right median and peroneal nerves. CSF laboratory examination was normal in all cases. Facial nerve latencies were abnormal in all patients in the affected side, and they differed significantly from those of control group in the clinically sound side. Half of the patients showed abnormal values in the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities and motor terminal latencies of the right median and peroneal nerves. These results agree with previous reports which have pointed out that other cranial nerves may be affected in Bell's palsy. However, we have found a higher frequency of peripheral nerve involvement in this entity. These findings, support the hypothesis that in some patients Bell's palsy is the component of a more widespread disease, affecting other cranial and peripheral nerves.

  9. Outcomes Following Closed Axillary Nerve Injury: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Joseph W; Eichinger, Josef K

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old male who sustained an axillary nerve injury secondary to a glenohumeral joint dislocation at a young age, and who has served over 20 years in the military with near normal shoulder function. In addition, we review the literature for the natural history of axillary nerve injury. A 43-year-old male sustained a left anterior glenohumeral dislocation in a motor vehicle accident as an 18-year-old. Following prompt manual reduction and subsequent physical therapy, the patient developed a permanent axillary nerve palsy. Despite the development of complete atrophy of his deltoid musculature and persistent sensory loss in the axillary nerve distribution, he experienced restoration of function with minimal to no deficit. Ultimately, he enlisted in the military 4 years after the injury and has served 22 years, which includes combat deployments with normal shoulder function and absence of pain. Axillary nerve injury is a relatively common injury after anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation. There is little known about the long-term outcome of patient's with permanent axillary nerve injury. This case suggests that it is possible for a young athletic individual to function at a high level of activity after permanent loss of axillary nerve function. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. Axillary nerve injury in young adults--an overlooked diagnosis? Early results of nerve reconstruction and nerve transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Lars B; Cöster, Marcus; Björkman, Anders; Backman, Clas

    2012-09-01

    An injury to the axillary nerve from a shoulder trauma can easily be overlooked. Spontaneous functional recovery may occur, but occasionally reconstructive surgery is required. The time frame for nerve reconstruction procedures is from a neurobiological view crucial for a good functional outcome. This study presents a group of operatively and non-operatively treated young adults with axillary nerve injuries caused by motorcycle accidents, where the diagnosis was set late. Ten young men (median age at trauma 13 years, range 9-24) with an axillary nerve injury were diagnosed by examination of shoulder function and electromyography (EMG). The patients had either a nerve reconstruction procedure or were treated conservatively and their recovery was monitored. The axillary nerve was explored and reconstructed at a median of 8 months (range 1-22 months) after trauma in 8/10 patients. Two patients were treated non-operatively. In 4/8 cases, a reconstruction with sural nerve graft was performed and in 1/8 case only exploration of the nerve was made (minor neuroma). In 3/8 cases a radial nerve branch transfer to the axillary nerve was chosen as the procedure. The shoulder was mobilised after 3 weeks with physiotherapy and the patients were monitored regularly. Functional recovery was observed in 9/10 cases (median follow up 11 months, range 7-64) with EMG signs of reinnervation in seven patients. Axillary nerve function should not be overlooked in young patients with a minor shoulder trauma. Nerve reconstruction can successfully recreate function.

  11. Axillary nerve injury in young adults-An overlooked diagnosis? Early results of nerve reconstruction and nerve transfers.

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlin, Lars; Cöster, Marcus; Björkman, Anders; Backman, Clas

    2012-01-01

    An injury to the axillary nerve from a shoulder trauma can easily be overlooked. Spontaneous functional recovery may occur, but occasionally reconstructive surgery is required. The time frame for nerve reconstruction procedures is from a neurobiological view crucial for a good functional outcome. This study presents a group of operatively and non-operatively treated young adults with axillary nerve injuries caused by motorcycle accidents, where the diagnosis was set late. Ten young men (media...

  12. Intraoperative Fluoroscopic Imaging for Suprascapular Nerve Localization During Spinal Accessory Nerve to Suprascapular Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabbad, Nicole C; Nuland, Kyle S; Pothula, Aravind

    2017-08-01

    Distal fiber transfer of the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) has been well described as an effective means to regain shoulder external rotation following upper trunk brachial plexus injuries. Both supine and prone positioning techniques have been described with comparable success. Whereas the posterior technique allows for sufficient distal length on the SAN for effective neurotization of the infraclavicular brachial plexus and SSN both proximal and distal to the suprascapular ligament, localization of the SSN within the suprascapular notch can be challenging and time intensive, especially in the obese patient. The use of intraoperative C-arm fluoroscopy is presented as a viable method for more exact suprascapular notch identification during dissection of the SSN. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Incorporation of chitosan microspheres into collagen-chitosan scaffolds for the controlled release of nerve growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zeng

    Full Text Available Artifical nerve scaffold can be used as a promising alternative to autologous nerve grafts to enhance the repair of peripheral nerve defects. However, current nerve scaffolds lack efficient microstructure and neurotrophic support.Microsphere-Scaffold composite was developed by incorporating chitosan microspheres loaded with nerve growth factor (NGF-CMSs into collagen-chitosan scaffolds (CCH with longitudinally oriented microchannels (NGF-CMSs/CCH. The morphological characterizations, in vitro release kinetics study, neurite outgrowth assay, and bioactivity assay were evaluated. After that, a 15-mm-long sciatic nerve gap in rats was bridged by the NGF-CMSs/CCH, CCH physically absorbed NGF (NGF/CCH, CCH or nerve autograft. 16 weeks after implantation, electrophysiology, fluoro-gold retrograde tracing, and nerve morphometry were performed.The NGF-CMSs were evenly distributed throughout the longitudinally oriented microchannels of the scaffold. The NGF-CMSs/CCH was capable of sustained release of bioactive NGF within 28 days as compared with others in vitro. In vivo animal study demonstrated that the outcomes of NGF-CMSs/CCH were better than those of NGF/CCH or CCH.Our findings suggest that incorporation of NGF-CMSs into the CCH may be a promising tool in the repair of peripheral nerve defects.

  14. Morphological differences in skeletal muscle atrophy of rats with motor nerve and/or sensory nerve injury★

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lei; Lv, Guangming; Jiang, Shengyang; Yan, Zhiqiang; Sun, Junming; Wang, Ling; Jiang, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs after denervation. The present study dissected the rat left ventral root and dorsal root at L4-6 or the sciatic nerve to establish a model of simple motor nerve injury, sensory nerve injury or mixed nerve injury. Results showed that with prolonged denervation time, rats with simple motor nerve injury, sensory nerve injury or mixed nerve injury exhibited abnormal behavior, reduced wet weight of the left gastrocnemius muscle, decreased diameter and cross-sectional...

  15. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Roehm, P.C.; Mends, F.; Hagiwara, M.; Fatterpekar, G.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell’s palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers

  16. Factors that influence peripheral nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Archibald, Simon J; Madison, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    Regeneration in the peripheral nervous system is often incomplete though it is uncertain which factors, such as the type and extent of the injury or the method or timing of repair, determine the degree of functional recovery. Serial electrophysiological techniques were used to follow recovery from...... median nerve lesions (n = 46) in nonhuman primates over 3 to 4 years, a time span comparable with such lesions in humans. Nerve gap distances of 5, 20, or 50mm were repaired with nerve grafts or collagen-based nerve guide tubes, and three electrophysiological outcome measures were followed: (1) compound...... muscle action potentials in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, (2) the number and size of motor units in reinnervated muscle, and (3) compound sensory action potentials from digital nerve. A statistical model was used to assess the influence of three variables (repair type, nerve gap distance, and time...

  17. Optic nerve invasion of uveal melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Isager, Peter; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the histopathological characteristics associated with the invasion of the optic nerve of uveal melanoma and to evaluate the association between invasion of the optic nerve and survival. In order to achieve this, all uveal melanomas with optic nerve invasion...... in Denmark between 1942 and 2001 were reviewed (n=157). Histopathological characteristics and depth of optic nerve invasion were recorded. The material was compared with a control material from the same period consisting of 85 cases randomly drawn from all choroidal/ciliary body melanomas without optic nerve...... invasion. Prelaminar/laminar optic nerve invasion was in multivariate analysis associated with focal retinal invasion, neovascularization of the chamber angle, and scleral invasion. Postlaminar invasion was further associated with non-spindle cell type and rupture of the inner limiting membrane...

  18. The nerve endings of the acetabular labrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y T; Azuma, H

    1995-11-01

    The nerve endings of the human acetabular labrum were investigated. Twenty-three acetabular labra were obtained from 24 fresh human cadavers, stained with Suzuki's silver impregnation and an immunohistochemical technique for neurogenic specific protein S-100, and examined by light and electron microscopy. Ramified free nerve endings were seen in all specimens by silver staining, and also were observed by the immunohistochemical technique for S-100 protein. Sensory nerve end organs, such as a Vater-Pacini corpuscle, Golgi-Mazzoni corpuscle, Ruffini corpuscle, and articular corpuscle (Krause corpuscle), were observed by silver staining. Collagen fibers were scattered sparsely in the superficial layer of the labrum, and nerve endings were observed mostly in this region. Collagen fibers were sparse, and nerve endings also were observed in some regions among the collagen fiber bundles in the inner layer. Innervation of the acetabular labrum was confirmed in this study, suggesting that nerve endings in the labrum may be involved in nociceptive and proprioceptive mechanisms.

  19. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber...... years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. Results: At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p ...% and the amplitudes only to 7 ± 1% (P Touch sensation correlated with SNAP areas (p

  20. Optic nerve sheath fenestration in cryptococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Tatyana; Mirani, Neena; Turbin, Roger E

    2008-01-01

    A patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) developed crytpococcal meningitis, complicated by papilledema and severe progressive visual loss despite medical therapy. Bilateral optic sheath fenestration resulted in significant improvement in vision and resolution of papilledema. Histopathologic evaluation of the optic nerve sheath demonstrated numerous cryptococci. Optic nerve sheath fenestration may be an effective treatment method when high intracranial pressure is contributing to visual loss, even in the presence of involvement of the optic nerve sheath by the fungus. PMID:19668765

  1. Intermittent third nerve palsy with cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, J R

    1993-06-01

    In the several days before death, two AIDS patients with cryptococcal meningitis and increased intracranial pressure (ICP) experienced episodic unilateral third nerve palsies seemingly related to transient peaks in ICP. While cryptococcal neuritis may have predisposed the nerves to pressure effects, CT scans showed no evidence of tentorial herniation. These cases raise the possibility that severe elevations of ICP can precipitate third nerve paresis on rare occasions.

  2. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used to ...... to study ephaptic (nonsynaptic) interactions between impulses on parallel fibers, which may play a functional role in neural processing. (C) 2001 Published by Elsevier Science B.V....

  3. Shrapnel Injury of Isolated Third Cranial Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Ulutaş, Murat; Seçer, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Isolated third nerve palsy develops in numerous intracranial pathologies such as closed head trauma, tumor, and aneurysm. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy caused by shrapnel injury is uncommon. After a penetrating intracranial shrapnel injury, our patient with oculomotor ophthalmoplegia underwent surgery. Microsurgery removed the shrapnel that was applying pressure on the third nerve, resulting in contusion. A partial recovery associated with regeneration was observed at month 9. Extraocular m...

  4. An audit of traumatic nerve injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, G

    2009-07-01

    The impact of trauma in the Irish healthcare setting is considerable. We present the results of a retrospective assessment of referrals to a Neurophysiology department for suspected traumatic nerve injury. A broad range of traumatic neuropathies was demonstrated on testing, from numerous causes. We demonstrate an increased liklihood of traumatic nerve injury after fracture \\/ dislocation (p = 0.007). Our series demonstrates the need for clinicians to be aware of the possibility of nerve injury post trauma, especially after bony injury.

  5. Label-free in vivo imaging of peripheral nerve by multispectral photoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Phillips, Evan; Wang, Pu; Goergen, Craig J; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional surgical damage to nerves is mainly due to poor visualization of nerve tissue relative to adjacent structures. Multispectral photoacoustic tomography can provide chemical information with specificity and ultrasonic spatial resolution with centimeter imaging depth, making it a potential tool for noninvasive neural imaging. To implement this label-free imaging approach, a multispectral photoacoustic tomography platform was built. Imaging depth and spatial resolution were characterized. In vivo imaging of the femoral nerve that is 2 mm deep in a nude mouse was performed. Through multivariate curve resolution analysis, the femoral nerve was discriminated from the femoral artery and chemical maps of their spatial distributions were generated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A rare case of bifurcated lesser occipital nerve in the posterior triangle of the neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the lesser occipital nerve (LON may vary, but variations in its pattern are rare. We report here a case of LON, bifurcated into superior and inferior roots in the posterior triangle of the neck. Bifurcation of the LON formed about 1.5 cm above the nerve point of the neck, near the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both roots ascended obliquely upwards, and later united to form a single trunk in the upper part of the posterior triangle of the neck. It then entered the scalp where its distribution was normal. Since the cutaneous nerves of the cervical plexus are anesthetized for pain relief, as with cervicogenic headache, exceptional morphological variations of these nerves should be taken into consideration before any anesthetic procedures are performed in this region. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(3.000: 184-186

  7. Nerve Biopsy In The Diagnosis Of Leporsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazra B

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin and nerve biopsies were done in 33 cases of different clinical types of leprosy selected from Dermatology OPD of Medical College and Hospitals, Calcutta during 1994-95. Histopathological results were compared with emphasis on the role of nerve biopsies in detection of patients with multibacillary leprosy. The evident possibility of having patients with multibacillary leprosy in peripheral leprosy with multiple drugs. It is found that skin and nerve biopsy are equally informative in borderline and lepromatour leprosy and is the only means to diagnose polyneuritic leprosy. Nerve biopsy appears to be more informative in the diagnosis of all clinical types of leprosy.

  8. [Proximal interlocking of humeral intramedullary nails and risk of axillary nerve injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, J; Rommens, P M

    2002-01-01

    Possible injuries to the axillary nerve are criticised in antegrade and retrograde endomedullary nailing of the humeral shaft during proximal interlocking. Clinical experience seems not to support the theory of a high risk of nerve injury. The real risk although remains unknown under anatomical-morphological aspects. Eight complete human cadaveric shoulder-arm regions with original soft-tissue coverage had been used. Four times the unreamed humeral nail (UHN) had been inserted retrograde, and four times antegrade, distributed in each pair. Antegrade interlocking was performed after skin incision and spreading of soft tissues through the aiming devices. This involved one oblique bolt from lateral to medial. Retrograde proximal interlocking was performed under image intensifier. This involved triple interlocking, once dorso-ventrally and twice latero-medially. The incision paths have been marked. After preparation of the nerve stem in the lateral axillary portal the different branches have been searched and exposed. The spatial relations of bolts and nerve branches have been measured and the insertion path of the bolts has been revised, finally lesions of nerve structures have been documented. We found the latero-medially inserted bolt heads of the retrograde approach and the oblique bolt head of the antegrade approach being placed in a safe distance from the medio-dorsally positioned stem of the axillary nerve. On the other hand the dorsoventrally inserted bolt head (retrograde approach) showed in most cases a very tight relation to the nerve stem. Exploring the axillary nerve and its branches showed in no case a direct nerve lesion. We suggest to perform only a sharp cutaneous incision and then to prepare the muscle only by careful spreading until touching bone, with tissue retraction during drilling. In retrograde nailing the dorso-ventral bolt should only be used in extreme proximal fractures.

  9. Receipt and Perceived Helpfulness of Mental Illness Information: Findings from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Annette L; Brooker, Joanne; Hasking, Penelope; Clarke, David; Meadows, Graham

    2017-10-20

    The distribution of mental illness information is a crucial element of mental health promotion initiatives. We assessed the receipt and perceived helpfulness of such information in Australia. Data from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing indicated that, during the year prior to the survey, 33.7% of Australians received mental illness information; of these, 51.2% found it helpful. Among people with a mental disorder, 46.1% received information; of these, 67.4% found it helpful. Non-English speakers and the socially disadvantaged were less likely to receive mental illness information. Older and less educated respondents were less likely to both receive mental illness information and find it helpful. Mental health service users were more likely to receive mental illness information perceived as helpful than those who had not accessed such services. Better targeted information interventions are required to ensure those most likely to benefit receive mental illness-related information.

  10. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Mental Foramen Variations: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Karbasi Kheir, Mitra; Hekmatian, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mental foramen is important in surgical operations of premolars because it transfers the mental nerves and vessels. This study evaluated the variations of mental foramen by cone-beam computed tomography among a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods. A total number of 180 cone-beam computed tomography projections were analyzed in terms of shape, size, direction, and horizontal and vertical positions of mental foramen in the right and left sides. Results. The most common shape was oval, opening direction was posterior-superior, horizontal position was in line with second premolar, and vertical position was apical to the adjacent dental root. The mean of foremen diameter was 3.59 mm. Conclusion. In addition to the most common types of mental foramen, other variations exist, too. Hence, it reflects the significance of preoperative radiographic examinations, especially 3-dimensional images to prevent nerve damage

  11. Accessory mental foramen: A rare anatomical variation detected by cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; De Faro Valverde, Ludmila; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Crusoe-Rebello, Ieda Margarida [Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    The mental foramen is a bilateral opening in the vestibular portion of the mandible through which nerve endings, such as the mental nerve, emerge. In general, the mental foramen is located between the lower premolars. This region is a common area for the placement of dental implants. It is very important to identify anatomical variations in presurgical imaging exams since damage to neurovascular bundles may have a direct influence on treatment success. In the hemimandible, the mental foramen normally appears as a single structure, but there are some rare reports on the presence and number of anatomical variations; these variations may include accessory foramina. The present report describes the presence of accessory mental foramina in the right mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before dental implant placement.

  12. Accessory mental foramen: A rare anatomical variation detected by cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; De Faro Valverde, Ludmila; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Crusoe-Rebello, Ieda Margarida

    2015-01-01

    The mental foramen is a bilateral opening in the vestibular portion of the mandible through which nerve endings, such as the mental nerve, emerge. In general, the mental foramen is located between the lower premolars. This region is a common area for the placement of dental implants. It is very important to identify anatomical variations in presurgical imaging exams since damage to neurovascular bundles may have a direct influence on treatment success. In the hemimandible, the mental foramen normally appears as a single structure, but there are some rare reports on the presence and number of anatomical variations; these variations may include accessory foramina. The present report describes the presence of accessory mental foramina in the right mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before dental implant placement.

  13. Accessory mental foramen: A rare anatomical variation detected by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; Valverde, Ludmila de Faro; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Crusoé-Rebello, Iêda Margarida

    2015-03-01

    The mental foramen is a bilateral opening in the vestibular portion of the mandible through which nerve endings, such as the mental nerve, emerge. In general, the mental foramen is located between the lower premolars. This region is a common area for the placement of dental implants. It is very important to identify anatomical variations in presurgical imaging exams since damage to neurovascular bundles may have a direct influence on treatment success. In the hemimandible, the mental foramen normally appears as a single structure, but there are some rare reports on the presence and number of anatomical variations; these variations may include accessory foramina. The present report describes the presence of accessory mental foramina in the right mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before dental implant placement.

  14. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Mental Foramen Variations: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Karbasi Kheir, Mitra; Hekmatian, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mental foramen is important in surgical operations of premolars because it transfers the mental nerves and vessels. This study evaluated the variations of mental foramen by cone-beam computed tomography among a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods. A total number of 180 cone-beam computed tomography projections were analyzed in terms of shape, size, direction, and horizontal and vertical positions of mental foramen in the right and left sides. Results. The most common shape was oval, opening direction was posterior-superior, horizontal position was in line with second premolar, and vertical position was apical to the adjacent dental root. The mean of foremen diameter was 3.59 mm. Conclusion. In addition to the most common types of mental foramen, other variations exist, too. Hence, it reflects the significance of preoperative radiographic examinations, especially 3-dimensional images to prevent nerve damage.

  15. Muscle potentials evoked by magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve in unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Soens, I.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Van Ham, L. M. L.

    Magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve and subsequent recording of the muscle-evoked potential (MEP) was performed in eight dogs and three cats with unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction. Localisation of the lesion in the sciatic nerve was based on the history, clinical neurological examination

  16. Genetic modification of human sural nerve segments by a lentiviral vector encoding nerve growth factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tannemaat, Martijn R; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, J.; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Autologous nerve grafts are used to treat severe peripheral nerve injury, but recovery of nerve function after grafting is rarely complete. Exogenous application of neurotrophic factors may enhance regeneration, but thus far the application of neurotrophic factors has been hampered by

  17. One-stage human acellular nerve allograft reconstruction for digital nerve defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-yuan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human acellular nerve allografts have a wide range of donor origin and can effectively avoid nerve injury in the donor area. Very little is known about one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defects. The present study observed the feasibility and effectiveness of human acellular nerve allograft in the reconstruction of < 5-cm digital nerve defects within 6 hours after injury. A total of 15 cases of nerve injury, combined with nerve defects in 18 digits from the Department of Emergency were enrolled in this study. After debridement, digital nerves were reconstructed using human acellular nerve allografts. The patients were followed up for 6-24 months after reconstruction. Mackinnon-Dellon static two-point discrimination results showed excellent and good rates of 89%. Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test demonstrated that light touch was normal, with an obvious improvement rate of 78%. These findings confirmed that human acellular nerve allograft for one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defect after hand injury is feasible, which provides a novel trend for peripheral nerve reconstruction.

  18. The functional results of acute nerve grafting in traumatic sciatic nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayvada, Haluk; Demirdöver, Cenk; Menderes, Adnan; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Karaca, Can

    2013-03-01

    The sciatic and peroneal nerves are the most frequently injured in lower extremities, followed by tibial and femoral nerves. The aim of this study is to evaluate the functional results of acute nerve grafting in traumatic sciatic nerve injuries. A total of 9 patients with sciatic nerve defect were treated with primary nerve grafting. The mean age was 31.7 years. The etiologic factors were gunshot wounds, traffic accident, and penetrating trauma. All of the patients had sciatic nerve defects ranging from 3.4 to 13.6 cm. The follow-up period ranged between 25 and 84 months. The tibial nerve motor function was "good" or "very good" (M3-M4) in 5 patients (55.6%). The plantar flexion was not sufficient for the rest of the patients. The peroneal nerve motor function was also "good" and "very good" in 3 patients (33.3%). The functional results of the acute nerve grafting of the sciatic nerve within the first week after the injury are poorer than reported in the related literature. This protocol should only be applied to select patients who have adequate soft tissue coverage and healthy nerve endings.

  19. Axillary Nerve Reconstruction: Anterior-Posterior Exposure With Sural Nerve Cable Graft Pull-Through Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Heather L; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2015-12-01

    Deltoid paralysis after axillary nerve injury results in limitations in shoulder function and stability. In the setting of an isolated axillary nerve injury with no clinical or electromyographic evidence of recovery that is within 6 to 9 months postinjury, the authors' preferred technique to reinnervate the deltoid is to reconstruct the axillary nerve with sural nerve grafting. Intraoperative neuromuscular electrophysiology is critical to determine the continuity of the axillary nerve before proceeding with reconstruction. The majority of the time, both an anterior and posterior incision and dissection of the axillary nerve is required to adequately delineate the zone of injury. This also ensures that both proximally and distally, uninjured axillary nerve is present before graft inset and also facilitates the ability to perform a meticulous microsurgical inset of the nerve graft posteriorly. The nerve graft must be pulled through from posterior to anterior to span the zone of injury and reconstruct the axillary nerve. Careful infraclavicular brachial plexus dissection is necessary to prevent further injury to components of the brachial plexus in the setting of a scarred bed. Patients will require postoperative therapy to prevent limitations in shoulder range of motion secondary to postoperative stiffness. This paper presents a detailed surgical technique for axillary nerve reconstruction by an anterior-posterior approach with a pull-through technique of a sural nerve cable graft.

  20. A prospective clinical evaluation of biodegradable neurolac nerve guides for sensory nerve repair in the hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertleff, MJOE; Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA

    Purpose: Our purpose was to study the recovery of sensory nerve function, after treatment of traumatic peripheral nerve lesions with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone) Neurolac nerve guide (Polyganics B.V., Groningen, the Netherlands) versus the current standard reconstruction

  1. Biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides versus autologous nerve grafts : Electromyographic and video analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional effects of bridging a gap in the sciatic nerve of the rat with either a biodegradable copolymer of (DL)-lactide and epsilon -caprolactone [p(DLLA-epsilon -CL)] nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. Electromyograms (EMGs) of the gastrocnemius

  2. Carbon dioxide laser-assisted nerve repair: effect of solder and suture material on nerve regeneration in rat sciatic nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menovsky, Tomas; Beek, Johan F.

    2003-01-01

    In order to further improve and explore the role of lasers for nerve reconstruction, this study was designed to investigate regeneration of sharply transected peripheral nerves repaired with a CO(2) milliwatt laser in combination with three different suture materials and a bovine albumin protein

  3. Evaluation of Morphological and Functional Nerve Recovery of Rat Sciatic Nerve with a Hyaff11-Based Nerve Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jansen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of a Hyaff11-based nerve guide was studied in rats. Functional tests were performed to study motor nerve recovery. A withdrawal reflex test was performed to test sensory recovery. Morphology was studied by means of histology on explanted tissue samples. Motor nerve recovery was established within 7 weeks. Hereafter, some behavioral parameters like alternating steps showed an increase in occurence, while others remained stable. Sensory function was observed within the 7 weeks time frame. Nerve tissue had bridged the 10-mm gap within 7 weeks. The average nerve fiber surface area increased significantly in time. In situ degradation of the nerve conduit was fully going on at week 7 and tubes had collapsed by then. At weeks 15 and 21, the knitted tube wall structure was completely surrounded by macrophages and giant cells, and matrix was penetrating the tube wall. We conclude that a Hyaff11-based nerve guide can be used to bridge short peripheral nerve defects in rat. However, adaptations need to be made.

  4. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-01-01

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups...

  5. Nerve injuries do occur in elbow arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgersom, Nick F. J.; van Deurzen, Derek F. P.; Gerritsma, Carina L. E.; van der Heide, Huub J. L.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Eygendaal, Denise; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose is to create more awareness as well as emphasize the risk of permanent nerve injury as a complication of elbow arthroscopy. Patients who underwent elbow arthroscopy complicated by permanent nerve injury were retrospectively collected. Patients were collected using two strategies: (1) by

  6. suprascapular nerve entrapment secondary to compression at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-16

    Feb 16, 2010 ... entrapment syndrome in English literature (2,3) but in fact the first description of suprascapular nerve entrapment was provided by André ... suprascapular nerve injury proximal to the branch to supraspinatus muscle. ... suprascapular notch, most of the time the reason is supraglenoid cyst as reported by ...

  7. Benign Recurrent Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective chart review of a cohort of 253 pediatric patients with sixth nerve palsies uncovered 30 cases of benign sixth nerve palsy, of which 9 were recurrent, in a study at University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

  8. Congenital sixth nerve palsy with associated anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama Kasturi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital abduction deficit is most likely due to Duane's retraction syndrome as congenital abducens nerve palsy is very rare. We report two cases of infantile abduction deficit due to sixth nerve palsy associated with other anomalies to highlight the importance of including neuroimaging in the evaluation of an infant presenting with a limitation of abduction.

  9. Congenital sixth nerve palsy with associated anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturi, Nirupama

    2017-10-01

    Congenital abduction deficit is most likely due to Duane's retraction syndrome as congenital abducens nerve palsy is very rare. We report two cases of infantile abduction deficit due to sixth nerve palsy associated with other anomalies to highlight the importance of including neuroimaging in the evaluation of an infant presenting with a limitation of abduction.

  10. Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000326.htm Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care To use the sharing features on ... or at other unusual times. Treating and Preventing Nerve Damage from Diabetes Treating diabetic neuropathy can make some symptoms of ...

  11. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  12. Multiple cranial nerve palsies complicating tympanomastoiditis: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otitis media either acute or chronic, is not uncommon in childhood. Multiple cranial nerve palsies occuring as a complication of either form of otitis media is unusual. A case of a nine year old boy with chronic suppurative otitis media with associated mastoiditis complicated with ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve palsies is ...

  13. Mental Illness Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News & Events About Us Home > Health Information Share Statistics Research shows that mental illnesses are common in ... of mental illnesses, such as suicide and disability. Statistics Top ı cs Mental Illness Any Anxiety Disorder ...

  14. Common Mental Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Susan R.; Levine, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of common student mental health issues and approaches for student affairs practitioners who are working with students with mental illness, and ways to support the overall mental health of students on campus.

  15. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  16. Latino Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NAMI About NAMI + x IN THIS SECTION La salud mental en la comunidad latina Share NAMI Share Home ... Support Diverse Communities Latinos IN THIS SECTION La salud mental en la comunidad latina Latino Mental Health Video ...

  17. Keratin gel filler for peripheral nerve repair in a rodent sciatic nerve injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chih; Ramadan, Mostafa; Van Dyke, Mark; Kokai, Lauren E; Philips, Brian J; Rubin, J Peter; Marra, Kacey G

    2012-01-01

    Restoration with sufficient functional recovery after long-gap peripheral nerve damage remains a clinical challenge. In vitro, keratins, which are derived from human hair, enhance activity and gene expression of Schwann cells. The specific aim of the authors' study was to examine keratin gel as conduit filler for peripheral nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Incorporation of glial cell line-derived, neurotrophic factor, double-walled microspheres into polycaprolactone nerve guides has demonstrated an off-the-shelf product alternative to promote nerve regeneration, and this conduit was filled with keratin gel and examined in a rat 15-mm sciatic nerve defect model. As an indicator of recovery, nerve sections were stained with S100 and protein gene product 9.5 antibody. The keratin-treated groups, compared with both saline and empty polycaprolactone (control) groups (p nerve conduits possess optimal mechanical and degradative properties, rendering the biocompatible conduits potentially useful in peripheral nerve repair. From their studies, the authors conclude that polycaprolactone nerve guides with glial cell line-derived, neurotrophic factor-loaded, double-walled microspheres filled with keratin gel represent a potentially viable guiding material for Schwann cell and axon migration and proliferation in the treatment of peripheral nerve regeneration.

  18. A silk sericin/silicone nerve guidance conduit promotes regeneration of a transected sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongjian; Yang, Wen; Chen, Jianghai; Zhang, Jinxiang; Lu, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xiaobo; Huang, Kun; Li, Huili; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2015-10-28

    Peripheral nerve gap defects lead to significant loss of sensory or motor function. Tissue engineering has become an important alternative to nerve repair. Sericin, a major component of silk, is a natural protein whose value in tissue engineering has just begun to be explored. Here, the first time use of sericin in vivo is reported as a long-term implant for peripheral nerve regeneration. A sericin nerve guidance conduit is designed and fabricated. This conduit is highly porous with mechanical strength matching peripheral nerve tissue. It supports Schwann cell proliferation and is capable of up-regulating the transcription of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in Schwann cells. The sericin conduit wrapped with a silicone conduit (sericin/silicone double conduits) is used for bridging repair of a 5 mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. The sericin/silicone double conduits achieve functional recovery comparable to that of autologous nerve grafting as evidenced by drastically improved nerve function and morphology. Importantly, this improvement is mainly attributed to the sericin conduit as the silicone conduit alone only produces marginal functional recovery. This sericin/silicone-double-conduit strategy offers an efficient and valuable alternative to autologous nerve grafting for repairing damaged peripheral nerve. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Matching of motor-sensory modality in the rodent femoral nerve model shows no enhanced effect on peripheral nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, David H.; Johnson, Philip J.; Moore, Amy M.; Magill, Christina K.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Tung, Thomas HH.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of peripheral nerve injuries with nerve gaps largely consists of autologous nerve grafting utilizing sensory nerve donors. Underlying this clinical practice is the assumption that sensory autografts provide a suitable substrate for motoneuron regeneration, thereby facilitating motor endplate reinnervation and functional recovery. This study examined the role of nerve graft modality on axonal regeneration, comparing motor nerve regeneration through motor, sensory, and mixed nerve isografts in the Lewis rat. A total of 100 rats underwent grafting of the motor or sensory branch of the femoral nerve with histomorphometric analysis performed after 5, 6, or 7 weeks. Analysis demonstrated similar nerve regeneration in motor, sensory, and mixed nerve grafts at all three time points. These data indicate that matching of motor-sensory modality in the rat femoral nerve does not confer improved axonal regeneration through nerve isografts. PMID:20122927

  20. An Important Chemical Weapon Group: Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yaren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of developing modern chemistry, nerve agents, which are one of the most important group of efficient chemical warfare agents, were developed just before Second World War. They generate toxic and clinical effects via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and causing excessive amounts of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in the body. Clinical symptoms are occurred as a result of affected muscarinic (stimulation of secretuar glands, miosis, breathing problems etc., nicotinic (stimulation of skeletal muscles, paralyse, tremors etc. and central nerve system (convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma etc. areas. In case of a nerve agent exposure, treatment includes the steps of ventilation, decontamination, antidotal treatment (atropine, oximes, diazepam and pyridostigmine bromide and supportive theraphy. Because of arising possibility of using chemical warfare agents due to current conjuncture of the world, medical staff should know about nerve agents, their effects and how to treat the casualties exposured to nerve agents. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(6.000: 491-500

  1. An Important Chemical Weapon Group: Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yaren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of developing modern chemistry, nerve agents, which are one of the most important group of efficient chemical warfare agents, were developed just before Second World War. They generate toxic and clinical effects via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and causing excessive amounts of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in the body. Clinical symptoms are occurred as a result of affected muscarinic (stimulation of secretuar glands, miosis, breathing problems etc., nicotinic (stimulation of skeletal muscles, paralyse, tremors etc. and central nerve system (convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma etc. areas. In case of a nerve agent exposure, treatment includes the steps of ventilation, decontamination, antidotal treatment (atropine, oximes, diazepam and pyridostigmine bromide and supportive theraphy. Because of arising possibility of using chemical warfare agents due to current conjuncture of the world, medical staff should know about nerve agents, their effects and how to treat the casualties exposured to nerve agents. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(6: 491-500

  2. Nerve injury caused by mandibular block analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2006-01-01

    Fifty-four injection injuries in 52 patients were caused by mandibular block analgesia affecting the lingual nerve (n=42) and/or the inferior alveolar nerve (n=12). All patients were examined with a standardized test of neurosensory functions. The perception of the following stimuli was assessed......: feather light touch, pinprick, sharp/dull discrimination, warm, cold, point location, brush stroke direction, 2-point discrimination and pain perception. Gustation was tested for recognition of sweet, salt, sour and bitter. Mandibular block analgesia causes lingual nerve injury more frequently than...... inferior alveolar nerve injury. All grades of loss of neurosensory and gustatory functions were found, and a range of persisting neurogenic malfunctions was reported. Subjective complaints and neurosensory function tests indicate that lingual nerve lesions are more incapacitating than inferior alveolar...

  3. MR imaging of the intraparotid facial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Hiroaki; Iwasawa, Tae; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Furukawa, Masaki

    1996-01-01

    Using a 1.5T MR imaging system, seven normal volunteers and 6 patients with parotid tumors were studied and their intraparotid facial nerves were directly imaged. The findings were evaluated by T1-weighted axial, sagittal and oblique images. The facial nerve appeared to be relatively hypointensive within the highsignal parotid parenchyma, and the main trunks of the facial nerves were observed directly in all the cases examined. Their main divisions were detected in all the volunteers and 5 of 6 patients were imaged obliquely. The facial nerves run in various fashions and so the oblique scan planes were determined individually to detect this running figure directly. To verify our observations, surgical findings of the facial nerve were compared with the MR images or results. (author)

  4. Multifunctional Silk Nerve Guides for Axon Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupaj, Marie C.

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a critical issue as 2.8% of trauma patients present with this type of injury, estimating a total of 200,000 nerve repair procedures yearly in the United States. While the peripheral nervous system exhibits slow regeneration, at a rate of 0.5 mm -- 9 mm/day following trauma, this regenerative ability is only possible under certain conditions. Clinical repairs have changed slightly in the last 30 years and standard methods of treatment include suturing damaged nerve ends, allografting, and autografting, with the autograft the gold standard of these approaches. Unfortunately, the use of autografts requires a second surgery and there is a shortage of nerves available for grafting. Allografts are a second option however allografts have lower success rates and are accompanied by the need of immunosuppressant drugs. Recently there has been a focus on developing nerve guides as an "off the shelf" approach. Although some natural and synthetic guidance channels have been approved by the FDA, these nerve guides are unfunctionalized and repair only short gaps, less than 3 cm in length. The goal of this project was to identify strategies for functionalizing peripheral nerve conduits for the outgrowth of neuron axons in vitro . To accomplish this, two strategies (bioelectrical and biophysical) were indentified for increasing axon outgrowth and promoting axon guidance. Bioelectrical strategies exploited electrical stimulation for increasing neurite outgrowth. Biophysical strategies tested a range of surface topographies for axon guidance. Novel methods were developed for integrating electrical and biophysical strategies into silk films in 2D. Finally, a functionalized nerve conduit system was developed that integrated all strategies for the purpose of attaching, elongating, and guiding nervous tissue in vitro. Future directions of this work include silk conduit translation into a rat sciatic nerve model in vivo for the purpose of repairing long

  5. [Mental Space Navigation and Mental Time Travel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2017-11-01

    We examined patients with mental space navigation or mental time travel disorder to identify regions in the brain that may play a critical role in mental time travel in terms of clinical neuropsychology. These regions included the precneus, posterior cingulate gyrus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus, as well as the orbitofrontal cortex: the anterior and posterior medial areas were both shown to be important in this process. Further studies are required to define whether these form a network for mental time travel.

  6. Stress Altered Stem Cells with Decellularized Allograft to Improve Rate of Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    of the cellular elements normally present in peripheral nerve . 2. KEYWORDS: peripheral nerve repair , nerve injury , decellularized nerve ... nerve regeneration. The slow rate of nerve re generation in limbs results in poor prognosis for patients suffering from severe injuries , leading to...allograft, neural regeneration, stem cells, stress altered cells, peripheral nerve injury model, nerve graft 3 This comprehensive final report summarizes

  7. Collaboration in the provision of mental health care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, L.; Valius, L.; Lazarus, J.V.

    2012-01-01

    collaboration with mental health teams were a lack of GPs'confidence in their communication skills and ability to diagnose the most frequent mental disorders, prompt referral to mental health team specialists, low estimation of the prevalence of non-managed mental disorders, and location of mental health team......Background. General practitioners (GPs) often become the first point of care for mental health issues. Improved collaboration between GPs and mental health teams can make a GP's mental health services more efficient. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the collaboration between GPs...... and mental health team members and determine predictors for better collaboration. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, a 41- item questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of 797 Lithuanian GPs. The purpose of this questionnaire was to obtain knowledge about current practices of GPs in providing...

  8. Alterations of sympathetic nerve fibers in avascular necrosis of femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deqiang; Liu, Peilai; Zhang, Yuankai; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) was mainly due to alterations of bone vascularity. And noradrenaline (NA), as the neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), leads to the vasoconstriction by activating its α-Receptor. This study was to explore the nerve fiber density of the femoral head in the rabbit model of ANFH. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. The rabbit model of ANFH was established by the injection of methylprednisolone acetate. The nerve fiber density and distribution in the femoral head was determined using an Olympus BH2 microscope. Significant fewer sympathetic nerve fibers was found in the ANFH intertrochanteric bone samples (P = 0.036) with osteonecrosis. The number of sympathetic nerve fibers was compared between the two groups. And less sympathetic nerve fibers were found in later stage ANFH samples in comparison with those of early stages. ANFH might be preceded by an inflammatory reaction, and an inflammatory response might lead to arthritic changes in tissue samples, which in turn reduces the number of sympathetic nerve fibers.

  9. Detection of a diabetic sural nerve from the magnetic field after electric stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji; Hyodo, Akira; Chen, Xian; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we proposed a new diagnostic technique for diabetic neuropathy using biomagnetic measurement. Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes. To examine the injury, the skin potential around the nerve is often measured after electric stimulation. However, measuring the magnetic field may reveal precise condition of the injury. To evaluate the effect of measuring the magnetic field, a simulation study was performed. A diabetic sural nerve was simulated as a bundle of myelinated nerve fibers. Each fiber was modeled as an electric cable of Ranvier's nodes. Anatomical data were used to determine the number of nerve fibers and distribution of nerve fiber diameters. The electric potential and the magnetic field on the skin after electric stimulation were computed to the boundary element method. Biphasic time courses were obtained as the electric potential and the magnetic flux density at measurement points. In diabetic nerves, the longer interpeak latency of the electric potential wave and the shorter interpeak latency of the magnetic flux wave were obtained. Measuring both the electric potential and the magnetic flux density seemed to provide a noninvasive and objective marker for diabetic neuropathy.

  10. Primary optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremic, Branislav [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pitz, Susanne (eds.) [University Eye Hospital, Mainz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumour. Cases are usually separated into primary ONSM, which arises either intraorbitally or, less commonly, intracanalicularly, and secondary ONSM, which arises intracranially and subsequently invades the optic canal and orbit. This is the first book to cover all important aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of primary ONSM. After a general introduction, individual chapters discuss the clinical presentation, clinical examination and diagnosis, imaging, and histology. Treatment options are then addressed in detail, with special emphasis on external beam radiation therapy, and in particular stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy. The latter has recently produced consistently good results and is now considered the emerging treatment of choice for the vast majority of patients with primary ONSM. This well-illustrated book will prove invaluable to all practitioners who encounter primary ONSM in their clinical work. (orig.)

  11. Diabetes and the peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrosova, Irina G

    2009-10-01

    Diabetes-induced damage to peripheral nerve culminates in development of peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN), one of the most devastating complications of diabetes mellitus and a leading cause of foot amputation. The pathogenesis of PDN occurs as a consequence of complex interactions among multiple hyperglycemia-initiated mechanisms, impaired insulin signaling, inflammation, hypertension, and disturbances of fatty acid and lipid metabolism. This review describes experimental new findings in animal and cell culture models as well as clinical data suggesting the importance of 1) previously established hyperglycemia-initiated mechanisms such as increased aldose reductase activity, non-enzymatic glycation/glycooxidation, activation of protein kinase C, 2) oxidative-nitrosative stress and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation; 3) mitogen-activated protein kinase and cyclooxygenase-2 activation, impaired Ca(++) homeostasis and signaling, and several other mechanisms, in PDN.

  12. Presentation of pain and nerve involvement in trigeminal neuralgia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luqman, U.; Ahmed, A.; Janjua, O.S.; Umair, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine pain distribution and nerve involvement of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) patients at Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry, Rawalpindi. Material and Methods: A one year cross sectional study from Feb 2009 to Feb 2010 of TN patients was conducted in oral and maxillofacial surgery department, Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry, Rawalpindi. A detailed history of patients suffering from TN was taken followed by thorough extra-oral and intra-oral examination. The parameters analyzed included age of onset, gender, site of involvement, nerve branch involvement and clinical presentations. History and clinical features of already diagnosed cases with TN was included as such. Results: A total of 52 patients were included in the study. The patients had a mean age of 52.25 +- 14.82 years. The male to female ratio was 1:1.3. The mean age of onset was 48.5 +- 13.3 years. Right side was involved in 59.6% of the patients. V2 was most commonly involved nerve (59.6%), followed by V3 (53.8%) and V1 (13.7%). Forty six percent of patients gave history of extractions of teeth as a treatment for this condition. Forty two percent recalled or had previous medical records prescribed with antibiotics and pain killers. Conclusion: TN in our population is more frequent in females and with more right side involvement. Maxillary division is most commonly affected followed by the mandibular nerve. It is a rare disorder and most of these patients are inadequately diagnosed and treated. Keeping the disease in differential diagnosis of atypical pain without local pathology is advised. (author)

  13. Human Lymphatic Mesenteric Vessels: Morphology and Possible Function of Aminergic and NPY-ergic Nerve Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Vito; Panarese, Alessandra; Taurone, Samanta; Coppola, Luigi; Cavallotti, Carlo; Artico, Marco

    2015-09-01

    The lymphatic vessels have been studied in different organs from a morphological to a clinical point of view. Nevertheless, the knowledge of the catecholaminergic control of the lymphatic circulation is still incomplete. The aim of this work is to study the presence and distribution of the catecholaminergic and NPY-ergic nerve fibers in the whole wall of the human mesenteric lymphatic vessels in order to obtain knowledge about their morphology and functional significance. The following experimental procedures were performed: 1) drawing of tissue containing lymphatic vessels; 2) cutting of tissue; 3) staining of tissue; 4) staining of nerve fibers; 5) histofluorescence microscopy for the staining of catecholaminergic nerve fibers; 6) staining of neuropeptide Y like-immune reactivity; 7) biochemical assay of proteins; 8) measurement of noradrenaline; 9) quantitative analysis of images; 10) statistical analysis of data. Numerous nerve fibers run in the wall of lymphatic vessels. Many of them are catecholaminergic in nature. Some nerve fibers are NPY-positive. The biochemical results on noradrenaline amounts are in agreement with morphological results on catecholaminergic nerve fibers. Moreover, the morphometric results, obtained by the quantitative analysis of images and the subsequent statistical analysis of data, confirm all our morphological and biochemical data. The knowledge of the physiological or pathological mechanism regulating the functions of the lymphatic system is incomplete. Nevertheless the catecholaminergic nerve fibers of the human mesenteric lymphatic vessels come from the adrenergic periarterial plexuses of the mesenterial arterial bed. NPY-ergic nerve fibers may modulate the microcirculatory mesenterial bed in different pathological conditions.

  14. Optical Biopsy of Peripheral Nerve Using Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy: A New Tool for Nerve Surgeons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S Crowe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries remain a challenge for reconstructive surgeons with many patients obtaining suboptimal results. Understanding the level of injury is imperative for successful repair. Current methods for distinguishing healthy from damaged nerve are time consuming and possess limited efficacy. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE is an emerging optical biopsy technology that enables dynamic, high resolution, sub-surface imaging of live tissue. Porcine sciatic nerve was either left undamaged or briefly clamped to simulate injury. Diluted fluorescein was applied topically to the nerve. CLE imaging was performed by direct contact of the probe with nerve tissue. Images representative of both damaged and undamaged nerve fibers were collected and compared to routine H&E histology. Optical biopsy of undamaged nerve revealed bands of longitudinal nerve fibers, distinct from surrounding adipose and connective tissue. When damaged, these bands appear truncated and terminate in blebs of opacity. H&E staining revealed similar features in damaged nerve fibers. These results prompt development of a protocol for imaging peripheral nerves intraoperatively. To this end, improving surgeons' ability to understand the level of injury through real-time imaging will allow for faster and more informed operative decisions than the current standard permits.

  15. Facial nerve repair after operative injury: Impact of timing on hypoglossal-facial nerve graft outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Robert J; Wright, Harry V; Francis, David O; Stephan, Scott; Bennett, Marc L

    Reanimation of facial paralysis is a complex problem with multiple treatment options. One option is hypoglossal-facial nerve grafting, which can be performed in the immediate postoperative period after nerve transection, or in a delayed setting after skull base surgery when the nerve is anatomically intact but function is poor. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of timing of hypoglossal-facial grafting on functional outcome. A retrospective case series from a single tertiary otologic referral center was performed identifying 60 patients with facial nerve injury following cerebellopontine angle tumor extirpation. Patients underwent hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis following facial nerve injury. Facial nerve function was measured using the House-Brackmann facial nerve grading system at a median follow-up interval of 18months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used determine how time to hypoglossal-facial nerve grafting affected odds of achieving House-Brackmann grade of ≤3. Patients who underwent acute hypoglossal-facial anastomotic repair (0-14days from injury) were more likely to achieve House-Brackmann grade ≤3 compared to those that had delayed repair (OR 4.97, 95% CI 1.5-16.9, p=0.01). Early hypoglossal-facial anastomotic repair after acute facial nerve injury is associated with better long-term facial function outcomes and should be considered in the management algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Alterations in corneal nerves following crack cocaine use mimic diabetes-induced nerve damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney L Stuard

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM is rapidly emerging as an important clinical tool to evaluate changes in corneal sensory nerves as a surrogate measure for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Commonly used metrics to document and grade the severity of diabetes and risk for diabetic peripheral neuropathy include nerve fiber length, density, branching and tortuosity. In addition to corneal nerves, thinning of the retinal fiber layer has been shown to correlate with the severity of diabetic disease. Here, we present a case report on a pre-diabetic 60-year-old native American woman with abnormal corneal nerve morphology and retinal nerve fiber layer thinning. Her past medical history was positive for illicit substance abuse. IVCM showed a decrease in nerve fiber density and length, in addition to abnormally high levels of tortuosity. OCT revealed focal areas of reduced retinal nerve fiber layer thickness that were asymmetric between eyes. This is the first report of abnormally high levels of tortuosity in the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus in a patient with a past history of cocaine abuse. It also demonstrates, for the first time, that illicit substance abuse can have long-term adverse effects on ocular nerves for years following discontinued use of the drug. Studies using IVCM to evaluate changes in corneal nerve morphology in patients with diabetes need to consider a past history of illicit drug use as an exclusionary measure.

  17. Comparison of treatment methods in lumbar spinal stenosis for geriatric patient: nerve block versus radiofrequency neurotomy versus spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Kyu; Kim, Sung Bum; Kim, Min Ki; Park, Bong Jin; Choi, Seok Geun; Lim, Young Jin; Kim, Tae Sung

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of spinal treatment, including nerve block, radiofrequency neurotomy, instrumented fusions, is increasing, and progressively involves patients of age 65 and older. Treatment of the geriatric patients is often a difficult challenge for the spine surgeon. General health, sociofamilial and mental condition of the patients as well as the treatment techniques and postoperative management are to be accurately evaluated and planned. We tried to compare three treatment methods of spinal stenosis for geriatric patient in single institution. The cases of treatment methods in spinal stenosis over than 65 years old were analyzed. The numbers of patients were 371 underwent nerve block, radiofrequency neurotomy, instrumented fusions from January 2009 to December 2012 (nerve block: 253, radiofrequency neurotomy: 56, instrumented fusions: 62). The authors reviewed medical records, operative findings and postoperative clinical results, retrospectively. Simple X-ray were evaluated and clinical outcome was measured by Odom's criteria at 1 month after procedures. We were observed excellent and good results in 162 (64%) patients with nerve block, 40 (71%) patient with radIofrequency neurotomy, 46 (74%) patient with spinal surgery. Poor results were 20 (8%) patients in nerve block, 2 (3%) patients in radiofrequency neurotomy, 3 (5%) patient in spinal surgery. We reviewed literatures and analyzed three treatment methods of spinal stenosis for geriatric patients. Although the long term outcome of surgical treatment was most favorable, radiofrequency neurotomy and nerve block can be considered for the secondary management of elderly lumbar spinals stenosis patients.

  18. Outcome following nerve repair of high isolated clean sharp injuries of the ulnar nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Post

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The detailed outcome of surgical repair of high isolated clean sharp (HICS ulnar nerve lesions has become relevant in view of the recent development of distal nerve transfer. Our goal was to determine the outcome of HICS ulnar nerve repair in order to create a basis for the optimal management of these lesions. METHODS: High ulnar nerve lesions are defined as localized in the area ranging from the proximal forearm to the axilla just distal to the branching of the medial cord of the brachial plexus. A meta-analysis of the literature concerning high ulnar nerve injuries was performed. Additionally, a retrospective study of the outcome of nerve repair of HICS ulnar nerve injuries at our institution was performed. The Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer and the Rosén-Lundborg protocol were used. RESULTS: The literature review identified 46 papers. Many articles presented outcomes of mixed lesion groups consisting of combined ulnar and median nerves, or the outcome of high and low level injuries was pooled. In addition, outcome was expressed using different scoring systems. 40 patients with HICS ulnar nerve lesions were found with sufficient data for further analysis. In our institution, 15 patients had nerve repair with a median interval between trauma and reconstruction of 17 days (range 0-516. The mean score of the motor and sensory domain of the Rosen's Scale instrument was 58% and 38% of the unaffected arm, respectively. Two-point discrimination never reached less then 12 mm. CONCLUSION: From the literature, it was not possible to draw a definitive conclusion on outcome of surgical repair of HICS ulnar nerve lesions. Detailed neurological function assessment of our own patients showed that some ulnar nerve function returned. Intrinsic muscle strength recovery was generally poor. Based on this study, one might cautiously argue that repair strategies of HICS ulnar nerve lesions need to be improved.

  19. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ribak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. METHODS: This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. RESULTS: The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources.

  20. Regenerative scaffold electrodes for peripheral nerve interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Isaac P; Mukhatyar, Vivek J; Srinivasan, Akhil; Bentley, John T; Andreasen, Dinal S; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2013-07-01

    Advances in neural interfacing technology are required to enable natural, thought-driven control of a prosthetic limb. Here, we describe a regenerative electrode design in which a polymer-based thin-film electrode array is integrated within a thin-film sheet of aligned nanofibers, such that axons regenerating from a transected peripheral nerve are topographically guided across the electrode recording sites. Cultures of dorsal root ganglia were used to explore design parameters leading to cellular migration and neurite extension across the nanofiber/electrode array boundary. Regenerative scaffold electrodes (RSEs) were subsequently fabricated and implanted across rat tibial nerve gaps to evaluate device recording capabilities and influence on nerve regeneration. In 20 of these animals, regeneration was compared between a conventional nerve gap model and an amputation model. Characteristic shaping of regenerated nerve morphology around the embedded electrode array was observed in both groups, and regenerated axon profile counts were similar at the eight week end point. Implanted RSEs recorded evoked neural activity in all of these cases, and also in separate implantations lasting up to five months. These results demonstrate that nanofiber-based topographic cues within a regenerative electrode can influence nerve regeneration, to the potential benefit of a peripheral nerve interface suitable for limb amputees.

  1. Human butyrylcholinesterase efficacy against nerve agent exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Beth A; Sabourin, Carol L; Lenz, David E

    2017-05-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is vital for normal operation of many processes in the body. Following exposure to organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents, death can ensue without immediate medical intervention. Current therapies mitigate the cholinergic crisis caused by nerve agents but do not fully prevent long-term health concerns, for example, brain damage following seizures. Human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger being investigated as an antidote for OP nerve agent poisoning. HuBChE sequesters OP nerve agent in the bloodstream preventing the nerve agent from reaching critical target organ systems. HuBChE was effective when used as both a pre-treatment and as a post-exposure therapy. HuBChE has potential for use in both military settings and to protect civilian first responders in situations where nerve agent usage is suspected. We reviewed various animal models studies evaluating the efficacy of HuBChE against nerve agent exposure, pursuant to its submission for approval under the FDA Animal Rule. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Posterior Interosseous Nerve Syndrome from Thermal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay A. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to anatomical proximity to bone, the radial nerve is the most frequently injured major nerve of the upper extremity, frequently secondary to fractures (Li et al. (2013. We describe an incidence when a branch of the radial nerve is injured as a result of a thermal injury. Observation. Radial nerve injury can occur anywhere along the anatomical course with varied etiologies, but commonly related to trauma. The most frequent site is in the proximal forearm involving the posterior interosseous branch. However, problems can occur at the junction of the middle and proximal thirds of the humerus and wrist radially. When the radial nerve is injured by a burn, a new rehabilitation dynamic arises. Not only does one agonize about the return of nerve function but also fret about the skin grafts that replaced the devitalized tissue housing that compartment. Discussion. Although posterior interosseous nerve syndrome has been described in the context of many different etiologies, it has not previously been discussed in relation to burn injuries. In this case, not only did the patient’s rehabilitation involve aggressive therapy for return of sensation and function of the arm, but also prevention of contracture normally seen in replacement of full thickness burns.

  3. Beta secretase activity in peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Tallon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While the peripheral nervous system has the capacity to regenerate following a nerve injury, it is often at a slow rate and results in unsatisfactory recovery, leaving patients with reduced function. Many regeneration associated genes have been identified over the years, which may shed some insight into how we can manipulate this intrinsic regenerative ability to enhance repair following peripheral nerve injuries. Our lab has identified the membrane bound protease beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, or beta secretase, as a potential negative regulator of peripheral nerve regeneration. When beta secretase activity levels are abolished via a null mutation in mice, peripheral regeneration is enhanced following a sciatic nerve crush injury. Conversely, when activity levels are greatly increased by overexpressing beta secretase in mice, nerve regeneration and functional recovery are impaired after a sciatic nerve crush injury. In addition to our work, many substrates of beta secretase have been found to be involved in regulating neurite outgrowth and some have even been identified as regeneration associated genes. In this review, we set out to discuss BACE1 and its substrates with respect to axonal regeneration and speculate on the possibility of utilizing BACE1 inhibitors to enhance regeneration following acute nerve injury and potential uses in peripheral neuropathies.

  4. The Ultrasonographic Findings of Bifid Median Nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Jin; Park, Noh Hyuck; Joh, Joon Hee [Myoungji Hospital, Gwandong University College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    We wanted to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of bifid median nerve and its clinical significance. We retrospectively reviewed five cases (three men and two women, mean age: 54 years) of incidentally found bifid median nerve from 264 cases of clinically suspected carpal-tunnel syndrome that were seen at our hospital during last 6 years. Doppler sonography was performed in all five cases and MR angiography was done in one case for detecting a persistent median artery. The difference ({Delta}CSA) between the sum of the cross-sectional areas of the bifid median nerve at the pisiform level (CSA2) and the cross-sectional area proximal to the bifurcation(CSA1) was calculated. The incidence of a bifid median nerve was 1.9%. All the patients presented with a tingling sensation on a hand and two patients had nocturnal pain. All the cases showed bifurcation of the nerve bundle proximal to the carpal tunnel. The margins appeared relatively smooth and each bundle showed a characteristic fascicular pattern. A persistent median artery was noted between the bundles in four cases. {Delta}CSA was more than 2 mm 2 in four cases. Bifid median nerve with a persistent median artery is a relatively rare normal variance and these are very important findings before performing surgical intervention to avoid potential nerve injury and massive bleeding. We highly suggest that radiologists should understand the anatomical characteristics of this anomaly and make efforts to detect it

  5. Radiofrequency ablation of the supra-orbital nerve in the treatment algorithm of hemicrania continua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyker, Paul; Webb, Christopher; Mathew, Leena

    2012-01-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is an uncommon primary headache disorder in which the diagnosis centers on unilaterality and its absolute responsiveness to indomethacin. We describe 3 patients with a long standing history of headache diagnosed as hemicrania continua. There was profound response to indomethacin which was limited by side effects. In one patient the therapy with indomethacin was limited secondary to co-morbidities. Initial diagnostic blockade provided significant relief of symptoms based on which radio-frequency ablation of the supraorbital nerve was performed with substantial improvement in symptoms. Traditionally, hemicrania continua has been managed exclusively with oral analgesics and is defined by its singular response to indomethacin. Radio-frequency ablation (RFA) has been reported in the literature for multiple indications. This case series is unique in that it describes 3 patients diagnosed with hemicrania continua with pain referred in the supraorbital nerve distribution, who underwent radiofrequency ablation of the supraorbital nerve with resultant resolution of headaches. Traditionally, hemicrania continua has been managed exclusively with oral analgesics and is defined by its singular response to indomethacin. This report is unique in that it describes three patients diagnosed with hemicrania continua with pain referred in the supraorbital nerve distribution who underwent radiofrequency ablation of the supraorbital nerve with resultant resolution of headaches. After the RFA medical management was minimal to none in both patients. Though the utility and cost efficacy of RFA of peripheral nerves needs to be confirmed in well-designed trials we present these cases as an example of how this minimally invasive technique can safely provide analgesia in a difficult to treat cephalgia. Moreover if precise anatomical localization of the headache is possible then diagnostic blockade of the appropriate peripheral nerve may be performed followed by

  6. Model study of combined electrical and near-infrared neural stimulation on the bullfrog sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Mengxian; Mou, Zongxia

    2017-07-01

    This paper implemented a model study of combined electrical and near-infrared (808 nm) neural stimulation (NINS) on the bullfrog sciatic nerve. The model includes a COMSOL model to calculate the electric-field distribution of the surrounding area of the nerve, a Monte Carlo model to simulate light transport and absorption in the bullfrog sciatic nerve during NINS, and a NEURON model to simulate the neural electrophysiology changes under electrical stimulus and laser irradiation. The optical thermal effect is considered the main mechanism during NINS. Therefore, thermal change during laser irradiation was calculated by the Monte Carlo method, and the temperature distribution was then transferred to the NEURON model to stimulate the sciatic nerve. The effects on thermal response by adjusting the laser spot size, energy of the beam, and the absorption coefficient of the nerve are analyzed. The effect of the ambient temperature on the electrical stimulation or laser stimulation and the interaction between laser irradiation and electrical stimulation are also studied. The results indicate that the needed stimulus threshold for neural activation or inhibition is reduced by laser irradiation. Additionally, the needed laser energy for blocking the action potential is reduced by electrical stimulus. Both electrical and laser stimulation are affected by the ambient temperature. These results provide references for subsequent animal experiments and could be of great help to future basic and applied studies of infrared neural stimulation (INS).

  7. Intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kasukurthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcomas are soft-tissue malignancies with a poor prognosis and propensity for distant metastases. Although originally believed to arise from the synovium, these tumors have been found to occur anywhere in the body. We report a rare case of synovial sarcoma arising from the median nerve. To our knowledge, this is the twelfth reported case of intraneural synovial sarcoma, and only the fourth arising from the median nerve. Because the diagnosis may not be apparent until after pathological examination of the surgical speci­men, synovial sarcoma should be kept in mind when dealing with what may seem like a benign nerve tumor.

  8. Endodermal cyst of the oculomotor nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, M.A. [School of Medicine, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Enterline, D.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Fukushima, T. [Carolina Neuroscience Research Inst., Carolina Skull Base Surgery Center, Raleigh, NC (United States); McLendon, R.E.; Cummings, T.J. [Dept. of Pathology, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Endodermal cysts are rare congenital intracranial lesions. Although histologically benign, they can become symptomatic as a result of mass effect and cause neurological deficits. We report a 30-year-old woman who presented with paresis of her right oculomotor nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 13 x 8-mm cystic lesion originating from the right oculomotor nerve at its exit from the mesencephalon. She underwent craniotomy, biopsy, slit resection, and drainage of the cyst. To our knowledge, endodermal cysts have not been previously described in relation to the oculomotor nerve. (orig.)

  9. Morphometric data of canine sacral nerve roots with reference to electrical sacral root stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkhoff, N. J.; Koldewijn, E. L.; d'Hollosy, W.; Debruyne, F. M.; Wijkstra, H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments to investigate restoration of lower urinary tract control by electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve roots are mostly performed on dogs, yet little morphometric data (such as canine root and fiber diameter distributions) are available. The aim of this study was to acquire morphometric

  10. Recurrent unilateral facial nerve palsy in a child with dehiscent facial nerve canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The dehiscent facial nerve canal has been well documented in histopathological studies of temporal bones as well as in clinical setting. We describe clinical and radiologic features of a child with recurrent facial nerve palsy and dehiscent facial nerve canal. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: A 5-year-old male was referred to the otolaryngology clinic for evaluation of recurrent acute otitis media and hearing loss. He also developed recurrent left peripheral FN palsy associated with episodes of bilateral acute otitis media. High resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones revealed incomplete bony coverage of the tympanic segment of the left facial nerve. Conclusions: Recurrent peripheral FN palsy may occur in children with recurrent acute otitis media in the presence of a dehiscent facial nerve canal. Facial nerve canal dehiscence should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with recurrent peripheral FN palsy.

  11. Evaluation of the mental foramen and accessory mental foramen in Turkish patients using cone-beam computed tomography images reconstructed from a volumetric rendering program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender, A; Orhan, K; Aksoy, U

    2012-07-01

    This study determined the occurrence and location of the mental foramen (MF) and accessory mental foramen (AMF) in Turkish patients using cone-beam computed-tomography (CBCT) with 3D-imaging software. CBCT scans of 386 sites in 193 (92 male, 101 female) patients were retrospectively analyzed to determine MF and AMF occurrence, sizes, and locations. Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data were transferred to surface-rendering software to generate 3D images. Distances between the MF and AMF and from both foramina to the alveolar ridge and to the closest tooth were measured. Differences in AMF incidence by sex, side, and location were evaluated using chi-squared tests, and MF and AMF measurements were evaluated using Mann-Whitney U-tests. AMFs were observed in 6.5% of patients and were most commonly in an anteroinferior location. Mean AMF size did not differ significantly by sex or side [males: horizontal = 1.5 mm (1.0-2.4 mm), vertical = 1.4 mm (0.8-2.4 mm); females: horizontal = 1.5 mm (0.8-3 mm), vertical = 1.3 mm (0.8-2.1 mm); P > 0.05]. Males showed significantly greater mean vertical and horizontal MF dimensions compared with females [males: horizontal = 3.9 mm (1.0-7.0 mm), vertical = 3.6 mm (1.2-7.0 mm); females: horizontal = 3.5 mm (1.3-5.6 mm), vertical = 3.3 mm (0.8-5.8 mm); P mental nerve damage during surgical intervention and anesthetic applications. CBCT is useful for AMF detection, distributes less ionizing radiation, and allows 3D imaging. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Multicenter Clinical Trial of Keratin Biomaterial for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    which cause extensive damage to skin, bones , and nerves. The management of damaged peripheral nerves is challenging for patients and surgeons... artificial nerve conduits for digital nerve repair: a prospective cohort study and literature review. J Reconstr Microsurg 2009 Jan;25(1):55-61. Pace

  13. A RARE BIFURCATION PATTERN OF THE SCIATIC NERVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emran

    2017-08-17

    Aug 17, 2017 ... In the course of dissection, an anomaly was noticed in the right lower limb. Two nerves, as opposed to a single sciatic nerve, were observed along the entire length of the posterior thigh (Figure 1). The nerves were followed proximally into the gluteal region, where the common fibular nerve was seen to be ...

  14. Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Rysová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy Summary: Teoretical part of bachelor's thesis contains theoretical foundation of peripheral facial nerve palsy. Practical part of bachelor's thesis contains physiotherapeutic case report of patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy. Key words: peripheral facial nerve palsy, casuistry, rehabilitation

  15. A polylactic acid non-woven nerve conduit for facial nerve regeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumine, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    This study developed a biodegradable nerve conduit with PLA non-woven fabric and evaluated its nerve regeneration-promoting effect. The buccal branch of the facial nerve of 8 week-old Lewis rats was exposed, and a 7 mm nerve defect was created. A nerve conduit made of either PLA non-woven fabric (mean fibre diameter 460 nm), or silicone tube filled with type I collagen gel, or an autologous nerve, was implanted into the nerve defect, and their nerve regenerative abilities were evaluated 13 weeks after the surgery. The number of myelinated neural fibres in the middle portion of the regenerated nerve was the highest for PLA tubes (mean ± SD, 5051 ± 2335), followed by autologous nerves (4233 ± 590) and silicone tubes (1604 ± 148). Axon diameter was significantly greater in the PLA tube group (5.17 ± 1.69 µm) than in the silicone tube group (4.25 ± 1.60 µm) and no significant difference was found between the PLA tube and autograft (5.53 ± 1.93 µm) groups. Myelin thickness was greatest for the autograft group (0.65 ± 0.24 µm), followed by the PLA tube (0.54 ± 0.18 µm) and silicone tube (0.38 ± 0.12 µm) groups, showing significant differences among the three groups. The PLA non-woven fabric tube, composed of randomly-connected PLA fibres, is porous and has a number of advantages, such as sufficient strength to maintain luminal structure. The tube has demonstrated a comparable ability to induce peripheral nerve regeneration following autologous nerve transplantation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Immediate versus delayed primary nerve repair in the rabbit sciatic nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Piskin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zühal; Çιtlak, Atilla; Sezgin, Hicabi; Yazιcι, Ozgür; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that peripheral nerve injury should be treated immediately in the clinic, but in some instances, repair can be delayed. This study investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed (3 days after injury) neurorrhaphy on repair of transected sciatic nerve in New Zealand rabbits using stereological, histomorphological and biomechanical methods. At 8 weeks after immediate and delayed neurorrhaphy, axon number and area in the sciatic nerve, myelin sheath and epineurium thicknes...

  17. How Far Have We Come in the Field of Nerve Regeneration After Trigeminal Nerve Injury?

    OpenAIRE

    Rosén, Annika; Tardast, Arezo; Shi, Tie-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering from nerve injury with sensory disturbances or orofacial pain have greatly reduced quality of life, and it is a big cost for the society. Abnormal sensations caused by trigeminal nerve injury often become chronic, severely debilitating, and extremely difficult to treat. In general, non-invasive treatment such as drug treatment has been insufficient, and there are currently few available effective treatments. Surgical interventions such as end-to-end connection or nerve graf...

  18. Median Nerve Repair with Autologous Sciatic Nerve Graft: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ragel, Brian T.; Park, Gregory C.; Brevard, Sid

    2011-01-01

    Background. Peripheral nerve injury treatment options are limited to primary nerve repair, nerve grafting, and tendon transfers. In this case, a large suitable donor site was easily accessible and delayed grafting was indicative of poor prognosis. Case Description. A 25-year-old soldier presented to a military hospital in Afghanistan following a roadside bomb attack. The patient had a medial shrapnel wound in the bicipital groove with a cool pulseless hand and catastrophic lower extremity inj...

  19. Alterations in corneal nerves following crack cocaine use mimic diabetes-induced nerve damage

    OpenAIRE

    Stuard, Whitney L; Gallerson, Bryan K; Robertson, Danielle M

    2017-01-01

    Summary The use of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) is rapidly emerging as an important clinical tool to evaluate changes in corneal sensory nerves as a surrogate measure for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Commonly used metrics to document and grade the severity of diabetes and risk for diabetic peripheral neuropathy include nerve fiber length, density, branching and tortuosity. In addition to corneal nerves, thinning of the retinal fiber layer has been shown to correlate with the severity...

  20. Nerve terminal contributes to acetylcholine receptor organization at the dystrophic neuromuscular junction of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Maria Julia; Taniguti, Ana Paula Tiemi; Minatel, Elaine; Neto, Humberto Santo

    2007-02-01

    Changes in the distribution of acetylcholine receptors have been reported to occur at the neuromuscular junction of mdx mice and may be a consequence of muscle fiber regeneration rather than the absence of dystrophin. In the present study, we examined whether the nerve terminal determines the fate of acetylcholine receptor distribution in the dystrophic muscle fibers of mdx mice. The left sternomastoid muscle of young (1-month-old) and adult (6-month-old) mdx mice was injected with 60 microl lidocaine hydrochloride to induce muscle degeneration-regeneration. Some mice had their sternomastoid muscle denervated at the time of lidocaine injection. After 10 days of muscle denervation, nerve terminals and acetylcholine receptors were labeled with 4-Di-2-ASP and rhodamine-alpha-bungarotoxin, respectively, for confocal microscopy. In young mdx mice, 75% (n = 137 endplates) of the receptors were distributed in islands. The same was observed in 100% (n = 114 endplates) of the adult junctions. In denervated-regenerated fibers of young mice, the receptors were distributed as branches in 89% of the endplates (n = 90). In denervated-regenerated fibers of adult mice, the receptors were distributed in islands in 100% of the endplates (n = 100). These findings show that nerve-dependent mechanisms are also involved in the changes in receptor distribution in young dystrophic muscles. In older dystrophic muscles, other factors may play a role in receptor distribution.

  1. [Isolated traumatic injuries of the axillary nerve. Radial nerve transfer in four cases and literatura review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Páez, Miguel; Socolovsky, Mariano; Di Masi, Gilda; Arráez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2012-11-01

    To analyze the results of an initial series of four cases of traumatic injuries of the axillary nerve, treated by a nerve transfer from the triceps long branch of the radial nerve. An extensive analysis of the literature has also been made. Four patients aged between 21 and 42 years old presenting an isolated traumatic palsy of the axillary nerve were operated between January 2007 and June 2010. All cases were treated by nerve transfer six to eight months after the trauma. The results of these cases are analyzed, the same as the axillary nerve injuries series presented in the literature from 1982. One year after the surgery, all patients improved their abduction a mean of 70° (range 30 to 120°), showing a M4 in the British Medical Council Scale. No patient complained of triceps weakness after the procedure. These results are similar to those published employing primary grafting for the axillary nerve. Isolated injuries of the axillary nerve should be treated with surgery when spontaneous recovery is not verified 6 months after the trauma. Primary repair with grafts is the most popular surgical technique, with a rate of success of approximately 90%. The preliminary results of a nerve transfer employing the long triceps branch are similar, and a definite comparison of both techniques with a bigger number of cases should be done in the future. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Thoracoscopic phrenic nerve patch insulation to avoid phrenic nerve stimulation with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatsugu Nozoe, MD, PhD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old female was implanted with a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT device, with the left ventricular lead implanted through a transvenous approach. One day after implantation, diaphragmatic stimulation was observed when the patient was in the seated position, which could not be resolved by device reprogramming. We performed thoracoscopic phrenic nerve insulation using a Gore-Tex patch. The left phrenic nerve was carefully detached from the pericardial adipose tissue, and a Gore-Tex patch was inserted between the phrenic nerve and pericardium using a thoracoscopic technique. This approach represents a potential option for the management of uncontrollable phrenic nerve stimulation during CRT.

  3. Vein Wrapping Technique for Nerve Reconstruction in Patients with Thyroid Cancer Invading the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Moon Yoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis is the most common and serious complication after thyroid cancer surgery. The objective of this study was to report the advantages of the vein wrapping technique for nerve reconstruction in patients with thyroid cancer invading the recurrent laryngeal nerve and its effects on postoperative phonatory function. The subjects were three patients who underwent resection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve during surgical extirpation of papillary thyroid cancer. Free ansa cervicalis nerve graft or direct neurorrhaphy with a vein wrapping technique was used to facilitate nerve regeneration, protect the anastomosed nerve site mechanically, and prevent neuroma formation. One-year postoperative laryngoscopic examination revealed good vocal cord mobility. Maximum phonation time (19.5 ± 0.3 sec was longer than a previously-reported value in conventional reconstruction patients (18.8 ± 6.6 sec. The present phonation efficiency index (7.88 ± 0.78 was higher than that previously calculated in conventional reconstruction (7.59 ± 2.82. The mean value of the Voice Handicap Index-10 was 6, which was within the normal range. This study demonstrates improvement in phonation indices measured 1 year after recurrent laryngeal nerve reconstruction. Our results confirm that the vein wrapping technique has theoretical advantages and could be favored over conventional reconstruction techniques for invenerate nerve injuries.

  4. Past, Present, and Future of Nerve Conduits in the Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikeremujiang Muheremu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With significant advances in the research and application of nerve conduits, they have been used to repair peripheral nerve injury for several decades. Nerve conduits range from biological tubes to synthetic tubes, and from nondegradable tubes to biodegradable tubes. Researchers have explored hollow tubes, tubes filled with scaffolds containing neurotrophic factors, and those seeded with Schwann cells or stem cells. The therapeutic effect of nerve conduits is improving with increasing choice of conduit material, new construction of conduits, and the inclusion of neurotrophic factors and support cells in the conduits. Improvements in functional outcomes are expected when these are optimized for use in clinical practice.

  5. Facial reanimation by muscle-nerve neurotization after facial nerve sacrifice. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, A; Labbé, D; Babin, E; Fromager, G

    2016-12-01

    Recovering a certain degree of mimicry after sacrifice of the facial nerve is a clinically recognized finding. The authors report a case of hemifacial reanimation suggesting a phenomenon of neurotization from muscle-to-nerve. A woman benefited from a parotidectomy with sacrifice of the left facial nerve indicated for recurrent tumor in the gland. The distal branches of the facial nerve, isolated at the time of resection, were buried in the masseter muscle underneath. The patient recovered a voluntary hémifacial motricity. The electromyographic analysis of the motor activity of the zygomaticus major before and after block of the masseter nerve showed a dependence between mimic muscles and the masseter muscle. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the spontaneous reanimation of facial paralysis. The clinical case makes it possible to argue in favor of muscle-to-nerve neurotization from masseter muscle to distal branches of the facial nerve. It illustrates the quality of motricity that can be obtained thanks to this procedure. The authors describe a simple implantation technique of distal branches of the facial nerve in the masseter muscle during a radical parotidectomy with facial nerve sacrifice and recovery of resting tone but also a quality voluntary mimicry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes peripheral nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve transection in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Rahim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To evaluate the local effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on transected sciatic nerve regeneration. Methods: Sixty male white Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups randomly (n=15. In transected group the left sciatic nerve was transected and the stump was fixed to adjacent muscle. In treatment group the defect was bridged using a silicone graft filled with 10 µL VEGF. In silicone group the graft was filled with phosphate-buffered saline. In sham-operated group the sciatic nerve was ex- posed and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups with five animals in each and nerve fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after operation. Results: Behavioral test, functional study of sciatic nerve, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indi- ces confirmed a faster recovery of regenerated axons in VEGF group than in silicone group (P<0.05. In immunohistochemi- cal assessment, reactions to S-100 in VEGF group were more positive than that in silicone group. Conclusion: Local administration of VEGF will im- prove functional recovery and morphometric indices of sci- atic nerve. Key words: Peripheral nerves; Nerve regeneration; Sciatic nerve; Vascular endothelial growth factor

  7. Using Eggshell Membrane as Nerve Guide Channels in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Farjah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:  The aim of this study was to evaluate the final outcome of nerve regeneration across the eggsell membrane (ESM tube conduit in comparison with autograft. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male rats (250-300 g were randomized into (1 ESM conduit, (2 autograft, and (3 sham surgery groups. The eggs submerged in 5% acetic acid. The decalcifying membranes were cut into four pieces, rotated over the teflon mandrel and dried at   37°C. The left sciatic nerve was surgically cut. A 10-mm nerve segment was cut and removed. In the ESM group, the proximal and distal cut ends of the sciatic nerve were telescoped into the nerve guides. In the autograft group, the 10 mm nerve segment was reversed and used as an autologous nerve graft. All animals were evaluated by sciatic functional index (SFI and electrophysiology testing.  Results:The improvement in SFI from the first to the last evalution in ESM and autograft groups were evaluated. On days 49 and 60 post-operation, the mean SFI of ESM group was significantly greater than the autograft group (P 0.05. Conclusion:These findings demonstrate that ESM effectively enhances nerve regeneration and promotes functional recovery in injured sciatic nerve of rat.

  8. Optic nerve sheath fenestration in cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Milman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Tatyana Milman1, Neena Mirani1,2, Roger E Turbin11Ophthalmology Department, Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 2Pathology Department, University Hospital, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USAAbstract: A patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS developed crytpococcal meningitis, complicated by papilledema and severe progressive visual loss despite medical therapy. Bilateral optic sheath fenestration resulted in significant improvement in vision and resolution of papilledema. Histopathologic evaluation of the optic nerve sheath demonstrated numerous cryptococci. Optic nerve sheath fenestration may be an effective treatment method when high intracranial pressure is contributing to visual loss, even in the presence of involvement of the optic nerve sheath by the fungus.Keywords: optic nerve sheath, cryptococcal, meningitis, fenestration

  9. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hand, pain in the wrist, pain in the forearm, or weakness (particularly in the thumb) can be ... Hand. Related What is a Brachial Plexus Injury? Anatomy 101: Brachial Plexus Anatomy 101: Nerves of the ...

  10. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...

  11. Ulnar nerve paralysis after forearm bone fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Schwartsmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Paralysis or nerve injury associated with fractures of forearm bones fracture is rare and is more common in exposed fractures with large soft-tissue injuries. Ulnar nerve paralysis is a rare condition associated with closed fractures of the forearm. In most cases, the cause of paralysis is nerve contusion, which evolves with neuropraxia. However, nerve lacerations and entrapment at the fracture site always need to be borne in mind. This becomes more important when neuropraxia appears or worsens after reduction of a closed fracture of the forearm has been completed. The importance of diagnosing this injury and differentiating its features lies in the fact that, depending on the type of lesion, different types of management will be chosen.

  12. Medial and Lateral Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot Problems Overview of Foot Problems Achilles Tendon Bursitis Achilles Tendon Enthesopathy Bunion Corns and Calluses Damage ... the Foot Freiberg Disease Hammer Toe Inferior Calcaneal Bursitis Medial and Lateral Plantar Nerve Entrapment Metatarsal Joint ...

  13. Intraoperative nerve monitoring in laryngotracheal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolufer, Sergio; Coves, María Dolores; Gálvez, Carlos; Villalona, Gustavo Adolfo

    Laryngotracheal surgery has an inherent risk of injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN). These complications go from minor dysphonia to even bilateral vocal cord paralysis. The intraoperative neuromonitoring of the RLN was developed in the field of thyroid surgery, in order to preserve nerve and vocal cord function. However, tracheal surgery requires in-field intubation of the distal trachea, which limits the use of nerve monitoring using conventional endotracheal tube with surface electrodes. Given these challenges, we present an alternative method for nerve monitoring during laryngotracheal surgery through the insertion of electrodes within the endolaryngeal musculature by bilateral puncture. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... to this condition. Some factors that can cause birth trauma (injury) include: Large baby size (may be ...

  15. CT appearance of thickened nerves in neurofibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daneman, A.; Mancer, K.; Sonley, M.

    1983-11-01

    In neutrofibromatosis (von Recklinghausen disease), peripheral nerves may develop enlarged diameters or focal fusiform enlargement due to neurofibromatous involvement. Their appearance on computed tomography (CT) forms the basis of this report.

  16. Mental state talk by Danish preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Knüppel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen 4 to 6-year-old Danish children were video-recorded, while interacting spontaneously with their family in their homes. The mental state talk of the children was identified and analysed with respect to three mental domains: desire, feeling and cognition, and was compared to data from a similar study carried out with Canadian families (Jenkins et al., 2003. Our results suggest some cross-cultural differences in children’s mental state talk. First, Danish children produce a larger variation of mental state talk words than Canadian children do, and second, the distribution of mental state talk across the three domains differed for the two language groups. Semantic variation between Danish and English was identified in the study, which may partly explain the findings. Furthermore we present a usage-based approach to the investigation of children’s development of psychological categories in language as well as cross-linguistically.

  17. Evaluation of functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a new biodegradable poly (DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; denDunnen, WFA; Robinson, PH; Pennings, AJ; Schakenraad, JM

    The aim of this study was to evaluate functional nerve recovery following reconstruction of a 1 cm gap in the sciatic nerve of a rat, using a new biodegradable p (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide. To evaluate both motor and sensory nerve recovery, walking track analysis and electrostimulation tests were

  18. Ulnar nerve entrapment by anconeus epitrochlearis ligament.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2012-01-01

    Ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow is the second most common upper limb entrapment neuropathy other than carpal tunnel syndrome. There have been many causes identified ranging from chronic aging joint changes to inflammatory conditions or systemic disorders. Among them, uncommon anatomical variants accounts for a small number of cases. Here, we report our experience in managing ulnar nerve entrapment caused by a rare vestigial structure, anconeus epitrochlearis ligament, and provide a brief review of the literature of its management.

  19. Peripheral Facial Nerve Palsy after Therapeutic Endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal...

  20. Sciatic Nerve Injury Associated with Acetabular Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Issack, Paul S.; Helfet, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injuries associated with acetabular fractures may be a result of the initial trauma or injury at the time of surgical reconstruction. Patients may present with a broad range of symptoms ranging from radiculopathy to foot drop. There are several posttraumatic, perioperative, and postoperative causes for sciatic nerve palsy including fracture–dislocation of the hip joint, excessive tension or inappropriate placement of retractors, instrument- or implant-related complications, hete...

  1. Optic Nerve Avulsion after Blunt Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Halil Karabulut

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve avulsion is an uncommon presentation of ocular trauma with a poor prognosis. It can be seen as complete or partial form due to the form of trauma. We assessed the complete optic nerve avulsion in a 16-year-old female patient complaining of loss of vision in her left eye after a traffic accident. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 249-51

  2. Homeless mentally ill or mentally ill homeless?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C I; Thompson, K S

    1992-06-01

    Mainstream psychiatry conceptualizes people who are homeless and mentally ill as distinct from other homeless persons because it is thought that their status stems from their mental disorder and the poor implementation of deinstitutionalization. The authors believe this dichotomy is illusory. They present data indicating that recent socioeconomic and political shifts contributed greatly to homelessness among all groups, regardless of mental illness; that those with and without mental illness have similar biographical and demographic profiles; that high levels of mental distress are common to all homeless persons; and that few mentally ill homeless persons require involuntary hospitalization. This perspective suggests novel responses that de-emphasize clinical solutions and focus on empowerment, consumerism, entitlement, community-level interventions, and closer alliances with other advocates for the homeless.

  3. An analysis of facial nerve function in irradiated and unirradiated facial nerve grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul D.; Eshleman, Jeffrey S.; Foote, Robert L.; Strome, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of high-dose radiation therapy on facial nerve grafts is controversial. Some authors believe radiotherapy is so detrimental to the outcome of facial nerve graft function that dynamic or static slings should be performed instead of facial nerve grafts in all patients who are to receive postoperative radiation therapy. Unfortunately, the facial function achieved with dynamic and static slings is almost always inferior to that after facial nerve grafts. In this retrospective study, we compared facial nerve function in irradiated and unirradiated nerve grafts. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 818 patients with neoplasms involving the parotid gland who received treatment between 1974 and 1997 were reviewed, of whom 66 underwent facial nerve grafting. Fourteen patients who died or had a recurrence less than a year after their facial nerve graft were excluded. The median follow-up for the remaining 52 patients was 10.6 years. Cable nerve grafts were performed in 50 patients and direct anastomoses of the facial nerve in two. Facial nerve function was scored by means of the House-Brackmann (H-B) facial grading system. Twenty-eight of the 52 patients received postoperative radiotherapy. The median time from nerve grafting to start of radiotherapy was 5.1 weeks. The median and mean doses of radiation were 6000 and 6033 cGy, respectively, for the irradiated grafts. One patient received preoperative radiotherapy to a total dose of 5000 cGy in 25 fractions and underwent surgery 1 month after the completion of radiotherapy. This patient was placed, by convention, in the irradiated facial nerve graft cohort. Results: Potential prognostic factors for facial nerve function such as age, gender, extent of surgery at the time of nerve grafting, preoperative facial nerve palsy, duration of preoperative palsy if present, or number of previous operations in the parotid bed were relatively well balanced between irradiated and unirradiated patients. However

  4. [Spinal accessory nerve and lymphatic neck dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsolle, V; Michelet, V; Majoufre, C; Caix, P; Siberchicot, F; Pinsolle, J

    1997-09-01

    Radical neck dissection was the golden standard of treatment for cervical nodes in head and neck tumors. From the seventies, the preservation of the spinal accessory nerve has become increasingly popular in order to improve the functional result of the neck dissections. The aim of this study was to assess the degree of functional disability associated with each type of neck dissection and the value of anatomical references for dissection of the spinal accessory nerve. One hundred twenty seven patients were evaluated 1 month and 1 year after radical, functional or supraomohyoid neck dissection with a questionnaire and a physical examination. Anatomical measurements of the spinal accessory nerve were performed in 20 patients. We found considerable or severe shoulder dysfunction in 7%, 34% and 51% respectively of patients in whom supraomohyoid, functional and radical neck dissections were performed. Furthermore 49% of patients having undergone a radical neck dissection had little or no symptoms. Sacrifice of the spinal accessory nerve in radical neck dissection may lead to shoulder dysfunction. A functional disability may also be associated, although in a less extent, with any neck dissection in which the spinal accessory nerve is dissected and placed in traction. There is a large variation in the degree of functional disability and pain in patients with similar neck dissections. The course of the spinal accessory nerve in the neck makes it particularly vulnerable to injury during the dissection near the sternocleidomastoid muscle and in the posterior cervical triangle.

  5. Axillary nerve conduction changes in hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, Atzmon; Ring, Haim

    2008-12-17

    To prove the possibility of axillary nerve conduction changes following shoulder subluxation due to hemiplegia, in order to investigate the usefulness of screening nerve conduction studies in patients with hemiplegia for finding peripheral neuropathy. Forty-four shoulders of twenty-two patients with a first-time stroke having flaccid hemiplegia were tested, 43 +/- 12 days after stroke onset. Wasting and weakness of the deltoid were present in the involved side. Motor nerve conduction latency and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude were measured along the axillary nerve, comparing the paralyzed to the sound shoulder. The stimulation was done at the Erb's point whilst the recording needle electrode was inserted into the deltoid muscle 4 cm directly beneath the lateral border of the acromion. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare the motor conduction between the sound and the paralytic shoulder. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare between plegic and sound shoulder in each side. Mean motor nerve conduction latency time to the deltoid muscle was 8.49, SD 4.36 ms in the paralyzed shoulder and 5.17, SD 1.35 ms in the sound shoulder (p atrophy in the same limb. The usefulness of routine screening nerve conduction studies in the shoulder of hemiplegic patients seems to be advocated.

  6. Lingual nerve injury II. Observations on sensory recovery after micro-neurosurgical reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Stoltze, Kaj

    2007-01-01

    /dull discrimination, warm, cold, location of touch, and brush stroke direction, pain perception and two-point discrimination. The rate of recovery was highest during the first 6 months. Females were more often affected than males, but recovery was not influenced by gender. The distribution of neurogenic discomfort......The aim of this study was to report on neurosensory recovery after micro-surgical lingual nerve repair, and to evaluate the effect on recovery of age, delay in repair and gender of the patient. Seventy-four patients entered the study. The micro-surgical repair performed was direct nerve suture (n...

  7. Nutritional therapies for mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira Karen F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4 out of the 10 leading causes of disability in the US and other developed countries are mental disorders. Major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD are among the most common mental disorders that currently plague numerous countries and have varying incidence rates from 26 percent in America to 4 percent in China. Though some of this difference may be attributable to the manner in which individual healthcare providers diagnose mental disorders, this noticeable distribution can be also explained by studies which show that a lack of certain dietary nutrients contribute to the development of mental disorders. Notably, essential vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids are often deficient in the general population in America and other developed countries; and are exceptionally deficient in patients suffering from mental disorders. Studies have shown that daily supplements of vital nutrients often effectively reduce patients' symptoms. Supplements that contain amino acids also reduce symptoms, because they are converted to neurotransmitters that alleviate depression and other mental disorders. Based on emerging scientific evidence, this form of nutritional supplement treatment may be appropriate for controlling major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD, addiction, and autism. The aim of this manuscript is to emphasize which dietary supplements can aid the treatment of the four most common mental disorders currently affecting America and other developed countries: major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD. Most antidepressants and other prescription drugs cause severe side effects, which usually discourage patients from taking their medications. Such

  8. Experimental study of vascularized nerve graft: evaluation of nerve regeneration using choline acetyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, M; Tamai, S; Yajima, H; Kawanishi, K

    2001-01-01

    A comparative study of nerve regeneration was performed on vascularized nerve graft (VNG) and free nerve graft (FNG) in Fischer strain rats. A segment of the sciatic nerve with vascular pedicle of the femoral artery and vein was harvested from syngeneic donor rat for the VNG group and the sciatic nerve in the same length without vascular pedicle was harvested for the FNG group. They were transplanted to a nerve defect in the sciatic nerve of syngeneic recipient rats. At 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks after operation, the sciatic nerves were biopsied and processed for evaluation of choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activity, histological studies, and measurement of wet weight of the muscle innervated by the sciatic nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation of the grafted nerve was also performed before sacrifice. The average CAT activity in the distal to the distal suture site was 383 cpm in VNG and 361 cpm in FNG at 2 weeks; 6,189 cpm in VNG and 2,264 cpm in FNG at 4 weeks; and 11,299 cpm in VNG and 9,424 cpm in FNG at 6 weeks postoperatively. The value of the VNG group was statistically higher than that of the FNG group at 4 weeks postoperatively. Electrophysiological and histological findings also suggested that nerve regeneration in the VNG group was superior to that in the FNG group during the same period. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups after 6 weeks postoperatively in any of the evaluations. The CAT measurement was useful in the experiments, because it was highly sensitive and reproducible. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Axillary nerve conduction changes in hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ring Haim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To prove the possibility of axillary nerve conduction changes following shoulder subluxation due to hemiplegia, in order to investigate the usefulness of screening nerve conduction studies in patients with hemiplegia for finding peripheral neuropathy. Methods Forty-four shoulders of twenty-two patients with a first-time stroke having flaccid hemiplegia were tested, 43 ± 12 days after stroke onset. Wasting and weakness of the deltoid were present in the involved side. Motor nerve conduction latency and compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude were measured along the axillary nerve, comparing the paralyzed to the sound shoulder. The stimulation was done at the Erb's point whilst the recording needle electrode was inserted into the deltoid muscle 4 cm directly beneath the lateral border of the acromion. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare the motor conduction between the sound and the paralytic shoulder. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare between plegic and sound shoulder in each side. Results Mean motor nerve conduction latency time to the deltoid muscle was 8.49, SD 4.36 ms in the paralyzed shoulder and 5.17, SD 1.35 ms in the sound shoulder (p Mean compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude was 2.83, SD 2.50 mV in the paralyzed shoulder and was 7.44, SD 5.47 mV in the sound shoulder (p p p = 0.003, 1-sided for amplitude, and patients with left paralyzed shoulder compared to patients with left sound shoulder (p = 0.011, 1-sided for latency, p = 0.001, 1-sided for amplitude, support the same outcomes. The electro-physiological changes in the axillary nerve may appear during the first six weeks after stroke breakout. Conclusion Continuous traction of the axillary nerve, as in hypotonic shoulder, may affect the electro-physiological properties of the nerve. It most probably results from subluxation of the head of the humerus, causing demyelinization and even axonopathy. Slowing of the conduction velocities of

  10. Therapeutic results in sixth nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruna Violeta-Ioana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors aim to assess through a retrospective study the efficiency of different therapeutic methods used in VIth nerve palsy. 60 patients with VIth nerve palsy, admitted and treated in Oftapro Clinic, were divided into two groups: a group with partial dysfunction (paresis of sixth nerve and a group with the complete abolition of neuromuscular function (VIth nerve palsy. Initial examination included assessment of neuromuscular function, binocular vision and existence of medial rectus muscle contracture (ipsi- and contralateral and contralateral lateral rectus inhibitory palsy. Neuromuscular dysfunction was graded from - 8 (paralysis to 0 (normal abduction. Therapeutic modalities ranged from conservative treatment (occlusion, prism correction, botulinum toxin chemodenervation and surgical treatment: medial rectus recession + lateral rectus resection, in cases of paresis, and transposition procedures (Hummelscheim and full tendon transfer in cases of sixth nerve palsy. Functional therapeutic success was defined as absence of diplopia in primary position, with or without prism correction, and surgical success was considered obtaining orthoptic alignment in primary position or a small residual deviation (under 10 PD. 51 patients had unilateral dysfunction, and 9 patients had bilateral VI-th nerve dysfunction. 8 patients had associated fourth or seventh cranial nerves palsy. The most common etiology was traumatic, followed by tumor and vascular causes. There were 18 cases of spontaneous remission, partial or complete (4-8 months after the onset, and 6 cases enhanced by botulinum toxin chemodenervation. 17 paretic eyes underwent surgery, showing a very good outcome, with restoration of binocular single vision. The procedure of choice was recession of medial rectus muscle, combined with resection of lateral rectus muscle. All patients with sixth nerve palsy underwent surgery, except one old female patient, who refused surgery. Hummelscheim procedure was

  11. Nerve Fiber Flux Analysis Using Wide-Field Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ou; Liu, Liang; Liu, Li; Huang, David

    2018-02-01

    To devise a method to quantify nerve fibers over their arcuate courses over an extended peripapillary area using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Participants were imaged with 8 × 8-mm volumetric OCT scans centered at the optic disc. A new quantity, nerve fiber flux (NFF), represents the cross-sectional area transected perpendicular to the nerve fibers. The peripapillary area was divided into 64 tracks with equal flux. An iterative algorithm traced the trajectory of the tracks assuming that the relative distribution of the NFF was conserved with compensation for fiber connections to ganglion cells on the macular side. Average trajectory was averaged from normal eyes and use to calculate the NFF maps for glaucomatous eyes. The NFF maps were divided into eight sectors that correspond to visual field regions. There were 24 healthy and 10 glaucomatous eyes enrolled. The algorithm converged on similar patterns of NFL tracks for all healthy eyes. In glaucomatous eyes, NFF correlated with visual field sensitivity in the arcuate sectors (Spearman ρ = 0.53-0.62). Focal nerve fiber loss in glaucomatous eyes appeared as uniform tracks of NFF defects that followed the expected arcuate fiber trajectory. Using an algorithm based on the conservation of flux, we derived nerve fiber trajectories in the peripapillary area. The NFF map is useful for the visualization of focal defects and quantification of sector nerve fiber loss from wide-area volumetric OCT scans. NFF provides a cumulative measure of volumetric loss along nerve fiber tracks and could improve the detection of focal glaucoma damage.

  12. Does the combination of erythropoietin and tapered oral corticosteroids improve recovery following iatrogenic nerve injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Derek T; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio; Mathis, Kenneth B

    2016-08-01

    The reported prognosis for recovery after peripheral nerve injury is remarkably poor. Deficits may persist for years, resulting in significant functional disability. Both corticosteroids and Erythropoietin have been investigated as neuroprotective agents; however, their efficacy in total hip and knee arthroplasty is not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of systemically-administered Erythropoietin and tapered oral corticosteroids on the recovery of postoperative nerve palsies in the setting of total hip and knee arthroplasty. Eleven patients sustaining postoperative peripheral nerve injuries after total hip or knee arthroplasty were treated acutely with Erythropoietin and tapered oral steroids. Motor and sensory function was assessed clinically pre- and postoperatively until complete motor recovery or for a minimum of 1 year. Motor loss was complete in seven (64%) patients and partial in four (36%). Seven (64%) patients' symptoms affected the common peroneal nerve distribution and four (36%) had concomitant tibial nerve involvement. Eight (73%) patients experienced full motor recovery at an average of 39 days (range: 3-133 days), and three (27%) had near-complete motor recovery. At final follow up, no patient required assistive devices for ambulation. Administration of Erythropoietin coupled with oral tapered steroids for patients sustaining iatrogenic nerve injuries in total hip and knee arthroplasty demonstrated faster and more complete recovery of motor and sensory function compared to previous reports in the literature. This study highlights the importance of further investigation to define the role of each in the setting of acute postoperative nerve palsies. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Incidence, associations, and evaluation of sixth nerve palsy using a population-based method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay V; Mutyala, Srinivas; Leske, David A; Hodge, David O; Holmes, Jonathan M

    2004-02-01

    To determine the incidence of sixth nerve palsy in a population-based study, with particular emphasis on associated coexisting medical conditions and to use these data to develop a management algorithm. Retrospective, population-based case series. All residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA, diagnosed with sixth nerve palsy between January 1, 1978 and December 31, 1992. All cases were identified by using the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records linkage system, which captures all patient-physician encounters in Olmsted County. The entire medical record of each patient was reviewed to confirm the diagnosis, document county residency, and to determine associated medical conditions. We used stringent predetermined criteria to define diabetes mellitus and hypertension as associations. Incidence rates were adjusted to the age and gender distribution of the 1990 white population in the United States. Etiology or systemic associations of the palsy. We identified 137 new cases of sixth nerve palsy over the 15-year period. The age- and gender-adjusted annual incidence of sixth nerve palsy was 11.3/100 000 (95% confidence interval, 9.3-13.2/100 000). Causes and associations were: undetermined (26%), hypertension alone (19%), coexistent hypertension and diabetes (12%), trauma (12%), multiple sclerosis (7%), neoplasm (5%), diabetes alone (4%), cerebrovascular accident (4%), postneurosurgery (3%), aneurysm (2%), and other (8%). When sixth nerve palsy was the presenting sign in cases of neoplasm (n = 1) and aneurysm (n = 3), history and examination revealed the presence of other neurologic symptoms or signs. We provide population-based data on the incidence of sixth nerve palsy with a notably lower incidence of neoplasm and higher incidence of diabetes and hypertension than previous institution-based series. We suggest that patients with nontraumatic neurologically isolated sixth nerve palsy may undergo a focused medical evaluation followed by close observation

  14. Viewing Uganda's mental health system through a human rights lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sara; Ssebunnya, Joshua; Kigozi, Fred; Lund, Crick; Flisher, Alan

    2010-01-01

    There has been increased global concern about the human rights violations experienced by people with mental disorders. The aim of this study was to analyse Uganda's mental health care system through a human rights lens. A survey of the existing mental health system in Uganda was conducted using the WHO Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems. In addition, 62 interviews and six focus groups were conducted with a broad range of mental health stakeholders at the national and district levels. Despite possessing a draft mental health policy that is in line with many international human rights standards, Uganda's mental health system inadequately promotes and protects, and frequently violates the human rights of people with mental disorders. The mental health legislation is offensive and stigmatizing. It is common for people accessing mental health services to encounter physical and emotional abuse and an inadequate quality of care. Mental health services are inequitably distributed. Within Ugandan society, people with mental disorders also frequently experience widespread stigma and discrimination, and limited support. Promoting and protecting the rights of people with mental disorders has ethical and public health imperatives. A number of policy, legislative and service development initiatives are required.

  15. Nerve Transfers in the Upper Extremity: A Practical User's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Nerve injuries above the elbow are associated with a poor prognosis, even with prompt repair and appropriate rehabilitation. The past 2 decades have seen the development of numerous nerve transfer techniques, by which a denervated peripheral target is reinnervated by a healthy donor nerve. Nerve transfers are indicated in proximal brachial plexus injuries where grafting is not possible or in proximal injuries of peripheral nerves with long reinnervation distances. Nerve transfers represent a revolution in peripheral nerve surgery and offer the potential for superior functional recovery in severe nerve injuries. However, the techniques have not been universally adopted due in part to a misconception that nerve transfers can only be understood and performed by superspecialists. Nerve transfer procedures are not technically difficult and require no specialized equipment. Numerous transfers have been described, but there are a handful of transfers for which there is strong clinical evidence. To restore shoulder abduction and external rotation in upper trunk brachial plexus injury, the key transfers are the spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve and the medial triceps branch to axillary nerve. For elbow flexion, the flexor carpi ulnaris branch of ulnar nerve to the biceps and brachialis branches of the musculocutaneous nerve is the key transfer. For ulnar intrinsic function, the distal anterior interosseous nerve to ulnar motor branch transfer has yielded excellent functional results. Nerve transfers form a therapeutic triad with traditional tendon transfers and functional motor unit rehabilitation which, when applied appropriately, can yield excellent functional results in complex nerve injuries. Nerve transfers are a powerful yet underused tool for proximal nerve injuries, which offer hope for traditionally discouraging injuries.

  16. Human vagus nerve branching in the cervical region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation is increasingly applied to treat epilepsy, psychiatric conditions and potentially chronic heart failure. After implanting vagus nerve electrodes to the cervical vagus nerve, side effects such as voice alterations and dyspnea or missing therapeutic effects are observed at different frequencies. Cervical vagus nerve branching might partly be responsible for these effects. However, vagus nerve branching has not yet been described in the context of vagus nerve stimulation.Branching of the cervical vagus nerve was investigated macroscopically in 35 body donors (66 cervical sides in the carotid sheath. After X-ray imaging for determining the vertebral levels of cervical vagus nerve branching, samples were removed to confirm histologically the nerve and to calculate cervical vagus nerve diameters and cross-sections.Cervical vagus nerve branching was observed in 29% of all cases (26% unilaterally, 3% bilaterally and proven histologically in all cases. Right-sided branching (22% was more common than left-sided branching (12% and occurred on the level of the fourth and fifth vertebra on the left and on the level of the second to fifth vertebra on the right side. Vagus nerves without branching were significantly larger than vagus nerves with branches, concerning their diameters (4.79 mm vs. 3.78 mm and cross-sections (7.24 mm2 vs. 5.28 mm2.Cervical vagus nerve branching is considerably more frequent than described previously. The side-dependent differences of vagus nerve branching may be linked to the asymmetric effects of the vagus nerve. Cervical vagus nerve branching should be taken into account when identifying main trunk of the vagus nerve for implanting electrodes to minimize potential side effects or lacking therapeutic benefits of vagus nerve stimulation.

  17. Infraorbital nerve block within the Pterygopalatine fossa of the horse: anatomical landmarks defined by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, S.; Hagen, G.

    2008-01-01

    In order to provide anaesthesia of the equine maxillary cheek teeth, a local nerve block of the infraorbital nerve in the pterygopalatine fossa had been proposed, which is referred to as the 'Palatine Bone Insertion' (PBI). As several complications with this method were reported, our study was designed to recommend a modified injection technique which avoids the risk of puncturing of relevant anatomical structures. Five cadaver heads and two living horses were examined by contrast medium injections and subsequent computed tomography (CT). Spinal needles were inserted using two different insertion techniques: The above mentioned (PBI), and a modification called 'Extraperiorbital Fat Body Insertion' (EFBI). Both techniques (PBI and EFBI) provide a consistent distribution of contrast medium around the infraorbital nerve. However, only the EFBI technique is appropriate to minimize the risk of complications. This study is an example for the permanent challenge of anatomists to supply a basis for clinical and surgical procedures

  18. Neuromyelitis optica IgG in the cerebrospinal fluid induces astrocytopathy in optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Kerstin; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Mørch, Marlene

    was coincident with deposition of complement. Histopathological lesions were markedly enhanced with extensive/long-segment astrocytopathy of optic nerve and optic chiasm involvement in AQP4- IgG+ C + anti-CD59a treated mice. Such pathology was not seen in mice receiving normal human IgG, C and anti-CD59a......Background: Serum immunoglobulin G targeting the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in the central nervous system (CNS) is a biomarker for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disease (NMOSD). Optic neuritis (ON) is believed to be immune-mediated and is associated with AQP4-IgG in NMOSD......-ON. The predilection of the optic nerve in NMOSD may partly be explained by the dense expression of AQP4 in the optic nerve. We previously reported that AQP4-IgG in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) becomes widely distributed in the brain and causes complementdependent astrocyte injury in periventricular areas and brain...

  19. A biosynthetic nerve guide conduit based on silk/SWNT/fibronectin nanocomposite for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mottaghitalab

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the functionality of nerve guide conduits (NGCs in nerve tissue engineering, here we report a conduit processing technique through introduction and evaluation of topographical, physical and chemical cues. Porous structure of NGCs based on freeze-dried silk/single walled carbon nanotubes (SF/SWNTs has shown a uniform chemical and physical structure with suitable electrical conductivity. Moreover, fibronectin (FN containing nanofibers within the structure of SF/SWNT conduits produced through electrospinning process have shown aligned fashion with appropriate porosity and diameter. Moreover, fibronectin remained its bioactivity and influenced the adhesion and growth of U373 cell lines. The conduits were then implanted to 10 mm left sciatic nerve defects in rats. The histological assessment has shown that nerve regeneration has taken places in proximal region of implanted nerve after 5 weeks following surgery. Furthermore, nerve conduction velocities (NCV and more myelinated axons were observed in SF/SWNT and SF/SWNT/FN groups after 5 weeks post implantation, indicating a functional recovery for the injured nerves. With immunohistochemistry, the higher S-100 expression of Schwann cells in SF/SWNT/FN conduits in comparison to other groups was confirmed. In conclusion, an oriented conduit of biocompatible SF/SWNT/FN has been fabricated with acceptable structure that is particularly applicable in nerve grafts.

  20. Sciatic nerve block performed with nerve stimulation technique in an amputee a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiring, C.; Kristensen, Billy

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of a sciatic nerve block performed with the nerve stimulation technique. This technique is normally not used in amputees because detection of a motor response to an electrical stimulation is impossible. In our patient the stimulation provoked a phantom sensation of movement...

  1. Natural history of sensory nerve recovery after cutaneous nerve injury following foot and ankle surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous nerve injury is the most common complication following foot and ankle surgery. However, clinical studies including long-term follow-up data after cutaneous nerve injury of the foot and ankle are lacking. In the current retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of 279 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery. Subjects who suffered from apparent paresthesia in the cutaneous sensory nerve area after surgery were included in the study. Patients received oral vitamin B 12 and methylcobalamin. We examined final follow-up data of 17 patients, including seven with sural nerve injury, five with superficial peroneal nerve injury, and five with plantar medial cutaneous nerve injury. We assessed nerve sensory function using the Medical Research Council Scale. Follow-up immediately, at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months, and 1 year after surgery demonstrated that sensory function was gradually restored in most patients within 6 months. However, recovery was slow at 9 months. There was no significant difference in sensory function between 9 months and 1 year after surgery. Painful neuromas occurred in four patients at 9 months to 1 year. The results demonstrated that the recovery of sensory function in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months

  2. end-to-side nerve suture - a technique to repair peripheral nerve injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raubenheimer, Head of the Department of Oral Pathology and. Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, MEDUNSA, for the meticulous histology investigations. References. 1. Mennen U. End-lo-side nerve suture in the non-human primate. Hand Surgery 1998; 3(1): 1-6. 2. Mennen U. End-to-side nerve suture in the human patient.

  3. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Strategies: Electrically Stimulating Polymer Based Nerve Growth Conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew; Shelke, Namdev B.; Manoukian, Ohan S.; Yu, Xiaojun; McCullough, Louise D.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of large peripheral nerve damages ranges from the use of an autologous nerve graft to a synthetic nerve growth conduit. Biological grafts, in spite of many merits, show several limitations in terms of availability and donor site morbidity, and outcomes are suboptimal due to fascicle mismatch, scarring, and fibrosis. Tissue engineered nerve graft substitutes utilize polymeric conduits in conjunction with cues both chemical and physical, cells alone and or in combination. The chemical and physical cues delivered through polymeric conduits play an important role and drive tissue regeneration. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been applied toward the repair and regeneration of various tissues such as muscle, tendon, nerve, and articular tissue both in laboratory and clinical settings. The underlying mechanisms that regulate cellular activities such as cell adhesion, proliferation, cell migration, protein production, and tissue regeneration following ES is not fully understood. Polymeric constructs that can carry the electrical stimulation along the length of the scaffold have been developed and characterized for possible nerve regeneration applications. We discuss the use of electrically conductive polymers and associated cell interaction, biocompatibility, tissue regeneration, and recent basic research for nerve regeneration. In conclusion, a multifunctional combinatorial device comprised of biomaterial, structural, functional, cellular, and molecular aspects may be the best way forward for effective peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27278739

  4. Perspectives of optic nerve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Frank John; Nitsch, Kristian; Huyck, Margaret; Troyk, Philip; Schug, Ken

    2016-01-01

    A number of projects exist that are investigating the ability to restore visual percepts for individuals who are blind through a visual prosthesis. While many projects have reported the results from a technical basis, very little exists in the professional literature on the human experience of visual implant technology. The current study uses an ethnographic methodological approach to document the experiences of the research participants and study personnel of a optic nerve vision prosthesis project in Brussels, Belgium. The findings have implications for motivation for participating in clinical trials, ethical safeguards of participants and the role of the participant in a research study. Implications for Rehabilitation Rehabilitation practitioners are often solicited by prospective participants to assist in evaluating a clinical trial before making a decision about participation. Rehabilitation professionals should be aware that: The decision to participate in a clinical trial is ultimately up to the individual participant. However, participants should be aware that family members might experience stress from of a lack of knowledge about the research study. The more opportunities a participant has to share thoughts and feelings about the research study with investigators will likely result in a positive overall experience. Ethical safeguards put in place to protect the interests of an individual participant may have the opposite effect and create stress. Rehabilitation professionals can play an important role as participant advocates from recruitment through termination of the research study. Participant hope is an important component of participation in a research study. Information provided to participants by investigators during the consent process should be balanced carefully with potential benefits, so it does not destroy a participant's hope.

  5. Vagus nerve stimulation improves working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lihua; Peräkylä, Jari; Holm, Katri; Haapasalo, Joonas; Lehtimäki, Kai; Ogawa, Keith H; Peltola, Jukka; Hartikainen, Kaisa M

    2017-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is used for treating refractory epilepsy and major depression. While the impact of this treatment on seizures has been established, its impact on human cognition remains equivocal. The goal of this study is to elucidate the immediate effects of vagus nerve stimulation on attention, cognition, and emotional reactivity in patients with epilepsy. Twenty patients (12 male and 8 female; 45 ± 13 years old) treated with VNS due to refractory epilepsy participated in the study. Subjects performed a computer-based test of executive functions embedded with emotional distractors while their brain activity was recorded with electroencephalography. Subjects' cognitive performance, early visual event-related potential N1, and frontal alpha asymmetry were studied when cyclic vagus nerve stimulation was on and when it was off. We found that vagus nerve stimulation improved working memory performance as seen in reduced errors on a subtask that relied on working memory, odds ratio (OR) = 0.63 (95% confidence interval, CI [0.47, 0.85]) and increased N1 amplitude, F(1, 15) = 10.17, p = .006. In addition, vagus nerve stimulation resulted in longer reaction time, F(1, 16) = 8.23, p = .019, and greater frontal alpha asymmetry, F(1, 16) = 11.79, p = .003, in response to threat-related distractors. This is the first study to show immediate improvement in working memory performance in humans with clinically relevant vagus nerve stimulation. Furthermore, vagus nerve stimulation had immediate effects on emotional reactivity evidenced in behavior and brain physiology.

  6. Are most sixth nerve palsies really paralytic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ayse Gul; Arifoglu, Hasan Basri; Dal, Derya; Simsek, Saban

    2011-01-01

    Etiology and date of palsy are two important parameters that affect the treatment protocol of sixth nerve palsies. This study evaluated the treatment protocols and outcomes of treatment in sixth nerve palsies. Thirty-four patients who had sixth nerve palsy were included. Botulinum toxin A (BTX) injection was performed on patients with acute sixth nerve palsy and paresis (BTX group), whereas chronic cases received only horizontal surgery (surgery group). All patients in the BTX group received a BTX injection into the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle. Patients in the surgery group underwent either ipsilateral medial rectus recession or recession combined with lateral rectus resection without the transposition procedure. Fifteen patients were treated with a BTX injection to the medial rectus muscle. One patient underwent ipsilateral medial rectus muscle recession and 6 patients received both medial rectus recession and lateral rectus resection in the same session. Measurement of esotropia was 24.9 prism diopters (PD) (range: 18 to 35 PD) before treatment in the BTX group. The recovery rate was 86.6% (13 of 15) without any residual deviation. In the surgery group, the mean preoperative deviation was 35.1 PD (range: 14 to 75 PD), which decreased to mean 2.57 PD (range: 0 to 10 PD) postoperatively. The achievement of orthotropia rate was 85.7%. BTX injection was found to be an effective treatment because it prevented medial rectus contraction in acute sixth nerve palsies. Correction of deviation with the recession of contracted medial rectus muscles and resection of lateral rectus muscles without the need of transposition in chronic sixth nerve palsy testified that most sixth nerve palsies involve partial paralysis rather than complete paralysis. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Electromechanical properties of biomembranes and nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimburg, T; Blicher, A; Mosgaard, L D; Zecchi, K

    2014-01-01

    Lipid membranes are insulators and capacitors, which can be charged by an external electric field. This phenomenon plays an important role in the field of electrophysiology, for instance when describing nerve pulse conduction. Membranes are also made of polar molecules meaning that they contain molecules with permanent electrical dipole moments. Therefore, the properties of membranes are subject to changes in trans-membrane voltage. Vice versa, mechanical forces on membranes lead to changes in the membrane potential. Associated effects are flexoelectricity, piezoelectricity, and electrostriction. Lipid membranes can melt from an ordered to a disordered state. Due to the change of membrane dimensions associated with lipid membrane melting, electrical properties are linked to the melting transition. Melting of the membrane can induce changes in trans-membrane potential, and application of voltage can lead to a shift of the melting transition. Further, close to transitions membranes are very susceptible to piezoelectric phenomena. We discuss these phenomena in relation with the occurrence of lipid ion channels. Close to melting transitions, lipid membranes display step-wise ion conduction events, which are indistinguishable from protein ion channels. These channels display a voltage-dependent open probability. One finds asymmetric current-voltage relations of the pure membrane very similar to those found for various protein channels. This asymmetry falsely has been considered a criterion to distinguish lipid channels from protein channels. However, we show that the asymmetry can arise from the electromechanical properties of the lipid membrane itself. Finally, we discuss electromechanical behavior in connection with the electromechanical theory of nerve pulse transduction. It has been found experimentally that nerve pulses are related to changes in nerve thickness. Thus, during the nerve pulse a solitary mechanical pulse travels along the nerve. Due to

  8. Electro-mechanical response of a 3D nerve bundle model to mechanical loads leading to axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, I; Destrade, M; Duffy, M; McHugh, P

    2018-03-01

    Traumatic brain injuries and damage are major causes of death and disability. We propose a 3D fully coupled electro-mechanical model of a nerve bundle to investigate the electrophysiological impairments due to trauma at the cellular level. The coupling is based on a thermal analogy of the neural electrical activity by using the finite element software Abaqus CAE 6.13-3. The model includes a real-time coupling, modulated threshold for spiking activation, and independent alteration of the electrical properties for each 3-layer fibre within a nerve bundle as a function of strain. Results of the coupled electro-mechanical model are validated with previously published experimental results of damaged axons. Here, the cases of compression and tension are simulated to induce (mild, moderate, and severe) damage at the nerve membrane of a nerve bundle, made of 4 fibres. Changes in strain, stress distribution, and neural activity are investigated for myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres, by considering the cases of an intact and of a traumatised nerve membrane. A fully coupled electro-mechanical modelling approach is established to provide insights into crucial aspects of neural activity at the cellular level due to traumatic brain injury. One of the key findings is the 3D distribution of residual stresses and strains at the membrane of each fibre due to mechanically induced electrophysiological impairments, and its impact on signal transmission. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Necrotizing Lymphocytic Vasculitis Limited to the Peripheral Nerves: Report of Six Cases and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Félix Restrepo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The systemic vasculitides are syndromes characterized by inflammation and injury (necrosis or thrombosis of blood vessels, resulting in clinical manifestations according to the affected vascular bed, but not classically in stocking-glove neuropathy. Objective. To describe a form of primary vasculitis affecting strictly peripheral nerves manifesting as stocking-glove neuropathy. Methods. Case series of 110 patients seen in three centers in Bogotá who presented with symptoms and signs of polyneuropathy and/or were identified with vasculitis affecting only the peripheral nerves, and who underwent sural nerve biopsy. Results. Six patients had a vasculitis affecting only the peripheral nerves diagnosed on sural nerve biopsy which demonstrated a mixed infiltrate of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes especially in the small epineurial blood vessels. Over time, all had worsening of symptoms, with grip weakness and motor deficits in the hand and feet. Serologies and acute phase reactants were normal in all patients. Treatment response to immunosuppression was satisfactory in 5 patients; 1 patient had progressive neurologic damage. Conclusions. There is a distinct form of primary vasculitis of the peripheral nervous system characterized by distal sensory polyneuropathy with stocking-glove distribution with good prognosis, few and minor relapses and good response to treatment even after delayed diagnosis.

  10. Ribosomal RNAs synthesized by isolated squid nerves and ganglia differ from native ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone-Capano, C; Crispino, M; Menichini, E; Kaplan, B B; Giuditta, A

    1999-03-01

    The large rRNA of the squid comprises two chains that may be dissociated by heating at 65 degrees C. A single chain constitutes the small rRNA. Surprisingly, the RNAs synthesized by dissected squid fin nerves and stellate nerves and ganglia differed in size from native rRNAs and did not manifest thermal instability. Nonetheless, they resembled native rRNAs in relative abundance, subcellular distribution, lack of poly(A), and metabolic stability. In addition, newly synthesized RNA was localized in nerve and glial cells, as shown by autoradiographic analysis, and was assembled into 80S ribosomes, which supported the synthesis of neuron-specific neurofilament proteins. Following incubation of nerves and ganglia for >10 h, native rRNAs started to disappear, while two major newly synthesized RNAs progressively accumulated. As a result, after 20 h, native rRNAs were substituted by the two novel RNAs. With use of 32P-cDNA synthesized from the latter RNAs as a probe, the novel RNAs demonstrated a considerable degree of homology with native rRNA in northern analysis. Taken together, the data suggest that in dissected squid nerves and ganglia, the synthesis of native rRNAs is gradually terminated while two novel rRNAs are being synthesized, presumably as a correlate of reactive gliosis and/or neuronal degeneration/regeneration.

  11. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-ling Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group. As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves.

  12. Inhibition: Mental Control Process or Mental Resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im-Bolter, Nancie; Johnson, Janice; Ling, Daphne; Pascual-Leone, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The current study tested 2 models of inhibition in 45 children with language impairment and 45 children with normally developing language; children were aged 7 to 12 years. Of interest was whether a model of inhibition as a mental-control process (i.e., executive function) or as a mental resource would more accurately reflect the relations among…

  13. Anomalous Innervation of the Median Nerve in the Arm in the Absence of the Musculocutaneous Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khursheed Raza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus innervates the upper extremities. While variations in the formation of the brachial plexus and its terminal branches are quite common, it is uncommon for the median nerve to innervate the muscles of the arm. During the dissection of an elderly male cadaver at the Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India, in 2016, the coracobrachialis muscle was found to be supplied by a direct branch from the lateral root of the median nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve was absent. The branches of the median nerve supplied the biceps brachii and brachialis muscles and the last branch continued as the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm. These variations may present atypically in cases of arm flexor paralysis or sensory loss on the lateral forearm. Knowledge of these variations is important in surgeries and during the administration of regional anaesthesia near the shoulder joint and upper arm.

  14. [Diagnostic ability of power measurement of different grip forms for distal median nerve lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, N; Mentzel, M; Krischak, G; Häderer, C; Gülke, J

    2018-03-01

    Peripheral lesions of the median nerve cause characteristic changes of the grip function of the hand. For evaluating grip force changes, measurement by dynamometers (JAMAR dynamometer and pinch dynamometer) is of high relevance. In this study the ability of grip force measurements of different grip forms was evaluated to discriminate between a simulated median nerve lesion and healthy subjects. In 21 healthy subjects, the grip force of power grip was measured by the JAMAR dynamometer at the second stage including measurement of force at the fingertips and the thenar by a sensor glove. With a pinch dynamometer the power of palmar abduction, precision grip, pincer grip and pinch grip was determined. Measurements were performed with and without median nerve block at the wrist. In power grip of the JAMAR dynamometer at the second stage a significant reduction of the grip force of 13.4% was found (p power distribution between the fingers D2-D5 did not change with median nerve block. The most relevant reduction of grip force in median nerve block compared with the healthy control was measured in palmar abduction (72.1%, p block there was a limited relevance of the measurement of the power grip and force distribution at the fingers by the JAMAR dynamometer. However, the best distinction was observed by dynamometric measurement of other grips than power grip, such as palmar abduction, precision grip, pincer grip and pinch grip. The results could be relevant for the clinical diagnostics and rehabilitation of median nerve lesion, complementing the widespread measurement of the power grip by other grip forms.

  15. Effect of chemical stimuli on nerves supplying upper airway muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, D; Mitra, J; Salamone, J; Cherniack, N S

    1982-03-01

    Studies of upper airway resistance suggest that the activity of cranial nerves supplying upper airway muscles changes with chemical drive and that imbalances in the activation of these nerves as compared to the phrenic play a role in causing upper airway obstruction. We assessed the effect of hypoxia and hypercapnia on the activity of the hypoglossal nerve, the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and phrenic nerve in paralyzed anesthetized artificially ventilated dogs. Comparison of hypoglossal and phrenic nerves were also repeated after vagotomy. Both hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerves exhibited increased activity with inspiration. Hypoxia and hypercapnia increased phrenic nerve activity as well as the activity of the two cranial nerves. While linear increases occurred in phrenic and recurrent laryngeal nerve activity with both chemical stimuli, the relationship between hypoglossal and phrenic nerve activity was curvilinear. At lower levels of chemical drive, changes in hypoglossal nerve were less than in the phrenic, and the reverse was true at higher levels of chemical stimulation. There were also differences in the response of both cranial nerves and the phrenic to changing vagal stimulation. The dissimilarities observed in the cranial response of the nerves (versus the phrenic) could potentially affect the forces developed during inspiration and lead to obstruction in the upper airway.

  16. The effects of irreversible electroporation (IRE on nerves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: If a critical nerve is circumferentially involved with tumor, radical surgery intended to cure the cancer must sacrifice the nerve. Loss of critical nerves may lead to serious consequences. In spite of the impressive technical advancements in nerve reconstruction, complete recovery and normalization of nerve function is difficult to achieve. Though irreversible electroporation (IRE might be a promising choice to treat tumors near or involved critical nerve, the pathophysiology of the nerve after IRE treatment has not be clearly defined. METHODS: We applied IRE directly to a rat sciatic nerve to study the long term effects of IRE on the nerve. A sequence of 10 square pulses of 3800 V/cm, each 100 µs long was applied directly to rat sciatic nerves. In each animal of group I (IRE the procedure was applied to produce a treated length of about 10 mm. In each animal of group II (Control the electrodes were only applied directly on the sciatic nerve for the same time. Electrophysiological, histological, and functional studies were performed on immediately after and 3 days, 1 week, 3, 5, 7 and 10 weeks following surgery. FINDINGS: Electrophysiological, histological, and functional results show the nerve treated with IRE can attain full recovery after 7 weeks. CONCLUSION: This finding is indicative of the preservation of nerve involving malignant tumors with respect to the application of IRE pulses to ablate tumors completely. In summary, IRE may be a promising treatment tool for any tumor involving nerves.

  17. Visualizing peripheral nerve regeneration by whole mount staining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-peng Dun

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve trauma triggers a well characterised sequence of events both proximal and distal to the site of injury. Axons distal to the injury degenerate, Schwann cells convert to a repair supportive phenotype and macrophages enter the nerve to clear myelin and axonal debris. Following these events, axons must regrow through the distal part of the nerve, re-innervate and finally are re-myelinated by Schwann cells. For nerve crush injuries (axonotmesis, in which the integrity of the nerve is maintained, repair may be relatively effective whereas for nerve transection (neurotmesis repair will likely be very poor as few axons may be able to cross between the two parts of the severed nerve, across the newly generated nerve bridge, to enter the distal stump and regenerate. Analysing axon growth and the cell-cell interactions that occur following both nerve crush and cut injuries has largely been carried out by staining sections of nerve tissue, but this has the obvious disadvantage that it is not possible to follow the paths of regenerating axons in three dimensions within the nerve trunk or nerve bridge. To try and solve this problem, we describe the development and use of a novel whole mount staining protocol that allows the analysis of axonal regeneration, Schwann cell-axon interaction and re-vascularisation of the repairing nerve following nerve cut and crush injuries.

  18. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Important security updates for DBSAlliance.org. Read more... Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  19. International Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  20. Mental Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Soomaali (Somali) MP3 EthnoMed Spanish (español) Expand Section Mental Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Enfermedades mentales: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National Library of Medicine ...

  1. Reconstruction of the abdominal vagus nerve using sural nerve grafts in canine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbo; Wang, Jun; Luo, Fen; Wang, Zhiming; Wang, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Recently, vagus nerve preservation or reconstruction of vagus has received increasing attention. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the severed vagal trunk using an autologous sural nerve graft. Ten adult Beagle dogs were randomly assigned to two groups of five, the nerve grafting group (TG) and the vagal resection group (VG). The gastric secretion and emptying functions in both groups were assessed using Hollander insulin and acetaminophen tests before surgery and three months after surgery. All dogs underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. In TG group, latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in a vagal trunk were measured, and then nerves of 4 cm long were cut from the abdominal anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Two segments of autologous sural nerve were collected for performing end-to-end anastomoses with the cut ends of vagal trunk (8-0 nylon suture, 3 sutures for each anastomosis). Dogs in VG group only underwent partial resections of the anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Laparotomy was performed in dogs of TG group, and latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in their vagal trunks were measured. The grafted nerve segment was removed, and stained with anti-neurofilament protein and toluidine blue. Latency of the action potential in the vagal trunk was longer after surgery than before surgery in TG group, while the conduction velocity was lower after surgery. The gastric secretion and emptying functions were weaker after surgery in dogs of both groups, but in TG group they were significantly better than in VG group. Anti-neurofilament protein staining and toluidine blue staining showed there were nerve fibers crossing the anastomosis of the vagus and sural nerves in dogs of TG group. Reconstruction of the vagus nerve using the sural nerve is technically feasible.

  2. Reconstruction of the abdominal vagus nerve using sural nerve grafts in canine models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, vagus nerve preservation or reconstruction of vagus has received increasing attention. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the severed vagal trunk using an autologous sural nerve graft. METHODS: Ten adult Beagle dogs were randomly assigned to two groups of five, the nerve grafting group (TG and the vagal resection group (VG. The gastric secretion and emptying functions in both groups were assessed using Hollander insulin and acetaminophen tests before surgery and three months after surgery. All dogs underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. In TG group, latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in a vagal trunk were measured, and then nerves of 4 cm long were cut from the abdominal anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Two segments of autologous sural nerve were collected for performing end-to-end anastomoses with the cut ends of vagal trunk (8-0 nylon suture, 3 sutures for each anastomosis. Dogs in VG group only underwent partial resections of the anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Laparotomy was performed in dogs of TG group, and latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in their vagal trunks were measured. The grafted nerve segment was removed, and stained with anti-neurofilament protein and toluidine blue. RESULTS: Latency of the action potential in the vagal trunk was longer after surgery than before surgery in TG group, while the conduction velocity was lower after surgery. The gastric secretion and emptying functions were weaker after surgery in dogs of both groups, but in TG group they were significantly better than in VG group. Anti-neurofilament protein staining and toluidine blue staining showed there were nerve fibers crossing the anastomosis of the vagus and sural nerves in dogs of TG group. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of the vagus nerve using the sural nerve is technically feasible.

  3. Vascularized nerve grafts: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzelli, Renato; Capone, Crescenzo; Sgulò, Francesco Giovanni; Mariniello, Giuseppe; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to define an experimental model in order to promote the functional recovery of the nerves using grafts with vascular support (Vascular Nerve Grafts - VNG). The aim of this study is to define, on an experimental model in normal recipient bed, whether the functional recovery with VNG is superior to that obtained non-vascularized graft (NNG). Twenty male rabbits, which underwent dissection of sciatic nerve, were later treated by reinnervation through an autograft. In 10 animals the reconstruction of sciatic nerve was realized with VNG; in 10 control animals the reconstruction of sciatic nerve was realized with NNG. The VNG group showed a better axonal organization and a significantly higher number of regenerated axons in the early phases (after 30 days) than the NNG group, whereas the difference in the axonal number at day 90 was less significant; besides, the axon diameter and the myelin thickness were not significantly improved by VNG group. Our data suggests that the use of VNG leads to a faster regeneration process and a better functional recovery, although the final results are comparable to those of the NNG. VNG improve the quality of the axonal regeneration (axonal diameter and Schwann cells), although the increase in the axonal number is not significant and does not improve the long-term functional outcome.

  4. Regeneration of the nerves in the aerial cavity with an artificial nerve conduit --reconstruction of chorda tympani nerve gaps-.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Due to its anatomical features, the chorda tympani nerve (CTN is sometimes sacrificed during middle ear surgery, resulting in taste dysfunction. We examined the effect of placing an artificial nerve conduit, a polyglycolic acid (PGA-collagen tube, across the gap in the section of the resected chorda tympani nerve (CTN running through the tympanic cavity.The CTN was reconstructed with a PGA-collagen tube in three patients with taste disturbance who underwent CTN resection. To evaluate the effect of the reconstruction procedure on the patients' gustatory function, we measured the patients' electrogustometry (EGM thresholds. The patients were followed-up for at least two years.Gustatory function was completely restored in all of the patients after the reconstruction. The patients' EGM thresholds exhibited early improvements within one to two weeks and had returned to their normal ranges within three months. They subsequently remained stable throughout the two-year follow-up period. In a patient who underwent a second surgical procedure, it was found that the PGA-collagen tube used in the first surgical procedure had been absorbed and replaced by new CTN fibers with blood vessels on their surfaces.These results suggest that reconstruction of the CTN with an artificial nerve conduit, a PGA-collagen tube, allows functional and morphological regeneration of the nerve and facilitates the recovery of taste function. PGA-collagen tubes might be useful for repairing CTNs that are resected during middle ear surgery. Further research is required to confirm these preliminary results although this is the first report to describe the successful regeneration of a nerve running through an aerial space.

  5. Development of regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces for motor control of neuroprosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Stephen W. P.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Irwin, Zachary T.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Cederna, Paul S.

    2017-05-01

    Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries suffered during amputation commonly results in debilitating neuropathic pain in the affected limb. Modern prosthetic technologies allow for intuitive, simultaneous control of multiple degrees of freedom. However, these state-of-the-art devices require separate, independent control signals for each degree of freedom, which is currently not possible. As a result, amputees reject up to 75% of myoelectric devices preferring instead to use body-powered artificial limbs which offer subtle sensory feedback. Without meaningful and intuitive sensory feedback, even the most advanced myoelectric prostheses remain insensate, burdensome, and are associated with enormous cognitive demand and mental fatigue. The ideal prosthetic device is one which is capable of providing intuitive somatosensory feedback essential for interaction with the environment. Critical to the design of such a bioprosthetic device is the development of a reliable biologic interface between human and machine. This ideal patient-prosthetic interface allows for transmission of both afferent somatosensory information and efferent motor signals for a closed-loop feedback system of neural control. Our lab has developed the Regenerative Peripheral Nerve Interface (RPNI) as a biologic nerve interface designed for stable integration of a prosthetic device with transected peripheral nerves in a residual limb. The RPNI is constructed by surgically implanting the distal end of a transected peripheral nerve into an autogenous muscle graft. Animal experiments in our lab have shown recording of motor signals from RPNI's implanted into both rodents and monkeys. Here, we achieve high amplitude EMG signals with a high signal to noise (SNR) ratio.

  6. The global burden of mental disorders: an update from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Chatterji, Somnath; Lee, Sing; Ormel, Johan; Ustün, T Bedirhan; Wang, Philip S

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviews recent findings from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) surveys on the global burden of mental disorders. The WMH surveys are representative community surveys in 28 countries throughout the world aimed at providing information to mental health policy makers about the prevalence, distribution, burden, and unmet need for treatment of common mental disorders. The first 17 WMH surveys show that mental disorders are commonly occurring in all participating countries. The inter-quartile range (IQR: 25th-75th percentiles) of lifetime DSM-IV disorder prevalence estimates (combining anxiety, mood, externalizing, and substance use disorders) is 18.1-36.1%. The IQR of 12-month prevalence estimates is 9.8-19.1%. Prevalence estimates of 12-month Serious Mental Illness (SMI) are 4-6.8% in half the countries, 2.3-3.6% in one-fourth, and 0.8-1.9% in one-fourth. Many mental disorders begin in childhood-adolescence and have significant adverse effects on subsequent role transitions in the WMH data. Adult mental disorders are found to be associated with such high role impairment in the WMH data that available clinical interventions could have positive cost-effectiveness ratios. Mental disorders are commonly occurring and often seriously impairing in many countries throughout the world. Expansion of treatment could be cost-effective from both employer and societal perspectives.

  7. Mental Health and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Mental Health Mental Health and African Americans Poverty level affects mental health ... compared to 120% of non-Hispanic whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  8. Introduction to Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arc of the United States, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to define mental retardation and answer questions related to this topic. According to the American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR), mental retardation is a disability that occurs before age 18. It is characterized by significant limitations in intellectual functioning and adaptive behaviors as expressed in…

  9. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  10. Hydrogel derived from porcine decellularized nerve tissue as a promising biomaterial for repairing peripheral nerve defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Shihao; Qiu, Shuai; Rao, Zilong; Liu, Jianghui; Zhu, Shuang; Yan, Liwei; Mao, Haiquan; Zhu, Qingtang; Quan, Daping; Liu, Xiaolin

    2018-04-09

    Decellularized matrix hydrogels derived from tissues or organs have been used for tissue repair due to their biocompatibility, tunability, and tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components. However, the preparation of decellularized peripheral nerve matrix hydrogels and their use to repair nerve defects have not been reported. Here, we developed a hydrogel from porcine decellularized nerve matrix (pDNM-G), which was confirmed to have minimal DNA content and retain collagen and glycosaminoglycans content, thereby allowing gelatinization. The pDNM-G exhibited a nanofibrous structure similar to that of natural ECM, and a ∼280-Pa storage modulus at 10 mg/mL similar to that of native neural tissues. Western blot and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the pDNM-G consisted mostly of ECM proteins and contained primary ECM-related proteins, including fibronectin and collagen I and IV). In vitro experiments showed that pDNM-G supported Schwann cell proliferation and preserved cell morphology. Additionally, in a 15-mm rat sciatic nerve defect model, pDNM-G was combined with electrospun poly(lactic-acid)-co-poly(trimethylene-carbonate)conduits to bridge the defect, which did not elicit an adverse immune response and promoted the activation of M2 macrophages associated with a constructive remodeling response. Morphological analyses and electrophysiological and functional examinations revealed that the regenerative outcomes achieved by pDNM-G were superior to those by empty conduits and closed to those using rat decellularized nerve matrix allograft scaffolds. These findings indicated that pDNM-G, with its preserved ECM composition and nanofibrous structure, represents a promising biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration. Decellularized nerve allografts have been widely used to treat peripheral nerve injury. However, given their limited availability and lack of bioactive factors, efforts have been made to improve the efficacy

  11. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  12. Mental Health and Mental Disorder Recommendation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchiwit, Manyat

    2017-12-01

    The characteristic differences among the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) countries in terms of trade and investment, society and cultural values, medical information and technology, and the living and working environment have become major health problems in terms of mental disorders. The purpose of this article is to identify the gaps in those aspects, to propose mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs, and to recommend policies for policy makers and research investors. A comparative analysis and literature review of existing policy, including overviews of previous research were used to generate a synthesis of the existing knowledge of the mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs. The review results recommend mental health and mental disorder programs for policy makers, research investors, and stakeholders in order to strengthen the directions for implementing these programs in the future. The healthcare provision in each country will not be limited only to its citizens; the healthcare markets and target groups are likely to expand to the neighboring countries in the context of changes in domestic and international factors, which have both positive and negative impacts according to the political, economic, and social situations of the influencing countries.

  13. Theobromine inhibits sensory nerve activation and cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Omar S; Belvisi, Maria G; Patel, Hema J; Crispino, Natascia; Birrell, Mark A; Korbonits, Márta; Korbonits, Dezso; Barnes, Peter J

    2005-02-01

    Cough is a common and protective reflex, but persistent coughing is debilitating and impairs quality of life. Antitussive treatment using opioids is limited by unacceptable side effects, and there is a great need for more effective remedies. The present study demonstrates that theobromine, a methylxanthine derivative present in cocoa, effectively inhibits citric acid-induced cough in guinea-pigs in vivo. Furthermore, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in man, theobromine suppresses capsaicin-induced cough with no adverse effects. We also demonstrate that theobromine directly inhibits capsaicin-induced sensory nerve depolarization of guinea-pig and human vagus nerve suggestive of an inhibitory effect on afferent nerve activation. These data indicate the actions of theobromine appear to be peripherally mediated. We conclude theobromine is a novel and promising treatment, which may form the basis for a new class of antitussive drugs.

  14. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Castro Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics.

  15. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  16. Ulnar nerve entrapment complicating radial head excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Parfait Bienvenu Bouhelo-Pam

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several mechanisms are involved in ischemia or mechanical compression of ulnar nerve at the elbow. Presentation of case: We hereby present the case of a road accident victim, who received a radial head excision for an isolated fracture of the radial head and complicated by onset of cubital tunnel syndrome. This outcome could be the consequence of an iatrogenic valgus of the elbow due to excision of the radial head. Hitherto the surgical treatment of choice it is gradually been abandoned due to development of radial head implant arthroplasty. However, this management option is still being performed in some rural centers with low resources. Discussion: The radial head plays an important role in the stability of the elbow and his iatrogenic deformity can be complicated by cubital tunnel syndrome. Conclusion: An ulnar nerve release was performed with favorable outcome. Keywords: Cubital tunnel syndrome, Peripheral nerve palsy, Radial head excision, Elbow valgus

  17. Capecitabine and sixth cranial nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta Sonali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Capecitabine is an oral chemotherapeutic agent converted to 5 flourouracil (5-FU. Neurotoxicity associated with the medication encompasses both central and peripheral nervous systems. We describe a 60 year old man with colonic carcinoma who developed diplopia due to a sixth nerve palsy following the use of capecitabine which is an orally administered prodrug of 5-FU. An MRI of brain did not reveal a space occupying lesion or vascular insult to account for his cranial nerve palsy. The sixth nerve palsy resolved spontaneously once capecitabine was withdrawn. Physicians in all walks of life are increasingly likely to come across such patients and should familiarize themselves with toxicities consequent to chemotherapy. Further research is needed to elucidate the cause of capecitabine associated neurotoxicity.

  18. Capecitabine and sixth cranial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sonali; Adilieje, Chineme; Bhattacharya, Amlan; Smith, Bruce; Sheikh, Moeen ul Haq

    2010-01-01

    Capecitabine is an oral chemotherapeutic agent converted to 5 fluorouracil (5-FU). Neurotoxicity associated with the medication encompasses both central and peripheral nervous systems. We describe a 60 year old man with colonic carcinoma who developed diplopia due to a sixth nerve palsy following the use of capecitabine which is an orally administered prodrug of 5-FU. An MRI of brain did not reveal a space occupying lesion or vascular insult to account for his cranial nerve palsy. The sixth nerve palsy resolved spontaneously once capecitabine was withdrawn. Physicians in all walks of life are increasingly likely to come across such patients and should familiarize themselves with toxicities consequent to chemotherapy. Further research is needed to elucidate the cause of capecitabine associated neurotoxicity.

  19. Nerve endings in the heart of teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S

    1979-01-01

    The nerve endings in the heart of fishes were studied using silver impregnation techniques. The heart chambers are profusely innervated by the sympathetic, parasympathetic (vagal) and postganglionic fibers of the intracardiac ganglia situated at the sinuatrial and the atrioventricular junctions. The plexuses are composed of medullated and nonmedullated fibers. The nerve fibers generally end freely and are slightly branched or unbranched terminations of myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. Moreover, a few nerve fibers end redundant in the form of end-rings, bulb-like, bush-like, club-shaped end end-coil like structures. The complex unencapsulated types of endings are also found in the myocardium of the atrium and the ventricle. The encapsulated endings (Vater-Pacinian; Krause end-bulb) could not be observed.

  20. Position of the mental foramen on panoramic radiographs and its relation to the horizontal course of the mandibular canal: a computed tomographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jung-Hoon; Lim, Young-Jun; Kim, Myung-Joo; Ahn, Sug-Joon; Kim, Jin

    2013-08-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to investigate the bucco-lingual course of the mandibular canal in the bony structure and (2) to figure out the relationship between the position of mental foramen on panoramic radiographs and the horizontal course of the mandibular canal. A database of panoramic radiography and spiral computed tomography (CT) scans was searched and 100 subjects were selected based on the criteria. Mental foramina were classified into four groups according to its antero-posterior position. Three measurements were made on each slice of coronal CT scans at three different points: (1) apex of second premolar; (2) median point of two root apexes of first molar; and (3) median point of two root apexes of second molar. The bucco-lingual ratios were calculated to access the relative bucco-lingual position of the mandibular canal. The distribution of subjects according to the type of mental foramen was: (1) type 3, 67%; (2) type 2, 26%; (3) type 4, 5%; and (4) type 1, 2%. The overall horizontal course of the mandibular canal was relatively constant from the second molar to first molar, whereas much significant directional change was found on the remaining course. Between types 2 and 3, no statistically significant differences were found at the level of the second molar and first molar (P = 0.461 and 0.965, respectively). Only below the second premolar, significant differences were found (P = 0.001). Based on the findings of our computed tomographic image analysis, the position of mental foramen on panoramic radiographs was affected by its horizontal course of inferior alveolar nerve. The significant horizontal direction change of the course was found after the canal passing below the mandibular first molar regardless of the antero-posterior position of mental foramen. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Renal nerve ultrastructural alterations in short term and long term experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Karina Laurenti; Sanada, Luciana Sayuri; Ferreira, Renata da Silva; de Marco, Maria Carolina Del Bem de Barros Oliveti; Castania, Jaci Airton; Salgado, Helio Cesar; Nessler, Randy Alan; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli

    2014-01-05

    Despite the evidence that renal hemodynamics is impaired in experimental diabetes, associated with glomeruli structural alterations, renal nerves were not yet investigated in experimental models of diabetes and the contribution of nerve alterations to the diabetic nephropathy remains to be investigated. We aimed to determine if ultrastructural morphometric parameters of the renal nerves are affected by short term and/or long term experimental diabetes and if insulin treatment reverses these alterations. Left renal nerves were evaluated 15 days or 12 weeks (N = 10 in each group) after induction of diabetes, with a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Control rats (N = 10 in each group) were injected with vehicle (citrate buffer). Treated animals (N = 10 in each group) received a single subcutaneous injection of insulin on a daily basis. Arterial pressure, together with the renal nerves activity, was recorded 15 days (short-term) or 12 weeks (long-term) after STZ injection. After the recordings, the renal nerves were dissected, prepared for light and transmission electron microscopy, and fascicle and fibers morphometry were carried out with computer software. The major diabetic alteration on the renal nerves was a small myelinated fibers loss since their number was smaller on chronic diabetic animals, the average morphometric parameters of the myelinated fibers were larger on chronic diabetic animals and distribution histograms of fiber diameter was significantly shifted to the right on chronic diabetic animals. These alterations began early, after 15 days of diabetes induction, associated with a severe mitochondrial damage, and were not prevented by conventional insulin treatment. The experimental diabetes, induced by a single intravenous injection of STZ, in adult male Wistar rats, caused small fiber loss in the renal nerves, probably due to the early mitochondrial damage. Conventional treatment with insulin was able to correct the weight gain and metabolic

  2. Arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming or repair under nerve blocks: Which nerves should be blocked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, AM; Abd-Elmaksoud, AM

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the role of the sciatic and obturator nerve blocks (in addition to femoral block) in providing painless arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming/repair. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with medial meniscus tear, who had been scheduled to knee arthroscopy, were planned to be included in this controlled prospective double-blind study. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups; FSO, FS, and FO. The femoral, sciatic, and obturator nerves were blocked in FSO groups. The femoral and sciatic nerves were blocked in FS group, while the femoral and obturator nerves were blocked in FO group. Intraoperative pain and its causative surgical maneuver were recorded. Results: All the patients (n = 7, 100%) in FO group had intraoperative pain. The research was terminated in this group but completed in FS and FSO groups (40 patients each). During valgus positioning of the knee for surgical management of the medial meniscus tear, the patients in FS group experienced pain more frequently than those in FSO group (P = 0.005). Conclusion: Adding a sciatic nerve block to the femoral nerve block is important for painless knee arthroscopy. Further adding of an obturator nerve block may be needed when a valgus knee position is required to manage the medial meniscus tear. PMID:27375382

  3. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  4. Role of Demyelination Efficiency within Acellular Nerve Scaffolds during Nerve Regeneration across Peripheral Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiqin Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hudson’s optimized chemical processing method is the most commonly used chemical method to prepare acellular nerve scaffolds for the reconstruction of large peripheral nerve defects. However, residual myelin attached to the basal laminar tube has been observed in acellular nerve scaffolds prepared using Hudson’s method. Here, we describe a novel method of producing acellular nerve scaffolds that eliminates residual myelin more effectively than Hudson’s method through the use of various detergent combinations of sulfobetaine-10, sulfobetaine-16, Triton X-200, sodium deoxycholate, and peracetic acid. In addition, the efficacy of this new scaffold in repairing a 1.5 cm defect in the sciatic nerve of rats was examined. The modified method produced a higher degree of demyelination than Hudson’s method, resulting in a minor host immune response in vivo and providing an improved environment for nerve regeneration and, consequently, better functional recovery. A morphological study showed that the number of regenerated axons in the modified group and Hudson group did not differ. However, the autograft and modified groups were more similar in myelin sheath regeneration than the autograft and Hudson groups. These results suggest that the modified method for producing a demyelinated acellular scaffold may aid functional recovery in general after nerve defects.

  5. Effect of diabetic retinopathy and panretinal photocoagulation on retinal nerve fiber layer and optic nerve appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Michele C; Tanimoto, Suzana A; Furlani, Bruno A; Lum, Brent; Pinto, Luciano M; Eliason, David; Prata, Tiago S; Brandt, James D; Morse, Lawrence S; Park, Susanna S; Melo, Luiz A S

    2009-07-01

    To determine if panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) alters retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and optic nerve appearance. Patients with diabetes who did and did not undergo PRP and nondiabetic control subjects were enrolled in a prospective study. Participants underwent optical coherence tomography of the peripapillary retina and optic nerve. Stereoscopic optic nerve photographs were graded in a masked fashion. Ninety-four eyes of 48 healthy individuals, 89 eyes of 55 diabetic patients who did not undergo PRP, and 37 eyes of 24 subjects with diabetes who underwent PRP were included in this study. Eyes that had been treated with PRP had thinner peripapillary RNFL compared with the other groups; this was statistically significantly different in the inferior (P = .004) and nasal (P = .003) regions. Optic nerve cupping did not increase with severity of disease classification, but the proportion of optic nerves graded as suspicious for glaucoma or as having nonglaucomatous optic neuropathy did (P = .008). These grading categories were associated with thinner RNFL measurements. Diabetic eyes that have been treated with PRP have thinner RNFL than nondiabetic eyes. Optic nerves in eyes treated with PRP are more likely to be graded as abnormal, but their appearance is not necessarily glaucomatous and may be related to thinning of the RNFL.

  6. Effects of graded mechanical compression of rabbit sciatic nerve on nerve blood flow and electrophysiological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayama, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Takeno, Kenichi; Awara, Kosuke; Mwaka, Erisa S; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2010-04-01

    Entrapment neuropathy is a frequent clinical problem that can be caused by, among other factors, mechanical compression; however, exactly how a compressive force affects the peripheral nerves remains poorly understood. In this study, using a rabbit model of sciatic nerve injury (n=12), we evaluated the time-course of changes in intraneural blood flow, compound nerve action potentials, and functioning of the blood-nerve barrier during graded mechanical compression. Nerve injury was applied using a compressor equipped with a custom-made pressure transducer. Cessation of intraneural blood flow was noted at a mean compressive force of 0.457+/-0.022 N (+/-SEM), and the compound action potential became zero at 0.486+/-0.031 N. Marked extravasation of Evans blue albumin was noted after 20 min of intraneural ischemia. The functional changes induced by compression are likely due to intraneural edema, which could subsequently result in impairment of nerve function. These changes may be critical factors in the development of symptoms associated with nerve compression. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mental toughness in soccer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diment, Gregory Michael

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade mental toughness has been discussed as a significant factor in performance in elite sport. Few studies have explored mental toughness from a behavioral perspective, and no comprehensive lists of mental toughness behaviors have been developed. The aim of the study was to produce...... a systematic observation checklist of mental toughness behavior in professional soccer. Consistent with existing studies, the results created a systematic observation instrument containing 15 mental toughness behaviors. Practical implications include goal-setting, game analysis and self-modeling interventions...

  8. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  9. Anomalous facial nerve canal with cochlear malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, L V; Curtin, H D

    2001-05-01

    Anteromedial "migration" of the first segment of the facial nerve canal has been previously identified in a patient with a non-Mondini-type cochlear malformation. In this study, several patients with the same facial nerve canal anomaly were reviewed to assess for the association and type of cochlear malformation. CT scans of the temporal bone of 15 patients with anteromedial migration of the first segment of the facial nerve canal were collected from routine departmental examinations. In seven patients, the anomalous course was bilateral, for a total of 22 cases. The migration was graded relative to normal as either mild/moderate or pronounced. The cochlea in each of these cases was examined for the presence and size of the basilar, second, and apical turns. The turns were either absent, small, normal, or enlarged. The CT scans of five patients with eight Mondini malformations were examined for comparison. The degree of the facial nerve migration was pronounced in nine cases and mild/moderate in 13. All 22 of these cases had associated cochlear abnormalities of the non-Mondini variety. These included common cavity anomalies with lack of definition between the cochlea and vestibule (five cases), cochleae with enlarged basilar turns and absent second or third turns (five cases), and cochleae with small or normal basilar turns with small or absent second or third turns (12 cases). None of the patients with Mondini-type cochlear malformations had anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal. Anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal occurs in association with some cochlear malformations. It did not occur in association with the Mondini malformations. A cochlea with a Mondini malformation, being similar in size to a normal cochlea, may physically prohibit such a deviation in course.

  10. Axon Counts Yield Multiple Options for Triceps Fascicular Nerve to Axillary Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khair, M Michael; Schreiber, Joseph J; Rosenblatt, Lauren; Byun, David J; Lee, Steve K; Wolfe, Scott W

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the relative axonal match between potential donor and recipient nerves, so that maximal reinnervation potential may be reached with the least chance of donor site morbidity. In 10 fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens, the main trunk and anterior, posterior, sensory and teres minor branches of the axillary nerve were identified, as were the radial nerve branches to the long, medial, and lateral heads of the triceps. The swing distances of the triceps fascicular nerve branches and the axillary nerve branches relative to the inferior border of the teres major muscle were recorded. Histomorphological analysis and axon counts were performed on sections of each branch. The median number of axons in the main axillary trunk was 7,887, with 4,052, 1,242, and 1,161 axons in the anterior, posterior, and teres minor branches, respectively. All specimens had a single long head triceps branch (median, 2,302 axons), a range of 1 to 3 branches to the medial head of the triceps (composite axon count, 2,198 axons), and 1 to 3 branches to the lateral head of the triceps (composite average, 1,462 axons). The medial and lateral head branches had sufficient swing distance to reach the anterior branch of the axillary nerve in all 10 specimens, with only 4 specimens having adequate long head branch swing distances. It is anatomically feasible to transfer multiple branches of the radial nerve supplying the medial, lateral, and sometimes, long head of the triceps to all branches of the axillary nerve in an attempt to reinnervate the deltoid and teres minor muscles. Understanding the axon counts of the different possible transfer combinations will improve operative flexibility and enable peripheral nerve surgeons to reinnervate for both abduction and external rotation with the highest donor/recipient axon count ratios. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  12. Organophosphate Nerve Agent Detection with Europium Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake R. Schwierking

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the detection of paraoxon, a model compound for nonvolatile organophosphate nerve agents such as VX. The detection utilizes europium complexes with 1,10 phenanthroline and thenoyltrifluoroacetone as sensitizing ligands. Both europium luminescence quenching and luminescence enhancement modalities are involved in the detection, which is simple, rapid, and sensitive. It is adaptable as well to the more volatile fluorophosphate nerve agents. It involves nothing more than visual luminescence observation under sample illumination by an ordinary hand-held ultraviolet lamp.

  13. A fiber optic sensor for nerve agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Steven R.; Mukamal, Harold; Low, Aaron; Locke, Edward P.; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2006-10-01

    We report advances made on the development of a fiber optic nerve agent sensor having its entire length as the sensing element. The optical fiber is multimode, and consists of a fused-silica core and a nerve agent sensitive cladding. Upon exposure to sarin gas, the cladding changes color, resulting in an alteration of the light intensity throughput. The fiber is mass produced using a conventional fiber optic draw tower. This technology could replace, or be used with, a collection of point-detectors to protect personnel, buildings and perimeters from dangerous chemical attacks.

  14. Clinical anatomy study of autonomic nerve with respective to the anterior approach lumbar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng; Xu, Yong-qing; Chang, Shan; Zhang, Yuan-zhi; Shi, Ji-hong; Ding, Zi-hai; Li, Zhong-hua; Zhong, Shi-zhen

    2009-07-01

    Male genital dysfunction was recognized as a complication following anterior approach lumbar surgery. Disruption of efferent sympathetic pathways such as the abdominal aortic plexus (AAP) and superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) which lied pre-abdominal aorta and iliac artery had been thought as the main reason. Though there were some clinical reports of retrograde ejaculation, the applied anatomic study of the autonomic nerve anterior to the lumbar was little. The purpose was to find out a lumbar surgery approach which was ejaculation preservation through the detailed study of the anatomy and histology observation of the autonomic nerve anterior to the lumbar vertebrae. The lumbar region of ten male cadavers was dissected and analyzed. We investigated the relationship between the peritoneum and abdominal aorta, iliac artery and sacral promontory fascia, as well as the trend and distribution of the autonomic nerve and SHP anterior to the L5-S1. We also observed the distribution of autonomic nerve at retroperitoneum through hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained tissues pre-aorta, para-aorta, and pre-vertebrae sacrales. Superior hypogastric plexus, which deviated to left, located in a triangle formed by the common iliac arteries and its bilateral branches, its truck sited anterior to the lumbarsacral space in seven cases (70%), and anterior to sacrum in three cases (30%); at the aortic bifurcation, SHP strided over left iliac artery from left-hand side, then located in front of sacrum in four cases (40%), and sifted to the left at the lumbar sacral promontory in six cases (60%); from both anatomic and histological view, the autonomic nerve plexus lying in an fascia layer of retroperitoneum. At the anterior approach lumbar surgery of trans-peritoneum, we should choose the right-hand side incision; the SHP should be pushed aside carefully from right to left along intervertebral disc. The accurate surgical plane was at the deeper layer of autonomical nerve fascia; we also

  15. Chondroitinase C Selectively Degrades Chondroitin Sulfate Glycosaminoglycans that Inhibit Axonal Growth within the Endoneurium of Peripheral Nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Graham

    Full Text Available The success of peripheral nerve regeneration is highly dependent on the regrowth of axons within the endoneurial basal lamina tubes that promote target-oriented pathfinding and appropriate reinnervation. Restoration of nerve continuity at this structural level after nerve transection injury by direct repair and nerve grafting remains a major surgical challenge. Recently, biological approaches that alter the balance of growth inhibitors and promoters in nerve have shown promise to improve appropriate axonal regeneration and recovery of peripheral nerve function. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs are known inhibitors of axonal growth. This growth inhibition is mainly associated with a CSPG's glycosaminoglycan chains. Enzymatic degradation of these chains with chondroitinase eliminates this inhibitory activity and, when applied in vivo, can improve the outcome of nerve repair. To date, these encouraging findings were obtained with chondroitinase ABC (a pan-specific chondroitinase. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of CSPG subtypes in rodent, rabbit, and human peripheral nerve and to test more selective biological enzymatic approaches to improve appropriate axonal growth within the endoneurium and minimize aberrant growth. Here we provide evidence that the endoneurium, but not the surrounding epineurium, is rich in CSPGs that have glycosaminoglycan chains readily degraded by chondroitinase C. Biochemical studies indicate that chondroitinase C has degradation specificity for 6-sulfated glycosaminoglycans found in peripheral nerve. We found that chondroitinase C degrades and inactivates inhibitory CSPGs within the endoneurium but not so much in the surrounding nerve compartments. Cryoculture bioassays (neurons grown on tissue sections show that chondroitinase C selectively and significantly enhanced neuritic growth associated with the endoneurial basal laminae without changing growth-inhibiting properties of the surrounding

  16. Sciatic Nerve Injury After Proximal Hamstring Avulsion and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas J.; Spinner, Robert J.; Mohan, Rohith; Gibbs, Christopher M.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Muscle bellies of the hamstring muscles are intimately associated with the sciatic nerve, putting the sciatic nerve at risk of injury associated with proximal hamstring avulsion. There are few data informing the magnitude of this risk, identifying risk factors for neurologic injury, or determining neurologic outcomes in patients with distal sciatic symptoms after surgery. Purpose: To characterize the frequency and nature of sciatic nerve injury and distal sciatic nerve–related symptoms after proximal hamstring avulsion and to characterize the influence of surgery on these symptoms. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This was a retrospective review of patients with proximal partial or complete hamstring avulsion. The outcome of interest was neurologic symptoms referable to the sciatic nerve distribution below the knee. Neurologic symptoms in operative patients were compared pre- and postoperatively. Results: The cohort consisted of 162 patients: 67 (41.4%) operative and 95 (58.6%) nonoperative. Sciatic nerve–related symptoms were present in 22 operative and 23 nonoperative patients, for a total of 45 (27.8%) patients (8 [4.9%] motor deficits, 11 [6.8%] sensory deficits, and 36 [22.2%] with neuropathic pain). Among the operative cohort, 3 of 3 (100.0%) patients showed improvement in their motor deficit postoperatively, 3 of 4 (75.0%) patients’ sensory symptoms improved, and 17 of 19 (89.5%) patients had improvement in pain. A new or worsening deficit occurred in 5 (7.5%) patients postoperatively (2 [3.1%] motor deficits, 1 [1.5%] sensory deficit, and 3 [4.5%] with new pain). Predictors of operative intervention included lower age (odds ratio [OR], 0.952; 95% CI, 0.921-0.982; P = .001) and complete avulsion (OR, 10.292; 95% CI, 2.526-72.232; P hamstring avulsion are underrecognized. Currently, neurologic symptoms are not considered when determining whether to pursue operative intervention. Given the high likelihood of

  17. GLP-1 signals via ERK in peripheral nerve and prevents nerve dysfunction in diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolivalt, CG; Fineman, M; Deacon, Carolyn F.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that induces glucose-dependent insulin secretion and may have neurotrophic properties. Our aim was to identify the presence and activity of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) in peripheral nerve and to assess the impact of GLP-1R agonists on diab...... that the peripheral nerve of diabetic rodents exhibits functional GLP-1R and suggest that GLP-1R-mediated ERK-signalling in sciatic nerve of diabetic rodents may protect large motor fibre function and small C fibre structure by a mechanism independent of glycaemic control....

  18. Does nerve identification during open inguinal herniorrhaphy reduce the risk of nerve damage and persistent pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, J M; Aasvang, E K; Kehlet, H

    2012-01-01

    the risk of development of persistent postherniorrhaphy pain, sensory dysfunction in the groin and functional ability score after open hernia repair. METHODS: A total of 244 men with a primary inguinal hernia underwent open Lichtenstein repair in a high-volume hernia surgery centre, where information...... = 0.59), the genitofemoral nerve (P = 0.40) or all nerves (P = 0.52). There were no differences in regard to sensory loss in the groin area or in regard to improvement in functional outcome following surgery, between patients with and without nerve identification. CONCLUSIONS: Although intraoperative...

  19. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    product marketed and distributed as a wound dressing by HealthPoint. Although the material is approximately double the thickness of human amnion, it...using 532 nm light delivered at 0.5 W/cm2 (n=5, ** pɘ.5). 29 Figure 7: Schematic representation of the anatomy of human amniotic...Biological dressing Summary Since the early 1900s, human amnion has been applied to a wide variety of clinical scenarios including burns, chronic ulcers

  20. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, A A; Salina, A A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Badiah, Y; Cheah, Y C; Nor Hayati, A; Ruzanna, Z Z; Sharifah Suziah, S M; Chee, K Y

    2008-09-01

    The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) collects information about patients with mental disorder in Malaysia. This information allows us to estimate the incidence of selected mental disorders, and to evaluate risk factors and treatment in the country. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) presented its first report in 2004, a year after its establishment. The report focused on schizophrenia as a pioneer project for the National Mental Health Registry. The development of the registry has progressed with data collected from government-based facilities, the academia and the private sector. The 2003-2005 report was recently published and distributed. Since then the registry has progressed to include suicides and other mental illnesses such as depression. The NMHR Report 2003-2005 provides detailed information about the profile of persons with Schizophrenia who presented for the first time to various psychiatry and mental health providers throughout Malaysia. More detailed description regarding pharmacotherapy is reported and few cross tabulations done in an effort to provide better understanding and more clinically meaningful reports.

  1. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Sang; Heo, Sung Hyuk [Dept. of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  2. Motonuclear changes after cranial nerve injury and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, E; Pallini, R; Lauretti, L; La Marca, F; Scogna, A; Rossi, G F

    1997-09-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms at play in nerve regeneration after nerve injury. Personal studies are reported regarding motonuclear changes after regeneration of injured cranial nerves, in particular of the facial and oculomotor nerves, as well as the influence that the natural molecule acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) has on post-axotomy cranial nerve motoneuron degeneration after facial and vagus nerve lesions. Adult and newborn animal models were used. Massive motoneuron response after nerve section and reconstruction was observed in the motonuclei of all nerves studied. ALC showed to have significant neuroprotective effects on the degeneration of axotomized motoneurons. Complex quantitative, morphological and somatotopic nuclear changes occurred that sustain new hypotheses regarding the capacities of motoneurons to regenerate and the possibilities of new neuron proliferation. The particularities of such observations are described and discussed.

  3. Evaluation of dermal myelinated nerve fibers in diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Amanda C.; Myers, M. Iliza; Artibee, Kay J.; Hamilton, Audra D.; Yan, Qing; Guo, Jiasong; Shi, Yaping; Wang, Lily; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Skin biopsies have primarily been used to study the non-myelinated nerve fibers of the epidermis in a variety of neuropathies. In the present study, we have expanded the skin biopsy technique to glabrous, non-hairy skin to evaluate myelinated nerve fibers in the most highly prevalent peripheral nerve disease, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Twenty patients with DPN (Type I, n=9; Type II, n=11) and sixteen age-matched healthy controls (ages 29–73) underwent skin biopsy of the index finger, nerve conduction studies, and composite neuropathy scoring. In patients with DPN, we found a statistically significant reduction of both mechanoreceptive Meissner corpuscles (MC) and their afferent myelinated nerve fibers (p=0.01). This myelinated nerve fiber loss was correlated with the decreased amplitudes of sensory/motor responses in nerve conduction studies. This study supports the utilization of skin biopsy to quantitatively evaluate axonal loss of myelinated nerve fibers in patients with DPN. PMID:23781963

  4. High frequency ultrasound evaluation of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Anne M; Simoncini, Alberto; Sciuk, Adam; Jordan, Jenee'

    2012-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and localization of peripheral nerve traumatic injury remains difficult. Early diagnosis and repair of nerve discontinuity lesions lead to better outcome than delayed repair. We used new high frequency ultrasound to evaluate 24 patients with 29 traumatic nerve injuries. There were a variety of causes including gunshot wounds, blunt injuries, burns, stabbings, and motor vehicle accidents. The patients were then either treated surgically with nerve status directly observed or followed clinically for recovery of nerve function. The ultrasound findings correspond with the clinical outcome of 28 of the 29 nerves. While this is a study limited by a small patient number, ultrasound evaluation should be considered in the evaluation of nerve injury and can lead to early diagnosis and treatment of surgical nerve injuries.

  5. Facial nerve stimulation as a future treatment for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark K Borsody

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation of the autonomic parasympathetic fibers of the facial nerve system (hereafter simply "facial nerve" rapidly dilates the cerebral arteries and increases cerebral blood flow whether that stimulation is delivered at the facial nerve trunk or at distal points such as the sphenopalatine ganglion. Facial nerve stimulation thus could be used as an emergency treatment of conditions of brain ischemia such as ischemic stroke. A rich history of scientific research has examined this property of the facial nerve, and various means of activating the facial nerve can be employed including noninvasive means. Herein, we review the anatomical and physiological research behind facial nerve stimulation and the facial nerve stimulation devices that are in development for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  6. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy. A Cochrane review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P.G. Nicholls (Peter); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage in leprosy. We assessed the effectiveness of corticosteroids for treating nerve damage due to leprosy. METHODS: A systematic search was undertaken to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing

  7. Ulnar nerve contribution in the innervation of the triceps brachii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ulnar nerve contribution in the innervation of the triceps brachii muscle ulnar nerve to the triceps brachii. DLR Silva, MP Barros, TGS Freire, L Firmino Júnior, WRB Almeida Filho, JSL Correia Cadeira, NO Silva ...

  8. A novel electrical model of nerve and muscle using Pspice

    CERN Document Server

    Peasgood, W; Lam, C K; Armstrong, A G; Wood, W

    2003-01-01

    In this work, a model is developed to simulate the biological processes involved in nerve fibre transmission and subsequent muscle contraction. The model has been based on approximating biological structure and function to electrical circuits and as such was implemented on an electronics simulation software package called Pspice. Models of nerve, the nerve-muscle interface and muscle fibre have been implemented. The time dependent ionic properties of the nerve and muscle membranes have been simulated using the Hodgkin-Huxley equations and for the muscle fibre, the implementation of the Huxley sliding filament theory for muscular contraction. The results show that nerve may be considered as a fractal transmission line and that the amplitude of the nerve membrane depolarization is dependent on the dimensions of the fibre. Additionally, simulation of the nerve-muscle interface allows the fractal nerve model to be connected to the muscle fibre model and it is shown that a two sarcomere molecular simulation can pr...

  9. Sciatic nerve regeneration in rats by a promising electrospun collagen/poly(ε-caprolactone nerve conduit with tailored degradation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xinquan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To cope with the limitations faced by autograft acquisitions particularly for multiple nerve injuries, artificial nerve conduit has been introduced by researchers as a substitute for autologous nerve graft for the easy specification and availability for mass production. In order to best mimic the structures and components of autologous nerve, great efforts have been made to improve the designation of nerve conduits either from materials or fabrication techniques. Electrospinning is an easy and versatile technique that has recently been used to fabricate fibrous tissue-engineered scaffolds which have great similarity to the extracellular matrix on fiber structure. Results In this study we fabricated a collagen/poly(ε-caprolactone (collagen/PCL fibrous scaffold by electrospinning and explored its application as nerve guide substrate or conduit in vitro and in vivo. Material characterizations showed this electrospun composite material which was made of submicron fibers possessed good hydrophilicity and flexibility. In vitro study indicated electrospun collagen/PCL fibrous meshes promoted Schwann cell adhesion, elongation and proliferation. In vivo test showed electrospun collagen/PCL porous nerve conduits successfully supported nerve regeneration through an 8 mm sciatic nerve gap in adult rats, achieving similar electrophysiological and muscle reinnervation results as autografts. Although regenerated nerve fibers were still in a pre-mature stage 4 months postoperatively, the implanted collagen/PCL nerve conduits facilitated more axons regenerating through the conduit lumen and gradually degraded which well matched the nerve regeneration rate. Conclusions All the results demonstrated this collagen/PCL nerve conduit with tailored degradation rate fabricated by electrospinning could be an efficient alternative to autograft for peripheral nerve regeneration research. Due to its advantage of high surface area for cell attachment, it

  10. [Distal sciatic nerve blocks: randomized comparison of nerve stimulation and ultrasound guided intraepineural block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, R; Natge, U; Schulz, J

    2013-03-01

    The design of this study is related to an important current issue: should local anesthetics be intentionally injected into peripheral nerves? Answering this question is not possible without better knowledge regarding classical methods of nerve localization (e.g. cause of paresthesias and nerve stimulation technique). Have intraneural injections ever been avoided? This prospective, randomized comparison of distal sciatic nerve block with ultrasound guidance tested the hypothesis that intraneural injection of local anesthetics using the nerve stimulation technique is common and associated with a higher success rate. In this study 250 adult patients were randomly allocated either to the nerve stimulation group (group NS, n = 125) or to the ultrasound guidance group (group US, n = 125). The sciatic nerve was anesthetized with 20 ml prilocaine 1% and 10 ml ropivacaine 0.75%. In the US group the goal was an intraepineural needle position. In the NS group progress of the block was observed by a second physician using ultrasound imaging but blinded for the investigator performing the nerve stimulation. The main outcome variables were time until readiness for surgery (performance time and onset time), success rate and frequency of paresthesias. In the NS group needle positions and corresponding stimulation thresholds were recorded. In both groups seven patients were excluded from further analysis because of protocol violation. In the NS group (n = 118) the following needle positions were estimated: intraepineural (NS 1, n = 51), extraparaneural (NS 2, n = 33), needle tip dislocation from intraepineural to extraparaneural while injecting local anesthetic (NS 3, n = 19) and other or not determined needle positions (n = 15). Paresthesias indicated an intraneural needle position with an odds ratio of 27.4 (specificity 98.8%, sensitivity 45.9%). The success rate without supplementation was significantly higher in the US group (94.9% vs. 61.9%, p

  11. Radiographic localization of mental foramen in Northeast and South Indian ethnic groups of Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Hunsigi, Prahalad; Kaipa, Balakasi Reddy; Reddy, Rajini; Ealla, Kranti Kiran Reddy; Kumar, Chakki B Arun; Prasanna, M D

    2014-11-01

    The position of mental foramen varies in different ethnic groups. The position of mental foramen is mainly important for achieving effective mental nerve block to carry out dental surgical procedures in mandible. Deviation in its position can be a cause of complication during local anesthesia or surgical procedures. The position of the mental foramen in South Indian and Northeast Indian population has not been reported. The purpose of the current study was to determine the most common location of the mental foramen (MF) and its bilateral symmetry in selected Indian population. 380 digital panoramic radiographs (DPR) of a randomly selected 2 Ethnic groups of Indian population were studied. The common position (59.2%) of the mental foramen was located between the 1st and 2nd premolars (P3) in Northeast Indians and in South Indians the common location (62.8%) was in line with the long axis of the 2nd premolar (P4), which was statistically significant in both Populations. A bilateral symmetry was observed in the location of mental foramina, either mesial to or in line with the long axis of the 2nd premolar, which is consistent with the observations of similar studies in various ethnic or racial groups. In our study a statistically significant association between the 2 ethnic groups and the position of mental foramen exists. Therefore the position of mental foramen may be specific to racial groups facilitating accurate landmark for mental nerve block depending on the ethnic group. Further, studies are required with larger sample for better understanding of mental foramen location in different ethnic groups.

  12. A bioengineered peripheral nerve construct using aligned peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, Anisa; Berns, Eric J.; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; McClendon, Mark T.; Segovia, Luis A.; Spigelman, Igor; Stupp, Samuel I.; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can result in lifelong disability. Primary coaptation is the treatment of choice when the gap between transected nerve ends is short. Long nerve gaps seen in more complex injuries often require autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits implemented into the repair. Nerve grafts, however, cause morbidity and functional loss at donor sites, which are limited in number. Nerve conduits, in turn, lack an internal scaffold to support and guide axonal regeneration, resulting in decreased efficacy over longer nerve gap lengths. By comparison, peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are molecules that can self-assemble into nanofibers, which can be aligned to mimic the native architecture of peripheral nerve. As such, they represent a potential substrate for use in a bioengineered nerve graft substitute. To examine this, we cultured Schwann cells with bioactive PAs (RGDS-PA, IKVAV-PA) to determine their ability to attach to and proliferate within the biomaterial. Next, we devised a PA construct for use in a peripheral nerve critical sized defect model. Rat sciatic nerve defects were created and reconstructed with autologous nerve, PLGA conduits filled with various forms of aligned PAs, or left unrepaired. Motor and sensory recovery were determined and compared among groups. Our results demonstrate that Schwann cells are able to adhere to and proliferate in aligned PA gels, with greater efficacy in bioactive PAs compared to the backbone-PA alone. In vivo testing revealed recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs comparable to animals treated with autologous nerve grafts. Functional recovery in conduit/PA and autologous graft groups was significantly faster than in animals treated with empty PLGA conduits. Histological examinations also demonstrated increased axonal and Schwann cell regeneration within the reconstructed nerve gap in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs. These results indicate that PA nanofibers may

  13. Anatomy of the intercostal nerve: its importance during thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D C

    1982-09-01

    Complications from attempts to block the intercostal nerves intraneurally before closure of a thoracotomy have resulted in hypotension with or without spinal block. Placement of a chest tube has resulted in transection of the intercostal nerve. The first of these complications can be avoided by not attempting intraneural block of the nerves intrathoracically. Avoidance of the latter requires careful dissection of the intercostal spaces and identification of the intercostal nerve, as opposed to stab insertion of a chest tube.

  14. Kinetics of Uptake and Washout of Lidocaine in Rat Sciatic Nerve In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeson, Stanley; Strichartz, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Background The potency and efficacy of local anesthetics injected clinically for peripheral nerve block depends strongly on the rate of neural drug uptake. However, since diffusion into surrounding tissues and removal by the vascular system are major factors in the overall distribution of lidocaine in vivo, true kinetics of drug/neural tissue interactions must be studied in the absence of those confounding factors. Methods Uptake: Ensheathed or desheathed isolated rat sciatic nerves were exposed to [14C]-lidocaine for 0-180min and then removed and the lidocaine content of nerve and sheath analyzed. Washout: Isolated nerves were soaked in [14C]-lidocaine for 60min and then placed in lidocaine-free solution for 0-30min, with samples removed at different times to assess the drug content. Experimental variables included the effects of the ensheathing epineurium, lidocaine concentration, pH, presence of CO2-bicarbonate, and incubation duration. Results The equilibrium uptake of lidocaine increased with incubation time, concentration and the fraction of molecules in the non-ionized form. The uptake rate was unaffected by drug concentration, but was about halved by the presence of the epineurial sheath, with the washout rate slowed less. Slight alkalinization, from pH 6.8 to pH 7.4, by bicarbonate-CO2 buffer or a non-bicarbonate buffer, enhanced the neural uptake, and to the same degree. The washout of lidocaine was faster after shorter incubations at high concentrations than when equal amounts of lidocaine were taken up after long incubations at low lidocaine concentrations. Conclusion Lidocaine enters a nerve by a process other than free diffusion, through an epineurial sheath that is a slight obstacle. Given the rapid entry in vitro compared to the much smaller and transient content measured in vivo, it seems highly unlikely that lidocaine equilibrates with the nerve during a peripheral blockade. PMID:23400993

  15. Study of position, shape, and size of mental foramen utilizing various parameters in dry adult human mandibles from north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhiraja, Virendra; Rastogi, Rakhi; Lalwani, Rekha; Goel, Prabhat; Bose, Subhash Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Background. As the mental foramen (MF) is an important landmark to facilitate surgical, local anesthetic, and other invasive procedures, the present study was aimed to elucidate its morphological features and morphometric parameters with reference to surrounding landmarks. Material and Method. 105 dry adult human mandibles of unknown sex were observed for position, shape, and number of mental foramina. Their size was measured using a digital vernier caliper and statistically analyzed by mean and standard deviations (SD). Results. In most cases (74.3%), the MF was oval in shape and situated on the longitudinal axis of the 2nd premolar tooth (61% on right side and 59.1% on left side). The mean distance for the right and left sides was measured from various landmarks. Conclusion. Prior knowledge of mental foramen variations helps surgeons in planning surgery in that region to avoid nerve damage and also enable effective mental nerve block anesthesia.

  16. A situation analysis of mental health services and legislation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: There are shortfalls in the provision of mental health care including insufficient numbers of mental health professionals, aging infrastructure, widespread stigma, inadequate funding and an inequitable geographical distribution of services. Conclusion: Community-based services need to be delivered in the primary ...

  17. Incidence and Outcome of the Radial Nerve Injury following Open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Radial nerve injury is the most common peripheral nerve injury associated with humeral shaft fracture and can result in significant motor impairment of the arm and the wrist. Objectives: To evaluate the incidence, pattern and outcome of the radial nerve injury following open fracture of the humerus. Material and ...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An electrical peripheral nerve stimulator (neuromuscular blockade monitor) is...

  19. Cranial nerve palsies in Nigerian children | Eyong | Nigerian Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cranial nerve palsies are common clinical problem routinely encountered in neurological practice; the dysfunction can occur at any point in the course of the nerve and may point to serious pathology. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and underlying aetiology of cranial nerve palsies in Nigerian ...

  20. Anomalous common peroneal nerve supplying the gluteus maximus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On dissection of a 60-year-old adult male cadaver, a high division of the sciatic nerve was observed on the right side along with an accessory slip of the piriformis. In this case, the common peroneal nerve pierced through and the tibial nerve passed below the accessory slip of the piriformis. Additionally, there was an ...

  1. Intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Basir Hashemi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intra parotid facial nerve schowannoma is a rare tumor. Case report: In this article we presented two cases of intra parotid facial nerve schowannoma. In two cases tumor presented with asymptomatic parotid mass that mimic pleomorphic adenoma. No preoperative facial nerve dysfunction in cases is detected. Diagnostic result and surgical management are discussed in this paper.  

  2. Nerve identification and prevention of intraneural injection in regional anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moayeri, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313998264

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with techniques to more reliably identify nervous structures and subsequently prevent intraneural injection in the practice of regional anesthesia. To identify nerves of the brachial plexus and sciatic nerve, both conventional techniques such as nerve stimulation, as well as

  3. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: Research Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Florene Carnicelli

    Currently, research is being performed in the area of nonsurgical and nonchemical means for influencing the body's threshold for pain. Today, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is being widely used for this purpose. Application of this treatment can be confusing, however, because determining such things as selection of the proper…

  4. Tissue Biomechanics: Whales Have Some Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sameer B

    2017-03-06

    Nerves in the mouth of the rorqual whale can double in length during feeding, without incurring damage. Several clever structural features underlie this amazing phenomenon. Such neuroprotective architectural strategies may be conserved, to a lesser extreme, across the organismal spectrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ciliary body melanoma with optic nerve invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Haddab, S; Hidayat, A; Tabbara, K F

    1990-01-01

    A case of melanoma of the ciliary body is presented. Initially the patient was diagnosed and treated for uveitis, but following CT scanning and ultrasound a tumour was detected and the eye enucleated. Histopathologically it was found that the tumour had invaded the optic nerve head, apparently via Cloquet's canal. Images PMID:2310725

  6. Functional outcome after peroneal nerve injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, I.; Geertzen, J.H.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe muscle strength, ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) use, walking ability, participation and quality of life in patients with peroneal nerve injury. A historic cohort study (n = 27) was performed with a median follow-up time of 61 months (inter quartile range

  7. Cold intolerance: From thermoregulation to nerve innervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.S. Smits (Ernst)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Trauma to the hand is frequently seen in people working with machinery, during occasional handyman work in and around the house. In the Netherlands (a population of 16.7 million) 50.000 fractures of hand and fingers, 790 amputations of fingers and 200 nerve injuries

  8. Intercellular junctions in nerve-free hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, A W; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1980-01-01

    Epithelial cells of nerve-free hydra contain septate and gap junctions. In thin sections the gap junctions are characterized by a gap of 3-4 nm. Freeze-fracture demonstrates the presence of septate junctions and two further types of structures: (i) the "E-type" or "inverted" gap junctions...

  9. Etonogestrel contraceptive implant: ulnar nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    (1) Subcutaneous etonogestrel implants are intended to provide female contraception for three years. The implants can be difficult to locate before removal, and general anaesthesia is necessary in some cases. (2) Cases of ulnar (cubital) nerve damage have occurred during manipulation of the implant, especially during removal. Neurological recovery is sometimes slow and uncertain.

  10. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The submaxillary salivary flow test gives reliable in- formation as to whether neurapraxia, axono:mesis, or neurotmesis of the facial nerve is present. This can be corroborated by electrical studies. This test can make an important contribution to the topognosis and prognosis of facial paralysis, especially when elaborate.

  11. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-20

    Jan 20, 1973 ... We have no test in facial paralysis to tell us the moment axonotmesis takes place, and because of this we cannot know for certain when to decompress the facial nerve. When axonotmesis sets in, complications follow in all cases to a greater or lesser degree. It should be possible to set a definite prognosis ...

  12. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    2003-01-01

    . A continuous-time current-steering offset-compensation technique is utilized in order to minimize the noise contribution and to minimize dynamic impact on the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard digital 0...

  13. Shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; van der Laan, BFAM; Plukker, JTM; Roodenburg, JLN

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the prevalence of shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissection at least I year after surgery, and to analyse the influence of radiation therapy on shoulder complaints. Patients were interviewed for shoulder complaints, and patients filled out the

  14. Ultrasonography study of the suprascapular nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruch Bilfeld, M; Lapègue, F; Sans, N; Chiavassa Gandois, H; Laumonerie, P; Larbi, A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the assessability of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) by ultrasonography in cadavers and healthy volunteers. With ultrasonography guidance, needles were placed at origin of the SSN of four cadavers and evaluated by dissection. Two blinded radiologists performed 60 ultrasonography scans in 30 healthy volunteers to study the entire SSN at five anatomical landmarks. Dissection revealed that the needles were correctly located at the nerve's origin. There were no significant differences between the two radiologists' measurements of nerve size and depth. The interobserver correlation for the description of the nerve at the five predefined anatomical landmarks was very good (ICC=0.7-1). Five anatomical landmarks were used to analyze the SSN with ultrasonography. Its supraclavicular portion was easier to describe than its scapular portion; a segment of the SSN was not visible between these two portions. Copyright © 2017 Editions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunction caused by neurosarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loor, Rivkah G. J.; van Tongeren, Joost; Derks, Wynia

    2012-01-01

    Neurosarcoidosis is a rare identity and occurs in only 5% to 15% of patients with sarcoidosis. It can manifest in many different ways, and therefore, diagnosis may be complicated. We report a case presented in a very unusual manner with involvement of 3 cranial nerves; anosmia (NI), facial palsy

  16. New Nerve Cells for the Adult Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempermann, Gerd; Gage, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    Contrary to dogma, the human brain does produce new nerve cells in adulthood. The mature human brain spawns neurons routinely in the hippocampus, an area important to memory and learning. This research can make it possible to ease any number of disorders involving neurological damage and death. (CCM)

  17. Tissue-engineered rhesus monkey nerve grafts for the repair of long ulnar nerve defects: similar outcomes to autologous nerve grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-qing Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acellular nerve allografts can help preserve normal nerve structure and extracellular matrix composition. These allografts have low immunogenicity and are more readily available than autologous nerves for the repair of long-segment peripheral nerve defects. In this study, we repaired a 40-mm ulnar nerve defect in rhesus monkeys with tissue-engineered peripheral nerve, and compared the outcome with that of autograft. The graft was prepared using a chemical extract from adult rhesus monkeys and seeded with allogeneic Schwann cells. Pathomorphology, electromyogram and immunohistochemistry findings revealed the absence of palmar erosion or ulcers, and that the morphology and elasticity of the hypothenar eminence were normal 5 months postoperatively. There were no significant differences in the mean peak compound muscle action potential, the mean nerve conduction velocity, or the number of neurofilaments between the experimental and control groups. However, outcome was significantly better in the experimental group than in the blank group. These findings suggest that chemically extracted allogeneic nerve seeded with autologous Schwann cells can repair 40-mm ulnar nerve defects in the rhesus monkey. The outcomes are similar to those obtained with autologous nerve graft.

  18. Use of Processed Nerve Allografts to Repair Nerve Injuries Greater Than 25 mm in the Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Brian; Zoldos, Jozef; Weber, Renata V; Ko, Jason; Thayer, Wesley; Greenberg, Jeffrey; Leversedge, Fraser J; Safa, Bauback; Buncke, Gregory

    2017-06-01

    Processed nerve allografts (PNAs) have been demonstrated to have improved clinical results compared with hollow conduits for reconstruction of digital nerve gaps less than 25 mm; however, the use of PNAs for longer gaps warrants further clinical investigation. Long nerve gaps have been traditionally hard to study because of low incidence. The advent of the RANGER registry, a large, institutional review board-approved, active database for PNA (Avance Nerve Graft; AxoGen, Inc, Alachua, FL) has allowed evaluation of lower incidence subsets. The RANGER database was queried for digital nerve repairs of 25 mm or greater. Demographics, injury, treatment, and functional outcomes were recorded on standardized forms. Patients younger than 18 and those lacking quantitative follow-up data were excluded. Recovery was graded according to the Medical Research Council Classification for sensory function, with meaningful recovery defined as S3 or greater level. Fifty digital nerve injuries in 28 subjects were included. There were 22 male and 6 female subjects, and the mean age was 45. Three patients gave a previous history of diabetes, and there were 6 active smokers. The most commonly reported mechanisms of injury were saw injuries (n = 13), crushing injuries (n = 9), resection of neuroma (n = 9), amputation/avulsions (n = 8), sharp lacerations (n = 7), and blast/gunshots (n = 4). The average gap length was 35 ± 8 mm (range, 25-50 mm). Recovery to the S3 or greater level was reported in 86% of repairs. Static 2-point discrimination (s2PD) and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWF) were the most common completed assessments. Mean s2PD in 24 repairs reporting 2PD data was 9 ± 4 mm. For the 38 repairs with SWF data, protective sensation was reported in 33 repairs, deep pressure in 2, and no recovery in 3. These data compared favorably with historical data for nerve autograft repairs, with reported levels of meaningful recovery of 60% to 88%. There were no reported adverse effects

  19. Characteristic Extraction of Mental Disease Patients by Nonlinear Analysis of Plethysmograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuyu; Wang, Wenbiao; Suzuki, Takashi; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi

    2011-06-01

    We measured the pulse waves of 196 mentally ill patients and 113 healthy students. Using heartbeat changes, we calculated the values of their sympathetic nerves, parasympathetic nerves, and autonomic nerve balance. In addition, we calculated the largest Lyapunov exponents (LLE) by non-linear analysis of plethysmograms. Values were analyzed by group. The results revealed a significant relationship between LLE and the autonomic nerve balance. The sympathetic nerve values in the patient group were significantly higher than those in the student group, whereas the LLE values were significantly lower. Furthermore, we illustrated the dynamic change in the results for single participants over several testing times. The measurement of pulse waves is easy and economical and does not put a strain on the subject. Additionally, these values can provide information that is more accurate than medical examination obtained from an interview. Our study contributed to the existing methodology in this field, and future data collection and measurement will be carried out. We hope that our study will be useful for neurologists and psychotherapists in their detection and treatment of mental illness.

  20. Combined KHFAC + DC nerve block without onset or reduced nerve conductivity after block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Manfred; Vrabec, Tina; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Niloy; Bhadra, Narendra; Kilgore, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) waveforms have been shown to provide peripheral nerve conductivity block in many acute and chronic animal models. KHFAC nerve block could be used to address multiple disorders caused by neural over-activity, including blocking pain and spasticity. However, one drawback of KHFAC block is a transient activation of nerve fibers during the initiation of the nerve block, called the onset response. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using charge balanced direct current (CBDC) waveforms to temporarily block motor nerve conductivity distally to the KHFAC electrodes to mitigate the block onset-response. Approach. A total of eight animals were used in this study. A set of four animals were used to assess feasibility and reproducibility of a combined KHFAC + CBDC block. A following randomized study, conducted on a second set of four animals, compared the onset response resulting from KHFAC alone and combined KHFAC + CBDC waveforms. To quantify the onset, peak forces and the force-time integral were measured during KHFAC block initiation. Nerve conductivity was monitored throughout the study by comparing muscle twitch forces evoked by supra-maximal stimulation proximal and distal to the block electrodes. Each animal of the randomized study received at least 300 s (range: 318-1563 s) of cumulative dc to investigate the impact of combined KHFAC + CBDC on nerve viability. Main results. The peak onset force was reduced significantly from 20.73 N (range: 18.6-26.5 N) with KHFAC alone to 0.45 N (range: 0.2-0.7 N) with the combined CBDC and KHFAC block waveform (p conductivity was observed after application of the combined KHFAC + CBDC block relative to KHFAC waveforms. Significance. The distal application of CBDC can significantly reduce or even completely prevent the KHFAC onset response without a change in nerve conductivity.